WorldWideScience

Sample records for coherent scattering probes

  1. Fiber bundle based probe with polarization for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microendoscopy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengfan; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Xi; Xu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xu; Cheng, Jie; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Shufen; Xin, Jianguo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2013-02-01

    The ability to visualize cellular structures and tissue molecular signatures in a live body could revolutionize the practice of surgery. Specifically, such technology is promising for replacing tissue extraction biopsy and offering new strategies for a broad range of intraoperative or surgical applications, including early cancer detection, tumor margin identification, nerve damage avoidance, and surgical outcomes enhancement. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscopy offers a way to achieve this with label-free imaging capability and sub-cellular resolution. However, efficient collection of epi-CARS signals and reduction of nonlinear effects in fibers are two major challenges encountered in the development of fiber-based CARS microendoscopy. To circumvent this problem, we designed and developed a fiber bundle for a CARS microendoscopy prototype. The excitation lasers were delivered by a single multimode fiber at the center of the bundle while the epi-CARS signals were collected by multiple MMFs surrounding the central fiber. A polarization scheme was employed to suppress the four-wave mixing (FWM) effect in the excitation fiber. Our experimental results suggest that, with this fiber bundle and the polarization FWM-suppressing scheme, the signal-to-noise ratio of the CARS images was greatly enhanced through a combination of high collection efficiency of epi-CARS signals, isolation of excitation lasers, and suppression of FWM. Tissue imaging capability of the microendoscopy prototype was demonstrated by ex vivo imaging on mouse skin and lung tissues. This fiber bundle-based CARS microendoscopy prototype, with the polarization FWM-suppressing scheme, offers a promising platform for constructing efficient fiber-based CARS microendoscopes for label free intraoperative imaging applications.

  2. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  3. Coherent Scatter Imaging Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur Rehman, Mahboob

    In conventional radiography, anatomical information of the patients can be obtained, distinguishing different tissue types, e.g. bone and soft tissue. However, it is difficult to obtain appreciable contrast between two different types of soft tissues. Instead, coherent x-ray scattering can be utilized to obtain images which can differentiate between normal and cancerous cells of breast. An x-ray system using a conventional source and simple slot apertures was tested. Materials with scatter signatures that mimic breast cancer were buried in layers of fat of increasing thickness and imaged. The result showed that the contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR) remained high even with added fat layers and short scan times.

  4. Scattering and coherence in EUVL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milster, Tomas D.; Beaudry, Neil A.

    1998-06-01

    We illustrate the importance of considering scattering from the illuminator in extreme UV lithography systems. Our results indicate that a significant amount of amplitude modulation noise is present in the aerial image if scatter is present in a Koehler illuminator. The effect depends on the spatial frequency of the pattern on the mask, the numerical aperture of the projection camera, the coherence factor, and placement of the plane in the illuminator where the scattering occurs.

  5. Coherency in Neutrino-Nucleus Elastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kerman, S; Deniz, M; Wong, H T; Chen, J -W; Li, H B; Lin, S T; Liu, C -P; Yue, Q

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering provides a unique laboratory to study the quantum mechanical coherency effects in electroweak interactions, towards which several experimental programs are being actively pursued. We report results of our quantitative studies on the transitions towards decoherency. A parameter ($\\alpha$) is identified to describe the degree of coherency, and its variations with incoming neutrino energy, detector threshold and target nucleus are studied. The ranges of $\\alpha$ which can be probed with realistic neutrino experiments are derived, indicating complementarity between projects with different sources and targets. Uncertainties in nuclear physics and in $\\alpha$ would constrain sensitivities in probing physics beyond the standard model. The maximum neutrino energies corresponding to $\\alpha$>0.95 are derived.

  6. Probing dynamics of complex ordered phases in colossal magnetoresistive transition-metal oxides using coherent resonant soft x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joshua J.

    A growing interest in the physics of complex systems such as in the transition-metal oxide family has exploded recently, especially in the last 20 years or so. One notable effect is the change in electrical resistivity of a system by orders of magnitude in an applied magnetic field, coined the "colossal magnetoresistance effect". In efforts to understand these types of effects, there has been an unveiling of a rich variety of phenomena in the field of strongly correlated electron physics that has come to dominate the current scientific times. Most notable is the competition of myriad types of order: magnetic, lattice, charge and orbital all self-organize to display a fascinating array of phases on a variety of length scales. Furthermore, it has become apparent that new probes are needed to grasp some of this physics that transcends current condensed matter theory, where much of the behavior of these types of systems has remained unexplored. We have developed a new technique to gain more information about the system than with conventional x-ray diffraction. By scattering highly coherent, low energy x-rays, we can measure manganite speckle: a "fingerprint' of the microscopic structure in the bulk. The coherence of the x-rays can further be used to elucidate new insight into the dynamics of these phases. We describe here a number of novel effects near the orbital order phase transition in a half-doped manganite. We observe a small fluctuating component in the scattered signal that is correlated with three effects: both a rapidly decreasing total signal and orbital domain size, as well as an abrupt onset of a broad background intensity that we attribute to the thermal production of correlated polarons. Our results suggest that the transition is characterized by a competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static, and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, spatiotemporal fluctuations. This study opens up a new chapter to the study of

  7. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) as a Probe for Supersonic Hydrogen-Fuel/Air Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, P. M.; O'Byrne, S.; Cutler, A. D.; Rodriguez, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic non-reacting fuel-air mixing experiment. Experiments were conducted in NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. Under normal operation of this facility, hydrogen and air burn to increase the enthalpy of the test gas and O2 is added to simulate air. This gas is expanded through a Mach 2 nozzle and into a combustor model where fuel is then injected, mixes and burns. In the present experiment the O2 of the test gas is replaced by N2. The lack of oxidizer inhibited combustion of the injected H2 fuel jet allowing the fuel/air mixing process to be studied. CARS measurements were performed 427 mm downstream of the nozzle exit and 260 mm downstream of the fuel injector. Maps were obtained of the mean temperature, as well as the N2, O2 and H2 mean mole fraction fields. A map of mean H2O vapor mole fraction was also inferred from these measurements. Correlations between different measured parameters and their fluctuations are presented. The CARS measurements are compared with a preliminary computational prediction of the flow.

  8. Coherence effects in scattering order expansion of light by atomic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Rouabah, Mohamed-Taha; Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe W; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    We interpret cooperative scattering by a collection of cold atoms as a multiple scattering process. Starting from microscopic equations describing the response of $N$ atoms to a probe light beam, we represent the total scattered field as an infinite series of multiple scattering events. As an application of the method, we obtain analytical expressions of the coherent intensity in the double scattering approximation for Gaussian density profiles. In particular, we quantify the contributions of coherent backward and forward scattering.

  9. Coherence effects in scattering order expansion of light by atomic clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabah, Mohamed-Taha; Samoylova, Marina; Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe W; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    We interpret cooperative scattering by a collection of cold atoms as a multiple-scattering process. Starting from microscopic equations describing the response of N atoms to a probe light beam, we represent the total scattered field as an infinite series of multiple-scattering events. As an application of the method, we obtain analytical expressions of the coherent intensity in the double-scattering approximation for Gaussian density profiles. In particular, we quantify the contributions of coherent backward and forward scattering.

  10. Coherent Scattering Imaging Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Laila Abdulgalil Rafik

    Conventional mammography has poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter potentially provides more information because interference of coherently scattered radiation depends on the average intermolecular spacing, and can be used to characterize tissue types. However, typical coherent scatter analysis techniques are not compatible with rapid low dose screening techniques. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is a novel imaging technique which provides new information with higher contrast. In this work a simulation of coherent scatter was performed for slot scan imaging to assess its performance and provide system optimization. In coherent scatter imaging, the coherent scatter is exploited using a conventional slot scan mammography system with anti-scatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the coherent scatter imaging. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The contrast increased as the grid tilt angle increased beyond the characteristic angle for the modeled carcinoma. A grid tilt angle of 16 degrees yielded the highest contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Also, contrast increased as the source voltage increased. Increasing grid ratio improved contrast at the expense of decreasing SNR. A grid ratio of 10:1 was sufficient to give a good contrast without reducing the intensity to a noise level. The optimal source to sample distance was determined to be such that the source should be located at the focal distance of the grid. A carcinoma lump of 0.5x0.5x0.5 cm3 in size was detectable which is reasonable considering the high noise due to the usage of relatively small number of incident photons for computational reasons. A further study is needed to study the effect of breast density and breast thickness

  11. Theoretical Aspects of Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gail

    2014-09-01

    We will discuss the physics potential of coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering. This standard model process has never been directly measured, although there are a number of experiments proposed at stopped pion/muon or reactor sites that could make such a first detection. Such a measurement opens up the possibility for a number of interesting physics probes. We will review these from a theoretical point of view, with a particular focus on the nuclear-neutron form factor.

  12. Raman Scattering in Coherently Prepared Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Fu-Cheng(林福成); Yongjoo Rhee; Jonghoon Yi; Hyunmin Park

    2001-01-01

    Atoms in the coherent superposition state prepared by a pulse pair are used as a novel optical memory material where a single interrogation pulse will produce a new pulse pair preserving the relative amplitudes and phases of the preparing pulse pair. Such a coherent superposition state can also be specially tailored along the propagation path to generate Raman scattering in a relatively short distance with very high efficiency.

  13. Multiple Scattering Model for Optical Coherence Tomography with Rytov Approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Muxingzi

    2017-04-24

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a coherence-gated, micrometer-resolution imaging technique that focuses a broadband near-infrared laser beam to penetrate into optical scattering media, e.g. biological tissues. The OCT resolution is split into two parts, with the axial resolution defined by half the coherence length, and the depth-dependent lateral resolution determined by the beam geometry, which is well described by a Gaussian beam model. The depth dependence of lateral resolution directly results in the defocusing effect outside the confocal region and restricts current OCT probes to small numerical aperture (NA) at the expense of lateral resolution near the focus. Another limitation on OCT development is the presence of a mixture of speckles due to multiple scatterers within the coherence length, and other random noise. Motivated by the above two challenges, a multiple scattering model based on Rytov approximation and Gaussian beam optics is proposed for the OCT setup. Some previous papers have adopted the first Born approximation with the assumption of small perturbation of the incident field in inhomogeneous media. The Rytov method of the same order with smooth phase perturbation assumption benefits from a wider spatial range of validity. A deconvolution method for solving the inverse problem associated with the first Rytov approximation is developed, significantly reducing the defocusing effect through depth and therefore extending the feasible range of NA.

  14. Can different media generate scattered field with identical spectral coherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Zhenfei; Ji, Xiaoling; Zhao, Daomu

    2016-03-01

    The possibility for different media to generate scattered field with identical spectral coherence is discussed. It is shown that two random media, with different characters of correlation function, may generate scattered field with identical spectral coherence property. An example of light waves on scattering from Gaussian-Schell model media is discussed, and a condition for identical spectral coherence of the far-zone scattered field is obtained.

  15. Hyperfine Coherence in the Presence of Spontaneous Photon Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Ozeri, R; Jost, J D; De Marco, B L; Ben-Kish, A; Blakestad, B R; Britton, J L; Chiaverini, J; Itano, W M; Hume, D; Leibfried, D; Rosenband, T; Schmidt, P; Wineland, D J

    2005-01-01

    The coherence of a hyperfine-state superposition of a trapped $^{9}$Be$^+$ ion in the presence of off-resonant light is experimentally studied. It is shown that Rayleigh elastic scattering of photons that does not change state populations also does not affect coherence. Coherence times exceeding the average scattering time of 19 photons are observed. This result implies that, with sufficient control over its parameters, laser light can be used to manipulate hyperfine-state superpositions with very little decoherence.

  16. Internal Defect Measurement of Scattering Media by Optical Coherence Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yong-kai; ZHAO Hong; WANG Zhao; WANG Jun-li

    2005-01-01

    Optical coherence microscopy is applied to measure scattering media's internal defect, which based on low coherence interferometry and confocal microscopy. Optical coherence microscopy is more effective in the rejection of out of focus and multiple scattered photons originating further away of the focal plane. With the three-dimension scanning, the internal defect is detected by measuring the thickness of different points on the sample. The axial resolution is 6 μm and lateral resolution is 1.2 μm. This method is possessed of the advantages over the other measurement method of scattering media, such as non-destruction and highresolution.

  17. Impurity scattering rate and coherence factor in vortex core of sign-reversing s -wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yuki; Kato, Yusuke

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the impurity scattering rates for quasiparticles in vortex cores of sign-reversing s -wave superconductors as a probe to detect the internal phase difference of the order parameters among different Fermi surfaces. The impurity scattering rates and coherence factors are related to quasiparticle interference effect by the scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy technique. With use of the Born and Kramer-Pesch approximations for the Andreev bound states, we show that the sign-reversed forward scatterings are dominant in vortex cores. Owing to the coherence factor in vortex cores of ±s -wave superconductors, the impurity scattering rate of the Andreev bound states has a characteristic distribution on the Fermi surfaces. For comparison, the impurity scattering rates in vortex cores of s -wave and d -wave superconductors are also discussed.

  18. Non coherent continuum scattering as a line polarization mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Alemán, T del Pino; Bueno, J Trujillo

    2014-01-01

    Line scattering polarization can be strongly affected by Rayleigh scattering by neutral hydrogen and Thompson scattering by free electrons. Often a continuum depolarization results, but the Doppler redistribution produced by the continuum scatterers, which are light (hence, fast), induces more complex interactions between the polarization in spectral lines and in the continuum. Here we formulate and solve the radiative transfer problem of scattering line polarization with non coherent continumm scattering consistently. The problem is formulated within the spherical tensor representation of atomic and light polarization. The numerical method of solution is a generalization of the Accelerated Lambda Iteration that is applied to both, the atomic system and the radiation field. We show that the redistribution of the spectral line radiation due to the non coherence of the continuum scattering may modify significantly the shape of the emergent fractional linear polarization patterns, even yielding polarization sign...

  19. International workshop on phase retrieval and coherent scattering. Coherence 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.A.; Fienup, J.R.; Van Dyck, D.; Van Aert, S.; Weitkamp, T.; Diaz, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cloetens, P.; Stampanoni, M.; Bunk, O.; David, C.; Bronnikov, A.V.; Shen, Q.; Xiao, X.; Gureyev, T.E.; Nesterets, Ya.I.; Paganin, D.M.; Wilkins, S.W.; Mokso, R.; Cloetens, P.; Ludwig, W.; Hignette, O.; Maire, E.; Faulkner, H.M.L.; Rodenburg, J.M.; Wu, X.; Liu, H.; Grubel, G.; Ludwig, K.F.; Livet, F.; Bley, F.; Simon, J.P.; Caudron, R.; Le Bolloc' h, D.; Moussaid, A.; Gutt, C.; Sprung, M.; Madsen, A.; Tolan, M.; Sinha, S.K.; Scheffold, F.; Schurtenberger, P.; Robert, A.; Madsen, A.; Falus, P.; Borthwick, M.A.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Livet, F.; Sutton, M.D.; Ehrburger-Dolle, F.; Bley, F.; Geissler, E.; Sikharulidze, I.; Jeu, W.H. de; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Robinson, I.K.; Chapman, H.N.; Barty, A.; Beetz, T.; Cui, C.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; He, H.; Stadler, L.M.; Sepiol, B.; Harder, R.; Robinson, I.K.; Zontone, F.; Vogl, G.; Howells, M.; London, R.; Marchesini, S.; Shapiro, D.; Spence, J.C.H.; Weierstall, U.; Eisebitt, S.; Shapiro, D.; Lima, E.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.R.; Huang, X.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A.; Sayre, D.; Thibault, P.; Vartanyants, I.A.; Robinson, I.K.; Onken, J.D.; Pfeifer, M.A.; Williams, G.J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Metzger, H.; Zhong, Z.; Bauer, G.; Nishino, Y.; Miao, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Koike, K.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Spence, J.C.H.; Doak, B

    2005-07-01

    The contributions of the participants have been organized into 3 topics: 1) phase retrieval methods, 2) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and 3) coherent diffraction imaging. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations and of the posters.

  20. Human skin image analysis using coherent focused beam scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, Dmitry A.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Utz, Sergei R.; Mishin, Alexey A.

    1995-02-01

    The analysis of statistical and correlation properties of speckle patterns formed during different skin tissue scanning by the sharply focused probing laser beam has been carried out. The influences of the biotissues' structural features on the speckle patterns formation under Gaussian beam illumination have been investigated. The relationships between the structural characteristics of the sample under study, Rayleigh range of the probing beam and normalized statistical moments of the speckle intensity (contrast and asymmetry coefficient) are discussed for the different scatterer models. A phenomenological model of speckle pattern formation for the large-scale scatterers allows us to explain the dependence of speckle contrast and the coefficient of asymmetry on the generalized structure parameters and illumination conditions for the samples under study. The experimental investigations of the human skin structure features have been carried out using two types of the tissue samples by means of coherent scanning microscopy (CSM). Firstly, D-SQUAME discs (CuDerm Corporation, Texas, USA) have been used for the evaluation of skin dryness level. Secondly, the samples under study were the thin layers of normal and psoriatic epidermis (skin strippings). The dependencies of contrast and coefficient of asymmetry on the beam defocusing parameter and 2D correlation functions of speckle pattern intensity have been analyzed for different zones on the biotissue's surface. Particularly, promising results in skin dryness studies (using D-SQUAME discs) have been obtained. Our results and conventional 5-pattern kit scale are in good agreement. So, the presented method is accurate and objective and may be useful in novel cosmetic research and development.

  1. Timeresolved Speckle Analysis: Probing the Coherence of Excitonic Secondary Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Zimmermann, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new technique to analyze the time-dependent coherence of light emitted in a non-specular direction is presented. We demonstrate that the coherence degree of the emission can be deduced from the intensity fluctuations over the emission directions (speckles). The secondary emission of excitons...... in semiconductor quantum wells is investigated. Here, a partial coherence results from an interplay between scattering due to static disorder and inelastic relaxation, without any influence of the radiative decay. The temperature dependence is well explained by dephasing due to phonon scattering....

  2. Coherent Pions From Neutrino Scattering Off Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Valverde, M; Hernandez, E; Nieves, J; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2010-01-01

    We describe a model for pion production off nucleons and coherent pions from nuclei induced by neutrinos in the 1 GeV energy regime. Besides the dominant Delta pole contribution, it takes into account the effect of background terms required by chiral symmetry. Moreover, the model uses a reduced nucleon-to-Delta resonance axial coupling, which leads to coherent pion production cross sections around a factor two smaller than most of the previous theoretical estimates. Nuclear effects like medium corrections on the Delta propagator and final pion distortion are included.

  3. Coherent scattering of high-energy photon in a medium

    CERN Document Server

    Baier, V N

    2001-01-01

    The coherent scattering of photon in the Coulomb field (the Delbr\\"uck scattering) is considered for the momentum transfer $\\Delta \\ll m$ in the frame of the quasiclassical operator method. In high-energy region this process occurs over rather long distance. The process amplitude is calculated taking into account the multiple scattering of particles of the intermediate electron-positron pair in a medium. The result is the suppression of the process. Limiting cases of weak and strong effects of the multiple scattering are analyzed. The approach used is the generalization of the method developed by authors for consideration of the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect.

  4. Coherent methods in X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorobtsov, Oleg

    2017-05-15

    X-ray radiation has been used to study structural properties of materials for more than a hundred years. Construction of extremely coherent and bright X-ray radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) and latest generationstorage rings led to rapid development of experimental methods relying on high radiation coherence. These methods allow to perform revolutionary studies in a wide range of fields from solid state physics to biology. In this thesis I focus on several important problems connected with the coherent methods. The first part considers applications of dynamical diffraction theory on crystals to studies with coherent X-ray radiation. It presents the design of a high-resolution spectrometer for free electron lasers that should allow to resolve spectral structure of individual FEL pulses. The spectrometer is based on the principle of dynamical diffraction focusing. The knowledge of individual FEL pulse spectra is necessary for understanding FEL longitudinal coherence. In the same part I present quasi-kinematical approximation to dynamical theory which allows to treat analytically phase effects observed in X-ray coherent imaging on nanocrystals. These effects may play a big role when methods such as ptychography are used to study crystalline samples. The second part deals with measurements of FEL coherence properties using intensity - intensity interferometry. Results of several experiments performed at FELs FLASH and LCLS are revealed in this section. I have developed models and theories to explain the behavior observed in experiments on FLASH. These models allowed to extract information about external positional jitter of FEL pulses and secondary beams present in FEL radiation. In the LCLS experiment the Hanbury Brown and Twiss type interferometry was performed on Bragg peaks from colloidal crystal. This did not require additional measurements without the sample and information was extracted directly from diffraction patterns. Therefore intensity

  5. Modeling Scattering Polarization for Probing Solar Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Javier Trujillo

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of modeling the light polarization that emerges from an astrophysical plasma composed of atoms whose excitation state is significantly influenced by the anisotropy of the incident radiation field. In particular, it highlights how radiative transfer simulations in three-dimensional models of the quiet solar atmosphere may help us to probe its thermal and magnetic structure, from the near equilibrium photosphere to the highly non-equilibrium upper chromosphere. The paper finishes with predictions concerning the amplitudes and magnetic sensitivities of the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes in two transition region lines, which should encourage us to develop UV polarimeters for sounding rockets and space telescopes with the aim of opening up a new diagnostic window in astrophysics.

  6. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Y; Wang, Y; Belfield, K D; Liu, X

    2016-06-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging.

  7. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Heterodyne Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bredfeldt, J S; Vinegoni, C; Hambir, S; Boppart, S A

    2003-01-01

    A new interferometric technique is demonstrated for measuring Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals. Two forward-directed CARS signals are generated, one in each arm of an interferometer. The deterministic nature of the CARS process allows for these two signals, when spatially and temporally overlapped, to interfere with one another. Heterodyne detection can therefore be employed to increase the sensitivity in CARS signal detection. In addition, nonlinear CARS interferometry will facilitate the use of this spectroscopic technique for molecular contrast in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).

  8. Fourier domain multispectral multiple scattering low coherence interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas E; Giacomelli, Michael G; Brown, William J; Wax, Adam

    2013-12-01

    We have implemented multispectral multiple scattering low coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) with Fourier domain data collection. The ms2/LCI system is designed to localize features with spectroscopic contrast with millimeter resolution up to 1 cm deep in scattering samples by using photons that have undergone multiple low-angle (forward) scattering events. Fourier domain detection both increases the data acquisition speed of the system and gives access to rich spectroscopic information, compared to the previous single channel, time-domain implementation. Separate delivery and detection angular apertures reduce collection of the diffuse background signal in order to isolate localized spectral features from deeper in scattering samples than would be possible with traditional spectroscopic optical coherence tomography. Light from a supercontinuum source is used to acquire absorption spectra of chromophores in the visible range within a tissue-like scattering phantom. An intensity modulation and digital lock-in detection scheme is implemented to mitigate relative intensity and spectral noise inherent in supercontinuum sources. The technical parameters of the system and comparative analysis are presented.

  9. Point-defect diffusion from coherent quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillan, M.J.; Wolf, D.

    1985-09-16

    We outline a theory which suggests that the dynamics of point defects in crystals can be studied by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering. The theory assumes that the surrounding lattice distortion follows each defect instantaneously, and that the distortion fields of different defects can be linearly superposed. The energy width of the scattered intensity yields the hopping rate and jump vectors of the defects. We discuss systems for which the predicted effects for ionic defects are observable, pointing out that the detection of small polaron hopping should also be possible.

  10. Propagation of coherent polarized light in turbid highly scattering medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Macdonald, Callum; Meglinski, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Within the framework of further development of unified Monte Carlo code for the needs of biomedical optics and biophotonics, we present an approach for modeling of coherent polarized light propagation in highly scattering turbid media, such as biological tissues. The temporal coherence of light, linear and circular polarization, interference, and the helicity flip of circularly polarized light due to reflection at the medium boundary and/or backscattering events are taken into account. To achieve higher accuracy in the results and to speed up the modeling, the implementation of the code utilizes parallel computing on NVIDIA graphics processing units using Compute Unified Device Architecture. The results of the simulation of coherent linearly and circularly polarized light are presented in comparison with the results of known theoretical studies and the results of alternative modelings.

  11. Biological imaging with coherent Raman scattering microscopy: a tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-García, Alba; Mittal, Richa; Lee, Eun Seong; Potma, Eric O.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is gaining acceptance as a valuable addition to the imaging toolset of biological researchers. Optimal use of this label-free imaging technique benefits from a basic understanding of the physical principles and technical merits of the CRS microscope. This tutorial offers qualitative explanations of the principles behind CRS microscopy and provides information about the applicability of this nonlinear optical imaging approach for biological research. PMID:24615671

  12. Phase-referenced Doppler optical coherence tomography in scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Cameron J; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Westphal, Volker; Rollins, Andrew M

    2005-08-15

    We present a fiber-based, low-coherence interferometer that significantly reduces phase noise by incorporating a second, narrowband, continuous-wave light source as a phase reference. By incorporating this interferometer into a Doppler OCT system, we demonstrate significant velocity noise reduction in reflective and scattering samples using processing techniques amenable to real-time implementation. We also demonstrate 90% suppression of velocity noise in a flow phantom.

  13. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, David I H; Collini, Elisabetta; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-05-21

    We examine transient circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy as a technique to investigate signatures of exciton coherence dynamics under the influence of structured vibrational environments. We consider a pump-probe configuration with a linearly polarized pump and a circularly polarized probe, with a variable angle θ between the two directions of propagation. In our theoretical formalism the signal is decomposed in chiral and achiral doorway and window functions. Using this formalism, we show that the chiral doorway component, which beats during the population time, can be isolated by comparing signals with different values of θ. As in the majority of time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy, the overall TRCD response shows signatures of both excited and ground state dynamics. However, we demonstrate that the chiral doorway function has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if an impulsive pump pulse is used. These findings suggest that the pump-probe configuration of optical TRCD in the impulsive limit has the potential to unambiguously probe quantum coherence beating in the excited state. We present numerical results for theoretical signals in an example dimer system.

  14. Probing beyond the laser coherence time in optical clock comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David B.; Leibrandt, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We develop differential measurement protocols that circumvent the laser noise limit in the stability of optical clock comparisons by synchronous probing of two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators. This allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time, avoids the Dick effect, and supports Heisenberg-limited measurement precision. We present protocols for such frequency comparisons and develop numerical simulations of the protocols with realistic noise sources. These methods provide a route to reduce frequency ratio measurement durations by more than an order of magnitude.

  15. Spectral model of time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocco, Michele

    2014-01-01

    We show that the increasingly popular nonlinear optical technique of time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), which is usually understood in terms of the semiclassical time-dependent third-order polarization, can be equally explained in terms of the time-delayed version of the Yuratich equation so popular in traditional frequency-domain CARS. The method brings out the strong dependence of CARS time traces and time-delayed CARS lineshapes on the spectral envelope of the probe laser electric field. Examples are analytically shown for experimental results that are otherwise treated by means of numerical methods only.

  16. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  17. Snowpack Microstructure Characterization and Partial Coherent and Fully Coherent Forward Scattering Models in Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S.; Tsang, L.; Xu, X.; Ding, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we describe partial coherent model and fully coherent snowpack scattering model based on numerical simulation of Maxwell's equation. In medium characterization, we derive the correlation functions from the pair distribution functions of sticky spheres and multiple-size spheres used in QCA. We show that both the Percus-Yevick pair functions and the bicontinuous model have tails in the correlation functions that are distinctly different from the traditional exponential correlation functions. The methodologies of using ground measurements of grain size distributions and correlation functions to obtain model parameters are addressed. The DMRT theory has been extended to model the backscattering enhancement. We developed the methodology of cyclical corrections beyond first order to all orders of multiple scattering. This enables the physical modeling of combined active and passive microwave remote sensing of snow over the same scene. The bicontinuous /DMRT is applied to compare with data acquired in the NoSREx campaign, and the model results are validated against coincidental active and passive measurements using the same set of physical parameters of snow in all frequency and polarization channels. The DMRT is a partially coherent approach that one accounts for the coherent wave interaction only within few wavelengths as represented by phase matrix. However, the phase information of field is lost in propagating the specific intensity via RT and this hinders the use of DMRT in coherent synthetic aperture radar (SAR) analysis, including InSAR, PolInSAR and Tomo-SAR. One can alternatively calculate the scattering matrix of the terrestrial snowpack above ground by solving the volume integral equations directly with half space Green's function. The scattering matrix of the snowpack is computed for each realization giving rise to the speckle statistics. The resulting bistatic scattering automatically includes the backscattering enhancement effects. Tomograms of

  18. Coherent Neutron Scattering and Collective Dynamics in the Protein, GFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D.; Perticaroli, Stefania; O’Neill, Hugh; Zhang, Qiu; Ehlers, Georg; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2013-01-01

    Collective dynamics are considered to be one of the major properties of soft materials, including biological macromolecules. We present coherent neutron scattering studies of the low-frequency vibrations, the so-called boson peak, in fully deuterated green fluorescent protein (GFP). Our analysis revealed unexpectedly low coherence of the atomic motions in GFP. This result implies a low amount of in-phase collective motion of the secondary structural units contributing to the boson peak vibrations and fast conformational fluctuations on the picosecond timescale. These observations are in contrast to earlier studies of polymers and glass-forming systems, and suggest that random or out-of-phase motions of the β-strands contribute greater than two-thirds of the intensity to the low-frequency vibrational spectra of GFP. PMID:24209864

  19. Research Program towards Observation of Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T

    2006-01-01

    The article describes the research program pursued by the TEXONO Collaboration towards an experiment to observe coherent scattering between neutrinos and the nucleus at the power reactor. The motivations of studying this process are surveyed. In particular, a threshold of 100-200 eV has been achieved with an ultra-low-energy germanium detector prototype. This detection capability at low energy can also be adapted to conduct searches of Cold Dark Matter in the low-mass region as well as to enhance the sensitivities in the study of neutrino magnetic moments.

  20. Background Studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering Reactor Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agnolet, G; Barker, D; Beck, R; Carroll, T J; Cesar, J; Cushman, P; Dent, J B; De Rijck, S; Dutta, B; Flanagan, W; Fritts, M; Gao, Y; Harris, H R; Hays, C C; Iyer, V; Jastram, A; Kadribasic, F; Kennedy, A; Kubik, A; Ogawa, I; Lang, K; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martin, R D; Mast, N; McDeavitt, S; Mirabolfathi, N; Mohanty, B; Nakajima, K; Newhouse, J; Newstead, J L; Phan, D; Proga, M; Roberts, A; Rogachev, G; Salazar, R; Sander, J; Senapati, K; Shimada, M; Strigari, L; Tamagawa, Y; Teizer, W; Vermaak, J I C; Villano, A N; Walker, J; Webb, B; Wetzel, Z; Yadavalli, S A

    2016-01-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 meters) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5 to 20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  1. Electromagnetic-scattering by bi-sphere groups and coherent-beam scattering by homogeneous spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linsheng LIU; Hengyu KE; Zhensen WU; Lu BAI

    2008-01-01

    By using Mie's theory, the boundary condi-tions, and some advanced mathematical knowledge, the scattering problem of a plane-wave by bi-sphere groups and of cores-traversed coherent Gauss-beams by one sphere was addressed. In each, the coefficients of the scattering-field expressions were deduced. Finally, the result was predigested and transfigured so that the available form for programming was achieved. On deducing, the former adopted the undetermined coeffi-cient method and the latter used the plane geometry method. Moreover, the complexity of the calculation was decreased here.

  2. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  3. Nanobeam X-ray scattering probing matter at the nanoscale

    CERN Document Server

    Stangl, Julian; Chamard, Virginie; Carbone, Dina

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the possibilities and potential of X-ray scattering using nanofocused beams for probing matter at the nanoscale, including guidance on the design of nanobeam experiments. The monograph discusses various sources, including free electron lasers, synchrotron radiation and other portable and non-portable X-ray sources.For scientists using synchrotron radiation or students and scientists with a background in X-ray scattering methods in general.

  4. Measurements of wavelength dependent scattering and backscattering coefficients by low-coherence spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C.G.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of scattering properties are invaluable for optical techniques in medicine. However, noninvasive, quantitative measurements of scattering properties over a large wavelength range remain challenging. We introduce low-coherence spectroscopy as a noninvasive method to locally

  5. On measuring the neutron coherent scattering length with ultrahigh precision

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sohrab Abbas; Apoorva G Wagh

    2004-08-01

    We propose an order of magnitude improvement in the present five parts in 105 precision of a nondispersive interferometric measurement of the neutron coherent scattering length c. For this purpose we make a judicious selection of the Bragg angle for the interferometer and the sample thickness. The precision is further improved by an optimal choice of the Bragg reflection (and a consequent neutron wavelength). By performing the experiment in vacuum, errors arising from possible variations in the pressure, composition or humidity of the ambient air can be eliminated. On attaining such precision, we ought to account for the neutron beam refraction at the sample-ambient interfaces, to infer the correct c from the observed phase. The formula for the phase used hitherto is approximate and would significantly overestimate c. The refractive index for neutrons can thus be determined to a phenomenal precision of a few parts in 1012.

  6. Coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering as a flow diagnostic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graul, J. S.; Lilly, T. C. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80918 (United States)

    2014-12-09

    Broadband coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (CRBS) was used to measure translational gas temperatures for nitrogen at the ambient pressure of 0.8 atm using a purpose-built Fabry-Perot etalon spectrometer. Temperatures derived from the CRBS spectral analysis were compared with experimentally-measured temperatures, and were found to be, on average, within 2% of the experimentally-measured value. Axial flow velocities from a double jet at a pressure ratio of 0.38 were also measured by looking at the Doppler shift of the CRBS line shape. With recent developments in chirped laser technology and the capacity of CRBS to simultaneously provide thermodynamic and bulk flow information, the CRBS line shape acquisition and analysis technique presented here may allow for future time-resolved, characterization of aerospace flows.

  7. Quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James P R; Domke, Katrin F; Rago, Gianluca; Kano, Hideaki; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o; Vartiainen, Erik M; Bonn, Mischa

    2011-06-23

    The ability to observe samples qualitatively at the microscopic scale has greatly enhanced our understanding of the physical and biological world throughout the 400 year history of microscopic imaging, but there are relatively few techniques that can truly claim the ability to quantify the local concentration and composition of a sample. We review coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) as a quantitative, chemically specific, and label-free microscopy. We discuss the complicating influence of the nonresonant response on the CARS signal and the various experimental and mathematical approaches that can be adopted to extract quantitative information from CARS. We also review the uses to which CARS has been employed as a quantitative microscopy to solve challenges in material and biological science.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp(3) vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  10. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy in Biology and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Delong; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy have enabled label-free visualization and analysis of functional, endogenous biomolecules in living systems. When compared with spontaneous Raman microscopy, a key advantage of CRS microscopy is the dramatic improvement in imaging speed, which gives rise to real-time vibrational imaging of live biological samples. Using molecular vibrational signatures, recently developed hyperspectral CRS microscopy has improved the readout of chemical information available from CRS images. In this article, we review recent achievements in CRS microscopy, focusing on the theory of the CRS signal-to-noise ratio, imaging speed, technical developments, and applications of CRS imaging in bioscience and clinical settings. In addition, we present possible future directions that the use of this technology may take.

  11. Imaging properties of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Jing-He; Xiao Fan-Rong; Wang Gui-Ying; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope with the combination of confocal and CARS techniques is a remarkable alternative for imaging chemical or biological specimens that neither fluoresce nor tolerate labelling. CARS is a nonlinear optical process, the imaging properties of CARS microscopy will be very different from the conventional confocal microscope. In this paper, the intensity distribution and the polarization property of the optical field near the focus was calculated. By using the Green function, the precise analytic solution to the wave equation of a Hertzian dipole source was obtained. We found that the intensity distributions vary considerably with the different experimental configurations and the different specimen shapes. So the conventional description of microscope (e.g. the point spread function) will fail to describe the imaging properties of the CARS microscope.

  12. Dynamics in viscous orthoterphenyl: Results from coherent neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, E.; Fujara, F.; Legrand, J. F.; Petry, W.; Sillescu, H.; Wuttke, J.

    1995-07-01

    We have measured coherent neutron scattering from deuterated orthoterphenyl on a spin echo and a backscattering spectrometer. In agreement with mode coupling theory, pair correlations decay in two steps and follow the same scaling laws as those found previously for self-correlations. The temperature evolution of the intermediate plateau is compatible with the previously established Tc=290 K. The spatial resolution has not been sufficient to fully resolve oscillations of parameters as functions of Q, which are predicted by mode coupling theory. Within this limitation, we find that the double peak structure of S(Q) is not expressed in the nonergodicity parameter fcQ and that the de Gennes narrowing is missing.

  13. Observation of Laser Induced Magnetization Dynamics in Co/Pd Multilayers with Coherent X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Benny

    2012-04-05

    We report on time-resolved coherent x-ray scattering experiments of laser induced magnetization dynamics in Co/Pd multilayers with a high repetition rate optical pump x-ray probe setup. Starting from a multi-domain ground state, the magnetization is uniformly reduced after excitation by an intense 50 fs laser pulse. Using the normalized time correlation, we study the magnetization recovery on a picosecond timescale. The dynamic scattering intensity is separated into an elastic portion at length scales above 65 nm which retains memory of the initial domain magnetization, and a fluctuating portion at smaller length scales corresponding to domain boundary motion during recovery.

  14. Coherent-form energy conservation relation for the elastic scattering of a guided mode in a symmetric scattering system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao

    2013-10-07

    We propose a coherent-form energy conservation relation (ECR) that is generally valid for the elastic transmission and reflection of a guided mode in a symmetric scattering system. In contrast with the classical incoherent-form ECR, |τ|2 + |ρ|2≤1 with τ and ρ denoting the elastic transmission and reflection coefficients of a guided mode, the coherent-form ECR is expressed as |τ + ρ|≤1, which imposes a constraint on a coherent superposition of the transmitted and reflected modes. The coherent-form ECR is rigorously demonstrated and is numerically tested by considering different types of modes in various scattering systems. Further discussions with the scattering matrix formalism indicate that two coherent-form ECRs, |τ + ρ|≤1 and |τ-ρ|≤1, along with the classical ECR |τ|2 + |ρ|2≤1 constitute a complete description of the energy conservation for the elastic scattering of a guided mode in a symmetric scattering system. The coherent-form ECR provides a common tool in terms of energy transfer for understanding and analyzing the scattering dynamics in currently interested scattering systems.

  15. Coherence specific signal detection via chiral pump-probe spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Holdaway, David I H; Olaya-Castro, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    We examine the transient circular dichroism as a technique to investigate exciton coherence signatures in structured vibrational environments. We consider multiple beam configurations, in terms of both direction and polarization, which provide independent contributions to the signal. We develop a formalism in terms of chiral doorway and windows contributions. Using this formalism we show that signals which beat during the population time can be isolated by comparing signals from configurations in which the angle between the pump and probe pulses is varied. The chiral doorway signal has only a weak ground state contribution, which can generally be neglected if a short pump pulse is used, allowing for unambiguous identification of quantum superpositions of exciton states.

  16. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100-1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ(3) without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM).

  17. Effect of Scatterering on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2016-01-01

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We use the Huygens-Fresnel Wave-based Electric Field Superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2{\\mu}m diameter solid sphere, 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin cylinder and 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike...

  18. Distributed stress and temperature sensing based on Rayleigh scattering of low-coherence light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshkov, B. G.; Taranov, M. A.; E Alekseev, A.

    2017-08-01

    A novel arrangement for fiber optic distributed stress and temperature sensing based on the Rayleigh scattering spectra correlation method is proposed. The principal feature of the arrangement is usage of low-coherence light in probe pulses, which ensures a wide dynamic range for measurements at moderate sensitivity. Such a characteristic corresponds to performance specifications for infrastructure monitoring systems. A theory of optical time domain reflectometry for arbitrary coherence light is developed describing the contrast in reflectograms and Rayleigh scattering spectra properties. The experimental setup uses a wideband source of light pulses and an electronically controlled micro-electro-mechanical system optical filter for wavelength tuning. Temperature change experiments show root mean square (RMS) noise levels of 0.13 °C, 0.24 °C and 0.3 °C for fiber lengths of 2 km, 8 km and 25 km, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 1 m (for 10 min data collection). As much as 2000 µstrain dynamic range is demonstrated in the stress measurement experiment while the noise level (RMS error) is estimated to be 2 µstrain. Our experimental results are compared with the theory and a satisfactory match is demonstrated.

  19. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    A tutorial article is presented for the use of linear and nonlinear Raman microspectroscopies in biomedical diagnostics. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is the most frequently applied nonlinear variant of Raman spectroscopy. The basic concepts of Raman and CARS are introduced first, and subsequent biomedical applications of Raman and CARS are described. Raman microspectroscopy is applied to both in-vivo and in-vitro tissue diagnostics, and the characterization and identification of individual mammalian cells. These applications benefit from the fact that Raman spectra provide specific information on the chemical composition and molecular structure in a label-free and nondestructive manner. Combining the chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope allows recording hyperspectral images with molecular contrast. We also elaborate on interfacing Raman spectroscopic tools with other technologies such as optical tweezing, microfluidics and fiber optic probes. Thereby, we aim at presenting a guide into one exciting branch of modern biophotonics research.

  20. SU-E-I-64: X-Ray Coherent Scatter Mammography Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, L R; MacDonald, C A [University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Conventional mammography has poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter potentially provides more information because interference of coherently scattered radiation depends on the average intermolecular spacing, and can be used to characterize tissue types. However, typical coherent scatter analysis techniques are not compatible with rapid low dose screening modalities. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is a novel imaging technique which provides new information with higher contrast. In this work a simulation was performed of coherent scatter slot scan imaging to assess its performance and provide system optimization. Methods: In coherent scatter imaging, the coherent scatter is exploited using a conventional slot scan mammography system with anti-scatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the coherent scatter imaging. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage and filtration, tilt angle, source and grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. Results: The contrast was high and increased as the grid tilt angle was increased beyond the characteristic angle for the modeled carcinoma, and as the source voltage increased. Source filtration did not have a significant effect on contrast. Increasing grid ratio improved contrast at the expense of decreasing the signal to noise ratio (SNR). As the tumor size is decreased, additional shields to block the fat signal are necessary in order to detect the cancer signal. Conclusion: Coherent scatter analysis using a wide slot setup is promising as an enhancement for screening mammography. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health, # 7 R01EB009715.

  1. Lensed fiber probes designed as an alternative to bulk probes in optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seon Young; Choi, Hae Young; Na, Jihoon; Choi, Woo June; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrate a compact all-fiber sampling probe for an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. By forming a focusing lens directly on the tip of an optical fiber, a compact sampling probe could be implemented. To simultaneously achieve a sufficiently long working distance and a good lateral resolution, we employed a large-mode area photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a coreless silica fiber (CSF) of the same diameters. A working distance of up to 1270 microm, a 3 dB distance range of 2210 microm, and a transverse resolution of 14.2 microm were achieved with the implemented PCF lensed fiber; these values are comparable to those obtainable with a conventional objective lens having an NA of 0.25 (10 x). The performance of the OCT system equipped with the proposed PCF lensed fiber is presented by showing the OCT images of a rat finger as a biological sample and a pearl as an in-depth sample.

  2. Dispersion-based stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy, holography, and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) enables fast, high resolution imaging of chemical constituents important to biological structures and functional processes. While this technology has shown remarkable potential, it is currently limited to point scanning and can only probe a few Raman bands at a time. In this work we take a fundamentally different approach to detecting the small nonlinear signals based on dispersion effects that accompany the loss/gain processes in SRS. We use a modified pump-probe system (pulses with duration of ~0.5 ps and 75 fs, respectively) with interferometric detection in the Fourier-domain to demonstrate that the dispersive measurements are more robust to noise (e.g., laser noise) compared to conventional amplitude measurements, which in turn permits facile spectral and spatial multiplexing. Results show that it is possible to assess a broadband dispersion spectrum (currently limited to ~400 cm-1) with a single laser shot or spectrometer acquisition (20-50 µs). For molecular imaging with broadband spectral information, we achieve spatial pixel rates of 2.5 kHz, and will discuss how this can be further improved to 20-50 kHz. We also combine SRS with optical coherence tomography (OCT) (molecular and structural information are rendered from the same data), which enables axial multiplexing by coherence gating and paves the way for volumetric biochemical imaging. The approach is tested on a thin water-and-oil phantom, a thick scattering polystyrene bead phantom, and thick freshly excised human adipose tissue. Finally, we will outline other opportunities for spatial multiplexing using wide-field holography and spectroscopic-OCT, which would massively parallelize the spatial and spectral information. The combination of dispersion-based SRS and phase imaging has the potential to enable faster wide-area and volumetric molecular imaging. Such methods would be valuable in a clinical setting for many applications.

  3. Scanning coherent scattering methods for actinic EUV mask inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Y.; Helfenstein, P.; Rajeev, R.; Mochi, I.; Mohacsi, I.; Gobrecht, J.; Yoshitake, S.

    2016-10-01

    Actinic mask inspection for EUV lithography with targeted specifications of resolution, sensitivity, and throughput remains a big hurdle for the successful insertion of EUVL into high volume manufacturing and effective solutions are needed to address this. We present a method for actinic mask inspection based on scanning coherent scattering microscopy. In this method, the mask is scanned with an EUV beam of relatively small spot size and the scattered light is recorded with a pixel detector. Customized algorithms reconstruct the aerial image by iteratively solving the phaseproblem using over-determined diffraction data gathered by scanning across the specimen with a finite illumination. This approach provides both phase and amplitude of actinic aerial images of the mask with high resolution without the need to use high NA (numerical aperture) lenses. Futher, we describe a reflective mode EUV mask scanning lensless imaging tool (RESCAN), which was installed at the XIL-II beamline and later at the SIM beamline of the Swiss Light Source and show reconstructed aerial images down to 10 nm (on-wafer) resolution. As a complementary method, the a-priori knowledge of the sample is employed to identify potential defect sites by analyzing the diffraction patterns. In this method, the recorded diffraction patterns are compared with the die or database data (i.e. previously measured or calculated diffraction data from the defect-free mask layout respectively) and their difference is interpreted as the defect signal. Dynamic software filtering helps to suppress the strong diffraction from defect-free structures and allows registration of faint defects with high sensitivity. Here, we discuss the basic principles of these Fourier domain techniques and its potential for actinic mask inspection with high signal-to-noise ratio and high throughput.

  4. Plasma Jet Interaction with Thomson Scattering Probe Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvank, Tom; Banasek, Jacob; Potter, William; Kusse, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering systems can diagnose plasma temperatures and velocities. When probing a plasma jet with the Thomson scattering laser, we observe a laser-plasma interaction that inputs energy into the plasma jet. The absorbed energy causes a bubble of low density ( 5*1017 cm-2) in the jet (unperturbed 1018 cm-2). A pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current, 100 ns rise time) with a radial foil (15 μm thick Al) configuration generates the plasma jet. We compare the effects of using 10 J and 1 J laser energies, for which the 10 J laser is a larger perturbation. We discuss how the interaction affects the Thomson scattering temperature and velocity measurements. Work supported by National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-NA0001836 and National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant PHY-1102471.

  5. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  6. Maximum-likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm for x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu; Popescu, Lucretiu M

    2016-04-21

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter cross section of the investigated object revealing structural information of tissue under investigation. In the original CSCT proposals the reconstruction of images from coherently scattered x-rays is done at each scattering angle separately using analytic reconstruction. In this work we develop a maximum likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm (ML-ESCA) that iteratively reconstructs images using a few material component basis functions from coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm combines the measured scatter data at different angles into one reconstruction equation with only a few component images. Also, it accounts for data acquisition statistics and physics, modeling effects such as polychromatic energy spectrum and detector response function. We test the algorithm with simulated projection data obtained with a pencil beam setup using a new version of MC-GPU code, a Graphical Processing Unit version of PENELOPE Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code, that incorporates an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The results obtained for breast imaging phantoms using adipose and glandular tissue cross sections show that the new algorithm can separate imaging data into basic adipose and water components at radiation doses comparable with Breast Computed Tomography. Simulation results also show the potential for imaging microcalcifications. Overall, the component images obtained with ML-ESCA algorithm have a less noisy appearance than the images obtained with the conventional filtered back projection algorithm for each individual scattering angle. An optimization study for x-ray energy range selection for breast CSCT is also presented.

  7. Maximum-likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm for x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Badal, Andreu; Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) is a reconstructive x-ray imaging technique that yields the spatially resolved coherent-scatter cross section of the investigated object revealing structural information of tissue under investigation. In the original CSCT proposals the reconstruction of images from coherently scattered x-rays is done at each scattering angle separately using analytic reconstruction. In this work we develop a maximum likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm (ML-ESCA) that iteratively reconstructs images using a few material component basis functions from coherent scatter projection data. The proposed algorithm combines the measured scatter data at different angles into one reconstruction equation with only a few component images. Also, it accounts for data acquisition statistics and physics, modeling effects such as polychromatic energy spectrum and detector response function. We test the algorithm with simulated projection data obtained with a pencil beam setup using a new version of MC-GPU code, a Graphical Processing Unit version of PENELOPE Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code, that incorporates an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The results obtained for breast imaging phantoms using adipose and glandular tissue cross sections show that the new algorithm can separate imaging data into basic adipose and water components at radiation doses comparable with Breast Computed Tomography. Simulation results also show the potential for imaging microcalcifications. Overall, the component images obtained with ML-ESCA algorithm have a less noisy appearance than the images obtained with the conventional filtered back projection algorithm for each individual scattering angle. An optimization study for x-ray energy range selection for breast CSCT is also presented.

  8. Monitoring changes in the scattering properties of mouse skin with optical coherence tomography during an in vivo glucose tolerance test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, M.; Tausta, S.; Myllylä, R.; Vainio, S.

    2007-05-01

    A non-invasive glucose monitoring technique would make evaluation of blood glucose values easier and more convenient. This would help diabetic patients to control their blood glucose values more regularly. A few years ago optical coherence tomography (OCT) was proposed as a non-invasive sensor for monitoring changes in blood glucose concentration. The method is based on monitoring glucose-induced changes in the scattering properties of the target. This article describes how OCT was used to monitor changes in the scattering properties of mouse skin during an in vivo glucose tolerance test. The results show that OCT has the potential to register glucose-induced changes in the optical properties of the sample. However, a commercial OCT device with a probe designed for imaging is not very suitable for non-invasive monitoring of glucose-induced changes in scattering. The problems confronted in this study, possibly originating from the small size of the animals, are discussed in the article.

  9. Self-trapping Characteristics of Partially Coherent Optical Beam in Photonic Crystal Fiber under Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; LI Ji-zhou

    2007-01-01

    Using the mutually coherent function, the self-trapping of the circle partially coherent optical beam in the total internal reflective photonic crystal fiber(TIRPCF) under Compton scattering is studied.The study shows that the composition of the non-coherent optical beam in the optical spectrum and the diffraction effect are decreased by Compton scattering,and the probability of forming the soliton is greatly increased.The vibration peak value in the propagation,compressed degree,changed cycle,and radius of the soliton are all smaller than those before the scattering,but its coherent radius is larger than that before the scattering.In this propagation,the self-focusing plays a key role.

  10. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimov, D. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); BarbeauP., [Duke University; Barton, P. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bolozdynya, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Cavanna, F. [Yale University; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL; Collar, J. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute; Cooper, R. J. [Indiana University; Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Etenko, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Fields, N. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute; Foxe, M. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Fomin, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gallmeier, F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Garishvili, I. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gerling, M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Green, M. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Greene, Geoffrey [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hatzikoutelis, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Henning, Reyco [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Hix, R. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hogan, D. [University of California-Berkeley; Hornback, D. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jovanovic, I. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Hossbach, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Iverson, Erik B [ORNL; Klein, S. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Khromov, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Link, J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Louis, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lu, W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Marleau, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Markoff, D. [North Carolina Central University, Durham; Martin, R. D. [University of South Dakota; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL; Newby, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Orrell, John L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); O' Shaughnessy, C. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Penttila, Seppo [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Patton, K. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Poon, A. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Radford, David C [ORNL; Reyna, D. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Ray, H. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Scholberg, K. [Duke University, North Carolina; Sosnovtsev, V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Tayloe, R. [Indiana University; Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Virtue, C. [Laurentian University, Canada; Wilkerson, J. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Yoo, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL); Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of a novel coherent scatter materials discrimination system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Laila; Starr-Baier, Sean; MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.

    2017-05-01

    X-ray coherent scatter imaging has the potential to improve the detection of liquid and powder materials of concern in security screening. While x-ray attenuation is dependent on atomic number, coherent scatter is highly dependent on the characteristic angle for the target material, and thus offers an additional discrimination. Conventional coherent scatter analysis requires pixel-by-pixel scanning, and so could be prohibitively slow for security applications. A novel slot scan system has been developed to provide rapid imaging of the coherent scatter at selected angles of interest, simultaneously with the conventional absorption images. Prior experimental results showed promising capability. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess discrimination capability and provide system optimization. Simulation analysis performed using the measured ring profiles for an array of powders and liquids, including water, ethanol and peroxide. For example, simulations yielded a signal-to-background ratio of 1.63+/-0.08 for a sample consisting of two 10 mm diameter vials, one containing ethanol (signal) and one water (background). This high SBR value is due to the high angular separation of the coherent scatter between the two liquids. The results indicate that the addition of coherent scatter information to single or dual energy attenuation images improves the discrimination of materials of interest.

  12. Scattering of coherent sound waves by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P. L.; Liu, C. H.; Maestrello, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study of the propagation of coherent sound waves through an atmosphere containing both mean and fluctuating flow variables is presented. The general flow problem is formulated as a time-dependent wave propagation in a half-space containing the turbulent medium. The coherent acoustic waves are analyzed by a smoothing technique, assuming that mean flow variables vary with the height only. The general equations for the coherent waves are derived, and then applied to two special cases, corresponding to uniform and shear mean flow, respectively. The results show that mean shear and turbulence introduce pronounced effects on the propagation of coherent acoustic disturbances.

  13. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for pharmaceutics: a shift in the right direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, Andrew Luke

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a tool in pharmaceutical solid state development. CARS microscopy is a nonlinear optical imaging technique that uses inelastic scattering of light to provide chemically specific imaging. CARS microscopy is suit

  14. Timeresolved Speckle Analysis: Probing the Coherence of Excitonic Secondary Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Zimmermann, R.

