WorldWideScience

Sample records for coherent electron transfer

  1. Coherent Electron Transfer at the Ag / Graphite Heterojunction Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shijing; Dai, Yanan; Zhang, Shengmin; Liu, Liming; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2018-03-01

    Charge transfer in transduction of light to electrical or chemical energy at heterojunctions of metals with semiconductors or semimetals is believed to occur by photogenerated hot electrons in metal undergoing incoherent internal photoemission through the heterojunction interface. Charge transfer, however, can also occur coherently by dipole coupling of electronic bands at the heterojunction interface. Microscopic physical insights into how transfer occurs can be elucidated by following the coherent polarization of the donor and acceptor states on the time scale of electronic dephasing. By time-resolved multiphoton photoemission spectroscopy (MPP), we investigate the coherent electron transfer from an interface state that forms upon chemisorption of Ag nanoclusters onto graphite to a σ symmetry interlayer band of graphite. Multidimensional MPP spectroscopy reveals a resonant two-photon transition, which dephases within 10 fs completing the coherent transfer.

  2. Quantum electron transfer processes induced by thermo-coherent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    ordinate analysis gave a quantitative estimate of the rate of the outer sphere electron transfer in solution phase5,6 corresponding to the terms of the thermal average Franck–Condon (FC) factor.16,20–22. This classical high temperature limiting expression of the non-adiabatic ET rate corresponds to the continuous dielectric ...

  3. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Fumio, E-mail: hosokawa@bio-net.co.jp [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Sawada, Hidetaka [JEOL (UK) Ltd., JEOL House, Silver Court, Watchmead, Welwyn Garden City, Herts AL7 1LT (United Kingdom); Shinkawa, Takao [BioNet Ltd., 2-3-28 Nishikityo, Tachikwa, Tokyo (Japan); Sannomiya, Takumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field’s components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field’s derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope. - Highlights: • The formula of partial coherence for aberration corrected TEM is derived. • Transfer functions are calculated with several residual aberrations. • The calculated transfer function shows the characteristic damping. • The odd-symmetric wave aberrations can cause the attenuation of image via coherence. • The examples of aberration corrected TEM image simulations are shown.

  5. Quantum electron transfer processes induced by thermo-coherent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    very high temperature the expressions are derived analytically and compared with the case of thermal distri- bution. We have investigated the dependence of temperature on the rate due to displacement, distortion of the harmonic potential energy ... one electron two-centered exchange problem,7–10 many electron direct ...

  6. Coherent electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  7. Coherently Enhanced Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnok, Alex; Baranov, Denis G.; Generalov, Andrey; Li, Sergey; Alù, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Extraction of electromagnetic energy by an antenna from impinging external radiation is at the basis of wireless communications and wireless power transfer (WPT). The maximum of transferred energy is ensured when the antenna is conjugately matched, i.e., when it is resonant and it has an equal coupling with free space and its load. This condition, however, can be easily affected by changes in the environment, preventing optimal operation of a WPT system. Here, we introduce the concept of coherently enhanced WPT that allows us to bypass this difficulty and achieve dynamic control of power transfer. The approach relies on coherent excitation of the waveguide connected to the antenna load with a backward propagating signal of specific amplitude and phase. This signal creates a suitable interference pattern at the load resulting in a modification of the local wave impedance, which in turn enables conjugate matching and a largely increased amount of extracted energy. We develop a simple theoretical model describing this concept, demonstrate it with full-wave numerical simulations for the canonical example of a dipole antenna, and verify experimentally in both near-field and far-field regimes.

  8. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter th...

  9. Theory of coherent resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Cheng, Y.-C.; Reichman, David R.; Eaves, Joel D.

    2008-01-01

    A theory of coherent resonance energy transfer is developed combining the polaron transformation and a time-local quantum master equation formulation, which is valid for arbitrary spectral densities including common modes. The theory contains inhomogeneous terms accounting for nonequilibrium initial preparation effects and elucidates how quantum coherence and nonequilibrium effects manifest themselves in the coherent energy transfer dynamics beyond the weak resonance coupling limit of the Foerster and Dexter (FD) theory. Numerical tests show that quantum coherence can cause significant changes in steady state donor/acceptor populations from those predicted by the FD theory and illustrate delicate cooperation of nonequilibrium and quantum coherence effects on the transient population dynamics.

  10. Coherent pump pulses in Double Electron Electron Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of shaped pulses to Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy has led to significant enhancements in sensitivity through increased excitation bandwidths and improved control over spin dynamics. The application of DEER has so far relied on the presence of an incoherent pump channel to average out most undesired coherent effects of the pump pulse(s) on the observer spins. However, in fully coherent EPR spectrometers that are increasingly used to generate shaped pulses, the presence of coherent pump pulses means that these effects need to be explicitly considered. In this paper, we examine the effects of coherent rectangular and sech/tanh pump pulses in DEER experiments with up to three pump pulses. We show that, even in the absence of significant overlap of the observer and pump pulse excitation bandwidths, coherence transfer pathways involving both types of pulses generate spin echoes of considerable intensity. These echoes introduce artefacts, which, if not identified and removed, can easily lead to misinterpretation. We demonstrate that the observed echoes can be quantitatively modelled using a simple spin quantum dynamics approach that includes instrumental transfer functions. Based on an analysis of the echo crossing artefacts, we propose efficient phase cycling schemes for their suppression. This enables the use of advanced DEER experiments, characterized by high sensitivity and increased accuracy for long-distance measurements, on novel fully coherent EPR spectrometers. PMID:27339858

  11. Coherence and relaxation in energy transfer processes in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelby, R.M.

    1978-03-01

    Investigations of electronic triplet and vibrational energy transfer dynamics and relaxation processes are presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of coherence and interactions which tend to destroy the coherence. In the case of triplet excitons at low temperatures, the importance of coherence in energy migration can be established, and the average coherence parameters can be experimentally determined. In the case of vibrational excitations, both picosecond spectroscopic studies of vibrational relaxation and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the dynamics and give increased insight into the nature of the mechanisms responsible for vibrational dephasing. The design and operation of the picosecond apparatus used in these experiments is also described

  12. Electron transfer reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  13. Spatial propagation of excitonic coherence enables ratcheted energy transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Stephan; Ishizaki, Akihito; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows that a variety of photosynthetic systems can preserve quantum beats in the process of electronic energy transfer, even at room temperature. However, whether this quantum coherence arises in vivo and whether it has any biological function have remained unclear. Here we present a theoretical model that suggests that the creation and recreation of coherence under natural conditions is ubiquitous. Our model allows us to theoretically demonstrate a mechanism for a ratch...

  14. Theory of coherent molecule to surface electron injection: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    erogeneous electron transfer from a molecule to a semiconductor occurs before full vibrational relaxa- tion of the excited molecule is achieved. 5,6. Accor- dingly, theoretical description of the decay of the initial state has been formulated to include vibra- tional coherence in the transfer process. 4. 2. Analytical model.

  15. Theory of interrelated electron and proton transfer processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic and nonadiaba......A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic...

  16. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...

  17. Relative coordinates of coherent electron pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Constantin V.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia O.

    2008-03-01

    It is shown that relative coordinate and momentum of coherent electron pair have the meaning of observables with the help of quadrupole and magnetic moments. Distributions of quadrupole terms of scalar potential are shown. These distributions have nonclassical properties.

  18. Electron dynamics inside short-coherence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Giulio; Bordone, Paolo; Jacoboni, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    We present theoretical results on electron dynamics inside nanometric systems, where the coherence of the electron ensemble is maintained in a very short region. The contacts are supposed to spoil such a coherence, therefore the interference processes between the carrier wavefunction and the internal potential profile can be affected by the proximity of the contacts. The problem has been analysed by using the Wigner-function formalism. For very short devices, transport properties, such as tunnelling through potential barriers, are significantly influenced by the distance between the contacts

  19. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  20. Quantum coherent energy transfer over varying pathways in single light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildner, Richard; Brinks, Daan; Nieder, Jana B; Cogdell, Richard J; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-06-21

    The initial steps of photosynthesis comprise the absorption of sunlight by pigment-protein antenna complexes followed by rapid and highly efficient funneling of excitation energy to a reaction center. In these transport processes, signatures of unexpectedly long-lived coherences have emerged in two-dimensional ensemble spectra of various light-harvesting complexes. Here, we demonstrate ultrafast quantum coherent energy transfer within individual antenna complexes of a purple bacterium under physiological conditions. We find that quantum coherences between electronically coupled energy eigenstates persist at least 400 femtoseconds and that distinct energy-transfer pathways that change with time can be identified in each complex. Our data suggest that long-lived quantum coherence renders energy transfer in photosynthetic systems robust in the presence of disorder, which is a prerequisite for efficient light harvesting.

  1. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin

    2015-06-07

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S (λ 1, T∼ 2, λ 3)) along the population time (T∼ 2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S (λ 1, ν∼ 2, λ 3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ ν∼ 2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (- ν∼ 2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  2. Electron collisions with coherently prepared atomic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.; LeClair, L.R.; Khakoo, M.S. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide (Australia). Electronics Structure of Materials Centre; Csanak, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-02-01

    The subject of electron scattering by laser-excited atoms is briefly reviewed. To demonstrate some aspects of these electron collision processes, the authors describe the procedures and the results of a joint experimental and theoretical study concerning elastic scattering by coherently excited {sup 138}Ba (...6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) atoms. Examples of experimental and theoretical collision parameters and magnetic sublevel differential cross sections for elastic scattering are given and compared. The convergent close coupling calculations (with the neglect of spin-orbit interaction) are in good agreement with experiment at 20 eV impact energy and 10, 15 and 20{degree} scattering angles and can be expected to yield reliable integral magnetic sublevel and alignment creation cross sections. The role of these quantities in plasma polarization spectroscopy is pointed out.

  3. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A.

    2014-01-01

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too ‘warm and wet’ to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the ‘dry’ hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The ‘tubulin’ subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible. PMID:25232047

  4. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-11-06

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too 'warm and wet' to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the 'dry' hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The 'tubulin' subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Electron transfer of monovalent cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerat-Parizot, O.; Potier, J.; Hickel, B.

    1993-01-01

    The surveys presented here concern monovalent Cadmium in aqueous solutions, produced by reduction of Cd(II), using pulsed radiolysis. We specifically studied the Cd(I) reactivity when complexed in certain synthetic ionophores. Cd(I), being an extremely powerful reducing agent, regains its stable valence by transferring an electron to an acceptor. Organic molecules are introduced into a solvent, permitting the analysis of the transfer rate of this electron. We investigated the influence of the ligand specificities and the variation of the electron transfer rate, that depend on the potential difference between Cadmium and the acceptor being used. 34 refs

  6. Electron beam instrumentation techniques using coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.X.

    1997-01-01

    Much progress has been made on coherent radiation research since coherent synchrotron radiation was first observed in 1989. The use of coherent radiation as a bunch length diagnostic tool has been studied by several groups. In this paper, brief introductions to coherent radiation and far-infrared measurement are given, the progress and status of their beam diagnostic application are reviewed, different techniques are described, and their advantages and limitations are discussed

  7. Quantum coherent optical phase modulation in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Armin; Echternkamp, Katharina E; Schauss, Jakob; Yalunin, Sergey V; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-05-14

    Coherent manipulation of quantum systems with light is expected to be a cornerstone of future information and communication technology, including quantum computation and cryptography. The transfer of an optical phase onto a quantum wavefunction is a defining aspect of coherent interactions and forms the basis of quantum state preparation, synchronization and metrology. Light-phase-modulated electron states near atoms and molecules are essential for the techniques of attosecond science, including the generation of extreme-ultraviolet pulses and orbital tomography. In contrast, the quantum-coherent phase-modulation of energetic free-electron beams has not been demonstrated, although it promises direct access to ultrafast imaging and spectroscopy with tailored electron pulses on the attosecond scale. Here we demonstrate the coherent quantum state manipulation of free-electron populations in an electron microscope beam. We employ the interaction of ultrashort electron pulses with optical near-fields to induce Rabi oscillations in the populations of electron momentum states, observed as a function of the optical driving field. Excellent agreement with the scaling of an equal-Rabi multilevel quantum ladder is obtained, representing the observation of a light-driven 'quantum walk' coherently reshaping electron density in momentum space. We note that, after the interaction, the optically generated superposition of momentum states evolves into a train of attosecond electron pulses. Our results reveal the potential of quantum control for the precision structuring of electron densities, with possible applications ranging from ultrafast electron spectroscopy and microscopy to accelerator science and free-electron lasers.

  8. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S., E-mail: gsengel@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  9. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  10. Energy and Information Transfer Via Coherent Exciton Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoning

    Electronic excitons are bound electron-hole states that are generated when light interacts with matter. Such excitations typically entangle with phonons and rapidly decohere; the resulting electronic state dynamics become diffusive as a result. However, if the exciton-phonon coupling can be reduced, it may be possible to construct excitonic wave packets that offer a means of efficiently transmitting information and energy. This thesis is a combined theory/computation investigation to design condensed matter systems which support the requisite coherent transport. Under the idealizing assumption that exciton-phonon entanglement could be completely suppressed, the majority of this thesis focuses on the creation and manipulation of exciton wave packets in quasi-one-dimensional systems. While each site could be a silicon quantum dot, the actual implementation focused on organic molecular assemblies for the sake of computational simplicity, ease of experimental implementation, potential for coherent transport, and promise because of reduced structural uncertainty. A laser design was derived to create exciton wave packets with tunable shape and speed. Quantum interference was then exploited to manipulate these packets to block, pass, and even dissociate excitons based on their energies. These developments allow exciton packets to be considered within the arena of quantum information science. The concept of controllable excitonic wave packets was subsequently extended to consider molecular designs that allow photons with orbital angular momentum to be absorbed to create excitons with a quasi-angular momentum of their own. It was shown that a well-defined measure of topological charge is conserved in such light-matter interactions. Significantly, it was also discovered that such molecules allow photon angular momenta to be combined and later emitted. This amounts to a new way of up/down converting photonic angular momentum without relying on nonlinear optical materials. The

  11. Electron transfer in pnicogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Liangyu; Mo, Yirong

    2014-10-02

    As a new type of noncovalent interactions, pnicogen bond between a VA group element (N, P, and As) and an electron donor (Lewis base) has grabbed attention in recent several years. Here we employ the block-localized wave function (BLW) based energy decomposition scheme to probe the bonding nature in a series of substituted phosphines X(n)PH(3-n) complexed with ammonia. As the BLW method can derive the optimal monomer orbitals in a complex with the electron transfer among monomers quenched, we can effectively examine the HOMO-LUMO interaction in these pnicogen bonding systems. Among various energy components, electron transfer energy together with the polarization energy dominates the pnicogen bonding energy. Although usually it is assumed that the electron transfer from ammonia to substituted phosphines occurs in the form of n → σ*(XP) hyperconjugative interaction, we identify a kind of new pathway when X = NO2 and CN, i.e., n → dπ*, which results from the interaction between the π orbital of cyano or nitro substituent and d orbitals on P. But still this picture of electron transfer using a single pair of orbitals is greatly simplified, as the electron density difference (EDD) maps corresponding to the overall electron transfer processes show the accumulation of electron density on the P side opposite to the X-P bond, with insignificant or even negligible gain of electron density on the substituent group side. Thus, the EDD maps tend to support the concept of σ-hole in pnicogen bonds.

  12. Symmetry breaking by quantum coherence in single electron attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, E.; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Mason, Nigel J.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum coherence-induced effects in atomic and molecular systems are the basis of several proposals for laser-based control of chemical reactions. So far, these rely on coherent photon beams inducing coherent reaction pathways that may interfere with one another, to achieve the desired outcome. This concept has been successfully exploited for removing the inversion symmetry in the dissociation of homonuclear diatomic molecules, but it remains to be seen if such quantum coherent effects can also be generated by the interaction of incoherent electrons with such molecules. Here we show that resonant electron attachment to H2 and the subsequent dissociation into H (n = 2) + H- is asymmetric about the inter-nuclear axis, whereas the asymmetry in D2 is far less pronounced. We explain this observation as due to attachment of a single electron resulting in a coherent superposition of two resonances of opposite parity. In addition to exemplifying a new quantum coherent process, our observation of coherent quantum dynamics involves the active participation of all three electrons and two nuclei, which could provide new tools for studying electron correlations as a means to control chemical processes, and demonstrates the role of coherent effects in electron-induced chemistry.

  13. Cell Microtubules as Cavities Quantum Coherence and Energy Transfer?

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    2000-01-01

    A model is presented for dissipationless energy transfer in cell microtubules due to quantum coherent states. The model is based on conjectured (hydrated) ferroelectric properties of microtubular arrangements. Ferroelectricity is essential in providing the necessary isolation against thermal losses in thin interior regions, full of ordered water, near the tubulin dimer walls of the microtubule. These play the role of cavity regions, which are similar to electromagnetic cavities of quantum optics. As a result, the formation of (macroscopic) quantum coherent states of electric dipoles on the tubulin dimers may occur. Some experiments, inspired by quantum optics, are suggested for the falsification of this scenario.

  14. Spin coherence transfer in chemical transformations monitoredNMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, Sabieh M.; Hilty, Christian; Chu, Chester; Bouchard,Louis-S.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Pines, Alexander

    2006-07-31

    We demonstrate the use of micro-scale nuclear magneticresonance (NMR) for studying the transfer of spin coherence innon-equilibrium chemical processes, using spatially separated NMRencoding and detection coils. As an example, we provide the map ofchemical shift correlations for the amino acid alanine as it transitionsfrom the zwitterionic to the anionic form. Our method is unique in thesense that it allows us to track the chemical migration of encodednuclear spins during the course of chemical transformations.