    1998-01-01

    A new technique to analyze the time-dependent coherence of light emitted in a non-specular direction is presented. We demonstrate that the coherence degree of the emission can be deduced from the intensity fluctuations over the emission directions (speckles). The secondary emission of excitons...

  15. Optimization of a coherent soft x-ray beamline for coherent scattering experiments at NSLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro D.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Reininger, R.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Wang, S.

    2011-08-21

    The coherent soft x-ray and full polarization control (CSX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source - II (NSLS-II) will deliver 1013 coherent photons per second in the energy range of 0.2-2 keV with a resolving power of 2000. The source, a dual elliptically polarizing undulator (EPU), and beamline optics should be optimized to deliver the highest possible coherent flux in a 10-30 {micro}m spot for use in coherent scattering experiments. Using the computer code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW), we simulate the photon source and focusing optics in order to investigate the conditions which provide the highest usable coherent intensity on the sample. In particular, we find that an intermediate phasing magnet is needed to correct for the relative phase between the two EPUs and that the optimum phase setting produces a spectrum in which the desired wavelength is slightly red-shifted thus requiring a larger aperture than originally anticipated. This setting is distinct from that which produces an on-axis spectrum similar to a single long undulator. Furthermore, partial coherence calculations, utilizing a multiple electron approach, indicate that a high degree of spatial coherence is still obtained at the sample location when such an aperture is used. The aperture size which maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio of a double-slit experiment is explored. This combination of high coherence and intensity is ideally suited for x-ray ptychography experiments which reconstruct the scattering density from micro-diffraction patterns. This technique is briefly reviewed and the effects on the image quality of proximity to the beamline focus are explored.

  16. Coded aperture coherent scatter imaging for breast cancer detection: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Morris, Robert E.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that conventional x-ray imaging provides a maximum contrast between cancerous and healthy fibroglandular breast tissues of 3% based on their linear x-ray attenuation coefficients at 17.5 keV, whereas coherent scatter signal provides a maximum contrast of 19% based on their differential coherent scatter cross sections. Therefore in order to exploit this potential contrast, we seek to evaluate the performance of a coded- aperture coherent scatter imaging system for breast cancer detection and investigate its accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations we modeled our experimental system, which consists of a raster-scanned pencil beam of x-rays, a bismuth-tin coded aperture mask comprised of a repeating slit pattern with 2-mm periodicity, and a linear-array of 128 detector pixels with 6.5-keV energy resolution. The breast tissue that was scanned comprised a 3-cm sample taken from a patient-based XCAT breast phantom containing a tomosynthesis- based realistic simulated lesion. The differential coherent scatter cross section was reconstructed at each pixel in the image using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Each pixel in the reconstructed image was then classified as being either air or the type of breast tissue with which its normalized reconstructed differential coherent scatter cross section had the highest correlation coefficient. Comparison of the final tissue classification results with the ground truth image showed that the coded aperture imaging technique has a cancerous pixel detection sensitivity (correct identification of cancerous pixels), specificity (correctly ruling out healthy pixels as not being cancer) and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9% and 92.0%, respectively. Our Monte Carlo evaluation of our experimental coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system shows that it is able to exploit the greater contrast available from coherently scattered x-rays to increase the accuracy of detecting cancerous regions within the breast.

  17. Smart optical coherence tomography for ultra-deep imaging through highly scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Badon, Amaury; Lerosey, Geoffroy; Boccara, Albert C; Fink, Mathias; Aubry, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Multiple scattering of waves in disordered media is a nightmare whether it be for detection or imaging purposes. The best approach so far to get rid of multiple scattering is optical coherence tomography. It basically combines confocal microscopy and coherence time-gating to discriminate ballistic photons from a predominant multiple scattering background. Nevertheless, the imaging depth range remains limited to 1 mm at best in human soft tissues. Here we propose a matrix approach of optical imaging to push back this fundamental limit. By combining a matrix discrimination of ballistic waves and iterative time-reversal, we show both theoretically and experimentally an extension of the imaging-depth limit by at least a factor two compared to optical coherence tomography. In particular, the reported experiment demonstrates imaging through a strongly scattering layer from which only one reflected photon over 1000 billion is ballistic. This approach opens a new route towards ultra-deep tissue imaging.

  18. Probing the transverse coherence of an undulator x-ray beam using brownian particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, M D; Potenza, M A C; Manfredda, M; Geloni, G; Sztucki, M; Narayanan, T; Giglio, M

    2009-11-06

    We present a novel method to map the two-dimensional transverse coherence of an x-ray beam using the dynamical near-field speckles formed by scattering from colloidal particles. Owing to the statistical nature of the method, the coherence properties of synchrotron radiation from an undulator source is obtained with high accuracy. The two-dimensional complex coherence function is determined at the sample position and the imaging optical scheme further allowed us to evaluate the coherence factor at the undulator output despite the aberrations introduced by the focusing optics.

  19. Coherently scattering atoms from an excited Bose-Einstein condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    2000-01-01

    We consider scattering atoms from a fully Bose-Einstein condensed gas. If we take these atoms to be identical to those in the Bose-Einstein condensate, this scattering process is to a large extent analogous to Andreev reflection from the interface between a superconducting and a normal metal. We det

  20. Performance limit of a multi-frequency probe based coherent optical time domain reflectometry caused by nonlinear effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lidong Lü; Yuejiang Song; Fan Zhu; Xuping Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear effects that limit the performance of the multi-frequency probe (MFP) based coherent optical time domain reflectometry (C-OTDR) are investigated.Based on theoretical analysis and experimental results,compared with conventional C-OTDR,when the probe pulse has power gradient within the pulse width,self-phase modulation (SPM) and cross-phase modulation (XPM) are strengthened in the new COTDR scheme.The generation of four-wave mixing (FWM) is dependent on SPM and XPM,and with modulation frequency of phase modulator higher than 40 MHz,the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) threshold can be enhanced by more than 5 dB,which benefits the maximum dynamic range of the MFP C-OTDR.

  1. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Accardo, Angelo [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); Di Fabrizio, Enzo [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); BIONEM Lab at University Magna Graecia, Campus Salvatore Venuta, Viale Europa 88100, Germaneto-Catanzaro (Italy); Limongi, Tania [KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology), Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Marinaro, Giovanni [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, Genova 16163 (Italy); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Riekel, Christian, E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-06-10

    A comprehensive review about the use of micro- and nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces as a tool for in situ X-ray scattering investigations of soft matter and biological materials. Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data.

  2. Probing angular momentum coherence in a twin-atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    de Carvalho, Carlos R; Impens, François; Robert, J; Medina, Aline; Zappa, F; Faria, N V de Castro

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use a double longitudinal Stern-Gerlach atom interferometer in order to investigate quantitatively the angular momentum coherence of molecular fragments. Assuming that the dissociated molecule has a null total angular momentum, we investigate the propagation of the corresponding atomic fragments in the apparatus. We show that the envisioned interferometer enables one to distinguish unambiguously a spin-coherent from a spin-incoherent dissociation, as well as to estimate the purity of the angular momentum density matrix associated with the fragments. This setup, which may be seen as an atomic analogue of a twin-photon interferometer, can be used to investigate the suitability of molecule dissociation processes -- such as the metastable hydrogen atoms H($2^2 S$)-H($2^2 S$) dissociation - for coherent twin-atom optics.

  3. Scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a material circular cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Milo W; Bogle, Andrew E; Havrilla, Michael J

    2013-12-30

    The case of a partially-coherent wave scattered from a material circular cylinder is investigated. Expressions for the TMz and TEz scattered-field cross-spectral density functions are derived by utilizing the plane-wave spectrum representation of electromagnetic fields and cylindrical wave transformations. From the analytical scattered-field cross-spectral density functions, the mean scattering widths are derived and subsequently validated via comparison with those computed from Method of Moments Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical relations as well as the simulation results are discussed and physically interpreted. Key insights are noted and subsequently analyzed.

  4. Experimental Investigation on Selective Excitation of Two-Pulse Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; ZHANG Hui; ZHANG Xiang-Yun; ZHANG Shi-An; WANG Zu-Geng; SUN Zhen-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Selective excitation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering from the benzene solution is achieved by adaptive pulse shaping based on genetic algorithm, and second harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) technique is adopted to characterize the original and optimal laser pulses. The mechanism for two-pulse coherent mode-selective excitation of Raman scattering is experimentally investigated by modulating the pump pulse in the frequency domain, and it is indicated that two-pulse coherent mode-selective excitation of Raman scattering mainly depends on the effective frequency components of the pump pulse related to specific vibrational mode. The experimental results suggest that two-pulse CARS has good signal-to-background ratio and high sensitivity, and it has attractive potential applications in the complicated molecular system.

  5. Focusing coherent light through a nonlinear scattering medium

    CERN Document Server

    Frostig, Hadas; Derevyanko, Stanislav; Silberberg, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Wavefront shaping is a powerful technique that can be used to focus light through scattering media, with the limitation that the obtained focus contains a small fraction of the total power. The method is based on the assumption that the field at the output is a linear superposition of the modes traveling through different paths in the medium. However, when the scattering medium also exhibits nonlinearity, as may occur in multiphoton microscopy, this assumption is violated and the applicability of wavefront shaping becomes unclear. Here we show that using adaptive optimization of the wavefront light can still be controlled and focused through a nonlinear scattering medium, and that the focused fraction of power can be significantly enhanced in the presence of moderate positive nonlinearity. Our results suggest that the use of short pulses for focusing through scattering media with a mild self-focusing response might be favorable to the use of continuous-wave light.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  7. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Gas Phase Thermometry at 5 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Claresta; Lucht, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the thermal instabilities occurring in turbulent combustion, such as in modern gas turbine combustors, is critical for more reliable and fuel-efficient operation. Non-intrusive laser based spectroscopy methods have been documented as the techniques of choice for turbulent combustion diagnostics. Specifically, femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) thermometry has been established for temporal resolution of turbulent fluctuations in flame structure and provides accurate measurements across a wide range of temperatures. Experiments performed to date include 5 kHz pure vibrational N2 chirped probe-pulse fs-CARS thermometry on non-premixed hydrogen jet diffusion flames, methane jet diffusion flames, and the DLR gas turbine model combustor (GTMC). The fs-CARS signal generation process requires precise spatial and temporal overlap of tightly focused pulsed laser beams of less than 100 fs pulse duration. Here, signal loss due to beam steering, pressure fluctuations, or shear layer density gradients can become a problem. The effect of such interferences has been investigated using high velocity flow of compressed nitrogen gas from a converging-diverging nozzle. Resulting changes in fs-CARS spectra have been studied. Funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  8. Decoherence as a Probe of Coherent Quantum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    D'Arcy, M B; Summy, G S; Guarneri, I; Wimberger, S M; Fishman, S; Buchleitner, A; Arcy, Michael B. d'; Godun, Rachel M.; Summy, Gil S.; Guarneri, Italo; Wimberger, Sandro; Fishman, Shmuel; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The effect of decoherence, induced by spontaneous emission, on the dynamics of periodically kicked cold atoms at quantum resonance is experimentally and theoretically studied. We clarify the nature of the coherent evolution, and the way in which decoherence disrupts it, thereby resolving the puzzle of the observed enhancement of the atomic mean energy growth by decoherence [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 074102 (2001)].

  9. Gaseous detector of ionizing radiation for registration of coherent neutrino scattering on nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, A. V.; Orekhov, I. V.; Petukhov, V. V.; Solomatin, A. E.

    2014-03-01

    A method for registration of the coherent scattering reactor antineutrino on nuclei using a three-section low-background proportional counter was proposed. It is planned to use argon and xenon as the working substance. As has been shown on a test bench, pulse shape discrimination can effectively suppress the background from electromagnetic interference and microphonic effects in the energy range from 20 to 100 eV where the effect of coherent scattering of neutrinos on nuclei is expected with a factor of about 103. Problems of the neutron background generated by cosmic-ray muons are analyzed. The scheme of the experimental setup is presented.

  10. The Coherent Photon Scattering Background in Sub-GeV/$c^2$ Direct Dark Matter Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alan E. [Fermilab

    2016-10-24

    Proposed dark matter detectors with eV-scale sensitivities will detect a large background of atomic (nuclear) recoils from coherent photon scattering. This background climbs steeply below $\\sim10$~eVnr, far exceeding the declining rate of low-energy Compton recoils. The upcoming generation of dark matter detectors will not be limited by this background, but further development of eV-scale and sub-eV detectors will require the use of low-$Z$ target materials, such as helium, to avoid a large rate of coherent photon scattering.

  11. The coherent photon scattering background in sub-GeV/$c^2$ direct dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    Proposed dark matter detectors with eV-scale sensitivities will detect a large background of atomic (nuclear) recoils from coherent photon scattering. This background climbs steeply below $\\sim10$~eVnr, far exceeding the declining rate of low-energy Compton recoils. The upcoming generation of dark matter detectors will not be limited by this background, but further development of eV-scale and sub-eV detectors will require the use of low-$Z$ target materials, such as helium, to avoid a large rate of coherent photon scattering.

  12. Coherent photon scattering background in sub-GeV /c2 direct dark matter searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2017-01-01

    Proposed dark matter detectors with eV-scale sensitivities will detect a large background of atomic (nuclear) recoils from coherent photon scattering of MeV-scale photons. This background climbs steeply below ˜10 eV , far exceeding the declining rate of low-energy Compton recoils. The upcoming generation of dark matter detectors will not be limited by this background, but further development of eV-scale and sub-eV detectors will require strategies, including the use of low nuclear mass target materials, to maximize dark matter sensitivity while minimizing the coherent photon scattering background.

  13. Charged Current Coherent Pion Production in Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We summarise here the main differences of three models of neutrino-induced coherent pion production, namely the Rein-Sehgal and Berger-Sehgal models based on the Partially Conserved Axial Current theorem and the Alvarez-Ruso \\textit{et al.} model which is using a microscopic approach. Their predictions in the event generators are compared against recent experimental measurements for a neutrino energy from 0.5 to 20 GeV.

  14. Coherence properties of light propagated through a scattering medium

    CERN Document Server

    Aruldoss, C K; Nugent, K A; Roberts, A

    2007-01-01

    Partially-coherent, quasi-monochromatic optical fields are fully described by their Mutual Optical Intensity (MOI) or the phase-space equivalent, the Generalised Radiance (GR). This paper reports on the application of a propagation-based phase-space tomographic technique for determining both the MOI and the GR of wavefields. This method is applied to the reconstruction of the MOI and the GR of an optical wavefield propagated through a suspension of \\~10micrometre diameter polystyrene spheres.

  15. Supercontinuum generation for coherent anti- Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Isomäki, Antti; Hansen, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) designs with two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) are experimentally investigated in order to suggest a novel PCF for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. From our investigation, we select the optimum PCF design and demonstrate a tailored spectrum...... analysis, the nonlinear effects responsible for the spectral broadening are explained to be soliton fission processes, dispersive waves, and stimulated Raman scattering....

  16. Detecting quantum coherence of Bose gases in optical lattices by scattering light intensity in cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xu; Yin, Lan; Liu, W M; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-07-19

    We propose a new method of detecting quantum coherence of a Bose gas trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice by measuring the light intensity from Raman scattering in cavity. After pump and displacement process, the intensity or amplitude of scattering light is different for different quantum states of a Bose gas, such as superfluid and Mott-Insulator states. This method can also be useful to detect quantum states of atoms with two components in an optical lattice.

  17. Ultrafast probes of coherent oscillations in Fe-based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. W. [Dept. of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Forefront ultrafast experimental techniques have recently proven their potential as new approaches to understand materials based on non-equilibrium dynamics in the time domain. The time domain approach is useful especially in disentangling complicated coupling among charge, spin and lattice degrees of freedom. Various ultrafast experiments on Fe-based superconductors have observed strong coherent oscillations of an A1g phonon mode of arsenic ions, which shows strong coupling to the electronic and magnetic states. This paper reviews the recent reports of ultrafast studies on Fe-based superconductor with a focus on the coherent oscillations. Experimental results with ultrashort light sources from the terahertz-infrared pulses to the hard X-rays from a free electron laser will be presented.

  18. Optical probe design with extended depth-of-focus for optical coherence microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Minseog; Lee, Eunsung; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Chang, Jong-hyeon; Kim, Woonbae

    2013-03-01

    In this report, Optical probe system for modality, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical coherence microscope (OCM), is presented. In order to control the back focal length from 2.2 mm to 27 mm, optical probe is designed using two liquid lenses and several lenses. The narrow depth of focus (DOF) in microscope is extended by phase filter such as cubic filter. The filter is modified so that DOF is extended only In the OCM mode. The section for the extended DOF of probe is controlled by iris. Therefore in OCT mode, the phase filter does not affect on the DOF of lens. In OCM mode, the Gaussian light and modified light will affect the DOF. The probe dimension is less than 4 mm diameter and less than 60 mm long. The scan range of system is 0.88 mm wide, 1 mm deep in the OCT and 510 μm wide, 1 mm deep in the OCM mode. The lens curvature and iris aperture are operated by digital microelectrofluidic lens and iris.

  19. Probing myocardium biomechanics using quantitative optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a quantitative optical coherence elastographic method for noncontact assessment of the myocardium elasticity. The method is based on shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT), where a focused air-puff system is used to induce localized tissue deformation through a low-pressure short-duration air stream and a phase-sensitive OCT system is utilized to monitor the propagation of the induced tissue displacement with nanoscale sensitivity. The 1-D scanning of M-mode OCT imaging and the application of optical phase retrieval and mapping techniques enable the reconstruction and visualization of 2-D depth-resolved shear wave propagation in tissue with ultra-high frame rate. The feasibility of this method in quantitative elasticity measurement is demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms with the estimated Young's modulus compared with uniaxial compression tests. We also performed pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with normal and genetically altered cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate this noncontact quantitative optical coherence elastographic method can be a useful tool for the cardiac muscle research and studies.

  20. Redshift and blueshift in the spectra of lights coherently and diffusely scattered from random rough interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtdar, Masoomeh; Tavassoly, M Taghi

    2009-10-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that the spectrum of coherently scattered light from a randomly rough interface in reflection and transmission is redshifted with a shrinkage in spectral width. In reflection mode the amounts of the redshift and the shrinkage depend on interface roughness, incident angle, and the spectral width of the illuminating light. In transmission mode they also depend on the refractive indices of the surrounding media. The redshift and width shrinkage increase with decrease of the coherently scattered light intensity. This study shows that the spectrum of the diffusely scattered light is blueshifted in the specular direction and in directions with small scattering angles only in situations with appreciable intensity of the coherently scattered light. With decrease of the latter intensity the blueshift reduces and turns into redshift. Also, the redshift and blueshift decay with increase of the scattering angle. An experimental investigation has been carried out, on sheet glasses with different roughness on one side, in reflection and transmission modes. The experimental results and theoretical predictions are quite consistent.

  1. Miniaturized magnetic-driven scanning probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Ziwei; Wu, Jigang

    2015-06-01

    We designed and implemented a magnetic-driven scanning (MDS) probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). The probe uses an externally-driven tiny magnet in the distal end to achieve unobstructed 360-degree circumferential scanning at the side of the probe. The design simplifies the scanning part inside the probe and thus allows for easy miniaturization and cost reduction. We made a prototype probe with an outer diameter of 1.4 mm and demonstrated its capability by acquiring OCT images of ex vivo trachea and artery samples from a pigeon. We used a spectrometer-based Fourier-domain OCT system and the system sensitivity with our prototype probe was measured to be 91 dB with an illumination power of 850 μW and A-scan exposure time of 1 ms. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are 6.5 μm and 8.1 μm, respectively.

  2. Domain and range decomposition methods for coded aperture x-ray coherent scatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinaka, Ikenna; Kaganovsky, Yan; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Politte, David G.; Holmgren, Andrew D.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Carin, Lawrence; Brady, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter imaging is a novel modality for ascertaining the molecular structure of an object. Measurements from different spatial locations and spectral channels in the object are multiplexed through a radiopaque material (coded aperture) onto the detectors. Iterative algorithms such as penalized expectation maximization (EM) and fully separable spectrally-grouped edge-preserving reconstruction have been proposed to recover the spatially-dependent coherent scatter spectral image from the multiplexed measurements. Such image recovery methods fall into the category of domain decomposition methods since they recover independent pieces of the image at a time. Ordered subsets has also been utilized in conjunction with penalized EM to accelerate its convergence. Ordered subsets is a range decomposition method because it uses parts of the measurements at a time to recover the image. In this paper, we analyze domain and range decomposition methods as they apply to coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter imaging using a spectrally-grouped edge-preserving regularizer and discuss the implications of the increased availability of parallel computational architecture on the choice of decomposition methods. We present results of applying the decomposition methods on experimental coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter measurements. Based on the results, an underlying observation is that updating different parts of the image or using different parts of the measurements in parallel, decreases the rate of convergence, whereas using the parts sequentially can accelerate the rate of convergence.

  3. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy driving the future of loaded mesoporous silica imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Mah, Pei Ting; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Niemi, Sanna-Mari; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Helder A.; Strachan, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the use of variants of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel method for improved physicochemical characterization of drug-loaded silica particles. Ordered mesoporous silica is a biomaterial that can be loaded to carry a number of biochemicals,

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, H.N.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup is demonstra...... is demonstrated by imaging of micrometer-sized polystyrene beads....

  5. Spectral Study of a Broad Energy HPGe Detector for First Measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbrook, Jason; Green, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Intense neutrino flux at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the energy domain below Eν = 50 MeV makes SNS a suitable location for measurement of Coherent Neutrino Scattering. Coherent scattering is assumed to occupy vital roles in supernovae (SN) events and measurement offers promising insight into SN mechanics and advancements in SN- ν detection. Furthermore, this interaction is well-calculable and therefore, a strong test of the Standard Model. P-Type Point Contact High-purity germanium detectors are excellent candidates for this measurement due to their sensitivity to low-energy nuclear recoils. One such, a Canberra Broad Energy HPGe detector, was tested for quality degradation from exposure to fast neutrons in the SNS target building, to assess usefulness in a future coherent scattering experiment. Analysis of the lead-shielded spectra was handled using tools developed for the Majorana Demonstrator neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment. Broad spectrum energy resolution and 68Ge decay rates were calculated. This poster will present findings that will help determine this detector's eligibility and exposure limitations for measurement in a future coherent neutrino scattering experiment at the SNS.

  6. Effects of absorption on coherence domain path length resolved dynamic light scattering in the diffuse regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petoukhova, Anna; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2002-01-01

    A low coherence Mach–Zehnder interferometer is developed for path length resolved dynamic light scattering in highly turbid media. The path length distribution of multiply scatteredphotons in Intralipid is changed by the addition of absorbing dyes. Path length distributions obtained for various abso

  7. Path length distribution of multiple-scattered photons by low coherence Doppler interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petoukhova, Anna; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Mul, F.F.M.; Tuchin, V.V.; Izatt, J.A.; Fujimoto, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    We report results of measurements by low coherence Doppler interferometry of the path length distribution of photons undergoing multiple scattering in a highly turbid medium. We use a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with multimode graded index fibers and a superluminescent diode as light source. The pat

  8. Coherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Solid Orthodeuterium at High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, J.W.;; Nielsen, Mourits; Daniels, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    The phonon spectrum of solid deuterium has been measured using coherent inelastically-scattered thermal neutrons. Measurements were conducted at pressures up to 4.5 kbar with a temperature range between 4 and 50 K. Force constants of a harmonic model were calculated from the phonon energies at two...

  9. Broadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy employing photonic-crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Paulsen, Henrik Nørgaard; Birkedal, Victoria;

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy and microscopy based on a single Ti:sapphire oscillator and a nonlinear photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). The Stokes pulse is generated by spectral conversion of the laser pulse in a PCF. The pump pulse...

  10. Coherent anti-stokes raman scattering microscopy to monitor drug dissolution in different oral pharmaceutical tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Windbergs, M.; Strachan, C.J.; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Otto, Cornelis; Kleinebudde, P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2009-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is used to visualize the release of a model drug (theophylline) from a lipid (tripalmitin) based tablet during dissolution. The effects of transformation and dissolution of the drug are imaged in real time. This study reveals that the manufactu

  11. Generation of Attosecond X-Ray Pulse through Coherent Relativistic Nonlinear Thomson Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K; Jeong, Y U; Lee, B C; Park, S H

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to some recent experimental results, which state that the Nonlinear Thomson Scattered (NTS) radiation is incoherent, a coherent condition under which the scattered radiation of an incident laser pulse by a bunch of electrons can be coherently superposed has been investigated. The Coherent Relativistic Nonlinear Thomson Scattered (C-RNTS) radiation makes it possible utilizing the ultra-short pulse nature of NTS radiation with a bunch of electrons, such as plasma or electron beams. A numerical simulation shows that a 25 attosecond X-ray pulse can be generated by irradiating an ultra-intense laser pulse of 4x10(19) W/cm2 on an ultra-thin solid target of 50 nm thickness, which is commercially available. The coherent condition can be easily extended to an electron beam from accelerators. Different from the solid target, much narrower electron beam is required for the generation of an attosecond pulse. Instead, this condition could be applied for the generation of intense Compton scattered X-rays with a...

  12. Probing quantum coherence in arrays of superconducting qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Alexandra; Rivas, Angel; Huelga, Susana; Plenio, Martin [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In the mid-80's the so-called phenomenon of dynamic localization was shown for a charged particle moving under the influence of a sinusoidally-varying time-dependent electric field, and more recently similar resonances in the conduction were found to be present also in ion channels. In this work we study the conditions under which this dynamic localization can be found in arrays of superconducting qubits. This phenomenon can serve as a signature of quantum coherence in such systems and moreover could be checked experimentally by various groups constructing arrays of superconducting flux qubits.

  13. Strong far field coherent scattering of ultraviolet radiation by holococcolithophores

    CERN Document Server

    Quintero-Torres, R; Torres, M; Estrada, M; Cros, L

    2007-01-01

    By considering the structure of holococcoliths (calcite plates that cover holococcolithophores, a haploid phase of the coccolithophore life cycle) as a photonic structure, we apply a discrete dipolar approximation to study the light backscattering properties of these algae. We show that some holococcolith structures have the ability to scatter the ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This property may represent an advantage for holococcolithophores possessing it, by allowing them to live higher in the water column than other coccolithophores.

  14. Anisotropy-assisted non-scattering coherent absorption of surface plasmon-polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatov, Anton I; Baranov, Denis G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control propagation of electromagnetic guided modes lies at the heart of integrated nanophotonics. Surface plasmon-polaritons are a class of guided modes which can be employed in integrated optical systems. Here, we present a theoretical design of a coherent surface plasmon absorber which can perfectly harvest energy of coherently incident surface plasmons without parasitic scattering into free space modes. Excitation of free space modes which usually accompanies scattering of a surface plasmon by an interface boundary is avoided due to specially tailored anisotropy of the absorber. The concept of coherent SPP absorber is analyzed numerically for spatially non-uniform and finite-size structures. We believe that our results will be important for the development of integrated nanoplasmonic systems.

  15. Extinction of Light and Coherent Scattering by a Single Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Thai Hien; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2016-01-01

    Coherently scattered light from a single quantum system promises to get a valuable quantum resource. In this letter an external laser field is efficiently coupled to a single nitrogen vacancy (NV-)center in diamond. By this it is possible to detect a direct extinction signal and estimate the NV's extinction cross-section. The exact amount of coherent and incoherent photons is determined against the saturation parameter, and reveals the optimal point of generating coherently scattered photons and an optimal point of excitation. A theoretical model of spectral diffusion allows to explain the deviation to an atom in free-space. The introduced experimental techniques are used to determine the properties of the tight focusing in an interference experiment, and allow for a direct determination of the Gouy-phase in a strongly focused beam.

  16. Ultrafast spectral interferometry of resonant secondary emission from quantum wells: From Rayleigh scattering to coherent emission from biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Shah, Jagdeep; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    1999-01-01

    Recent investigations of secondary emission from quantum well excitons following ultrafast resonant excitation have demonstrated an intricate interplay of coherent Rayleigh scattering and incoherent luminescence. We have very recently demonstrated that it is possible to isolate and time resolve...... invalidating the use of current theories using ensemble averages to describe our observations. Furthermore, we report here a new and hitherto unknown coherent scattering mechanism involving the two-photon coherence associated with the biexciton transition. The process leaves an exciton behind taking up...

  17. Isospin coherence and final-state scattering of disoriented chiral condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Z; Huang, Zheng; Suzuki, Mahiko

    1995-01-01

    We examine the validity of the notion of the coherent state for pions and the quantum scattering effect in the final state of pion emission. When the number of particles is large, the effect caused by the small but finite mass difference between the neutral and charged pions can add up substantially in the quantum evolution of an initially coherent state. As a result, the states with quite different numbers of neutral or charged pions are essentially incoherent. The importance of the quantum scattering in the final-state isospin charge distribution of a disoriented chiral condensate (DCC) is investigated. We find that the scattering effect significantly reduces the spectacular Centauro and anti-Centauro events. The deformation of a charge distribution dP/df predicted by the classical field theory is significant only for a DCC with the size of 10 fm or more.

  18. Coherent and incoherent Thomson scattering on an argon/hydrogen microwave plasma torch with transient behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusník, A.; Synek, P.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Zajíčková, L.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-10-01

    A new method of processing time-integrated coherent Thomson scattering spectra is presented, which provides not only the electron density and temperature but also information about the transient behaviour of the plasma. Therefore, it is an alternative to single-shot Thomson scattering measurements as long as the scattering is coherent. The method is applied to a microwave plasma torch operating in argon or a mixture of argon with hydrogen at atmospheric pressure. Electron densities up to 8\\cdot {{10}21} m-3 (ionization degree above 10-3) were observed, which is more than two times higher than presented in earlier works on comparable discharges. Additionally, a parametric study with respect to the argon/hydrogen ratio and the input power was carried out and the results are discussed together with earlier Stark broadening measurements on the same plasma.

  19. Coherent inelastic scattering in Si and TiAl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie, Alexander F; Colson, Tobias A; Whitfield, Harold J

    2004-11-01

    An image filter has been used to test a simple model describing the dynamical scattering of electrons that have suffered multiple interactions with plasmons. Semi-quantitative agreement is observed in both Si and TiAl under quasi two-beam conditions. In the latter material it is shown that the classical Hirsch, Howie, Whelan analysis of contrast due to dislocations can be carried out in images produced by electrons that have suffered as many as five interactions with plasmons and at thicknesses at which the unfiltered and zero loss images show no contrast.

  20. Coherent inelastic scattering in Si and TiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moodie, Alexander F. [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)]. E-mail: alexander.moodie@rmit.edu.au; Colson, Tobias A. [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Whitfield, Harold J. [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476V, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2004-11-15

    An image filter has been used to test a simple model describing the dynamical scattering of electrons that have suffered multiple interactions with plasmons. Semi-quantitative agreement is observed in both Si and TiAl under quasi two-beam conditions. In the latter material it is shown that the classical Hirsch, Howie, Whelan analysis of contrast due to dislocations can be carried out in images produced by electrons that have suffered as many as five interactions with plasmons and at thicknesses at which the unfiltered and zero loss images show no contrast.

  1. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bito, Kotatsu [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Analytical Science Research Laboratories, Kao Corporation, 2606 Akabane, Ichikai-Machi, Haga-Gun, Tochigi 321-3497 (Japan); Okuno, Masanari [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kano, Hideaki [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tenodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Leproux, Philippe [Institut de Recherche XLIM, UMR CNRS No. 7252, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); LEUKOS, ESTER Technopole, 1 Avenue d’Ester, 87069 Limoges Cedex (France); Couderc, Vincent [Institut de Recherche XLIM, UMR CNRS No. 7252, 123 Avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Hamaguchi, Hiro-o, E-mail: hhama@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute of Molecular Science and Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► We have developed a simultaneous measurement system of CARS and CSRS. ► We can obtain information on the electronic resonance effect with the measurement. ► The simultaneous measurement provides us with more reliable spectral information. - Abstract: We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ{sup (3)} without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM)

  2. Coherent population oscillation produced by saturating probe and pump fields on the intercombination Line

    CERN Document Server

    Vafafard, A; Agarwal, G S

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the experiments on coherent population oscillations and coher- ent population trapping on the intercombination line of 174Y b. The transition involves a change of the spin and thus can not be interpreted in terms of an effective Lambda system. The reported experiments are done in the regime where both pump and probe fields can saturate the transition. We demonstrate by both numerical and analytical calculations the appearance of the interference minimum as both pump and probe start saturating the transition. We present an analytical result for the threshold probe power when the interference minimum can appear. We also present de- tailed study of the appearance of the interference minimum when magnetic fields are applied. The magnetic fields not only create Zeeman splittings but in addition make the system open because of the couplings to other levels. We show the possibility of interference minimum at the position of subharmonic resonances.

  3. Application of THz probe radiation in low-coherent tomographs based on spatially separated counterpropagating beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuritsyn, I I; Shkurinov, A P; Nazarov, M M [Department of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Mandrosov, V I [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-31

    A principle of designing a high-resolution low-coherent THz tomograph, which makes it possible to investigate media with a high spatial resolution (in the range λ{sub 0} – 2λ{sub 0}, where λ{sub 0} is the average probe wavelength) is considered. The operation principle of this tomograph implies probing a medium by radiation with a coherence length of 8λ{sub 0} and recording a hologram of a focused image of a fixed layer of this medium using spatially separated counterpropagating object and reference beams. Tomograms of the medium studied are calculated using a temporal approach based on application of the time correlation function of probe radiation. (terahertz radiation)

  4. Sensitivity to oscillation with a sterile fourth generation neutrino from ultra-low threshold neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Mahapatra, Rupak; Mirabolfathi, Nader; Strigari, Louis E; Walker, Joel W

    2015-01-01

    We discuss prospects for probing short-range sterile neutrino oscillation using neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering with ultra-low energy ($\\sim 10$ eV - 100 eV) recoil threshold cryogenic Si and Ge detectors. The analysis is performed in the context of a specific and contemporary reactor-based experimental proposal, developed in cooperation with the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University, and references available technology based upon economical and scalable detector arrays. The baseline of the experiment is substantially shorter than existing measurements, as near as 1 meter from the reactor core, and is moreover variable, extending continuously up to a range of about 20~meters. This proximity and variety combine to provide extraordinary sensitivity to a wide spectrum of oscillation scales, while facilitating the tidy cancellation of leading systematic uncertainties in the reactor source. For expected exposures, we demonstrate sensitivity to first/fourth neutrino oscillation with a mass gap $\\D...

  5. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Joshua J., E-mail: joshuat@slac.stanford.edu; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Hwang, Harold Y. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Staub, Urs [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Johnson, Steven [ETH Zurich, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mitra, Ankush; Swiggers, Michele; Noonan, Peter; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes new instrumentation developments at the LCLS for materials studies using THz laser excitation and resonant soft X-ray scattering. This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm{sup −1} electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  6. Diagnosing lung cancer using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Yang, Yaliang; Xing, Jiong; Thrall, Michael J.; Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Fuhai; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Lung carcinoma is the most prevalent type of cancer in the world, and it is responsible for more deaths than other types of cancer. During diagnosis, a pathologist primarily aims to differentiate small cell carcinoma from non-small cell carcinoma on biopsy and cytology specimens, which is time consuming due to the time required for tissue processing and staining. To speed up the diagnostic process, we investigated the feasibility of using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a label-free strategy to image lung lesions and differentiate subtypes of lung cancers. Different mouse lung cancer models were developed by injecting human lung cancer cell lines, including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and small cell carcinoma, into lungs of the nude mice. CARS images were acquired from normal lung tissues and different subtypes of cancer lesions ex vivo using intrinsic contrasts from symmetric CH2 bonds. These images showed good correlation with the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections from the same tissue samples with regard to cell size, density, and cell-cell distance. These features are routinely used in diagnosing lung lesions. Our results showed that the CARS technique is capable of providing a visualizable platform to differentiate different kinds of lung cancers using the same pathological features without histological staining and thus has the potential to serve as a more efficient examination tool for diagnostic pathology. In addition, incorporating with suitable fiber-optic probes would render the CARS technique as a promising approach for in vivo diagnosis of lung cancer.

  7. Novel multiplexed low coherence interferometry endoscopic probe for analyzing the cervical epithelium in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek; Chu, Kengyeh K.; Crose, Michael; Desoto, Michael; Peters, Jennifer J.; Murtha, Amy P.; Wax, Adam

    2017-02-01

    The cervix is primarily composed of two types of epithelium: stratified squamous ectocervix and simple columnar endocervix. In between these two layers lies a metaplastic squamocolumnar junction commonly referred to as the transformation zone (T-zone). During puberty, the cervical epithelium undergoes dynamic changes including cervical ectropion and increased area and rates of metaplasia. Although these metaplastic changes have been linked to higher incidence of cervical cancer among young women, research in this field has been limited to surface analysis using computerized planimetry of colopophotographs. Here, we present a novel multiplexed low coherence interferometry (mLCI) system for interrogating the cervical epithelium. The system is comprised of 6 parallel Mach-Zehnder interferometers in a time-multiplexed configuration that increases throughput by 6-fold to realize a combined 36-channel acquisition. A custom designed endoscopic handheld probe is used to collect sparsely sampled, depth-resolved scattering intensity profiles (A-scans) from a large field of view (25 x 25 mm) on the cervical epithelium in vivo. The instrument incorporates white light imaging through a plastic fiber bundle to co-register the mLCI A-scans to colpophotographs which are analyzed by a clinician to manually segment the cervical epithelium. Our preliminary data shows significant differences in characteristic A-scans from endocervical and ectocervical epithelium. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using mLCI as both a research tool for studying the relationship between cervical ectopy and cancer as well as a clinical instrument for identifying the at-risk T-zone on the cervix in vivo as a means to improve biopsy targeting. Further analysis will be performed to develop an algorithm for distinguishing the mLCI A-scans of endocervical, ectocervical, and metaplastic epithelium in real time.

  8. Optical parametric oscillator-based light source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy: practical overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustlein, Sophie; Ferrand, Patrick; Walther, Nico; Brasselet, Sophie; Billaudeau, Cyrille; Marguet, Didier; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We present the assets and constraints of using optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) to perform point scanning nonlinear microscopy and spectroscopy with special emphasis on coherent Raman spectroscopy. The difterent possible configurations starting with one OPO and two OPOs are described in detail and with comments that are intended to be practically useful for the user. Explicit examples on test samples such as nonlinear organic crystal, polystyrene beads, and fresh mouse tissues are given. Special emphasis is given to background-free coherent Raman anti-Stokes scattering (CARS) imaging, including CARS hyperspectral imaging in a fully automated mode with commercial OPOs.

  9. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. © IMechE 2014.

  10. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Yuan, Jianmin; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in attosecond spectroscopy has enabled resolving electron-hole dynamics in real time. The correlated electron-hole dynamics and the resulted coherence are directly related to how fast the ionization is completed. How the laser-induced electron-hole coherence evolves and whether it can be utilized to probe the core dynamics are among the key questions in attosecond physics or even attosecond chemistry. In this work, we propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attosecond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  11. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  12. Coherent light scattering of heterogeneous randomly rough films and effective medium in the theory of electromagnetic wave multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berginc, G.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a general formalism based on Green's functions to calculate the coherent electromagnetic field scattered by a random medium with rough boundaries. The approximate expression derived makes it possible to determine the effective permittivity, which is generalised for a layer of an inhomogeneous random medium with different types of particles and bounded with randomly rough interfaces. This effective permittivity describes the coherent propagation of an electromagnetic wave in a random medium with randomly rough boundaries. We have obtained an expression, which contains the Maxwell - Garnett formula at the low-frequency limit, and the Keller formula; the latter has been proved to be in good agreement with experiments for particles whose dimensions are larger than a wavelength.

  13. Design and validation of an angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry fiber probe for in vivo clinical measurements of depth-resolved nuclear morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Terry, Neil G.; Woosley, John T.; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Wax, Adam

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Fourier-domain angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a /LCI) fiber probe designed for in vivo clinical application in gastrointestinal endoscopy. The a/LCI technique measures the depth-resolved angular scattering distribution to determine the size distribution and optical density of cell nuclei for assessing the health of epithelial tissues. Clinical application is enabled by an endoscopic fiber-optic probe that employs a 2.3-m-long coherent fiber bundle and is compatible with the standard 2.8-mm-diam biopsy channel of a gastroscope. The probe allows for real-time data acquisition by collecting the scattering from multiple angles in parallel, enabled by the Fourier domain approach. The performance of the probe is characterized through measurement of critical parameters. The depth-resolved sizing capability of the system is demonstrated using single- and double-layer microsphere phantoms with subwavelength sizing precision and accuracy achieved. Initial results from a clinical feasibility test are also presented to show in vivo application in the human esophagus.

  14. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yujie, E-mail: styojm@physics.tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  15. Combustion Diagnostics by Pure Rotational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipertz, Alfred; Seeger, Thomas

    Since its first use in Richard Chang's laboratory in 1982 in a comparative study with vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (VCARS) in a flame, pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (RCARS) has gained tremendous importance for gas temperature and relative species concentration measurements in combustion diagnostics. The field of application covers basic studies on diagnostics development and on flame research as well as its use in technical combustion systems, e.g., for the determination of the gas-phase temperature in the vaporizing spray of a gasoline direct injection (GDI) injector or for the simultaneous measurement of gas temperature and exhaust-gas-recirculation rate (EGR rate) in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. An overview is given on the fundamentals of the technique and on its most important technical applications.

  16. Classification of fracture and non-fracture groups by analysis of coherent X-ray scatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, A. J.; Evans, J. P. O.; Rogers, K. D.; Stone, N.; Greenwood, C.; Godber, S. X.; Clement, J. G.; Lyburn, I. D.; Martin, R. M.; Zioupos, P.

    2016-07-01

    Osteoporotic fractures present a significant social and economic burden, which is set to rise commensurately with the aging population. Greater understanding of the physicochemical differences between osteoporotic and normal conditions will facilitate the development of diagnostic technologies with increased performance and treatments with increased efficacy. Using coherent X-ray scattering we have evaluated a population of 108 ex vivo human bone samples comprised of non-fracture and fracture groups. Principal component fed linear discriminant analysis was used to develop a classification model to discern each condition resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 93% and 91%, respectively. Evaluating the coherent X-ray scatter differences from each condition supports the hypothesis that a causal physicochemical change has occurred in the fracture group. This work is a critical step along the path towards developing an in vivo diagnostic tool for fracture risk prediction.

  17. Assessment of the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient of biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, A. L. C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.

    2010-07-01

    New differential linear coherent scattering coefficient, μ CS, data for four biological tissue types (fat pork, tendon chicken, adipose and fibroglandular human breast tissues) covering a large momentum transfer interval (0.07≤ q≤70.5 nm -1), resulted from combining WAXS and SAXS data, are presented in order to emphasize the need to update the default data-base by including the molecular interference and the large-scale arrangements effect. The results showed that the differential linear coherent scattering coefficient demonstrates influence of the large-scale arrangement, mainly due to collagen fibrils for tendon chicken and fibroglandular breast samples, and triacylglycerides for fat pork and adipose breast samples at low momentum transfer region. While, at high momentum transfer, the μ CS reflects effects of molecular interference related to water for tendon chicken and fibroglandular samples and, fatty acids for fat pork and adipose samples.

  18. Intermediate scattering function for macromolecules in solutions probed by neutron spin echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-spin-echo method (NSE) is a powerful technique for studying internal dynamics of macromolecules in solutions because it can simultaneously probe length and time scales comparable to intramolecular density fluctuations of macromolecules. Recently, there has been increased, strong interest in studying protein internal motions using NSE. The coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) measured by NSE depends on internal, rotational, and translational motions of macromolecules in solutions. It is thus critical, but highly nontrivial, to separate the internal motion from other motions in order to properly understand protein internal dynamics. Even though many experiments are performed at relatively high concentrations, current theories of calculating the ISF of concentrated protein solutions are either inaccurate or flawed by incorrect assumptions for realistic protein systems with anisotropic shapes. Here, a theoretical framework is developed to establish the quantitative relationship of different motions included in the ISF. This theory based on the dynamic decoupling approximation is applicable to a wide range of protein concentrations, including dilute cases. It is also, in general, useful for studying many other types of macromolecule systems studied by NSE.

  19. Intermediate scattering function for macromolecules in solutions probed by neutron spin echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun

    2017-02-01

    The neutron-spin-echo method (NSE) is a powerful technique for studying internal dynamics of macromolecules in solutions because it can simultaneously probe length and time scales comparable to intramolecular density fluctuations of macromolecules. Recently, there has been increased, strong interest in studying protein internal motions using NSE. The coherent intermediate scattering function (ISF) measured by NSE depends on internal, rotational, and translational motions of macromolecules in solutions. It is thus critical, but highly nontrivial, to separate the internal motion from other motions in order to properly understand protein internal dynamics. Even though many experiments are performed at relatively high concentrations, current theories of calculating the ISF of concentrated protein solutions are either inaccurate or flawed by incorrect assumptions for realistic protein systems with anisotropic shapes. Here, a theoretical framework is developed to establish the quantitative relationship of different motions included in the ISF. This theory based on the dynamic decoupling approximation is applicable to a wide range of protein concentrations, including dilute cases. It is also, in general, useful for studying many other types of macromolecule systems studied by NSE.

  20. Common path ball lens probe for optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarpal; Yamada, Daisuke; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Common path probes are highly desirable for optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they reduce system complexity and cost. In this work we report an all-fiber common path side viewing monolithic probe for coronary artery imaging. Methods: Our common path probe was designed for spectrometer based Fourier domain OCT at 1310 nm wavelength. Light from the fiber expands in the coreless fiber region and then focussed by the ball lens. Reflection from ball lens-air interface served as reference signal. The monolithic ball lens probe was assembled within a 560 µmouter diameter drive shaft which was attached to a rotary junction. The drive shaft was placed inside an outer, transparent sheath of 800 µm diameter. Results: With a source input power of 25 mW, we could achieve sensitivity of 100.5 dB. The axial resolution of the system was found to be 15.6 µm in air and the lateral resolution (full width half maximum) was approximately 49 µm. As proof of principal, images of skin acquired using this probe demonstrated clear visualization of the stratum corneum, epidermis, and papillary dermis, along with sweat ducts. Conclusion: In this work we have demonstrated a monolithic, ball lens common, path probe for OCT imaging. The designed ball lens probe is easy to fabricate using a laser splicer. Based on the features and capability of common path probes to provide a simpler solution for OCT, we believe that this development will be an important enhancement for certain types of catheters.

  1. Development of fiber lasers and devices for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Erin Stranford

    As ultrafast laser technology has found expanding application in machining, spectroscopy, microscopy, surgery, and numerous other areas, the desire for inexpensive and robust laser sources has grown. Until recently, nonlinear effects in fiber systems due to the tight confinement of the light in the core have limited their performance. However, with advances in managing nonlinearity through pulse propagation physics and the use of large core fibers, the performance of fiber lasers can compete with that of their solid-state counterparts. As specific applications, such as coherent Raman scattering microscopy, emerge that stand to benefit from fiber technology, new performance challenges in areas such as laser noise are anticipated. This thesis studies nonlinear pulse propagation in fiber lasers and fiber parametric devices. Applications of dissipative solitons and self-similar pulse propagation to low-repetition rate oscillators that have the potential to simplify short-pulse amplification schemes will be examined. The rest of this thesis focuses on topics relevant to fiber laser development for coherent Raman scattering microscopy sources. Coherent pulse division and recombination inside the laser cavity will be introduced as an energy-scaling mechanism and demonstrated for a fiber soliton laser. The relative intensity noise properties of mode-locked fiber lasers, with a particular emphasis on normal dispersion lasers, will be explored in simulation and experiment. A fiber optical parametric oscillator will be studied in detail for low noise frequency conversion of picosecond pulses, and its utility for coherent Raman imaging will be demonstrated. Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses is used to generate picosecond pulses to pump this device, and this technique provides a route to future noise reduction in the system. Furthermore, this device forms a multimodal source capable of providing the picosecond pulses for coherent Raman scattering microscopy and the

  2. Remote-sensing gas measurements with coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakis, A.; Shneider, M. N.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    We measure the coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (CRBS) signal integral as a function of the recorded gas pressure in He, Co2, SF6, and air, and we confirm the already established quadratic dependence of the signal on the gas density. We propose the use of CRBS as an effective diagnostic for the remote measurement of gas' density (pressure) and temperature, as well as polarizability, for gases of known composition.

  3. Design of supercontinuum source for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; CHANG Sheng-jiang; ZHANG Yan-xin; ZHAO Xiang-ting

    2008-01-01

    A new method to obtain supemontinuum(SC)source for multiplex coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering(CARS)micros-copy is proposed.The nonlinear propagation in photonic-crystal fibers(PCF)of femtosecond pulse laser with central wavelength at 800.9 nm is studied with scalar wave theory.Based on the incident laser power and dispersion of PCF,super broadband source for multiplex CARS microscopy is designed.

  4. Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy: chemical imaging for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Conor L; Xie, X Sunney

    2008-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free imaging technique that is capable of real-time, nonperturbative examination of living cells and organisms based on molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Recent advances in detection schemes, understanding of contrast mechanisms, and developments of laser sources have enabled superb sensitivity and high time resolution. Emerging applications, such as metabolite and drug imaging and tumor identification, raise many exciting new possibilities for biology and medicine.

  5. Deorientation of PolSAR coherency matrix for volume scattering retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Garg, R. D.; Kushwaha, S. P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetric SAR data has proven its potential to extract scattering information for different features appearing in single resolution cell. Several decomposition modelling approaches have been developed to retrieve scattering information from PolSAR data. During scattering power decomposition based on physical scattering models it becomes very difficult to distinguish volume scattering as a result from randomly oriented vegetation from scattering nature of oblique structures which are responsible for double-bounce and volume scattering , because both are decomposed in same scattering mechanism. The polarization orientation angle (POA) of an electromagnetic wave is one of the most important character which gets changed due to scattering from geometrical structure of topographic slopes, oriented urban area and randomly oriented features like vegetation cover. The shift in POA affects the polarimetric radar signatures. So, for accurate estimation of scattering nature of feature compensation in polarization orientation shift becomes an essential procedure. The prime objective of this work was to investigate the effect of shift in POA in scattering information retrieval and to explore the effect of deorientation on regression between field-estimated aboveground biomass (AGB) and volume scattering. For this study Dudhwa National Park, U.P., India was selected as study area and fully polarimetric ALOS PALSAR data was used to retrieve scattering information from the forest area of Dudhwa National Park. Field data for DBH and tree height was collect for AGB estimation using stratified random sampling. AGB was estimated for 170 plots for different locations of the forest area. Yamaguchi four component decomposition modelling approach was utilized to retrieve surface, double-bounce, helix and volume scattering information. Shift in polarization orientation angle was estimated and deorientation of coherency matrix for compensation of POA shift was performed. Effect of

  6. Coherence and Relaxation in Potassium-Doped Helium Droplets Studied by Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienkemeier, F.; Meier, F.; Hägele, A.; Lutz, H. O.; Schreiber, E.; Schulz, C. P.; Hertel, I. V.

    1999-09-01

    Superfluid helium droplets are doped with potassium atoms to form complexes in which the metal atom is weakly bound to the cluster surface. The dynamics of these systems upon electronic excitation of the metal atom is probed by means of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Alignment of the excited potassium p orbital parallel to the cluster surface leads to quantum interferences, the decay of which gives information on the ultrafast perturbation of the induced atomic coherence by the superfluid environment; exciting the p state aligned perpendicularly, the strong repulsive interaction with the helium surface comes into play and the response of the helium environment is followed in time.

  7. Charge Coupled Devices for detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Moroni, Guillermo [Fermilab; Estrada, Juan [Fermilab; Paolini, Eduardo E. [Buenos Aires U.; Cancelo, Gustavo [Fermilab; Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Molina, Jorge [Asuncion Natl. U.

    2015-04-03

    In this article the feasibility of using charge coupled devices (CCD) to detect low-energy neutrinos through their coherent scattering with nuclei is analyzed. The detection of neutrinos through this standard model process has been elusive because of the small energy deposited in such interaction. Typical particle detectors have thresholds of a few keV, and most of the energy deposition expected from coherent scattering is well below this level. The CCD detectors discussed in this paper can operate at a threshold of approximately 30 eV, making them ideal for observing this signal. On a CCD array of 500 g located next to a power nuclear reactor the number of coherent scattering events expected is about 3000 events/year. Our results shows that a detection with a confidence level of 99% can be reached within 16 days of continuous operation; with the current 52 g detector prototype this time lapse extends to five months.

  8. Charge coupled devices for detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Moroni, Guillermo; Estrada, Juan; Paolini, Eduardo E.; Cancelo, Gustavo; Tiffenberg, Javier; Molina, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    In this article the feasibility of using charge coupled devices (CCD) to detect low-energy neutrinos through their coherent scattering with nuclei is analyzed. The detection of neutrinos through this standard model process has been elusive because of the small energy deposited in such interaction. Typical particle detectors have thresholds of a few keV, and most of the energy deposition expected from coherent scattering is well below this level. The CCD detectors discussed in this paper can operate at a threshold of approximately 30 eV, making them ideal for observing this signal. On a CCD array of 500 g located next to a power nuclear reactor the number of coherent scattering events expected is about 3000 events/year. Our results shows that a detection with a confidence level of 99% can be reached within 16 days of continuous operation; with the current 52 g detector prototype this time lapse extends to five months.

  9. Strong-field ionization inducing multi-electron-hole coherence probed by attosecond pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Zengxiu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new scenario to apply IR-pump-XUV-probe schemes to resolving strong field ionization induced and attosecond pulse driven electron-hole dynamics and coherence in real time. The coherent driving of both the infrared laser and the attoscond pulse correlates the dynamics of the core-hole and the valence-hole which leads to the otherwise forbidden absorption and emission of XUV photon. An analytical model is developed based on the strong-field approximation by taking into account of the essential multielectron configurations. The emission spectra from the core-valence transition and the core-hole recombination are found modulating strongly as functions of the time delay between the two pulses, which provides a unique insight into the instantaneous ionization and the interplay of the multi-electron-hole coherence.

  10. Structural colouration of mammalian skin: convergent evolution of coherently scattering dermal collagen arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Torres, Rodolfo H

    2004-05-01

    For more than a century, the blue structural colours of mammalian skin have been hypothesized to be produced by incoherent, Rayleigh or Tyndall scattering. We investigated the colour, anatomy, nanostructure and biophysics of structurally coloured skin from two species of primates - mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) and vervet monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) - and two species of marsupials - mouse opossum (Marmosa mexicana) and wooly opossum (Caluromys derbianus). We used two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier analysis of transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) of the collagen arrays in the primate tissues to test whether these structural colours are produced by incoherent or coherent scattering (i.e. constructive interference). The structural colours in Mandrillus rump and facial skin and Cercopithecus scrotum are produced by coherent scattering by quasi-ordered arrays of parallel dermal collagen fibres. The 2-D Fourier power spectra of the collagen arrays from Mandrillus and Cercopithecus reveal ring-shaped distributions of Fourier power at intermediate spatial frequencies, demonstrating a substantial nanostructure of the appropriate spatial frequency to produce the observed blue hues by coherent scattering alone. The Fourier power spectra and the observed reflectance spectra falsify assumptions and predictions of the incoherent, Rayleigh scattering hypothesis. Samples of blue Marmosa and Caluromys scrotum conform generally to the anatomy seen in Mandrillus and Cercopithecus but were not sufficiently well preserved to conduct numerical analyses. Colour-producing collagen arrays in mammals have evolved multiple times independently within the two clades of mammals known to have trichromatic colour vision. Mammalian colour-producing collagen arrays are anatomically and mechanistically identical to structures that have evolved convergently in the dermis of many lineages of birds, the tapetum of some mammals and the cornea of some fishes. These collagen arrays constitute quasi

  11. Scattering of a partially coherent Gaussian-Schell beam from a diffuse target in slant atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Sen; Li, Ya-Qing

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the scattering of partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model (GSM) beams from a diffuse target in slant double-passage atmospheric turbulence is studied and compared with that of fully coherent Gaussian beams. Using the cross-spectral density function of the GSM beams, we derive the expressions of the mutual coherence function, angle-of-arrival fluctuation, and covariance and variance of the intensity of the scattered field, taking into account the fluctuations of both the log-amplitude and phase. The numerical results are presented, and the influences of the wavelength, propagation distance, and waist radius on scattering properties are discussed. The perturbation region of the normalized intensity variance of the partially coherent GSM beam is smaller than that of the fully coherent Gaussian beam at the middle turbulence level. The normalized intensity variance of long-distance beam propagation is smaller than that of beam propagation along a short distance.

  12. Turbulence-Resolving Coherent Acoustic Sediment Flux Probe Device and Method for Using

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Timothy Peter

    2001-01-01

    Patent This invention describes a new method to estimate the sediment flux in front of a Coherent Acoustic Sediment Probe (CASP) instrument. Also, described is a newly invented Bistatic Doppler Velocity and Sediment Profiler (BDVSP) device for measuring sediment concentration, sediment velocity, and the resultant sediment transport in a sediment bed, and for the measurement of turbulent stresses and dissipation in the ocean. This invention describes a new method to ...

  13. Probing biological nanotopology via diffusion of weakly constrained plasmonic nanorods with optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Wu, Wei-Chen; Hill, David B.; Button, Brian; Casbas-Hernandez, Patricia; Troester, Melissa A; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Many diseases are characterized by nanostructural changes in connective fibers and soluble proteins, which can indicate or drive disease progression. Noninvasive methods sensitive to nanotopological changes in 3D tissue models can elucidate biophysical changes associated with disease progression. Nanoparticles probe their environment via their diffusion, which is impacted by the size and connectivity of pores into which they freely diffuse. Here, we show that optical coherence tomography prov...

  14. Turbulence-Resolving Coherent Acoustic Sediment Flux Probe Device and Method for Using

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Patent This invention describes a new method to estimate the sediment flux in front of a Coherent Acoustic Sediment Probe (CASP) instrument. Also, described is a newly invented Bistatic Doppler Velocity and Sediment Profiler (BDVSP) device for measuring sediment concentration, sediment velocity, and the resultant sediment transport in a sediment bed, and for the measurement of turbulent stresses and dissipation in the ocean. This invention describes a new method to ...

  15. Alignment, vibronic level splitting, and coherent coupling effects on the pump-probe polarization anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric R; Jonas, David M

    2011-04-28

    The pump-probe polarization anisotropy is computed for molecules with a nondegenerate ground state, two degenerate or nearly degenerate excited states with perpendicular transition dipoles, and no resonant excited-state absorption. Including finite pulse effects, the initial polarization anisotropy at zero pump-probe delay is predicted to be r(0) = 3/10 with coherent excitation. During pulse overlap, it is shown that the four-wave mixing classification of signal pathways as ground or excited state is not useful for pump-probe signals. Therefore, a reclassification useful for pump-probe experiments is proposed, and the coherent anisotropy is discussed in terms of a more general transition dipole and molecular axis alignment instead of experiment-dependent ground- versus excited-state pathways. Although coherent excitation enhances alignment of the transition dipole, the molecular axes are less aligned than for a single dipole transition, lowering the initial anisotropy. As the splitting between excited states increases beyond the laser bandwidth and absorption line width, the initial anisotropy increases from 3/10 to 4/10. Asymmetric vibrational coordinates that lift the degeneracy control the electronic energy gap and off-diagonal coupling between electronic states. These vibrations dephase coherence and equilibrate the populations of the (nearly) degenerate states, causing the anisotropy to decay (possibly with oscillations) to 1/10. Small amounts of asymmetric inhomogeneity (2 cm(-1)) cause rapid (130 fs) suppression of both vibrational and electronic anisotropy beats on the excited state, but not vibrational beats on the ground electronic state. Recent measurements of conical intersection dynamics in a silicon napthalocyanine revealed anisotropic quantum beats that had to be assigned to asymmetric vibrations on the ground electronic state only [Farrow, D. A.; J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 128, 144510]. Small environmental asymmetries likely explain the observed absence

  16. Second-Harmonic Scattering as a Probe of Structural Correlations in Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tocci, Gabriele; Wilkins, David M; Roke, Sylvie; Ceriotti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Second-harmonic scattering experiments of water and other bulk molecular liquids have long been assumed to be insensitive to interactions between the molecules. The measured intensity is generally thought to arise from incoherent scattering due to individual molecules. We introduce a method to compute the second-harmonic scattering pattern of molecular liquids directly from atomistic computer simulations, which takes into account the coherent terms. We apply this approach to large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water, where we show that nanosecond second-harmonic scattering experiments contain a coherent contribution arising from radial and angular correlations on a length scale of < 1 nm, much shorter than had been recently hypothesized (Shelton, D. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141). By combining structural correlations from simulations with experimental data (Shelton, D. P. J. Chem. Phys. 2014, 141), we can also extract an effective molecular hyperpolarizability in the liquid phase. This work ...

  17. Nonlinear coherent Thomson scattering from relativistic electron sheets as a means to produce isolated ultrabright attosecond x-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-C. Wu (武慧春

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A new way to generate intense attosecond x-ray pulses is discussed. It relies on coherent Thomson scattering (CTS from relativistic electron sheets. A double layer technique is used to generate planar solid-density sheets of monochromatic high-γ electrons with zero transverse momentum such that coherently backscattered light is frequency upshifted by factors up to 4γ^{2}. Here previous work [H.-C. Wu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 234801 (2010PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.234801] is extended to the regime of high-intensity probe light with normalized amplitude a_{0}>1 leading to nonlinear CTS effects such as pulse contraction and steepening. The results are derived both by particle-in-cell (PIC simulation in a boosted frame and by analytic theory. PIC simulation shows that powerful x-ray pulses (1 keV, 10   gigawatt can be generated. They call for experimental verification. Required prerequisites such as manufacture of nanometer-thick target foils is ready and ultrahigh contrast laser pulses should be within reach in the near future.

  18. Handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography: developments, applications, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, V.-F.; Demian, D.; Sinescu, C.; Cernat, R.; Dobre, G.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the handheld scanning probes that we have recently developed in our current project for biomedical imaging in general and for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in particular. OCT is an established, but dynamic imagistic technique based on laser interferometry, which offers micrometer resolutions and millimeters penetration depths. With regard to existing devices, the newly developed handheld probes are simple, light and relatively low cost. Their design is described in detail to allow for the reproduction in any lab, including for educational purposes. Two probes are constructed almost entirely from off-the-shelf components, while a third, final variant is constructed with dedicated components, in an ergonomic design. The handheld probes have uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer scanners therefore they achieve transversal sections through the biological sample investigated - in contrast to handheld probes equipped with bi-dimensional (2D) scanners that can also achieve volumetric (3D) reconstructions of the samples. These latter handheld probes are therefore also discussed, as well as the possibility to equip them with galvanometer 2D scanners or with Risley prisms. For galvanometer scanners the optimal scanning functions studied in a series of previous works are pointed out; these functions offer a higher temporal efficiency/duty cycle of the scanning process, as well as artifact-free OCT images. The testing of the handheld scanning probes in dental applications is presented, for metal ceramic prosthesis and for teeth.

  19. Spatial structure and coherence properties of Brillouin scatter from CO2 laser-target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchel, G. R.; Grek, B.; Johnston, T. W.; Pépin, H.; Church, P.; Martin, F.

    1982-05-01

    The spatial structure and coherence properties of 10.6-μm light scattered from CO2 laser-target interactions in oblique incidence show many unexpected features. It is found that the Brillouin backscatter is neither a phase conjugate nor a ray retrace of the incident beam. Rather, it shows a preference for scattering directions other than those exactly antiparallel to the incident beam, apparently related to the angular distribution of the scattering source and also of the plasma corona that serves as the Brillouin amplifying medium. As well, the backscatter phasefront is strongly perturbed with respect to the incident phasefront. This is an indication of turbulence in the corona and/or memory of the structure in the source that is then amplified. Small-scale structures seen in the reimaged backscatter are due to phase perturbation and cannot be simply interpreted as geometric images of a (filamented) source. The phasefront of light that is scattered obliquely from the plasma is much more coherent.

  20. High angle phase modulated low coherence interferometry for path length resolved Doppler measurements of multiply scattered light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Leeuwen, van Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2008-01-01

    We describe an improved method for coherence domain path length resolved measurements of multiply scattered photons in turbid media. An electro-optic phase modulator sinusoidally modulates the phase in the reference arm of a low coherence fiber optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer, at a high phase modu

  1. Role of strongly modulated coherence in transient evolution dynamics of probe absorption in a three-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical behaviour of atomic response in a closed three-level V-type atomic system with the variation of different relevant parameters to exhibit transient evolution of absorption, gain and transparency in the probe response. The oscillations in probe absorption and gain can be efficiently modulated by changing the values of the Rabi frequency, detuning and the collective phase involved in the system. The interesting outcome of the work is the generation of coherence controlled loop-structure with varying amplitudes in the oscillatory probe response of the probe field at various parameter conditions. The prominence of these structures is observed when the coherence induced in a one-photon excitation path is strongly modified by two-step excitations driven by the coherent fields operating in closed interaction contour. In contrast to purely resonant case, the time interval between two successive loops gets significantly reduced with the application of non-zero detuning in the coherent fields.

  2. Random lasing and coherent back scattering study in rhodamine 6G doped polymer optical fiber (POF) particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    C, Sreechandralijith K.; Peter, Jaison; Thankappan, Aparna; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate coherent back scattering and random lasing from an active random media of Rhodamine 6G doped polymer optical fiber particles on different sizes. Narrow emission modes are observed experimentally over a broad range of scattering strengths without requiring optical cavities. The particle-size dependence of transport mean free path, which measured from coherent backscattering measurements. Since the scattering mean free path is less than the emission wavelength, recurrent light scattering arises and provides coherent feedback for lasing. Laser emission from the sample observed in all directions. This observation also provides direct evidence for the existence of recurrent scattering of light. The lasing threshold intensity depends on the excitation volume, also the decrease of the lasing threshold at large particle size. The feedback for lasing originates mainly from backscattering of particles near the boundaries of the pumped region. Here, the lasing threshold depends strongly on the size distribution, dye concentration and intensity of excitation in the ensemble.

  3. Sensitivity to oscillation with a sterile fourth generation neutrino from ultralow threshold neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Gao, Yu; Kubik, Andrew; Mahapatra, Rupak; Mirabolfathi, Nader; Strigari, Louis E.; Walker, Joel W.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss prospects for probing short-range sterile neutrino oscillation using neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering with ultralow energy (˜10 - 100 eV ) recoil threshold cryogenic Ge detectors. The analysis is performed in the context of a specific and contemporary reactor-based experimental proposal, developed in cooperation with the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University, and references developing technology based upon economical and scalable detector arrays. The baseline of the experiment is substantially shorter than existing measurements, as near as about 2 m from the reactor core, and is moreover variable, extending continuously up to a range of about 10 m. This proximity and variety combine to provide extraordinary sensitivity to a wide spectrum of oscillation scales, while facilitating the tidy cancellation of leading systematic uncertainties in the reactor source and environment. With 100 eV sensitivity, for exposures on the order of 200 kg .y , we project an estimated sensitivity to first and fourth neutrino oscillation with a mass gap Δ m2˜1 eV2 at an amplitude sin22 θ ˜10-1, or Δ m2˜0.2 eV2 at unit amplitude. Larger exposures, around 5000 kg .y , together with 10 eV sensitivity are capable of probing more than an additional order of magnitude in amplitude.

  4. Final Report: Novel Nanowires as Probes of Electron Coherence and Correlations in Restricted Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natelson, Douglas

    2005-05-20

    This is a final summary report of the research conducted under DE-FG03-01ER45946, which was a research program using metal nanostructures to examine quantum coherence of electrons in normal and ferromagnetic metals. This program was the PI's first federal research grant, and by augmenting with other funds (Packard Foundation), this grant supported two graduate students during its duration. In normal metal nanostructures, quantum coherence was assessed by two independent techniques: weak localization magnetoresistance, and time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations (TDUCF noise). This work found that, in AuPd nanowires, the coherence information inferred from these two techniques were quantitatively consistent, even in the presence of magnetic impurity and phonon scattering. This confirmed theoretical expectations. However, in Ag and Au wires, the two techniques disagree, with noise measurements indicating a lower coherence length at low temperatures than weak localization. We have a candidate explanation for this, and are finishing these experiments. This work shows that subtleties remain in our understanding of coherence processes even in normal metals, particularly those involving the tunneling two-level systems that produce low frequency noise; this has relevance for quantum information processing implementations using metal devices. We have also studied time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations in ferromagnetic metals for the first time. The TDUCF in ferromagnetic nanowires show that the Cooperon channel of coherent processes is suppressed in these correlated materials. Furthermore, the surprisingly steep temperature dependence of the noise suggests that decoherence in these systems is through a different process than in normal metals. We are finishing measurements of ''magnetofingerprint'' conductance fluctuations in ferromagnetic metals to examine this unusual temperature dependence with an independent technique. This

  5. Ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber probe for full-field optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Saito, Daisuke; Shouji, Kou; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-12-01

    To extend the applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the fields of physiology and clinical medicine, less invasive, robust, and reliable optical probes are required. Thus, we demonstrate an ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber (SMMF) optical coherence microscopy (OCM) probe with a 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm total diameter, and 5.12 mm length. Imaging conditions and magnification were analyzed, and they correspond closely to the measured results. The dispersion of the SMMF was investigated, and the modal dispersion coefficient was found to be 2.3% of the material dispersion coefficient. The axial resolution was minimized at 2.15 μm using a 0.885-mm-thick dispersion compensator. The lateral resolution was evaluated to be 4.38 μm using a test pattern. The contrast of the OCM images was 5.7 times higher than that of the signal images owing to the coherence gate. The depth of focus and diameter of the field of view were measured to be 60 μm and 40-50 μm, respectively. OCM images of the dried fins of small fish (Medaka) were measured and internal structures could be recognized.

  6. Compton scattering as a probe for materials investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammadi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates into the feasibility of using gamma radiation Compton backscatter spectra as a means of material characterization, with the view to developing a portable, hand held probe for investigative purposes such as searching for illicit substances hidden in wall or car door cavities.

  7. Supersonic exciton gratings: coherent inter-polariton scattering in semiconductor microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    We report on a coherent nonlinear phenomenon in a semiconductor microcavity (SMC), which has no parallel for QW excitons. When two different polariton modes of the SMC are impulsively excited they undergo normal mode oscillations (NMOs) with coherent energy exchange between the exciton and the ca......We report on a coherent nonlinear phenomenon in a semiconductor microcavity (SMC), which has no parallel for QW excitons. When two different polariton modes of the SMC are impulsively excited they undergo normal mode oscillations (NMOs) with coherent energy exchange between the exciton...... and the cavity mode. In our experiment the two polaritons are excited with slightly different angles resulting in a travelling wave exciton grating. When a test polariton mode is excited it will scatter in the travelling grating producing amplitude modulation sidebands. This phenomenon produces a transient four......-wave mixing (TFWM) signal, which is shifted in frequency from that of the test beam by the NMO frequency, in our case, in the THz range corresponding to a grating velocity = 1 /spl times/ 10/sup 7/ m/s, which is four orders of magnitude larger than the sound velocity. The sample under investigation is a Ga...

  8. Optical scattering coefficient estimated by optical coherence tomography correlates with collagen content in ovarian tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Biswal, Nrusingh C.; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2011-09-01

    Optical scattering coefficient from ex vivo unfixed normal and malignant ovarian tissue was quantitatively extracted by fitting optical coherence tomography (OCT) A-line signals to a single scattering model. 1097 average A-line measurements at a wavelength of 1310 nm were performed at 108 sites obtained from 18 ovaries. The average scattering coefficient obtained from the normal tissue group consisted of 833 measurements from 88 sites was 2.41 mm-1 (+/-0.59), while the average coefficient obtained from the malignant tissue group consisted of 264 measurements from 20 sites was 1.55 mm-1 (+/-0.46). The malignant ovarian tissue showed significant lower scattering than the normal group (p collagen within OCT imaging depth was analyzed from the tissue histological section stained with Sirius Red. The average collagen area fraction (CAF) obtained from the normal tissue group was 48.4% (+/-12.3%), while the average CAF obtained from the malignant tissue group was 11.4% (+/-4.7%). A statistical significance of the collagen content was found between the two groups (p < 0.001). These results demonstrated that quantitative measurements of optical scattering coefficient from OCT images could be a potential powerful method for ovarian cancer detection.

  9. Ultrafast spectral interferometry of resonant secondary emission from quantum wells: From Rayleigh scattering to coherent emission from biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Dan; Shah, Jagdeep; Pfeiffer, L. N.

    1999-01-01

    Recent investigations of secondary emission from quantum well excitons following ultrafast resonant excitation have demonstrated an intricate interplay of coherent Rayleigh scattering and incoherent luminescence. We have very recently demonstrated that it is possible to isolate and time resolve...... the coherent field associated with Rayleigh component using ultrafast spectral interferometry or Tadpole, thus, obtaining substantial and new information of the nature of resonant secondary emission. Our observation demonstrates that Rayleigh scattering from static disorder is inherently a non-ergodic process...... invalidating the use of current theories using ensemble averages to describe our observations. Furthermore, we report here a new and hitherto unknown coherent scattering mechanism involving the two-photon coherence associated with the biexciton transition. The process leaves an exciton behind taking up...

  10. Novel technique for distributed fibre sensing based on coherent Rayleigh scattering measurements of birefringence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Soto, Marcelo A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-05-01

    A novel distributed fibre sensing technique is described and experimentally validated, based on birefringence measurements using coherent Rayleigh scattering. It natively provides distributed measurements of temperature and strain with more than an order of magnitude higher sensitivity than Brillouin sensing, and requiring access to a single fibre-end. Unlike the traditional Rayleigh-based coherent optical time-domain reflectometry, this new method provides absolute measurements of the measurand and may lead to a robust discrimination between temperature and strain in combination with another technique. Since birefringence is purposely induced in the fibre by design, large degrees of freedom are offered to optimize and scale the sensitivity to a given quantity. The technique has been validated in 2 radically different types of birefringent fibres - elliptical-core and Panda polarization-maintaining fibres - with a good repeatability.

  11. Theme Article - Time-Resolved X-Ray Scattering from Coherent Excitations in Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Mariano; Reis, David (SLAC)

    2010-10-22

    Recent advances in pulsed x-ray sources have opened up new opportunities to study the dynamics of matter directly in the time domain with picosecond to femtosecond resolution. In this article, we present recent results from a variety of ultrafast sources on time-resolved x-ray scattering from elementary excitations in periodic solids. A few representative examples are given on folded acoustic phonons, coherent optical phonons, squeezed phonons, and polaritons excited by femtosecond lasers. Next-generation light sources, such as the x-ray-free electron laser, will lead to improvements in coherence, flux, and pulse duration. These experiments demonstrate potential opportunities for studying matter far from equilibrium on the fastest time scales and shortest distances that will be available in the coming years.

  12. Correlation between intensity fluctuations induced by scattering of a partially coherent, electromagnetic wave from a quasi-homogeneous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Chang, Liping; Chen, Feinan

    2016-12-01

    Based on the first-order Born approximation, the correlation between intensity fluctuations is derived for a partially coherent, electromagnetic plane wave scattering from a spatially quasi-homogeneous medium. Young's pinholes are utilized to control the degree of coherence of the incident field. For the electromagnetic scattering case, it is shown that the CIF of the scattered field strongly depends on the degree of polarization of the incident wave, Young's pinhole parameter, effective radius and correlation length of the medium. The influences of these parameters on the CIF distributions are revealed by numerical calculations.

  13. Phase-shift effect of amplitude spread function on spectrum and image formation in coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which includes coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microspectroscopy, permits label-free hyperspectral imaging. We report the theoretical study of the phase-shift effect of the impulse response function on the spectral and image-forming properties of coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy. We show that the spectrum and image are influenced by not only the NA of objective for excitation (NA(ex)) but also that for signal collection (NA(col)), in association with the phase-shift effect. We discuss that, under the condition NA(ex)≠NA(col), both the spectrum and the image become deformed by the phase-shift effect, which can be applied to the direct measurement of the imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility in CARS spectroscopy. We point out that, even in SRS microscopy, the nonresonant background can contribute to the image formation and cause the artifact in the image.

  14. Probing polymer nanocomposite morphology by small angle neutron scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Puyam S Singh; Vinod K Aswal

    2008-11-01

    Polyamide nanocomposite films were prepared from nanometer-sized silica particles having particle radius of gyration (g) of about 66 Å and trimesoyl chloride--phenylene diamine-based polyamides having macromolecular units of about 100-140 Å. The nanoscale morphology of the samples was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). SANS reveals that silica nanoparticles interact well with the polyamide units only at limited silica loading.

  15. Probing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces by synchrotron radiation scattering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2014-06-10

    Droplets on artificially structured superhydrophobic surfaces represent quasi contact-free sample environments which can be probed by X-ray microbeams and nanobeams in the absence of obstructing walls. This review will discuss basic surface wettability concepts and introduce the technology of structuring surfaces. Quasi contact-free droplets are compared with contact-free droplets; processes related to deposition and evaporation on solid surfaces are discussed. Droplet coalescence based on the electrowetting effect allows the probing of short-time mixing and reaction processes. The review will show for several materials of biological interest that structural processes related to conformational changes, nucleation and assembly during droplet evaporation can be spatially and temporally resolved by raster-scan diffraction techniques. Orientational ordering of anisotropic materials deposited during solidification at pinning sites facilitates the interpretation of structural data. 2014 International Union of Crystallography.

  16. Broadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy employing photonic-crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Paulsen, Henrik Nørgaard; Birkedal, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy and microscopy based on a single Ti:sapphire oscillator and a nonlinear photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). The Stokes pulse is generated by spectral conversion of the laser pulse in a PCF. The pump pulse...... is either a highly chirped pulse or a pulse spectrally compressed in a PCF. A region of the Raman spectrum from 800 to 4000 cm(-1) is accessible with two different PCFs. Spectral resolution improvement by 1 order of magnitude over a transform-limited pump pulse utilizing a chirped or spectrally compressed...

  17. Large Gaseous Detector of Ionizing Eradiation in Search for Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Kopylov, A. V.; Orekhov, I. V.; Petukhov, V. V.; A. E. Solomatin

    2013-01-01

    We propose to search for coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS)by means of a triple-sectioned low background proportional counter. As a working medium we plan to use argon and xenon at about 1 MPa. We have shown using bench-scale assembly, that pulse-shape discrimination enables to effectively suppress noise pulses from electromagnetic disturbances and microphonic effect in the energy region where one expects signal from CNNS (from 20 eV to 100 eV) with a factor of about $10^3$. The calc...

  18. Large Gaseous Detector of Ionizing Eradiation in Search for Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Kopylov, A V; Petukhov, V V; Solomatin, A E

    2013-01-01

    We propose to search for coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS)by means of a triple-sectioned low background proportional counter. As a working medium we plan to use argon and xenon at about 1 MPa. We have shown using bench-scale assembly, that pulse-shape discrimination enables to effectively suppress noise pulses from electromagnetic disturbances and microphonic effect in the energy region where one expects signal from CNNS (from 20 eV to 100 eV) with a factor of about $10^3$. The calculation has been done of the background from neutrons, generated by muons of cosmic rays. The experimental setup has been proposed.

  19. High precision, medium flux rate CZT spectroscopy for coherent scatter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Joel A.; Hassan, Mehadi; Brady, David J.; Iniewski, Kris

    2016-05-01

    CZT detectors are primary candidates for many next-generation X-ray imaging systems. These detectors are typically operated in either a high precision, low flux spectroscopy mode or a low precision, high flux photon counting mode. We demonstrate a new detector configuration that enables operation in a high precision, medium flux spectroscopy mode, which opens the potential for a variety of new applications in medical imaging, non-destructive testing and baggage scanning. In particular, we describe the requirements of a coded aperture coherent scattering X-ray system that can perform fast imaging with accurate material discrimination.

  20. An explosives detection system for airline security using coherent x-ray scattering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Robert W.; Mahdavieh, Jacob; Smith, Richard C.; Subramanian, Ravi

    2008-08-01

    L-3 Communications Security and Detection Systems (SDS) has developed a new system for automated alarm resolution in airline baggage Explosive Detection Systems (EDS) based on coherent x-ray scattering spectroscopy. The capabilities of the system were demonstrated in tests with concealed explosives at the Transportation Security Laboratory and airline passenger baggage at Orlando International Airport. The system uses x-ray image information to identify suspicious objects and performs targeted diffraction measurements to classify them. This extra layer of detection capability affords a significant reduction in the rate of false alarm objects that must presently be resolved by opening passenger bags for hand inspection.

  1. Ultra-Low-Energy Germanium Detector for Neutrino-Nucleus Coherent Scattering and Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Henry T

    2008-01-01

    The status and plans of a research program on the development of ultra-low-energy germanium detectors with sub-keV sensitivities are reported. We survey the scientific goals which include the observation of neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering, the studies of neutrino magnetic moments, as well as the searches of WIMP dark matter. In particular, a threshold of 100-200 eV and a sub-keV background comparable to underground experiments were achieved with prototype detectors. New limits were set for WIMPs with mass between 3-6 GeV. The prospects of the realization of full-scale experiments are discussed.

  2. Polarized multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using a picosecond laser and a fiber supercontinuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Sébastien; Courjaud, Antoine; Mottay, Eric; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    We perform multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) micro-spectroscopy with a picosecond pulsed laser and a broadband supercontinuum (SC) generated in photonic crystal fiber. CARS signal stability is achieved using an active fiber coupler that avoids thermal and mechanical drifts. We obtain multiplex CARS spectra for test liquids in the 600-2000 cm(-1) spectral range. In addition we investigate the polarization dependence of the CARS spectra when rotating the pump beam linear polarization state relative to the linearly polarized broad stokes SC. From these polarization measurements we deduce the Raman depolarization ratio, the resonant versus nonresonant contribution, the Raman resonance frequency, and the linewidth.

  3. Resolving directional ambiguity in dynamic light scattering-based transverse motion velocimetry in optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic Light Scattering-based Optical Coherence Tomography approaches have been successfully implemented to measure total transverse (xy) flow speed, but are unable to resolve directionality. We propose a method to extract directional velocity in the transverse plane by introducing a variable scan bias to our system. Our velocity estimation, which yields the directional velocity component along the scan axis, is also independent of any point spread function calibration. By combining our approach with Doppler velocimetry, we show three-component velocimetry that is appropriately dependent on latitudinal and longitudinal angle. PMID:24487855

  4. Determination of functional collective motions in a protein at atomic resolution using coherent neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Liang; Jain, Nitin; Cheng, Xiaolin; Bernal, Ana; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein function often depends on global, collective internal motions. However, the simultaneous quantitative experimental determination of the forms, amplitudes, and time scales of these motions has remained elusive. We demonstrate that a complete description of these large-scale dynamic modes can be obtained using coherent neutron-scattering experiments on perdeuterated samples. With this approach, a microscopic relationship between the structure, dynamics, and function in a protein, cytochrome P450cam, is established. The approach developed here should be of general applicability to protein systems. PMID:27757419

  5. Phonons in Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium Studied by Inelastic Coherent Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits

    1973-01-01

    Phonon dispersion relations have been measured by coherent neutron scattering in solid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium. The phonon energies are found to be nearly equal in the two solids, the highest energy in each case lying close to 10 meV. The pressure and temperature dependence of the phonon...... energies have been measured in ortho-deuterium and the lattice change determined by neutron diffraction. When a pressure of 275 bar is applied, the phonon energies are increased by about 10%, and heating the crystal to near the melting point decreases them by about 7%. The densities of states, the specific...

  6. Interference spectroscopy with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of noisy broadband pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Shapiro, Evgeny A; Milner, Valery

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new technique for comparing two Raman active samples. The method employs optical interference of the signals generated via coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of broadband laser pulses with noisy spectra. It does not require spectrally resolved detection, and no prior knowledge about either the Raman spectrum of the samples, or the spectrum of the incident light is needed. We study the proposed method theoretically, and demonstrate it in a proof-of-principle experiment on Toluene and ortho-Xylene samples.

  7. Improvement of Test of Solar Neutrino Coherent Scattering with Torsion Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Guo-Qiang; YANG Shan-Qing; TU Liang-Cheng; LUO Jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ A torsion pendulum containing two sapphire crystals and two lead rings is used to test Weber's theory of enhanced solar neutrino coherent scattering. Our experiment gives a null result for the diurnal force with a noise level of 3.8 ×10-14N, which is 526 times smaller than the predicted value of Weber's theory, and directly rules out Weber's theory and the experimental result. This experiment also reveals a test of the weak equivalence principle with η(Al2O3, Pb)= (0.8±3.1)×10-10 for masses falling toward the Sun.

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS): Instrumentation and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djaker, Nadia [Institut Fresnel, Mosaic team, CNRS UMR 6133, Universite Paul Cezanne (Aix-Marseille III), F-1397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Lenne, Pierre-Francois [Institut Fresnel, Mosaic team, CNRS UMR 6133, Universite Paul Cezanne (Aix-Marseille III), F-1397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Marguet, Didier [Centre d' Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Universite de la Mediterranee, Case 906, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); INSERM, UMR631, Marseille (France); CNRS, UMR6102, Marseille (France); Colonna, Anne [L' Oreal Recherche, Aulnay Sous bois (France); Hadjur, Christophe [L' Oreal Recherche, Aulnay Sous bois (France); Rigneault, Herve [Institut Fresnel, Mosaic team, CNRS UMR 6133, Universite Paul Cezanne (Aix-Marseille III), F-1397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)]. E-mail: herve.rigneault@fresnel.fr

    2007-02-01

    Recent advances in laser physics have permitted the development of a new kind of microscopy based on stimulated Raman scattering. This new technique known as Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. We review recent advances in CARS microscopy, with applications to chemical and biological systems. We also present an application of CARS microscopy with high optical resolution and spectral selectivity, in resolving structures in surface ex vivo stratum corneum by looking at the CH{sub 2} stretching vibrational band. A strong CARS signal is backscattered from an intense forward generated CARS signal in thick samples. This makes noninvasive imaging of deep structures possible, without labeling or chemical treatments.

  9. Spatial observations by the CUTLASS coherent scatter radar of ionospheric modification by high power radio waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Bond

    Full Text Available Results are presented from an experimental campaign in April 1996, in which the new CUTLASS (Co-operative UK twin-located Auroral Sounding System coherent scatter radar was employed to observe artificial field aligned irregularities (FAI generated by the EISCAT (European Incoherent SCATter heating facility at Tromsø, Norway. The distribution of backscatter intensity from within the heated region has been investigated both in azimuth and range with the Finland component of CUTLASS, and the first observations of artificial irregularities by the Iceland radar are also presented. The heated region has been measured to extend over a horizontal distance of 170±50km, which by comparison with a model of the heater beam pattern corresponds to a threshold electric field for FAI of between 0.1 and 0.01V/m. Differences between field-aligned and vertical propagation heating are also presented.

  10. Neutron Background Characterization for a Coherent Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering experiment at SNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerling, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CNNS) is a theoretical well-grounded, but as-yet unverified process. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) may provide an optimal platform for detection of CNNS, possibly with existing detector technology. A proto-collaboration of groups from several institutions has come together to investigate this option and propose an experiment for the first-time observation of CNNS. Currently, the largest risk to such an experiment comes from an unknown background of beam-induced high-energy neutrons that penetrate the existing SNS concrete shielding. We have deployed a neutron scatter camera at the SNS during beam operation and performed preliminary measurements of the neutron backgrounds at a promising experimental location. In order to measure neutrons as high as 100 MeV, we needed to make modifications to the neutron scatter camera and expand its capabilities beyond its standard operating range of 1-14MeV. We have identified sources of high-energy neutrons and continue to investigate other possible locations that may allow a successful CNNS experiment to go forward. The imaging capabilities of the neutron scatter camera will allow more optimal shielding designs that take into account neutron flux anisotropies at the selected experiment locations.

  11. Probing the dynamics of Andreev states in a coherent normal/superconducting ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Ferrier, M; Tikhonov, K; Virtanen, P; Heikkilä, T T; Feigelman, M; Guéron, S; Bouchiat, H

    2011-01-01

    The supercurrent that establishes between two superconductors connected through a normal N mesoscopic link is carried by quasiparticule states localized within the link, the "Andreev bound states (ABS)". Whereas the dc properties of this supercurrent in SNS junctions are now well understood, its dynamical properties are still an unresolved issue. In this letter we probe this dynamics by inductively coupling an NS ring to a multimode superconducting resonator, thereby implementing both a phase bias and current detection at high frequency. Whereas at very low temperatures we essentially measure the phase derivative of the supercurrent, at higher temperature we find a surprisingly strong frequency dependence in the current response of the ring: the ABS do not follow adiabatically the phase modulation. This experiment also illustrates a new tool to probe the fundamental time scales of phase coherent systems that are decoupled from macroscopic normal contacts and thermal baths.

  12. Possibility of single biomolecule imaging with coherent amplification of weak scattering x-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2008-10-01

    The number of photons produced by coherent x-ray scattering from a single biomolecule is very small because of its extremely small elastic-scattering cross section and low damage threshold. Even with a high x-ray flux of 3 x 10;{12} photons per 100-nm -diameter spot and an ultrashort pulse of 10 fs driven by a future x-ray free electron laser (x-ray FEL), it has been predicted that only a few 100 photons will be produced from the scattering of a single lysozyme molecule. In observations of scattered x rays on a detector, the transfer of energy from wave to matter is accompanied by the quantization of the photon energy. Unfortunately, x rays have a high photon energy of 12 keV at wavelengths of 1A , which is required for atomic resolution imaging. Therefore, the number of photoionization events is small, which limits the resolution of imaging of a single biomolecule. In this paper, I propose a method: instead of directly observing the photons scattered from the sample, we amplify the scattered waves by superimposing an intense coherent reference pump wave on it and record the resulting interference pattern on a planar x-ray detector. Using a nanosized gold particle as a reference pump wave source, we can collect 10;{4}-10;{5} photons in single shot imaging where the signal from a single biomolecule is amplified and recorded as two-dimensional diffraction intensity data. An iterative phase retrieval technique can be used to recover the phase information and reconstruct the image of the single biomolecule and the gold particle at the same time. In order to precisely reconstruct a faint image of the single biomolecule in Angstrom resolution, whose intensity is much lower than that of the bright gold particle, I propose a technique that combines iterative phase retrieval on the reference pump wave and the digital Fourier transform holography on the sample. By using a large number of holography data, the three-dimensional electron density map can be assembled.

  13. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Saiz, E.; Riley, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Gregori, G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; Clarke, R.J.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.M.; Spindloe, C. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX (United Kingdom); Gericke, D.O.; Vorberger, J.; Wunsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Barbrel, B.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Laser Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique - Universite Paris-6, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Freeman, R.R.; Weber, R.L.; Van Woerkom, L. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.; Neumayer, P.; Price, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Khattak, F.Y. [Department of Physics, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat-26000, NWFP (Pakistan); Pelka, A.; Roth, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    One of the grand challenges of contemporary physics is understanding strongly interacting quantum systems comprising such diverse examples as ultracold atoms in traps, electrons in high-temperature superconductors and nuclear matter. Warm dense matter, defined by temperatures of a few electron volts and densities comparable with solids, is a complex state of such interacting matter. Moreover, the study of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where it is encountered during the implosion phase, and it also represents laboratory analogues of astrophysical environments found in the core of planets and the crusts of old stars. Here we demonstrate how warm dense matter states can be diagnosed and structural properties can be obtained by inelastic X-ray scattering measurements on a compressed lithium sample. Combining experiments and ab initio simulations enables us to determine its microscopic state and to evaluate more approximate theoretical models for the ionic structure. (authors)

  14. Rat brain imaging using full field optical coherence microscopy with short multimode fiber probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Manabu; Saito, Daisuke; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrated FF OCM(full field optical coherence microscopy) using an ultrathin forward-imaging SMMF (short multimode fiber) probe of 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm diameter, and 7.4 mm length, which is a typical graded-index multimode fiber for optical communications. The axial resolution was measured to be 2.20 μm, which is close to the calculated axial resolution of 2.06 μm. The lateral resolution was evaluated to be 4.38 μm using a test pattern. Assuming that the FWHM of the contrast is the DOF (depth of focus), the DOF of the signal is obtained at 36 μm and that of the OCM is 66 μm. The contrast of the OCT images was 6.1 times higher than that of the signal images due to the coherence gate. After an euthanasia the rat brain was resected and cut at 2.6mm tail from Bregma. Contacting SMMF to the primary somatosensory cortex and the agranular insular cortex of ex vivo brain, OCM images of the brain were measured 100 times with 2μm step. 3D OCM images of the brain were measured, and internal structure information was obtained. The feasibility of an SMMF as an ultrathin forward-imaging probe in full-field OCM has been demonstrated.

  15. Non-invasive classification of breast microcalcifications using x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghammraoui, Bahaa; Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the use of energy dispersive x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (ED-CSCT) as a non-invasive diagnostic method to differentiate between type I and type II breast calcifications. This approach is sensitive to the differences of composition and internal crystal structure of different types of microcalcifications. The study is carried out by simulating a CSCT system with a scanning pencil beam, considering a polychromatic x-ray source and an energy-resolving photon counting detector. In a first step, the multidimensional angle and energy distributed CSCT data is reduced to the projection-space distributions of only a few components, corresponding to the expected target composition: adipose, glandular tissue, weddellite (calcium oxalate) for type I calcifications, and hydroxyapatite for type II calcifications. The maximum-likelihood estimation of scatter components algorithm used, operating in the projection space, takes into account the polychromatic source, the detector response function and the energy dependent attenuation. In the second step, component images are reconstructed from the corresponding estimated component projections using filtered backprojection. In a preliminary step the coherent scatter differential cross sections for hydroxyapatite and weddellite minerals were determined experimentally. The classification of type I or II calcifications is done using the relative contrasts of their components as the criterion. Simulation tests were carried out for different doses and energy resolutions for multiple realizations. The results were analyzed using relative/receiver operating characteristic methodology and show good discrimination ability at medium and higher doses. The noninvasive CSCT technique shows potential to further improve the breast diagnostic accuracy and reduce the number of breast biopsies.

  16. Source of statistical noises in the Monte Carlo sampling techniques for coherently scattered photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Detailed comparisons of the predictions of the Relativistic Form Factors (RFFs) and Modified Form Factors (MFFs) and their advantages and shortcomings in calculating elastic scattering cross sections can be found in the literature. However, the issues related to their implementation in the Monte Carlo (MC) sampling for coherently scattered photons is still under discussion. Secondly, the linear interpolation technique (LIT) is a popular method to draw the integrated values of squared RFFs/MFFs (i.e. A(Z, v(i)²)) over squared momentum transfer (v(i)² = v(1)²,......, v(59)²). In the current study, the role/issues of RFFs/MFFs and LIT in the MC sampling for the coherent scattering were analyzed. The results showed that the relative probability density curves sampled on the basis of MFFs are unable to reveal any extra scientific information as both the RFFs and MFFs produced the same MC sampled curves. Furthermore, no relationship was established between the multiple small peaks and irregular step shapes (i.e. statistical noise) in the PDFs and either RFFs or MFFs. In fact, the noise in the PDFs appeared due to the use of LIT. The density of the noise depends upon the interval length between two consecutive points in the input data table of A(Z, v(i)²) and has no scientific background. The probability density function curves became smoother as the interval lengths were decreased. In conclusion, these statistical noises can be efficiently removed by introducing more data points in the A(Z, v(i)²) data tables.

  17. Probing near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Duesterer, S; Faeustlin, R R; Laarmann, T; Redlin, H [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bornath, T; Goede, S; Irsig, R; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Przystawik, A [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, Universitaetsplatz 3, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Doeppner, T; Glenzer, S H [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Av., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Foerster, E [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Fortmann, C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gregori, G; Mithen, J [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Lee, H J; Nagler, B [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Li, B [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Radcliffe, P, E-mail: sven.toleikis@desy.d [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-10-14

    X-ray scattering using highly brilliant x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) radiation provides new access to probe free-electron density, temperature and ionization in near-solid density plasmas. First experiments at the soft x-ray FEL FLASH at DESY, Hamburg, show the capabilities of this technique. The ultrashort FEL pulses in particular can probe equilibration phenomena occurring after excitation of the plasma using ultrashort optical laser pumping. We have investigated liquid hydrogen and find that the interaction of very intense soft x-ray FEL radiation alone heats the sample volume. As the plasma establishes, photons from the same pulse undergo scattering, thus probing the transient, warm dense matter state. We find a free-electron density of (2.6 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and an electron temperature of 14 {+-} 3.5 eV. In pump-probe experiments, using intense optical laser pulses to generate more extreme states of matter, this interaction of the probe pulse has to be considered in the interpretation of scattering data. In this paper, we present details of the experimental setup at FLASH and the diagnostic methods used to quantitatively analyse the data.

  18. Detecting polymeric nanoparticles with coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microscopy in tissues exhibiting fixative-induced autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, N. L.; Godfrey, L.; Lalatsa, A.; Serrano, D. R.; Uchegbu, I. F.; Schatzlein, A.; Moger, J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in pharmaceutical nanotechnology have enabled the development of nano-particulate medicines with enhanced drug performance. Although the fate of these nano-particles can be macroscopically tracked in the body (e.g. using radio-labeling techniques), there is little information about the sub-cellular scale mechanistic processes underlying the particle-tissue interactions, or how these interactions may correlate with pharmaceutical efficacy. To rationally engineer these nano-particles and thus optimize their performance, these mechanistic interactions must be fully understood. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy provides a label-free means for visualizing biological samples, but can suffer from a strong non-resonant background in samples that are prepared using aldehyde-based fixatives. We demonstrate how formalin fixative affects the detection of polymeric nanoparticles within kidneys following oral administration using CARS microscopy, compared with samples that were snap-frozen. These findings have implications for clinical applications of CARS for probing nanoparticle distribution in tissue biopsies.

  19. Polarization-Dependent Interference of Coherent Scattering from Orthogonal Dipole Moments of a Resonantly Excited Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Flagg, Edward B.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant photoluminescence excitation (RPLE) spectra of a neutral InGaAs quantum dot show unconventional line shapes that depend on the detection polarization. We characterize this phenomenon by performing polarization-dependent RPLE measurements and simulating the measured spectra with a three-level quantum model. The spectra are explained by interference between fields coherently scattered from the two fine structure split exciton states, and the measurements enable extraction of the steady-state coherence between the two exciton states.

  20. The active layer morphology of organic solar cells probed with grazing incidence scattering techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2014-12-10

    Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) provides unique insights into the morphology of active materials and thin film layers used in organic photovoltaic devices. With grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) the molecular arrangement of the material is probed. GIWAXS is sensitive to the crystalline parts and allows for the determination of the crystal structure and the orientation of the crystalline regions with respect to the electrodes. With grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) the nano-scale structure inside the films is probed. As GISAXS is sensitive to length scales from nanometers to several hundred nanometers, all relevant length scales of organic solar cells are detectable. After an introduction to GISAXS and GIWAXS, selected examples for application of both techniques to active layer materials are reviewed. The particular focus is on conjugated polymers, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT).

  1. Resolving phase information of the optical local density of state with scattering near-field probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, R.; Vincent, R.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically discuss the link between the phase measured using a scattering optical scanning near-field microscopy (s-SNOM) and the local density of optical states (LDOS). A remarkable result is that the LDOS information is directly included in the phase of the probe. Therefore by monitoring the spatial variation of the trans-scattering phase, we locally measure the phase modulation associated with the probe and the optical paths. We demonstrate numerically that a technique involving two-phase imaging of a sample with two different sized tips should allow to obtain the image the pLDOS. For this imaging method, numerical comparison with extinction probe measurement shows crucial qualitative and quantitative improvement.

  2. Fundamental Limits to Coherent Scattering and Photon Coalescence from Solid-State Quantum Emitters [arXiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iles-Smith, Jake; McCutcheon, Dara; Mørk, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The desire to produce high-quality single photons for applications in quantum information science has lead to renewed interest in exploring solid-state emitters in the weak excitation regime. Under these conditions it is expected that photons are coherently scattered, and so benefit from...... find that the sideband resulting from non-Markovian relaxation of the phonon environment leads to a fundamental limit to the fraction of coherently scattered light and to the visibility of two-photon coalescence at weak driving, both of which are absent for atomic systems or within simpler Markovian...

  3. Ultra-thin and flexible endoscopy probe for optical coherence tomography based on stepwise transitional core fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangbeom; Chae, Yugyeong; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Moon, Sucbei

    2015-05-01

    We present an ultra-thin fiber-body endoscopy probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT) which is based on a stepwise transitional core (STC) fiber. In a minimalistic design, our probe was made of spliced specialty fibers that could be directly used for beam probing optics without using a lens. In our probe, the OCT light delivered through a single-mode fiber was efficiently expanded to a large mode field of 24 μm diameter for a low beam divergence. The size of our probe was 85 μm in the probe's diameter while operated in a 160-μm thick protective tubing. Through theoretical and experimental analyses, our probe was found to exhibit various attractive features in terms of compactness, flexibility and reliability along with its excellent fabrication simplicity.

  4. Determination of thorium (IV) using isophthalaldehyde-tetrapyrrole as probe by resonance light scattering, second-order scattering and frequency-doubling scattering spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Xue, Jinhua; Xiao, Xilin; Xu, Li; Jiang, Min; Peng, Pengcheng; Liao, Lifu

    2017-12-05

    The coordination reaction of thorium (IV) with a ditopic bidentate ligand to form supramolecular polymer was studied by resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra, second-order scattering (SOS) spectra and frequency-doubling scattering (FDS) spectra, respectively. The ditopic bidentate ligand is isophthalaldehyde-tetrapyrrole (IPTP). It was synthesized through a condensation reaction of isophthalaldehyde with pyrrole. The formation of supramolecular polymer results in remarkable intensity enhancements of the three light scattering signals. The maximum scattering wavelengths of RLS, FDS and SOS were 290, 568 and 340nm, respectively. The reaction was used to establish new light scattering methods for the determination of thorium (IV) by using IPTP as probe. Under optimum conditions, the intensity enhancements of RLS, SOS and FDS were directly proportional to the concentration of thorium (IV) in the ranges of 0.01 to 1.2μgmL(-1), 0.05 to 1.2μgmL(-1) and 0.05 to 1.2μgmL(-1), respectively. The detection limits were 0.003μgmL(-1), 0.012μgmL(-1) and 0.021μgmL(-1), respectively. The methods were suitable for analyzing thorium (IV) in actual samples. The results show acceptable recoveries and precision compared with a reference method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular Orientation in Dry and Hydrated Cellulose Fibers: A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerley, Maxwell; Younger, Rebecca; Valenton, Tiffany; Oertel, David C.; Ward, Jimmie L.; Potma, Eric O.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is combined with spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to interrogate the molecular alignment in dry and hydrated cellulose fibers. Two types of cellulose were investigated: natural cellulose I in cotton fibers and regenerated cellulose II in rayon fibers. On the basis of the orientation of the methylene symmetric stretching vibration, the molecular alignment of cellulose microfibr...

  6. Darkfield microspectroscopy of nanostructures on silver tip-enhanced Raman scattering probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Tamitake, E-mail: tamitake-itou@aist.go.jp [Nano-Bioanalysis Team, Health Technology Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0395 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yuko S., E-mail: yamayulab@gmail.com [Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0396 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshiaki [UNISOKU Co. Ltd., 2-4-3 Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131 (Japan); Kitahama, Yasutaka; Ozaki, Yukihiro [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2016-01-11

    We report an evaluation method employing darkfield microspectroscopy for silver probes used in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). By adjusting the darkfield illumination, the diffracted light from the probe outlines disappears and the diffracted light from the surface nanostructures and tips of the probes appears as colorful spots. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the spectral variations in these spots reflect the shapes of the surface nanostructures. The tip curvatures correlate to the spectral maxima of their spots. Temporal color changes in the spots indicate the deterioration due to the oxidation of the silver surfaces. These results show that the proposed method is useful for in situ evaluation of plasmonic properties of TERS probes.

  7. In Situ and In Vivo Molecular Analysis by Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Sheng; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-06-01

    Coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy is a high-speed vibrational imaging platform with the ability to visualize the chemical content of a living specimen by using molecular vibrational fingerprints. We review technical advances and biological applications of CRS microscopy. The basic theory of CRS and the state-of-the-art instrumentation of a CRS microscope are presented. We further summarize and compare the algorithms that are used to separate the Raman signal from the nonresonant background, to denoise a CRS image, and to decompose a hyperspectral CRS image into concentration maps of principal components. Important applications of single-frequency and hyperspectral CRS microscopy are highlighted. Potential directions of CRS microscopy are discussed.

  8. Delivery of picosecond lasers in multimode fibers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Yang, Yaliang; Luo, Pengfei; Gao, Liang; Wong, Kelvin K; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-06-07

    We investigated the possibility of using standard commercial multimode fibers (MMF), Corning SMF28 fibers, to deliver picosecond excitation lasers for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging. We theoretically and/or experimentally analyzed issues associated with the fiber delivery, such as dispersion length, walk-off length, nonlinear length, average threshold power for self-phase modulations, and four-wave mixing (FWM). These analyses can also be applied to other types of fibers. We found that FWM signals are generated in MMF, but they can be filtered out using a long-pass filter for CARS imaging. Finally, we demonstrated that MMF can be used for delivery of picosecond excitation lasers in the CARS imaging system without any degradation of image quality.

  9. Quantitative, Comparable Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Spectroscopy: Correcting Errors in Phase Retrieval

    CERN Document Server

    Camp, Charles H; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2015-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy has demonstrated significant potential for biological and materials imaging. To date, however, the primary mechanism of disseminating CARS spectroscopic information is through pseudocolor imagery, which explicitly neglects a vast majority of the hyperspectral data. Furthermore, current paradigms in CARS spectral processing do not lend themselves to quantitative sample-to-sample comparability. The primary limitation stems from the need to accurately measure the so-called nonresonant background (NRB) that is used to extract the chemically-sensitive Raman information from the raw spectra. Measurement of the NRB on a pixel-by-pixel basis is a nontrivial task; thus, reference NRB from glass or water are typically utilized, resulting in error between the actual and estimated amplitude and phase. In this manuscript, we present a new methodology for extracting the Raman spectral features that significantly suppresses these errors through phase detrending ...

  10. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kideog; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-08-01

    We report the quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using the circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CP-CARS) technique together with Stokes parameters in the Poincaré sphere. The pump and Stokes excitation beams are circularly polarized to suppress both the linear polarization-dependent artifacts and the nonresonant background of tissue CARS imaging, enabling quantitative CP-CARS image analysis. This study shows that CP-CARS imaging uncovers significantly increased phase retardance of injured spinal cord tissue as compared to normal tissue, suggesting that CP-CARS is an appealing label-free imaging tool for determining the degree of tissue phase retardance, which could serve as a unique diagnostic parameter associated with nervous tissue injury.

  11. Automated identification of subcellular organelles by coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Niedieker, Daniel; Petersen, Dennis; Krauss, Sascha D; Freier, Erik; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Mosig, Axel; Hahn, Stephan; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-05-06

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is an emerging tool for label-free characterization of living cells. Here, unsupervised multivariate analysis of CARS datasets was used to visualize the subcellular compartments. In addition, a supervised learning algorithm based on the "random forest" ensemble learning method as a classifier, was trained with CARS spectra using immunofluorescence images as a reference. The supervised classifier was then used, to our knowledge for the first time, to automatically identify lipid droplets, nucleus, nucleoli, and endoplasmic reticulum in datasets that are not used for training. These four subcellular components were simultaneously and label-free monitored instead of using several fluorescent labels. These results open new avenues for label-free time-resolved investigation of subcellular components in different cells, especially cancer cells.