  15. Enhanced coherent undulator radiation from bunched electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Crosson, E.R.; Ricci, K.N.; Smith, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    When energetic bunches of electrons traverse an undulator field, they can spontaneously emit radiation both coherently and incoherently. Although it has generally been assumed that undulator radiation is incoherent at wavelengths short compared to the longitudinal size of the electron bunch, several recent observations have proved this assumption false. Furthermore, the appearance of coherent radiation is often accompanied by a significant increase in radiated power. Here we report observations of strongly enhanced coherent spontaneous radiation together with direct measurements, using transition radiation techniques, of the electron distributions responsible for the coherent emission. We also report demonstrated enhancements in the predicted spontaneous radiated power by as much as 6x10 4 using electron bunch compression. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yin [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie [Department of Materials and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Scholes, Gregory D., E-mail: gscholes@princeton.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S(λ{sub 1},T{sup ~}{sub 2},λ{sub 3})) along the population time (T{sup ~}{sub 2}) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S(λ{sub 1},ν{sup ~}{sub 2},λ{sub 3})). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ν{sup ~}{sub 2}) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (−ν{sup ~}{sub 2}) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  17. Electron Bunch Length Diagnostic With Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have designed a new technique for measuring subpicosecond electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation. This new diagnostic technique involves passing the electron beam in close proximity of a grating with a period comparable to the electron bunch length. The emitted Smith-Purcell radiation will have a coherent component whose angular position and distribution are directly related to the electron bunch length and longitudinal profile, respectively. This new diagnostic technique is inherently simple, inexpensive and non-intercepting. The authors show that the new technique is also scaleable to femtosecond regime

  18. Intramolecular electron transfer in laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, Ole; Wherland, Scot; Koroleva, Olga; Loginov, Dmitry S; Pecht, Israel

    2011-09-01

    Rate constants and activation parameters have been determined for the internal electron transfer from type 1 (T1) to type 3 (T3) copper ions in laccase from both the fungus Trametes hirsuta and the lacquer tree Rhus vernicifera, using the pulse radiolysis method. The rate constant at 298 K and the enthalpy and entropy of activation were 25 ± 1 s(-1), 39.7 ± 5.0 kJ·mol(-1) and -87 ± 9 J·mol(-1) ·K(-1) for the fungal enzyme and 1.1 ± 0.1 s(-1), 9.8 ± 0.2 kJ·mol(-1) and -211 ± 3 J·mol(-1) ·K(-1) for the tree enzyme. The initial reduction of the T1 site by pulse radiolytically produced radicals was direct in the case of T. hirsuta laccase, but occured indirectly via a disulfide radical in R. vernicifera. The equilibrium constant that characterizes the electron transfer from T1 to T3 copper ions was 0.4 for T. hirsuta laccase and 1.5 for R. vernicifera laccase, leading to full reduction of the T1 site occurring at 2.9 ± 0.2 electron equivalents for T. hirsuta and 4 electron equivalents for R. vernicifera laccase. These results were compared with each other and with those for the same process in other multicopper oxidases, ascorbate oxidase and Streptomyces coelicolor laccase, using available structural information and electron transfer theory. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  19. Control of Nuclear Dynamics through Conical Intersections and Electronic Coherences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Caroline; Vendrell, Oriol; Welsch, Ralph; Santra, Robin

    2018-03-01

    The effect of nuclear dynamics and conical intersections on electronic coherences is investigated employing a two-state, two-mode linear vibronic coupling model. Exact quantum dynamical calculations are performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. It is found that the presence of a nonadiabatic coupling close to the Franck-Condon point can preserve electronic coherence to some extent. Additionally, the possibility of steering the nuclear wave packets by imprinting a relative phase between the electronic states during the photoionization process is discussed. It is found that the steering of nuclear wave packets is possible given that a coherent electronic wave packet embodying the phase difference passes through a conical intersection. A conical intersection close to the Franck-Condon point is thus a necessary prerequisite for control, providing a clear path towards attochemistry.

  20. Coherent Zeeman resonance from electron spin coherence in a mixed-type GaAs/AlAs quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Shannon; Wang, Hailin; Prineas, John P

    2007-03-01

    Coherent Zeeman resonance from electron spin coherence is demonstrated in a Lambda-type three-level system, coupling electron spin states via trions. The optical control of electron density that is characteristic of a mixed-type quantum-well facilitates the study of trion formation as well as the effects of many-body interactions on the manifestation of electron spin coherence in the nonlinear optical response.

  1. The role of quantum coherence in dimer and trimer excitation energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, Charlotta; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2017-11-01

    Recent progress in resource theory of quantum coherence has resulted in measures to quantify coherence in quantum systems. Especially, the l 1-norm and relative entropy of coherence have been shown to be proper quantifiers of coherence and have been used to investigate coherence properties in different operational tasks. Since long-lasting quantum coherence has been experimentally confirmed in a number of photosynthetic complexes, it has been debated if and how coherence is connected to the known efficiency of population transfer in such systems. In this study, we investigate quantitatively the relationship between coherence, as quantified by l 1-norm and relative entropy of coherence, and efficiency, as quantified by fidelity, for population transfer between end-sites in a network of two-level quantum systems. In particular, we use the coherence averaged over the duration of the population transfer in order to carry out a quantitative comparison between coherence and fidelity. Our results show that although coherence is a necessary requirement for population transfer, there is no unique relation between coherence and the efficiency of the transfer process.

  2. Theory of coherent transition radiation generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. P. E. M. Op ’t Root

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the theory of coherent transition radiation (CTR generated by ellipsoidal electron bunches. We calculate analytical expressions for the electric field spectrum, the power spectrum, and the temporal electric field of CTR, generated by cylindrically symmetric ellipsoidal electron bunches with hard and soft edges. This theory is relevant for diagnostics of ellipsoidal electron bunches. Realization of such bunches would solve the problem of space-charge induced emittance degradation.

  3. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  4. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe...

  5. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  6. Nonrelativistic electron bunch train for coherently enhanced terahertz radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuelin; Kim, Kwang-Je

    2008-01-01

    We propose to generate a train of prebunched electron beams for producing coherently enhanced Smith-Purcell radiation [S. J. Smith and E. M. Purcell, Phys. Rev. 92, 1069 (1953)] in the terahertz wavelength range. In this scheme, a train of picosecond laser pulses is produced to drive a photoemission gun to generate a train of 50 keV electron pulses. The parameters are chosen so that the space-charge effect does not destroy the pulse time structure. Smith-Purcell radiation from the electron pulse train is enhanced due both to the short length of the individual electron bunch and to the repetitive structure of the beam. Example systems producing coherent terahertz power at about 1 mW are described

  7. Coherent dynamics of singlet fission controlled by nonlocal electron-phonon coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Based on the Frenkel-charge transfer (CT) mixing model of singlet fission (SF), we incorporate both the local and nonlocal phonon baths in the Hamiltonian and adopt the algorithm of time-dependent density matrix renormalization group to simulate the fission process in tetracene. The endergonic SF is found to be facilitated by the robust quantum coherence, which concurrently gives rise to a notable quantum beating effect. Controlled by the nonlocal electron-phonon coupling, the density of trip...

  8. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  9. Longitudinal Electron Bunch Diagnostics Using Coherent Transition Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Happek, Uwe; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The longitudinal charge distribution of electron bunches in the Fermilab A0 photo-injector was determined by using the coherent transition radiation produced by electrons passing through a thin metallic foil. The auto-correlation of the transition radiation signal was measured with a Michelson type interferometer. The response function of the interferometer was determined from measured and simulated power spectra for low electron bunch charge and maximum longitudinal compression. Kramers-Kroning technique was used to determine longitudinal charge distribution. Measurements were performed for electron bunch lengths in the range from 0.3 to 2 ps (rms).

  10. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...

  11. Coherent spontaneous radiation from highly bunched electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, K.W.; Crosson, E.R.; Ricci, K.N.

    1995-01-01

    Coherent spontaneous radiation has now been observed in several FELs, and is a subject of great importance to the design of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) devices. We report observations of coherent spontaneous radiation in both FIREFLY and the mid-infrared FEL at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. Coherent emission has been observed at wavelengths as short as 5 microns, and enhancement over incoherent levels by as much as a factor of 4x10 4 has been observed at longer wavelengths. The latter behavior was observed at 45 microns in FIREFLY with short bunches produced by off-peak acceleration and dispersive compression. We present temporal measurements of the highly bunched electron distributions responsible for the large enhancements, using both transition radiation and energy-phase techniques

  12. Microbunching and coherent acceleration of electrons by subcycle laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, B.; Tajima, T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Physics Dept.; Hojo, H. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan). Plasma Research Center

    1997-05-01

    The pick up and acceleration of all plasma electrons irradiated by an intense, subcyclic laser pulse is demonstrated via analytical and numerical calculations. It is shown that the initial low emittance of the plasma electrons is conserved during the process of acceleration, leading to an extremely cold, bunched electron beam. Compression of the electron bunch along the longitudinal coordinate is naturally achieved due to the interaction of electrons and laser pulse. In this paper, the authors find the localized solutions to Maxwell`s equations of a subcyclic laser pulse and use these to determine the acceleration of charged particles and they suggest future application for this acceleration mechanism as low energy particle injector and as electron source for coherent x-ray generation.

  13. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; de Bok, Frank A M; Plugge, Caroline M; van Eekert, Miriam H A; Dolfing, Jan; Schraa, Gosse

    2006-03-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory syntrophic consortia of proton-reducing acetogenic bacteria and hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic microorganisms that use insoluble electron acceptors for growth, such as iron- and manganese-oxide as well as inert graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells, also transfer electrons exocellularly. Soluble compounds, like humic substances, quinones, phenazines and riboflavin, can function as exocellular electron mediators enhancing this type of anaerobic respiration. However, direct electron transfer by cell-cell contact is important as well. This review addresses the mechanisms of exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities. There are fundamental differences but also similarities between electron transfer to another microorganism or to an insoluble electron acceptor. The physical separation of the electron donor and electron acceptor metabolism allows energy conservation in compounds as methane and hydrogen or as electricity. Furthermore, this separation is essential in the donation or acceptance of electrons in some environmental technological processes, e.g. soil remediation, wastewater purification and corrosion.

  14. Applications of Coherent Radiation from Electrons traversing Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Überall, H.

    2000-04-01

    Historically, the first types of coherent radiation from electrons traversing crystals studied were coherent bremsstrahlung (CB: Dyson and Überall 1955; Überall 1956, 1962) and channeling radiation (CR: Kumakhov, 1976) which produce quasimonochromatic X-rays and γ-rays, as well as parametric X-rays (Baryshevsky and Feranchuk, 1983). Related non-crystal sources are transition radiation and synchrotron radiation. We here present a comparison of radiation types from these sources, and we discuss a series of their possible applications, namely (a) CR: X-ray lithography, angiography, structure analysis of macromolecules, and trace element analysis, and (b) for CB: Radiography, use as a neutron source, elemental analysis, radiation therapy, and radioisotope production for commercial or medical use. CR and CB are very intense sources, needing only low-energy, moderately-priced electron linacs for their generation, hence competing with (or surpassing) more conventional X-ray sources intensity-wise and from a cost standpoint.

  15. Effects of collisions on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Anil K.; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.; Lucht, Robert P.; Settersten, Thomas B.

    2009-06-01

    A six-level model is developed and used to study the effects of collisional energy transfer and dephasing on electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) in nitric oxide. The model includes the three levels that are coherently coupled by the three applied lasers as well as three additional bath levels that enable inclusion of the effects of electronic quenching and rotational energy transfer. The density-matrix equations that describe the evolution of the relevant populations and coherences are presented. The parametric dependencies of the ERE-CARS signal on collisional energy transfer and dephasing processes are described in terms of both a steady-state analytical solution and the numerical solutions to the governing equations. In the weak-field limit, the ERE-CARS signal scales inversely with the square of the dephasing rates for the electronic and Raman coherences. In accord with published experimental observations [Roy et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 104105 (2006)], the ERE-CARS signal is shown to be insensitive to the collisional quenching rate. Parametric dependencies on quenching, rotational energy transfer, and pure electronic dephasing are presented, demonstrating reduced collisional dependence for saturating laser fields.

  16. The Theory of Coherent Radiation by Intense Electron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Buts, Vyacheslav A; Kurilko, V.I

    2006-01-01

    Spurred by the development of high-current, high-energy relativistic electron beams this books delves into the foundations of a device and geometry independent theoretical treatment of a large collection of interacting and radiating electron bunches. Part I deals with the basics of the radiation emission of a single charged particle, paying particular attention to the effect of radiation reaction and dwelling on the corresponding well-known paradoxes. Part II investigates the collective behaviour of a high-density electron bunch where both discrete and continous beam modelling is explored. Part III treats the application to modern systems while still keeping the treatment as general as possible. This book will be mandatory reading for anyone working on the foundations of modern devices such as free electron lasers, plasma accelerators, synchroton sources and other modern sources of bright, coherent radiation with high spectral density.

  17. A phenomenological model for collisional coherence transfer in an optically pumped atomic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanbekyan, K; Bevilaqua, G; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [Universita degli Studi di Siena, Siena, 53100 (Italy); Khanbekyan, A; Papoyan, A, E-mail: karen.khanbekyan@gmail.com [Institute for Physical Research, National Academy of Sciences, Ashtarak 2 (Armenia)

    2011-03-14

    We consider a dual {Lambda}-system under double laser excitation to investigate the possibility of indirect coherence transfer between atomic ground states through an excited state. The atomic system is excited by a frequency modulated pump laser and probed by a low-power cw laser. All the decoherence mechanisms are discussed and taken into account. Adjustment of parameters of the two radiations aimed at maximization of coherence transfer is addressed. The study can help to understand the phenomena as collisional transfer of coherence and can find application in the experimental realization of atomic sensors.

  18. Local control approach to ultrafast electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vindel-Zandbergen, Patricia [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Meier, Christoph [Laboratoire Colisions, Agrégats et Reactivité, UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Université Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Sola, Ignacio R., E-mail: isola@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Física, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-20

    We study ultrafast electron transfer between separated nuclei using local control theory. By imposing electron ionization and electron transport through the continuum, different local control formulations are used to increase the yield of retrapping the electron at the desired nuclei. The control mechanism is based on impulsive de-excitation. Both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear arrangements are analyzed, as well as the role of the nuclear motion.

  19. Advances in electron transfer chemistry, v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, PS

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that electron transfer chemisty is now one of the most active areas of chemical study. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry has been designed to allow scientists who are developing new knowledge in this rapidly expanding area to describe their most recent research findings. This volume will serve those interested in learning about current breakthroughs in this rapidly expanding area of chemical research.

  20. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H. Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., Bowling Green, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Center for Photochemical Sciences

    2017-11-28

    This project is focused on the use of single-molecule high spatial and temporal resolved techniques to study molecular dynamics in condensed phase and at interfaces, especially, the complex reaction dynamics associated with electron and energy transfer rate processes. The complexity and inhomogeneity of the interfacial ET dynamics often present a major challenge for a molecular level comprehension of the intrinsically complex systems, which calls for both higher spatial and temporal resolutions at ultimate single-molecule and single-particle sensitivities. Combined single-molecule spectroscopy and electrochemical atomic force microscopy approaches are unique for heterogeneous and complex interfacial electron transfer systems because the static and dynamic inhomogeneities can be identified and characterized by studying one molecule at a specific nanoscale surface site at a time. The goal of our project is to integrate and apply these spectroscopic imaging and topographic scanning techniques to measure the energy flow and electron flow between molecules and substrate surfaces as a function of surface site geometry and molecular structure. We have been primarily focusing on studying interfacial electron transfer under ambient condition and electrolyte solution involving both single crystal and colloidal TiO2 and related substrates. The resulting molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes will be important for developing efficient light harvesting systems and broadly applicable to problems in fundamental chemistry and physics. We have made significant advancement on deciphering the underlying mechanism of the complex and inhomogeneous interfacial electron transfer dynamics in dyesensitized TiO2 nanoparticle systems that strongly involves with and regulated by molecule-surface interactions. We have studied interfacial electron transfer on TiO2 nanoparticle surfaces by using ultrafast single

  1. Recent Developments in Electron Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-29

    Developments in ElectronTransfer Reactions by R.A. Marcus Prepared for Publication in Nouveau J. Chimie California Institute of Technology Noyes... coordination shell of the reactants. Comparison of the various predictions with the experimental data has been described in the review with Sutin.1 Electron

  2. Coherent dynamics of singlet fission controlled by nonlocal electron-phonon coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao

    2016-03-01

    Based on the Frenkel and charge transfer mixing model of singlet fission (SF), we incorporate both the local and nonlocal phonon baths into the Hamiltonian and adopt the algorithm of the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group to simulate the SF process in tetracene and pentacene. The endergonic SF is found to be facilitated by the robust quantum coherence, which concurrently gives rise to a notable quantum beating effect. Being controlled by the nonlocal electron-phonon coupling, the SF process is accelerated and the triplet yield manifests a nonlinear relationship with the singlet density.

  3. Respiratory electron transfer pathways in plant mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eSchertl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory electron transport chain (ETC couples electron transfer from organic substrates onto molecular oxygen with proton translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The resulting proton gradient is used by the ATP synthase complex for ATP formation. In plants, the ETC is especially intricate. Besides the classical oxidoreductase complexes (complex I to IV and the mobile electron transporters cytochrome c and ubiquinone, it comprises numerous alternative oxidoreductases. Furthermore, several dehydrogenases localized in the mitochondrial matrix and the mitochondrial intermembrane space directly or indirectly provide electrons for the ETC. Entry of electrons into the system occurs via numerous pathways which are dynamically regulated in response to the metabolic state of a plant cell as well as environmental factors. This mini review aims to summarize recent finding on respiratory electron transfer pathways in plants and on the involved components and supramolecular assemblies.

  4. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D.; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Christoper P.

    2018-01-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins. PMID:29464211

  5. Probing quantum coherence in single-atom electron spin resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, Philip; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian D; Yang, Kai; Bae, Yujeong; Choi, Taeyoung; Fernández-Rossier, Joaquin; Heinrich, Andreas J; Lutz, Christoper P

    2018-02-01

    Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T 2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T 2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins.

  6. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, Michael; Zang, Ling; Liu, Ruchuan; Adams, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  7. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2013-07-01

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies

  8. Nanosecond-timescale spin transfer using individual electrons in a quadruple-quantum-dot device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baart, T. A.; Jovanovic, N.; Vandersypen, L. M. K. [QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-07-25

    The ability to coherently transport electron-spin states between different sites of gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots is an essential ingredient for a quantum-dot-based quantum computer. Previous shuttles using electrostatic gating were too slow to move an electron within the spin dephasing time across an array. Here, we report a nanosecond-timescale spin transfer of individual electrons across a quadruple-quantum-dot device. Utilizing enhanced relaxation rates at a so-called hot spot, we can upper bound the shuttle time to at most 150 ns. While actual shuttle times are likely shorter, 150 ns is already fast enough to preserve spin coherence in, e.g., silicon based quantum dots. This work therefore realizes an important prerequisite for coherent spin transfer in quantum dot arrays.

  9. Legal Risk Associated with Electronic Funds Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulah, Samahir

    2014-01-01

    The past thirty years have seen rapid advances in the technological component of banking services and as a consequence new legal issues have come to the fore, especially with regard to Electronic Fund Transfers (EFTs) which are now used to transfer money around the world, and have made fund transactions between payers and payees easier, faster and more secure. The method involves risks for both banks and customers, due to the possibility of unauthorized payments risks, credit and insolvency p...

  10. Perfect transfer of coherent state-based qubits via coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Naghi; Rudsary, Sobhan Kazemi; Salmas, Bahram Ahansaz

    2013-11-01

    Motivated by the need for communication of coherent state-based qubits in quantum computers, we introduce a method for perfect transferring of an arbitrary superposition of coherent states between two distant nodes of a linear array of three semiconductor QDs. The QDs are trapped in a system of coupled cavities. In this method, the field mode of the cavities, as the resource of transferring of quantum states, are only virtually excited which minimises the effect of decoherence due to photon loss. Also, by a numerical evaluation, the effect of decoherence on the quality of state transfer processes in the system is directly investigated.

  11. Electromagnetically induced absorption due to transfer of coherence and to transfer of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2003-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a weak probe, interacting with a driven degenerate two-level atomic system, whose ground and excited hyperfine states are F g,e , can exhibit narrow peaks at line center. When the pump and probe polarizations are different, F e =F g +1 and F g >0, the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak has been shown to be due to the transfer of coherence (TOC) between the excited and ground states via spontaneous decay. We give a detailed explanation of why the TOC that leads to EIA (EIA-TOC) can only take place when ground-state population trapping does not occur, that is, when F e =F g +1. We also explain why EIA-TOC is observed in open systems. We show that EIA can also occur when the pump and probe polarizations are identical and F e =F g +1. This EIA is analogous to an effect that occurs in simple two-level systems when the collisional transfer of population (TOP) from the ground state to a reservoir is greater than that from the excited state. For a degenerate two-level system, the reservoir consists of the Zeeman sublevels of the ground hyperfine state, and of other nearby hyperfine states that do not interact with the pump. We will also discuss the four-wave mixing spectrum under the conditions where EIA-TOC and EIA-TOP occur

  12. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  13. Energy and electron transfers in photosensitive chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuizhu; Zeng, Fang; Zhu, Hongping; Tong, Zhen

    2005-02-23

    Novel photosensitive chitosan was synthesized. The modified chitosan contains photoactive anthracene chromophore moieties. Because of the presence of anthracene chromophores, the polymer absorbs light in the UV-vis spectral region. Electronically excited polymeric chromophores could participate in energy and electron transfer processes to the suitable acceptor molecules. The photosensitive chitosan developed herein could could act as an efficient photosensitizer and lead to the application of the environmentally friendly photocatalytic system for an efficient degradation of a wide range of pollutants.

  14. Closed loop coherent control of electronic transitions in gallium arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Sima; Hu, Zhan; Gordon, Robert J

    2011-06-16

    A genetic algorithm was used to control the photoluminesce-nce (PL) from GaAs(100). A spatial light modulator (SLM) used feedback from the emission to optimize the spectral phase profile of an ultrashort laser pulse. Most of the experiments were performed using a sine phase function to optimize the integrated PL spectrum over a specified wavelength range, with the amplitude and period of the phase function treated as genetic parameters. An order of magnitude increase in signal was achieved after only one generation, and an optimized waveform, consisting of three equally spaced pulses approximately 0.8 ps apart, was obtained after 15 generations. The effects of fluence, polarization, relative phase of the subpulses, and spectral range of the optimized PL were investigated. In addition, preliminary experiments were performed using the phases of individual pixels of the SLM as genetic variables. The PL spectrum is identified with recombination of electron-hole pairs in the L-valley of the Brillouin zone. Control is achieved by coherent manipulation of plasma electrons. It is proposed that hot electrons excite lattice phonons, which in turn scatter carriers into the L-valley. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Robust Multiple-Range Coherent Quantum State Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Peng, Yan-Dong; Li, Yong; Qian, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We propose a multiple-range quantum communication channel to realize coherent two-way quantum state transport with high fidelity. In our scheme, an information carrier (a qubit) and its remote partner are both adiabatically coupled to the same data bus, i.e., an N-site tight-binding chain that has a single defect at the center. At the weak interaction regime, our system is effectively equivalent to a three level system of which a coherent superposition of the two carrier states constitutes a dark state. The adiabatic coupling allows a well controllable information exchange timing via the dark state between the two carriers. Numerical results show that our scheme is robust and efficient under practically inevitable perturbative defects of the data bus as well as environmental dephasing noise. PMID:27364891

  16. Quantum effects in biological electron transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; Řezáč, Jan; Levy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 17 (2012), s. 5902-5918 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * tunnelling * decoherence * semi-classical molecular dynamics * density functional theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  17. A Study Looking the Electronic Funds Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codruta POENAR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the characteristics of the most important electronic funds transfer in the world, both interperson and interbank. We identified the following informations: location, type, owner, operator, number of transactions, transsactions value, clients, financial scheme and the message format.

  18. Electron transfer and bond breaking: Recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2006-05-01

    After a reminder of concerted/stepwise mechanistic dichotomy and other basic concepts and facts in the field, a series of recent advances is discussed. Particular emphasis is laid on the interactions between the fragments formed upon bond cleavage. These interactions may persist even in polar solvents and have important consequences on dissociative electron transfer kinetics and on the competition between concerted and stepwise pathways. Cleavage of ion radicals and its reverse reaction are examples of single electron transfer reactions concerted with bond cleavage and bond formation, respectively. The case of aromatic carbon-heteroatom bonds is particularly worth examination since symmetry restrictions impose circumventing a conical intersection. Reductive dehalogenases are involved in 'dehalorespiration' of anaerobic bacteria in which the role of dioxygen in aerobic organisms is played by major polychloride pollutants such as tetrachloroethylene. They offer an interesting illustration of how the coupling of electron transfer with bond breaking may be an important issue in natural processes. Applications of dissociative electron transfer concepts and models to mechanistic analysis in this class of enzymes will be discussed.

  19. Peculiarities in the spectrum of coherent emission from relativistic electrons crossing a thin aligned crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasonov, N.; Pokhil, G.; Zhukova, P.

    2005-01-01

    An emission from relativistic electrons crossing an aligned crystal is considered with account of coherent bremsstrahlung on atomic strings and transition radiation contributions. Some peculiarities in the low energy range of the emission spectrum caused by azimuthal scattering of emitting electrons on atomic strings and an interference between the transition radiation and coherent bremsstrahlung are predicted and analyzed theoretically

  20. Coherent Smith-Purcell radiation as a diagnostic for sub-picosecond electron bunch length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    We suggest a novel technique of measuring sub-picosecond electron bunch length base on coherent Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR) emitted when electrons pass close to the surface of a metal grating. With electron bunch lengths comparable to the grating period, we predict that coherent SPR will be emitted at large angles with respect to direction of beam propagation. As the bunch length shortens, the coherent SPR will be enhanced over the incoherent component that is normally observed at small angles. Furthermore, the angular distribution of the coherent SPR will be shifted toward smaller angles as the bunch length becomes much smaller than the grating period. By measuring the angular distribution of the coherent SPR, one can determine the bunch length of sub-picosecond electron pulses. This new technique is easy to implement and appears capable of measuring femtosecond electron bunch lengths

  1. A coherent modified Redfield theory for excitation energy transfer in molecular aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang-Fu, Yu-Hsien; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Chung, E-mail: yuanchung@ntu.edu.tw

    2015-02-02

    Highlights: • A CMRT method for coherent energy transfer in molecular aggregates was developed. • Applicability of the method was verified in two-site systems with various parameters. • CMRT accurately describes population dynamics in the FMO-complex. • The method is accurate in a large parameter space and computationally efficient. - Abstract: Excitation energy transfer (EET) is crucial in photosynthetic light harvesting, and quantum coherence has been recently proven to be a ubiquitous phenomenon in photosynthetic EET. In this work, we derive a coherent modified Redfield theory (CMRT) that generalizes the modified Redfield theory to treat coherence dynamics. We apply the CMRT method to simulate the EET in a dimer system and compare the results with those obtained from numerically exact path integral calculations. The comparison shows that CMRT provides excellent computational efficiency and accuracy within a large EET parameter space. Furthermore, we simulate the EET dynamics in the FMO complex at 77 K using CMRT. The results show pronounced non-Markovian effects and long-lasting coherences in the ultrafast EET, in excellent agreement with calculations using the hierarchy equation of motion approach. In summary, we have successfully developed a simple yet powerful framework for coherent EET dynamics in photosynthetic systems and organic materials.

  2. Electron Transfer and Reaction Mechanism of Laccases

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Stephen M.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (T...

  3. Coherence Evolution and Transfer Supplemented by Sender's Initial-State Restoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fel'dman, E. B.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of quantum coherences comes with a set of conservation laws provided that the Hamiltonian governing this evolution conserves the spin-excitation number. At that, coherences do not intertwist during the evolution. Using the transmission line and the receiver in the initial ground state we can transfer the coherences to the receiver without interaction between them, although the matrix elements contributing to each particular coherence intertwist in the receiver's state. Therefore we propose a tool based on the unitary transformation at the receiver side to untwist these elements and thus restore (at least partially) the structure of the sender's initial density matrix. A communication line with two-qubit sender and receiver is considered as an example of implementation of this technique.

  4. Role of Electronic-Vibrational Mixing in Enhancing Vibrational Coherences in the Ground Electronic States of Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ian Seungwan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Bioscience Division; Dong, Hui [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Bioscience Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Bioscience Division

    2014-01-24

    Described is the polarization controlled two-color coherence photon echo studies of the reaction center complex from a purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Long-lived oscillatory signals that persist up to 2 ps are observed in neutral, oxidized, and mutant (lacking the special pair) reaction centers, for both (0,0,0,0) and (45,-45,90,0) polarization sequences. We show that the long-lived signals arise via vibronic coupling of the bacteriopheophytin (H) and accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B) pigments that leads to vibrational wavepackets in the B ground electronic state. Fourier analysis of the data suggests that the 685 cm-1 mode of B may play a key role in the H to B energy transfer.

  5. Transfer coating by electron initiated polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nablo, Sam V.

    The high speed and depth of cure possible with electron initiated monomer/oligomer coating systems provide many new opportunities for approaches to product finishing. Moreover, the use of transfer or cast coating using films or metallic surfaces offers the ability to precisely control the surface topology of liquid film surfaces during polymerization. Transfer coating such as with textiles has been a commercial process for many years and the synergistic addition of EB technology permits the manufacture of unusual new products. One of these, the casting paper used in the manufacture of vinyl and urethane fabrics, is the first EB application to use a drum surface for pattern replication in the coating. In this case the coated paper is cured against, and then released from, an engraved drum surface. Recent developments in the use of plastic films for transfer have been applied to the manufacture of transfer metallized and coated paper and paperboard products for packaging. Details of these and related processes will be presented as well as a discussion of the typical product areas (e.g. photographic papers, release papers, magnetic media) using this high speed transfer technology.

  6. Electron transfer and reaction mechanism of laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-03-01

    Laccases are part of the family of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), which couple the oxidation of substrates to the four electron reduction of O2 to H2O. MCOs contain a minimum of four Cu's divided into Type 1 (T1), Type 2 (T2), and binuclear Type 3 (T3) Cu sites that are distinguished based on unique spectroscopic features. Substrate oxidation occurs near the T1, and electrons are transferred approximately 13 Å through the protein via the Cys-His pathway to the T2/T3 trinuclear copper cluster (TNC), where dioxygen reduction occurs. This review outlines the electron transfer (ET) process in laccases, and the mechanism of O2 reduction as elucidated through spectroscopic, kinetic, and computational data. Marcus theory is used to describe the relevant factors which impact ET rates including the driving force, reorganization energy, and electronic coupling matrix element. Then, the mechanism of O2 reaction is detailed with particular focus on the intermediates formed during the two 2e(-) reduction steps. The first 2e(-) step forms the peroxide intermediate, followed by the second 2e(-) step to form the native intermediate, which has been shown to be the catalytically relevant fully oxidized form of the enzyme.

  7. Promoting Interspecies Electron Transfer with Biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Liu, Fanghua; Fan, Wei; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why biochar may enhance methane production from organic wastes under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24846283

  8. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla

    2014-01-01

    Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...... attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why...

  9. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 121; Issue 2. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed addenda heteropolytungstovanadophosphates with NADH ... Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH); heteropoly-tungstovanadophosphate; outer sphere electron transfer reactions.

  10. Education and solar conversion. Demonstrating electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smestad, Greg P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, ICP-2, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-07-23

    A simplified solar cell fabrication procedure is presented that uses natural anthocyanin or chlorophyll dyes extracted from plants. This procedure illustrates how interdisciplinary science can be taught at lower division university and upper division high school levels for an understanding of renewable energy as well as basic science concepts. Electron transfer occurs on the Earth in the mitochondrial membranes found in living cells, and in the thylakoid membranes found in the photosynthetic cells of green plants. Since we depend on the results of this electron and energy transfer, e.g. in our use of petroleum and agricultural products, it is desirable to understand and communicate how the electron transfer works. The simplified solar cell fabrication procedure, based on nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells, has therefore been developed so that it can be inexpensively reproduced and utilized in the teaching of basic principles in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. A water-based solution of commercial nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) powder is used to deposit a highly porous semiconductor electron acceptor. This acceptor couples the light-driven processes occurring at an organic dye to the macroscopic world and an external electrical circuit. Materials science and semiconductor physics are emphasized during the deposition of the sintered TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline ceramic film. Chelation, complexation and molecular self-assembly are demonstrated during the attachment of the dye molecule to the surface of the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor particles. Environmental chemistry and energy conversion can be linked to these concepts via the regenerative oxidation and reduction cycle found in the cell. The resulting device, made in under 3 h, can be used as a light detector or power generator that produces 0.4-0.5 V at open circuit, and 1-2 mA per square cm under solar illumination

  11. Fast photoinduced electron transfer through DNA intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C J; Arkin, M R; Ghatlia, N D; Bossmann, S; Turro, N J; Barton, J K

    1994-01-01

    We report evidence for fast photoinduced electron transfer mediated by the DNA helix that requires metal complexes that are avid intercalators of DNA. Here the donor bis(phenanthroline)(dipyridophenazine)ruthenium(II) [Ru(phen)2dppz2+] and acceptor bis(9,10-phenanthrenequinone diimine)(phenanthroline)rhodium(III) [Rh(phi)2phen3+] intercalate into DNA with Kb > 10(6) M-1. Luminescence quenching experiments in the presence of two different lengths of DNA yield upward-curving Stern-Volmer plots and the loss of luminescence intensity far exceeds the change in emission lifetimes. In the presence of a nonintercalative electron acceptor, Ru(NH3)3+(6), Ru(phen)2dppz2+ luminescence is quenched much less efficiently compared to that found for the intercalative Rh(phi)2phen3+ quencher and follows linear Stern-Volmer kinetics; steady-state and time-resolved Stern-Volmer plots are comparable in scale. These experiments are consistent with a model involving fast long-range electron transfer between intercalators through the DNA helix. Images PMID:8202486

  12. Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Wilson [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-02-03

    Interfacial electron transfer (ET) plays an important role in many chemical and biological processes. Specifically, interfacial ET in TiO2-based systems is important to solar energy technology, catalysis, and environmental remediation technology. However, the microscopic mechanism of interfacial ET is not well understood with regard to atomic surface structure, molecular structure, bonding, orientation, and motion. In this project, we used two complementary methodologies; single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning-tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) to address this scientific need. The goal of this project was to integrate these techniques and measure the molecular dependence of ET between adsorbed molecules and TiO2 semiconductor surfaces and the ET induced reactions such as the splitting of water. The scanning probe techniques, STM and STS, are capable of providing the highest spatial resolution but not easily time-resolved data. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is capable of good time resolution but requires further development to match the spatial resolution of the STM. The integrated approach involving Peter Lu at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) and Wilson Ho at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine) produced methods for time and spatially resolved chemical imaging of interfacial electron transfer dynamics and photocatalytic reactions. An integral aspect of the joint research was a significant exchange of graduate students to work at the two institutions. This project bridged complementary approaches to investigate a set of common problems by working with the same molecules on a variety of solid surfaces, but using appropriate techniques to probe under ambient (BGSU) and ultrahigh vacuum (UCI) conditions. The molecular level understanding of the fundamental interfacial electron transfer processes obtained in this joint project will be important for developing efficient light harvesting

  13. Influence of weak vibrational-electronic couplings on 2D electronic spectra and inter-site coherence in weakly coupled photosynthetic complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, Daniele M.; Whaley-Mayda, Lukas; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ishizaki, Akihito [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Coherence oscillations measured in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of pigment-protein complexes may have electronic, vibrational, or mixed-character vibronic origins, which depend on the degree of electronic-vibrational mixing. Oscillations from intrapigment vibrations can obscure the inter-site coherence lifetime of interest in elucidating the mechanisms of energy transfer in photosynthetic light-harvesting. Huang-Rhys factors (S) for low-frequency vibrations in Chlorophyll and Bacteriochlorophyll are quite small (S ≤ 0.05), so it is often assumed that these vibrations influence neither 2D spectra nor inter-site coherence dynamics. In this work, we explore the influence of S within this range on the oscillatory signatures in simulated 2D spectra of a pigment heterodimer. To visualize the inter-site coherence dynamics underlying the 2D spectra, we introduce a formalism which we call the “site-probe response.” By comparing the calculated 2D spectra with the site-probe response, we show that an on-resonance vibration with Huang-Rhys factor as small as S = 0.005 and the most strongly coupled off-resonance vibrations (S = 0.05) give rise to long-lived, purely vibrational coherences at 77 K. We moreover calculate the correlation between optical pump interactions and subsequent entanglement between sites, as measured by the concurrence. At 77 K, greater long-lived inter-site coherence and entanglement appear with increasing S. This dependence all but vanishes at physiological temperature, as environmentally induced fluctuations destroy the vibronic mixing.

  14. Parallel simulations of partially coherent wavefront propagation from a finite emittance electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundy, D.; Sutter, J. P.; Wagner, U. H.; Rau, C.; Thomas, C. A.; Sawhney, K. J. S.; Chubar, O.

    2013-03-01

    Hard X-ray undulator radiation at 3rd generation storage rings falls between the geometrical and the fully coherent limit. This is a result of the small but finite emittance of the electron beam source and means that the radiation cannot be completely modelled by incoherent ray tracing or by fully coherent wave propagation. We have developed using the wavefront propagation code Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) running in a Python environment, a parallel computer program using the Monte Carlo method for modelling the partially coherent emission from electron beam sources taking into account the finite emittance of the source. Using a parallel computing cluster with in excess of 500 cores and each core calculating the wavefront from in excess of a 1000 electrons, a source containing millions of electrons could be simulated. We have applied this method to the Diamond X-ray Imaging and Coherence beamline (113).

  15. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  16. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freguia, Stefano; Tsujimura, Seiya; Kano, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O 2 reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 μM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O 2 reduction to H 2 O 2 with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  17. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron

  18. Coherence in electron-impact excitation of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batelaan, Hermanus.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis describes an experimental study into the electron-impact excitation to the 3 3 P, 3 1 D and 3 3 D states of Helium. The scattered electron and the photon, emitted by the excited atom, are measured in coincidence. The parameters, which can be varied, are the scattering angle and the kinetic energy of the projectile. Two parameters, which are used to characterize the excited state, are the angular momentum transferred to the atom, L perpendicular, and the alignment angle γ. It is shown that results of measurements on 3 1 D excitation with photon detection perpendicular to the scattering plane do not agree in the small scattering angle region with any of the model calculations currently available. Remarkable is the sign of L perpendicular, which appears to start of negatively at 60 eV. It is shown that for 3 3 P excitation the predicted large value of γ is indeed found experimentally. This supports the suggestion that exchange scattering is underestimated in model calculations for 1 P excitation. Another result is that for 1 P and 3 P excitation the behaviour of L perpendicular as a function of the scattering angle can be related at different impact energies with the help of a partial wave expansion. A scaling relation can be formulated for the behaviour of L perpendicular. The influence of a negative ion resonance to excitation of the 3 3 D state is investigated. Both in coincidence and non-coincidence measurements the presence of the resonance yields information on both the direct and indirect excitation of the 3 3 D state. It is shown that the coincident measurement gives an unique opportunity to determine the excited 3 3 D state completely. Results of measurements with photon detection in the scattering plane are given. They supplement previous 3 1 D and 3 3 D results and allow physical parameters, such as L perpendicular and γ, to be obtained. (H.W.). 132 refs.; 20 figs.; 18 tabs

  19. Selective Transfer of Superposition of Coherent States by Exploiting a Cavity QED System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, N.; Rudsary, S. Kazemi

    2015-05-01

    We propose a scheme on the basis of a N + 2 identical single-mode coupled-cavity QED system for selective transfer of a qubit constructed from superposition of standard coherent states. The cavities arranged in such way that the intermediate or channel cavity is connected uniformly to the sender and N receiver cavities. We consider N different ternary sets of identical QDs whose QDs have been distributed in the sender, channel and one of the receiver cavities respectively. We demonstrate a situation in which the dynamics of the system is confined selectively in a sub sector belongs to one of the ternary set of QDs. This selective dynamics is able to transfer the coherent state-constructed qubit (CSCQ) from the sender party to the desired receiver one reliably. Also, we illustrate that the scheme is optimally robust due to dissipations arises from photon losses in the cavities.