  12. X-Ray Polarization Optics and Coherent Nuclear Resonance Scattering Using Synchrotron Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Sarvjit Devdat

    1995-01-01

    Two projects, both involving X-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation, are presented in this dissertation. (1) A system of diffracting perfect crystals for the generation of variable, elliptically polarized X-rays was tested at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source under the conditions of a standard undulator source. The phase retarding optical component was a 4-bounce, Ge(220) Bragg reflection channel -cut crystal. The full polarization state (density matrix) of the output beam, including the circular polarization purity P_3, was determined using the multiple-beam Bragg diffraction technique with a GaAs crystal polarimeter and was found to agree with calculations. In addition to measuring the optics' efficiency, the ability to scan the system in energy, while frequently reversing the circular helicity, was demonstrated at the vicinity of the Fe K-edge at 7.1 keV. The setup was applied to a circular magnetic X-ray dichroism measurement. (2) The time distribution of delayed photons from resonant forward scattering of 14.4 keV synchrotron radiation pulses by ^{57}Fe nuclei was investigated over the temperature range from 9 K to just above the Curie point at 1043 K, with particular attention to precise measurements of the Lamb-Mossbauer factor f_{LM } ~ e^{- } , whose change was determined from its influence on the "speed-up" of coherent decay. Apart from its importance in Mossbauer effect studies, knowing the temperature dependence of f_{LM} can be valuable for studies of lattice dynamics and structural phase transitions. The change in the nuclear hyperfine splitting was also measured. The synchrotron technique has precision-enhancing advantages over conventional Mossbauer spectroscopy methods employing radioactive sources because dealing with source effects and absolute intensity measurements is eliminated. The results also straightforwardly illustrate an interesting principle concerning the temperature dependence of scattering --that for "slow" resonance

  13. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Daniel Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  14. Coherent deeply virtual Compton scattering off 3He and neutron generalized parton distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been recently proposed to study coherent deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS off 3He nuclei to access neutron generalized parton distributions (GPDs. In particular, it has been shown that, in Impulse Approximation (IA and at low momentum transfer, the sum of the quark helicity conserving GPDs of 3He, H and E, is dominated by the neutron contribution. This peculiar result makes the 3He target very promising to access the neutron information. We present here the IA calculation of the spin dependent GPD H See Formula in PDF of 3He. Also for this quantity the neutron contribution is found to be the dominant one, at low momentum transfer. The known forward limit of the IA calculation of H See Formula in PDF , yielding the polarized parton distributions of 3He, is correctly recovered. The extraction of the neutron information could be anyway non trivial, so that a procedure, able to take into account the nuclear effects encoded in the IA analysis, is proposed. These calculations, essential for the evaluation of the coherent DVCS cross section asymmetries, which depend on the GPDs H,E and H See Formula in PDF , represent a crucial step for planning possible experiments at Jefferson Lab.

  15. A Note on the Radiative and Collisional Branching Ratios in Polarized Radiation Transport with Coherent Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, R.; del Pino Alemán, T.; Manso Sainz, R.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the implementation of physically meaningful branching ratios between the CRD and partial redistribution contributions to the emissivity of a polarized multi-term atom in the presence of both inelastic and elastic collisions. Our derivation is based on a recent theoretical formulation of partially coherent scattering, and it relies on a heuristic diagrammatic analysis of the various radiative and collisional processes to determine the proper form of the branching ratios. The expression we obtain for the emissivity is {\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}=[{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1)-{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}{{f}.{{s}}.}(2)]+{{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2), where {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(1) and {{\\boldsymbol{\\varepsilon }}}(2) are the emissivity terms for the redistributed and partially coherent radiation, respectively, and where “f.s.” implies that the corresponding term must be evaluated assuming a flat-spectrum average of the incident radiation. This result is shown to be in agreement with prior literature on the subject in the limit of the unpolarized multi-level atom.

  16. Articulated dual modality photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography probe for preclinical and clinical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Zabihian, Behrooz; Weingast, Jessika; Hermann, Boris; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Pehamberger, Hubert; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    The combination of photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has seen steady progress over the past few years. With the benchtop and semi-benchtop configurations, preclinical and clinical results have been demonstrated, paving the way for wider applications using dual modality PAT/OCT systems. However, as for the most updated semi-benchtop PAT/OCT system which employs a Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor, it is restricted to only human palm imaging due to the limited flexibility of the probe. The passband limit of the polymer film sensor further restricts the OCT source selection and reduces the sensitivity of the combined OCT system. To tackle these issues, we developed an articulated PAT/OCT probe for both preclinical and clinical applications. In the probe design, the sample arm of OCT sub-system and the interrogation part of the PAT sub-system are integrated into one compact unit. The polymer film sensor has a quick release function so that before each OCT scan, the sensor can be taken off to avoid the sensitivity drop and artefacts in OCT. The holding mechanism of the sensor is also more compact compared to previous designs, permitting access to uneven surfaces of the subjects. With the help of the articulated probe and a patient chair, we are able to perform co-registered imaging on human subjects on both upper and lower extremities while they are at rest positions. An increase in performance characteristics is also achieved. Patients with skin diseases are currently being recruited to test its clinical feasibility.

  17. Fiber-optic polarization diversity detection for rotary probe optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anthony M D; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Yang, Victor X D; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre

    2014-06-15

    We report a polarization diversity detection scheme for optical coherence tomography with a new, custom, miniaturized fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the X and Y OCT polarization channels prior to interference and the PM fiber outputs ensure defined X and Y axes after interference. Advantages for this scheme include easier alignment, lower cost, and easier miniaturization compared to designs with free-space bulk optical components. We demonstrate the utility of the detection system to mitigate the effects of rapidly changing polarization states when imaging with rotating fiber optic probes in Intralipid suspension and during in vivo imaging of human airways.

  18. Probing proton halo of the exotic nucleus 28S by elastic electron scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zaijun; REN; Zhongzhou

    2004-01-01

    Elastic electron scattering on the exotic light nucleus 28S is investigated in the plane wave Born approximation. The variation of the squared form factors of 28S with momentum transfer is compared with that of 32S. It is found that the behavior of the form factors near the second minimum (with a moderate momentum transfer) is sensitive to the alteration of the charge density distribution of halo protons in 28S. This indicates that elastic electron scattering can be a good probe of the structure of proton-halo nuclei.

  19. Persistence of Covalent Bonding in Liquid Silicon Probed by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, J. T.; Sit, P. H.-L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wang, Y. J.; Barbiellini, B.; Ishikawa, T.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Bansil, A.; Ishikawa, R.; Hamaishi, M.; Masaki, T.; Paradis, P.-F.; Kimura, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Nanao, S.

    2012-02-01

    Metallic liquid silicon at 1787 K is investigated using x-ray Compton scattering. An excellent agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show persistence of covalent bonding in liquid silicon and provide support for the occurrence of theoretically predicted liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled liquid states. The population of covalent bond pairs in liquid silicon is estimated to be 17% via a maximally localized Wannier function analysis. Compton scattering is shown to be a sensitive probe of bonding effects in the liquid state.

  20. Polar structure of disclination loops in nematic liquid crystals probed by second-harmonic-light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardaev, Shokir A; Williams, J C; Twieg, R J; Jakli, A; Gleeson, J T; Ellman, B; Sprunt, S

    2015-03-01

    Angle-resolved, second-harmonic-light scattering (SHLS) measurements are reported for three different classes of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (NLCs): polar and nonpolar rodlike compounds and a bent-core compound. Results revealing well-defined scattering peaks are interpreted in terms of the electric polarization induced by distortions of the nematic orientational field ("flexopolarity") associated with inversion wall defects, nonsingular disclinations, analogous to Neel walls in ferromagnets, that often exhibit a closed loop morphology in NLCs. Analysis of the SHLS patterns based on this model provides a "proof-of-concept" for a potentially useful method to probe the flexopolar properties of NLCs.

  1. Probing biological nanotopology via diffusion of weakly constrained plasmonic nanorods with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K; Blackmon, Richard L; Wu, Wei-Chen; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Casbas-Hernandez, Patricia; Troester, Melissa A; Tracy, Joseph B; Oldenburg, Amy L

    2014-10-14

    Biological materials exhibit complex nanotopology, i.e., a composite liquid and solid phase structure that is heterogeneous on the nanoscale. The diffusion of nanoparticles in nanotopological environments can elucidate biophysical changes associated with pathogenesis and disease progression. However, there is a lack of methods that characterize nanoprobe diffusion and translate easily to in vivo studies. Here, we demonstrate a method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to depth-resolve diffusion of plasmon-resonant gold nanorods (GNRs) that are weakly constrained by the biological tissue. By using GNRs that are on the size scale of the polymeric mesh, their Brownian motion is minimally hindered by intermittent collisions with local macromolecules. OCT depth-resolves the particle-averaged translational diffusion coefficient (DT) of GNRs within each coherence volume, which is separable from the nonequilibrium motile activities of cells based on the unique polarized light-scattering properties of GNRs. We show how this enables minimally invasive imaging and monitoring of nanotopological changes in a variety of biological models, including extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling as relevant to carcinogenesis, and dehydration of pulmonary mucus as relevant to cystic fibrosis. In 3D ECM models, DT of GNRs decreases with both increasing collagen concentration and cell density. Similarly, DT of GNRs is sensitive to human bronchial-epithelial mucus concentration over a physiologically relevant range. This novel method comprises a broad-based platform for studying heterogeneous nanotopology, as distinct from bulk viscoelasticity, in biological milieu.

  2. Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: I. Echo scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, A D [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Blencowe, M P [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)], E-mail: andrew.armour@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: miles.p.blencowe@dartmouth.edu

    2008-09-15

    We propose a scheme in which the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator can be probed using a superconducting qubit. We consider a mechanical resonator coupled capacitively to a Cooper pair box and assume that the superconducting qubit is tuned to the degeneracy point so that its coherence time is maximized and the electro-mechanical coupling can be approximated by a dispersive Hamiltonian. When the qubit is prepared in a superposition of states, this drives the mechanical resonator progressively into a superposition which in turn leads to apparent decoherence of the qubit. Applying a suitable control pulse to the qubit allows its population to be inverted resulting in a reversal of the resonator dynamics. However, the resonator's interactions with its environment mean that the dynamics is not completely reversible. We show that this irreversibility is largely due to the decoherence of the mechanical resonator and can be inferred from appropriate measurements on the qubit alone. Using estimates for the parameters involved based on a specific realization of the system, we show that it should be possible to carry out this scheme with existing device technology.

  3. Stimulated-emission pumping enabling sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, H.L.; Herek, J.L.; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, C.J.; Boller, K-J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stimulated emission pumping to achieve sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A pair of control light fields is used to prepopulate the Raman state involved in the CARS process prior to the CARS

  4. Rapid diagnosis and differentiation of microbial pathogens in otitis media with a combined Raman spectroscopy and low-coherence interferometry probe: toward in vivo implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Monroy, Guillermo L.; You, Sixian; Shelton, Ryan L.; Nolan, Ryan M.; Tu, Haohua; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate and demonstrate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering (RS) spectroscopy and low-coherence interferometry (LCI) probe to differentiate microbial pathogens and improve our diagnostic ability of ear infections [otitis media (OM)]. While the RS probe provides noninvasive molecular information to identify and differentiate infectious microorganisms, the LCI probe helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as to guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition times. A series of phantom studies, including the use of human middle ear effusion samples, were performed to mimic the conditions of in vivo investigations. These were also conducted to validate the feasibility of using this combined RS/LCI probe for point-of-care diagnosis of the infectious pathogen(s) in OM patients. This work establishes important parameters for future in vivo investigations of fast and accurate determination and diagnosis of infectious microorganisms in OM patients, potentially improving the efficacy and outcome of OM treatments, and importantly reducing the misuse of antibiotics in the presence of viral infections.

  5. Dynamic coherent backscattering of ultrasound in three-dimensional strongly-scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobus, L. A.; Tiggelen, B. A. van; Derode, A.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    We present measurements of the diffusion coefficient of ultrasound in strongly scattering three-dimensional (3D) disordered media using the dynamic coherent backscattering (CBS) effect. Our experiments measure the CBS of ultrasonic waves using a transducer array placed in the far-field of a 3D slab sample of brazed aluminum beads surrounded by vacuum. We extend to 3D media the general microscopic theory of CBS that was developed initially for acoustic waves in 2D. This theory is valid in the strong scattering, but still diffuse, regime that is realized in our sample, and is evaluated in the diffuse far field limit encountered in our experiments. By comparing our theory with the experimental data, we obtain an accurate measurement of the Boltzmann diffusion coefficient of ultrasound in our sample. We find that the value of DB is quite small, 0.74 ± 0.03 mm2/μs, and comment on the implications of this slow transport for the energy velocity.

  6. Coherent scattering of $\\pi$ mesons from helium at high energies : 4 papers

    CERN Document Server

    Ekelöf, T J C

    1972-01-01

    [Article I: A measurement of the differential cross section for elastic pion-helium scattering at 7.76 GeV/c] Results are presented for the region of squared four-momentum transfers between −0.05 and −0.5 (GeV/c)2. The directions of the scattered pions and alpha particles were measured with spark chambers and the momentum of the alphas as obtained from pulse-height and time-of-flight measurements. The results are compared with calculations from the Glauber theory, showing good agreement over the whole momentum-transfer range including the interference-dip region. [Article II:A helium-recoil spectrometer] The instrument described is intended for the detection and measurement of particles from coherent interactions of high-energy particles with 4He nuclei. It allows the determination of the magnitude and the direction of the momenta of the helium recoils from interactions in a pressurized gas target. The measurements are carried out with spark chambers and scintillation counters. Recoils emitted at angles g...

  7. Structure and dynamics of multicellular assemblies measured by coherent light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Benjamin; Blanch, Carles; Gourrier, Aurélien; Petrolli, Vanni; Delon, Antoine; Joanny, Jean-François; Carminati, Rémi; Pierrat, Romain; Cappello, Giovanni

    2017-07-01

    Determining the structure and the internal dynamics of tissues is essential to understand their functional organization. Microscopy allows for monitoring positions and trajectories of every single cell. Those data are useful to extract statistical observables, such as intercellular distance, tissue symmetry and anisotropy, and cell motility. However, this procedure requires a large and supervised computational effort. In addition, due to the large cross-section of cells, the light scattering limits the use of microscopy to relatively thin samples. As an alternative approach, we propose to take advantage of light scattering and to analyze the dynamical diffraction pattern produced by a living tissue illuminated with coherent light. In this article, we illustrate with a few examples that supra-cellular structures produce an exploitable diffraction signal. From the diffraction signal, we deduce the mean distance between cells, the anisotropy of the supra-cellular organization and, from its fluctuations, the mean speed of moving cells. This easy to implement technique considerably reduces analysis time, allowing real time monitoring.

  8. Intravascular optical coherence tomography light scattering artifacts: merry-go-rounding, blooming, and ghost struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, J. Jacob; Halaney, David L.; Elahi, Sahar; Ho, Derek; Wang, Tianyi; Ouyang, Yongjian; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2014-12-01

    We sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying two common intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) artifacts that occur when imaging metallic stents: "merry-go-rounding" (MGR), which is an increase in strut arc length (SAL), and "blooming," which is an increase in the strut reflection thickness (blooming thickness). Due to uncontrollable variables that occur in vivo, we performed an in vitro assessment of MGR and blooming in stented vessel phantoms. Using Xience V and Driver stents, we examined the effects of catheter offset, intimal strut coverage, and residual blood on SAL and blooming thickness in IV-OCT images. Catheter offset and strut coverage both caused minor MGR, while the greatest MGR effect resulted from light scattering by residual blood in the vessel lumen, with 1% hematocrit (Hct) causing a more than fourfold increase in SAL compared with saline (pResidual blood also resulted in blooming, with blooming thickness more than doubling when imaged in 0.5% Hct compared with saline (presidual blood in the imaging field, is the predominant cause of MGR. Light scattering also results in blooming, and a newly described artifact, three-dimensional-MGR, which results in "ghost struts" in B-scans.

  9. 4{omega} Thomson scattering probe for high-density plasma characterization at Titan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Yang, S.; Henesian, M.; Weiland, T.; Price, D.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In preparation for the upcoming experiments on the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility, a new Thomson scattering system has been designed and implemented. This system allows electron temperature and density measurements in a high-density regime (n{sub e}>10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}). A 263 nm probe has been demonstrated to produce a total energy of 15 J at 4{omega}(263 nm) in a 1 ns square pulse with a focal spot size of 100 {mu}m. This probe has been used for imaging Thomson scattering of the ion feature. The goal of this study is to investigate the heating of a preformed plasma by a short-pulse heater beam.

  10. The ν -cleus experiment: a gram-scale fiducial-volume cryogenic detector for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R.; Rothe, J.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Kluck, H.; Mancuso, M.; Oberauer, L.; Petricca, F.; Pröbst, F.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss a small-scale experiment, called ν -cleus, for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering by probing nuclear-recoil energies down to the 10 eV regime. The detector consists of low-threshold CaWO_4 and Al_2O_3 calorimeter arrays with a total mass of about 10 g and several cryogenic veto detectors operated at millikelvin temperatures. Realizing a fiducial volume and a multi-element target, the detector enables active discrimination of γ , neutron and surface backgrounds. A first prototype Al_2O_3 device, operated above ground in a setup without shielding, has achieved an energy threshold of {˜ }20 eV and further improvements are in reach. A sensitivity study for the detection of coherent neutrino scattering at nuclear power plants shows a unique discovery potential (5σ ) within a measuring time of {\\lesssim }2 weeks. Furthermore, a site at a thermal research reactor and the use of a radioactive neutrino source are investigated. With this technology, real-time monitoring of nuclear power plants is feasible.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of bone-mineral density loss using X-ray coherent scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Regina Cély; Oliveira, Luis Fernando; Castro, Carlos Roberto Ferreira; Lima, João Carlos; Braz, Delson; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Droppa, Roosevel; Tromba, Giuliana; Mancini, Lucia; Zanini, Franco; Rigon, Luigi; Dreossi, Diego

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we intend to relate the mineral to non-mineral bone scattering intensity ratio with the bone-mineral density (BMD) reduction. In this way, EDXRD can be a novel technique to measure BMD loss in function of the mineral and non-mineral scattering intensity. The scattering profiles were obtained at Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS) at the X-ray diffraction beamline XD2. A double-crystal Si(1 1 1) pre-monochromator, upstream of the beamline, was used to select a small energy bandwidth (Δ λ/ λ≈10 -4) at 11 keV. The sample holder has a circle depression in the center to contain a range of bone and fat mixture ratios. The mixture consists of powdered cortical bone and fat, which together simulate in vivo bone. The diffraction patterns were carried out with 0.5 mm slits after and behind of the sample holder. The data were collected in 0.05° increments every 0.5 s. EDXRD results show an indication of different bone densities may be distinguished which suggested that X-ray coherent scattering technique may have a role in monitoring changes in BMD via changes in the related scattering intensity of mineral and non-mineral bone. The main aim of the Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) project at the ELETTRA is the investigation and the development of innovative techniques for medical imaging. The beamline provides, at a distance of about 23 m from the source, a monochromatic, laminar section X-ray beam with a maximum area of about 160×5 mm 2 at 20 keV. The monochromator, that covers the entire angular acceptance of the beamline, is based on a double-Si (1 1 1) crystal system working in Bragg configuration. A micrometric vertical and horizontal translation stage allows the positioning and scanning of the sample with respect to the stationary beam. In this case, the detector is kept stationary in front of the beam, while the object is rotated in discrete steps in front of it. At each rotation, a projection is acquired. A goniometric

  12. Development of an Optically Modulated Scatterer Probe for a Near-Field Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-08

    proportional to the gain of the AUT after normalizing by the antenna pattern of the known receiver. If the scattering strength of the probe is modulated...optical power until no change was observed. The real and imaginary components of the impedance for the PDA photodiode with no light ( dark ) and at various...GHz there was a change in impedance between the dark (off) and maximum optical power (on) states of 40 Ohm in the real component and 80 Ohm in the

  13. Distributed fiber Brillouin strain and temperature sensor with centimeter spatial resolution by coherent probe-pump technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lufan; Bao, Xiaoyi; Wan, Yidun; Ravet, Fabien; Chen, Liang

    2005-05-01

    We present a sensing principle of the distributed fiber Brillouin strain and temperature sensor by coherent probe-pump technique that offers a new method to achieve centimeter spatial resolution with high frequency resolution. A combination of continuous wave (cw) and pulse source as the probe (Stokes) beam and cw laser as the pump beam have resulted in stronger Brillouin interaction of Stokes and pump inside the pulse-length in the form of cw-pump and pulse-pump interactions. We find that the coherent portion inside the pulse-length of these two interactions due to the same phase has a very high Brillouin amplification. The Brillouin profile originating from the coherent interaction of pulse-pump with cw-pump results in high temperature and strain accuracy with centimeter resolution, which has been verified by successfully detecting 1.5 cm out-layer crack on an optical ground wire (OPGW) cable.

  14. Tapered Optical Fiber Probe Assembled with Plasmonic Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhulin; Lei, Xing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Zhaoming; Mao, Qinghe; Meng, Guowen

    2015-08-12

    Optical fiber-Raman devices integrated with plasmonic nanostructures have promising potentials for in situ probing remote liquid samples and biological samples. In this system, the fiber probe is required to simultaneously demonstrate stable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals and high sensitivity toward the target species. Here we demonstrate a generic approach to integrate presynthesized plasmonic nanostructures with tapered fiber probes that are prepared by a dipping-etching method, through reversed electrostatic attraction between the silane couple agent modified silica fiber probe and the nanostructures. Using this approach, both negatively and positively charged plasmonic nanostructures with various morphologies (such as Au nanosphere, Ag nanocube, Au nanorod, Au@Ag core-shell nanorod) can be stably assembled on the tapered silica fiber probes. Attributed to the electrostatic force between the plasmonic units and the fiber surface, the nanostructures do not disperse in liquid samples easily, making the relative standard deviation of SERS signals as low as 2% in analyte solution. Importantly, the detection sensitivity of the system can be optimized by adjusting the cone angle (from 3.6° to 22°) and the morphology of nanostructures assembled on the fiber. Thus, the nanostructures-sensitized optical fiber-Raman probes show great potentials in the applications of SERS-based environmental detection of liquid samples.

  15. The relative diffusive transport rate of SrI2 in water changes over the nanometer length scale as measured by coherent quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Faraone, Antonio

    2016-05-14

    X-ray and neutron scattering have been used to provide insight into the structures of ionic solutions for over a century, but the probes have covered distances shorter than 8 Å. For the non-hydrolyzing salt SrI2 in aqueous solution, a locally ordered lattice of ions exists that scatters slow neutrons coherently down to at least 0.1 mol L(-1) concentration, where the measured average distance between scatterers is over 18 Å. To investigate the motions of these scatterers, coherent quasielastic neutron scattering (CQENS) data on D2O solutions with SrI2 at 1, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mol L(-1) concentrations was obtained to provide an experimental measure of the diffusive transport rate for the motion between pairs of ions relative to each other. Because CQENS measures the motion of one ion relative to another, the frame of reference is centered on an ion, which is unique among all diffusion measurement methods. We call the measured quantity the pairwise diffusive transport rate Dp. In addition to this ion centered frame of reference, the diffusive transport rate can be measured as a function of the momentum transfer q, where q = (4π/λ)sin θ with a scattering angle of 2θ. Since q is related to the interion distance (d = 2π/q), for the experimental range 0.2 Å(-1)≤q≤ 1.0 Å(-1), Dp is, then, measured over interion distances from 40 Å to ≈6 Å. We find the measured diffusional transport rates increase with increasing distance between scatterers over the entire range covered and interpret this behavior to be caused by dynamic coupling among the ions. Within the model of Fickian diffusion, at the longer interionic distances Dp is greater than the Nernst-Hartley value for an infinitely dilute solution. For these nm-distance diffusional transport rates to conform with the lower, macroscopically measured diffusion coefficients, we propose that local, coordinated counter motion of at least pairs of ions is part of the transport process.

  16. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography probe employing a two-axis microelectromechanical scanning mirror with through-silicon vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Wu, Lei; Sun, Jingjing; Lin, Elaine; Xie, Huikai

    2011-02-01

    We present the design and experimental results of a new MEMS-based endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe. The uniqueness of this miniature OCT imaging probe is a two-axis MEMS mirror with through-silicon vias (TSVs) for interconnecting. The TSV interconnection enables ultracompact probe design, successfully reducing the probe size to only 2.6 mm in diameter. The MEMS mirror is actuated by an electrothermal actuator that is capable of scanning ± 16° at only 3.6 V DC. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional OCT images of microspheres embedded in PDMS and acute rat brain tissue have been obtained with this miniature probe in a time-domain OCT system.

  17. Resonance light scattering determination of metallothioneins using levofloxacin-palladium complex as a light scattering probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jin-Hua; Qian, Qiu-Mei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Meng, Xia-Ling; Liu, Lu

    2013-02-01

    A novel method of resonance light scattering (RLS) was developed for the analysis of trace metallothioneins (MTs) in human urine. In a CH3COOH-CH3COONa buffer solution of pH 4.5, the formation of a complex between levofloxacin (LEV)-Pd and MTs led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system, and the enhanced RLS intensity at 468 nm was proportional to the concentration of MTs in the range of 0.059-22.4 μg mL-1. The linear regression equation was ΔI = 127.5 ρ (μg mL-1)-88.02 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992, and the detection limit of 17.8 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation and the average recovery were 3.8-5.4% (n = 11) and 92.15%, respectively. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive, and has been used successfully for the determination of trace MTs in human urine samples.

  18. Soft X-ray Resonant Scattering in Manganites as a Probe of Orbital Order: Theoretical Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarelli, Massimo

    2001-03-01

    The claim of the detection of orbital order [1] in manganites by resonant x-ray scattering at the Mn K-edge has raised considerable controversy [2] because of the indirect mechanism by which properties of the 3d electrons are probed by a process involving excitation into the 4p states. In particular, the possibility that x-ray experiments probe Jahn-Teller displacements, rather than orbital order, has been debated. An alternative proposal [3] is to use resonant scattering at the Mn L2 and L3 edges, with dipole allowed excitation into 3d states, as a more direct probe allowing to separate effects related to the order of the 3d orbitals from lattice displacements. Given the longer wavelength, only order with a period longer than about 0.97 nm is accessible. There are however systems, like La_1-x(Ca,Sr)_xMnO3 for x=0.5, x=0.33, etc., in addition to La_0.5Sr_1.5MnO4 where this condition is fulfilled. Calculations within an atomic multiplet scheme, with inclusion of crystal field effects, which point to an easier separation of orbital order from lattice displacements in the soft x-ray case, are presented and discussed. Different structures in the energy dependence of the scattering intensity are related predominantly to one of the two mechanisms. Other issues, such as the smaller scattering volume due to photoelectric absorption effects, are also addressed. 1. Y. Murakami et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 1932 (1998); ibid. 81, 582 (1998). 2. Elfimov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4264 (1998); M. Benfatto et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 636 (1999); M. Takahashi et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 68, 2530 (1999). 3. C.W.M. Castleton and M. Altarelli, Phys. Rev B 62, 1033 (2000).

  19. Optical fibre probes in the measurement of scattered light: Application for sensing turbidity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Sheno

    2014-01-01

    Optical fibre probes or optrodes often form the heart of multimode fibre-based measurements and sensors. An optrode usually comprises a bundle of multimode fibres, out of which one or more fibres are used for irradiating the sample, and the remaining fibres are used to collect the light reflected/scattered/fluoresced from the sample containing the measurand(s). The so-collected light carries the characteristic signature of the measurand. Here we present our work on the design and realization of optrodes for the measurement of scattered light from liquid samples. Optical properties of a solution are usually characterized by the parameters absorption coefficient $_a$, scattering coefficient $_s$, and anisotropy factor . We have developed a simple method to determine $_a$, $_s$, and , of a turbid medium, and a Monte–Carlo model was used to simulate the light scattering from the turbid medium. As an application, we describe the development of a turbidity sensor that has been designed and realized by employing an optrode in conjunction with a concave mirror. The estimation of turbidity is done on the basis of total interaction, by considering scattering and absorption of light from the sample solution. Details of the experiments and results are presented here.

  20. Dual-Pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Temperature and CO2 Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucht, Robert P.; Velur-Natarajan, Viswanathan; Carter, Campbell D.; Grinstead, Keith D., Jr.; Gord, James R.; Danehy, Paul M.; Fiechtner, G. J.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and CO2 concentration using dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, (CARS) are described. The measurements were performed in laboratory flames,in a room-temperature gas cell, and on an engine test stand at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. A modeless dye laser, a single-mode Nd:YAG laser, and an unintensified back-illuminated charge-coupled device digital camera were used for these measurements. The CARS measurements were performed on a single-laser-shot basis. The standard deviations of the temperatures and CO2 mole fractions determined from single-shot dual-pump CARS spectra in steady laminar propane/air flames were approximately 2 and 10% of the mean values of approximately 2000 K and 0.10, respectively. The precision and accuracy of single-shot temperature measurements obtained from the nitrogen part of the dual-pump CARS system were investigated in detail in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air/CO2 flames. The precision of the CARS temperature measurements was found to be comparable to the best results reported in the literature for conventional two-laser, single-pump CARS. The application of dual-pump CARS for single-shot measurements in a swirl-stabilized combustor fueled with JP-8 was also demonstrated.

  1. Optical transistor action by nonlinear coupling of stimulated emission and coherent scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Bradshaw, David S.

    2010-08-01

    In the pursuit of improved platforms for computing, communications and internet connectivity, all-optical systems offer excellent prospects for a speed and fidelity of data transmission that will greatly surpass conventional electronics, alongside the anticipated benefits of reduced energy loss. With a diverse range of sources and fiber optical connections already in production, much current effort is being devoted towards forging optical components for signal switching, such as an all-optical transistor. Achievement of the desired characteristics for any practicable device can be expected to depend crucially on the engagement of a strongly nonlinear optical response. The innovative scheme proposed in the present work is based upon a third-order nonlinearity - its effect enhanced by stimulated emission - operating within a system designed to exploit the highly nonlinear response observed at the threshold for laser emission. Here, stimulated emission is strongly driven by coupling to the coherent scattering of a signal input beam whose optical frequency is purposely off-set from resonance. An electrodynamical analysis of the all-optical coupling process shows that the signal beam can significantly modify the kinetics of emission, and so lead to a dramatically enhanced output of resonant radiation. The underlying nonlinear optical mechanism is analyzed, model calculations are performed for realizable three-level laser systems, and the results exhibited graphically. The advantages of implementing this all-optical transistor scheme, compared to several previously envisaged proposals, are then outlined.

  2. Scattering angle resolved optical coherence tomography for in vivo murine retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Michael R.; Katta, Nitesh; McElroy, Austin; Baruah, Vikram; Rylander, H. G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal imaging contributes to understanding central nervous system (CNS) diseases because the eye is an anatomical "window to the brain" with direct optical access to nonmylenated retinal ganglion cells. However, many CNS diseases are associated with neuronal changes beyond the resolution of standard OCT retinal imaging systems. Though studies have shown the utility of scattering angle resolved (SAR) OCT for particle sizing and detecting disease states ex vivo, a compact SAR-OCT system for in vivo rodent retinal imaging has not previously been reported. We report a fiber-based SAR-OCT system (swept source at 1310 nm +/- 65 nm, 100 kHz scan rate) for mouse retinal imaging with a partial glass window (center aperture) for angular discrimination of backscattered light. This design incorporates a dual-axis MEMS mirror conjugate to the ocular pupil plane and a high collection efficiency objective. A muring retina is imaged during euthanasia, and the proposed SAR-index is examined versus time. Results show a positive correlation between the SAR-index and the sub-cellular hypoxic response of neurons to isoflurane overdose during euthanasia. The proposed SAR-OCT design and image process technique offer a contrast mechanism able to detect sub-resolution neuronal changes for murine retinal imaging.

  3. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  4. Coherent dynamics of meta-toluidine investigated by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Antonio; Hong, Kunlun; Kneller, Larry R; Ohl, Michael; Copley, John R D

    2012-03-14

    The coherent dynamics of a typical fragile glass former, meta-toluidine, was investigated at the molecular level using quasielastic neutron scattering, with time-of-flight and neutron spin echo spectrometers. It is well known that the static structure factor of meta-toluidine shows a prepeak originating from clustering of the molecules through hydrogen bonding between the amine groups. The dynamics of meta-toluidine was measured for several values of the wavevector transfer Q, which is equivalent to an inverse length scale, in a range encompassing the prepeak and the structure factor peak. Data were collected in the temperature range corresponding to the liquid and supercooled states, down to the glass transition. At least two dynamical processes were identified. This paper focuses on the slowest relaxation process in the system, the α-relaxation, which was found to scale with the macroscopic shear viscosity at all the investigated Q values. No evidence of "de Gennes" narrowing associated with the prepeak was observed, in contrast with what happens at the Q value corresponding to the interparticle distance. Moreover, using partially deuterated samples, the dynamics of the clusters was found to be correlated to the single-particle dynamics of the meta-toluidine molecules.

  5. Coherent Dynamics of meta-Toluidine Investigated by QuasiElastic Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Kneller, Larry [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD; Ohl, Michael E [ORNL; Copley, John R. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD

    2012-01-01

    The coherent dynamics of a typical fragile glass former, meta-toluidine, was investigated at the molecular level using quasielastic neutron scattering, with time-of-flight and neutron spin echo spectrometers. It is well known that the static structure factor of meta-toluidine shows a prepeak originating from clustering of the molecules through hydrogen bonding between the amine groups. The dynamics of meta-toluidine was measured for several values of the wavevector transfer Q, which is equivalent to an inverse length scale, in a range encompassing the prepeak and the structure factor peak. Data were collected in the temperature range corresponding to the liquid and supercooled states, down to the glass transition. At least two dynamical processes were identified. This paper focuses on the slowest relaxation process in the system, the {alpha}-relaxation, which was found to scale with the macroscopic shear viscosity at all the investigated Q values. No evidence of 'de Gennes' narrowing associated with the prepeak was observed, in contrast with what happens at the Q value corresponding to the interparticle distance. Moreover, using partially deuterated samples, the dynamics of the clusters was found to be correlated to the single-particle dynamics of the meta-toluidine molecules.

  6. Coherent phonon scattering in ZnO and ZnS at sulfite and oxygen impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, M.; Czerner, M.; Heiliger, C. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus Liebig University Giessen (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    We employ an atomistic Green's function (AGF) method which is based on ab initio interatomic force constants (IFCs) to calculate coherent phonon scattering in ZnO at sulfur impurities and ZnS at oxygen impurities. For our calculations we consider different geometries and different transport directions. In particular, we investigate the impact of the change in the mass of the impurities on the transmission function and also the change in the IFCs due to the impurities. We show that if we only consider a change in the mass the transmission function for the high energy phonons is strongly reduced. If we further take into account the change in the IFCs also the low energy phonons are affected. From these results we conclude that incorporation of sulfur in ZnO and incorporation of oxygen in ZnS can reduce the thermal lattice conductivity and therefore increase the figure of merit substantially. In addition, our results demonstrate that for a realistic description just the change of the mass is not enough but the IFCs of the impurities have to be calculated. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Fast spectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with high-speed tunable picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyadi, Harsono; Iwatsuka, Junichi; Minamikawa, Takeo; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2013-09-01

    We develop a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy system equipped with a tunable picosecond laser for high-speed wavelength scanning. An acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is integrated in the laser cavity to enable wavelength scanning by varying the radio frequency waves applied to the AOTF crystal. An end mirror attached on a piezoelectric actuator and a pair of parallel plates driven by galvanometer motors are also introduced into the cavity to compensate for changes in the cavity length during wavelength scanning to allow synchronization with another picosecond laser. We demonstrate fast spectral imaging of 3T3-L1 adipocytes every 5  cm-1 in the Raman spectral region around 2850  cm-1 with an image acquisition time of 120 ms. We also demonstrate fast switching of Raman shifts between 2100 and 2850  cm-1, corresponding to CD2 symmetric stretching and CH2 symmetric stretching vibrations, respectively. The fast-switching CARS images reveal different locations of recrystallized deuterated and nondeuterated stearic acid.

  8. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. (Departamento de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Facultad de Informatica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 649, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain)); Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M. (Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain))

    1994-01-15

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He[sup +] ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the [l angle]100[r angle] direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., [approx]0.9 for 53 MeV B[sup 4+] and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces.

  9. Contributed Review: A new synchronized source solution for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Yuxin; Liang, Runfu; Wang, Jiaqi; Qiu, Ping

    2016-07-01

    Based on vibrational spectroscopy, coherent Raman Scattering (CRS) microscopy allows label-free imaging of biological and chemical samples with endogenous image contrast. Two-color, synchronized picosecond pulses are typically used for high spectral resolution imaging, which in turn constitutes a dramatic laser source challenge for CRS microscopy. Recently, synchronized time-lens source, inspired from ultrafast optical signal processing, has emerged as a promising laser source solution and has found application in various modalities of CRS microscopy. Time-lens is based on space-time analogy, which uses a "lens" in the time domain to compress long optical pulses or even continuous waves to ultrashort pulses, mimicking a lens in the space domain. Phase and intensity modulators driven with electrical signals are used in the time-lens source for picosecond pulse generation. As a result, the time-lens source is highly versatile and naturally compatible with modulation capabilities. More importantly, if the electrical signals used to drive the time-lens source are derived from other laser sources, such as mode-locked lasers, then synchronization between them can be realized, underlying the physics of a synchronized time-lens source. In this paper, we review recent progress on the basic principle, design of the synchronized time-lens source, and its applications to CRS microscopy of both biological and chemical samples.

  10. Investigation of lipid homeostasis in living Drosophila by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2012-12-01

    To improve our understanding of lipid metabolism, Drosophila is used as a model animal, and its lipid homeostasis is monitored by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. We are able to achieve in vivo imaging of larval fat body (analogous to adipose tissue in mammals) and oenocytes (analogous to hepatocytes) in Drosophila larvae at subcellular level without any labeling. By overexpressing two lipid regulatory proteins-Brummer lipase (Bmm) and lipid storage droplet-2 (Lsd-2)-we found different phenotypes and responses under fed and starved conditions. Comparing with the control larva, we observed more lipid droplet accumulation by ˜twofold in oenocytes of fat-body-Bmm-overexpressing (FB-Bmm-overexpressing) mutant under fed condition, and less lipid by ˜fourfold in oenocytes of fat-body-Lsd-2-overexpressing (FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing) mutant under starved condition. Moreover, together with reduced size of lipid droplets, the lipid content in the fat body of FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant decreases much faster than that of the control and FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing mutant during starvation. From long-term starvation assay, we found FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant has a shorter lifespan, which can be attributed to faster consumption of lipid in its fat body. Our results demonstrate in vivo observations of direct influences of Bmm and Lsd-2 on lipid homeostasis in Drosophila larvae.

  11. Sterile Neutrinos, Coherent Scattering and Oscillometry Measurements with Low-temperature Bolometers

    CERN Document Server

    Formaggio, Joseph A; Anderson, A J

    2011-01-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleon scattering offers a unique approach in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. When used in conjunction with mono-energetic neutrino sources, the technique can be sensitive to the existence of light sterile neutrinos. The ability to utilize such reactions has been limited in the past due to the extremely low energy threshold (10-50 eV) needed for detection. In this paper, we discuss an optimization of cryogenic solid state bolometers that enables reaching extremely low kinetic energy thresholds. We investigate the sensitivity of an array of such detectors to neutrino oscillations to sterile states. A recent analysis of available reactor data appears to favor the existence of such such a sterile neutrino with a mass splitting of $|\\Delta m_{\\rm sterile}|^2 \\ge 1.5$ eV$^2$ and mixing strength of $\\sin^2{2\\theta_{\\rm sterile}} = 0.17\\pm 0.08$ at 95% C.L. An array of such low-threshold detectors would be able to make a definitive statement as to the validity of the interpretati...

  12. Detection of chemical interfaces in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Dk-CARS. I. Axial interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-12-01

    We develop a full vectorial theoretical investigation of the chemical interface detection in conventional coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In Part I, we focus on the detection of axial interfaces (i.e., parallel to the optical axis) following a recent experimental demonstration of the concept [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 213905 (2010)]. By revisiting the Young's double slit experiment, we show that background-free microscopy and spectroscopy is achievable through the angular analysis of the CARS far-field radiation pattern. This differential CARS in k space (Dk-CARS) technique is interesting for fast detection of interfaces between molecularly different media. It may be adapted to other coherent and resonant scattering processes.

  13. An improved Monte Carlo study of coherent scattering effects of low energy charged particle transport in Percus-Yevick liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Tattersall, W J; Boyle, G J; White, R D

    2015-01-01

    We generalize a simple Monte Carlo (MC) model for dilute gases to consider the transport behavior of positrons and electrons in Percus-Yevick model liquids under highly non-equilibrium conditions, accounting rigorously for coherent scattering processes. The procedure extends an existing technique [Wojcik and Tachiya, Chem. Phys. Lett. 363, 3--4 (1992)], using the static structure factor to account for the altered anisotropy of coherent scattering in structured material. We identify the effects of the approximation used in the original method, and develop a modified method that does not require that approximation. We also present an enhanced MC technique that has been designed to improve the accuracy and flexibility of simulations in spatially-varying electric fields. All of the results are found to be in excellent agreement with an independent multi-term Boltzmann equation solution, providing benchmarks for future transport models in liquids and structured systems.

  14. Impact of Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering on Direct Dark Matter Searches based on CaWO$_4$ Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Gütlein, A.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gorla, P; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; M. Kiefer; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J. -C.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric and solar neutrinos scattering coherently off target nuclei will be an important background source for the next generation of direct dark matter searches. In this work we focus on calcium tungstate as target material. For comparison with existing works we calculate the neutrino floor indicating which sensitivities can be reached before the neutrino background appears. In addition, we investigate the sensitivities of future direct dark matter searches using CRESST-II like detectors...

  15. Label‐Free Fluctuation Spectroscopy Based on Coherent Anti‐Stokes Raman Scattering from Bulk Water Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Rabasovic, M. D.; Sisamakis, E.; Wennmalm, S.; Widengren, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nanoparticles (NPs) and molecules can be analyzed by inverse fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (iFCS) as they pass through an open detection volume, displacing fractions of the fluorescence‐emitting solution in which they are dissolved. iFCS does not require the NPs or molecules to be labeled. However, fluorophores in μm–mm concentrations are needed for the solution signal. Here, we instead use coherent anti‐Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from plain water molecules as the signal ...

  16. A New Nanogold-Labeled Immunoresonance Scattering Spectral Probe for Determination of Trace IgG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG,Zhi-Liang; LI,Yan; SUN,Shuang-Jiao; CHEN,Bing

    2007-01-01

    A kind of 9 nm gold nanoparticles was prepared with the trisodium citrate and used to label goat anti-human IgG to obtain an IgG immunoresonance scattering spectral probe. In pH 5.8 buffer solution and in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), the immune reaction between gold-labeled goat anti-human IgG and IgG took place,and the resonance scattering intensity at 580 nm (I580nm) was enhanced greatly. The enhanced intensity △IRS is proportional to the IgG concentration from 1.3 to 1.5 × 103 ng·mL 1, with a detection limit of 0.78 ng·mL-1. This assay showed high sensitivity and good selectivity for quantitative determination of IgG in human serum, with satisfactory results.

  17. High enhancement factor of Au nano triangular prism structure for surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuyin; Song, Guofeng

    2017-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) is a well-known detecting tool in biosensing and nonlinear spectroscopy. It can provide a non-invasive alternative without the need for exogenous labels, while the enhancement factor for surface plasmon resonances (SPR) are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators and which can obtain high enhancement. In this work, we investigate the enhancement factor of our structure for surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The absorption spectrum of the structure has been studied, a wide range of absorption has been realized. The enhancement can be as high as 10{16} over standard CARS. Our design is very useful for improving the enhancement factor of surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Project supported by the National Key Research Program of China (No. 2011ZX01015-001) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2011CBA00608, 2012CB619203, 2015CB351902, 2015CB932402).

  18. Multiple defocused coherent diffraction imaging: method for simultaneously reconstructing objects and probe using X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Makoto; Shimomura, Kei; Suzuki, Akihiro; Burdet, Nicolas; Takahashi, Yukio

    2016-05-30

    The sample size must be less than the diffraction-limited focal spot size of the incident beam in single-shot coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) based on a diffract-before-destruction scheme using X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). This is currently a major limitation preventing its wider applications. We here propose multiple defocused CXDI, in which isolated objects are sequentially illuminated with a divergent beam larger than the objects and the coherent diffraction pattern of each object is recorded. This method can simultaneously reconstruct both objects and a probe from the coherent X-ray diffraction patterns without any a priori knowledge. We performed a computer simulation of the prposed method and then successfully demonstrated it in a proof-of-principle experiment at SPring-8. The prposed method allows us to not only observe broad samples but also characterize focused XFEL beams.

  19. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  20. Clinical cancer diagnosis using optical fiber-delivered coherent anti-stokes ramon scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang

    This thesis describes the development of a combined label-free imaging and analytical strategy for intraoperative characterization of cancer lesions using the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging (CARS) technique. A cell morphology-based analytical platform is developed to characterize CARS images and, hence, provide diagnostic information using disease-related pathology features. This strategy is validated for three different applications, including margin detection for radical prostatectomy, differential diagnosis of lung cancer, as well as detection and differentiation of breast cancer subtypes for in situ analysis of margin status during lumpectomy. As the major contribution of this thesis, the developed analytical strategy shows high accuracy and specificity for all three diseases and thus has introduced the CARS imaging technique into the field of human cancer diagnosis, which holds substantial potential for clinical translations. In addition, I have contributed a project aimed at miniaturizing the CARS imaging device into a microendoscope setup through a fiber-delivery strategy. A four-wave-mixing (FWM) background signal, which is caused by simultaneous delivery of the two CARS-generating excitation laser beams, is initially identified. A polarization-based strategy is then introduced and tested for suppression of this FWM noise. The approach shows effective suppression of the FWM signal, both on microscopic and prototype endoscopic setups, indicating the potential of developing a novel microendoscope with a compatible size for clinical use. These positive results show promise for the development of an all-fiber-based, label-free imaging and analytical platform for minimally invasive detection and diagnosis of cancers during surgery or surgical-biopsy, thus improving surgical outcomes and reducing patients' suffering.

  1. Nanometal Skin of Plasmonic Heterostructures for Highly Efficient Near-Field Scattering Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Vecchione, Antonio; Pesce, Giuseppe; di Girolamo, Rocco; Malafronte, Anna; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    In this work, atomic force microscopy probes are functionalized by virtue of self-assembling monolayers of block copolymer (BCP) micelles loaded either with clusters of silver nanoparticles or bimetallic heterostructures consisting of mixed species of silver and gold nanoparticles. The resulting self-organized patterns allow coating the tips with a sort of nanometal skin made of geometrically confined nanoislands. This approach favors the reproducible engineering and tuning of the plasmonic properties of the resulting structured tip by varying the nanometal loading of the micelles. The newly conceived tips are applied for experiments of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) spectroscopy and scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). TERS and s-SNOM probe characterizations on several standard Raman analytes and patterned nanostructures demonstrate excellent enhancement factor with the possibility of fast scanning and spatial resolution nanoparticles at the tip apex, which may promote the tuning of the plasmonic properties, a large enhancement, and the possibility of adding new degrees of freedom for tip functionalization.

  2. Hard scattering of partons as a probe of collisions at RHIC using the STAR detector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, W.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-07-15

    Presented here is the current state of the author`s investigations into the use of hard probes to study pp, pA, and AA collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) being built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The overall goal of the RHIC program is the discovery and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), which is predicted to be formed at the high energy densities reached at RHIC in high energy AA collisions. The term {open_quotes}Hard probes{close_quotes} as used in this document includes those particles whose origin is the result of a direct hard parton scatter (i.e qq, qg, or gg). The final states of these hard parton scatters which the author proposes to study include dijets, gamma-jet coincidences, and inclusive high P{sub t} particle spectra. A brief discussion of the physics objectives is given in section 1. This is followed by an introduction to the STAR detector system in section 2, with particular details given for the proposed STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMC). The present simulation studies and results are given in section 3. The author concludes with a summary and a discussion of future plans in section 4.

  3. Extraction of optical scattering parameters and attenuation compensation in optical coherence tomography images of multi-layered tissue structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Tycho, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    A recently developed analytical optical coherence tomography (OCT) model [Thrane et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 484 (2000)] allows the extraction of optical scattering parameters from OCT images, thereby permitting attenuation compensation in those images. By expanding this theoretical model, we...... have developed a new method for extracting optical scattering parameters from multilayered tissue structures in vivo. To verify this, we used a Monte Carlo (MC) OCT model as a numerical phantom to simulate the OCT signal for het-erogeneous multilayered tissue. Excellent agreement between the extracted...... values of the optical scattering properties of the different layers and the corresponding input reference values of the MC simulation was obtained, which demonstrates the feasibility of the method for in vivo applications. This is to our knowledge the first time such verification has been obtained...

  4. Study of Correlation Between Glucose Concentration and Reduced Scattering Coefficients in Turbid media using Optical Coherence Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Poddar, R; Sen, P; Andrews, J T

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive, non-contact and \\textit{in vivo} monitoring of blood glucose is a long needed pathology tool for saving patients from recurring pain and hassle that can accompany conventional blood glucose testing methods. Optical coherence tomography known for its high axial resolution imaging modality is adopted in this article for monitoring glucose levels in tissue like media non-invasively. Making use of changes in reduced scattering coefficient due to the refractive-index mismatch between the extracellular fluid and the cellular membranes and armed with a theoretical model, we establish a correlation between the glucose concentration and reduced scattering coefficient. The scattering coefficients are extracted from the deconvoluted interference signal by using Monte-Carlo simulation with valid approximations. A program code using NI LabVIEW(^{TM}) is developed for automation of the experiment, data acquisition and analysis.

  5. Reflection and extinction of light by self-assembled monolayers of a quinque-thiophene derivative: A coherent scattering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamrezaie, Fatemeh; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.

    2016-06-01

    Scattering matrix theory is used to describe resonant optical properties of molecular monolayers. Three types of coupling are included: exciton-exciton, exciton-photon, and exciton-phonon coupling. We use the K-matrix formalism, developed originally to describe neutron scattering spectra in nuclear physics to compute the scattering of polaritons by phonons. This perturbation approach takes into account the three couplings and allows one to go beyond molecular exciton theory without the need of introducing additional boundary conditions for the polariton. We demonstrate that reflection, absorption, and extinction of light by 2D self-assembled monolayers of molecules containing quinque-thiophene chromophoric groups can be calculated. The extracted coherence length of the Frenkel exciton is discussed.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of scattering in optical coherence tomography skin images using the extended Huygens-Fresnel theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Mohammad R N; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh; Schofield, John B; Jones, Carole; Sira, Manu; Liu, Yan; Hojjat, Ali

    2013-03-10

    An optical properties extraction algorithm is developed based on enhanced Huygens-Fresnel light propagation theorem, to extract the scattering coefficient of a specific region in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) image. The aim is to quantitatively analyze the OCT images. The algorithm is evaluated using a set of phantoms with different concentrations of scatterers, designed based on Mie theory. The algorithm is then used to analyze basal cell carcinoma and healthy eyelid tissues, demonstrating distinguishable differences in the scattering coefficient between these tissues. In this study, we have taken advantage of the simplification introduced by the utilization of a dynamic focus OCT system. This eliminates the need to deconvolve the reflectivity profile with the confocal gate profile, as the sensitivity of the OCT system is constant throughout the axial range.

  7. Authentication of vegetable oils by confocal X-ray scattering analysis with coherent/incoherent scattered X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an alternative analytical method based on the Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio and effective atomic number for non-destructive identification of vegetable oils using confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry. A calibration curve for the Rayleigh to Compton scattering intensity ratio and effective atomic number was constructed on the basis of a reliable physical model for X-ray scattering. The content of light elements, which are "invisible" using X-ray fluorescence, can be calculated "by difference" from the calibration curve. In this work, we demonstrated the use of this proposed approach to identify complex organic matrices in different vegetable oils with high precision and accuracy.

  8. Detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques by Raman probe spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthäus, Christian; Dochow, Sebastian; Egodage, Kokila D.; Schie, Iwan; Romeike, Bernd F.; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Visualization and characterization of inner arterial plaque depositions is of vital diagnostic interest. Established intravascular imaging techniques provide valuable morphological information, but cannot deliver information about the chemical composition of individual plaques. Probe based Raman spectroscopy offers the possibility for a biochemical characterization of atherosclerotic plaque formations during an intravascular intervention. From post mortem studies it is well known that the severity of a plaque and its stability are strongly correlated with its biochemical composition. Especially the identification of vulnerable plaques remains one of the most important and challenging aspects in cardiology. Thus, specific information about the composition of a plaque would greatly improve the risk assessment and management. Furthermore, knowledge about the composition can offer new therapeutic and medication strategies. Plaque calcifications as well as major lipid components such as cholesterol, cholesterol esters and triglycerides can be spectroscopically easily differentiated. Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently a prominent catheter based imaging technique for the localization and visualization of atherosclerotic plaque depositions. The high resolution of OCT with 10 to 15 µm allows for very detailed characterization of morphological features such as different plaque formations, thin fibrous caps and accurate measurements of lesion lengths. In combination with OCT imaging the obtained spectral information can provide substantial information supporting on on-site diagnosis of various plaque types and therefor an improved risk assessment. The potential and feasibility of combining OCT with Raman spectroscopy is demonstrated on excised plaque samples, as well as under in vivo conditions. Acknowledgements: Financial support from the Carl Zeiss Foundation is greatly acknowledged.

  9. High-harmonic probing of electronic coherence in dynamically aligned molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, P M; Gijsbertsen, A; Lucchese, R R; Rohringer, N; Wörner, H J

    2013-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate a new approach to measuring coherent electron wave packets using high-harmonic spectroscopy. By preparing a molecule in a coherent superposition of electronic states, we show that electronic coherence opens previously unobserved high-harmonic-generation channels that connect distinct but coherently related electronic states. Performing the measurements in dynamically aligned nitric oxide (NO) molecules we observe the complex temporal evolution of the electronic coherence under coupling to nuclear motion. Choosing a weakly allowed transition to prepare the wave packet, we demonstrate an unprecedented sensitivity that arises from optical interference between coherent and incoherent pathways. This mechanism converts a 0.1 $%$ excitation fraction into a $\\sim$20 $%$ signal modulation.

  10. Probing the Structure of Ionic Liquid Surfaces by Rotationally and Electronically Inelastic Scattering of no

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemkiewicz, M. P.; Zutz, A.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL’s) are a highly diverse class of materials with many potential technological applications. They are candidates for use in advanced electrolytes, green solvents, and supported liquid membranes for CO_2 sequestration. We present studies where inelastic scattering of high or low velocity nitric oxide provides insight into the microscopic structure of these complex surfaces. As an open shell diatomic, jet-cooled NO [^2π1/2(J = 0.5)] features both molecular and electronic collision dynamics as seen by probing scattered rotational and spin-orbit distributions respectively. These studies show substantial variation in degree of rotational and electronic excitation as ionic liquid identity is varied. Also, surface heating is found to have a strong effect on scattered spin-orbit branching, possibly due to the dependence of surface structure on temperature. This is discussed in terms of a picture where the electronic degree of freedom may serve as a sensitive measure of the cationic versus anionic nature of the top few layers of this material.