  20. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunnik, J.N.M. van.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  1. Coherent Structures and Spectral Energy Transfer in Turbulent Plasma: A Space-Filter Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Califano, F.; Retinò, A.

    2018-03-01

    Plasma turbulence at scales of the order of the ion inertial length is mediated by several mechanisms, including linear wave damping, magnetic reconnection, the formation and dissipation of thin current sheets, and stochastic heating. It is now understood that the presence of localized coherent structures enhances the dissipation channels and the kinetic features of the plasma. However, no formal way of quantifying the relationship between scale-to-scale energy transfer and the presence of spatial structures has been presented so far. In the Letter we quantify such a relationship analyzing the results of a two-dimensional high-resolution Hall magnetohydrodynamic simulation. In particular, we employ the technique of space filtering to derive a spectral energy flux term which defines, in any point of the computational domain, the signed flux of spectral energy across a given wave number. The characterization of coherent structures is performed by means of a traditional two-dimensional wavelet transformation. By studying the correlation between the spectral energy flux and the wavelet amplitude, we demonstrate the strong relationship between scale-to-scale transfer and coherent structures. Furthermore, by conditioning one quantity with respect to the other, we are able for the first time to quantify the inhomogeneity of the turbulence cascade induced by topological structures in the magnetic field. Taking into account the low space-filling factor of coherent structures (i.e., they cover a small portion of space), it emerges that 80% of the spectral energy transfer (both in the direct and inverse cascade directions) is localized in about 50% of space, and 50% of the energy transfer is localized in only 25% of space.

  2. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology -. The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. One of the most important chemical reactions is electron transfer from one atomic/molecular unit to another. This reaction, accompanied by proton and hydrogen atom transfers, occurs in a cascade in many biological processes,.

  3. Coherent electron emission from H2 and Young type interference in swift ion and electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, D.; Chatterjee, S.; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai (India)

    2009-07-01

    The coherent electron emission from the inversion-symmetric homonuclear diatomic molecule H{sub 2}, carry the signature of the Young type electron interference. In a new approach we have shown that instead of taking H{sub 2}-to-2H DDCS ratios one can use the forward backward asymmetry in electron emission to obtain the oscillation due to interference. Bare fast C and F available from Pelletron accelerator at TIFR and 8 keV electron beam was used for these experiments. The frequency in 160 {sup circle} was found to be a factor of two higher w.r.t. 20 {sup circle}. The difference in the oscillation frequency for the forward and backward angles causes the oscillation in the asymmetry parameter. A model calculation based on Cohen-Fano model joined together with the frequency difference in forward-backward angles, fits the spectrum well. Since this study does not need any atomic target, can be applied for other diatomic molecular targets: a step forward towards the study of Young type interference in ionizations of molecule. Besides first order interference our data provides a strong support for the evidence of a double frequency component in interference oscillations.

  4. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  5. Bacterial Electron Transfer Chains Primed by Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, H J C T; de Almeida, N M; Kartal, B; Keltjens, J T

    2016-01-01

    Electron transport phosphorylation is the central mechanism for most prokaryotic species to harvest energy released in the respiration of their substrates as ATP. Microorganisms have evolved incredible variations on this principle, most of these we perhaps do not know, considering that only a fraction of the microbial richness is known. Besides these variations, microbial species may show substantial versatility in using respiratory systems. In connection herewith, regulatory mechanisms control the expression of these respiratory enzyme systems and their assembly at the translational and posttranslational levels, to optimally accommodate changes in the supply of their energy substrates. Here, we present an overview of methods and techniques from the field of proteomics to explore bacterial electron transfer chains and their regulation at levels ranging from the whole organism down to the Ångstrom scales of protein structures. From the survey of the literature on this subject, it is concluded that proteomics, indeed, has substantially contributed to our comprehending of bacterial respiratory mechanisms, often in elegant combinations with genetic and biochemical approaches. However, we also note that advanced proteomics offers a wealth of opportunities, which have not been exploited at all, or at best underexploited in hypothesis-driving and hypothesis-driven research on bacterial bioenergetics. Examples obtained from the related area of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation research, where the application of advanced proteomics is more common, may illustrate these opportunities. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantum coherence effects in electromagnetic radiation in the case of interaction with electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazazian, A. D.; Sherman, B. G.

    1989-07-01

    A study is made of electron dynamics in a monochromatic quantum field whose state is represented in different forms. Wave functions of the system are obtained, and it is shown that electron motion in a linearly polarized coherent quantum field leads to the formation of the compressed photon state. The coherent state is formed in the case of the circular polarization of the external field. The compressed photon state is also formed in the case of electron interaction with individual linearly polarized vacuum modes in a finite volume. Formulas are obtained for the classical field emission and Compton effect.

  7. Superconductivity driven by pairing of the coherent parts of the physical electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuehua; Zhang, Chao

    2018-03-01

    How the superconductivity in unconventional superconductors emerges from the diverse mother normal states is still a big puzzle. Whatever the mother normal states are the superconductivity is normal with BCS-like behaviours of the paired quasiparticles in condensation. To reconcile the diverse mother normal states and the normal superconductivity in unconventional superconductors, we revisit a proposal that the emergence of the low-energy coherent parts of the physical electrons, which survive from the interaction correlations, is an essential prerequisite for superconductivity. The superconductivity is driven by the pair condensation of these coherent parts of the physical electrons. Moreover the incoherent parts of the physical electrons can enhance the superconducting transition temperature Tc although they are not in driving role in the emergence of the superconductivity. Some experimental responses of the coherent parts of the physical electrons are predicted.

  8. Coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, microbunched for the FEL power outcoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulipanov, G.N.; Sokolov, A.S.; Vinokurov, N.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The spectral intensity of the coherent undulator radiation of electron beam, preliminarily microbunched by the FEL oscillator for the FEL power outcoupling, is approximately calculated by simple analytic considerations, taking into account the transverse emittances and the energy spread of the microbunched electron beams.

  9. Observation of coherent undulator radiation from sub-picosecond electron pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocek, D.; Hernandez, M.; Kung, P.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Settakorn, C.; Wiedemann, H.

    1995-09-01

    The generation and observation of high power, coherent, far-infrared undulator radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches at the SUNSHINE facility is reported. Coherent undulator radiation tunable from 50 to 200 microns wavelength is demonstrated. Measurements of the energy (up to 1.7 mJ per 1 microsecs macropulse), frequency spectrum, and spatial distribution of the radiation are reported. Apparent exponential growth of the radiated energy as a function of undulator length is observed.

  10. Coherent transition radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator as an electron bunch diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilborg, J. van; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Martin, M.C.; Hao, Z.; Leemans, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    The observation and modeling of coherent transition radiation from femtosecond laser accelerated electron bunches is discussed. The coherent transition radiation, scaling quadratically with bunch charge, is generated as the electrons transit the plasma-vacuum boundary. Due to the limited transverse radius of the plasma boundary, diffraction effects will strongly modify the angular distribution and the total energy radiated is reduced compared to an infinite transverse boundary. The multi-nC electron bunches, concentrated in a length of a few plasma periods (several tens of microns), experience partial charge neutralization while propagating inside the plasma towards the boundary. This reduces the space-charge blowout of the beam, allowing for coherent radiation at relatively high frequencies (several THz). The charge distribution of the electron bunch at the plasma-vacuum boundary can be derived from Fourier analysis of the coherent part of the transition radiation spectrum. A Michelson interferometer was used to measure the coherent spectrum, and electron bunches with duration on the order of 50 fs (rms) were observed

  11. Analysis of nonstationarity in renal autoregulation mechanisms using time-varying transfer and coherence functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chon, Ki H; Zhong, Yuru; Moore, Leon C

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which renal blood flow dynamics vary in time and whether such variation contributes substantively to dynamic complexity have emerged as important questions. Data from Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were analyzed by time-varying transfer functions...... (TVTF) and time-varying coherence functions (TVCF). Both TVTF and TVCF allow quantification of nonstationarity in the frequency ranges associated with the autoregulatory mechanisms. TVTF analysis shows that autoregulatory gain in SDR and SHR varies in time and that SHR exhibit significantly more...... nonstationarity than SDR. TVTF gain in the frequency range associated with the myogenic mechanism was significantly higher in SDR than in SHR, but no statistical difference was found with tubuloglomerular (TGF) gain. Furthermore, TVCF analysis revealed that the coherence in both strains is significantly...

  12. Retrieving of the complex degree of spatial coherence of electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrasquilla-Alvarez, J.; Castaneda, R.; Garcia-Sucerquia, J.; Schofield, M.; Blegiia, M.; Matteucci, G.

    2005-10-01

    We discuss the applicability of a recently developed method for two-dimensionally retrieving the complex degree of spatial coherence of laser beams, in both amplitude and phase, to the case of the electron beam provided by the source of an electron microscope. Obtaining an electron beam with the highest possible coherence is critical for successful holography experiments. Therefore, the accurate measurement of the complex degree of spatial coherence is highly desirable. The method consists of the following three steps: recording of the beam spot, determining its centered-reduced moments and inserting them as coefficients of a series. This procedure is simple, fast and of higher performance than conventional procedures such Fourier analysis or Young interferometry. Experimental results are presented. (author)

  13. Coherent control of single electrons: a review of current progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Christopher; Christian Glattli, D; Meunier, Tristan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Roulleau, Preden; Takada, Shintaro; Waintal, Xavier

    2018-01-22

    In this report we review the present state of the art of the control of propagating quantum states at the single-electron level and its potential application to quantum information processing. We give an overview of the different approaches that have been developed over the last few years in order to gain full control over a propagating single-electron in a solid-state system. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts, we present experiments on flying qubit circuits for ensemble of electrons measured in the low frequency (DC) limit. We then present the basic ingredients necessary to realise such experiments at the single-electron level. This includes a review of the various single-electron sources that have been developed over the last years and which are compatible with integrated single-electron circuits. This is followed by a review of recent key experiments on electron quantum optics with single electrons. Finally we will present recent developments in the new physics that has emerged using ultrashort voltage pulses. We conclude our review with an outlook and future challenges in the field.

  14. Coherent control of single electrons: a review of current progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuerle, Christopher; Glattli, D. Christian; Meunier, Tristan; Portier, Fabien; Roche, Patrice; Roulleau, Preden; Takada, Shintaro; Waintal, Xavier

    2018-05-01

    In this report we review the present state of the art of the control of propagating quantum states at the single-electron level and its potential application to quantum information processing. We give an overview of the different approaches that have been developed over the last few years in order to gain full control over a propagating single-electron in a solid-state system. After a brief introduction of the basic concepts, we present experiments on flying qubit circuits for ensemble of electrons measured in the low frequency (DC) limit. We then present the basic ingredients necessary to realise such experiments at the single-electron level. This includes a review of the various single-electron sources that have been developed over the last years and which are compatible with integrated single-electron circuits. This is followed by a review of recent key experiments on electron quantum optics with single electrons. Finally we will present recent developments in the new physics that has emerged using ultrashort voltage pulses. We conclude our review with an outlook and future challenges in the field.

  15. Coherence Properties of Individual Femtosecond Pulses of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; /DESY /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Singer, A.; Mancuso, A.P.; Yefanov, O.M.; /DESY; Sakdinawat, A.; Liu, Y.; Bang, E.; /UC, Berkeley; Williams, G.J.; /SLAC; Cadenazzi, G.; Abbey, B.; /Melbourne U.; Sinn, H.; /European XFEL, Hamburg; Attwood, D.; /UC, Berkeley; Nugent, K.A.; /Melbourne U.; Weckert, E.; /DESY; Wang, T.; Zhu, D.; Wu, B.; Graves, C.; Scherz, A.; Turner, J.J.; Schlotter, W.F.; /SLAC /LERMA, Ivry /Zurich, ETH /LBL, Berkeley /ANL, APS /Argonne /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore /Latrobe U. /SLAC /SLAC /European XFEL, Hamburg /SLAC /Hamburg U.

    2012-06-06

    Measurements of the spatial and temporal coherence of single, femtosecond x-ray pulses generated by the first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, are presented. Single-shot measurements were performed at 780 eV x-ray photon energy using apertures containing double pinholes in 'diffract-and-destroy' mode. We determined a coherence length of 17 {micro}m in the vertical direction, which is approximately the size of the focused Linac Coherent Light Source beam in the same direction. The analysis of the diffraction patterns produced by the pinholes with the largest separation yields an estimate of the temporal coherence time of 0.55 fs. We find that the total degree of transverse coherence is 56% and that the x-ray pulses are adequately described by two transverse coherent modes in each direction. This leads us to the conclusion that 78% of the total power is contained in the dominant mode.

  16. Storage of Multiple Coherent Microwave Excitations in an Electron Spin Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hua; George, Richard E.; Wesenberg, Janus H.

    2010-01-01

    Strong coupling between a microwave photon and electron spins, which could enable a long-lived quantum memory element for superconducting qubits, is possible using a large ensemble of spins. This represents an inefficient use of resources unless multiple photons, or qubits, can be orthogonally...... stored and retrieved. Here we employ holographic techniques to realize a coherent memory using a pulsed magnetic field gradient and demonstrate the storage and retrieval of up to 100 weak 10 GHz coherent excitations in collective states of an electron spin ensemble. We further show that such collective...

  17. Undulator physics and coherent harmonic generation at the MAX-lab electron storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werin, Sverker.

    1991-01-01

    This work presents the undulator and harmonic generation project at the electron storage ring MAX-lab at University of Lund. The theory of undulator radiation, laser coherent harmonic generation, optical klystron amplifiers and FELs is treated in one uniform way, with complete solutions of the necessary equations. The permanent magnet undulator is described in some detail, along with the installation of the undulator in the storage ring. Details regarding the emitted radiation, the electron beam path in the undulator and other results are analysed. Finally harmonic generation using a Nd:YAG laser and the creation of coherent photons at the third harmonic (355 nm) is described. (author)

  18. 75 FR 75897 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of... Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). In response to the decision of the Financial Management Service to... INFORMATION: Background This document contains final regulations amending the Income Tax Regulations (26 CFR...

  19. 75 FR 51707 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ..., 40, and 301 [REG-153340-09] RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes AGENCY... Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The proposed regulations affect all taxpayers that currently use FTD coupons...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background This document contains proposed amendments to the Income Tax Regulations...

  20. THE ELECTRONIC COURSE OF HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander P. Solodov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electronic course of heat and mass transfer in power engineering is presented containing the full Electronic book as the structured hypertext document, the full set of Mathcad-documents with the whole set of educative computer models of heat and mass transfer, the computer labs, and selected educational presentations. 

  1. 76 FR 709 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 301 [TD 9507] RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS...) providing guidance relating to Federal tax deposits (FTDs) by Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The temporary...

  2. 76 FR 708 - Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 1, 31, 40, and 301 [TD 9507] RIN 1545-BJ13 Electronic Funds Transfer of Depository Taxes; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). The temporary and final regulations provide rules under which depositors...

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer between the dendritic zinc phthalocyanines and anthraquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuizhi; Wen, Junri; Liu, Jiangsheng; Chen, Zhenzhen; Pan, Sujuan; Huang, Zheng; Peng, Yiru

    2015-03-01

    The intermolecular electron transfer between the novel dendritic zinc (II) phthalocyanines (G1-DPcB and G2-DPcB) and anthraquinone (AQ) was studied by steady-state fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopic methods. The effect of dendron generation on intermolecular electron transfer was investigated. The results showed that the fluorescence emission of these dendritic phthalocyanines could be greatly quenched by AQ upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern- Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer was decreased with increasing the dendron generations. Our study suggested that these novel dendritic phthalocyanines were effective new electron donors and transmission complexes and could be used as a potential artifical photosysthesis system.

  4. Transition radiation and coherent electron-photon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, M.J.

    1985-04-01

    Relativistic electron irradiation of thin solid targets is known to generate collimated beams of x-ray photons in the forward direction by a number of different processes. A variety of mechanisms are discussed that share common characteristics in the angular and spectral distributions of the generated photon beams. Some simple physical explanations are offered for the characteristics shared by these processes. Some examples are then given based on experimental results attained at the LLNL electron-positron accelerator

  5. The distance and temperature dependence of electron-transfer rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.

    1987-01-01

    Electron transfer occurs over relatively long distances in a variety of systems. In interpreting the measured electron-transfer rates it is usually assumed that the rate constants depend exponentially on the distance separating the two redox sites and that this distance dependence arises from the decrease in the electronic coupling of the redox sites with increasing separation. Although the electronic coupling is an important factor determining the distance dependence of the rate, theoretical considerations suggest that the nuclear factors are also important. The various factors determining long-range electron-transfer rates are discussed and it is shown that very different distance dependences are predicted for reactions in the normal and inverted free-energy regions. The effect of the enthalpy change on the electron-transfer rate is also considered; three enthalpy regions are identified depending on the overall free energy and entropy changes for the reaction

  6. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Christopher T., E-mail: c.t.haynes@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Camporeale, Enrico [Multiscale Dynamics, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  7. Nanoscale structuring of tungsten tip yields most coherent electron point-source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutus, Josh Y; Livadaru, Lucian; Urban, Radovan; Pitters, Jason; Peter Legg, A; Salomons, Mark H; Cloutier, Martin; Wolkow, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    This report demonstrates the most spatially-coherent electron source ever reported. A coherence angle of 14.3 ± 0.5° was measured, indicating a virtual source size of 1.7 ± 0.6 Å using an extraction voltage of 89.5 V. The nanotips under study were crafted using a spatially-confined, field-assisted nitrogen etch which removes material from the periphery of the tip apex resulting in a sharp, tungsten–nitride stabilized, high-aspect ratio source. The coherence properties are deduced from holographic measurements in a low-energy electron point source microscope with a carbon nanotube bundle as sample. Using the virtual source size and emission current the brightness normalized to 100 kV is found to be 7.9 × 10 8 A sr −1 cm 2 . (paper)

  8. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  9. J-refocused coherence transfer spectroscopic imaging at 7 T in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J W; Avdievich, N; Hetherington, H P

    2010-11-01

    Short echo spectroscopy is commonly used to minimize signal modulation due to J-evolution of the cerebral amino acids. However, short echo acquisitions suffer from high sensitivity to macromolecules which make accurate baseline determination difficult. In this report, we describe implementation at 7 T of a double echo J-refocused coherence transfer sequence at echo time (TE) of 34 msec to minimize J-modulation of amino acids while also decreasing interfering macromolecule signals. Simulation of the pulse sequence at 7 T shows excellent resolution of glutamate, glutamine, and N-acetyl aspartate. B(1) sufficiency at 7 T for the double echo acquisition is achieved using a transceiver array with radiofrequency (RF) shimming. Using an alternate RF distribution to minimize receiver phase cancellation in the transceiver, accurate phase determination for the coherence transfer is achieved with rapid single scan calibration. This method is demonstrated in spectroscopic imaging mode with n = 5 healthy volunteers resulting in metabolite values consistent with literature and in a patient with epilepsy. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Strong-field control landscapes of coherent electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Tim; Wollenhaupt, Matthias; Baumert, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    We report on physical mechanisms behind resonant strong-field coherent control. To this end, we study multi-photon ionization of potassium atoms using intense shaped femtosecond laser pulses. The measured photoelectron spectra are discussed in terms of selective population of dressed states (SPODS). A physically motivated pulse parameterization is introduced which opens up two-dimensional parameter spaces comprising pulse sequences as well as chirped pulses. The control topologies of these subspaces are mapped out experimentally and are presented in the form of strong-field control landscapes (SFCLs). In the SFCLs, complementary realizations of SPODS via photon locking and rapid adiabatic passage are observed. Moreover, the combined effect, termed Multi-RAP, arises when both mechanisms are at play simultaneously. In order to better understand the performance of adaptive optimization procedures, we experimentally study their capability to find optimal solutions on a given parameter space. The evolution of different optimization procedures is visualized by means of control trajectories on the surface of the measured SFCL.

  11. Bunch length diagnostics with coherent relativistic electron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ayzatsky, M I; Kushnir, V A; Mitrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important problems when designing resonance electron linacs with a high beam brightness is creation of an equipment for electron bunch length diagnostics. One of ways to solve this problem is based on analysis of radiation from relativistic electrons (transition,synchrotron etc.). The paper presents results of calculations and experiments on studying the millimeter-band radiation that is a beam exited on the surface of the grating periodic structure and in a linac beam pipe. Experiments were carried out on the linac LIC with 13 MeV particle energy and 0.8 A pulse beam current. The possibility of observed radiation application for estimation of the bunch length value, monitoring its variation and for optimization of the accelerator operating mode was shown experimentally.

  12. K-shell Analysis Reveals Distinct Functional Parts in an Electron Transfer Network and Its Implications for Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dewu; Li, Ling; Shu, Chuanjun; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) and hence has attracted considerable attention. The EET pathways mainly consist of c-type cytochromes, along with some other proteins involved in electron transfer processes. By whole genome study and protein interactions inquisition, we constructed a large-scale electron transfer network containing 2276 interactions among 454 electron transfer related proteins in S. oneidensis MR-1. Using the k-shell decomposition method, we identified and analyzed distinct parts of the electron transfer network. We found that there was a negative correlation between the k s (k-shell values) and the average DR_100 (disordered regions per 100 amino acids) in every shell, which suggested that disordered regions of proteins played an important role during the formation and extension of the electron transfer network. Furthermore, proteins in the top three shells of the network are mainly located in the cytoplasm and inner membrane; these proteins can be responsible for transfer of electrons into the quinone pool in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In most of the other shells, proteins are broadly located throughout the five cellular compartments (cytoplasm, inner membrane, periplasm, outer membrane, and extracellular), which ensures the important EET ability of S. oneidensis MR-1. Specifically, the fourth shell was responsible for EET and the c-type cytochromes in the remaining shells of the electron transfer network were involved in aiding EET. Taken together, these results show that there are distinct functional parts in the electron transfer network of S. oneidensis MR-1, and the EET processes could achieve high efficiency through cooperation through such an electron transfer network.

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll-athrough the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- ...

  14. Dissociative electron attachment and charge transfer in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments using energy-selected beams of electrons incident from vacuum upon thin vapour deposited solids show that, as in the gas-phase, scattering cross sections at low energies are dominated by the formation of temporary negative ions (or resonances) and that molecular damage may be effected via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). Recent results also show that charge transfer between anionic states of target molecules and their environment is often crucial in determining cross sections for electron driven processes. Here, we review recent work from our laboratory, in which charge transfer is observed. For rare gas solids, electron exchange between the electron-exciton complex and either a metal substrate or co-adsorbed molecule enhances the desorption of metastable atoms and/or molecular dissociation. We discuss how transient electron capture by surface electron states of a substrate and subsequent electron transfer to a molecular adsorbate enhances the effective cross sections for DEA. We also consider the case of DEA to CF 2 Cl 2 condensed on water and ammonia ices, where electron exchange between pre-solvated electron states of ice and transient molecular anions can also increase DEA cross sections. Electron transfer from molecular resonances into pre-solvated electron states of ice is also discussed

  15. Coherent and incoherent radiation from free-electron lasers with an axial guide field

    OpenAIRE

    Freund, Henry P.; Sprangle, P.; Dillenburg, Darcy; Jornada, Eda Homrich da; Liberman, Bernardo; Schneider, Ruth de Souza

    1981-01-01

    The spontaneous and induced emission from a free-electron laser is treated for the case in which an axial magnetic field is imposed in addition to the helical, axially periodic wiggler magnetic field. The classes of possible single-particle trajectories in this configuration are discussed, and the results are applied to a calculation of the incoherent radiation from a beam of relativistic electrons in the system. The coherent radiation is treated by solving the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for th...

  16. Electron-impact coherence parameters for 41 P 1 excitation of zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwiński, Mariusz; Kłosowski, Łukasz; Chwirot, Stanisław; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Das, Tapasi; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    We present electron-impact coherence parameters (EICP) for electron-impact excitation of 41 P 1 state of zinc atoms for collision energies 40 eV and 60 eV. The experimental results are presented together with convergent close-coupling and relativistic distorted-wave approximation theoretical predictions. The results are compared and discussed with EICP data for collision energies 80 eV and 100 eV.

  17. Application of Coherent Tune Shift Measurements to the Characterization of Electron Cloud Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreinick, D.L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Dugan, G.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Randazzo, M.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.; Palmer, M.A.; Ramirez, G.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of coherent tune shifts at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) have been made for electron and positron beams under a wide variety of beam energies, bunch charge, and bunch train configurations. Comparing the observed tunes with the predictions of several electron cloud simulation programs allows the evaluation of important parameters in these models. These simulations will be used to predict the behavior of the electron cloud in damping rings for future linear colliders. We outline recent improvements to the analysis techniques that should improve the fidelity of the modeling.

  18. Theory of electron transfer and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The main effort reported is directed toward charge transfer and ionization in high energy atomic collisions. The research may be divided into classical trajectory calculations, quantum - mechanical collision theory, and phenomenological treatments of quantal interference effects in heavy ion collisions

  19. Final Report: Vibrational Dynamics in Photoinduced Electron Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth G. Spears

    2006-04-19

    The objective of this grant was to understand how molecular vibrational states (geometry distortions) are involved in photoinduced electron transfer rates of molecules. This subject is an important component of understanding how molecular absorbers of light convert that energy into charge separation. This is important because the absorption usually excites molecular vibrations in a new electronic state prior to electron transfer to other molecules or semiconductor nanoparticles, as in some types of solar cells. The speeds of charge separation and charge recombination are key parameters that require experiments such as those in this work to test the rules governing electron transfer rates. Major progress was made on this goal. Some of the molecular structures selected for developing experimental data were bimolecular charge transfer complexes that contained metals of cobalt or vanadium. The experiments used the absorption of an ultrafast pulse of light to directly separate charges onto the two different molecular parts of the complex. The charge recombination then proceeds naturally, and one goal was to measure the speed of this recombination for different types of molecular vibrations. We used picosecond and femtosecond duration pulses with tunable colors at infrared wavelengths to directly observe vibrational states and their different rates of charge recombination (also called electron transfer). We discovered that different contact geometries in the complexes had very different electron transfer rates, and that one geometry had a significant dependence on the amount of vibration in the complex. This is the first and only measurement of such rates, and it allowed us to confirm our interpretation with a number of molecular models and test the sensitivity of electron transfer to vibrational states. This led us to develop a general theory, where we point out how molecular distortions can change the electron transfer rates to be much faster than prior theories

  20. Ultrafast Charge Transfer Visualized by Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančal T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES is used to investigate ultrafast excited-state dynamics in a lutetium bisphthalocyanine dimer. Following optical excitation, a chain of electron and hole transfer steps gives rise to characteristic cross-peak dynamics in the electronic 2D spectra. The combination of density matrix propagation and quantum chemical calculations results in a molecular view of the charge transfer dynamics and highlights the role of the counter-ion in providing an energetic perturbation which promotes charge transfer across the complex.

  1. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U., E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Döppner, T.; Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Förster, E. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hartley, N. J. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

    2014-09-08

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5 nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  2. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  3. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker [Universität Würzburg, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Emil-Fischer-Str. 42, Campus Nord, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  4. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  5. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  6. Electron-Transfer Acceleration Investigated by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlček, Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, M.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2015), s. 868-876 ISSN 0001-4842 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.003, year: 2015

  7. Anderson localization and its ramifications disorder, phase coherence and electron correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Kettemann, S

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of localization of the electronic wave function in a random medium can be regarded as the key manifestation of quantum coherence in a condensed matter system. As one of the most remarkable phenomena in condensed matter physics discovered in the 20th century, the localization problem is an indispensable part of the theory of the quantum Hall effects and rivals superconductivity in its significance as a manifestation of quantum coherence at a macroscopic scale. The present volume, written by some of the leading experts in the field, is intended to highlight some of the recent progress in the field of localization, with particular emphasis on the effect of interactions on quantum coherence. The chapters are written in textbook style and should serve as a reliable and thorough introduction for advanced students or researchers already working in the field of mesoscopic physics.

  8. Coherent radiation characteristics of modulated electron bunch formed in stack of two plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, H. L.; Gevorgian, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    The present article is devoted to the radiation from the electron bunch with modulated density passes through the stack consisting of two plates with different thicknesses and electrodynamic properties. The new elegant expression for the frequency-angular distribution of transition radiation is obtained. Using the existence of resonant frequency at which the longitudinal form-factor of bunch not suppresses radiation coherence and choosing parameters for the stack of plates, one can also avoid suppression of the radiation coherence by transverse form-factor of bunch. The radiation from a bunch with modulated density in the process SASE (self-amplified spontaneous emission) FEL can be partially coherent at a resonant frequency. Then the intense sub monochromatic beam of X-ray photons is formed. On the other hand one can define an important parameter of the bunch density modulation depth which is unknown to this day.

  9. Analysis of coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartanyants, I.A.; Singer, A.

    2009-07-01

    A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wave elds are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source. (orig.)

  10. A Novel Diagnostics of Ultrashort Electron Bunches Based on Detection of Coherent Radiation from Bunched Electron Beam in an Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, Evgeny L; Yurkov, Mikhail V

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new method for measurements of the longitudinal profile of 100 femtosecond electron bunches for X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs). The method is based on detection of coherent undulator radiation produced by modulated electron beam. Seed optical quantum laser is used to produce exact optical replica of ultrashort electron bunches. The replica is generated in apparatus which consists of an input undulator (energy modulator), and output undulator (radiator) separated by a dispersion section. The radiation in the output undulator is excited by the electron bunch modulated at the optical wavelength and rapidly reaches a hundred-MW-level power. We then use the now-standard method of ultrashort laser pulse-shape measurement, a tandem combination of autocorrelator and spectrum (FROG -- frequency resolved optical gating) providing real-time single-shot measurements of the electron bunch structure. The big advantage of proposed technique is that it can be used to determine the slice energy spread and emi...

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Semiconductor; photocatalytic; photosensitive molecule; intramolecular charge transfer; TiO2/Y-zeolite. 1. Introduction. The consumption of energy has grown exponentially over the last two decades due to rapid industrialization and better living standards throughout the world. Among the various forms of energy available ...

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, p-N,N-dimethyl- aminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing ...

  13. Photoinduced electron transfer in some photosensitive molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) molecule, -N,N-dimethylaminobenzoic acid (DMABA) has been studied in zeolite and colloidal media. The ratio of ICT to normal emission (ICT/LE) is greatly enhanced in zeolites compared to that in polar solvents. The ICT emission of DMABA was quenched by increasing the ...

  14. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive...... theory of charge transfer in polar media offers convenient tools for the treatment of experimental data for such systems, with due account of large-amplitude strongly anharmonic intramolecular reorganization. Equations for the activation barrier and free energy relationships are provided, incorporating...

  15. Stark-like electron transfer between quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovis, S.A.; Voronko, A.N.; Basharov, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Stark-like mechanism of electron transfer between two energy subband localized in remote quantum wells is examined theoretically. Estimations of major parameters of the problem in case of delta-function-wells model are adduced. Schematic model allowing experimental study of Stark-like transfer is proposed

  16. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods. 1260.69 Section 1260.69 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND.... (2) The American Bankers Association 9-digit identifying number for wire transfers of the financing...

  17. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  18. Study of Coherent Tune Shift Caused by Electron Cloud in Positron Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifets, Samuel A

    2001-12-06

    We discuss the transverse betatron tune shift of the coherent dipole motion of a beam interacting with an electron cloud. A positron beam which passes through a frozen charge distribution experiences an electric field, which shifts its tune in the positive direction. The electrons in the actual cloud are not frozen, but move during the bunch passage. Thus, the electron distribution varies due to the interaction with the beam and it is ''soft''. We study the dipole tune shift of the beam interacting with such a ''soft'' charge distribution.

  19. Study of coherent tune shift caused by electron cloud in positron storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, Frank

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the transverse betatron tune shift of the coherent dipole motion of a beam interacting with an electron cloud. A positron beam which passes through a frozen charge distribution experiences an electric field, which shifts its tune in the positive direction. The electrons in the actual cloud are not frozen, but move during the bunch passage. Thus, the electron distribution varies due to the interaction with the beam and it is "soft". We study the dipole tune shift of the beam interacting with such a "soft" charge distribution.

  20. Landscape, kinetics, paths and statistics of curl flux, coherence, entanglement and energy transfer in non-equilibrium quantum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhedong; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We develop a population and flux landscape theory for general non-equilibrium quantum systems. We illustrate our theory by modelling the quantum transport of donor-acceptor energy transfer. We find two driving forces for the non-equilibrium quantum dynamics. The symmetric part of the driving force corresponds to the population landscape contribution which mainly governs the equilibrium part of dynamics while the anti-symmetric part of the driving force generates the non-equilibrium curl quantum flux which leads to the detailed-balance-breaking and time-irreversibility. The multi-loop structure of the flux emerges forms the flux-landscape. We study the trend of changes in population and flux-landscape with respect to the voltage (temperature difference induced by environments) and electronic coupling. Improving the voltage and electronic coupling in general facilitates the quantum transport by reducing the population landscape barriers between major states and increasing the mean value of the flux. A limit-cycle mode emerges when the underlying flux-landscape becomes funnelled with a significant gap between the largest flux loop and the rest of them. On the kinetic level, we find that multiple kinetic paths between quantum states emerge and illustrate the interference effects. The degree of interference is determined by the landscape and flux. Furthermore, we quantify kinetic rate which strongly correlates with the population landscape and flux. For quantum transport, we demonstrate that as the coherence or the quantum entanglement is enhanced, the flux and energy transfer efficiency are increased. Finally it is surprising that the non-equilibriumness quantified by voltage has a non-trivial contribution on strengthening the entanglement, which is attributed to the non-local feature of the quantum curl flux. (paper)

  1. Coherent coupling of a superconducting flux qubit to an electron spin ensemble in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Saito, Shiro; Kemp, Alexander; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Karimoto, Shin-Ichi; Nakano, Hayato; Munro, William J.; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Everitt, Mark S.; Nemoto, Kae; Kasu, Makoto; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Semba, Kouichi

    2012-02-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated coherent strong coupling between a single macroscopic superconducting artificial atom (a gap tunable flux qubit [1]) and an ensemble of electron spins in the form of nitrogen--vacancy color centres in diamond. We have observed coherent exchange of a single quantum of energy between a flux qubit and a macroscopic ensemble consisting of about 3.0*10^7 NV- centers [2]. This is the first step towards the realization of a long-lived quantum memory and hybrid devices coupling microwave and optical systems. [1] Coherent operation of a gap-tunable flux qubit X. B. Zhu, A. Kemp, S. Saito, K. Semba, APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, Volume: 97, Issue: 10 pp. 102503 (2010) [2] Coherent coupling of a superconducting flux qubit to an electron spin ensemble in diamond Xiaobo Zhu, Shiro Saito, Alexander Kemp, Kosuke Kakuyanagi, Shin-ichi Karimoto, Hayato Nakano, William J. Munro, Yasuhiro Tokura, Mark S. Everitt, Kae Nemoto, Makoto Kasu, Norikazu Mizuochi, and Kouichi Semba, Nature, Volume: 478, 221-224 (2011)

  2. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H[sub 2] and I[sub 3][sup [minus

  3. Numerical Simulation of Transient Moisture Transfer into an Electronic Enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems.In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce theCPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which...

  4. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron transfer. (PET) is a very important process, with considerable chemical and biological relevance. GENERAL I ARTICLE of electrons, respectively. This has entirely changed the earlier framework of interpreting reactions in chemistry and biology. This shift in emphasis enables one to understand the elementary.

  5. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes...

  6. Studies on electron transfer reactions of Keggin-type mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    (PV2) in aqueous phosphate buffer of pH 6 at ambient temperature. Electrochemical and optical studies show that the stoichiometry of the reaction is 1: 2 (NADH : HPA). EPR and optical studies show that HPA act as one electron acceptor and the products of electron transfer reactions are one elec- tron reduced heteropoly ...

  7. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 e-mail: hnghosh@barc.gov.in. Abstract. Dynamics of interfacial electron transfer (ET) in ruthenium ..... As the localization takes place mostly on bpy-cat ligand, ILET process does not interfere much in the electron injection ...

  8. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...... is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... electrochemical ET at a single metal/electrolyte interface. Similar data for a short oligonucleotide immobilized on Au(111) show that oligonucleotides can be characterized with comparable detail, with novel perspectives for addressing DNA electronic conduction mechanisms and for biological screening towards...

  9. Toddlers' word learning and transfer from electronic and print books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Gabrielle A; Ganea, Patricia A

    2017-04-01

    Transfer from symbolic media to the real world can be difficult for young children. A sample of 73 toddlers aged 17 to 23months were read either an electronic book displayed on a touchscreen device or a traditional print book in which a novel object was paired with a novel label. Toddlers in both conditions learned the label within the context of the book. However, only those who read the traditional format book generalized and transferred the label to other contexts. An older group of 28 toddlers aged 24 to 30months did generalize and transfer from the electronic book. Across ages, those children who primarily used screens to watch prerecorded video at home transferred less from the electronic book than those with more diverse home media experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial Electron Transfer Chains Primed by Proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, H.; Almeida, N.M. de; Kartal, B.; Keltjens, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    Electron transport phosphorylation is the central mechanism for most prokaryotic species to harvest energy released in the respiration of their substrates as ATP. Microorganisms have evolved incredible variations on this principle, most of these we perhaps do not know, considering that only a

  11. Computational Approach to Electron Charge Transfer Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Elvar Örn

    The step from ab initio atomic and molecular properties to thermodynamic - or macroscopic - properties requires the combination of several theoretical tools. This dissertation presents constant temperature molecular dynamics with bond length constraints, a hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mecha...... structure modes. This is for a large iridium-iridium dimer complex which shows a dramatic structural (and vibrational) change upon electronic excitation....

  12. Macroscopic quantum coherence in a single molecular magnet and Kondo effect of electron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Bo; Wang, Qiang; Xie, Haiqing; Liang, J.-Q.