  11. Coherent X-Radiation Excited by a Beam of Multiply Scattered Relativistic Electrons in a Single Crystal in the Bragg Scattering Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazhevich, S. V.; Noskov, A. V.; Nemtsev, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A dynamic theory of coherent x-radiation emitted by a divergent beam of relativistic electrons traversing a thin single-crystal plate is developed which takes into account multiple scattering of the electrons on the target atoms. The case is considered in which the target is quite thin, so that it is not necessary to take absorption of radiation into account, but the electron path in the target is quite long, so that it is necessary to take multiple scattering into account. Expressions are obtained which describe the spectral-angular characteristics of parametric x-radiation and diffracted transient radiation under these conditions. Conditions are described under which diffracted bremsstrahlung radiation can be neglected. The possibility of manifesting the effects of dynamic diffraction is investigated.

  12. Sapphire ball lensed fiber probe for common-path optical coherence tomography in ocular imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingtao; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    We describe a novel common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) fiber probe design using a sapphire ball lens for cross-sectional imaging and sensing in retina vitrectomy surgery. Single mode Gaussian beam (TEM00) simulation was used to optimize lateral resolution and working distance (WD) of the common-path probe. A theoretical sensitivity model for CP-OCT was prosed to assess its optimal performance based an unbalanced photodetector configuration. Two probe designs with working distances (WD) 415μm and 1221μm and lateral resolution 11μm and 18μm, respectively were implemented with sensitivity up to 88dB. The designs are also fully compatible with conventional Michelson interferometer based OCT configurations. The reference plane of the probe, located at the distal beam exit interface of the single mode fiber (SMF), was encased within a 25-gauge hypodermic needle by the sapphire ball lens facilitates its applications in bloody and harsh environments. The performances of the fiber probe with 11μm of lateral resolution and 19μm of axial resolution were demonstrated by cross-sectional imaging of a cow cornea and retina in vitro with a 1310nm swept source OCT system. This probe was also attached to a piezoelectric motor for active compensation of physiological tremor for handheld retinal surgical tools.

  13. Photoacoustic endoscopy probe using a coherent fibre-optic bundle and Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensor (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Rehman; Beard, Paul C.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) probes for the clinical assessment of pathologies in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, guiding minimally invasive laparoscopic surgeries and applications in foetal medicine. However, most previous PAE probes integrate mechanical scanners and piezoelectric transducers at the distal end which can be technically complex, expensive and pose challenges in achieving the necessary level of miniaturisation. We present two novel all-optical forward-viewing endoscopic probes operating in widefield tomography mode that have the potential to overcome these limitations. In one configuration, the probe comprises a transparent 40 MHz Fabry-Pérot ultrasound sensor deposited at the tip of a rigid, 3 mm diameter coherent fibre-optic bundle. In this way, the distal end of coherent fibre bundle acts as a 2D array of wideband ultrasound detectors. In another configuration, an optical relay is used between the distal end face of flexible fibre bundle and the Fabry-Pérot sensor to enlarge the lateral field of view to 6 mm x 6 mm. In both configurations, the pulsed excitation laser beam is full-field coupled into the fibre bundle at the proximal end for uniform backward-mode illumination of the tissue at the probe tip. In order to record the photoacoustic waves arriving at the probe tip, the proximal end of the fibre bundle is optically scanned in 2D with a CW wavelength-tunable interrogation laser beam thereby interrogating different spatial points on the sensor. A time-reversal image reconstruction algorithm was used to reconstruct a 3D image from the detected signals. The 3D field of view of the flexible PAE probe is 6 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm and the axial and lateral spatial resolution is 30 µm and 90 µm, respectively. 3D imaging capability is demonstrated using tissue phantoms, ex vivo tissues and in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first forward-viewing implementation of a photoacoustic

  14. Probing interactions and phase separations of proteins, colloids, and polymers with light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish Singh

    solutions at high salt concentration, over a wide range of pH values and temperatures for the common tracer particle polystyrene flocculates. We applied dynamic light scattering to measure the viscoelastic responses of polystyrene probe particles embedded in solutions and gels of two different polymers: polyacrylamide (PAAm) and poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (poly-NiPAAm).

  15. A unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear resonance and inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limbach, H.H.; Ulrich, S.; Buntkowsky, G. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Organische Chemie; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Chaudret, B. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Lab. de Chimie de Coordination du C.N.R.S.; Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-08-12

    In this paper a unified view of coherent and incoherent dihydrogen exchange in transition metal hydrides by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is presented. It is shown that both exchange processes coexist i.e. do not transform into each other although they may dominate the spectra in different temperature ranges. This superposition is the consequence of the incorporation of the tunnel frequency J of the coherent process into the nuclear two-spin hamiltonian of hydrogen pairs which allows to treat the problem using the well known density matrix theory of NMR line-shapes developed by Alexander and Binsch. It is shown that this theory can also be used to predict the line-shapes of the rotational tunneling transitions observed in the INS spectra of transition metal dihydrogen complexes and that both NMR and INS spectra depend on similar parameters.

  16. Probing the pairing symmetry of the iron pnictides with electronic Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.R.

    2010-04-29

    An important issue in the study of the iron-arsenic based superconductors is the symmetry of the superconducting gap, a problem complicated by multiple gaps on different Fermi surface sheets. Electronic Raman scattering is a flexible bulk probe which allows one in principle to determine gap magnitudes and test for gap nodes in different regions of the Brillouin zone by employing different photon polarization states. Here we calculate the clean Raman intensity for A{sub 1g}, B{sub 1g} and B{sub 2g} polarizations, and discuss the peak structures and low-energy power laws which might be expected for several popular models of the superconducting gap in these systems.

  17. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-03: Tissue Equivalent Material Phantom to Test and Optimize Coherent Scatter Imaging for Tumor Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Methods: A breast phantom has been designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The tissue-equivalent phantom was modeled as a hollow plastic cylinder containing multiple cylindrical and spherical inserts that can be positioned, rearranged, or removed to model different breast geometries. Each enclosure can be filled with a tissue-equivalent material and excised human tumors. In this study, beef and lard, placed inside 2-mm diameter plastic Nalgene containers, were used as surrogates for fibroglandular and adipose tissue, respectively. The phantom was imaged at 125 kVp, 40 mA for 10 seconds each with a 1-mm pencil beam. The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor, or momentum transfer (q) spectrum of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: The tissue equivalent phantom was found to accurately model different types of breast tissue by qualitatively comparing our measured form factors to those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Our imaging system has been able to define the location and composition of the various materials in the phantom. Conclusion: This work introduces a new tissue equivalent phantom for testing and optimization of our coherent scatter imaging system for material classification. In future studies, the phantom will enable the use of a variety of materials including excised human tissue specimens in evaluating and optimizing our imaging system using pencil- and fan-beam geometries. United States Department of Homeland Security Duke University

  18. Ultrahigh resolution endoscopic spectral domain optical coherence tomography with a tiny rotary probe driven by a hollow ultrasonic motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Huo, Tiancheng; Wang, Chengming; Zheng, Jing-gao; Zhou, Tieying; Xue, Ping

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel rotary endoscopic probe for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The probe with a large N.A. objective lens is driven by an ultra-small hollow rectangular ultrasonic motor for circular scanning. Compared to the conventional driven techniques, the hollow ultrasonic motor enables the fiber to pass through its inside. Therefore the fiber, the objective lens and the motor are all at the same side. This enables 360 degree unobstructed imaging without any shadow resulted from power wire as in the conventional motor-driven endoscopic OCT. Moreover, it shortens the length of the rigid tip and enhances the flexibility of the probe. Meanwhile, the ultrasonic motor is robust, simple, quiet and of high torque, very suitable for OCT endoscopic probe. The side length of the motor is 0.7 mm with 5mm in length. The outer diameter of the probe is 1.5mm. A significant improvement in the lateral resolution is demonstrated due to the novel design of the objective lens. A right-angle lens is utilized instead of the traditional right-angle prism as the last optics close to the sample, leading to a reduction of the working distance and an enlargement of the N.A. of the objective lens. It is demonstrated that the endoscopic SD-OCT system achieves an axial resolution of ~7μm, a lateral resolution of ~6μm and a SNR of ~96dB.

  19. Fiber-optical sensor with miniaturized probe head and nanometer accuracy based on spatially modulated low-coherence interferogram analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depiereux, Frank; Lehmann, Peter; Pfeifer, Tilo; Schmitt, Robert

    2007-06-10

    Fiber-optical sensors have some crucial advantages compared with rigid optical systems. They allow miniaturization and flexibility of system setups. Nevertheless, optical principles such as low-coherence interferometry can be realized by use of fiber optics. We developed and realized an approach for a fiber-optical sensor, which is based on the analysis of spatially modulated low-coherence interferograms. The system presented consists of three units, a miniaturized sensing probe, a broadband fiber-coupled light source, and an adapted Michelson interferometer, which is used as an optical receiver. Furthermore, the signal processing procedure, which was developed for the interferogram analysis in order to achieve nanometer measurement accuracy, is discussed. A system prototype has been validated thoroughly in different experiments. The results approve the accuracy of the sensor.

  20. Validation of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging for normal and neoplastic breast tissues via surgical pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. E.; Albanese, K. E.; Lakshmanan, M. N.; McCall, S. J.; Greenberg, J. A.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2016-03-01

    This study intends to validate the sensitivity and specificity of coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging (CACSSI) by comparison to standard histological preparation and pathologic analysis methods used to differentiate normal and neoplastic breast tissues. A composite overlay of the CACSSI rendered image and pathologist interpreted stained sections validate the ability of CACSSI to differentiate normal and neoplastic breast structures ex-vivo. Via comparison to pathologist annotated slides, the CACSSI system may be further optimized to maximize sensitivity and specificity for differentiation of breast carcinomas.

  1. Spatiotemporal coherent control of light through a multiply scattering medium with the Multi-Spectral Transmission Matri

    CERN Document Server

    Mounaix, Mickael; Defienne, Hugo; Volpe, Giorgio; Katz, Ori; Grésillon, Samuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    We report broadband characterization of the propagation of light through a multiply scattering medium by means of its Multi-Spectral Transmission Matrix. Using a single spatial light modulator, our approach enables the full control of both spatial and spectral properties of an ultrashort pulse transmitted through the medium. We demonstrate spatiotemporal focusing of the pulse at any arbitrary position and time with any desired spectral shape. Our approach opens new perspectives for fundamental studies of light-matter interaction in disordered media, and has potential applications in sensing, coherent control and imaging.

  2. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering light generation in BBO crystal by using two crossing femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jun; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2008-07-01

    As broad as 12000 cm(-1) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) light from ultraviolet to infrared was generated in a BBO crystal by using two crossing femtosecond laser pulses with 30% conversion efficiency. More than fifteenth-order anti-Stokes and second-order Stokes Raman sidebands were observed with nice Gaussian spatial mode. The effect of the crossing angle between two input beams on the spectrum and emitting angle of the Raman sidebands was studied in detail. Calculation shows that the phase-matching condition determines the frequencies and angles of the sidebands.

  3. Outflow structure of the quiet sun corona probed by spacecraft radio scintillations in strong scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 484-8601 (Japan); Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, Yamashina, Kyoto 607-8471, Japan. (Japan); Miyamoto, Mayu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Häusler, Bernd [Institut für Raumfahrttechnik, Universität der Bundeswehr München, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Pätzold, Martin [Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung, Department Planetenforschung, Universität zu Köln, Aachener Strasse 209, D-50931 Köln (Germany); Nabatov, Alexander [The Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Chervonoprapornaya, Strasse 4, Kharkov 61002 (Ukraine); Yaji, Kentaro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yamada, Manabu, E-mail: imamura.takeshi@jaxa.jp [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1, Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan)

    2014-06-20

    Radio scintillation observations have been unable to probe flow speeds in the low corona where the scattering of radio waves is exceedingly strong. Here we estimate outflow speeds continuously from the vicinity of the Sun to the outer corona (heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 solar radii) by applying the strong scattering theory to radio scintillations for the first time, using the Akatsuki spacecraft as the radio source. Small, nonzero outflow speeds were observed over a wide latitudinal range in the quiet-Sun low corona, suggesting that the supply of plasma from closed loops to the solar wind occurs over an extended area. The existence of power-law density fluctuations down to the scale of 100 m was suggested, which is indicative of well-developed turbulence which can play a key role in heating the corona. At higher altitudes, a rapid acceleration typical of radial open fields is observed, and the temperatures derived from the speed profile show a distinct maximum in the outer corona. This study opened up a possibility of observing detailed flow structures near the Sun from a vast amount of existing interplanetary scintillation data.

  4. Inelastic light scattering to probe strongly correlated bosons in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, Chiara; Fabbri, Nicole; Fallani, Leonardo; Clement, David; Inguscio, Massimo, E-mail: fort@lens.unifi.it [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy (LENS), via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-01-10

    We have used inelastic light scattering to study correlated phases of an array of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases. In the linear response regime, the observed spectra are proportional to the dynamic structure factor. In particular we have investigated the superfluid to Mott insulator crossover loading the one-dimensional gases in an optical lattice and monitoring the appearance of an energy gap due to finite particle-hole excitation energy. We attribute the low frequency side of the spectra to the presence of some superfluid and normal phase fraction between the Mott insulator regions with different fillings produced in the inhomogeneous systems. In the Mott phase we also investigated excitations to higher excited bands of the optical lattice, the spectra obtained in this case being connected to the single particle spectral function. In one-dimensional systems the effect of thermal fluctuations and interactions is enhanced by the reduced dimensionality showing up in the dynamic structure factor. We measured the dynamic structure factor of an array of one-dimensional bosonic gases pointing out the effect of temperature-induced phase fluctuations in reducing the coherence length of the system.

  5. Physical optics solution for the scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a statistically rough material surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Milo W; Basu, Santasri; Spencer, Mark F; Cusumano, Salvatore J; Fiorino, Steven T

    2013-03-25

    The scattering of a partially-coherent wave from a statistically rough material surface is investigated via derivation of the scattered field cross-spectral density function. Two forms of the cross-spectral density are derived using the physical optics approximation. The first is applicable to smooth-to-moderately rough surfaces and is a complicated expression of source and surface parameters. Physical insight is gleaned from its analytical form and presented in this work. The second form of the cross-spectral density function is applicable to very rough surfaces and is remarkably physical. Its form is discussed at length and closed-form expressions are derived for the angular spectral degree of coherence and spectral density radii. Furthermore, it is found that, under certain circumstances, the cross-spectral density function maintains a Gaussian Schell-model form. This is consistent with published results applicable only in the paraxial regime. Lastly, the closed-form cross-spectral density functions derived here are rigorously validated with scatterometer measurements and full-wave electromagnetic and physical optics simulations. Good agreement is noted between the analytical predictions and the measured and simulated results.

  6. Impact of Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering on Direct Dark Matter Searches based on CaWO$_4$ Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Gütlein, A; Bento, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Erb, A; Feilitzsch, F v; Iachellini, N Ferreiro; Gorla, P; Hauff, D; Jochum, J; Kiefer, M; Kluck, H; Kraus, H; Lanfranchi, J -C; Loebell, J; Münster, A; Petricca, F; Potzel, W; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Roth, S; Rottler, K; Sailer, C; Schäffner, K; Schieck, J; Schönert, S; Seidel, W; Sivers, M v; Stodolsky, L; Strandhagen, C; Strauss, R; Tanzke, A; Uffinger, M; Ulrich, A; Usherov, I; Wawoczny, S; Willers, M; Wüstrich, M; Zöller, A

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric and solar neutrinos scattering coherently off target nuclei could be a serious background source for the next generation of direct dark matter searches. We present our studies on the maximal sensitivity on the elastic spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section which can be achieved by a background-free experiment based on calcium tungstate as target material. An experiment achieves this maximal sensitivity when one neutrino event is expected for the experiment's energy threshold and exposure. Thus, a first detection of coherent neutrino nucleus scattering (CNNS) could also be in reach of such an experiment, if neutron-like backgrounds are small enough ($\\lesssim 0.1$ events for the respective exposures). Due to the small energies of solar neutrinos, calcium tungstate with its light nuclei oxygen and calcium seems to be well suited for a detection of CNNS. We show that for a counting experiment using only the integral above an energy threshold as well as a Bayesian analysis taking into account spe...

  7. Coexistence of diffuse liquid-like scattering and emergent coherent mode in Fe1+yTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Fobes, David; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Savici, Andrei; Garlea, Ovidiu; Abernathy, Douglas

    2015-03-01

    Neutron scattering in the chalcogenide parent material FeTe reveals diffuse dynamical magnetic response, suggesting dynamical correlation length of only 1-2 lattice repeats. The wave-vector structure of magnetic fluctuations can be best described by a liquid-like state with local order in the form of weakly correlated, co-aligned four-spin plaquettes. Additionally, this dynamical magnetism is extremely robust. It survives to temperatures well above the Neel ordering T ~ 60 K, and even exhibits unusual temperature-induced enhancement. More surprisingly, no coherent excitation was seen to emerge when system is cooled into magnetically ordered state. Nevertheless, spin-wave theory has been applied to interpret the measured spectra, but the agreement of its predictions with the experiment was found to be marginal at best. Here we report the discovery of a coherent magnetic excitation in the magnetically ordered state at low temperature, which coexists with the diffuse, liquid-like magnetic response. This resolves puzzle of surprising absence of coherent excitations associated with magnetic order in FeTe, where emergence of sharp electronic resonance near the Fermi energy has been observed by ARPES. This work was supported by the US DOE under Contract DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  8. Vertical coherence and forward scattering from the sea surface and the relation to the directional wave spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Peter H; Plant, William J; Dall'Osto, David R

    2013-09-01

    Results of an experiment to measure vertical spatial coherence from acoustic paths interacting once with the sea surface but at perpendicular azimuth angles are presented. The measurements were part of the Shallow Water 2006 program that took place off the coast of New Jersey in August 2006. An acoustic source, frequency range 6-20 kHz, was deployed at depth 40 m, and signals were recorded on a 1.4 m long vertical line array centered at depth 25 m and positioned at range 200 m. The vertical array consisted of four omni-directional hydrophones and vertical coherences were computed between pairs of these hydrophones. Measurements were made over four source-receiver bearing angles separated by 90°, during which sea surface conditions remained stable and characterized by a root-mean-square wave height of 0.17 m and a mixture of swell and wind waves. Vertical coherences show a statistically significant difference depending on source-receiver bearing when the acoustic frequency is less than about 12 kHz, with results tending to fade at higher frequencies. This paper presents field observations and comparisons of these observations with two modeling approaches, one based on bistatic forward scattering and the other on a rough surface parabolic wave equation utilizing synthetic sea surfaces.

  9. Measurement of Coherent π+ Production in Low Energy Neutrino-Carbon Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent π+ production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV, and with a restriction on the final state phase space volume in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso et al., the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. We observe a clear event excess above background, disagreeing with the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region. The measured flux-averaged cross sections are below those predicted by both the Rein-Sehgal and Alvarez-Ruso et al. models.

  10. Measurement of Coherent π^{+} Production in Low Energy Neutrino-Carbon Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Ban, S; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buizza Avanzini, M; Calland, R G; Campbell, T; Cao, S; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Coplowe, D; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S G; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Harada, J; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Lasorak, P; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Novella, P; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radermacher, T; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Stowell, P; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-11-04

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent π^{+} production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV, and with a restriction on the final state phase space volume in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso et al., the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. We observe a clear event excess above background, disagreeing with the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region. The measured flux-averaged cross sections are below those predicted by both the Rein-Sehgal and Alvarez-Ruso et al.

  11. Measurement of coherent $\\pi^{+}$ production in low energy neutrino-Carbon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00508393

    2016-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent $\\pi^{+}$ production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV to a restricted final state phase space region in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso {\\it et al.}, the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. This results contradicts the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region.

  12. Probing color coherence effects in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Tikvica, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bluj, Michal; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Goebel, Kristin; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Marchesini, Ivan; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Ntomari, Eleni; Topsis-giotis, Iasonas; Gouskos, Loukas; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Saxena, Pooja; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Anil; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Musenich, Riccardo; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Triossi, Andrea; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Grigelionis, Ignas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Wolszczak, Weronika; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Kilminster, Benjamin; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wang, Minzu; Asavapibhop, Burin; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Bahtiyar, Hüseyin; Barlas, Esra; Cankocak, Kerem; Günaydin, Yusuf Oguzhan; Vardarli, Fuat Ilkehan; Yücel, Mete; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Ilic, Jelena; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Felcini, Marta; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Takasugi, Eric; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Kcira, Dorian; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Ratnikova, Natalia; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Lacroix, Florent; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Gude, Alexander; Haupt, Jason; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Summers, Don; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Wan, Zongru; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Lusito, Letizia; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Vuosalo, Carl; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Alagoz, Enver; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    A study of color coherence effects in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data used in the analysis were collected in 2010 with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. Events are selected that contain at least three jets and where the two jets with the largest transverse momentum exhibit a back-to-back topology. The measured angular correlation between the second- and third-leading jet is shown to be sensitive to color coherence effects, and is compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo models with various implementations of color coherence. None of the models describe the data satisfactorily.

  13. Separation of coherent and incoherent scattering in liquid para-H{sub 2} by polarisation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Mompean, F.J. [Madrid Univ. (Spain); Schaerpf, O.; Andersen, K.H. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Fak, B. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    In the 1960 IAEA Symposium on Neutron Scattering, Sarma presented his theoretical study on the scattering of cold neutrons by liquid hydrogen and demonstrated how the intimate coupling between nuclear and rotational degrees of freedom finally results in the possibility of observing collective modes from this material, which to many neutron scatterers is synonymous with `incoherent`. This problem is investigated with polarised neutrons to gain access to a limited region of the (Q,E) space where the collective response from this liquid is found. (author).

  14. Resonance Rayleigh scattering and resonance non-linear scattering method for the determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics with water solubility CdS quantum dots as probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengwen; Liu, Shaopu; Wang, Lei; Peng, Juanjuan; He, Youqiu

    2009-09-01

    In pH 6.6 Britton-Robinson buffer medium, the CdS quantum dots capped by thioglycolic acid could react with aminoglycoside (AGs) antibiotics such as neomycin sulfate (NEO) and streptomycin sulfate (STP) to form the large aggregates by virtue of electrostatic attraction and the hydrophobic force, which resulted in a great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and resonance non-linear scattering such as second-order scattering (SOS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). The maximum scattering peak was located at 310 nm for RRS, 568 nm for SOS and 390 nm for FDS, respectively. The enhancements of scattering intensity (Δ I) were directly proportional to the concentration of AGs in a certain ranges. A new method for the determination of trace NEO and STP using CdS quantum dots probe was developed. The detection limits (3 σ) were 1.7 ng mL -1 (NEO) and 4.4 ng mL -1 (STP) by RRS method, were 5.2 ng mL -1 (NEO) and 20.9 ng mL -1 (STP) by SOS method and were 4.4 ng mL -1 (NEO) and 25.7 ng mL -1 (STP) by FDS method, respectively. The sensitivity of RRS method was the highest. The optimum conditions and influence factors were investigated. In addition, the reaction mechanism was discussed.

  15. In situ dissolution analysis using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and hyperspectral CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, Andrew; Garbacik, Erik; Offerhaus, Herman; Kleinebudde, Peter; Strachan, Clare

    2013-01-01

    The solid-state form of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in an oral dosage form plays an important role in determining the dissolution rate of the API. As the solid-state form can change during dissolution, there is a need to monitor the oral dosage form during dissolution testing. Coherent

  16. Sensitivity to Z-prime and non-standard neutrino interactions from ultra-low threshold neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Bhaskar; Strigari, Louis E; Walker, Joel W

    2016-01-01

    We discuss prospects for probing Z-prime and non-standard neutrino interactions using neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering with ultra-low energy (~ 10 eV) threshold Si and Ge detectors. The analysis is performed in the context of a specific and contemporary reactor-based experimental proposal, developed in cooperation with the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University, and referencing available technology based upon economical and scalable detector arrays. For expected exposures, we show that sensitivity to the Z-prime mass is on the order of several TeV, and is complementary to the LHC search with low mass detectors in the near term. This technology is also shown to provide sensitivity to the neutrino magnetic moment, at a level that surpasses terrestrial limits, and is competitive with more stringent astrophysical bounds. We demonstrate the benefits of combining silicon and germanium detectors for distinguishing between classes of models of new physics, and for suppressing correlated systematic unc...

  17. Rigorous and asymptotic models of coherent scattering from random rough layers with applications to roadways and geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe; Le Bastard, Cédric

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the rigorous efficient PILE (Propagation-Inside-Layer Expansion) numerical method [1] and an extension of the Ament model [2] to calculate the field scattered by three homogeneous media separated by two random rough surfaces. Here, the study is applied to ground penetrating radar (GPR) (nadir angle, wide band) for nondestructive survey by taking the roughness of the surfaces into account and by calculating the contribution of each echo coming from the multiple scattering inside the layer. Applications to roadways and geoscience are investigated. The PILE method starts from the Method of Moments (MoM), and the impedance matrix is inverted by blocks from the Taylor series expansion of the inverse of the Schur complement. Its great advantage is that it is rigorous, with a simple formulation and has a straightforward physical interpretation. Actually, this last property relies on the fact that each block of the impedance matrix is linked to a particular and quasi-independent physical process occurring during the multiple scattering between the two rough surfaces. Furthermore, the PILE method allows us to use any acceleration algorithm (MLFMM, BMIA/CAG, Forward-Backward with or without Spectral Acceleration, etc.) developed for a single interface. In addition, an asymptotic approach is extended to rough layered media: the scalar Kirchhoff-tangent plane approximation (SKA), for calculating the coherent scattering from the rough layer. The numerical rigorous PILE method is used as a reference to validate this asymptotic model. The study focuses on 2D problems with so-called 1D surfaces, for computational ease of the reference numerical method. Nevertheless, it must be highlighted that the SKA approach can readily be applied to 3D problems. This approach is applied to rough layers with two slightly rough surfaces characterized by either Gaussian or exponential correlation functions. The height probability density function (PDF) is assumed to be Gaussian

  18. Local Probing of Phase Coherence in a Strongly Interacting 2D Quantum Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luick, Niclas; Siegl, Jonas; Hueck, Klaus; Morgener, Kai; Lompe, Thomas; Weimer, Wolf; Moritz, Henning

    2016-05-01

    The dimensionality of a quantum system has a profound impact on its coherence and superfluid properties. In 3D superfluids, bosonic atoms or Cooper pairs condense into a macroscopic wave function exhibiting long-range phase coherence. Meanwhile, 2D superfluids show a strikingly different behavior: True long-range coherence is precluded by thermal fluctuations, nevertheless Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory predicts that 2D systems can still become superfluid. The superfluid state is characterized by an algebraic decay of phase correlations g1(r) ~r - τ / 4 , where the decay exponent τ is directly related to the superfluid density ns according to τ = 4 /(nsλdB2) . I will present local coherence measurements in a strongly interacting 2D gas of diatomic 6 Li molecules. A self-interference technique allows us to locally extract the algebraic decay exponent and to reconstruct the superfluid density. We determine the scaling of the decay exponent with phase space density to provide a benchmark for studies of 2D superfluids in the strongly interacting regime.

  19. First correlated measurements of the shape and light scattering properties of cloud particles using the new Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdelmonem

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds requires knowledge of the relationship between their microphysics and the single scattering properties of cloud particles. Usually, this relationship is obtained by modeling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. We present here a novel optical sensor (the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe, PHIPS designed to measure simultaneously the 3-D morphology and the corresponding optical and microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles. Clouds containing particles ranging from a few micrometers to about 800 μm diameter in size can be characterized systematically with an optical resolution power of 2 μm and polar scattering resolution of 1° for forward scattering directions (from 1° to 10° and 8° for side and backscattering directions (from 18° to 170°. The maximum acquisition rates for scattering phase functions and images are 262 KHz and 10 Hz, respectively. Some preliminary results collected in two ice cloud campaigns conducted in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber are presented. PHIPS showed reliability in operation and produced size distributions and images comparable to those given by other certified cloud particles instruments. A 3-D model of a hexagonal ice plate is constructed and the corresponding scattering phase function is compared to that modeled using the Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF program. PHIPS is a highly promising novel airborne optical sensor for studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds and correlating the particle habit-scattering properties which will serve as a reference for other single, or multi-independent, measurement instruments.

  20. Coherent evolution of parahydrogen induced polarisation using laser pump, NMR probe spectroscopy: Theoretical framework and experimental observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Meghan E; Procacci, Barbara; Henshaw, Sarah-Louise; Perutz, Robin N; Duckett, Simon B

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a pump-probe method that uses a single laser pulse to introduce parahydrogen (p-H2) into a metal dihydride complex and then follows the time-evolution of the p-H2-derived nuclear spin states by NMR. We present here a theoretical framework to describe the oscillatory behaviour of the resultant hyperpolarised NMR signals using a product operator formalism. We consider the cases where the p-H2-derived protons form part of an AX, AXY, AXYZ or AA'XX' spin system in the product molecule. We use this framework to predict the patterns for 2D pump-probe NMR spectra, where the indirect dimension represents the evolution during the pump-probe delay and the positions of the cross-peaks depend on the difference in chemical shift of the p-H2-derived protons and the difference in their couplings to other nuclei. The evolution of the NMR signals of the p-H2-derived protons, as well as the transfer of hyperpolarisation to other NMR-active nuclei in the product, is described. The theoretical framework is tested experimentally for a set of ruthenium dihydride complexes representing the different spin systems. Theoretical predictions and experimental results agree to within experimental error for all features of the hyperpolarised (1)H and (31)P pump-probe NMR spectra. Thus we establish the laser pump, NMR probe approach as a robust way to directly observe and quantitatively analyse the coherent evolution of p-H2-derived spin order over micro-to-millisecond timescales. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The manipulation of massive ro-vibronic superpositions using time-frequency-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TFRCARS) from quantum control to quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zadoyan, R; Lidar, D A; Apkarian, V A

    2001-01-01

    Molecular ro-vibronic coherences, joint energy-time distributions of quantum amplitudes, are selectively prepared, manipulated, and imaged in Time-Frequency-Resolved Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (TFRCARS) measurements using femtosecond laser pulses. The studies are implemented in iodine vapor, with its thermally occupied statistical ro-vibrational density serving as initial state. The evolution of the massive ro-vibronic superpositions, consisting of 1000 eigenstates, is followed through two-dimensional images. The first- and second-order coherences are captured using time-integrated frequency-resolved CARS, while the third-order coherence is captured using time-gated frequency-resolved CARS. The Fourier filtering provided by time integrated detection projects out single ro-vibronic transitions, while time-gated detection allows the projection of arbitrary ro-vibronic superpositions from the coherent third-order polarization. Beside the control and imaging of chemistry, the controlled manipulation of...

  2. Probing the interaction of nanoparticles with mucin for drug delivery applications using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter Charles; Cattoz, Beatrice; Ibrahim, Mervat Shafik; Anuonye, Josephine Chibuzor

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery via the eye, nose, gastrointestinal tract and lung is of great interest as they represent patient-compliant and facile methods to administer drugs. However, for a drug to reach the systemic circulation it must penetrate the "mucus barrier". An understanding of the characteristics of the mucus barrier is therefore important in the design of mucus penetrating drug delivery vehicles e.g. nanoparticles. Here, a range of nanoparticles - silica, aluminium coated silica, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PEGylated PLGA - each with known but different physicochemical characteristics were examined in the presence of mucin to identify those characteristics that engender nanoparticle/mucin interactions and thus, to define "design rules" for mucus penetrating (nano)particles (MPP), at least in terms of the surface characteristics of charge and hydrophilicity. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and rheology have been used to assess the interaction between such nanoparticles and mucin. It was found that negatively charged and hydrophilic nanoparticles do not exhibit an interaction with mucin whereas positively charged and hydrophobic nanoparticles show a strong interaction. Surface grafted poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains significantly reduced this interaction. This study clearly demonstrates that the established colloid science techniques of DLS and rheology are very powerful screening tools to probe nanoparticle/mucin interactions.

  3. Probing a scattering resonance in Rydberg molecules with a Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Schlagmüller, Michael; Nguyen, Huan; Lochead, Graham; Engel, Felix; Böttcher, Fabian; Westphal, Karl M; Kleinbach, Kathrin S; Löw, Robert; Hofferberth, Sebastian; Pfau, Tilman; Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopy of a single Rydberg atom excited within a Bose-Einstein condensate. We not only observe the density shift as discovered by Amaldi and Segre in 1934, but a line shape which changes with the principal quantum number n. The line broadening depends precisely on the interaction potential energy curves of the Rydberg electron with the neutral atom perturbers. In particular, we show the relevance of the triplet p-wave shape resonance in the Rydberg electron-Rb(5S) scattering, which significantly modifies the interaction potential. With a peak density of 5.5x10^14 cm^-3, and therefore an inter-particle spacing of 1300 a0 within a Bose-Einstein condensate, the potential energy curves can be probed at these Rydberg ion - neutral atom separations. We present a simple microscopic model for the spectroscopic line shape by treating the atoms overlapped with the Rydberg orbit as zero-velocity, uncorrelated, point-like particles, with binding energies associated with their ion-neutral separation, and ...

  4. Resonance Rayleigh scattering method for highly sensitive detection of chitosan using aniline blue as probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiai; Ma, Caijuan; Su, Zhengquan; Bai, Yan

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a highly sensitive and accurate approach using aniline blue (AB) (water soluble) as a probe to determine chitosan (CTS) through Resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). Under optimum experimental conditions, the intensities of RRS were linearly proportional to the concentration of CTS in the range from 0.01 to 3.5 μg/mL, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 6.94 ng/mL. Therefore, a new and highly sensitive method based on RRS for the determination of CTS has been developed. Furthermore, the effect of molecular weight of CTS and the effect of the degree of deacetylation of CTS on the accurate quantification of CTS was studied. The experimental data was analyzed by linear regression analysis, which indicated that the molecular weight and the degree of deacetylation of CTS had no statistical significance and this method could be used to determine CTS accurately. Meanwhile, this assay was applied for CTS determination in health products with satisfactory results.

  5. Structural formation of huntingtin-like aggregates probed by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; Perevozchikova, Tatiana [ORNL; Berthelier-Jung, Valerie M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington s disease (HD), aspects concerning the earliest of protein structures that form along the aggregation pathway have increasingly gained attention since these particular species are likely to be neurotoxic. We used time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to probe in solution these transient structures formed by peptides having the N-terminal sequence context of mutant huntingtin (Htt) exon 1. We obtained snapshots of the formed aggregates as the kinetic reaction ensued to yield quantitative information on their size and mass. At the early stage, small precursor species with an initial radius of gyration (Rg) of 16.1 5.9 and average mass of a dimer to trimer were monitored. Structural growth was treated as two modes with a transition from three-dimensional early aggregate formation to two-dimensional fibril growth and association. Our SANS results on the internal structure of the mature fibrils demonstrate loose packing with about 1 peptide per 4.75 -sheet repeat distance, which is shown to be quantitatively consistent with a -helix model. This research provides new insights into the structures forming along the pathway of Htt exon 1 aggregation and should assist in determining the role that precursors play in neuronal toxicity.

  6. Probing phase of a scattering amplitude beyond the plane-wave approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Karlovets, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Within a plane-wave approach, a number of scattering events in a generic collision process is insensitive to an overall complex phase of a transition amplitude, although this phase is extremely important for a number of problems, especially in hadronic physics at the LHC energies. In reality, however, the particles are better described as localized wave packets with the mean momenta $p$, their uncertainties $\\sigma$, and here we show that the observables grow dependent upon this phase if one lays aside the simplified plane-wave model. A relative contribution of the phase to the cross section is generally attenuated by a small factor $\\sigma^2/p^2 \\ll 1$, making its experimental measurement a rather challenging task. We discuss two methods for probing how this phase changes with the transferred momentum $t$, either by colliding two beams at a non-zero impact-parameter (say, $pp \\rightarrow X$) or by employing the states with the non-trivial wave functions, for instance, vortex particles carrying orbital angula...

  7. Fano resonance and the hidden order in URu2 Si 2 probed by quasiparticle scattering spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, W. K.; Greene, L. H.; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Ronning, F.; Lu, X.; Sarrao, J. L.; Thompson, J. D.

    2011-03-01

    The nature of the hidden order transition occurring at 17.5 K in URu 2 Si 2 remains puzzling despite intensive investigations over the past two and half decades. Recent experimental and theoretical developments render it a timely subject to probe the hidden order state using quasiparticle tunneling and scattering techniques. We report on the Fano resonance in pure and Rh-doped URu 2 Si 2 single crystals using point-contact spectroscopy. The conductance spectra reproducibly reveal asymmetric double peak structures slightly off-centered around zero bias with the two peaks merging well above the hidden order transition temperature. An analysis using the Fano resonance model in a Kondo lattice [1] shows that the conductance peaks arise from the hybridization gap opening. Our estimated gap size agrees well with those reported from other measurements. We will present experimental results over a wide parameter space including temperature and doping dependences and discuss their underlying physics. M. Maltseva, M. Dzero, and P. Coleman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 206402 (2009). * The work at UIUC is supported by the U.S. DOE under Award Nos. DE-FG02-07ER46453 and DE-AC02-98CH10886, and the work at LANL is carried out under the auspices of the U.S. DOE, Office of Science.

  8. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging: prospective tools for monitoring skeletal cells and skeletal regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Catarina Costa; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    The use of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) for cell-based therapies is currently one of the most promising areas for skeletal disease treatment and skeletal tissue repair. The ability for controlled modification of SSCs could provide significant therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine, with the prospect to permanently repopulate a host with stem cells and their progeny. Currently, SSC differentiation into the stromal lineages of bone, fat and cartilage is assessed using different approaches that typically require cell fixation or lysis, which are invasive or even destructive. Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy present an exciting alternative for studying biological systems in their natural state, without any perturbation. Here we review the applications of Raman spectroscopy and CARS imaging in stem-cell research, and discuss the potential of these two techniques for evaluating SSCs, skeletal tissues and skeletal regeneration as an exemplar. PMID:27170652

  9. Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering detection with a CsI[Na] scintillator at the SNS spallation source

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I; Fuller, E; Hai, M; Hossbach, T W; Orrell, J L; Perumpilly, G; Scholz, B

    2014-01-01

    We study the possibility of using CsI[Na] scintillators as an advantageous target for the detection of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), using the neutrino emissions from the SNS spallation source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The response of this material to low-energy nuclear recoils like those expected from this process is characterized. Backgrounds are studied using a 2 kg low-background prototype crystal in a dedicated radiation shield. The conclusion is that a planned 14 kg detector should measure approximately 550 CENNS events per year above a demonstrated $\\sim7$ keVnr low-energy threshold, with a signal-to-background ratio sufficient for a first measurement of the CENNS cross-section. The cross-section for the $^{208}$Pb($\

  10. Longitudinal in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of demyelination and remyelination in injured spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunzhou; Zhang, Delong; Huff, Terry B.; Wang, Xiaofei; Shi, Riyi; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2011-10-01

    In vivo imaging of white matter is important for the mechanistic understanding of demyelination and evaluation of remyelination therapies. Although white matter can be visualized by a strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal from axonal myelin, in vivo repetitive CARS imaging of the spinal cord remains a challenge due to complexities induced by the laminectomy surgery. We present a careful experimental design that enabled longitudinal CARS imaging of de- and remyelination at single axon level in live rats. In vivo CARS imaging of secretory phospholipase A2 induced myelin vesiculation, macrophage uptake of myelin debris, and spontaneous remyelination by Schwann cells are sequentially monitored over a 3 week period. Longitudinal visualization of de- and remyelination at a single axon level provides a novel platform for rational design of therapies aimed at promoting myelin plasticity and repair.

  11. Single electron emission in two-phase xenon with application to the detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, E; Chepel, V; Araujo, H M; Akimov, D Yu; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Majewski, P; Murphy, A StJ; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental study of single electron emission in ZEPLIN-III, a two-phase xenon experiment built to search for dark matter WIMPs, and discuss applications enabled by the excellent signal-to-noise ratio achieved in detecting this signature. Firstly, we demonstrate a practical method for precise measurement of the free electron lifetime in liquid xenon during normal operation of these detectors. Then, using a realistic detector response model and backgrounds, we assess the feasibility of deploying such an instrument for measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering using the ionisation channel in the few-electron regime. We conclude that it should be possible to measure this elusive neutrino signature above an ionisation threshold of $\\sim$3 electrons both at a stopped pion source and at a nuclear reactor. Detectable signal rates are larger in the reactor case, but the triggered measurement and harder recoil energy spectrum afforded by the accelerator source enable lower overall backgroun...

  12. Selective excitation of molecular mode in a mixture by femtosecond resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ping; Li Si-Ning; Fan Rong-Wei; Li Xiao-Hui; Xia Yuan-Qin; Yu Xin; Chen De-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is used to investigate gaseous molecular dynamics.Due to the spectrally broad laser pulses,usually poorly resolved spectra result from this broad spectroscopy.However,it can be demonstrated that by the electronic resonance enhancement optimization control a selective excitation of specific vibrational mode is possible.Using an electronically resonance-enhanced effect,iodine molecule specific CARS spectroscopy can be obtained from a mixture of iodine-air at room temperature and a pressure of 1 atm (corresponding to a saturation iodine vapour as low as about 35 Pa).The dynamics on either the electronically excited state or the ground state of iodine molecules obtained is consistent with previous studies (vacuum,heated and pure iodine) in the femtosecond time resolved CARS spectroscopy,showing that an effective method of suppressing the non-resonant CARS background and other interferences is demonstrated.

  13. Vibrational excitons in ionophores: Experimental probes for quantum coherence-assisted ion transport and selectivity in ion channels

    CERN Document Server

    Ganim, Ziad; Vaziri, Alipasha

    2011-01-01

    Despite a large body of work, the exact molecular details underlying ion-selectivity and transport in the potassium channel have not been fully laid to rest. One major reason has been the lack of experimental methods that can probe these mechanisms dynamically on their biologically relevant time scales. Recently it was suggested that quantum coherence and its interplay with thermal vibration might be involved in mediating ion-selectivity and transport. In this work we present an experimental strategy for using time resolved infrared spectroscopy to investigate these effects. We show the feasibility by demonstrating the IR absorption and Raman spectroscopic signatures of potassium binding model molecules that mimic the transient interactions of potassium with binding sites of the selectivity filter during ion conduction. In addition to guide our experiments on the real system we have performed molecular dynamic-based simulations of the FTIR and 2DIR spectra of the entire KcsA complex, which is the largest comp...

  14. Charged kaon production by coherent scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Simo, I Ruiz; Valverde, M; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of achieving a better and more complete understanding of neutrino interactions with nuclear targets, the coherent production of charged kaons induced by neutrinos and antineutrinos is investigated in the energy range of some of the current neutrino experiments. We follow a microscopic approach which, at the nucleon level, incorporates the most important mechanisms allowed by the chiral symmetry breaking pattern of QCD. The distortion of the outgoing (anti)kaon is taken into account by solving the Klein-Gordon equation with realistic optical potentials. Angular and momentum distributions are studied, as well as the energy and nuclear dependence of the total cross section.

  15. Probing of high-frequency coherent fluctuations by using a two-channel microwave reflectometer with antenna switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Itagaki, J.; Hirata, M.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Izumi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-10-01

    A two-channel microwave reflectometer with capability of fast switching of microwave antennas in array was developed and applied to a hot linear plasma produced in GAMMA 10 to study the behavior of Alfvén waves in a collisionless bounded plasma. High-frequency fluctuations associated with Alfvén-ion-cyclotron (AIC) waves were successfully measured at multi points using this system. It is found that coherent phase fluctuations are obtainable at wide radial and axial region for the AIC waves. In addition, measured phase-difference profile clearly shows standing wave structures. Signature of movement of these nodes is also obtained. These results demonstrate applicability of the developed two-channel reflectometer for assessment of spatial structure of high-frequency waves and also verifies globally expanded coherent structure of the AIC waves in GAMMA 10. Two-point correlation analysis in conjunction with multi-point measurements using antenna switching turns out to be a powerful tool for investigating spatial structure of waves in a hot plasma where traditional solid probes are inadequate. This work was in part supported by Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (15K17797) and Scientific Research (C) (25400531), and by Bidirectional Collaborative Research Program of NIFS (NIFS15KUGM101).

  16. Spatial distribution and temporal evolution of scattering centers by optical coherence tomography in the poly(L-lactide) backbone of a bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Chico, Juan Luis; Radu, Maria D; Diletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Scattering centers (SC) are often observed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) in some struts of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS). These SC might be caused by crazes in the polymer during crimp-deployment (more frequent at inflection points) or by other processes, such as physiological...

  17. Path-length distribution and path-length-resolved Doppler measurements of multiply scattered photons by use of low-coherence interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petoukhova, Anna; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2001-01-01

    We report first results of measurements by low-coherence Doppler interferometry of the path-length distribution of photons undergoing multiple scattering in a highly turbid medium. We use a Mach–Zehnder interferometer with multimode graded-index fibers and a superluminescent diode as the light sourc

  18. Probing the $^{6}He$ halo structure with elastic and inelastic proton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Lagoyannis, A; Musumarra, A; Alamanos, N; Pollacco, E C; Pakou, A; Blumenfeld, Y; Braga, F; La Commara, M; Drouart, A; Fioni, G; Gillibert, A; Khan, E U; Lapoux, V; Mittig, W; Ottini-Hustache, S; Pierroutsakou, D; Romoli, M; Roussel-Chomaz, P; Sandoli, M; Santonocito, D; Scarpaci, J A; Sida, J L; Suomijärvi, T; Karataglidis, S; Amos, K A

    2001-01-01

    Proton elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the first excited state of 6He have been measured over a wide angular range using a 40.9A MeV 6He beam. The data have been analyzed with a fully microscopic model of proton-nucleus scattering using 6He wave functions generated from large space shell model calculations. The inelastic scattering data show a remarkable sensitivity to the halo structure of 6He.

  19. X-ray scattering as a probe for warm dense mixtures and high-pressure miscibility

    CERN Document Server

    Wünsch, K; Gregori, G; Gericke, D O

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the abilities of elastic x-ray scattering to yield information on dense matter with multiple ion species and on the microscopic mixing in dense materials. Based on partial structure factors from ab initio simulations, a novel approach for the elastic scattering feature is applied to dense hydrogen-beryllium and hydrogen-helium mixtures. The scattering signal differs significantly between single species, real microscopic mixtures, and two separate fluids in the scattering volume.

  20. Coherent Raman scattering microscopy: an emerging platform for biology and medicine (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sunney S.

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a label-free and noninvasive imaging technique using vibration spectroscopy as the contrast mechanism. Recent advances have allowed significant improvements in sensitivity, selectivity, robustness, and cost reduction, opening a wide range of biomedical applications. In particular, it provides instant tissue examination without the need of previous histological staining, and is best suited for imaging small metabolite molecules. An overview will be given to a variety of biomedical applications of SRS microscopy.

  1. Coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering for in situ detection of nanoparticles and large molecules in gas and plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakis, A.; Shneider, M. N.; Stratton, B. C.; Santra, B.; Car, R.; Raitses, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Laser-based diagnostics methods, such as Spontaneous and Coherent Rayleigh and Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (SRBS and CRBS), can be used for in-situ detection and characterization of nanoparticle shape and size as well as their concentration in an inert gas atmosphere. We recently developed and tested this advanced diagnostic at PPPL. It was shown that the signal intensity of the CRBS signal depends on the gas-nanoparticle mixture composition, density and the polarizabilities of the mixture components. The measured results agree well with theoretical predictions of Refs. In this work, we report the application of this diagnostic to monitor nucleation and growth of nanoparticles in a carbon arc discharge. In support of these measurements, A time-dependent density functional theory was used to compute the frequency-dependent polarizabilities of various nanostructures in order to predict the corresponding Rayleigh scattering intensities as well as light depolarization. Preliminary results of measurements demonstrate that CRBS is capable to detect nanoparticles in volume. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  2. Charge-exchange scattering to the isobaric analog state at medium energies as a probe of the neutron skin

    CERN Document Server

    Loc, Bui Minh; Zegers, R G T

    2014-01-01

    The charge-exchange (3He,t) scattering to the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the target can be considered as "elastic" scattering of 3He by the isovector term of the optical potential (OP) that flips the projectile isospin. Therefore, the accurately measured charge-exchange scattering cross- section for the IAS can be a good probe of the isospin dependence of the OP, which is determined exclusively within the folding model by the difference between the neutron and proton densities and isospin dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Given the neutron skin of the target is related directly to the same density difference, it can be well probed in the analysis of the charge- exchange (3He,t) reactions at medium energies when the two-step processes can be neglected and the t-matrix interaction can be used in the folding calculation. For this purpose, the data of the (3He,t) scattering to the IAS of 90Zr and 208Pb targets at Elab = 420 MeV have been analyzed in the distorted wave Born approximation using the...

  3. Intraoperative handheld probe for 3D imaging of pediatric benign vocal fold lesions using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benboujja, Fouzi; Garcia, Jordan; Beaudette, Kathy; Strupler, Mathias; Hartnick, Christopher J.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Excessive and repetitive force applied on vocal fold tissue can induce benign vocal fold lesions. Children affected suffer from chronic hoarseness. In this instance, the vibratory ability of the folds, a complex layered microanatomy, becomes impaired. Histological findings have shown that lesions produce a remodeling of sup-epithelial vocal fold layers. However, our understanding of lesion features and development is still limited. Indeed, conventional imaging techniques do not allow a non-invasive assessment of sub-epithelial integrity of the vocal fold. Furthermore, it remains challenging to differentiate these sub-epithelial lesions (such as bilateral nodules, polyps and cysts) from a clinical perspective, as their outer surfaces are relatively similar. As treatment strategy differs for each lesion type, it is critical to efficiently differentiate sub-epithelial alterations involved in benign lesions. In this study, we developed an optical coherence tomography (OCT) based handheld probe suitable for pediatric laryngological imaging. The probe allows for rapid three-dimensional imaging of vocal fold lesions. The system is adapted to allow for high-resolution intra-operative imaging. We imaged 20 patients undergoing direct laryngoscopy during which we looked at different benign pediatric pathologies such as bilateral nodules, cysts and laryngeal papillomatosis and compared them to healthy tissue. We qualitatively and quantitatively characterized laryngeal pathologies and demonstrated the added advantage of using 3D OCT imaging for lesion discrimination and margin assessment. OCT evaluation of the integrity of the vocal cord could yield to a better pediatric management of laryngeal diseases.

  4. Collective atomic scattering and motional effects in a dense coherent medium

    CERN Document Server

    Bromley, Sarah L; Bishof, Michael; Zhang, Xibo; Bothwell, Tobias; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Nicholson, Travis L; Kaiser, Robin; Yelin, Susanne F; Lukin, Mikhail D; Rey, Ana Maria; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We investigate systematically collective emission from coherently driven ultracold $^{88}$Sr atoms. We perform two sets of experiments, using a strong (weak) transition with natural linewidth of $\\Gamma$$=$$32$ MHz ($7.5$ kHz), making it insensitive (sensitive) to atomic motion at one microKelvin. We observe highly directional forward emission with a peak intensity that is enhanced, for the strong transition, by $>$$10^{3}$ compared to that in the transverse direction. This is accompanied by substantial broadening of spectral lines. For the weak transition, the forward enhancement is substantially reduced due to motion. At the same time, a density-dependent frequency shift of the weak transition ($\\sim$$0.1\\Gamma$) is observed. In contrast, this line shift is suppressed to $<$$0.01\\Gamma$ for the strong transition. Along the transverse direction, we observe strong polarization dependences of the fluorescence intensity and line broadening for both transitions. The measurements are reproduced with a theoreti...

  5. Experimental probes of axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  6. Pion production: A probe for coherence in medium-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Freifelder, R. H.; Paul, P.; Sen, S.; Deyoung, P.; Zhang, P. H.; Awes, T. C.; Obenshain, F. E.; Plasil, F.; Young, G. R.; Fox, R.; Ronningen, R.

    1986-04-01

    The production of neutral pions has been studied in reactions of 35 MeV/nucleon 14N+ 27Al,Ni,W and 25 MeV/nucleon 16O+ 27Al,Ni. Inclusive pion differential distributions dσ/dTπ, dσ/dΩ, dσ/dy, dσ/dp⊥, and d2σ/dy dp⊥ have been measured by detecting the two pion-decay γ rays in a setup of 20 lead glass Cˇerenkov detector telescopes. Special care was taken to understand and suppress background events. Effects of pion reabsorption are discussed and it is found that the cross sections presented here are substantially affected by such final state interactions. The comparatively large experimental cross sections and the shape of the spectral distributions cannot be accounted for in single nucleon-nucleon collision or statistical models; they rather call for a coherent pion production mechanism.

  7. Surface defects characterization in a quantum wire by coherent phonons scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabia, M. S. [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Structures et Energétique, Faculté du Génie de la Construction, Université. Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou, BP 17 RP Hasnaoua II, Tizi-Ouzou 15000, Algérie m2msr@yahoo.fr (Algeria)

    2015-03-30

    The influence of surface defects on the scattering properties of elastic waves in a quasi-planar crystallographic waveguide is studied in the harmonic approximation using the matching method formalism. The structural model is based on three infinite atomic chains forming a perfect lattice surmounted by an atomic surface defect. Following the Landauer approach, we solve directly the Newton dynamical equation with scattering boundary conditions and taking into account the next nearest neighbour’s interaction. A detailed study of the defect-induced fluctuations in the transmission spectra is presented for different adatom masses. As in the electronic case, the presence of localized defect-induced states leads to Fano-like resonances. In the language of mechanical vibrations, these are called continuum resonances. Numerical results reveal the intimate relation between transmission spectra and localized defect states and provide a basis for the understanding of conductance spectroscopy experiments in disordered mesoscopic systems. The results could be useful for the design of phononic devices.

  8. Crossover from incoherent to coherent phonon scattering in epitaxial oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Yadav, Ajay K.; Cheaito, Ramez; Rossen, Pim B.; Soukiassian, Arsen; Suresha, S. J.; Duda, John C.; Foley, Brian M.; Lee, Che-Hui; Zhu, Ye; Lichtenberger, Arthur W.; Moore, Joel E.; Muller, David A.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Majumdar, Arun; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Zurbuchen, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    Elementary particles such as electrons or photons are frequent subjects of wave-nature-driven investigations, unlike collective excitations such as phonons. The demonstration of wave-particle crossover, in terms of macroscopic properties, is crucial to the understanding and application of the wave behaviour of matter. We present an unambiguous demonstration of the theoretically predicted crossover from diffuse (particle-like) to specular (wave-like) phonon scattering in epitaxial oxide superlattices, manifested by a minimum in lattice thermal conductivity as a function of interface density. We do so by synthesizing superlattices of electrically insulating perovskite oxides and systematically varying the interface density, with unit-cell precision, using two different epitaxial-growth techniques. These observations open up opportunities for studies on the wave nature of phonons, particularly phonon interference effects, using oxide superlattices as model systems, with extensive applications in thermoelectrics and thermal management.

  9. Persistent Scatterer Coherence Analysis over the Valley of Ten Thousands Smokes, Katmai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    During the recent decade, time-series analysis of Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data has become a powerful tool for long term analysis of sub-centimeter geodynamic deformation signals. While Persistent Scatter InSAR (PSI), one of the currently available InSAR time-series analysis techniques, has been successfully applied to quantify deformation patterns near active volcanoes, its performance has been limited by low densities of phase-stable-points especially near a volcano's caldera. Aside from the presence of a dominant stable scatterer in a SAR resolution cell, the detectability of PS in a stack of SAR data depends on various factors, including the characteristics of the applied selection algorithms, potential seasonal variations of scattering conditions, and the SAR system's observation geometry. Especially in natural environments, the choice of above factors has a significant impact on the achievable density and distribution of PS points. In this paper, we analyze the dependence of PS densities on scene parameters such as surface type, observation geometry, as well as seasonal effects on scattering properties, and propose concepts for PS density maximization All investigations use the Valley of Ten Thousands Smokes (VTTS), as main test site. VTTS is the site of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta Volcano, which altered the area dramatically. Glacial and wind erosion left out barren grounds that potentially contribute to build natural PS. Based on this test site, this paper addresses the following research: Dependence of PS Density on Surface Type: Based on ground truth information of surface types and surface conditions that were acquired in early summer 2011, the dependence of PS density on surface conditions was analyzed. Here, ground truth information was compared to PS distributions in a stack of summer-only C-band SAR scenes. The selection of summer-only data minimizes seasonal effects and maximizes the applicability of the ground truth data

  10. Detection of early carious lesions using contrast enhancement with coherent light scattering (speckle imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deana, A. M.; Jesus, S. H. C.; Koshoji, N. H.; Bussadori, S. K.; Oliveira, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, dental caries still represent one of the chronic diseases with the highest prevalence and present in most countries. The interaction between light and teeth (absorption, scattering and fluorescence) is intrinsically connected to the constitution of the dental tissue. Decay induced mineral loss introduces a shift in the optical properties of the affected tissue; therefore, study of these properties may produce novel techniques aimed at the early diagnosis of carious lesions. Based on the optical properties of the enamel, we demonstrate the application of first-order spatial statistics in laser speckle imaging, allowing the detection of carious lesions in their early stages. A highlight of this noninvasive, non-destructive, real time and cost effective approach is that it allows a dentist to detect a lesion even in the absence of biofilm or moisture.

  11. Hydrodynamic surface fluctuations of polymer films by coherent X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunjung [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hkim@sogang.ac.kr; Jiang, Zhang [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 United States (United States); Lee, Heeju [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Joo [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jiao, Xuesong; Li, Chunhua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 United States (United States); Lurio, Laurence [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, De Kalb, IL 60115 United States (United States); Rafailovich, Miriam [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794 United States (United States); Sinha, S.K. [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-Dong, Mapo-Gu Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); LANSCE, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 United States (United States)

    2007-05-23

    We have applied X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) to measure the surface dynamics of polymer films of thicknesses down to a few times of the polymer radius of gyration. XPCS is currently the only technique to measure selectively dynamics of surface and/or interfacial fluctuations of the films thanks to high brilliance and coherence of the third generation synchrotron source. The results show the behavior of the capillary waves expected in viscous liquid when the film thickness is thicker than four times of the radius of gyration. However, thinner films show a deviation indicating the need to account for viscoelasticity. We present also the theory for surface dynamics of the thermally excited fluctuations on homogenous single-layer film with arbitrary depth is generalized to describe surface and interfacial dynamics of polymeric liquid bilayer films in terms of susceptibilities, power spectra and characteristic relaxation time constants. The effects on surface dynamics originating from viscosity inhomogeneities close to surface region are investigated by the bilayer theory and compared with the surface dynamics from homogeneous single-layer films under non-slip and slip boundary conditions.

  12. Probing Novel Properties of Nucleons and Nuclei via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado, Luis [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This thesis reports on two experiments conducted by the HAPPEx (Hall A Proton Parity Experiment) collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For both, the weak neutral current interaction (WNC, mediated by the Z0 boson) is used to probe novel properties of hadronic targets. The WNC interaction amplitude is extracted by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons o unpolarized target hadrons. HAPPEx-III, conducted in the Fall of 2009, used a liquid hydrogen target at a momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.62 GeV2. The measured asymmetry was used to set new constraints on the contribution of strange quark form factors (GsE,M ) to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. A value of APV = -23.803±} 0.778 (stat)± 0.359 (syst) ppm resulted in GsE + 0.517GsM = 0.003± 0.010 (stat)± 0.004 (syst)± 0.009 (FF). PREx, conducted in the Spring of 2010, used a polarized electron beam on a 208Pb target at a momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.009 GeV2. This parity-violating asymmetry can be used to obtain a clean measurement of the root-mean-square radius of the neutrons in the 208Pb nucleus. The Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons; the neutron weak charge is much larger than that of the proton. The value of this asymmetry is at the sub-ppm level and has a projected experimental fractional precision of 3%. We will describe the accelerator setup used to set controls on helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis methods for finding the raw asymmetry for HAPPEx-III. We will also discuss in some detail the preparations to meet the experimental challenges associated with measuring such a small asymmetry with the degree of precision required for PREx.

  13. Self-organized coherent bursts of stimulated Raman scattering and speckle interaction in multi-speckled laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Bowers, K. J.; Bergen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Nonlinear physics governing the kinetic behavior of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in multi-speckled laser beams has been identified in the trapping regime over a wide range of k{lambda}{sub D} values (here k is the wave number of the electron plasma waves and {lambda}{sub D} is the Debye length) in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas. Hot electrons from intense speckles, both forward and side-loss hot electrons produced during SRS daughter electron plasma wave bowing and filamentation, seed and enhance the growth of SRS in neighboring speckles by reducing Landau damping. Trapping-enhanced speckle interaction through transport of hot electrons, backscatter, and sidescatter SRS light waves enable the system of speckles to self-organize and exhibit coherent, sub-ps SRS bursts with more than 100% instantaneous reflectivity, resulting in an SRS transverse coherence width much larger than a speckle width and a SRS spectrum that peaks outside the incident laser cone. SRS reflectivity is found to saturate above a threshold laser intensity at a level of reflectivity that depends on k{lambda}{sub D}: higher k{lambda}{sub D} leads to lower SRS and the reflectivity scales as {approx}(k{lambda}{sub D}){sup -4}. As k{lambda}{sub D} and Landau damping increase, speckle interaction via sidescattered light and side-loss hot electrons decreases and the occurrence of self-organized events becomes infrequent, leading to the reduction of time-averaged SRS reflectivity. It is found that the inclusion of a moderately strong magnetic field in the laser direction can effectively control SRS by suppressing transverse speckle interaction via hot electron transport.

  14. Pion production: A probe for coherence in medium-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachel, J.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Freifelder, R.H.; Paul, P.; Sen, S.; DeYoung, P.; Zhang, P.H.; Awes, T.C.; Obenshain, F.E.; Plasil, F.

    1986-04-01

    The production of neutral pions has been studied in reactions of 35 MeV/nucleon /sup 14/N+ /sup 27/Al,Ni,W and 25 MeV/nucleon /sup 16/O+ /sup 27/Al,Ni. Inclusive pion differential distributions dsigma/dT/sub ..pi../, dsigma/d..cap omega.., dsigma/dy, dsigma/dp/sub perpendicular/, and d/sup 2/sigma/dy dp/sub perpendicular/ have been measured by detecting the two pion-decay ..gamma.. rays in a setup of 20 lead glass Cerenkov detector telescopes. Special care was taken to understand and suppress background events. Effects of pion reabsorption are discussed and it is found that the cross sections presented here are substantially affected by such final state interactions. The comparatively large experimental cross sections and the shape of the spectral distributions cannot be accounted for in single nucleon-nucleon collision or statistical models; they rather call for a coherent pion production mechanism.

  15. The rate of quasiparticle recombination probes the onset of coherence in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, J P; Thewalt, E; Alpichshev, Z; Mahmood, F; Koralek, J D; Chan, M K; Veit, M J; Dorow, C J; Barišić, N; Kemper, A F; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Liang, Ruixing; Gedik, N; Greven, M; Lanzara, A; Orenstein, J

    2016-04-13

    In the underdoped copper-oxides, high-temperature superconductivity condenses from a nonconventional metallic "pseudogap" phase that exhibits a variety of non-Fermi liquid properties. Recently, it has become clear that a charge density wave (CDW) phase exists within the pseudogap regime. This CDW coexists and competes with superconductivity (SC) below the transition temperature Tc, suggesting that these two orders are intimately related. Here we show that the condensation of the superfluid from this unconventional precursor is reflected in deviations from the predictions of BSC theory regarding the recombination rate of quasiparticles. We report a detailed investigation of the quasiparticle (QP) recombination lifetime, τqp, as a function of temperature and magnetic field in underdoped HgBa2CuO(4+δ) (Hg-1201) and YBa2Cu3O(6+x) (YBCO) single crystals by ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity. We find that τqp(T) exhibits a local maximum in a small temperature window near Tc that is prominent in underdoped samples with coexisting charge order and vanishes with application of a small magnetic field. We explain this unusual, non-BCS behavior by positing that Tc marks a transition from phase-fluctuating SC/CDW composite order above to a SC/CDW condensate below. Our results suggest that the superfluid in underdoped cuprates is a condensate of coherently-mixed particle-particle and particle-hole pairs.

  16. The rate of quasiparticle recombination probes the onset of coherence in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, J. P.; Thewalt, E.; Alpichshev, Z.; Mahmood, F.; Koralek, J. D.; Chan, M. K.; Veit, M. J.; Dorow, C. J.; Barišić, N.; Kemper, A. F.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, Ruixing; Gedik, N.; Greven, M.; Lanzara, A.; Orenstein, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the underdoped copper-oxides, high-temperature superconductivity condenses from a nonconventional metallic ”pseudogap” phase that exhibits a variety of non-Fermi liquid properties. Recently, it has become clear that a charge density wave (CDW) phase exists within the pseudogap regime. This CDW coexists and competes with superconductivity (SC) below the transition temperature Tc, suggesting that these two orders are intimately related. Here we show that the condensation of the superfluid from this unconventional precursor is reflected in deviations from the predictions of BSC theory regarding the recombination rate of quasiparticles. We report a detailed investigation of the quasiparticle (QP) recombination lifetime, τqp, as a function of temperature and magnetic field in underdoped HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg-1201) and YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) single crystals by ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity. We find that τqp(T ) exhibits a local maximum in a small temperature window near Tc that is prominent in underdoped samples with coexisting charge order and vanishes with application of a small magnetic field. We explain this unusual, non-BCS behavior by positing that Tc marks a transition from phase-fluctuating SC/CDW composite order above to a SC/CDW condensate below. Our results suggest that the superfluid in underdoped cuprates is a condensate of coherently-mixed particle-particle and particle-hole pairs.

  17. Probing an NV Center's Nuclear Spin Environment with Coherent Population Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levonian, David; Goldman, Michael; Singh, Swati; Markham, Matthew; Twitchen, Daniel; Lukin, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have emerged as a versatile atom-like system, finding diverse applications in metrology and quantum information science, but interaction between the NV center's electronic spin and its nuclear spin environment represent a major source of decoherence. We use optical techniques to monitor and control the nuclear bath surrounding an NV center. Specifically, we create an optical Λ-system using the | +/- 1 > components of the NV center's spin-triplet ground state. When the Zeeman splitting between the two states is equal to the two-photon detuning between the lasers, population is trapped in the resulting dark state. Measuring the rate at which the NV center escapes from the dark state therefore gives information on how spin bath dynamics change the effective magnetic field experienced by the NV center. By monitoring statistics of the emitted photons, we plan to probe non-equilibrium dynamics of the bath.

  18. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy: Understanding the essentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Altangerel, Narangerel

    2016-12-01

    This paper is a brief overview to coherent anti- Stokes Raman spectroscopic technique and introduces the strengths and barriers to its use all based on the interpretation of simple theoretical formulae. The use of the Gaussian ultrashort pulses is highlighted as a practical elucidatory reconstruction tool of coherent Raman spectra. The paper presents the integral formulae for coherent anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman scattering, and discusses the closed-form solutions, its complex error function, and the delay time formula for enhancement of the inferred pure coherent Raman spectra. As an example, the timeresolved coherent Stokes Raman scattering experimental observations are quantitatively elucidated.Understanding the essentials of coherent Raman spectroscopy, therefore, promotes the importance of a number of experiments including the ones utilizing a broadband excitation with a narrowband delayed probing for successful background suppression.

  19. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe with integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J.; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a versatile imaging technique and has great potential in tissue characterization for breast cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance. In addition to structural difference, cancerous breast tissue is usually stiffer compared to normal adipose breast tissue. However, previous studies on compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) are qualitative rather than quantitative. It is challenging to identify the cancerous status of tissue based on qualitative OCE results obtained from different measurement sessions or from different patients. Therefore, it is critical to develop technique that integrates structural imaging and force sensing, for quantitative elasticity characterization of breast tissue. In this work, we demonstrate a quantitative OCE (qOCE) microsurgery device which simultaneously quantifies force exerted to tissue and measures the resultant tissue deformation. The qOCE system is based on a spectral domain OCT engine operated at 1300 nm and a probe with an integrated Febry-Perot (FP) interferometric cavity at its distal end. The FP cavity is formed by the cleaved end of the lead-in fiber and the end surface of a GRIN lens which allows light to incident into tissue for structural imaging. The force exerted to tissue is quantified by the change of FP cavity length which is interrogated by a fiber-optic common-paths phase resolved OCT system with sub-nanometer sensitivity. Simultaneously, image of the tissue structure is acquired from photons returned from tissue through the GRIN lens. Tissue deformation is obtained through Doppler analysis. Tissue elasticity can be quantified by comparing the force exerted and tissue deformation.

  20. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    OpenAIRE

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; LEPROUX, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between th...

  1. Coherent scatter-controlled phase-change grating structures in silicon using femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Edfuf, Yasser; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Puerto, Daniel; Florian, Camilo; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2017-07-04

    Periodic structures of alternating amorphous-crystalline fringes have been fabricated in silicon using repetitive femtosecond laser exposure (800 nm wavelength and 120 fs duration). The method is based on the interference of the incident laser light with far- and near-field scattered light, leading to local melting at the interference maxima, as demonstrated by femtosecond microscopy. Exploiting this strategy, lines of highly regular amorphous fringes can be written. The fringes have been characterized in detail using optical microscopy combined modelling, which enables a determination of the three-dimensional shape of individual fringes. 2D micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals that the space between amorphous fringes remains crystalline. We demonstrate that the fringe period can be tuned over a range of 410 nm - 13 µm by changing the angle of incidence and inverting the beam scan direction. Fine control over the lateral dimensions, thickness, surface depression and optical contrast of the fringes is obtained via adjustment of pulse number, fluence and spot size. Large-area, highly homogeneous gratings composed of amorphous fringes with micrometer width and millimeter length can readily be fabricated. The here presented fabrication technique is expected to have applications in the fields of optics, nanoelectronics, and mechatronics and should be applicable to other materials.

  2. Assessment of liver steatosis and fibrosis in rats using integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Lu, Fake; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Shuoyu; Tai, Dean; Yu, Hanry; Huang, Zhiwei

    2011-11-01

    We report the implementation of a unique integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy imaging technique developed for label-free monitoring of the progression of liver steatosis and fibrosis generated in a bile duct ligation (BDL) rat model. Among the 21 adult rats used in this study, 18 rats were performed with BDL surgery and sacrificed each week from weeks 1 to 6 (n = 3 per week), respectively; whereas 3 rats as control were sacrificed at week 0. Colocalized imaging of the aggregated hepatic fats, collagen fibrils, and hepatocyte morphologies in liver tissue is realized by using the integrated CARS, SHG, and TPEF technique. The results show that there are significant accumulations of hepatic lipid droplets and collagen fibrils associated with severe hepatocyte necrosis in BDL rat liver as compared to a normal liver tissue. The volume of normal hepatocytes keeps decreasing and the fiber collagen content in BDL rat liver follows a growing trend until week 6; whereas the hepatic fat content reaches a maximum in week 4 and then appears to stop growing in week 6, indicating that liver steatosis and fibrosis induced in a BDL rat liver model may develop at different rates. This work demonstrates that the integrated CARS and multiphoton microscopy imaging technique has the potential to provide an effective means for early diagnosis and detection of liver steatosis and fibrosis without labeling.

  3. Fast, label-free super-resolution live-cell imaging using rotating coherent scattering (ROCS) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünger, Felix; Olshausen, Philipp V.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Living cells are highly dynamic systems with cellular structures being often below the optical resolution limit. Super-resolution microscopes, usually based on fluorescence cell labelling, are usually too slow to resolve small, dynamic structures. We present a label-free microscopy technique, which can generate thousands of super-resolved, high contrast images at a frame rate of 100 Hertz and without any post-processing. The technique is based on oblique sample illumination with coherent light, an approach believed to be not applicable in life sciences because of too many interference artefacts. However, by circulating an incident laser beam by 360° during one image acquisition, relevant image information is amplified. By combining total internal reflection illumination with dark-field detection, structures as small as 150 nm become separable through local destructive interferences. The technique images local changes in refractive index through scattered laser light and is applied to living mouse macrophages and helical bacteria revealing unexpected dynamic processes.

  4. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences.

  5. Detection of Lipid-Rich Prostate Circulating Tumour Cells with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Ranjana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circulating tumour cells (CTC are an important indicator of metastasis and associated with a poor prognosis. Detection sensitivity and specificity of CTC in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patient remain a technical challenge. Methods Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy was employed to examine the lipid content of CTC isolated from the peripheral blood of metastatic prostate cancer patients. CARS microscopy was also employed to evaluate lipid uptake and mobilization kinetics of a metastatic human prostate cancer cell line. Results One hundred CTC from eight metastatic prostate cancer patients exhibited strong CARS signal which arose from intracellular lipid. In contrast, leukocytes exhibited weak CARS signal which arose mostly from cellular membrane. On average, CARS signal intensity of prostate CTC was 7-fold higher than that of leukocytes (P Conclusions Intracellular lipid could serve as a biomarker for prostate CTC which could be sensitively detected with CARS microscopy in a label-free manner. Strong affinity for lipid by metastatic prostate cancer cells could be used to improve detection sensitivity and therapeutic targeting of prostate CTC.

  6. Widely tunable two-colour seeded free-electron laser source for resonant-pump resonant-probe magnetic scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Eugenio; Spezzani, Carlo; Fortuna, Franck; Delaunay, Renaud; Vidal, Franck; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Cinquegrana, Paolo; Diviacco, Bruno; Gauthier, David; Penco, Giuseppe; Ribič, Primož Rebernik; Roussel, Eleonore; Trovò, Marco; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Pincelli, Tommaso; Lounis, Lounès; Manfredda, Michele; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Capotondi, Flavio; Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Zangrando, Marco; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Demidovich, Alexander; Giannessi, Luca; De Ninno, Giovanni; Danailov, Miltcho Boyanov; Allaria, Enrico; Sacchi, Maurizio

    2016-01-13

    The advent of free-electron laser (FEL) sources delivering two synchronized pulses of different wavelengths (or colours) has made available a whole range of novel pump-probe experiments. This communication describes a major step forward using a new configuration of the FERMI FEL-seeded source to deliver two pulses with different wavelengths, each tunable independently over a broad spectral range with adjustable time delay. The FEL scheme makes use of two seed laser beams of different wavelengths and of a split radiator section to generate two extreme ultraviolet pulses from distinct portions of the same electron bunch. The tunability range of this new two-colour source meets the requirements of double-resonant FEL pump/FEL probe time-resolved studies. We demonstrate its performance in a proof-of-principle magnetic scattering experiment in Fe-Ni compounds, by tuning the FEL wavelengths to the Fe and Ni 3p resonances.

  7. Fiber optic probe enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering for early diagnosis of potential acute rejection of kidney transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jingmao; Chen, Hui; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have explored the use of a fiber-optic probe with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing modality for early, noninvasive and, rapid diagnosis of potential renal acute rejection (AR) and other renal graft dysfunction of kidney transplant patients. Multimode silica optical fiber immobilized with colloidal Ag nanoparticles at the distal end was used for SERS measurements of as-collected urine samples at 632.8 nm excitation wavelength. All patients with abnormal renal graft function (3 AR episodes and 2 graft failure episodes) who were clinically diagnosed independently show common unique SERS spectral features in the urines collected just one day after transplant. SERS-based fiber-optic probe has excellent potential to be a bedside tool for early diagnosis of kidney transplant patients for timely medical intervention of patients at high risk of transplant dysfunction.

  8. A Sensitive Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Method for Determination of Melamine with Aptamer-modified Nanosilver Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温桂清; 周莲平; 李廷盛; 梁爱惠; 蒋治良

    2012-01-01

    The small nanosilver was prepared by the sodium borohydride procedure. The aptamer was used to modify nanosilver to obtain a nanosilver-aptamer (AgssDNA) SERS probe for the determination of melamine. In pH 6.6 phosphate buffer solution and in the presence of NaCI, the AgssDNA probe specifically combined with melamine to release nanosilver particles that were aggregated to nanosilver clusters, which exhibited SERS effect at 240 cm-1. When melamine concentration increased, the nanosilver clusters increased, and the SERS intensity at 240 cm-1 in- creased. The increased SERS intensity AI240cm, is linear to melamine concentration in the range of 6.3--403.6 μg.L 1, with a detection limit of 1.2 μg L 1. This assay was applied to determination of melamine in milk, with sat- isfactory results. Keywords melamine, apatmer-modified nanosilver, aggregation, surface-enhanced Raman scattering

  9. Evidence for out-of-equilibrium states in warm dense matter probed by X-ray Thomson scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Clerouin, J; Robert, G; Ticknor, C; Kress, J; Collins, L

    2014-01-01

    A recent and unexpected discrepancy between \\textit{ab initio} simulations and the interpretation of a laser shock experiment on aluminum, probed by X-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS), is addressed. The ion-ion structure factor deduced from the XRTS elastic peak (ion feature) is only compatible with a strongly coupled out-of-equilibrium state. Orbital free molecular dynamics simulations with ions colder than the electrons are employed to interpret the experiment. The relevance of decoupled temperatures for ions and electrons is discussed. The possibility that it mimics a transient, or metastable, out-of-equilibrium state after melting is also suggested.

  10. New Frontier in Probing Fluid Transport in Low-Permeability Geomedia: Applications of Elastic and Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Sussman, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Low-permeability geomedia are prevalent in subsurface environments. They have become increasingly important in a wide range of applications such as CO2-sequestration, hydrocarbon recovery, enhanced geothermal systems, legacy waste stewardship, high-level radioactive waste disposal, and global security. The flow and transport characteristics of low-permeability geomedia are dictated by their exceedingly low permeability values ranging from 10-6 to 10-12 darcy with porosities dominated by nanoscale pores. Developing new characterization methods and robust computational models that allow estimation of transport properties of low-permeability geomedia has been identified as a critical basic research and technology development need for controlling subsurface and fluids flow. Due to its sensibility to hydrogen and flexible sample environment, neutron based elastic and inelastic scattering can, through various techniques, interrogate all the nanoscale pores in the sample whether they are fluid accessible or not, and readily characterize interfacial waters. In this presentation, we will present two studies revealing the effects of nanoscale pore confinement on fluid dynamics in geomedia. In one study, we use combined (ultra-small)/small-angle elastic neutron scatterings to probe nanoporous features responses in geological materials to transport processes. In the other study, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering was used to distingwish between intergranular pore water and fluid inclusion moisture in bedded rock salt, and to explore their thermal stablibility. Our work demonstrates that neutron based elastic and inelastic scatterings are techniques of choice for in situ probing hydrocarbon and water behavior in nanoporous materials, providing new insights into water-rock interaction and fluids transport in low-permeability geomaterials.

  11. Anomalous lattice vibrations of monolayer MoS 2 probed by ultraviolet Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive Raman scattering study of monolayer MoS2 with increasing laser excitation energies ranging from the near-infrared to the deep-ultraviolet. The Raman scattering intensities from the second-order phonon modes are revealed to be enhanced anomalously by only the ultraviolet excitation wavelength 354 nm. We demonstrate theoretically that such resonant behavior arises from a strong optical absorption that forms near the Γ point and of the band structure and an inter-valley resonant electronic scattering by the M-point phonons. These results advance our understanding of the double resonance Raman scattering process in low-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterials and provide a foundation for the technological development of monolayer MoS2 in the ultraviolet frequency range. © the Owner Societies 2015.

  12. Probing spin frustration in high-symmetry magnetic nanomolecules by inelastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garlea, V.O.; Nagler, S.E.; Zarestky, J.L.;

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies have been performed to characterize the low energy magnetic excitation spectrum of the magnetic nanomolecule {Mo(72)Fe(30)}. This unique highly symmetric cluster features spin frustration and is one of the largest discrete magnetic molecules st...... of the temperature dependence of the observed neutron scattering are explained by a quantum model of the frustrated spin cluster. However, no satisfactory theoretical explanation is yet available for the observed magnetic field dependence....

  13. Probing Matter Radii of Neutron-Rich Nuclei by Antiproton Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Lenske, H.; P. Kienle

    2005-01-01

    We propose to use antiprotons to investigate the sizes of stable and neutron-rich exotic nuclei by measurements of the $\\pbar A$ absorption cross section along isotopic chains in inverse kinematics. The expected effects are studied theoretically in a microscopic model. The $\\pbar U$ optical potentials are obtained by folding free space $\\pbar N$ scattering amplitudes with HFB ground state densities and solving the scattering equations by direct integration. The mass dependence of absorption c...

  14. MultiProbe Electrical Measurements of Carbon Nanotubes With On-line Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Dalia; Yeshua, Talia; Lehmann, Christian; Reich, Stephanie; Strain, Kristin; Campbell, Eleano

    2014-03-01

    A multiprobe scanning probe microscope (SPM) system has been used to perform multiprobe electrical measurement of carbon nanotubes. In this system two probes can be used across an isolated carbon nanotube. A variety of probes have been developed that are compatible with multiprobe operation. These include probes for writing single single walled carbon nanotubes which have a high degree of alignment and this is demonstrated with on-line Raman. The interconnection of the multiprobe system with the Raman System will be described in detail. The combination has the potential to cross the fabrication/measurement gap that will allow for both production and nanocharacterization of such single molecule carbon nanotube molecular devices both with chemically sensitive Raman measurements (with and without plasmonic enhancement) and with on-line electrical transport on isolated carbon nanotubes.

  15. SU-F-I-53: Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging of the Breast: A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Absorbed Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R [Durham, NC (United States); Lakshmanan, M; Fong, G; Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States); Greenberg, J [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Coherent scatter based imaging has shown improved contrast and molecular specificity over conventional digital mammography however the biological risks have not been quantified due to a lack of accurate information on absorbed dose. This study intends to characterize the dose distribution and average glandular dose from coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging of the breast. The dose deposited in the breast from this new diagnostic imaging modality has not yet been quantitatively evaluated. Here, various digitized anthropomorphic phantoms are tested in a Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the absorbed dose distribution and average glandular dose using clinically feasible scan protocols. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation software is used to replicate the coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system. Energy sensitive, photon counting detectors are used to characterize the x-ray beam spectra for various imaging protocols. This input spectra is cross-validated with the results from XSPECT, a commercially available application that yields x-ray tube specific spectra for the operating parameters employed. XSPECT is also used to determine the appropriate number of photons emitted per mAs of tube current at a given kVp tube potential. With the implementation of the XCAT digital anthropomorphic breast phantom library, a variety of breast sizes with differing anatomical structure are evaluated. Simulations were performed with and without compression of the breast for dose comparison. Results: Through the Monte Carlo evaluation of a diverse population of breast types imaged under real-world scan conditions, a clinically relevant average glandular dose for this new imaging modality is extrapolated. Conclusion: With access to the physical coherent scatter imaging system used in the simulation, the results of this Monte Carlo study may be used to directly influence the future development of the modality to keep breast dose to

  16. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Characterization of Fan Beam Coded Aperture Coherent Scatter Spectral Imaging Methods for Differentiation of Normal and Neoplastic Breast Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R; Albanese, K; Lakshmanan, M; Greenberg, J; Kapadia, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study intends to characterize the spectral and spatial resolution limits of various fan beam geometries for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast structures via coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging techniques. In previous studies, pencil beam raster scanning methods using coherent scatter computed tomography and selected volume tomography have yielded excellent results for tumor discrimination. However, these methods don’t readily conform to clinical constraints; primarily prolonged scan times and excessive dose to the patient. Here, we refine a fan beam coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system to characterize the tradeoffs between dose, scan time and image quality for breast tumor discrimination. Methods: An X-ray tube (125kVp, 400mAs) illuminated the sample with collimated fan beams of varying widths (3mm to 25mm). Scatter data was collected via two linear-array energy-sensitive detectors oriented parallel and perpendicular to the beam plane. An iterative reconstruction algorithm yields images of the sample’s spatial distribution and respective spectral data for each location. To model in-vivo tumor analysis, surgically resected breast tumor samples were used in conjunction with lard, which has a form factor comparable to adipose (fat). Results: Quantitative analysis with current setup geometry indicated optimal performance for beams up to 10mm wide, with wider beams producing poorer spatial resolution. Scan time for a fixed volume was reduced by a factor of 6 when scanned with a 10mm fan beam compared to a 1.5mm pencil beam. Conclusion: The study demonstrates the utility of fan beam coherent scatter spectral imaging for differentiation of normal and neoplastic breast tissues has successfully reduced dose and scan times whilst sufficiently preserving spectral and spatial resolution. Future work to alter the coded aperture and detector geometries could potentially allow the use of even wider fans, thereby making coded

  17. Scattering and Diffraction of Electromagnetic Radiation: An Effective Probe to Material Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Scattered electromagnetic waves from material bodies of different forms contain, in an intricate way, precise information on the intrinsic, geometrical and physical properties of the objects. Scattering theories, ever deepening, aim to provide dependable interpretation and prediction to the complicated interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are well-established multiple-scattering formulations based on classical electromagnetic theories. An example is the Generalized Multi-particle Mie-solution (GMM), which has recently been extended to a special version ? the GMM-PA approach, applicable to finite periodic arrays consisting of a huge number (e.g., >>106) of identical scattering centers [1]. The framework of the GMM-PA is nearly complete. When the size of the constituent unit scatterers becomes considerably small in comparison with incident wavelength, an appropriate array of such small element volumes may well be a satisfactory representation of a material entity having an arbitrary structure. X-ray diffraction is a powerful characterization tool used in a variety of scientific and technical fields, including material science. A diffraction pattern is nothing more than the spatial distribution of scattered intensity, determined by the distribution of scattering matter by way of its Fourier transform [1]. Since all linear dimensions entered into Maxwell's equations are normalized by wavelength, an analogy exists between optical and X-ray diffraction patterns. A large set of optical diffraction patterns experimentally obtained can be found in the literature [e.g., 2,3]. Theoretical results from the GMM-PA have been scrutinized using a large collection of publically accessible, experimentally obtained Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. As far as characteristic structures of the patterns are concerned, theoretical and experimental results are in uniform agreement; no exception has been found so far. Closely connected with the spatial distribution of

  18. Shape-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering in gold-Raman probe-silica sandwiched nanoparticles for biocompatible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K; Zhang, Jianming; Lankford, Jessica; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Ma, Dongling; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-03-23

    To meet the requirement of Raman probes (labels) for biocompatible applications, a synthetic approach has been developed to sandwich the Raman-probe (malachite green isothiocyanate, MGITC) molecules between the gold core and the silica shell in gold-SiO₂ composite nanoparticles. The gold-MGITC-SiO₂ sandwiched structure not only prevents the Raman probe from leaking out but also improves the solubility of the nanoparticles in organic solvents and in aqueous solutions even with high ionic strength. To amplify the Raman signal, three types of core, gold nanospheres, nanorods and nanostars, have been chosen as the substrates of the Raman probe. The effect of the core shape on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been investigated. The colloidal nanostars showed the highest SERS enhancement factor while the nanospheres possessed the lowest SERS activity under excitation with 532 and 785 nm lasers. Three-dimensional finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation showed significant differences in the local electromagnetic field distributions surrounding the nanospheres, nanorods, and nanostars, which were induced by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The electromagnetic field was enhanced remarkably around the two ends of the nanorods and around the sharp tips of the nanostars. This local electromagnetic enhancement made the dominant contribution to the SERS enhancement. Both the experiments and the simulation revealed the order nanostars > nanorods > nanospheres in terms of the enhancement factor. Finally, the biological application of the nanostar-MGITC-SiO₂ nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the monitoring of DNA hybridization. In short, the gold–MGITC-SiO₂ sandwiched nanoparticles can be used as a Raman probe that features high sensitivity, good water solubility and stability, low-background fluorescence, and the absence of photobleaching for future biological applications.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a new optical probe in molecular biophysics and biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, J.; Wittig, B.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and detailed molecular structural information plays an increasing role in molecular biophysics and molecular medicine. Therefore, vibrational spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, which provide high structural information content are of growing interest in biophysical...... of the free electrons in the metal. This effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to push vibrational spectroscopy to new limits in detection sensitivity, lateral resolution, and molecular structural selectivity. This opens up exciting perspectives also in molecular biospectroscopy...... and biomedical research. Raman spectroscopy can be revolutionized when the inelastic scattering process takes place in the very close vicinity of metal nanostructures. Under these conditions, strongly increased Raman signals can be obtained due to resonances between optical fields and the collective oscillations...

  20. Nonadiabaticity in a Jahn-Teller system probed by absorption and resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, K; Hizhnyakov, V

    2013-03-14

    A theory of absorption and resonance Raman scattering of impurity centers in crystals with E⊗e-type Jahn-Teller effect in the excited state is presented. The vibronic interaction with non-totally symmetric local or pseudolocal modes and with a continuum of bath modes (phonons) is considered. A number of specific quantum effects, such as the nonadiabaticity-induced enhancement of the Raman scattering at high-energy excitation, the size effect of the final state, the interference of different channels of scattering, the Fermi resonances in the conical intersection, and others, were shown to become apparent in the calculated spectra. The vibronic interaction with phonons essentially determines the structure of the spectra.

  1. Probing 2D Quantum Turbulence in Atomic Superfluid Gas using Bragg Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Joon Hyun; Shin, Yong-il

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of spatially resolved Bragg spectroscopy for detection of the quantum vortex circulation signs in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). High-velocity atoms near the vortex cores are resonantly scattered from the BEC, and the vortex signs are determined from the scattered atom positions relative to the corresponding vortex cores. Using this method, we investigate decaying 2D quantum turbulence in a highly oblate BEC at temperatures of $\\sim 0.5 T_c$, where $T_c$ is the critical temperature of the trapped sample. Clustering of like-sign vortices is not observed; rather, the measured vortex configurations reveal weak pair correlations between the vortices and antivortices in the turbulent BEC. Our Bragg scattering method enables a direct experimental study of 2D quantum turbulence in BECs.

  2. Probing the self-assembled nanostructures of functional polymers with synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ree, Moonhor

    2014-05-01

    For advanced functional polymers such as biopolymers, biomimic polymers, brush polymers, star polymers, dendritic polymers, and block copolymers, information about their surface structures, morphologies, and atomic structures is essential for understanding their properties and investigating their potential applications. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) is established for the last 15 years as the most powerful, versatile, and nondestructive tool for determining these structural details when performed with the aid of an advanced third-generation synchrotron radiation source with high flux, high energy resolution, energy tunability, and small beam size. One particular merit of this technique is that GIXS data can be obtained facilely for material specimens of any size, type, or shape. However, GIXS data analysis requires an understanding of GIXS theory and of refraction and reflection effects, and for any given material specimen, the best methods for extracting the form factor and the structure factor from the data need to be established. GIXS theory is reviewed here from the perspective of practical GIXS measurements and quantitative data analysis. In addition, schemes are discussed for the detailed analysis of GIXS data for the various self-assembled nanostructures of functional homopolymers, brush, star, and dendritic polymers, and block copolymers. Moreover, enhancements to the GIXS technique are discussed that can significantly improve its structure analysis by using the new synchrotron radiation sources such as third-generation X-ray sources with picosecond pulses and partial coherence and fourth-generation X-ray laser sources with femtosecond pulses and full coherence.

  3. Probing scattering resonances of Vogel's spirals with the Green's matrix spectral method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofi, Aristi; Pinheiro, Felipe A; Dal Negro, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Using the rigorous Green's function spectral method, we systematically investigate the scattering resonances of different types of Vogel spiral arrays of point-like scatterers. By computing the distributions of eigenvalues of the Green's matrix and the corresponding eigenvectors, we obtain important physical information on the spatial nature of the optical modes, their lifetimes and spatial patterns, at small computational cost and for large-scale systems. Finally, we show that this method can be extended to the study of three-dimensional Vogel aperiodic metamaterials and aperiodic photonic structures that may exhibit a richer spectrum of localized resonances of direct relevance to the engineering of novel optical light sources and sensing devices.

  4. Polyglutamine aggregate structure in vitro and in vivo; new avenues for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Perney

    Full Text Available Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy is applied for the first time for the evaluation of the protein secondary structure of polyglutamine (polyQ aggregates in vivo. Our approach demonstrates the potential for translating information about protein structure that has been obtained in vitro by X-ray diffraction into a microscopy technique that allows the same protein structure to be detected in vivo. For these studies, fibres of polyQ containing peptides (D(2Q(15K(2 were assembled in vitro and examined by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods; the fibril structure was shown to be cross β-sheet. The same polyQ fibres were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and this further confirmed the β-sheet structure, but indicated that the structure is highly rigid, as indicated by the strong Amide I signal at 1659 cm(-1. CARS spectra were simulated using the Raman spectrum taking into account potential non-resonant contributions, providing evidence that the Amide I signal remains strong, but slightly shifted to lower wavenumbers. Combined CARS (1657 cm(-1 and multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of chimeric fusions of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP with polyQ (Q40 expressed in the body wall muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes (1 day old adult hermaphrodites revealed diffuse and foci patterns of Q40-YFP that were both fluorescent and exhibited stronger CARS (1657 cm(-1 signals than in surrounding tissues at the resonance for the cross β-sheet polyQ in vitro.

  5. First Demonstration of a Scintillating Xenon Bubble Chamber for Detecting Dark Matter and Coherent Elastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D.; Chen, C. J.; Crisler, M.; Cwiok, T.; Dahl, C. E.; Grimsted, A.; Gupta, J.; Jin, M.; Puig, R.; Temples, D.; Zhang, J.

    2017-06-01

    A 30-g xenon bubble chamber, operated at Northwestern University in June and November 2016, has for the first time observed simultaneous bubble nucleation and scintillation by nuclear recoils in a superheated liquid. This chamber is instrumented with a CCD camera for near-IR bubble imaging, a solar-blind photomultiplier tube to detect 175-nm xenon scintillation light, and a piezoelectric acoustic transducer to detect the ultrasonic emission from a growing bubble. The time of nucleation determined from the acoustic signal is used to correlate specific scintillation pulses with bubble-nucleating events. We report on data from this chamber for thermodynamic "Seitz" thresholds from 4.2 to 15.0 keV. The observed single- and multiple-bubble rates when exposed to a Cf 252 neutron source indicate that, for an 8.3-keV thermodynamic threshold, the minimum nuclear recoil energy required to nucleate a bubble is 19 ±6 keV (1 σ uncertainty). This is consistent with the observed scintillation spectrum for bubble-nucleating events. We see no evidence for bubble nucleation by gamma rays at any of the thresholds studied, setting a 90% C.L. upper limit of 6.3 ×10-7 bubbles per gamma interaction at a 4.2-keV thermodynamic threshold. This indicates stronger gamma discrimination than in CF3 I bubble chambers, supporting the hypothesis that scintillation production suppresses bubble nucleation by electron recoils, while nuclear recoils nucleate bubbles as usual. These measurements establish the noble-liquid bubble chamber as a promising new technology for the detection of weakly interacting massive particle dark matter and coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  6. Metal nanoinks as chemically stable surface enhanced scattering (SERS) probes for the analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, A; Saviello, D; McAuliffe, M A P; Mirabile, A; Lewis, L; Iacopino, D

    2017-06-07

    Metal nanoinks constituted by Ag nanoparticles and Au nanorods were employed as probes for the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) analysis of a blue BIC ballpoint pen. The dye components of the pen ink were first separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and subsequently analysed by SERS at illumination wavelengths of 514 nm and 785 nm. Compared to normal Raman conditions, enhanced spectra were obtained for all separated spots, allowing easy identification of phthalocyanine Blue 38 and triarylene crystal violet in the ink mixture. A combination of effects such as molecular resonance, electromagnetic and chemical effects were the contributing factors to the generation of spectra enhanced compared to normal Raman conditions. Enhancement factors (EFs) between 5 × 10(3) and 3 × 10(6) were obtained, depending on the combination of SERS probes and laser illumination used. In contrast to previous conflicting reports, the metal nanoinks were chemically stable, allowing the collection of reproducible spectra for days after deposition on TLC plates. In addition and in advance to previously reported SERS probes, no need for additional aggregating agents or correction of electrostatic charge was necessary to induce the generation of enhanced SERS spectra.

  7. A novel approach to neutron scattering instrumentation for probing multiscale dynamics in soft and biological matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamontov, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    We present a concept and ray-tracing simulation of a mechanical device that will enable inelastic neutron scattering measurements where the data at energy transfers from a few μeV to several hundred meV can be collected in a single, gapless spectrum. Besides covering 5 orders of magnitude on the energy (time) scale, the device provides data over 2 orders of magnitude on the scattering momentum (length) scale in a single measurement. Such capabilities are geared primarily toward soft and biological matter, where the broad dynamical features of relaxation origin largely overlap with vibration features, thus necessitating gapless spectral coverage over several orders of magnitude in time and space. Furthermore, neutron scattering experiments with such a device are performed with a fixed neutron final energy, which enables measurements, with neutron energy loss in the sample, at arbitrarily low temperatures over the same broad spectral range. This capability is also invaluable in biological and soft matter research, as the variable temperature dependence of different relaxation components allows their separation in the scattering spectra as a function of temperature.

  8. Probing photoinduced spin states in spin-crossover molecules with neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, K.; Craig, G. A.; Damay, F.; Fennell, T.; Murrie, M.; Chaboussant, G.

    2017-03-01

    We report a neutron-scattering investigation of the spin-crossover compound [Fe (ptz) 6] (BF4)2 , which undergoes an abrupt thermal spin transition from high spin (HS), S =2 , to low spin (LS), S =0 , around 135 K. The HS magnetic state can be restored at low temperature under blue/green light irradiation. We have developed a specially designed optical setup for neutron scattering to address the magnetic properties of the light-induced HS state. By using neutron diffraction, we demonstrate that significant HS/LS ratios (of up to 60%) can be obtained with this experimental setup on a sample volume considered large (400 mg), while a complete recovery of the LS state is achieved using near-infrared light. Finally, with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) we have observed magnetic transitions arising from the photo-induced metastable HS S =2 state split by crystal-field and spin-orbit coupling. We interpret the INS data assuming a spin-only model with a zero-field splitting of the S =2 ground state. The obtained parameters are D ≈-1.28 ±0.03 meV and |E |≈0.08 ±0.03 meV. The present results show that in situ magnetic inelastic neutron-scattering investigations on a broad range of photomagnetic materials are now possible.

  9. Coherent to incoherent cross section ratio for 59.54 keV gamma rays at scattering angle of 110°

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B. S., E-mail: balvir@pbi.ac.in [Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147002 (India); Sharma, Amandeep [Deptt. of Math. Stat. & Physics, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141004 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The coherent (Rayleigh) to incoherent (Compton) scattering cross-section ratio of elements, in the range 13 ≤ Z ≤ 82, are determined experimentally for 59.54 keV incident gamma photons. An HPGe (High purity germanium) semiconductor detector is employed, at scattering angle of 110°, to record the spectra originating from interactions of incident gamma photons with the target under investigation. The intensity ratio of Rayleigh to Compton scattered peaks observed in the recorded spectra, and corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the target and air, along with the other required parameters provides the differential cross-section ratio. The measured values of cross-section ratio are found to agree with theoretical predictions based upon non-relativistic form factor, relativistic form factor, modified form factor and S-matrix theory.

  10. Wavelength dependent SHG imaging and scattering probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Campbell, Kirby R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Manish

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate. To improve upon this situation, we utilized collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe structural differences in the extracellular matrix of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous (LGS and HGS) tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found strong wavelength dependent dependencies of these metrics that were different between the different tumors that are related to respective structural attributes in the collagen organization. These sub-resolution determinations are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. However, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. Moreover, our analyses are further consistent with LGS and benign tumors having similar etiology. We identified optimal wavelengths for the SHG metrics as well as optical scattering measurements. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were then used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy ( 90%) between the tissue types. This delineation is superior to current clinical performance and has potential applicability in supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool.

  11. Back-to-back optical coherence tomography-ultrasound probe for co-registered three-dimensional intravascular imaging with real-time display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Patel, Pranav M.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a novel integrated optical coherence tomography (OCT)-intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) probe, with a 1.5 mm-long rigid-part and 0.9 mm outer diameter, for real-time intracoronary imaging of atherosclerotic plaques and guiding interventional procedures. By placing the OCT ball lens and IVUS 45MHz single element transducer back-to-back at the same axial position, this probe can provide automatically co-registered, co-axial OCT-IVUS imaging. To demonstrate its capability, 3D OCT-IVUS imaging of a pig's coronary artery in real-time displayed in polar coordinates, as well as images of two major types of advanced plaques in human cadaver coronary segments, was obtained using this probe and our upgraded system. Histology validation is also presented.

  12. Rayleigh scattering in an optical nanofiber as a probe of higher-order mode propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, Jonathan E; Beadie, Guy; Rolston, Steven L; Orozco, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibers provide a rich platform for exploring atomic and optical phenomena even when they support only a single spatial mode. Nanofibers supporting higher-order modes provide additional degrees of freedom to enable complex evanescent field profiles for interaction with the surrounding medium, but local control of these profiles requires nondestructive evaluation of the propagating fields. Here, we use Rayleigh scattering for rapid measurement of the propagation of light in few-mode optical nanofibers. Imaging the Rayleigh scattered light provides direct visualization of the spatial evolution of propagating fields throughout the entire fiber, including the transition from core-cladding guidance to cladding-air guidance. We resolve the interference between higher-order modes to determine local beat lengths and modal content along the fiber, and show that the modal superposition in the waist can be systematically controlled by adjusting the input superposition. With this diagnostic we can measure vari...

  13. Probing structural evolution in heat induced protein gelation by scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Piplani, Pulkit; Mehan, S.; Aswal, V. K.

    2017-05-01

    The heating of a globular protein is known to elicit conformational changes in the protein molecules, resulting in the formation of a gel depending on the solution conditions. We have used dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to investigate the phase behavior and structure evolution in heat induced gelation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein as a function of pH and ionic strength. The gelation temperature is found to be increasing with increase in pH and decrease in ionic strength. The structure of the protein molecule remains intact very close to the gelation temperature. However, on further increase in temperature, the protein molecules form small aggregates which eventually lead to a network gel at gelation temperature. The gel structure is characterized by a mass fractal having a fractal dimension about 2.

  14. Medium effect in high density region probed by nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furumoto, T; Yamamoto, Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the medium effect in the high density region on the nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering in the framework of the double-folding (DF) model with the complex $G$-matrix interaction. First, the evaluating position of the local density, which is an ambiguity of the DF model, is investigated. However, the effect has a minor role to the nucleus-nucleus system. Next, the medium effect including three-body-force (TBF) effect is investigated with two methods. In the both methods, the medium effect is clearly seen on the potential and the elastic cross section, but not on the total reaction cross section. Finally, we make clear the crucial role of the TBF effect up to $k_F =$ 1.6 fm$^{-1}$ in the nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering.

  15. Neutron scattering as a probe of liquid crystal polymer-reinforced composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, R.P.; Douglas, E.P.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Langlois, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This research project sought to obtain nanoscale and molecular level information on the mechanism of reinforcement in liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-reinforced composites, to realize molecular-reinforced LCP composites, and to test the validity of the concept of molecular reinforcement. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to study the structures in the ternary phase diagram of LCP with liquid crystal thermosets and solvent on length scales ranging from 1-100 nm. The goal of the scattering measurements is to understand the phase morphology and degree of segregation of the reinforcing and matrix components. This information helps elucidate the physics of self assembly in these systems. This work provides an experimental basis for a microengineering approach to composites of vastly improved properties.

  16. Superhydrophobic surfaces allow probing of exosome self organization using X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Angelo; Tirinato, Luca; Altamura, Davide; Sibillano, Teresa; Giannini, Cinzia; Riekel, Christian; di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2013-02-01

    Drops of exosome dispersions from healthy epithelial colon cell line and colorectal cancer cells were dried on a superhydrophobic PMMA substrate. The residues were studied by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering using both a synchrotron radiation micrometric beam and a high-flux table-top X-ray source. Structural differences between healthy and cancerous cells were detected in the lamellar lattices of the exosome macro-aggregates.Drops of exosome dispersions from healthy epithelial colon cell line and colorectal cancer cells were dried on a superhydrophobic PMMA substrate. The residues were studied by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering using both a synchrotron radiation micrometric beam and a high-flux table-top X-ray source. Structural differences between healthy and cancerous cells were detected in the lamellar lattices of the exosome macro-aggregates. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34032e

  17. Direct probe of anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions via quantum scattering resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ayelet; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr S; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M C; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultra-cold molecular processes, where long range forces have been found to significantly depend on orientation in ultra-cold polar molecule collisions. Recent experiments have demonstrated the emergence of quantum phenomena such as scattering resonances in the cold collisions regime due to quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom. Although these states have been shown to be sensitive to interaction details, the effect of anisotropy on quantum resonances has eluded experimental observation so far. Here, we directly measure the anisotropy in atom-molecule interactions via quantum resonances by changing the quantum state of the internal molecular rotor. We observe that a quantum scattering resonance at a collision energy of $k_B$ x 270 mK appears in the Penning ionization of molecular hydrogen with metastable helium only if the molecule is rotationally excited. We use state of the art ab initio and ...

  18. Raman-scattering probe of anharmonic effects in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Abbi, S. C.; Jain, K. P.

    1995-06-01

    A comparative study of anharmonic effects in various structural forms of GaAs, namely crystalline, disordered and ion-implanted, and pulse laser annealed (PLA), using temperature-dependent Raman scattering, is reported for various phonon modes over the temperature range 10-300 K. The disordered and PLA samples are found to have greater anharmonicity than crystalline GaAs. The localized vibrational mode in PLA GaAs shows shorter relaxation time than the LO-phonon mode.

  19. Superhydrophobic surfaces allow probing of exosome self organization using X-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Accardo, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Drops of exosome dispersions from healthy epithelial colon cell line and colorectal cancer cells were dried on a superhydrophobic PMMA substrate. The residues were studied by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering using both a synchrotron radiation micrometric beam and a high-flux table-top X-ray source. Structural differences between healthy and cancerous cells were detected in the lamellar lattices of the exosome macro-aggregates. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Final Report: Novel nanowires as probes of electron coherence and correlations in restricted geometries (DE-FG03-01ER45946)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas Natelson

    2005-05-17

    This is a final summary report of the research conducted under DE-FG03-01ER45946, which was a research program using metal nanostructures to examine quantum coherence of electrons in normal and ferromagnetic metals. This program was the PI's first federal research grant, and by augmenting with other funds (Packard Foundation), this grant supported two graduate students during its duration. In normal metal nanostructures, quantum coherence was assessed by two independent techniques: weak localization magnetoresistance, and time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations (TDUCF noise). This work found that, in AuPd nanowires, the coherence information inferred from these two techniques were quantitatively consistent, even in the presence of magnetic impurity and phonon scattering. This confirmed theoretical expectations. However, in Ag and Au wires, the two techniques disagree, with noise measurements indicating a lower coherence length at low temperatures than weak localization. We have a candidate explanation for this, and are finishing these experiments. This work shows that subtleties remain in our understanding of coherence processes even in normal metals, particularly those involving the tunneling two-level systems that produce low frequency noise; this has relevance for quantum information processing implementations using metal devices. We have also studied time-dependent universal conductance fluctuations in ferromagnetic metals for the first time. The TDUCF in ferromagnetic nanowires show that the Cooperon channel of coherent processes is suppressed in these correlated materials. Furthermore, the surprisingly steep temperature dependence of the noise suggests that decoherence in these systems is through a different process than in normal metals. We are finishing measurements of ``magnetofingerprint'' conductance fluctuations in ferromagnetic metals to examine this unusual temperature dependence with an independent technique. This program has

  1. Probing the O(6) character of {sup 196}Pt with inelastic electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslanidou, Simela; Bassauer, Sergej; Hufnagel, Alexander; Kremer, Christoph; Krugmann, Andreas; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Pietralla, Norbert; Singer, Maxim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Interacting-Boson-Model provides an elegant tool to classify low-lying collective states in medium and heavy mass even-even nuclei. One of its dynamical symmetries is O(6) and a crucial test of this theory is to investigate the monopole transition to the band head of the K=0, σ=N-2 band. A powerful tool to investigate monopole transitions is inelastic electron scattering. An experiment on {sup 196}Pt -claimed to be a perfect O(6) nucleus - has been performed at the superconducting electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC at Darmstadt using the high resolution LINTOTT spectrometer. The experiment and analysis results are presented.