    2011-01-01

    We report a Kondo-effect study of electron transport through a quantum dot with embedded biaxial single-molecule magnet based on slave boson mean-field theory and non-equilibrium Green-function technique. It is found the macroscopic quantum coherence of molecule-magnet results in the Kondo peak split of differential conductance due to interaction between electron and molecular magnet. It is also demonstrated that both the peak height and position can be controlled by the sweeping magnetic field and polarization of ferromagnetic electrodes. The characteristic peak split may be used to identify the macroscopic quantum coherence and develop molecule devices. -- Highlights: → Splits of Kondo peak are induced by the single molecular magnet. → Kondo effect can be controlled by magnetic field and its sweeping speed in our model. → The suppression and broadening of Kondo peaks is also observed with increase of temperature. → The peaks height and position is sensitive to polarization of the electrode.

  13. Resonant supercollisions and electron-phonon heat transfer in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, K. S.; Gornyi, I. V.; Kachorovskii, V. Yu.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2018-02-01

    We study the effects of strong impurities on heat transfer in a coupled electron-phonon system in disordered graphene. A detailed analysis of the electron-phonon heat exchange assisted by such an impurity through the "resonant supercollision" mechanism is presented. We further explore the local modification of heat transfer in a weakly disordered graphene due to a resonant scatterer and determine spatial profiles of the phonon and electron temperature around the scatterer under electrical driving. Our results are consistent with recent experimental findings on imaging resonant dissipation from individual atomic defects.

  14. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding......-order multipole moments. We use this extended model to systematically examine three different ways of obtaining EET couplings in a heterogeneous medium ranging from use of the exact transition density to a point-dipole approximation. Several interesting observations are made including that explicit use...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  15. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratner, Daniel [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  16. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO(2+) + NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Michael A; Lockyear, Jessica F; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, Jana; Price, Stephen D

    2011-11-07

    The single-electron transfer reaction between NO(2+) and NO, which initially forms a pair of NO(+) ions, has been studied using a position-sensitive coincidence technique. The reactivity in this class of collision system, which involves the interaction of a dication with its neutral precursor, provides a sensitive test of recent ideas concerning electronic state selectivity in dicationic single-electron transfer reactions. In stark contrast to the recently observed single-electron transfer reactivity in the analogous CO(2)(2+)/CO(2) and O(2)(2+)/O(2) collision systems, electron transfer between NO(2+) and NO generates two product NO(+) ions which behave in an identical manner, whether the ions are formed from NO(2+) or NO. This observed behaviour is in excellent accord with the recently proposed rationalization of the state selectivity in dication-molecule SET reactions using simple propensity rules involving one-electron transitions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  17. A method for ultrashort electron pulse-shape measurement using coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we discuss a method for nondestructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The method is based on the detection of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) spectrum produced by a bunch passing a dipole magnet system. This work also contains a systematic treatment of synchrotron radiation theory which lies at the basis of CSR. Standard theory of synchrotron radiation uses several approximations whose applicability limits are often forgotten: here we present a systematic discussion about these assumptions. Properties of coherent synchrotron radiation from an electron moving along an arc of a circle are then derived and discussed. We describe also an effective and practical diagnostic technique based on the utilization of an electromagnetic undulator to record the energy of the coherent radiation pulse into the central cone. This measurement must be repeated many times with different undulator resonant frequencies in order to reconstruct the modulus of the bunch form-factor. The retrieval of the bunch profile function from these data is performed by means of deconvolution techniques: for the present work we take advantage of a constrained deconvolution method. We illustrate with numerical examples the potential of the proposed method for electron beam diagnostics at the TESLA test facility (TTF) accelerator. Here we choose, for emphasis, experiments aimed at the measure of the strongly non-Gaussian electron bunch profile in the TTF femtosecond-mode operation. We demonstrate that a tandem combination of a picosecond streak camera and a CSR spectrometer can be used to extract shape information from electron bunches with a narrow leading peak and a long tail. (orig.)

  18. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-05-01

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9Å focused beam diameter, 200fs pulse duration and 0.6eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Can coherent Smith-Purcell radiation be used to determine the shape of an electron bunch?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, A.; Gallerano, G.P.; Giovenale, E.; Messina, G.; Doucas, G.; Kimmitt, M.F.; Andrews, H.L.; Brownell, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements at Frascati of the Smith-Purcell radiation emitted from the interaction of a 2.3 MeV (total) electron beam with a 2.5 mm grating show clear evidence of coherent enhancement of the radiation, with power levels exceeding 100 mW at emission angles around 90 deg. relative to the beam direction. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions and suggest that Smith-Purcell radiation may offer a simple way of determining the shape and duration of short (picosecond) electron bunches

  20. Electron transfer dynamics: Zusman equation versus exact theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Qiang; Chen Liping; Nan Guangjun; Xu Ruixue; Yan Yijing

    2009-01-01

    The Zusman equation has been widely used to study the effect of solvent dynamics on electron transfer reactions. However, application of this equation is limited by the classical treatment of the nuclear degrees of freedom. In this paper, we revisit the Zusman equation in the framework of the exact hierarchical equations of motion formalism, and show that a high temperature approximation of the hierarchical theory is equivalent to the Zusman equation in describing electron transfer dynamics. Thus the exact hierarchical formalism naturally extends the Zusman equation to include quantum nuclear dynamics at low temperatures. This new finding has also inspired us to rescale the original hierarchical equations and incorporate a filtering algorithm to efficiently propagate the hierarchical equations. Numerical exact results are also presented for the electron transfer reaction dynamics and rate constant calculations.

  1. Quantum control of coherent π -electron ring currents in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Hirobumi; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2017-12-01

    We present results for quantum optimal control (QOC) of the coherent π electron ring currents in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Since PAHs consist of a number of condensed benzene rings, in principle, there exist various coherent ring patterns. These include the ring current localized to a designated benzene ring, the perimeter ring current that flows along the edge of the PAH, and the middle ring current of PAHs having an odd number of benzene rings such as anthracene. In the present QOC treatment, the best target wavefunction for generation of the ring current through a designated path is determined by a Lagrange multiplier method. The target function is integrated into the ordinary QOC theory. To demonstrate the applicability of the QOC procedure, we took naphthalene and anthracene as the simplest examples of linear PAHs. The mechanisms of ring current generation were clarified by analyzing the temporal evolutions of the electronic excited states after coherent excitation by UV pulses or (UV+IR) pulses as well as those of electric fields of the optimal laser pulses. Time-dependent simulations of the perimeter ring current and middle ring current of anthracene, which are induced by analytical electric fields of UV pulsed lasers, were performed to reproduce the QOC results.

  2. Long-distance photoinitiated electron transfer through polyene molecular wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.; Kersey, K.M.; Cragg, D.E.; Minsek, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Long-chain polyenes can be used as molecular wires to facilitate electron transfer between a photo-excited donor and an acceptor in an artificial photosynthetic system. The authors present data here on two Zn-porphyrin-polyene-anthraquinone molecules possessing either 5 or 9 all trans double bonds between the donor and acceptor, 1 and 2. The center-to-center distances between the porphyrin and the quinone in these relatively rigid molecules are 25 angstrom for 1 and 35 angstrom for 2. Selective picosecond laser excitation of the Zn-porphyrin and 1 and 2 results in the very rapid transfer of an electron to the anthraquinone in <2 ps and 10 ps, respectively. The resultant radical ion pairs recombine with τ = 10 ps for 1 and τ = 25 ps for 2. The electron transfer rates remain remarkably rapid over these long distances. The involvement of polyene radical cations in the mechanism of the radical ion pair recombination reaction is clear from the transient absorption spectra of 1 and 2, which show strong absorbances in the near-infrared. The strong electronic coupling between the Zn-porphyrin n the anthraquinone provided by low-lying states of the polyene make it possible to transfer an electron rapidly over very long distances

  3. Electron transfer behaviour of biological macromolecules towards the single-molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Grubb, Mikala; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    is combined with state-of-the-art physical electrochemistry with emphasis on single-crystal, atomically planar electrode surfaces, in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and other surface techniques. These approaches have brought bioelectrochemistry important steps forward towards the nanoscale...... and single-molecule levels.We discuss here these advances with reference to two specific redox metalloproteins, the blue single-copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and the single-haem protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cytochrome c, and a short oligonucleotide. Both proteins can be immobilized...... electron transfer (ET) function retained. In situ STM can also address the microscopic mechanisms for electron tunnelling through the biomolecules and offers novel notions such as coherent multi-ET between the substrate and tip via the molecular redox levels. This differs in important respects from...

  4. Tolerance on sphere radius for the calibration of the transfer function of coherence scanning interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong; Coupland, Jeremy M.; Wang, Yuhang; Leach, Richard K.

    2017-06-01

    Although coherence scanning interferometry (CSI) commonly achieves a sub-nanometre noise level in surface topography measurement, the absolute accuracy is difficult to determine when measuring a surface that contains varying local slope angles and curvatures. Recent research has shown that it is possible to use a single sphere with a radius much greater than the source wavelength to calibrate the three-dimensional transfer function of a CSI system. A major requirement is the accurate knowledge of the sphere radius, but the three-dimensional measurement of a sphere with nanometre level uncertainty is a highly challenging metrology problem, and is not currently feasible. Perfect spheres do not exist and every measurement has uncertainty. Without having a quantitative understanding of the tolerance of the sphere radius, the calibration method cannot be used confidently for calibration of the transfer function of a CSI system that may be used in research laboratories or industry. In this paper, the effects of the tolerance of the radius of the calibration sphere on surface topography measurements are quantitatively analysed through a computational approach. CSI measurements of spherical, sinusoidal and rough surfaces are investigated in the presence of various degrees of radius error. A lookup table that relates the surface height error as a function of the radius error and surface slope angle is provided. The users may estimate the required tolerances of the sphere radius for their specific surface measurements if this calibration approach is used. The output of this paper provides a feasibility analysis for this calibration method for further development and applications.

  5. Numerical simulation of transient moisture transfer into an electronic enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H. [Process Modelling Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Allé, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-06-08

    Electronic systems are sometimes exposed to harsh environmental conditions of temperature and humidity. Moisture transfer into electronic enclosures and condensation can cause several problems such as corrosion and alteration in thermal stresses. It is therefore essential to study the local climate inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems. In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce the CPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which the real 3D geometry is approximated by a 2D axial symmetry one. The results for 2D and 3D models were compared in order to calibrate the 2D representation. Furthermore, simulation results were compared with experimental data and good agreement was found.

  6. Two-Dimensional Resonance Raman Signatures of Vibronic Coherence Transfer in Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P; Cheshire, Thomas P; Moran, Andrew M

    2017-11-02

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in condensed phase systems. 2DRR spectroscopy is motivated by knowledge of non-equilibrium effects that cannot be detected with traditional resonance Raman spectroscopy. For example, 2DRR spectra may reveal correlated distributions of reactant and product geometries in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this chapter, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide. We show that signatures of "vibronic coherence transfer" in the photodissociation process can be targeted with particular 2DRR pulse sequences. Key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopy techniques are also addressed. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest that it will be a valuable tool for elucidating ultrafast chemical reaction mechanisms.

  7. Inverse electron transfer in peroxyoxalate chemiexcitation using easily reducible activators

    OpenAIRE

    BARTOLONI, Fernando Heering; CISCATO, Luiz Francisco Monteiro Leite; AUGUSTO, Felipe Alberto; BAADER, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron transfer, from the peroxide intermediate to the activator, in its chemiexcitation step. Relative catalytic rate constants and singlet quantum yields were obtained for the peroxyoxalate reaction, using 9-chloro, 9,10-dichloro, 9-cyano and 9,10-dicyanoanthracenes as activators. The linear free-...

  8. Inelastic electron photon scattering at moderate four momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Genzel, H.; Grigull, R.; Lackas, W.; Raupach, F.; Klovning, A.; Lillestoel, E.; Skard, J.A.; Ackermann, H.; Buerger, J.

    1980-10-01

    We present new high statistics data on hadron production in photon photon reactions. The data are analyzed in terms of an electron photon scattering formalism. The dependence of the total cross section on Q 2 , the four momentum transfer squared of the scattered electron, and on the mass W of the hadronic system is investigated. The data are compared to predictions from Vector Dominance and the quark model. (orig.)

  9. Nanoscale and single-molecule interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical science and technology in the 21st century have reached high levels of sophistication. A fundamental quantum mechanical theoretical frame for interfacial electrochemical electron transfer (ET) was introduced by Revaz Dogonadze. This frame has remained for four decades as a basis...... scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and single-electron tunneling (SET, or Coulomb blockade) in electrochemical. systems directly in aqueous electrolyte solution and at room temperature. We illustrate the new theoretical formalism and its perspectives by recent cases of electrochemical SET, negative...

  10. Photoinduced Reductive Electron Transfer in LNA:DNA Hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenge, Ulrike; Wengel, Jesper; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2012-01-01

    Lock it, but not too much: LNA units (locked or bridging nucleic acids) in LNA:DNA hybrids lead to a negative effect on electron transfer (ET), but they also force the nucleic acid structure in the A-type double helix, which allows a better base stacking than the normal B-type and thus positively...... influences the ET. This result is significant for the design of nucleic acids of molecular electronics....

  11. Quality assurance and data collection -- Electronic Data Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomczak, L.M.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Salesky, J.A.; Spitz, H.B.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Environmental Monitoring (REM) group at the Fernald Environmental Management Project is involved in an Electronic Data Transfer practice that will result in the improved quality assurance of collected data. This practice focuses on electronic data transfer from the recording instrument to reduce the manpower normally required for manual data entry and improve the quality of the data transferred. The application of this practice can enhance any data collection program where instruments with electronic memories and a signal output are utilized. Organizations employing this practice can strengthen the quality and efficiency of their data collection program. The use of these practices can assist in complying with Quality Assurance requirements under ASME NQA-1, RCRA, CERCLA, and DOE Order activities. Data from Pylon AB-5 instrumentation is typically configured to print data to a tape. The REM group has developed a process to electronically transfer stored data. The data are sent from the Pylon AB-5 field instrument to a HewlettPackard portable hand computer, model HP95LX. Data are recorded and stored on a 128 K-byte RAN card and later transferred to a PC database as an electronic file for analysis. The advantage of this system is twofold: (1) Data entry errors are eliminated and (2) considerable data collection and entry time is eliminated. Checks can then be conducted for data validity between recorded intervals due to light leaks etc. and the detection of outliers. This paper will discuss the interface and connector components that allow this transfer of data from the Pylon to the PC to take place and the process to perform that activity

  12. Electronic structure and relative stability of the coherent and semi-coherent HfO2/III-V interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, A.; Levämäki, H.; Mäkelä, J.; Tuominen, M.; Yasir, M.; Dahl, J.; Kuzmin, M.; Laukkanen, P.; Kokko, K.; Punkkinen, M. P. J.

    2018-01-01

    III-V semiconductors are prominent alternatives to silicon in metal oxide semiconductor devices. Hafnium dioxide (HfO2) is a promising oxide with a high dielectric constant to replace silicon dioxide (SiO2). The potentiality of the oxide/III-V semiconductor interfaces is diminished due to high density of defects leading to the Fermi level pinning. The character of the harmful defects has been intensively debated. It is very important to understand thermodynamics and atomic structures of the interfaces to interpret experiments and design methods to reduce the defect density. Various realistic gap defect state free models for the HfO2/III-V(100) interfaces are presented. Relative energies of several coherent and semi-coherent oxide/III-V semiconductor interfaces are determined for the first time. The coherent and semi-coherent interfaces represent the main interface types, based on the Ga-O bridges and As (P) dimers, respectively.

  13. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  14. Electron Transfer from Azide Radical to Histidine Generates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The formation of histidinyl radical (HR), which is a product of electron transfer reaction between histidine and some free radicals, was studied by pulse radiolysis. The reaction between histidine and azide radicals was found to produce HR, which has a distinct absorption spectrum with peaks at 300, 480 and 520 nm.

  15. Electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency: Functional and molecular aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiff, M; Froissart, R; Olsen, Rikke Katrine Jentoft

    2006-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) is a recessively inherited metabolic disorder that can be due to a deficiency of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or its dehydrogenase (ETF-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). ETF is a mitochondrial matrix protein consisting of alpha- (30kDa) and beta...

  16. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggintype heteropolyanion, [PVVVVW10O40]5-, in acetate-acetic acid buffers have been measured spectrophotometrically at 25°C. The order of the reaction with respect to substrate and oxidant is unity. The reaction shows simple second ...

  17. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods. 1274.931 Section 1274.931 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... of the financial institution receiving payment. (2) The American Bankers Association 9-digit...

  18. Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins and chlorophyll a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neta, P.; Scherz, A.; Levanon, H.

    1979-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions involving porphyrins (P) and quinones (Q) have been studied by pulse radiolysis. The porphyrins used were tetraphenylporphyrin (H 2 TPP), its tetracarboxy derivative (H 2 TCPP), the sodium and zinc compounds (Na 2 TPP and ZnTPP), and chlorophyll a (Chl a). These compounds were found to be rapidly reduced by electron transfer from (CH 3 ) 2 CO - . Reduction by (CH 3 ) 2 COH was rapid in aqueous solutions but relatively slow in i-PrOH solutions. Transient spectra of the anion radicals were determined and, in the case of H 2 TCPP - ., a pK = 9.7 was derived for its protonation. Electron-transfer reactions from the anion radical of H 2 TCPP to benzoquinone, duroquinone, 9,10-anthraquinone 2-sulfonate, and methylviologen occur in aqueous solutions with rate constants approx. 10 7 -10 9 M -1 s -1 which depend on the pH and the quinone reduction potential. Reactions of Na 2 TPP - ., ZnTPP - ., and Chl a - . with anthraquinone in basic i-PrOH solutions occur with rate constants approx. 10 9 M -1 s -1 . The spectral changes associated with these electron-transfer reactions as observed over a period of approx. 1 ms indicated, in some cases, the formation of an intermediate complex [P...Q - .]. 8 figures, 2 tables

  19. Studies on electron transfer reactions: Reduction of heteropoly 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Rates of electron transfer reaction of thioglycolic acid with vanadium(V) substituted Keggin- type heteropolyanion, [PV ... By applying Rehm–Weller relationship, self exchange rate constant for the. –. SCH2COO. –. /S. •. CH2COO. – .... is much more higher than that of mono-anion. HSCH2COO–. 3.4 Marcus theory.

  20. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is in...

  1. Combining UV photodissociation with electron transfer for peptide structure analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaffer, C. J.; Marek, Aleš; Pepin, R.; Slováková, K.; Tureček, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2015), s. 470-475 ISSN 1076-5174 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer dissociation * laser photodissociation * peptide ions * cation radical * chromophores * isomer distinction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.541, year: 2015

  2. Effect of strong coupling on interfacial electron transfer dynamics in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Bonnett R, Lambert C, Land E J, Scourides P A, Sin- clair R S and Truscott T G 1983 Photochem. Photo- biol. 38 1. 18. Mataga N 1991 in Electron transfer in inorganic, organic, and biological systems (eds) J R Bolton, N. Mataga and G McLendon (Advances in Chemistry. Series) (Washington, DC:) pp. 91–115. 19. Furube A ...

  3. On the coherent radiation of an electron bunch moving in an arc of a circle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, E.L.; Shneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    1997-01-01

    Existing theories of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) are related to the motion of an electron bunch on a circular orbit and do not describe the case of finite magnet length. We present the CSR theory for a bunch of any length moving in an arc of a finite angle. The radiative interaction of the electrons in the bunch is analyzed for a line charge distribution using ultrarelativistic approximation. It is shown in particular that this interaction is important not only inside the magnet but also on the straight part of the trajectory after the magnet. Detailed analytical study of the CSR effects in the electron bunch with a stepped distribution of the charge density has been performed. The simple analytical technique of the radiative force calculation has been developed. The analytical solutions in the form of elementary functions are obtained for the radiative interaction force, for the energy loss distribution along the bunch and for the total energy loss of the bunch. The latter result is confirmed with calculation of the energy of coherent radiation in far zone. The criterion for the applicability region of the preceding theories to the case of a finite magnet length is obtained

  4. Monochromatic coherent transition and diffraction radiation from a relativistic electron bunch train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A.; Shevelev, M.; Karataev, P.; Shipulya, M.; Bleko, V.

    2018-04-01

    Electron beams of most accelerators have a bunched structure and are synchronized with the accelerating RF field. Due to modulation of the electron beam with frequency ν RF one can expect to observe resonances with frequencies ν k=kṡ ν RF in radiation spectrum generated via any spontaneous emission mechanism (k is an integer and the resonance order). In this paper we present the results of spectral measurements of coherent transition radiation (CTR) generated by an electron bunch train from the Tomsk microtron with ν RF=2.63GHz in the spectral frequency range from 8 to 35 GHz. We also measured the spectrum of coherent diffraction radiation and demonstrated that the observed spectra in both cases consist of monochromatic lines. For spectral measurements the Martin-Puplett interferometer with spectral resolution of 800 MHz (FWMH) was employed. Using a waveguide frequency cut-off we were able to exclude several spectral lines to observe higher resonance orders of up to k =7.

  5. Charge-transfer properties in the gas electron multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sanghyo; Kim, Yongkyun; Cho, Hyosung

    2004-01-01

    The charge transfer properties of a gas electron multiplier (GEM) were systematically investigated over a broad range of electric field configurations. The electron collection efficiency and the charge sharing were found to depend on the external fields, as well as on the GEM voltage. The electron collection efficiency increased with the collection field up to 90%, but was essentially independent of the drift field strength. A double conical GEM has a 10% gain increase with time due to surface charging by avalanche ions whereas this effect was eliminated with the cylindrical GEM. The positive-ion feedback is also estimated. (author)

  6. Cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging of biological samples at SACLA: a correlative approach with cryo-electron and light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Yuki; Yonekura, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging at cryogenic temperature (cryo-CXDI) allows the analysis of internal structures of unstained, non-crystalline, whole biological samples in micrometre to sub-micrometre dimensions. Targets include cells and cell organelles. This approach involves preparing frozen-hydrated samples under controlled humidity, transferring the samples to a cryo-stage inside a vacuum chamber of a diffractometer, and then exposing the samples to coherent X-rays. Since 2012, cryo-coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments have been carried out with the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) at the SPring-8 Ångstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) facility in Japan. Complementary use of cryo-electron microscopy and/or light microscopy is highly beneficial for both pre-checking samples and studying the integrity or nature of the sample. This article reports the authors' experience in cryo-XFEL-CDI of biological cells and organelles at SACLA, and describes an attempt towards reliable and higher-resolution reconstructions, including signal enhancement with strong scatterers and Patterson-search phasing.

  7. Two-electron double quantum dot coupled to coherent photon and phonon fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuya; Chen, Jason C. H.; Hashisaka, Masayuki; Muraki, Koji; Fujisawa, Toshimasa

    2017-09-01

    Two-electron states of a double quantum dot (DQD) under irradiation of coherent boson (photon and phonon) fields are studied by measuring spin-flip tunneling current in the Pauli spin blockade regime. This measurement scheme allows us to investigate Rabi splitting and associated boson dressed states particularly in the deep dispersive regime where the detuning δ ≡ℏ ω -EAB between the boson energy ℏ ω and energy spacing EAB of the two-level system is significantly large (δ ˜ℏ ω ), where the permanent dipole moment in the DQD plays a significant role in the hybridization.

  8. A unified diabatic description for electron transfer reactions, isomerization reactions, proton transfer reactions, and aromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    While diabatic approaches are ubiquitous for the understanding of electron-transfer reactions and have been mooted as being of general relevance, alternate applications have not been able to unify the same wide range of observed spectroscopic and kinetic properties. The cause of this is identified as the fundamentally different orbital configurations involved: charge-transfer phenomena involve typically either 1 or 3 electrons in two orbitals whereas most reactions are typically closed shell. As a result, two vibrationally coupled electronic states depict charge-transfer scenarios whereas three coupled states arise for closed-shell reactions of non-degenerate molecules and seven states for the reactions implicated in the aromaticity of benzene. Previous diabatic treatments of closed-shell processes have considered only two arbitrarily chosen states as being critical, mapping these states to those for electron transfer. We show that such effective two-state diabatic models are feasible but involve renormalized electronic coupling and vibrational coupling parameters, with this renormalization being property dependent. With this caveat, diabatic models are shown to provide excellent descriptions of the spectroscopy and kinetics of the ammonia inversion reaction, proton transfer in N2H7(+), and aromaticity in benzene. This allows for the development of a single simple theory that can semi-quantitatively describe all of these chemical phenomena, as well as of course electron-transfer reactions. It forms a basis for understanding many technologically relevant aspects of chemical reactions, condensed-matter physics, chemical quantum entanglement, nanotechnology, and natural or artificial solar energy capture and conversion.

  9. Doping Phosphorene with Holes and Electrons through Molecular Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, Pratap; Rajesh, S; Manjunatha, S; Bandyopadhyay, Arkamita; Barua, Manaswee; Pati, Swapan K; Rao, C N R

    2017-11-03

    An important aspect of phosphorene, the novel two-dimensional semiconductor, is whether holes and electrons can both be doped in this material. Some reports found that only electrons can be preferentially doped into phosphorene. There are some theoretical calculations showing charge-transfer interaction with both tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE). We have carried out an investigation of chemical doping of phosphorene by a variety of electron donor and acceptor molecules, employing both experiment and theory, Raman scattering being a crucial aspect of the study. We find that both electron acceptors and donors interact with phosphorene by charge-transfer, with the acceptors having more marked effects. All the three Raman bands of phosphorene soften and exhibit band broadening on interaction with both donor and acceptor molecules. First-principles calculations establish the occurrence of charge-transfer between phosphorene with donors as well as acceptors. The absence of electron-hole asymmetry is noteworthy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Vibrationally Assisted Electron Transfer Mechanism of Olfaction: Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Chang, Po-Yao; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    to this suggestion an olfactory receptor is activated by electron transfer assisted through odorant vibrational excitation. The hundreds to thousands of different olfactory receptors in an animal recognize odorants over a discriminant landscape with surface properties and vibrational frequencies as the two major...... dimensions. In the present paper we introduce the vibrationally assisted mechanism of olfaction and demonstrate for several odorants that, indeed, a strong enhancement of an electron tunneling rate due to odorant vibrations can arise. We discuss in this regard the influence of odorant deuteration and explain...... olfactory receptors and odorants must obey for the vibrationally assisted electron transfer mechanism to function. We argue that the stated characteristics are feasible for realistic olfactory receptors, noting, though, that the receptor structure presently is still unknown, but can be studied through...

  11. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer in Artificial Photosynthetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, S Jimena; Odella, Emmanuel; Moore, Gary F; Gust, Devens; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L

    2018-02-20

    Artificial photosynthetic constructs can in principle operate more efficiently than natural photosynthesis because they can be rationally designed to optimize solar energy conversion for meeting human demands rather than the multiple needs of an organism competing for growth and reproduction in a complex ecosystem. The artificial photosynthetic constructs described in this Account consist primarily of covalently linked synthetic chromophores, electron donors and acceptors, and proton donors and acceptors that carry out the light absorption, electron transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes characteristic of photosynthetic cells. PCET is the movement of an electron from one site to another accompanied by proton transfer. PCET and the transport of protons over tens of angstroms are important in all living cells because they are a fundamental link between redox processes and the establishment of transmembrane gradients of proton electrochemical potential, known as proton-motive force (PMF), which is the unifying concept in bioenergetics. We have chosen a benzimidazole phenol (BIP) system as a platform for the study of PCET because with appropriate substitutions it is possible to design assemblies in which one or multiple proton transfers can accompany oxidation of the phenol. In BIP, oxidation of the phenol increases its acidity by more than ten pK a units; thus, electrochemical oxidation of the phenol is associated with a proton transfer to the imidazole. This is an example of a PCET process involving transfer of one electron and one proton, known as electron-proton transfer (EPT). When the benzimidazole moiety of BIP is substituted at the 4-position with good proton acceptor groups such as aliphatic amines, experimental and theoretical results indicate that two proton transfers occur upon one-electron oxidation of the phenol. This phenomenon is described as a one-electron-two-proton transfer (E2PT) process and results in translocation of

  12. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  13. Coherent infrared radiation from the ALS generated via femtosecond laser modulation of the electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.M.; Hao, Z.; Martin, M.C.; Robin, D.S.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of an electron beam with a femtosecond laser pulse co-propagating through a wiggler at the ALS produces large modulation of the electron energies within a short ∼100 fs slice of the electron bunch. Propagating around the storage ring, this bunch develops a longitudinal density perturbation due to the dispersion of electron trajectories. The length of the perturbation evolves with a distance from the wiggler but is much shorter than the electron bunch length. This perturbation causes the electron bunch to emit short pulses of temporally and spatially coherent infrared light which are automatically synchronized to the modulating laser. The intensity and spectra of the infrared light were measured in two storage ring locations for a nominal ALS lattice and for an experimental lattice with the higher momentum compaction factor. The onset of instability stimulated by laser e-beam interaction had been discovered. The infrared signal is now routinely used as a sensitive monitor for a fine tuning of the laser beam alignment during data accumulation in the experiments with femtosecond x-ray pulses

  14. Dynamics of Coupled Electron-Boson Systems with the Multiple Davydov D1Ansatz and the Generalized Coherent State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lipeng; Borrelli, Raffaele; Zhao, Yang

    2017-11-22

    The dynamics of a coupled electron-boson system is investigated by employing a multitude of the Davydov D 1 trial states, also known as the multi-D 1 Ansatz, and a second trial state based on a superposition of the time-dependent generalized coherent state (GCS Ansatz). The two Ansätze are applied to study population dynamics in the spin-boson model and the Holstein molecular crystal model, and a detailed comparison with numerically exact results obtained by the (multilayer) multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method and the hierarchy equations of motion approach is drawn. It is found that the two methodologies proposed here have significantly improved over that with the single D 1 Ansatz, yielding quantitatively accurate results even in the critical cases of large energy biases and large transfer integrals. The two methodologies provide new effective tools for accurate, efficient simulation of many-body quantum dynamics thanks to a relatively small number of parameters which characterize the electron-nuclear wave functions. The wave-function-based approaches are capable of tracking explicitly detailed bosonic dynamics, which is absent by construct in approaches based on the reduced density matrix. The efficiency and flexibility of our methods are also advantages as compared with numerically exact approaches such as QUAPI and HEOM, especially at low temperatures and in the strong coupling regime.

  15. Phase-coherent electron transport in (Zn, Al)Ox thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Misra, P.; Ajimsha, R. S.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-11-01

    A clear signature of disorder induced quantum-interference phenomena leading to phase-coherent electron transport was observed in (Zn, Al)Ox thin films grown by atomic layer deposition. The degree of static-disorder was tuned by varying the Al concentration through periodic incorporation of Al2O3 sub-monolayer in ZnO. All the films showed small negative magnetoresistance due to magnetic field suppressed weak-localization effect. The temperature dependence of phase-coherence length ( l φ ∝ T - 3 / 4 ), as extracted from the magnetoresistance measurements, indicated electron-electron scattering as the dominant dephasing mechanism. The persistence of quantum-interference at relatively higher temperatures up to 200 K is promising for the realization of ZnO based phase-coherent electron transport devices.

  16. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  17. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  18. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-02

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established.

  19. Electron Transfer between Electrically Conductive Minerals and Quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Taran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance electron transfer in marine environments couples physically separated redox half-reactions, impacting biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur and carbon. Bacterial bio-electrochemical systems that facilitate electron transfer via conductive filaments or across man-made electrodes are well-known, but the impact of abiotic currents across naturally occurring conductive and semiconductive minerals is poorly understood. In this paper I use cyclic voltammetry to explore electron transfer between electrodes made of common iron minerals (magnetite, hematite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, and greigite, and hydroquinones—a class of organic molecules found in carbon-rich sediments. Of all tested minerals, only pyrite and magnetite showed an increase in electric current in the presence of organic molecules, with pyrite showing excellent electrocatalytic performance. Pyrite electrodes performed better than commercially available glassy carbon electrodes and showed higher peak currents, lower overpotential values and a smaller separation between oxidation and reduction peaks for each tested quinone. Hydroquinone oxidation on pyrite surfaces was reversible, diffusion controlled, and stable over a large number of potential cycles. Given the ubiquity of both pyrite and quinones, abiotic electron transfer between minerals and organic molecules is likely widespread in Nature and may contribute to several different phenomena, including anaerobic respiration of a wide variety of microorganisms in temporally anoxic zones or in the proximity of hydrothermal vent chimneys, as well as quinone cycling and the propagation of anoxic zones in organic rich waters. Finally, interactions between pyrite and quinones make use of electrochemical gradients that have been suggested as an important source of energy for the origins of life on Earth. Ubiquinones and iron sulfide clusters are common redox cofactors found in electron transport chains across all domains

  20. Electron Transfer Between Electrically Conductive Minerals and Quinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taran, Olga

    2017-07-01

    Long-distance electron transfer in marine environments couples physically separated redox half-reactions, impacting biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur and carbon. Bacterial bio-electrochemical systems that facilitate electron transfer via conductive filaments or across man-made electrodes are well known, but the impact of abiotic currents across naturally occurring conductive and semiconducitve minerals is poorly understood. In this paper I use cyclic voltammetry to explore electron transfer between electrodes made of common iron minerals (magnetite, hematite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite and greigite), and hydroquinones - a class of organic molecules found in carbon-rich sediments. Of all tested minerals, only pyrite and magnetite showed an increase in electric current in the presence of organic molecules, with pyrite showing excellent electrocatalytic performance. Pyrite electrodes performed better than commercially available glassy carbon electrodes and showed higher peak currents, lower overpotential values and a smaller separation between oxidation and reduction peaks for each tested quinone. Hydroquinone oxidation on pyrite surfaces was reversible, diffusion controlled, and stable over a large number of potential cycles. Given the ubiquity of both pyrite and quinones, abiotic electron transfer between minerals and organic molecules is likely widespread in Nature and may contribute to several different phenomena, including anaerobic respiration of a wide variety of microorganisms in temporally anoxic zones or in the proximity of hydrothermal vent chimneys, as well as quinone cycling and the propagation of anoxic zones in organic rich waters. Finally, interactions between pyrite and quinones make use of electrochemical gradients that have been suggested as an important source of energy for the origins of life on Earth. Ubiquinones and iron sulfide clusters are common redox cofactors found in electron transport chains across all domains of life and

  1. Relativistic electron mirrors from nanoscale foils for coherent frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, D.; Yeung, M.; Dzelzainis, T.; Foster, P.S.; Rykovanov, S.G.; Lewis, C.LS.; Marjoribanks, R.S.; Ruhl, H.; Habs, D.; Schreiber, J.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting light from a mirror moving close to the speed of light has been envisioned as a route towards producing bright X-ray pulses since Einstein’s seminal work on special relativity. For an ideal relativistic mirror, the peak power of the reflected radiation can substantially exceed that of the incident radiation due to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression. Here we demonstrate for the first time that dense relativistic electron mirrors can be created from the interaction of a high-intensity laser pulse with a freestanding, nanometre-scale thin foil. The mirror structures are shown to shift the frequency of a counter-propagating laser pulse coherently from the infrared to the extreme ultraviolet with an efficiency >104 times higher than in the case of incoherent scattering. Our results elucidate the reflection process of laser-generated electron mirrors and give clear guidance for future developments of a relativistic mirror structure. PMID:23612304

  2. First measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure by autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Rule, D W

    2001-01-01

    We report the initial measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure using a nonintercepting technique based on the autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). A far infrared (FIR) Michelson interferometer with a Golay detector was used to obtain the autocorrelation. The radiation was generated by a thermionic rf gun beam at 40 MeV as it passed through a 5-mm-tall slit/aperture in a metal screen whose surface was at 45 deg. to the beam direction. For the observed bunch lengths of about 450 fs (FWHM) with a shorter time spike on the leading edge, peak currents of about 100 A are indicated. Also a model was developed and used to calculate the CDR from the back of two metal strips separated by a 5-mm vertical gap. The demonstrated nonintercepting aspect of this method could allow on-line bunch length characterizations to be done during free-electron laser experiments.

  3. Coherent Response of Two Dimensional Electron Gas probed by Two Dimensional Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jagannath

    Advent of ultrashort lasers made it possible to probe various scattering phenomena in materials that occur in a time scale on the order of few femtoseconds to several tens of picoseconds. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy techniques, such as pump-probe, transient four wave mixing (TFWM), etc., are very common to study the carrier dynamics in various material systems. In time domain, the transient FWM uses several ultrashort pulses separated by time delays to obtain the information of dephasing and population relaxation times, which are very important parameters that govern the carrier dynamics of materials. A recently developed multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy is an enhanced version of TFWM which keeps track of two time delays simultaneously and correlate them in the frequency domain with the aid of Fourier transform in a two dimensional map. Using this technique, the nonlinear complex signal field is characterized both in amplitude and phase. Furthermore, this technique allows us to identify the coupling between resonances which are rather difficult to interpret from time domain measurements. This work focuses on the study of the coherent response of a two dimensional electron gas formed in a modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well both at zero and at high magnetic fields. In modulation doped quantum wells, the excitons are formed as a result of the inter- actions of the charged holes with the electrons at the Fermi edge in the conduction band, leading to the formation of Mahan excitons, which is also referred to as Fermi edge singularity (FES). Polarization and temperature dependent rephasing 2DFT spectra in combination with TI-FWM measurements, provides insight into the dephasing mechanism of the heavy hole (HH) Mahan exciton. In addition to that strong quantum coherence between the HH and LH Mahan excitons is observed, which is rather surprising at this high doping concentration. The binding energy of Mahan excitons is expected to be greatly

  4. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  5. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes...... s-1, respectively, at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4. This corresponds to an equilibrium constant of 3.4 under these conditions. Thermodynamic and activation parameters of the ET reactions were determined. The significance of these results, particularly the observed low activation barriers, are discussed...

  6. Human ceruloplasmin. Intramolecular electron transfer kinetics and equilibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Bendahl, L; Skov, L K

    1999-01-01

    Pulse radiolytic reduction of disulfide bridges in ceruloplasmin yielding RSSR(-) radicals induces a cascade of intramolecular electron transfer (ET) processes. Based on the three-dimensional structure of ceruloplasmin identification of individual kinetically active disulfide groups and type 1 (T1...... and indeed electron equilibration between T1A and the trinuclear copper center in the domain 1-6 interface takes place with a rate constant of 2.9 +/- 0.6 s(-1). The equilibrium constant is 0.17. Following reduction of T1A Cu(II), another ET process takes place between RSSR(-) and T1B copper(II) of domain 4...