  2. Probing the O(6) character of {sup 196}Pt with inelastic electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslanidou, Simela; Krugmann, Andreas; Neumann-Cosel, Peter von; Pietralla, Norbert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The Interacting-Boson-Model provides an elegant tool to classify low lying collective states in medium and heavy mass even-even nuclei. One of its dynamical symmetries is O(6) and a crucial test of this theory is to investigate the monopole transitions to the band head of the K=0,σ=N-2 band. A powerful tool to investigate monopole transitions is inelastic electron scattering. An experiment on {sup 196}Pt -claimed to be a perfect O(6) nucleus- has recently been performed at the superconducting electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC at Darmstadt using the high resolution LINTOTT spectrometer. The experiment and preliminary results will be presented.

  3. Inverse freezing in {alpha}-cyclodextrin solutions probed by quasi elastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plazanet, M. [LENS, University of Florence, Via Nello Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto-Fiorentino (Italy); INFM-CRS-Soft Matter (CNR), c/o Univ. la Sapienza, Piaz. A. Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Institut Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156X, 38042 Grenoble Cx (France); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156X, 38042 Grenoble Cx (France); Schweins, R. [Institut Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156X, 38042 Grenoble Cx (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, B.P. 156X, 38042 Grenoble Cx (France); Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, Universite J. Fourier Grenoble - CNRS (UMR 5588), BP 87, 38402 St. Martin d' Heres Cx (France)], E-mail: trommsdorff@ill.fr

    2006-12-11

    Solutions of {alpha}-cyclodextrin, 4-methylpyridine and water undergo a reversible liquid-solid phase transition on heating ('inverse freezing'). In this paper quasi elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements are reported, from which the diffusive dynamics of different components in the liquid and solid phases is determined. Results imply that, in solution, {alpha}-cyclodextrin is contained in a solvation shell of 4-methylpyridine molecules, while in the crystal phase, the majority of the cell contents are immobilized on the nanosecond timescale. This information will be important in evaluating the entropy of the system in its different phases and in understanding the unusual phase transition.

  4. Recent advances in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy: Fundamental developments and applications in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sukesh [Spectral Energies, LLC, 5100 Springfield Street, Ste. 301, Dayton, OH 45431 (United States); Gord, James R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Patnaik, Anil K. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Department of Physics, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is widely used for measuring temperature and species concentration in reacting flows. This paper reviews the advances made over the last twelve years in the development and application of CARS spectroscopy in gas-phase reacting flows. The advent of high-power nanosecond (ns) lasers and off-the-shelf compact picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) lasers is enabling the rapid expansion of the application of single-shot or high-bandwidth CARS spectroscopy in a way that would have been quite unimaginable two decades ago. Furthermore, compact ps lasers are paving the way for the development of a fiber-based CARS system for use in harsh environments. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of recent progresses in ns-, ps-, and fs-CARS spectroscopy for gas-phase thermometry and species-concentration measurements since the second edition of A.C. Eckbreth's book entitled Laser Diagnostics for Combustion Temperature and Species, which was published in 1996. During the last two decades, four encompassing issues have driven the fundamental development and application of CARS spectroscopy in reacting flows: 1) measurement of temperature and concentration of multiple species with one CARS system, 2) extension of the application of traditional ns-CARS to challenging reacting flow environments, 3) performance of nonresonant background-free and collision-free measurements in high-pressure reacting flows, and 4) measurement of temperature and species concentration at high bandwidth, typically 1 kHz or greater, to address the instability and transient phenomena associated with turbulent reacting flows in the combustors and augmentors of modern propulsion systems. This review is focused on identifying and discussing the recent results of gas-phase CARS spectroscopy related to the four issues mentioned above. The feasibility of performing high-bandwidth CARS spectroscopy with one laser beam as well as the

  5. Gold nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering for noninvasive molecular probing of embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandra Rao Sathuluri

    Full Text Available This study reports the use of gold nanoparticle-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS for probing the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, including undifferentiated single cells, embryoid bodies (EBs, and terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs were successfully delivered into all 3 mES cell differentiation stages without affecting cell viability or proliferation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM confirmed the localization of GNPs inside the following cell organelles: mitochondria, secondary lysosome, and endoplasmic reticulum. Using bright- and dark-field imaging, the bright scattering of GNPs and nanoaggregates in all 3 ES cell differentiation stages could be visualized. EB (an early differentiation stage and terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes both showed SERS peaks specific to metabolic activity in the mitochondria and to protein translation (amide I, amide II, and amide III peaks. These peaks have been rarely identified in undifferentiated single ES cells. Spatiotemporal changes observed in the SERS spectra from terminally differentiated cardiomyocyte tissues revealed local and dynamic molecular interactions as well as transformations during ES cell differentiation.

  6. Medium effect in high-density nuclear matter probed by systematic analyses of nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furumoto, T; Yamamoto, Y

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the property of the high-density nuclear matter probed by the nucleus-nucleus elastic scattering in the framework of the double-folding (DF) model with the complex $G$-matrix interaction. The medium effect including three-body-force (TBF) effect is investigated with present two methods based on the frozen density approximation. With the both methods, the medium effect in the high density region is clearly seen on the potential and the elastic cross section of the $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O system at $E/A =$ 70 MeV. The crucial role of the medium effect for the high-density nuclear matter is also confirmed with other effective nucleon-nucleon ($NN$) interactions. In addition, present methods are applied to other heavy-ion elastic scattering systems. Again, the medium effect in the high-density region is clearly seen in the heavy-ion elastic cross section. The effect on the elastic cross section becomes invisible with the increase of the target mass and the incident energy within existing the experiment...

  7. Micron-sized surface enhanced Raman scattering reporter/fluorescence probe encoded colloidal microspheres for sensitive DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Lijun; Li, Ruimin; Dong, Xu; Wang, Fang; Guo, Jia; Wang, Changchun

    2017-02-15

    A new type of optical probes, featuring surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and fluorescence spectra dual-mode encoding, has been reported in this article. Based on the uniform micrometer-sized melamine resin/Ag nanoparticles (MRM/Ag-NPs) composite microspheres, the SERS reporters and fluorescent probes were successfully fixed onto the different layers of the MEM/Ag-NPs microspheres, which supported the sensitive DNA detecton. The two spectroscopic methods commonly considered to be contradictive to each other, yet the optical signals were separable in the experiments. The dual-encoding strategy and single microsphere detecton method put the number of available independent codes to be rough the multiple of those available in the two optical detection channels, which increases far more rapidly than the summation of the two channels. As a proof of cencept, the utility of this dual spectrum mode SERS-fluoresecence encoded microsphere (SFEM) was demonstrated in a specific DNA detection using complimentary ssDNA functionalized magnetic beads as the DNA capturing and separation agents. Excellent encoding results were demonstrated from the decoding of the SERS and fluorescence signals of the SFEM. The method appears to be general in scope and we expect that the SERS-fluoresecence encoded microspheres system is applicable to multiplex bioassays of a variety of biomolecules.

  8. MEMS-based handheld scanning probe with pre-shaped input signals for distortion-free images in Gabor-domain optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Andrea; Canavesi, Cristina; Hayes, Adam; Tankam, Patrice; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Santhanam, Anand; Thompson, Kevin P; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-06-13

    High-speed scanning in optical coherence tomography (OCT) often comes with either compromises in image quality, the requirement for post-processing of the acquired images, or both. We report on distortion-free OCT volumetric imaging with a dual-axis micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based handheld imaging probe. In the context of an imaging probe with optics located between the 2D MEMS and the sample, we report in this paper on how pre-shaped open-loop input signals with tailored non-linear parts were implemented in a custom control board and, unlike the sinusoidal signals typically used for MEMS, achieved real-time distortion-free imaging without post-processing. The MEMS mirror was integrated into a compact, lightweight handheld probe. The MEMS scanner achieved a 12-fold reduction in volume and 17-fold reduction in weight over a previous dual-mirror galvanometer-based scanner. Distortion-free imaging with no post-processing with a Gabor-domain optical coherence microscope (GD-OCM) with 2 μm axial and lateral resolutions over a field of view of 1 × 1 mm2 is demonstrated experimentally through volumetric images of a regular microscopic structure, an excised human cornea, and in vivo human skin.

  9. Motion-compensated hand-held common-path Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography probe for image-guided intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Song, Cheol; Liu, Xuan; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    A motion-compensated hand-held common-path Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography imaging probe has been developed for image guided intervention during microsurgery. A hand-held prototype instrument was designed and fabricated by integrating an imaging fiber probe inside a stainless steel needle which is attached to the ceramic shaft of a piezoelectric motor housed in an aluminum handle. The fiber probe obtains A-scan images. The distance information was extracted from the A-scans to track the sample surface distance and a fixed distance was maintained by a feedback motor control which effectively compensated hand tremor and target movements in the axial direction. Graphical user interface, real-time data processing, and visualization based on a CPU-GPU hybrid programming architecture were developed and used in the implantation of this system. To validate the system, free-hand optical coherence tomography images using various samples were obtained. The system can be easily integrated into microsurgical tools and robotics for a wide range of clinical applications. Such tools could offer physicians the freedom to easily image sites of interest with reduced risk and higher image quality.

  10. PROBING THE STANDARD MODEL AND NUCLEON STRUCTURE VIA PARITY VIOLATING ELECTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humensky, T

    2003-10-28

    Parity-violating electron scattering has developed over the last 25 years into a tool to study both the structure of electroweak interactions and the structure of nucleons. Work on two parity-violation experiments is reported in this thesis. They are the Hall A Proton Parity EXperiment (HAPPEX), which ran at Jefferson Laboratory in 1998-1999, and SLAC E-158, which had its first physics running in 2002. HAPPEX measured the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at a momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 0.477 GeV{sup 2} and a scattering angle of 12{sup o}. This asymmetry is sensitive to the presence of strange sea quarks in the proton. In particular, it is sensitive to the proton's strange elastic form factors. An asymmetry of A{sub LR}{sup ep} = -15.05 {+-} 0.98 {+-} 0.56 ppm was measured, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. Combining this asymmetry measurement with existing measurements of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron allowed HAPPEX to set new constraints on the strange elastic form factors of the proton G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.025 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.014, where G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, respectively. The first error is the quadrature sum of the experimental errors and the second error is due to uncertainty in the electromagnetic form factors. This result is consistent with the absence of a contribution from strange quarks. This thesis reports an analysis of the 1999 data set, with a particular focus on the determination of the raw asymmetry and the corrections to the raw asymmetry to account for helicity-correlated asymmetries in properties of the electron beam.

  11. A method for measuring coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering at a far off-axis high-energy neutrino beam target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S. J. [Fermilab; Cooper, R. L. [Indiana U.; DeJongh, F. [Fermilab; Empl, A. [Houston U.; Garrison, L. M. [Indiana U.; Hime, A. [Los Alamos; Hungerford, E. [Houston U.; Kobilarcik, T. [Fermilab; Loer, B. [Fermilab; Mariani, C. [Virginia Tech.; Mocko, M. [Los Alamos; Muhrer, G. [Los Alamos; Pattie, R. [North Carolina State U.; Pavlovic, Z. [Los Alamos; Ramberg, E. [Fermilab; Scholberg, K. [Duke U.; Tayloe, R. [Indiana U.; Thornton, R. T. [Indiana U.; Yoo, J. [Fermilab; Young, A. [North Carolina State U.

    2014-04-03

    We present an experimental method for measuring the process of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS). This method uses a detector situated transverse to a high-energy neutrino beam production target. This detector would be sensitive to the low-energy neutrinos arising from decay-at-rest pions in the target. We discuss the physics motivation for making this measurement and outline the predicted backgrounds and sensitivities using this approach. We report a measurement of neutron backgrounds as found in an off-axis surface location of the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) target. The results indicate that the Fermilab BNB target is a favorable location for a CENNS experiment.

  12. A New Method for Measuring Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering at an Off-Axis High-Energy Neutrino Beam Target

    CERN Document Server

    Brice, S J; DeJongh, F; Empl, A; Garrison, L M; Hime, A; Hungerford, E; Kobilarcik, T; Loer, B; Mariani, C; Mocko, M; Muhrer, G; Pattie, R; Pavlovic, Z; Ramberg, E; Scholberg, K; Tayloe, R; Thornton, R T; Yoo, J; Young, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a new experimental method for measuring the process of Coherent Elastic Neutrino Nucleus Scattering (CENNS). This method uses a detector situated transverse to a high energy neutrino beam production target. This detector would be sensitive to the low energy neutrinos arising from pion decays-at-rest in the target. We discuss the physics motivation for making this measurement and outline the predicted backgrounds and sensitivities using this approach. We report a measurement of neutron backgrounds as found in an off-axis surface location of the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) target. The results indicate that the Fermilab BNB target is a favorable location for a CENNS experiment.

  13. Ellipsometric light scattering to probe the interface of colloids - current applications and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigel R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ellipsometric light scattering (ELS has been developed into a technique which can be used to characterise the interface between spherical colloidal particles and their surrounding medium. Here, we give an overview over previous successful applications of the technique, and its current limits. The successful applications include the characterisation of temperature-dependent swelling of a thermo-sensitive polymer coating on a latex particle, the measurement of birefringence and molecular orientation in a vescile shell, and the characterisation of the ion distribution around electrostatically stabilised latex particles. As a result of the characterisation of the ion distribution, disagreement with the Poisson-Boltzmann description has been reported before. Here, a few more experimental results on latex particles in the presence of CsBr are discussed.

  14. Inverse-kinematics proton scattering on $^{50}$Ca: Determining effective charges using complementary probes

    CERN Document Server

    Riley, L A; Baugher, T R; Bazin, D; Bowry, M; Cottle, P D; DeVone, F G; Gade, A; Glowacki, M T; Kemper, K W; Lunderberg, E; McPherson, D M; Noji, S; Recchia, F; Sadler, B V; Scott, M; Weisshaar, D; Zegers, R G T

    2014-01-01

    We have performed measurements of the $0_\\mathrm{g.s.}^+ \\rightarrow 2_1^+$ excitations in the neutron-rich isotopes $^{48,50}$Ca via inelastic proton scattering on a liquid hydrogen target, using the GRETINA $\\gamma$-ray tracking array. A comparison of the present results with those from previous measurements of the lifetimes of the $2_1^+$ states provides us the ratio of the neutron and proton matrix elements for the $0_\\mathrm{g.s.}^+ \\rightarrow 2_1^+$ transitions. These results allow the determination of the ratio of the proton and neutron effective charges to be used in shell model calculations of neutron-rich isotopes in the vicinity of $^{48}$Ca.

  15. Dynamics of ferrocene in molecular sieves probed by Mossbauer spectroscopy and nuclear resonant scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthalter, T [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitat Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Sergueev, I [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Buerck, U van; Wagner, F E [Experimentalphysik E13, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Haerter, P [Anorganische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Kornatowski, J [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, D-45470 Muelheim (Germany); Klingelhoefer, S; Behrens, P, E-mail: t.asthalter@ipc.uni-stuttgart.d [Anorganische Chemie, Leibniz-Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2010-03-01

    A detailed study on the slow dynamics of ferrocene in the unidimensional channels of the molecular sieves SSZ-24 and AlPO{sub 4}-5 has been carried out, using Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), nuclear forward scattering (NFS) and synchrotron radiation-based perturbed angular correlations (SRPAC). In both host systems, anisotropic rotational dynamics is observed above 100 K. For SSZ-24, this anisotropy persists even above the bulk melting temperature of ferrocene. Various theoretical models are exploited for the study of anisotropic discrete jump rotations for the first time. The experimental data can be described fairly well by a jump model that involves reorientations of the molecular axis on a cone mantle with an opening angle dependant on temperature.

  16. Probing electroweak gauge boson scattering with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Electroweak gauge bosons as central components of the Standard Model of particle physics are well understood theoretically and have been studied with high precision at past and present collider experiments. The electroweak theory predicts the existence of a scattering process of these particles consisting of contributions from triple and quartic bosonic couplings as well as Higgs boson mediated interactions. These contributions are not separable in a gauge invariant way and are only unitarized in the case of a Higgs boson as it is described by the Standard Model. The process is tied to the electroweak symmetry breaking which introduces the longitudinal modes for the massive electroweak gauge bosons. A study of this interaction is also a direct verification of the local gauge symmetry as one of the fundamental axioms of the Standard Model. With the start of the Large Hadron Collider and after collecting proton-proton collision data with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector, first-ever evidence for this process could be achieved in the context of this work. A study of leptonically decaying W{sup ±}W{sup ±}jj, same-electric-charge diboson production in association with two jets resulted in an observation of the electroweak W{sup ±}W{sup ±}jj production with same electric charge of the W bosons, inseparably comprising W{sup ±}W{sup ±}→W{sup ±}W{sup ±} electroweak gauge boson scattering contributions, with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations. The measured production cross section is in agreement with the Standard Model prediction. In the course of a study for leptonically decaying WZ productions, methods for background estimation, the extraction of systematic uncertainties and cross section measurements were developed. They were extended and applied to the WZjj final state whereof the purely electroweakly mediated contribution is intrinsically tied to the scattering of all Standard

  17. Direct observation of the cyclic dimer in liquid acetic acid by probing the C=O vibration with ultrafast coherent Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütgens, Matthias; Friedriszik, Frank; Lochbrunner, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    We present a comparison of spontaneous Raman and ultrafast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra of the C=O vibration of liquid acetic acid. The former technique cannot clearly reveal the number of contributions in the spectrum. However, the additional time and spectrally resolved CARS experiment supports strictly the existence of four modes, which proves the coexistence of more than one H-bonded configuration in liquid acetic acid. A comparably slowly dephasing mode which is obscured by a broad band in the linear Raman spectrum is assigned to the cyclic dimer and can be observed freed from all other contributions by ultrafast CARS.

  18. Audio frequency in vivo optical coherence elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adie, Steven G; Kennedy, Brendan F; Armstrong, Julian J; Alexandrov, Sergey A; Sampson, David D [Optical-Biomedical Engineering Laboratory (OBEL), School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)], E-mail: dsampson@ee.uwa.edu.au

    2009-05-21

    We present a new approach to optical coherence elastography (OCE), which probes the local elastic properties of tissue by using optical coherence tomography to measure the effect of an applied stimulus in the audio frequency range. We describe the approach, based on analysis of the Bessel frequency spectrum of the interferometric signal detected from scatterers undergoing periodic motion in response to an applied stimulus. We present quantitative results of sub-micron excitation at 820 Hz in a layered phantom and the first such measurements in human skin in vivo.

  19. Neutron Compton Scattering as a Probe of Hydrogen Bonded (and other) Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, George

    2010-12-22

    One of the two major themes of the proposal was to study quantum coherence in stressed hydrogen bond networks. Our experiments on double wall carbon nanotubes and two versions of Nafion, together with earlier work on water confined in xerogel and in single wall carbon nanotubes demonstrate that water confined in dimensions on the order of 20 Angstroms is in a qualitatively different quantum ground state than bulk water. It cannot be described as a collection of molecules interacting only electrostatically. This has major implications for biology, where most of the water in the cell is confined to distances on that order, and for fuel cell development using Nafion like materials, where the conduction mechanism is expected to be strongly affected by the quantum state of the water. We have demonstrated its importance in the binding of water molecules to DNA. Protein folding experiments at several concentrations have been carried out and are presently being analyzed. Initial analysis shows strong temperature dependent effects on the proton momentum distribution. The theoretical work proposed has been completed, and complements the experiments by demonstrating that even in room temperature bulk water, the electron density overlap between donor and acceptor molecules in the hydrogen bond has a significant measurable effect on the momentum distribution of the protons. The electrons are distributed throughout the hydrogen bond network, not simply in localized molecules. We had proposed to look at low coverage experiments on MCM-41, and have done so, revealing the details of the interaction of water molecules with silanol groups. Related experiments, not proposed, on water layers on SnO2 and TiO2 powders have confirmed the strong deviations of the proton momentum distribution for water molecules adsorbed on these surfaces. These results are not yet published. Another major theme was to measure Born-Oppenheimer potentials in M3H(XO4)2 systems. We have done this for Rb3(SO4

  20. Raman scattering probe of ion-implanted and pulse laser annealed GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prabhat; Jain, K. P.; Abbi, S. C.

    1996-04-01

    We report Raman scattering studies of phosphorus-ion-implanted and subsequently pulse laser annealed (PLA) GaAs. The threshold value of implantation fluence for the disappearance of one-phonon modes in the Raman spectrum of ion-implanted GaAs sample is found to be greater than that for the two-phonon modes by an order of magnitude. The phonon correlation length decreases with increasing disorder. The lattice reconstruction process during PLA creates microcrystallites for incomplete annealing, whose sizes can be given by the phonon correlation lengths, and are found to increase with the annealing power density. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectra corresponding to the allowed longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon mode to the forbidden transverse-optical (TO)-phonon mode, ILO/ITO, is used as a quantitative measure of crystallinity in the implantation and PLA processes. The threshold annealing power density is estimated to be 20 MW/cm2 for 70 keV phosphorus-ion-implanted GaAs at a fluence of 5×1015 ions/cm2. The localized vibrational mode of phosphorus is observed in PLA samples for fluences above 1×1015 ions/cm2.

  1. Probing IrTe2 crystal symmetry by polarized Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarević, N.; Bozin, E. S.; Šćepanović, M.; Opačić, M.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.; Popović, Z. V.

    2014-06-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements on IrTe2 single crystals carried out over the 15-640 K temperature range, and across the structural phase transition, reveal different insights regarding the crystal symmetry. In the high temperature regime three Raman active modes are observed at all of the studied temperatures above the structural phase transition, rather than two as predicted by the factor group analysis for the assumed P3¯m1 symmetry. This indicates that the actual symmetry of the high temperature phase is lower than previously thought. The observation of an additional Eg mode at high temperature can be explained by doubling of the original trigonal unit cell along the c axis and within the P3¯c1 symmetry. In the low temperature regime (below 245 K) the other Raman modes appear as a consequence of the symmetry lowering phase transition and the corresponding increase of the primitive cell. All of the modes observed below the phase transition temperature can be assigned within the monoclinic crystal symmetry. The temperature dependence of the Raman active phonons in both phases is mainly driven by anharmonicity effects. The results call for reconsideration of the crystallographic phases of IrTe2.

  2. Probing a scattering resonance with Rydberg molecules inside a Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rios, J.; Schlagmüller, M.; Liebisch, T. C.; Nguyen, H.; Lochead, G.; Engel, F.; Böottcher, F.; Westphal, K. M.; Kleinbach, K. S.; Löw, R.; Hofferberth, S.; Pfau, T.; Greene, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    The spectroscopy of a single Rydberg atom within a Bose-Einstein condensate is studied, and as a result a line shape dependence on the principal Rydberg quantum number n is observed, apart from the expected density shift due to the large number of neutrals inside the Rydberg orbit. The observed line broadening depends on the Rydberg electron-neutral interaction, in particular, it manifests the influence of the e-Rb(5S) p-wave scattering shape resonance, which dramatically affects the potential energy landscape for the neutrals embedded within the Rydberg orbit. The observed spectroscopic line shapes are reproduced with an overall good agreement by means of a microscopic model, in which the atoms overlapped with the Rydberg orbit are treated as zero-velocity point-like particles, with binding energies associated with the ion-neutral distance. We acknowledge support from Deutsche Forschungsge5 meinschaft (DFG) within the SFB/TRR21 and the project PF 381/13-1. This work has been supported by NSF under Grand Number PHY-130690.

  3. A sensitive resveratrol assay with a simple probe methylene blue by resonance light scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Haiyan; Dai, Kaijin; Luo, Qizhi; Duan, Wenjun; Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel resonance light scattering (RLS) method was developed for the determination of resveratrol based on the interaction between resveratrol and methylene blue (MB). It was found that at pH 8.69, the weak RLS intensity of MB was remarkably enhanced by the addition of trace amount of resveratrol with the maximum peak located at 385.0 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a good linear relationship between the enhanced RLS intensities and the concentrations of resveratrol was obtained over the range of 2.0-14.0 μg ml -1 with the detection limit (3 σ) of 0.63 μg ml -1. The results of the analysis of resveratrol in synthetic samples and human urine are satisfactory, which showed it may provide a more sensitive, convenient, rapid and reproducible method for the detection of resveratrol, especially in biological and pharmaceutical field. In this work, the characteristics of RLS, absorption and fluorescence spectra of the resveratrol-MB system, the influencing factors and the optimum conditions of the reaction were investigated.

  4. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Qin; Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^...

  5. Spin excitations in 3D molecular magnets probed by neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bordallo, H N; Chapon, L C; Manson, J L; Cook, J C; Lee, S H; Copley, J R D; Yildirim, T; Kern, S

    2002-01-01

    The emerging field of molecular magnetism constitutes a new branch of materials science that deals with the magnetic properties of molecules, or assemblies of molecules, that contain magnetic centers. The growing interest in understanding the origin of the magnetic ordering in these materials is to obtain novel multiproperty molecular magnetic materials with high transition temperatures. Molecules based on the dicyanamide ion [N ident to C-N-C ident to N], abbreviated (dca), such as M(dca) sub 2 [M=Mn, Ni], have shown interesting bulk properties that prompted our inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies. While the Mn sup 2 sup + ion is isotropic because of its L=0 configuration, the isostructural Ni analog has S=1 and demonstrates marked single-ion anisotropy. Mn(dca) sub 2 is a canted antiferromagnet below 16 K, while Ni(dca) sub 2 is a ferromagnet below 21 K. INS has been used to investigate the magnetic excitations in Mn(dca) sub 2 and Ni(dca) sub 2. For Mn(dca) sub 2 , a Heisenberg model gives good corr...

  6. Probing Electroweak Gauge Boson Scattering with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Anger, Philipp; Lammers, Sabine

    Electroweak gauge bosons as central components of the Standard Model of particle physics are well understood theoretically and have been studied with high precision at past and present collider experiments. The electroweak theory predicts the existence of a scattering process of these particles consisting of contributions from triple and quartic bosonic couplings as well as Higgs boson mediated interactions. These contributions are not separable in a gauge invariant way and are only unitarized in the case of a Higgs boson as it is described by the Standard Model. The process is tied to the electroweak symmetry breaking which introduces the longitudinal modes for the massive electroweak gauge bosons. A study of this interaction is also a direct verification of the local gauge symmetry as one of the fundamental axioms of the Standard Model. With the start of the Large Hadron Collider and after collecting proton-proton collision data with an integrated luminosity of $20.3\\;\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass e...

  7. d-d excitations in bilayer manganites probed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.; Rosenkranz, S.; Castellan, J.-P.; Osborn, R.; Mitchell, J. F.; Zheng, H.; Case, D.; Kim, J. H.; Gog, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report a high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering investigation of the bilayer manganites La{sub 2-2x}Sr{sub 1+2x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7} with x=0.36 and 0.5. The momentum dependence along the crystallographic (110) direction for energy losses 1 eV {le} {Delta}E {le} 15 eV has been measured in detail with the data analysis focusing on the energy-loss region 1 eV {le} {Delta}E {le} 5 eV, which includes a strong peak located at {Delta}E {approx} 2 eV. We observe a clear dispersion of up to 0.5 eV in the measured q range, which is direct evidence of the nonlocal character of this excitation. Further, we found that the intensity in this low-energy region strongly depends on both the reduced wave vector q=(h,h,0), h=0.1-0.5, and temperature, i.e., different ordered phases. Results can be explained via an intersite d-d charge-transfer excitation, proposed for pseudocubic manganites, where the hopping rate is strongly increased (decreased) by ferromagnetic (antiferromagnetic) alignment of neighboring in-plane Mn ion core spins.

  8. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems.

  9. Analysis of IgG kinetic stability by differential scanning calorimetry, probe fluorescence and light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemergut, Michal; Žoldák, Gabriel; Schaefer, Jonas V; Kast, Florian; Miškovský, Pavol; Plückthun, Andreas; Sedlák, Erik

    2017-08-19

    Monoclonal antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) type have become mainstream therapeutics for the treatment of many life-threatening diseases. For their successful application in the clinic and a favorable cost-benefit ratio, the design and formulation of these therapeutic molecules must guarantee long-term stability for an extended period of time. Accelerated stability studies, e.g., by employing thermal denaturation, have the great potential for enabling high-throughput screening campaigns to find optimal molecular variants and formulations in a short time. Surprisingly, no validated quantitative analysis of these accelerated studies has been performed yet, which clearly limits their application for predicting IgG stability. Therefore, we have established a quantitative approach for the assessment of the kinetic stability over a broad range of temperatures. To this end, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were performed with a model IgG, testing chaotropic formulations and an extended temperature range, and they were subsequently analyzed by our recently developed three-step sequential model of IgG denaturation, consisting of one reversible and two irreversible steps. A critical comparison of the predictions from this model with data obtained by an orthogonal fluorescence probe method, based on 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate binding to partially unfolded states, resulted in very good agreement. In summary, our study highlights the validity of this easy-to-perform analysis for reliably assessing the kinetic stability of IgGs, which can support accelerated formulation development of monoclonal antibodies by ranking different formulations as well as by improving colloidal stability models. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  10. Relationships between structure and rheology in polymer nanocomposites probed via X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujari, Saswati

    Polymer nanocomposites have received intense attention due to their potential for significantly enhanced polymer properties like mechanical strength, thermal stability, electrical conductivity, etc. Melt state processing of these materials exposes the nanofillers to complex flow fields, which can induce changes in nanocomposite microstructure, including particle dispersion and the orientation of anisotropic nanoparticles in the polymer matrix. Since nanocomposite properties are strongly correlated with both these structural features, it is essential to develop methods to characterize such microstructural changes. This thesis reports extensive measurements of mechanical rheology and particle orientation during flow of nanocomposites based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes, clays, and graphene nanosheets. Changes in orientation of anisotropic nanoparticles are manifested in x-ray scattering images collected during shear. In-situ studies of orientation are enabled by custom designed x-ray adapted shear cells and high energy synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Laboratory where these experiments were conducted. Studies of flow induced orientation in model nanotube dispersions revealed increasing sample anisotropy with increasing shear rate across concentrations and aspect ratios. In dilute dispersions the orientation dynamics was dominated by flow induced aggregation/disaggregation of MWNTs, with anisotropy primarily attributed to individually dispersed nanotubes. In concentrated suspensions, sample anisotropy resulted from flow induced elastic deformation within entangled MWNT clusters. Release of elastic energy upon flow cessation resulted in an unexpected relaxation of induced anisotropy. These studies were followed with study of more complex, but, industrially relevant nanocomposites made with polypropylene as the dispersing matrix. The high viscosity of polypropylene makes dispersion of nanoparticles difficult, and hence a careful

  11. Light Scattering in Solid IX

    CERN Document Server

    Cardona, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    This is the ninth volume of a well-established series in which expert practitioners discuss topical aspects of light scattering in solids. It reviews recent developments concerning mainly semiconductor nanostructures and inelastic x-ray scattering, including both coherent time-domain and spontaneous scattering studies. In the past few years, light scattering has become one of the most important research and characterization methods for studying carbon nanotubes and semiconducting quantum dots, and a crucial tool for exploring the coupled exciton--photon system in semiconductor cavities. Among the novel techniques discussed in this volume are pump--probe ultrafast measurements and those which use synchrotron radiation as light source. The book addresses improvements in the intensity, beam quality and time synchronization of modern synchrotron sources, which made it possible to measure the phonon dispersion in very small samples and to determine electronic energy bands as well as enabling real-time observations...

  12. A straightforward route to the synthesis of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe for targeting transferrin receptor-overexpressed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jing; Wang Zhuyuan; Tan Xuebin; Li Jin; Song Chunyuan; Zhang Ruohu; Cui Yiping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Advanced Photonics Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-08-27

    A tumor cell targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe has been successfully synthesized by using p-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) as both the SERS reporter and the conjugation agent for attaching transferrin molecules, which shows experimentally the targeting ability for transferrin receptor-overexpressed HeLa cells and exhibits strong SERS signals when being incubated inside cells. To prove that the uptake of such a SERS probe is through a Tf-receptor-mediated endocytosis process, two control experiments: (1) HeLa cells being incubated with the probe at 4 deg. C and (2) HeLa cells being pre-blocked with free transferrin at 37 deg. C, were employed. The difference of SERS intensity between the transferrin-overexpressed HeLa cells and transferrin-pre-blocked HeLa cells indicates that the probe has the potential to selectively target tumor cells.

  13. Counterion distribution surrounding spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates probed by small-angle x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Zwanikken, Jos W; Macfarlane, Robert J; Leung, Cheuk-Yui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Mirkin, Chad A; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2013-12-23

    The radial distribution of monovalent cations surrounding spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates (SNA-AuNPs) is determined by in situ small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and classical density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Small differences in SAXS intensity profiles from SNA-AuNPs dispersed in a series of solutions containing different monovalent ions (Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)) are measured. Using the "heavy ion replacement" SAXS (HIRSAXS) approach, we extract the cation-distribution-dependent contribution to the SAXS intensity and show that it agrees with DFT predictions. The experiment-theory comparisons reveal the radial distribution of cations as well as the conformation of the DNA in the SNA shell. The analysis shows an enhancement to the average cation concentration in the SNA shell that can be up to 15-fold, depending on the bulk solution ionic concentration. The study demonstrates the feasibility of HIRSAXS in probing the distribution of monovalent cations surrounding nanoparticles with an electron dense core (e.g., metals).

  14. Chemically stable Au nanorods as probes for sensitive surface enhanced scattering (SERS) analysis of blue BIC ballpoint pens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyami, Abeer; Saviello, Daniela; McAuliffe, Micheal A. P.; Cucciniello, Raffaele; Mirabile, Antonio; Proto, Antonio; Lewis, Liam; Iacopino, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Au nanorods were used as an alternative to commonly used Ag nanoparticles as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes for identification of dye composition of blue BIC ballpoint pens. When used in combination with Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC), Au nanorod colloids allowed identification of the major dye components of the BIC pen ink, otherwise not identifiable by normal Raman spectroscopy. Thanks to their enhanced chemical stability compared to Ag colloids, Au nanorods provided stable and reproducible SERS signals and allowed easy identification of phthalocyanine and triarylene dyes in the pen ink mixture. These findings were supported by FTIR and MALDI analyses, also performed on the pen ink. Furthermore, the self-assembly of Au nanorods into large area ordered superstructures allowed identification of BIC pen traces. SERS spectra of good intensity and high reproducibility were obtained using Au nanorod vertical arrays, due to the high density of hot spots and morphological reproducibility of these superstructures. These results open the way to the employment of SERS for fast screening analysis and for quantitative analysis of pens and faded pens which are relevant for the fields of forensic and art conservation sciences.

  15. Resonance Scattering Detection of Trace Hg2+ Using Aptamer-modified AuPd Nanoalloy Probe as Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆业; 范燕燕; 梁爱惠; 蒋治良

    2011-01-01

    The 5 nm AuPd nanoalloy in mole ratio of Au:Pd=32 : 1 was prepared, using sodium citrate as the stabilizing agent and NaBH4 as the reductant. The AuPd nanoalloy was modified by the aptamer to prepare an aptamer- AuPd (AptAuPd) probe for resonance scattering (RS) detection of 5.(Y-1250 nmol/L Hg2+. The AptAuPd-Hg2+ aptamer reaction solution was filtrated by membrane, and the AptAuPd in the filtrate exhibited strong catalytic ef- fect on the slow NiP particle reaction between NiCI2 and NaHzPO2, and the NiP particles showed a RS peak at 508 nm. The RS intensity decreased when Hg2+ concentration increased. The decreased RS intensity was linear to Hg2+ concentration in the range of 0.5--1250 nmol/L. The RS assays were used to determine Hg2+ in real samples, with good results.

  16. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines.

  17. Control of amplification without inversion in H2 and LiH molecules: Dependence on relative magnitude of probe and coherent field Rabi frequencies in three-level system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sulagna Dutta; Krishna Rai Dastidar

    2006-12-01

    Dependence of amplification without inversion (AWI) on the relative strength of probe and coherent field Rabi frequencies has been studied in H2 and LiH molecules for three-level configuration. We have derived exact analytical expressions for coherences and populations keeping all the orders of probe field Rabi frequency () and coherent field Rabi frequency () in the steady state limit. Previously, first-order approximation (i.e. keeping only the first-order term in ) was used and hence AWI was studied for the condition ≫ . Here, by using the exact analytical expressions of coherences and populations, we have shown that AWI is maximum when is within the same order of probe field Rabi frequency irrespective of the choice of different ro-vibrational transitions in both the molecules. However, the shape of the gain profile and the maximum value of gain on the probe field and the absorption on coherent field depend on the choice of different ro-vibrational levels as the upper lasing levels. Effect of bidirectional pumping, homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening on AWI process has been studied. By solving the density matrix equations numerically it has been shown that both the transient and the steady state AWI can be obtained and the numerical values of coherences and populations at large time are in very good agreement with exact analytical values in the steady state limit. It has been shown that in molecules AWI can be obtained on probe field of smaller wavelength than that of the coherent field which has not been observed in atoms so far.

  18. Spin rotation and birefringence effect for a particle in a high energy storage ring and measurement of the real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude, electric and magnetic polarizabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper the equations for the spin evolution of a particle in a storage ring are analyzed considering contributions from the tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the particle. Study of spin rotation and birefringence effect for a particle in a high energy storage ring provides for measurement as the real part of the coherent elastic zero-angle scattering amplitude as well as tensor electric and magnetic polarizabilities. We proposed the method for measurement the real part of the elastic coherent zero-angle scattering amplitude of particles and nuclei in a storage ring by the paramagnetic resonance in the periodical in time nuclear pseudoelectric and pseudomagnetic fields.

  19. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, L B; Zastrau, U; Galtier, E; Gamboa, E J; Goede, S; Schumaker, W; Ravasio, A; Gauthier, M; MacDonald, M J; Chen, Z; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Fry, A; Kim, J B; Roedel, C; Mishra, R; Pelka, A; Kraus, D; Barbrel, B; Döppner, T; Glenzer, S H

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  20. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Zastrau, U.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Goede, S.; Schumaker, W.; Ravasio, A.; Gauthier, M.; MacDonald, M. J.; Chen, Z.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Pelka, A.; Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  1. High resolution x-ray Thomson scattering measurements from cryogenic hydrogen jets using the linac coherent light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, L. B., E-mail: lbfletch@slac.stanford.edu; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Schumaker, W.; Gauthier, M.; Granados, E.; Lee, H. J.; Fry, A.; Kim, J. B.; Roedel, C.; Mishra, R.; Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zastrau, U. [European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Goede, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL, Schenefeld (Germany); Ravasio, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Laboratoire pour l’Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, Palaiseau Cedex (France); MacDonald, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Pelka, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kraus, D. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Barbrel, B. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); and others

    2016-11-15

    We present the first spectrally resolved measurements of x-rays scattered from cryogenic hydrogen jets in the single photon counting limit. The 120 Hz capabilities of the LCLS, together with a novel hydrogen jet design [J. B. Kim et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)], allow for the ability to record a near background free spectrum. Such high-dynamic-range x-ray scattering measurements enable a platform to study ultra-fast, laser-driven, heating dynamics of hydrogen plasmas. This measurement has been achieved using two highly annealed pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometers to spectrally resolve 5.5 keV x-rays elastically and inelastically scattered from cryogenic hydrogen and focused on Cornell-SLAC pixel array detectors [S. Herrmann et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 718, 550 (2013)].

  2. Coherent Phase Control in e-Ar Scattering in a Bichromatic Laser Field in the Second Born Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bin; LI Shu-Min

    2010-01-01

    @@ We study the elastic scattering of atomic argon by an electron in the presence of a bichromatic laser field in the second Born approximation.The target atom is approximated by a simple screening potential.We explore the dependences of the differential cross sections on the relative phase (φ) between the two components of the radiation field and discuss the influence of the number of photons exchanged on the phase-dependence effect.Moreover,for different scattering angles and incident electron energies,the differential cross sections are notably different.

  3. Ultrafast optical responses of {beta}-carotene and lycopene probed by sub-20-fs time-resolved coherent spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.; Sugisaki, M. [CREST-JST and Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Gall, A.; Robert, B. [CEA, Institut de Biologie et Technologies de Saclay, and CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France); Cogdell, R.J. [IBLS, Glasgow Biomedical Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hashimoto, H., E-mail: hassy@sci.osaka-cu.ac.j [CREST-JST and Department of Physics, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    We investigate how structural distortions in carotenoid cause decoherences of its high-frequency vibrational modes by applying the sub-20-fs time-resolved transient grating spectroscopy to {beta}-carotene and lycopene. The results indicate that the C=C central stretching mode shows significant loss of coherence under the effects of the steric hindrance between {beta}-ionone ring and polyene backbone, whereas the other high-frequency modes do not show such dependency on the structural distortions.

  4. Coherent inelastic backscattering of laser light from three isotropic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterer, Andreas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav N

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of double and triple scattering contributions on coherent backscattering of laser light from saturated isotropic atoms, in the helicity preserving polarization channel. Using the recently proposed diagrammatic pump-probe approach, we analytically derive single-atom spectral responses to a classical polychromatic driving field, combine them self-consistently to double and triple scattering processes, and numerically deduce the corresponding elastic and inelastic spectra, as well as the total backscattered intensities. We find that account of the triple scattering contribution leads to a faster decay of phase-coherence with increasing saturation of the atomic transition as compared to double scattering alone, and to a better agreement with the experiment on strontium atoms.

  5. Hyperspectral imaging and characterization of live cells by broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy with singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Jasensky, Joshua; Price, Erika; Zhang, Chi; Boughton, Andrew; Han, Xiaofeng; Seeley, Emily; Liu, Xinran; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Chen, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy can be used as a powerful imaging technique to identify chemical compositions of complex samples in biology, biophysics, medicine, and materials science. In this work we developed a CARS microscopic system capable of hyperspectral imaging. By employing an ultrafast laser source, a photonic crystal fiber, and a scanning laser microscope together with spectral detection by a highly sensitive back-illuminated cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we were able to rapidly acquire and process hyperspectral images of live cells with chemical selectivity. We discuss various aspects of hyperspectral CARS image analysis and demonstrate the use of singular value decomposition methods to characterize the cellular lipid content.

  6. Ab initio study of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of the 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdelsalam; Ågren, Hans; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) of the 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX) C 3H 6N 6O 6 molecule is studied by ab initio methods. The results are compared to available experimental observations and against calculations and experimental observations of the conventional non-resonant Raman spectrum for RDX. It is found that all intense bands in the observed CARS spectrum and all Raman differential cross sections are well reproduced by the calculations. The features of the resonant CARS signal vary strongly from the corresponding Raman signal, and are obtained with a considerably larger cross section, a fact that could further facilitate the use of CARS spectroscopy in applications of stand-off detection of gaseous samples at ultra-low concentrations.

  7. In planta imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T; Korai, Roza P; Frater, Eric H; Korterik, Jeroen P; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  8. Investigation of protein distribution in solid lipid particles and its impact on protein release using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip C.; Birch, Ditlev; Saarinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain new insights into protein distribution in solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) and subsequent release mechanisms using a novel label-free chemical imaging method, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Lysozyme-loaded SLMs were prepared using...... different lipids with lysozyme incorporated either as an aqueous solution or as a solid powder. Lysozyme distribution in SLMs was investigated using CARS microscopy with supportive structural analysis using electron microscopy. The release of lysozyme from SLMs was investigated in a medium simulating......-destructive method for elucidating the distribution of lysozyme in SLMs. The interpretation of protein distribution and release during lipolysis enabled elucidation of protein release mechanisms. In future, CARS microscopy analysis could facilitate development of a wide range of protein-lipid matrices with tailor...

  9. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  10. Kinetic adsorption profile and conformation evolution at the DNA-gold nanoparticle interface probed by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Ding, XiaoFan; He, Miao; Wang, Jing; Lou, Xinhui

    2014-10-21

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA-gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA-AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  11. Coherent amplified optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Rao, Bin; Chen, Zhongping

    2007-07-01

    A technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a high speed 1300 nm swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system was demonstrated. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was employed in the sample arm to coherently amplify the weak light back-scattered from sample tissue without increasing laser power illuminated on the sample. The image quality improvement was visualized and quantified by imaging the anterior segment of a rabbit eye at imaging speed of 20,000 A-lines per second. The theory analysis of SNR gain is given followed by the discussion on the technologies that can further improve the SNR gain.

  12. Combined multi-modal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe for in vivo human skin structure and vasculature imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Zabihian, Behrooz; Sinz, Christoph; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C; Ginner, Laurin; Hoover, Erich; Minneman, Micheal P; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous blood flow accounts for approximately 5% of cardiac output in human and plays a key role in a number of a physiological and pathological processes. We show for the first time a multi-modal photoacoustic tomography (PAT), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe to extract human cutaneous vasculature in vivo in various skin regions. OCT angiography supplements the microvasculature which PAT alone is unable to provide. Co-registered volumes for vessel network is further embedded in the morphologic image provided by OCT. This multi-modal system is therefore demonstrated as a valuable tool for comprehensive non-invasive human skin vasculature and morphology imaging in vivo.

  13. Combined multi-modal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe for in vivo human skin structure and vasculature imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Zabihian, Behrooz; Sinz, Christoph; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Ginner, Laurin; Hoover, Erich; Minneman, Micheal P.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous blood flow accounts for approximately 5% of cardiac output in human and plays a key role in a number of a physiological and pathological processes. We show for the first time a multi-modal photoacoustic tomography (PAT), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe to extract human cutaneous vasculature in vivo in various skin regions. OCT angiography supplements the microvasculature which PAT alone is unable to provide. Co-registered volumes for vessel network is further embedded in the morphologic image provided by OCT. This multi-modal system is therefore demonstrated as a valuable tool for comprehensive non-invasive human skin vasculature and morphology imaging in vivo. PMID:27699106

  14. Quantitative interpretation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy with all Gaussian pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Ariunbold, Gombojav O

    2016-01-01

    Coherent Raman scattering spectroscopy is studied purposely, with the Gaussian ultrashort pulses as a hands-on elucidatory extraction tool of the clean coherent Raman resonant spectra from the overall measured data contaminated with the non-resonant four wave mixing background. The integral formulae for both the coherent anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman scattering are given in the semiclassical picture, and the closed-form solutions in terms of a complex error function are obtained. An analytic form of maximum enhancement of pure coherent Raman spectra at threshold time delay depending on bandwidth of probe pulse is also obtained. The observed experimental data for pyridine in liquid-phase are quantitatively elucidated and the inferred time-resolved coherent Raman resonant results are reconstructed with a new insight.

  15. Robot-assisted three-dimensional registration for cochlear implant surgery using a common-path swept-source optical coherence tomography probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbani, Saumya S.; Wilkening, Paul; Zhao, Mingtao; Gonenc, Berk; Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Chien, Wade; Taylor, Russell H.; Niparko, John K.; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-05-01

    Cochlear implantation offers the potential to restore sensitive hearing in patients with severe to profound deafness. However, surgical placement of the electrode array within the cochlea can produce trauma to sensorineural components, particularly if the initial turn of the cochlea is not successfully navigated as the array is advanced. In this work, we present a robot-mounted common-path swept-source optical coherence tomography endoscopic platform for three-dimensional (3-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) registration and preoperative surgical planning for cochlear implant surgery. The platform is composed of a common-path 600-μm diameter fiber optic rotary probe attached to a five degrees of freedom robot capable of 1 μm precision movement. The system is tested on a dry fixed ex vivo human temporal bone, and we demonstrate the feasibility of a 3-D OCT registration of the cochlea to accurately describe the spatial and angular profiles of the canal formed by the scala tympani into the first cochlear turn.

  16. Multipurpose end-station for coherent diffraction imaging and scattering at FERMI@Elettra free-electron laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Bencivenga, Filippo; Manfredda, Michele; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Svetina, Cristian; Zangrando, Marco; Demidovich, Alexander; Nikolov, Ivaylo; Danailov, Miltcho; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Kiskinova, Maya

    2015-05-01

    The Diffraction and Projection Imaging (DiProI) beamline at FERMI, the Elettra free-electron laser (FEL), hosts a multi-purpose station that has been opened to users since the end of 2012. This paper describes the core capabilities of the station, designed to make use of the unique features of the FERMI-FEL for performing a wide range of static and dynamic scattering experiments. The various schemes for time-resolved experiments, employing both soft X-ray FEL and seed laser IR radiation are presented by using selected recent results. The ongoing upgrade is adding a reflection geometry setup for scattering experiments, expanding the application fields by providing both high lateral and depth resolution.

  17. Macromolecular structures probed by combining single-shot free-electron laser diffraction with synchrotron coherent X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kim, Sunam; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Nam, Daewoong; Kim, Chan; Kim, Yoonhee; Noh, Do Young; Miyashita, Osamu; Tama, Florence; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Tono, Kensuke; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Yabashi, Makina; Hasnain, S Samar; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong

    2014-05-02

    Nanostructures formed from biological macromolecular complexes utilizing the self-assembly properties of smaller building blocks such as DNA and RNA hold promise for many applications, including sensing and drug delivery. New tools are required for their structural characterization. Intense, femtosecond X-ray pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers enable single-shot imaging allowing for instantaneous views of nanostructures at ambient temperatures. When combined judiciously with synchrotron X-rays of a complimentary nature, suitable for observing steady-state features, it is possible to perform ab initio structural investigation. Here we demonstrate a successful combination of femtosecond X-ray single-shot diffraction with an X-ray free-electron laser and coherent diffraction imaging with synchrotron X-rays to provide an insight into the nanostructure formation of a biological macromolecular complex: RNA interference microsponges. This newly introduced multimodal analysis with coherent X-rays can be applied to unveil nano-scale structural motifs from functional nanomaterials or biological nanocomplexes, without requiring a priori knowledge.

  18. Influence of Electron–Acoustic-Phonon Scattering on Intensity Power Broadening in a Coherently Driven Quantum-Dot–Cavity System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Roy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantum optics formalism to study the intensity power broadening of a semiconductor quantum dot interacting with an acoustic-phonon bath and a high-Q microcavity. Power broadening is investigated using a time-convolutionless master equation in the polaron frame, which allows for a nonperturbative treatment of the interaction of the quantum dot with the phonon reservoir. We calculate the full non-Lorentzian photoluminescence (PL line shapes and numerically extract the intensity linewidths of the quantum-dot exciton and the cavity mode as a function of the pump rate and temperature. For increasing field strengths, multiphonon and multiphoton effects are found to be important, even for phonon-bath temperatures as low as 4 K. We show that the interaction of the quantum dot with the phonon reservoir introduces pronounced features in the power-broadened PL line shape, enabling one to observe clear signatures of electron-phonon scattering. The PL line shapes from cavity pumping and exciton pumping are found to be distinctly different, primarily since the latter is excited through the exciton-phonon reservoir. To help explain the underlying physics of phonon scattering on the power-broadened line shape, an effective phonon Lindblad master equation derived from the full time-convolutionless master equation is introduced; we identify and calculate distinct Lindblad scattering contributions from electron-phonon interactions, including effects such as excitation-induced dephasing, incoherent exciton excitation, and exciton-cavity feeding. Our effective phonon master equation is shown to reproduce the full PL intensity and the phonon-coupling effects very well, suggesting that its general Lindblad form may find widespread use in semiconductor cavity-QED.

  19. Shifting the phase of a coherent beam with a $^{174}$Yb$^+$ ion: influence of the scattering cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Martin; Alber, Lucas; Weber, Markus; Sondermann, Markus; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    We discuss and measure the phase shift imposed onto a radially polarized light beam when focusing it onto an $^{174}\\text{Yb}^{+}$ ion. In the derivation of the expected phase shifts we include the properties of the involved atomic levels. Furthermore, we emphasize the importance of the scattering cross section and its relation to the efficiency for coupling the focused light to an atom. The phase shifts found in the experiment are compatible with the expected ones when accounting for known deficiencies of the focusing optics and the motion of the trapped ion at the Doppler limit of laser cooling.

  20. Probe frequency- and field intensity-sensitive coherent control effects in an EIT-based periodic layered medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teh-Chau Liau; Jin-Jei Wu; Jianqi Shen; Tzong-Jer Yang

    2012-01-01

    A periodic layered medium,with unit cells consisting of a dielectric and an electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT)-based atomic vapor,is designed for light propagation manipulation. Considering that a destructive quantum interference relevant to a two-photon resonance emerges in EIT-based atoms interacting with both control and probe fields,an EIT-based periodic layered medium exhibits a flexible frequency-sensitive optical response,where a very small variation in the probe frequency can lead to a drastic variation in reflectance and transmittance.The present EIT-based periodic layered structure can result in controllable optical processes that depend sensitively on the external control field.The tunable and sensitive optical response induced by the quantum interference of a multi-level atomic system can be applied in the fabrication of new photonic and quantum optical devices.This material will also open a good perspective for the application of such designs in several new fields,including photonic microcircuits or integrated optical circuits.

  1. Photons and dileptons production in a quark gluon plasma: infrared structure and coherent scattering effects; Production de photons et de dileptons dans un plasma de quarks et de gluons: structure infrarouge et effets coherents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaraket, H

    2000-06-01

    This work is devoted to photon and dilepton production in a quark gluon plasma. The theoretical framework in which the study is carried out is Thermal Field Theory, more precisely the hard thermal loop effective theory. Several features of the observables preclude a straightforward application of the effective theory and new tools had to be developed such as the counter term method to avoid double counting. The first part of my study concerns static virtual photon production where I show that important physical contributions are missing in the effective theory at one loop level and hence a two loop calculation is indispensable. Furthermore I give an analytic leading logarithmic estimate of this two loop result showing clearly the insufficiency of the effective theory. The second part of the work focuses on real and quasi real photon production. Again, important contributions arise at two loop level due to collinear divergences. For high mass dilepton the two loop calculation is sufficient. On the other hand, near the light cone photon production rate is non perturbative. Getting closer to the light cone coherent scattering effects (Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal effect) arise, which imply the resummation of an infinite series of diagrams. Still nearer the light cone we found a dependence on the non perturbative magnetic mass due to infrared singularities. (author)

  2. Light scattering calculations for the nephelometer experiment on the 1981/1982 Jupiter Orbiter-Probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of studies were carried out to help establish the accuracy of quantities describing physical characteristics of cloud particles (such as size, shape, and composition) that are to be inferred from light scattering data obtained with the nephelameter experiment on the Galileo spacecraft. The objectives were to provide data for validating and testing procedures for analyzing the Galileo nephelameter data with light scattering observations in a variety of on-going laboratory and field measurement programs for which simultaneous observations of the physical characteristics of the scattering particles were available.

  3. Salt Dependence of the Radius of Gyration and Flexibility of Single-stranded DNA in Solution probed by Small-angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Lipfert, Jan; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian

    2012-07-06

    Short single-stranded nucleic acids are ubiquitous in biological processes and understanding their physical properties provides insights to nucleic acid folding and dynamics. We used small angle x-ray scattering to study 8-100 residue homopolymeric single-stranded DNAs in solution, without external forces or labeling probes. Poly-T's structural ensemble changes with increasing ionic strength in a manner consistent with a polyelectrolyte persistence length theory that accounts for molecular flexibility. For any number of residues, poly-A is consistently more elongated than poly-T, likely due to the tendency of A residues to form stronger base-stacking interactions than T residues.

  4. Coherence Times of Bose-Einstein Condensates beyond the Shot-Noise Limit via Superfluid Shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, William Cody; Chung, Woo Chang; Vadia, Samarth; Chen, Wenlan; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a new way to extend the coherence time of separated Bose-Einstein condensates that involves immersion into a superfluid bath. When both the system and the bath have similar scattering lengths, immersion in a superfluid bath cancels out inhomogeneous potentials either imposed by external fields or inherent in density fluctuations due to atomic shot noise. This effect, which we call superfluid shielding, allows for coherence lifetimes beyond the projection noise limit. We probe the coherence between separated condensates in different sites of an optical lattice by monitoring the contrast and decay of Bloch oscillations. Our technique demonstrates a new way that interactions can improve the performance of quantum devices.

  5. Probing Large-scale Coherence between Spitzer IR and Chandra X-Ray Source-subtracted Cosmic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, N.; Arendt, R.; Kashlinsky, A.; Li, Y.; Hasinger, G.; Helgason, K.; Urry, M.; Natarajan, P.; Finoguenov, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the large-scale clustering component of the cross-power spectra of the source-subtracted Spitzer-IRAC cosmic infrared background and Chandra-ACIS cosmic X-ray background surface brightness fluctuations Our investigation uses data from the Chandra Deep Field South, Hubble Deep Field North, Extended Groth Strip/AEGIS field, and UDS/SXDF surveys, comprising 1160 Spitzer hours and ∼12 Ms of Chandra data collected over a total area of 0.3 deg2. We report the first (>5σ) detection of a cross-power signal on large angular scales >20″ between [0.5–2] keV and the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, at ∼5σ and 6.3σ significance, respectively. The correlation with harder X-ray bands is marginally significant. Comparing the new observations with existing models for the contribution of the known unmasked source population at z < 7, we find an excess of about an order of magnitude at 5σ confidence. We discuss possible interpretations for the origin of this excess in terms of the contribution from accreting early black holes (BHs), including both direct collapse BHs and primordial BHs, as well as from scattering in the interstellar medium and intra-halo light.

  6. Long-lived coherence in pentafluorobenzene as a probe of ππ* - πσ* vibronic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüter, O.; Sala, M.; Neumann, H.; Zhang, S.; Studzinski, H.; Egorova, D.; Temps, F.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of pentafluorobenzene after femtosecond laser excitation to the optically bright ππ* first excited electronic state have been investigated by femtosecond time-resolved time-of-flight mass spectrometry and femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging spectroscopy. The observed temporal profiles exhibit a bi-exponential decay behavior with a superimposed, long-lived, large-amplitude oscillation with a frequency of νosc = 78-74 cm-1 and a damping time of τD = 5-2 ps. On the basis of electronic structure and quantum dynamics calculations, the oscillations have been shown to arise due to vibronic coupling between the optically bright ππ* state and the energetically close-lying optically dark πσ* state. The coupling leads to a pronounced double-well character of the lowest excited adiabatic potential energy surface along several out-of-plane modes of b1 symmetry. The optical electronic excitation initiates periodic wavepacket motion along these modes. In the out-of-plane distorted molecular configuration, the excited state acquires substantial πσ* character, thus modulating the ionization probability. The photoelectron spectra and the anisotropy of their angular distribution confirm the periodically changing electronic character. The ionizing probe laser pulse directly maps the coupled electron-nuclear motion into the observed signal oscillations.

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new method for noninvasive cross-sectional imaging in biological systems. In OCT, the longitudinal locations of tissue structures are determined by measuring the time-of-flight delays of light backscattered from these structures. The optical delays are measured by low coherence interferometry. Information on lateral position is provided by transverse scanning of the probe beam. The two dimensional map of optical scattering from internal tissue microstructures is then represented in a false-color or grayscale image. OCT is the optical analog of ultrasonic pulse-echo imaging, but with greatly improved spatial resolutions (a few microns). This thesis describes the development of this new high resolution tomographic imaging technology and the demonstration of its use in a variety of tissues under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro OCT ranging and imaging studies were performed using human ocular and arterial tissues, two clinically relevant examples of transparent and turbid media, respectively. In the anterior eye, precise measurements of cornea and anterior chamber dimensions were made. In the arterial specimens, the differentiation between fatty -calcified and fibromuscular tissues was demonstrated. In vivo OCT imaging in the retina and optic nerve head in human subjects was also performed. The delineation of retinal layers, which has not been possible with other noninvasive imaging techniques, is demonstrated in these OCT images. OCT has high spatial resolution but limited penetration into turbid tissue. It has potential for diagnostic applications where high resolution is needed and optical access is available, such as in the eye, skin, surgically exposed tissues, and surfaces that can be reached by various catheters and endoscopic probes. In particular, the measurement of fine retinal structures promises improvements in the diagnosis and management of glaucoma, macular edema and other vitreo-retinal diseases

  8. Label-free assessment of adipose-derived stem cell differentiation using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouras, Rabah; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Downes, Andrew R.; Elfick, Alistair P. D.

    2012-11-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) hold great potential as likely candidates for disease therapy but also as sources of differentiated human cells in vitro models of disease. In both cases, the label-free assessment of SC differentiation state is highly desirable, either as a quality-control technology ensuring cells to be used clinically are of the desired lineage or to facilitate in vitro time-course studies of cell differentiation. We investigate the potential of nonlinear optical microscopy as a minimally invasive technology to monitor the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) into adipocytes and osteoblasts. The induction of ADSCs toward these two different cell lineages was monitored simultaneously using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation at different time points. Changes in the cell's morphology, together with the appearance of biochemical markers of cell maturity were observed, such as lipid droplet accumulation for adipo-induced cells and the formation of extra-cellular matrix for osteo-induced cells. In addition, TPEF of flavoproteins was identified as a proxy for changes in cell metabolism that occurred throughout ADSC differentiation toward both osteoblasts and adipocytes. These results indicate that multimodal microscopy has significant potential as an enabling technology for the label-free investigation of SC differentiation.

  9. Multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy reveals microglia-associated myelin and axonal dysfunction in multiple sclerosis-like lesions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imitola, Jaime; Côté, Daniel; Rasmussen, Stine; Xie, X. Sunney; Liu, Yingru; Chitnis, Tanuja; Sidman, Richard L.; Lin, Charles. P.; Khoury, Samia J.

    2011-02-01

    Myelin loss and axonal degeneration predominate in many neurological disorders; however, methods to visualize them simultaneously in live tissue are unavailable. We describe a new imaging strategy combining video rate reflectance and fluorescence confocal imaging with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy tuned to CH2 vibration of myelin lipids, applied in live tissue of animals with chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our method allows monitoring over time of demyelination and neurodegeneration in brain slices with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Local areas of severe loss of lipid signal indicative of demyelination and loss of the reflectance signal from axons were seen in the corpus callosum and spinal cord of EAE animals. Even in myelinated areas of EAE mice, the intensity of myelin lipid signals is significantly reduced. Using heterozygous knock-in mice in which green fluorescent protein replaces the CX3CR1 coding sequence that labels central nervous system microglia, we find areas of activated microglia colocalized with areas of altered reflectance and CARS signals reflecting axonal injury and demyelination. Our data demonstrate the use of multimodal CARS microscopy for characterization of demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, and further confirm the critical role of microglia in chronic inflammatory neurodegeneration.

  10. Longitudinal, 3D in vivo imaging of sebaceous glands by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy –normal function and response to cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yookyung; Tam, Joshua; Jalian, H. Ray; Anderson, R. Rox; Evans, Conor L.

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous glands perform complex functions, and are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Current techniques for studying sebaceous glands are mostly static in nature, whereas the gland’s main function – excretion of sebum via the holocrine mechanism – can only be evaluated over time. We present a longitudinal, real-time alternative – the in vivo, label-free imaging of sebaceous glands using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy, which is used to selectively visualize lipids. In mouse ears, CARS microscopy revealed dynamic changes in sebaceous glands during the holocrine secretion process, as well as in response to damage to the glands caused by cooling. Detailed gland structure, plus the active migration of individual sebocytes and cohorts of sebocytes were measured. Cooling produced characteristic changes in sebocyte structure and migration. This study demonstrates that CARS microscopy is a promising tool for studying the sebaceous gland and its associated disorders in three-dimensions in vivo. PMID:25026458

  11. Measurement of vibrationally excited N2(v) in an atmospheric-pressure air pulsed corona discharge using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo

    2014-08-01

    Vibrationally excited N2(v = 1, 2) in an atmospheric-pressure air pulsed corona discharge was measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). In a dry air discharge, the vibrational temperature determined from the ratio N2(v = 2)/N2(v = 0), Tv2, was approximately 500 K higher than that determined from N2(v = 1)/N2(v = 0), Tv1, immediately after the discharge pulse. Both vibrational temperatures reached equilibrium within 100 μs after the discharge pulse by the vibration-to-vibration (V-V) process of N2-N2. The translational temperature was also measured using CARS. The rise in the translational temperature due to vibration-to-translation (V-T) energy transfer was not observed for a postdischarge time of 5 μs-1 ms in the dry-air discharge. However, when the air was humidified, a significant V-T energy transfer was observed. It was due to an extremely rapid V-T process of H2O-H2O following the V-V process of N2-H2O. Measurements showed that the humidification of the ambient air accelerated the decrease in the N2 vibrational temperature and increased the translational temperature. N2(v) was generated mostly in the secondary streamer, not in the primary one, according to estimation from the measured N2(v) density.

  12. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  13. Label-free in vivo analysis of intracellular lipid droplets in the oleaginous microalga Monoraphidium neglectum by coherent Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Daniel; Pilger, Christian; Hachmeister, Henning; Oberländer, Elina; Wördenweber, Robin; Wichmann, Julian; Mussgnug, Jan H; Huser, Thomas; Kruse, Olaf

    2016-10-21

    Oleaginous photosynthetic microalgae hold great promise as non-food feedstocks for the sustainable production of bio-commodities. The algal lipid quality can be analysed by Raman micro-spectroscopy, and the lipid content can be imaged in vivo in a label-free and non-destructive manner by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In this study, both techniques were applied to the oleaginous microalga Monoraphidium neglectum, a biotechnologically promising microalga resistant to commonly applied lipid staining techniques. The lipid-specific CARS signal was successfully separated from the interfering two-photon excited fluorescence of chlorophyll and for the first time, lipid droplet formation during nitrogen starvation could directly be analysed. We found that the neutral lipid content deduced from CARS image analysis strongly correlated with the neutral lipid content measured gravimetrically and furthermore, that the relative degree of unsaturation of fatty acids stored in lipid droplets remained similar. Interestingly, the lipid profile during cellular adaption to nitrogen starvation showed a two-phase characteristic with initially fatty acid recycling and subsequent de novo lipid synthesis. This works demonstrates the potential of quantitative CARS microscopy as a label-free lipid analysis technique for any microalgal species, which is highly relevant for future biotechnological applications and to elucidate the process of microalgal lipid accumulation.

  14. Numerical analysis of GRIN lens based miniature probes for optical coherence tomography%基于GRIN镜头的小型OCT探头的数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王驰; 毛幼馨; 唐智; 方臣; 于瀛洁; 齐博

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation technology was investigated by using the optical software GLAD to design Gradient Index(GRIN)lens based miniature probes for imaging of Optical Coherence Tomography(OCT).Firstly,the basic features of the GRIN lens were overviewed,and design methods for GRIN lens based optical probes were discussed.Then,the probe model consisting of a single mode fiber,a glass rod spacer and a GRIN lens were simulated.The simulating results show that the numerical simulation technique using GLAD can provide an intuitive and effective method for design of miniaturized probes and verification of their optical performance.In addition,the spacer can improve the optical properties of the GRIN lens based optical probes for there exists a suitable range of the spacer lengths in the glass rod.It shows that the working distance of the probe will be greater than 1.0 mm and the focus spot size less than 40 μm when the constant length of GRIN lens is to be 0.1 mm and the spacer length range from 0.8 to 1.1 mm.%利用光学软件GLAD的数值仿真技术设计了用于光学相干层析技术成像的基于梯度折射率(GRIN)镜头的小型化探头.首先,简述了梯度折射率镜头的基本特性,讨论了基于梯度折射率镜头的光学探头的设计方法;然后,对由单模光纤、玻璃棒隔片和梯度折射率镜头构成的探头模型进行了仿真.结果显示,利用GLAD的数值仿真技术为小型化探头的设计及其光学性能的验证提供了一种直观而有效的方法.另外,玻璃棒隔片存在一个适当的长度范围,可以改善设计的光学探头的传光性能.在所给仿真条件下,如设定梯度折射率镜头长0.1 mm、玻璃棒隔片长度为0.8~1.1 mm,则探头的工作距离将超过1.0 mm,而聚焦光斑的尺寸<40 μm.

  15. Reconstruction of surface morphology from coherent scattering of ''white'' synchrotron radiation in hard X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant, Tushar

    2009-07-01

    Energy Dispersive Reflectometry (EDR) beamline at BESSY II provides ''white'' X-rays in the useful energy range of 5coherent reflectivity data at EDR bending magnet beamline at BESSY II from various surfaces. Technologically smooth wafers of semiconducting materials of Si and GaAs are used as ''trivial'' samples to determine the so called apparatus function. In addition I measured coherent reflectivity maps from thin film of highly scattering material of Pt with high atom number, Z=78 and patterned semiconducting surface like a GaAs surface grating which provides a certain periodicity in the measured scattering intensity. Finally I measured the surface speckles from a spatially confined Si wafer under the constraint that the size of the sample is smaller than the footprint of the incoming beam at the sample position. To reconstruct surface morphology from coherent reflectivity data is a typical inverse problem. Conventional phase retrieval algorithms like Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm, error reduction (ER) algorithm, hybrid input-output (HIO) algorithm are used in earlier work by other authors. I modified the conventional GS algorithm and ER algorithm which takes into account the additional Fresnel propagator term and also the illumination function at the sample position. I tested the modified algorithm successfully for a model surface in the form of a surface grating. I used the modified algorithm to reconstruct surface morphology from various static speckle measurements I performed at EDR beamline. The surface profiles reconstructed for different samples from the data at different energies (below the critical energy for the material at a particular incident angle) show almost the same roughness behavior for surface height with mean roughness of {proportional_to}1 nm. With the static speckle data I measured I could retrieve a one-dimensional picture of the sample surface with spatial

  16. NADH-fluorescence scattering correction for absolute concentration determination in a liquid tissue phantom using a novel multispectral magnetic-resonance-imaging-compatible needle probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Frank; Schalk, Robert; Heintz, Annabell; Feike, Patrick; Firmowski, Sebastian; Beuermann, Thomas; Methner, Frank-Jürgen; Kränzlin, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert; Rädle, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    In this report, a quantitative nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) fluorescence measurement algorithm in a liquid tissue phantom using a fiber-optic needle probe is presented. To determine the absolute concentrations of NADH in this phantom, the fluorescence emission spectra at 465 nm were corrected using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy between 600 nm and 940 nm. The patented autoclavable Nitinol needle probe enables the acquisition of multispectral backscattering measurements of ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and fluorescence spectra. As a phantom, a suspension of calcium carbonate (Calcilit) and water with physiological NADH concentrations between 0 mmol l-1 and 2.0 mmol l-1 were used to mimic human tissue. The light scattering characteristics were adjusted to match the backscattering attributes of human skin by modifying the concentration of Calcilit. To correct the scattering effects caused by the matrices of the samples, an algorithm based on the backscattered remission spectrum was employed to compensate the influence of multiscattering on the optical pathway through the dispersed phase. The monitored backscattered visible light was used to correct the fluorescence spectra and thereby to determine the true NADH concentrations at unknown Calcilit concentrations. Despite the simplicity of the presented algorithm, the root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.093 mmol l-1.

  17. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  18. Forward-scattering particle image velocimetry (FSPIV): application of Mie and imaging theory to measure 3D velocities in microscopic flows using partially coherent illumination and high-aperture opt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovryn, Ben; Khaydarov, John D.

    1997-04-01

    We have combined Mie scattering theory and image theory to predict the forward scattering of light from spherical particles in a seeded fluid using high numerical aperture collection optics. Using this method, it is possible to determine all three components of a fluid's velocity by measuring the scattering from homogeneous spherical particles without moving the optics. The transverse velocity component is determined by following the centroid of the scattering pattern (with respect to time), while the component along the optical axis is determined by comparing the experimental data with numerical computations. We have verified our theoretical model and computer code by measuring the scattering from polystyrene particles illuminated with partially coherent, Koehler illumination in a transmitted light microscope. The three-dimensional scattering data is in quite good agreement with our model. To further verify our approach, we have measured the three- dimensional (parabolic) profile of a parallel flow of a low viscosity, seeded fluid in a straight channel (6 mm by 48 mm by 0.315 mm). The channel was placed on the stage of a conventional microscope equipped with a long working distance microscope objective, with the narrow dimension along the optical axis (OA). Instead of directly imaging the seed particles, the forward scattered light is recorded from the spherical, polystyrene seed particles (7 micrometer diameter).

  19. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ballhausen, H.; Abele, H.; Gaehler, R.; Trapp, M.; Van Overberghe, A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-re...

  20. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  1. In-situ real-time x-ray scattering for probing the processing-structure-performance relation

    KAUST Repository

    Smilgies, Detlef-M.

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Materials Research Society. In-situ X-ray scattering methodology is discussed, in order to analyze the microstructure development of soft functional materials during coating, annealing, and drying processes in real-time. The relevance of a fundamental understanding of coating processes for future industrial production is pointed out.

  2. Probing Amorphous Components in High Temperature TE Materials by in situ Total Scattering and the Pair Distribution Function (PDF) Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reardon, Hazel; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt; Blichfeld, Anders Bank

    Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) has been a steadfast tool for detailed crystal structure determination in thermoelectrics materials research. PXRD provides a description of the long-range periodic order, meanwhile, local structure information can be obtained from total scattering data, i.e., by m......Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) has been a steadfast tool for detailed crystal structure determination in thermoelectrics materials research. PXRD provides a description of the long-range periodic order, meanwhile, local structure information can be obtained from total scattering data, i.......e., by measuring both the Bragg and diffuse scattering from a sample. This method has rarely been exploited by the non-oxide thermoelectrics community. , , Treating total scattering data by the Pair Distribution Function method is a logical approach to understanding defects, disorder and amorphous components...... in thermoelectric materials. Moreover, in situ studies can enable an understanding of how high temperature influences the structure (and properties) at the local scale. If we can understand the local modifications in a structure prior to, during, and after restructuring as a thermoelectric material is exposed...

  3. PHIPS-HALO: the airborne Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe - Part 1: Design and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Järvinen, Emma; Duft, Denis; Hirst, Edwin; Vogt, Steffen; Leisner, Thomas; Schnaiter, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The number and shape of ice crystals present in mixed-phase and ice clouds influence the radiation properties, precipitation occurrence and lifetime of these clouds. Since clouds play a major role in the climate system, influencing the energy budget by scattering sunlight and absorbing heat radiation from the earth, it is necessary to investigate the optical and microphysical properties of cloud particles particularly in situ. The relationship between the microphysics and the single scattering properties of cloud particles is usually obtained by modelling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. There is a demand to obtain both information correspondently and simultaneously for individual cloud particles in their natural environment. For evaluating the average scattering phase function as a function of ice particle habit and crystal complexity, in situ measurements are required. To this end we have developed a novel airborne optical sensor (PHIPS-HALO) to measure the optical properties and the corresponding microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles simultaneously. PHIPS-HALO has been tested in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber and deployed in mountain stations as well as research aircraft (HALO and Polar 6). It is a successive version of the laboratory prototype instrument PHIPS-AIDA. In this paper we present the detailed design of PHIPS-HALO, including the detection mechanism, optical design, mechanical construction and aerodynamic characterization.

  4. Development of probes for bioanalytic applications of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering; Entwicklung neuer Sonden fuer bioanalytische Anwendungen der oberflaechenverstaerkten Raman-Streuung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matschulat, Andrea Isabel

    2011-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been established as a versatile tool for probing and labeling in analytical applications, based on the vibrational spectra of samples as well as label molecules in the proximity of noble metal nanostructures. The aim of this work was the construction of novel SERS hybrid probes. The hybrid probes consisted of Au and Ag nanoparticles and reporter molecules, as well as a targeting unit. The concept for the SERS hybrid probe design was followed by experiments comprising characterization techniques such as UV/Vis-spectroscopy (UV/Vis), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), respectively. SERS experiments were performed for studying and optimizing the plasmonic properties of nanoparticles with respect to their enhancement capabilities. The SERS-probes had to meet following requirements: biocompatibility, stability in physiological media, and enhancement of Raman-signals from Raman reporter molecules enabling the identification of different probes even in a complex biological environment. Au and Ag nanoaggregates were found to be the most appropriate SERS substrates for the hybrid probe design. The utilization of Raman reporters enabled the identification of different SERS probes in multiplexing experiments. In particular, the multiplexing capability of ten various reporter molecules para-aminobenzenethiol, 2-naphthalenethiol, crystal violet, rhodamine (B) isothiocyanate, fluorescein isothiocyanate, 5,5'dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), para-mercaptobenzoic acid, acridine orange, safranine O und nile blue was studied using NIR-SERS excitation. As demonstrated by the results the reporters could be identified through their specific Raman signature even in the case of high structural similarity. Chemical separation analysis of the reporter signatures was performed in a trivariate approach, enabling the discrimination through an automated calculation of specific band ratios. The trivariate

  5. Crystal structure of monoclinic samarium and cubic europium sesquioxides and bound coherent neutron scattering lengths of the isotopes {sup 154}Sm and {sup 153}Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlmann, Holger [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Hein, Christina; Kautenburger, Ralf [Saarland Univ., Saarbruecken (Germany). Inorganic Solid State Chemistry; Hansen, Thomas C.; Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Doyle, Stephen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS)

    2016-11-01

    The crystal structures of monoclinic samarium and cubic europium sesquioxide, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, were reinvestigated by powder diffraction methods (laboratory X-ray, synchrotron, neutron). Rietveld analysis yields more precise structural parameters than previously known, especially for oxygen atoms. Interatomic distances d(Sm-O) in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} range from 226.3(4) to 275.9(2) pm [average 241.6(3) pm] for the monoclinic B type Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} [space group C2/m, a = 1418.04(3) pm, b = 362.660(7) pm, c = 885.48(2) pm, β = 100.028(1) ], d(Eu-O) in Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} from 229.9(2) to 238.8(2) pm for the cubic bixbyite (C) type [space group Ia anti 3, a = 1086.87(1) pm]. Neutron diffraction at 50 K and 2 K did not show any sign for magnetic ordering in Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Isotopically enriched {sup 154}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {sup 153}Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for the neutron diffraction work because of the enormous absorption cross section of the natural isotopic mixtures for thermal neutrons. The isotopic purity was determined by inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry to be 98.9% for {sup 154}Sm and 99.8% for {sup 153}Eu. Advanced analysis of the neutron diffraction data suggest that the bound coherent scattering lengths of {sup 154}Sm and {sup 153}Eu need to be revised. We tentatively propose b{sub c}({sup 154}Sm) = 8.97(6) fm and b{sub c}({sup 153}Eu) = 8.85(3) fm for a neutron wavelength of 186.6 pm to be better values for these isotopes, showing up to 8% deviation from accepted literature values. It is shown that inaccurate scattering lengths may result in severe problems in crystal structure refinements causing erroneous structural details such as occupation parameters, which might be critically linked to physical properties like superconductivity in multinary oxides.

  6. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  7. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  8. Occurrence climatology of F region field-aligned irregularities in middle latitudes as observed by a 40.8 MHz coherent scatter radar in Daejeon, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kil, Hyosub; Lee, Young-Sook; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Jae-jin

    2015-11-01

    A new 40.8 MHz coherent scatter radar was built in Daejeon, South Korea (36.18°N, 127.14°E, dip latitude: 26.7°N) on 29 December 2009 and has since been monitoring the occurrence of field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the northern middle latitudes. We report on the occurrence climatology of the F region FAIs as observed by the Daejeon radar between 2010 and 2014. The F region FAIs preferentially occur around 250-350 km at 18:00-21:00 local time (postsunset FAI), around 350-450 km near midnight (nighttime FAI), around 250-350 km before sunrise (presunrise FAI), and around 160-300 km after 05:00 local time (postsunrise FAI). The occurrence rates of nighttime and presunrise FAIs are maximal during summer, though the occurrence rates of postsunset and postsunrise FAIs are maximal during the equinoxes. FAIs rarely occur during local winter. The occurrence rate of F region FAIs increases in concert with increases in solar activity. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are known as an important source of the F region FAIs in middle latitudes. The high occurrence rate of the nighttime FAIs in local summer is consistent with the high occurrence rate of MSTIDs in that season. However, the dependence of the FAI activity on the solar cycle is inconsistent with the MSTID activity. The source of the F region FAIs in middle latitudes is an open question. Our report of different types of FAIs and their occurrence climatology may provide a useful reference for the identification of the source of the middle latitude FAIs.

  9. OH MASER SOURCES IN W49N: PROBING MAGNETIC FIELD AND DIFFERENTIAL ANISOTROPIC SCATTERING WITH ZEEMAN PAIRS USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Avinash A. [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Mendoza-Torres, J. E., E-mail: desh@rri.res.in, E-mail: mgoss@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: mend@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Optica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico)

    2013-09-20

    Our analysis of a Very Long Baseline Array 12 hr synthesis observation of the OH masers in the well-known star-forming region W49N has yielded valuable data that enable us to probe distributions of magnetic fields in both the maser columns and the intervening interstellar medium (ISM). The data, consisting of detailed high angular resolution images (with beam width ∼20 mas) of several dozen OH maser sources, or spots, at 1612, 1665, and 1667 MHz, reveal anisotropic scatter broadening with typical sizes of a few tens of milliarcseconds and axial ratios between 1.5 and 3. Such anisotropies have been reported previously by Desai et al. and have been interpreted as being induced by the local magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. However, we find (1) apparent angular sizes of, on average, a factor of about 2.5 less than those reported by Desai et al., indicating significantly less scattering than inferred previously, and (2) a significant deviation in the average orientation of the scatter-broadened images (by ∼10°) from that implied by the magnetic field in the Galactic plane. More intriguingly, for a few Zeeman pairs in our set, significant differences (up to 6σ) are apparent in the scatter-broadened images for the two hands of circular polarization, even when the apparent velocity separation is less than 0.1 km s{sup –1}. This may possibly be the first example of a Faraday rotation contribution to the diffractive effects in the ISM. Using the Zeeman pairs, we also study the distribution of the magnetic field in the W49N complex, finding no significant trend in the spatial structure function. In this paper, we present the details of our observations and analysis leading to these findings, discuss implications of our results for the intervening anisotropic magneto-ionic medium, and suggest possible implications for the structure of magnetic fields within this star-forming region.

  10. Combined probes of X-ray scattering and optical spectroscopy reveal how global conformational change is temporally and spatially linked to local structural perturbation in photoactive yellow protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Wu; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Youngmin; Kim, Jong Goo; Kim, Jeongho; Jung, Yang Ouk; Jun, Sunhong; Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Sungjun; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert; van Thor, Jasper J; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2016-04-07

    Real-time probing of structural transitions of a photoactive protein is challenging owing to the lack of a universal time-resolved technique that can probe the changes in both global conformation and light-absorbing chromophores of the protein. In this work, we combine time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy to investigate how the global conformational changes involved in the photoinduced signal transduction of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is temporally and spatially related to the local structural change around the light-absorbing chromophore. In particular, we examine the role of internal proton transfer in developing a signaling state of PYP by employing its E46Q mutant (E46Q-PYP), where the internal proton transfer is inhibited by the replacement of a proton donor. The comparison of TRXSS and TA spectroscopy data directly reveals that the global conformational change of the protein, which is probed by TRXSS, is temporally delayed by tens of microseconds from the local structural change of the chromophore, which is probed by TA spectroscopy. The molecular shape of the signaling state reconstructed from the TRXSS curves directly visualizes the three-dimensional conformations of protein intermediates and reveals that the smaller structural change in E46Q-PYP than in wild-type PYP suggested by previous studies is manifested in terms of much smaller protrusion, confirming that the signaling state of E46Q-PYP is only partially developed compared with that of wild-type PYP. This finding provides direct evidence of how the environmental change in the vicinity of the chromophore alters the conformational change of the entire protein matrix.

  11. Networking properties of cyclodextrin-based cross-linked polymers probed by inelastic light-scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Barbara; Caponi, Silvia; Castiglione, Franca; Corezzi, Silvia; Fontana, Aldo; Giarola, Marco; Mariotto, Gino; Mele, Andrea; Petrillo, Caterina; Trotta, Francesco; Viliani, Gabriele

    2012-05-03

    An integrated experimental approach, based on inelastic light-scattering techniques, has been here employed for a multilength scale characterization of networking properties of cyclodextrin nanosponges, a new class of cross-linked polymeric materials built up from natural oligosaccharides cyclodextrins. By using Raman and Brillouin scattering experiments, we performed a detailed inspection of the vibrational dynamics of these polymers over a wide frequency window ranging from gigahertz to terahertz, with the aim of providing physical descriptors correlated to the cross-linking degree and elastic properties of the material. The results seem to suggest that the stiffness of cross-linked polymers can be successfully tuned by acting on the type and the relative amount of the cross-linker during the synthesis of a polymer matrix, predicting and controlling their swelling and entrapment properties. The proposed experimental approach is a useful tool for investigating the structural and physicochemical properties of polymeric network systems.

  12. Coherence Studies for Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coherence Studies for Synthetic Aperture Sonar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-13-1-0020 5c. PROGRAM...systematic look at, coherence. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Synthetic; Aperture Sonar , Coherence, Seafloor Scatter, Propagation Variability 16. SECURITY...reconstruction of the document. Coherence Studies for Synthetic Aperture Sonar Anthony P. Lyons The Pennsylvania State University Applied Research

  13. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  14. Look fast: Crystallization of conjugated molecules during solution shearing probed in-situ and in real time by X-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Smilgies, Detlef Matthias

    2012-12-20

    High-speed solution shearing, in which a drop of dissolved material is spread by a coating knife onto the substrate, has emerged as a versatile, yet simple coating technique to prepare high-mobility organic thin film transistors. Solution shearing and subsequent drying and crystallization of a thin film of conjugated molecules is probed in situ using microbeam grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (μGIWAXS). We demonstrate the advantages of this approach to study solution based crystal nucleation and growth, and identify casting parameter combinations to cast highly ordered and laterally aligned molecular thin films. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ag@SiO2 Core-shell Nanoparticles for Probing Spatial Distribution of Electromagnetic Field Enhancement via Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [ORNL; Li, Zhipeng [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Xu, Hongxing [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2009-01-01

    We show that the spatial distribution of the electromagnetic (EM) field enhancement can be probed directly via dynamic evolution of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules as they diffuse into Ag@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. The porous silica shell limits the diffusion of R6G molecules towards inner Ag cores, thereby allowing direct observation and quantification of the spatial distribution of SERS enhancement as molecules migrate from the low to high EM fields inside the dielectric silica shell. Our experimental evidence is validated by the generalized Mie theory, and the approach can potentially offer a novel platform for further investigating the site and spatial distribution of the EM fields and the EM versus chemical enhancement of SERS due to molecular confinement within the Ag@SiO2 nanoshell.

  16. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr2IrO4 using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbăian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-05-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr2IrO4, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolution in the hard x-ray region is usually poor.

  17. Probing the adsorption mechanism in thiamazole bound to the silver surface with Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering and DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nandita; Thomas, Susy; Sarkar, Anjana; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of thiamazole have been investigated in aqueous solution. Thiamazole is an important anti-thyroid drug that is used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism (over activity of the thyroid gland). Due to its medicinal importance, the surface adsorption properties of thiamazole have been studied. The experimental Raman and SERS data are supported with DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ basis set. From the SERS spectra as well as theoretical calculations, it has been inferred that thiamazole is chemisorbed to the silver surface directly through the sulphur atom and the ring N atom, with a tilted orientation.

  18. Sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin probed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oang, Key Young; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Jo, Junbeom; Kim, Youngmin; Kim, Jong Goo; Kim, Tae Wu; Jun, Sunhong; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2015-01-01

    Here we report sub-100-ps structural dynamics of horse heart myoglobin revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering. By applying the time-slicing scheme to the measurement and subsequent deconvolution, we investigate the protein structural dynamics that occur faster than the X-ray temporal pulse width of synchrotrons (~100 ps). The singular value decomposition analysis of the experimental data suggests that two structurally distinguishable intermediates are formed within 100 ps. In particular, the global structural change occurring on the time scale of 70 ps is identified. PMID:25678733

  19. Probing the micellization kinetics of pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymer via a combination of stopped-flow light-scattering and fluorescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yuting; Armes, Steven P; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-10-25

    A pyrene end-labeled double hydrophilic diblock copolymer, poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (Py-PDEA-b-PDMA), was synthesized by sequential monomer addition via oxyanionic polymerization using a 1-pyrenemethanol-based initiator. This diblock copolymer exhibits reversible pH-responsive micellization behavior in aqueous solution, forming PDEA-core micelles stabilized by the soluble PDMA block at neutral or alkaline pH. Taking advantage of the pyrene probe covalently attached to the end of the PDEA block, the pH-induced micellization kinetics of Py-PDEA-b-PDMA was monitored by stopped-flow light scattering using a fluorescence detector. Upon a pH jump from 4.0 to 9.0, both the scattered light intensity and excimer/monomer fluorescence intensity ratios (IE/IM) increase abruptly initially, followed by a more gradual increase to reach plateau values. Interestingly, the IE/IM ratio increases abruptly within the first 10 ms: a triple exponential function is needed to fit the corresponding dynamic trace, leading to three characteristic relaxation time constants (tau(1,fluo) fluo) fluo)). On the other hand, dynamic traces for the scattered light intensity can be well-fitted by double exponential functions: the resulting time constants tau(1,scat) and tau(2,scat) can be ascribed to formation of the quasi-equilibrium micelles and relaxation into their final equilibrium state, respectively. Most importantly, tau(1,scat) obtained from stopped-flow light scattering is in general agreement with tau(2,fluo) obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence. The fastest process (tau(1,fluo) approximately 4 ms) detected by stopped-flow fluorescence is ascribed to the burst formation of small transient micelles comprising only a few chains, which are too small to be detected by conventional light scattering. These nascent micelles undergo rapid fusion and grow into quasi-equilibrium micelles and then slowly approach their final equilibrium

  20. Coherent and Incoherent Structural Dynamics in Laser-Excited Antimony

    CERN Document Server

    Waldecker, Lutz; Bertoni, Roman; Vasileiadis, Thomas; Garcia, Martin E; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S; Ernstorfer, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the excitation of phonons in photoexcited antimony and demonstrate that the entire electron-lattice interactions, in particular coherent and incoherent electron-phonon coupling, can be probed simultaneously. Using femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) with high temporal resolution, we observe the coherent excitation of the fully symmetric \\Ag\\ optical phonon mode via the shift of the minimum of the atomic potential energy surface. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to quantify the change in lattice potential and the associated real-space amplitude of the coherent atomic oscillations. In addition, our experimental configuration allows observing the energy transfer from electrons to phonons via incoherent electron-lattice scattering events. Applying a modified two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling is determined from the data as a function of electronic temperature.

  1. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  2. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  3. Effect of surfactant excess on the stability of low-polarity ferrofluids probed by small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. I.; Avdeev, M. V.; Bulavin, L. A.; Almasy, L.; Grigoryeva, N. A.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2016-01-01

    The structures of ferrofluids (FFs) based on nonpolar solvent decahydronaphthalene, stabilized by saturated monocarboxylic acids with hydrocarbon chains of different lengths, C16 (palmitic acid) and ?12 (lauric acid), with an excess of acid molecules, have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. It is found that the addition of acid to an initially stable system with optimal composition leads to more significant structural changes (related to aggregation) than those observed previously for this class of FFs. A comparison of the influence of monocarboxylic acids on the stability of nonpolar FFs suggests that the enhancement of aggregation is much more pronounced in the case of palmitic acid excess. This fact confirms the conclusion of previous studies, according to which an increase in the hydrocarbon chain length in a saturated acid reduces the efficiency of the corresponding FF stabilization.

  4. Effect of surfactant excess on the stability of low-polarity ferrofluids probed by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, V. I., E-mail: vip@nf.jinr.ru; Avdeev, M. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Bulavin, L. A. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv (Ukraine); Almasy, L. [Hungarian Academy of Science, Wigner Research Centre for Physics (Hungary); Grigoryeva, N. A. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Aksenov, V. L. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The structures of ferrofluids (FFs) based on nonpolar solvent decahydronaphthalene, stabilized by saturated monocarboxylic acids with hydrocarbon chains of different lengths, C16 (palmitic acid) and ?12 (lauric acid), with an excess of acid molecules, have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. It is found that the addition of acid to an initially stable system with optimal composition leads to more significant structural changes (related to aggregation) than those observed previously for this class of FFs. A comparison of the influence of monocarboxylic acids on the stability of nonpolar FFs suggests that the enhancement of aggregation is much more pronounced in the case of palmitic acid excess. This fact confirms the conclusion of previous studies, according to which an increase in the hydrocarbon chain length in a saturated acid reduces the efficiency of the corresponding FF stabilization.

  5. Elastic Nd scattering at intermediate energies as a tool for probing the short-range deuteron structure

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhalev, M A

    2007-01-01

    A calculation of the deuteron polarization observables $A^d_y$, $A_{yy}$, $A_{xx}$, $A_{xz}$ and the differential cross-section for elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering at incident deuteron energies 270 and 880 MeV in lab is presented. A comparison of the calculations with two different deuteron wave-functions derived from the Bonn-CD $NN$-potential model and the dressed bag quark model is carried out. A model-independent approach, based on an optical potential framework, is used in which a nucleon-nucleon $T$-matrix is assumed to be local and taken on the energy shell, but still depends on the internal nucleon momentum in a deuteron.

  6. Structural stability of soybean lipoxygenase-1 in solution as probed by small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Enrico; Sabatucci, Annalaura; van Zadelhoff, Guus; Angelucci, Clotilde Beatrice; Vachette, Patrice; Veldink, Gerrit A; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2005-05-27

    Soybean lipoxygenase-1 (LOX-1) is used widely as a model for studying the structural and functional properties of the homologous family of lipoxygenases. The crystallographic structure revealed that LOX-1 is organized in a beta-sheet N-terminal domain and a larger, mostly helical, C-terminal domain. Here, we describe the overall structural characterization of native unliganded LOX-1 in solution, using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We show that the scattering pattern of the unliganded enzyme in solution does not display any significant difference compared with that calculated from the crystal structure, and that models of the overall shape of the protein calculated ab initio from the SAXS pattern provide a close envelope to the crystal structure. These data, demonstrating that LOX-1 has a compact structure also in solution, rule out any major motional flexibility of the LOX-1 molecule in aqueous solutions. In addition we show that eicosatetraynoic acid, an irreversible inhibitor of lipoxygenase used to mimic the effect of substrate binding, does not alter the overall conformation of LOX-1 nor its ability to bind to membranes. In contrast, the addition of glycerol (to 5%, v/v) causes an increase in the binding of the enzyme to membranes without altering its catalytic efficiency towards linoleic acid nor its SAXS pattern, suggesting that the global conformation of the enzyme is unaffected. Therefore, the compact structure determined in the crystal appears to be essentially preserved in these various solution conditions. During the preparation of this article, a paper by M. Hammel and co-workers showed instead a sharp difference between crystal and solution conformations of rabbit 15-LOX-1. The possible cause of this difference might be the presence of oligomers in the rabbit lipoxygenase preparations.

  7. Coherent diffractive {rho} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyett, N.M.; Tovey, S.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1995-12-31

    Coherent diffractive {rho} production by neutrinos occurs at low four-momentum transfer and high energy transfer. These interactions are generally understood to occur via the coupling of the weak charged current to the vector meson, which scatters diffractively from the target nucleus. Since coherent events are those in which the nucleus interacts as a whole, ie without breakup, and with small recoil energy, these events have a very sharp |t|-distribution. This presentation deals mostly with the Monte Carlo simulation of the coherent diffractive production of the {rho} production and in particular with the reconstruction algorithm (description and efficiency) and the |t| distribution. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  8. BSA adsorption onto nanospheres: Influence of surface curvature as probed by electrophoretic light scattering and UV/vis spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, Julio A.; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M.; González-Martín, M. Luisa; Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    The influence of surface curvature on the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated through the combination of two fairly simple techniques: electrophoretic light scattering and UV/vis spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out for a range of protein concentrations (0-320 μg/ml) at pH 3.5, 4.5 and 7 using hydrophobic polystyrene nanospheres of 38.8, 82 and 220 nm in diameter. The results obtained demonstrate that the charge of the BSA molecules in solution dictates the pH-dependent behavior of the protein-coated nanospheres, indicating in all cases a significant adsorption of BSA molecules. At a fixed pH, however, it is the zeta potential that characterizes the uncoated nanospheres normalized by their surface area that primarily controls protein adsorption. In particular, it is found that the rate at which BSA interact with the different nanospheres increases as their negative zeta potential per unit area (or diameter) increases (decreases) regardless of the pH. Moreover, provided that adsorption occurs away from the isoelectric point of the protein, highly curved surfaces are found to stabilize the native-like conformation of BSA upon adsorption by likely reducing lateral interactions between adsorbed molecules.

  9. Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Leonard

    1995-01-01

    This book presents a systematic account of optical coherence theory within the framework of classical optics, as applied to such topics as radiation from sources of different states of coherence, foundations of radiometry, effects of source coherence on the spectra of radiated fields, coherence theory of laser modes, and scattering of partially coherent light by random media. The book starts with a full mathematical introduction to the subject area and each chapter concludes with a set of exercises. The authors are renowned scientists and have made substantial contributions to many of the topi

  10. Probing electronic phase transitions with phonons via inelastic neutron scattering: superconductivity in borocarbides, charge and magnetic order in manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, F.

    2007-11-02

    The present thesis concentrates on the signatures of strong electron-phonon coupling in phonon properties measured by inelastic neutron scattering. The inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on the triple-axis spectrometers 1T and DAS PUMA at the research reactors in Saclay (France) and Munich (Germany), respectively. The work is subdivided into two separate chapters: In the first part, we report measurements of the lattice dynamical properties, i.e. phonon frequency, linewidth and intensity, of the conventional, i.e. phonon-mediated, superconductor YNi{sub 2}B{sub 2}C of the rare-earth-borocarbide family. The detailed check of theoretical predictions for these properties, which were calculated in the theory group of our institute, was one major goal of this work. We measured phonons in the normal state, i.e. T>T{sub c}, for several high symmetry directions up to 70 meV. We were able to extract the full temperature dependence of the superconducting energy gap 2{delta}(T) from our phonon scans with such accuracy that even deviations from the weak coupling BCS behaviour could be clearly observed. By measuring phonons at different wave vectors we demonstrated that phonons are sensitive to the gap anisotropy under the precondition, that different phonons get their coupling strength from different parts of the Fermi surface. In the second part, we investigated the properties of Mn-O bond-stretching phonons in the bilayer manganite La{sub 2-2x}Sr{sub 1+2x}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. At the doping level x=0.38 this compound has an ferromagnetic groundstate and exhibits the so-called colossal magnetoresistance effect in the vicinity of the Curie temperature T{sub C}. The atomic displacement patterns of the investigated phonons closely resemble possible Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO{sub 6} octahedra, which are introduced in this compound by the Jahn-Teller active Mn{sup 3+} ions. We observed strong renormalizations of the phonon frequencies and clear peaks of

  11. Use of a coherent fiber bundle for multi-diameter single fiber reflectance spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoy, C.L.; Gamm, U. A.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Robinson, D. J.; Amelink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-diameter single fiber reflectance (MDSFR) spectroscopy enables quantitative measurement of tissue optical properties, including the reduced scattering coefficient and the phase function parameter γ. However, the accuracy and speed of the procedure are currently limited by the need for co-localized measurements using multiple fiber optic probes with different fiber diameters. This study demonstrates the use of a coherent fiber bundle acting as a single fiber with a variable diameter for ...

  12. Probing the fractal pattern and organization of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria colonies growing under different conditions using quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Purwar, Harsh; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K

    2013-03-01

    Development of methods for quantification of cellular association and patterns in growing bacterial colony is of considerable current interest, not only to help understand multicellular behavior of a bacterial species but also to facilitate detection and identification of a bacterial species in a given space and under a given set of condition(s). We have explored quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for probing the morphological and structural changes taking place during colony formations of growing Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria under different conditions (in normal nutrient agar representing favorable growth environment, in the presence of 1% glucose as an additional nutrient, and 3 mM sodium arsenate as toxic material). The method is based on the measurement of spectral 3×3 Mueller matrices (which involves linear polarization measurements alone) and its subsequent analysis via polar decomposition to extract the intrinsic polarization parameters. Moreover, the fractal micro-optical parameter, namely, the Hurst exponent H, is determined via fractal-Born approximation-based inverse analysis of the polarization-preserving component of the light scattering spectra. Interesting differences are noted in the derived values for the H parameter and the intrinsic polarization parameters (linear diattenuation d, linear retardance δ, and linear depolarization Δ coefficients) of the growing bacterial colonies under different conditions. The bacterial colony growing in presence of 1% glucose exhibit the strongest fractality (lowest value of H), whereas that growing in presence of 3 mM sodium arsenate showed the weakest fractality. Moreover, the values for δ and d parameters are found to be considerably higher for the colony growing in presence of glucose, indicating more structured growth pattern. These findings are corroborated further with optical microscopic studies conducted on the same samples.

  13. Probing the fractal pattern and organization of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria colonies growing under different conditions using quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Purwar, Harsh; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K.

    2013-03-01

    Development of methods for quantification of cellular association and patterns in growing bacterial colony is of considerable current interest, not only to help understand multicellular behavior of a bacterial species but also to facilitate detection and identification of a bacterial species in a given space and under a given set of condition(s). We have explored quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for probing the morphological and structural changes taking place during colony formations of growing Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria under different conditions (in normal nutrient agar representing favorable growth environment, in the presence of 1% glucose as an additional nutrient, and 3 mM sodium arsenate as toxic material). The method is based on the measurement of spectral 3×3 Mueller matrices (which involves linear polarization measurements alone) and its subsequent analysis via polar decomposition to extract the intrinsic polarization parameters. Moreover, the fractal micro-optical parameter, namely, the Hurst exponent H, is determined via fractal-Born approximation-based inverse analysis of the polarization-preserving component of the light scattering spectra. Interesting differences are noted in the derived values for the H parameter and the intrinsic polarization parameters (linear diattenuation d, linear retardance δ, and linear depolarization Δ coefficients) of the growing bacterial colonies under different conditions. The bacterial colony growing in presence of 1% glucose exhibit the strongest fractality (lowest value of H), whereas that growing in presence of 3 mM sodium arsenate showed the weakest fractality. Moreover, the values for δ and d parameters are found to be considerably higher for the colony growing in presence of glucose, indicating more structured growth pattern. These findings are corroborated further with optical microscopic studies conducted on the same samples.

  14. Evaluation of light scattering and absorption properties ofin vivorat liver using a single-reflectance fiber probe during preischemia, ischemia-reperfusion, and postmortem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Sharmin; Maejima, Satoshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Hinoki, Akinari; Aosasa, Suefumi; Yamamoto, Junji; Nishidate, Izumi

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been extensively used for characterization of biological tissues as a noninvasive optical technique to evaluate the optical properties of tissue. We investigated a method for evaluating the reduced scattering coefficient , the absorption coefficient μa, the tissue oxygen saturation StO2, and the reduction of heme aa3 in cytochrome c oxidase CcO of in vivo liver tissue using a single-reflectance fiber probe with two source-collector geometries. We performed in vivo recordings of diffuse reflectance spectra for exposed rat liver during the ischemia-reperfusion induced by the hepatic portal (hepatic artery, portal vein, and bile duct) occlusion. The time courses of μa at 500, 530, 570, and 584 nm indicated the hemodynamic change in liver tissue as well as StO2. Significant increase in μa(605)/μa(620) during ischemia and after euthanasia induced by nitrogen breathing was observed, which indicates the reduction of heme aa3, representing a sign of mitochondrial energy failure. The time courses of at 500, 530, 570, and 584 nm were well correlated with those of μa, which also reflect the scattering by red blood cells. On the other hand, at 700 and 800 nm, a temporary increase in and an irreversible decrease in were observed during ischemia-reperfusion and after euthanasia induced by nitrogen breathing, respectively. The change in in the near-infrared wavelength region during ischemia is indicative of the morphological changes in the cellular and subcellular structures induced by the ischemia, whereas that after euthanasia implies the hepatocyte vacuolation. The results of the present study indicate the potential application of the current DRS system for evaluating the pathophysiological conditions of in vivo liver tissue.

  15. Magnetic excitations in spin-orbital liquid FeSc2S4 in zero and applied magnetic field probed by inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffin, Alun; Coldea, Radu; Rüegg, Christian; Zaharko, Oksana; Embs, Jan; Guidi, Tatiana; Tsurkan, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    In systems where both spin and orbital frustration are present, an intriguing Spin Orbital Liquid (SOL) state is believed to occur where spin and orbital moments remain disordered down to the lowest measurable temperatures. The A-site spinel FeSc2S4 is believed to form such a SOL ground state, with its undistorted cubic structure and diamond lattice of Fe2+ sites providing the ingredients for orbital and spin frustration, respectively. The system displays Curie-Weiss behaviour indicative of strong exchange between S = 2 , L = 2 Fe2+ ions, though it does not order down to the lowest measurable temperatures. Here I will present the results of inelastic, time-of-flight neutron scattering experiments that probe the full bandwidth of the magnetic excitations in a powder sample of FeSc2S4, and provide a consistent model of the observed dynamics in terms of spin-orbital excitations, in both zero-field and in-field measurements. I will discuss in particular how the application of a magnetic field elucidates the spin and orbital nature of these excitations, as the system shows behaviour drastically contrary to its spin-only analogue. We acknowledge support from EPSRC (UK).

  16. Using three-dimensional 3D grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) analysis to probe pore deformation in mesoporous silica films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, Elvia Anabela Chavez; Granlund, Håvard; Sztucki, Michael; Konovalov, Oleg; Breiby, Dag W; Gibaud, Alain

    2014-02-26

    In the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in studying nanoscale objects deposited on surfaces by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). However, unravelling the structural properties of mesostructured thin films containing highly organized internal three-dimensional (3D) structures remains a challenging issue, because of the lack of efficient algorithms that allow prediction of the GISAXS intensity patterns. Previous attempts to calculate intensities have mostly been limited to cases of two-dimensional (2D) assemblies of nanoparticles at surfaces, or have been adapted to specific 3D cases. Here, we demonstrate that highly organized 3D mesoscale structures (for example, porous networks) can be modeled by the combined use of established crystallography formalism and the Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA). Taking advantage of the near-zero intensity of symmetry-allowed Bragg reflections, the casual extinction or existence of certain reflections related to the anisotropy of the form factor of the pores can be used as a highly sensitive method to extract structural information. We employ this generic method to probe the slightly compressed anisotropic shape and orientation of pores in a mesoporous silica thin film having P63/mmc symmetry.

  17. Tunable nanowire nonlinear optical probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yuri; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Onorato, Robert M.; Saykally, Richard J.; Liphardt, Jan; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    One crucial challenge for subwavelength optics has been thedevelopment of a tunable source of coherent laser radiation for use inthe physical, information, and biological sciences that is stable at roomtemperature and physiological conditions. Current advanced near-fieldimaging techniques using fiber-optic scattering probes1,2 have alreadyachieved spatial resolution down to the 20-nm range. Recently reportedfar-field approaches for optical microscopy, including stimulatedemission depletion (STED)3, structured illumination4, and photoactivatedlocalization microscopy (PALM)5, have also enabled impressive,theoretically-unlimited spatial resolution of fluorescent biomolecularcomplexes. Previous work with laser tweezers6-8 has suggested the promiseof using optical traps to create novel spatial probes and sensors.Inorganic nanowires have diameters substantially below the wavelength ofvisible light and have unique electronic and optical properties9,10 thatmake them prime candidates for subwavelength laser and imagingtechnology. Here we report the development of an electrode-free,continuously-tunable coherent visible light source compatible withphysiological environments, from individual potassium niobate (KNbO3)nanowires. These wires exhibit efficient second harmonic generation(SHG), and act as frequency converters, allowing the local synthesis of awide range of colors via sum and difference frequency generation (SFG,DFG). We use this tunable nanometric light source to implement a novelform of subwavelength microscopy, in which an infrared (IR) laser is usedto optically trap and scan a nanowire over a sample, suggesting a widerange of potential applications in physics, chemistry, materials science,and biology.

  18. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. Mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample, in real time or at video rate. In addition...

  19. Reflection of resonant light from a plane surface of an ensemble of motionless point scatters: Quantum microscopic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraptsev, A S

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of general theoretical results developed previously in [JETP 112, 246 (2011)], we analyze the reflection of quasiresonant light from a plane surface of dense and disordered ensemble of motionless point scatters. Angle distribution of the scattered light is calculated both for s and p polarizations of the probe radiation. The ratio between coherent and incoherent (diffuse) components of scattered light is calculated. We analyze the contributions of scatters located at different distances from the surface and determine on this background the thickness of surface layer responsible for reflected beam generation. The inhomogeneity of dipole-dipole interaction near the surface is discussed.We study also dependence of total reflected light power on the incidence angle and compare the results of the microscopic approach with predictions of the Fresnel reflection theory. The calculations are performed for different densities of scatters and different frequencies of a probe radiation.

  20. Absorption-Amplification Response with or Without Spontaneously Generated Coherence in a Coherent Four-Level Atomic Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; YANG Wen-Xing; PENG Ju-Cun

    2004-01-01

    We discuss and analyze the absorption-amplification properties of a weak probe field in a typical four-level atomic system in the presence of an additional coherence term, the spontaneously generated coherence term. Theinfluences of the spontaneously generated coherence and a