  7. Coherent-phase or random-phase acceleration of electron beams in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.; Montello, Maria L.

    1994-01-01

    Time structures of electron beam signatures at radio wavelengths are investigated to probe correlated versus random behavior in solar flares. In particular we address the issue whether acceleration and injection of electron beams is coherently modulated by a single source, or whether the injection is driven by a stochastic (possibly spatially fragmented) process. We analyze a total of approximately = 6000 type III bursts observed by Ikarus (Zurich) in the frequency range of 100-500 MHz, during 359 solar flares with simultaneous greater than or = 25 keV hard X-ray emission, in the years 1890-1983. In 155 flares we find a total of 260 continuous type III groups, with an average number of 13 +/- 9 bursts per group, a mean duration of D = 12 +/- 14 s, a mean period of P = 2.0 +/- 1.2 s, with the highest burst rate at a frequency of nu = 310 +/- 120 MHz. Pulse periods have been measured between 0.5 and 10 s, and can be described by an exponential distribution, i.e., N(P) varies as e (exp -P/1.0s). The period shows a frequency dependence of P(nu)=46(exp-0.6)(sub MHz)s for different flares, but is invariant during a particular flare. We measure the mean period P and its standard deviation sigma (sub p) in each type III group, and quantify the degree of periodicity (or phase-coherence) by the dimensionless parameter sigma (sub p)P. The representative sample of 260 type III burst groups shows a mean periodicity of sigma (sub p/P) = 0.37 +/- 0.12, while Monte Carlo simulations of an equivalent set of truly random time series show a distinctly different value of sigma (sub p)P = 0.93 +/- 0.26. This result indicates that the injection of electron beams is coherently modulated by a particle acceleration source which is either compact or has a global organization on a timescale of seconds, in contrast to an incoherent acceleration source, which is stochastic either in time or space. We discuss the constraints on the size of the acceleration region resulting from electron beam

  8. Probing Nuclear Spin Effects on Electronic Spin Coherence via EPR Measurements of Vanadium(IV) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael J; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Freedman, Danna E

    2017-07-17

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has the potential to transform numerous fields from cryptography, to finance, to the simulation of quantum systems. A promising implementation of QIP employs unpaired electronic spins as qubits, the fundamental units of information. Though molecular electronic spins offer many advantages, including chemical tunability and facile addressability, the development of design principles for the synthesis of complexes that exhibit long qubit superposition lifetimes (also known as coherence times, or T 2 ) remains a challenge. As nuclear spins in the local qubit environment are a primary cause of shortened superposition lifetimes, we recently conducted a study which employed a modular spin-free ligand scaffold to place a spin-laden propyl moiety at a series of fixed distances from an S = 1 / 2 vanadium(IV) ion in a series of vanadyl complexes. We found that, within a radius of 4.0(4)-6.6(6) Å from the metal center, nuclei did not contribute to decoherence. To assess the generality of this important design principle and test its efficacy in a different coordination geometry, we synthesized and investigated three vanadium tris(dithiolene) complexes with the same ligand set employed in our previous study: K 2 [V(C 5 H 6 S 4 ) 3 ] (1), K 2 [V(C 7 H 6 S 6 ) 3 ] (2), and K 2 [V(C 9 H 6 S 8 ) 3 ] (3). We specifically interrogated solutions of these complexes in DMF-d 7 /toluene-d 8 with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy and found that the distance dependence present in the previously synthesized vanadyl complexes holds true in this series. We further examined the coherence properties of the series in a different solvent, MeCN-d 3 /toluene-d 8 , and found that an additional property, the charge density of the complex, also affects decoherence across the series. These results highlight a previously unknown design principle for augmenting T 2 and open new pathways for the

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I

    1999-01-01

    A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum......(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...... of the crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin and molecular structure calculation of the TUPS modified proteins, electron transfer pathways were calculated. Analysis of the results revealed a good correlation between separation distance from donor to Cu ligating atom (His-N or Cys-S) and the observed...

  10. Photoinduced electron transfer in singly labeled thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate azurin derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borovok, N; Kotlyar, A B; Pecht, I

    1999-01-01

    efficiency. TUPS derivatives of azurin, singly labeled at specific lysine residues, were prepared and purified to homogeneity by ion exchange HPLC. Transient absorption spectroscopy was used to directly monitor the rates of the electron transfer reaction from the photoexcited triplet state of TUPS to Cu......A novel method for the initiation of intramolecular electron transfer reactions in azurin is reported. The method is based on laser photoexcitation of covalently attached thiouredopyrenetrisulfonate (TUPS), the reaction that generates the low potential triplet state of the dye with high quantum......(II) and the back reaction from Cu(I) to the oxidized dye. For all singly labeled derivatives, the rate constants of copper ion reduction were one or two orders of magnitude larger than for its reoxidation, consistent with the larger thermodynamic driving force for the former process. Using 3-D coordinates...

  11. Initial experience with a electronic CT image transfer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K. E.; Loughrey, C.; Morrison, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    An electronic image transfer system for computed tomographic images links the CT scanner in Altnagelvin Hospital, Londonderry with the regional neuroradiology department in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast. In the first 13 months of operation, scans of 100 patients were transferred; 49 scans were taken in acute neurosurgical emergencies, and 51 were non-acute sent for a specialist neuroradiological opinion. Potentially hazardous inter-hospital transfer was avoided in 21 cases of acute neurosurgical emergency, and more efficient and appropriate referral was achieved in the cases whose scans had been sent for sent for radiological second opinion. We believe that the system has substantially improved the diagnosis and management of patients with neurosurgical problems in both hospitals. PMID:8658991

  12. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopies for Probing Electronic Structure and Charge Transfer: Applications to Photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogilvie, Jennifer P. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-11-22

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the only known natural enzyme that uses solar energy to split water, making the elucidation of its design principles critical for our fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and for our ability to mimic PSII’s remarkable properties. This report discusses progress towards addressing key open questions about the PSII RC. It describes new spectroscopic methods that were developed to answer these questions, and summarizes the outcomes of applying these methods to study the PSII RC. Using 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D electronic Stark spectroscopy, models for the PSII RC were tested and refined. Work is ongoing to use the collected data to elucidate the charge separation mechanism in the PSII RC. Coherent dynamics were also observed in the PSII RC for the first time. Through extensive characterization and modeling we have assigned these coherences as vibronic in nature, and believe that they reflect resonances between key vibrational pigment modes and electronic energy gaps that may facilitate charge separation. Work is ongoing to definitively test the functional relevance of electronic-vibrational resonances.

  13. Allenylidene Complexes of Ruthenium: Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Electron Transfer Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winter, R. F.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 248, 15/16 (2004), s. 1565-1583 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/03/0821; GA MŠk OC D14.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : spectroscopy * allenylidine complexes of ruthenium * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.446, year: 2004

  14. Blocking layer modeling for temperature analysis of electron transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we simulate thermal effects on the electron transfer rate from three quantum dots CdSe, CdS and CdTe to three metal oxides TiO2, SnO2 and ZnO2 in the presence of four blocking layers ZnS, ZnO, TiO2 and Al2O3, in a porous quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) structure, using Marcus theory.

  15. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Bimolecular Donor-Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsulami, Qana A.

    2016-11-30

    The efficiency of photoconversion systems, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, is largely controlled by a series of fundamental photophysical processes occurring at the interface before carrier collection. A profound understanding of ultrafast interfacial charge transfer (CT), charge separation (CS), and charge recombination (CR) is the key determinant to improving the overall performances of photovoltaic devices. The discussion in this dissertation primarily focuses on the relevant parameters that are involved in photon absorption, exciton separation, carrier transport, carrier recombination and carrier collection in organic photovoltaic devices. A combination of steady-state and femtosecond broadband transient spectroscopies was used to investigate the photoinduced charge carrier dynamics in various donor-acceptor systems. Furthermore, this study was extended to investigate some important factors that influence charge transfer in donor-acceptor systems, such as the morphology, energy band alignment, electronic properties and chemical structure. Interestingly, clear correlations among the steady-state measurements, time-resolved spectroscopy results, grain alignment of the electron transporting layer (ETL), carrier mobility, and device performance are found. In this thesis, we explored the significant impacts of ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination at donor/acceptor (D/A) interfaces on the performance of a conjugated polymer PTB7-Th device with three fullerene acceptors: PC71BM, PC61BM and IC60BA. Time-resolved laser spectroscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy can illustrate the basis for fabricating solar cell devices with improved performances. In addition, we studied the effects of the incorporation of heavy metals into π-conjugated chromophores on electron transfer by monitoring the triplet state lifetime of the oligomer using transient absorption spectroscopy, as understanding the mechanisms controlling intersystem crossing and

  16. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up.

  17. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  18. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  19. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia.

  20. Coherent and Tunable Terahertz Radiation from Graphene Surface Plasmon Polarirons Excited by Cyclotron Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Gong, Sen; Hu, Min; Zhong, Renbin; Liu, Diwei; Chen, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xinran; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Peiheng; Liu, Shenggang

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) radiation can revolutionize modern science and technology. To this date, it remains big challenges to develop intense, coherent and tunable THz radiation sources that can cover the whole THz frequency region either by means of only electronics (both vacuum electronics and semiconductor electronics) or of only photonics (lasers, for example, quantum cascade laser). Here we present a mechanism which can overcome these difficulties in THz radiation generation. Due to the natural periodicity of 2π of both the circular cylindrical graphene structure and cyclotron electron beam (CEB), the surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) dispersion can cross the light line of dielectric, making transformation of SPPs into radiation immediately possible. The dual natural periodicity also brings significant excellences to the excitation and the transformation. The fundamental and hybrid SPPs modes can be excited and transformed into radiation. The excited SPPs propagate along the cyclotron trajectory together with the beam and gain energy from the beam continuously. The radiation density is enhanced over 300 times, up to 105 W/cm2. The radiation frequency can be widely tuned by adjusting the beam energy or chemical potential. This mechanism opens a way for developing desired THz radiation sources to cover the whole THz frequency regime. PMID:26525516

  1. Coherent electron emission from O2 in collisions with fast electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Madhusree Roy; Stia, Carlos R.; Tachino, Carmen A.; Fojón, Omar A.; Rivarola, Roberto D.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2017-08-01

    Absolute double differential cross sections (DDCS) of secondary electrons emitted in ionization of O2 by fast electrons have been measured for different emission angles. Theoretical calculations of atomic DDCS were obtained using the first Born approximation with an asymptotic charge of Z T = 1. The measured molecular DDCS were divided by twice the theoretical atomic DDCS to detect the presence of interference effects which was the aim of the experiment. The experimental to theoretical DDCS ratios showed clear signature of first order interference oscillation for all emission angles. The ratios were fitted by a first order Cohen-Fano type model. The variation of the oscillation amplitudes as a function of the electron emission angle showed a parabolic behaviour which goes through a minimum at 90°. The single differential and total ionization cross sections have also been deduced, besides the KLL Auger cross sections. In order to make a comparative study, we have discussed these results along with our recent experimental data obtained for N2 molecule.

  2. Effects of electrostatic interactions on electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    The fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulse radiolysis. This technique allows the creation in about 10 -8 second radicals and radical ions with high redox potentials. For solvated electrons electrostatic interaction on the kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is described by Debye's equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from theory can occur in ion pairs formation. This is evidenced experimentally for anions by cation complexation with a cryptate. Relatively slow reactions are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than limited by diffusion. If ion pairs are not formed kinetics constant depends on dielectric constant of solvent and reaction radius. Experimentally is studied the effect of electrostatic interaction on the rate constants of solvated electrons with anions and cations in water-ethanol mixtures where the dielectric constant change from 80 to 25 at room temperature. 17 refs

  3. Coulomb blockade and transfer of electrons one by one

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, Hugues

    1991-01-01

    Zero point fluctuations of the charge on the capacitance of a tunnel junction connected to a bias circuit are in almost all experimental situations larger than the electron charge. As a consequence, the effects of charge granularity are hidden, but in circuits with 'islands', which are electrodes connected to the rest of the circuit only through tunnel junctions and capacitors. The island charge being quantized, its fluctuations are blocked. If the island capacitance is sufficiently small, no electron can enter the island because of the increase of electrostatic energy that would occur. We have observed this effect, called 'Coulomb blockade', in the 'single electron box', where an island is formed between a tunnel junction and a capacitor. A bias voltage source coupled to the island through the capacitor allows to control the number of electrons. We have designed and operated two devices with nano-scale tunnel junctions based on this principle, the 'turnstile' and the 'pump', through which the current is controlled electron by electron. In our experiments, the precision of the transfer is of the order of one percent. It should be a million time better in versions of these devices with more junctions. One could then use them for a new measurement of the fine structure constant alpha. (author) [fr

  4. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito, E-mail: ishizaki@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Fleming, Graham R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures are rather robust, even under the influence of the fluctuations and despite the small Huang-Rhys factors of the Franck-Condon active vibrational modes. This results in long-lasting beating behavior of vibrational origin in the 2D electronic spectra. At physiological temperatures, however, the fluctuations eradicate the mixing, and hence, the beating in the 2D spectra disappears. Further, it is demonstrated that such electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures do not necessarily play a significant role in electronic energy transfer dynamics, despite contributing to the enhancement of long-lived quantum beating in 2D electronic spectra, contrary to speculations in recent publications.

  5. 77 FR 24667 - TANF Assistance and Electronic Benefit Transfer Transactions; Request for Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Electronic Benefit Transfer Transactions; Request for Public Comment AGENCY: Department of Health and Human... States have implemented policies and practices to prevent electronic benefit transfer transactions involving TANF assistance in liquor stores, casinos, gambling casinos, or other gaming establishments, and...

  6. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of IR-driven electron dynamics in a charge transfer model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falge, Mirjam; Fröbel, Friedrich Georg; Engel, Volker; Gräfe, Stefanie

    2017-08-02

    If the adiabatic approximation is valid, electrons smoothly adapt to molecular geometry changes. In contrast, as a characteristic of diabatic dynamics, the electron density does not follow the nuclear motion. Recently, we have shown that the asymmetry in time-resolved photoelectron spectra serves as a tool to distinguish between these dynamics [Falge et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2012, 3, 2617]. Here, we investigate the influence of an additional, moderately intense infrared (IR) laser field, as often applied in attosecond time-resolved experiments, on such asymmetries. This is done using a simple model for coupled electronic-nuclear motion. We calculate time-resolved photoelectron spectra and their asymmetries and demonstrate that the spectra directly map the bound electron-nuclear dynamics. From the asymmetries, we can trace the IR field-induced population transfer and both the field-driven and intrinsic (non-)adiabatic dynamics. This holds true when considering superposition states accompanied by electronic coherences. The latter are observable in the asymmetries for sufficiently short XUV pulses to coherently probe the coupled states. It is thus documented that the asymmetry is a measure for phases in bound electron wave packets and non-adiabatic dynamics.

  7. High-intensity coherent FIR radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, P.H.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Wiedemann, H.; Bocek, D.

    1994-01-01

    A facility to generate high-intensity, ultra-short pulses of broad-band far-infrared radiation has been assembled and tested at Stanford. The device uses sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches to generate coherent radiation through transition or synchrotron radiation in the far-infrared (FIR) regime between millimeter waves and wavelengths of about 100 μm and less. Experimental results show a peak radiation power of greater than 0.33 MW within a micro-bunch and an average FIR radiation power of 4 mW. The average bunch length of 2856 micro-bunches within a 1 μsec macro-pulse is estimated to be about 480 sec. Simulations experimental setup and results will be discussed

  8. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto [Collider Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  9. Coherent electron-spin-resonance manipulation of three individual spins in a triple quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noiri, A. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yoneda, J.; Nakajima, T.; Otsuka, T.; Delbecq, M. R.; Takeda, K.; Tarucha, S. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Amaha, S.; Allison, G. [RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    Quantum dot arrays provide a promising platform for quantum information processing. For universal quantum simulation and computation, one central issue is to demonstrate the exhaustive controllability of quantum states. Here, we report the addressable manipulation of three single electron spins in a triple quantum dot using a technique combining electron-spin-resonance and a micro-magnet. The micro-magnet makes the local Zeeman field difference between neighboring spins much larger than the nuclear field fluctuation, which ensures the addressable driving of electron-spin-resonance by shifting the resonance condition for each spin. We observe distinct coherent Rabi oscillations for three spins in a semiconductor triple quantum dot with up to 25 MHz spin rotation frequencies. This individual manipulation over three spins enables us to arbitrarily change the magnetic spin quantum number of the three spin system, and thus to operate a triple-dot device as a three-qubit system in combination with the existing technique of exchange operations among three spins.

  10. Electron transfer mechanism and photochemistry of ferrioxalate induced by excitation in the charge transfer band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2008-03-17

    The photoredox reaction of ferrioxalate after 266/267 nm excitation in the charge transfer band has been studied by means of ultrafast extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis, optical transient spectroscopy, and quantum chemistry calculations. The Fe-O bond length changes combined with the transient spectra and kinetics have been measured and in combination with ultrahigh frequency density functional theory (UHF/DFT) calculations are used to determine the photochemical mechanism for the Fe(III) to Fe(II) redox reaction. The present data and the results obtained with 266/267 nm excitations strongly suggest that the primary reaction is the dissociation of the Fe-O bond before intramolecular electron transfer occurs. Low quantum yield electron photodetachment from ferrioxalate has also been observed.

  11. A non-destructive electron beam diagnostic for a SASE FEL using coherent off-axis undulator radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuman, C.P.; Ponds, M.L.; Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; O'Shea, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    We show that by observing coherent off-axis undulator radiation (COUR) from a short diagnostic wiggler, it may be possible to determine the length and structure of a short electron bunch. Typically the on-axis undulator radiation is incoherent, but at angles of a few degrees, the wavelength of the emitted radiation may be comparable to the length of a short electron bunch, and thus coherence effects emerge. Due to such coherence effects, the intensity of the emitted radiation may change by up to a factor of 10 9 as the angle of observation is increased. The radiation becomes coherent in a way which depends on the length and structure of the electron bunch. Observing COUR disturbs the electron bunch negligibly. Thus, COUR can be used as a non-destructive diagnostic which would allow for optimization of FEL performance while an FEL is operating. Such a diagnostic could be used for proposed SASE FELs, which use short electron bunches. We present two methods to describe the theory for COUR, and we use these methods to calculate the expected outcome of a COUR experiment. We propose an experiment to demonstrate COUR effects and their applications to SASE FELs

  12. Position-dependent radiative transfer as a tool for studying Anderson localization: Delay time, time-reversal and coherent backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiggelen, B. A.; Skipetrov, S. E.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    Previous work has established that the localized regime of wave transport in open media is characterized by a position-dependent diffusion coefficient. In this work we study how the concept of position-dependent diffusion affects the delay time, the transverse confinement, the coherent backscattering, and the time reversal of waves. Definitions of energy transport velocity of localized waves are proposed. We start with a phenomenological model of radiative transfer and then present a novel perturbational approach based on the self-consistent theory of localization. The latter allows us to obtain results relevant for realistic experiments in disordered quasi-1D wave guides and 3D slabs.

  13. Microbial interspecies electron transfer via electric currents through conductive minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    In anaerobic biota, reducing equivalents (electrons) are transferred between different species of microbes [interspecies electron transfer (IET)], establishing the basis of cooperative behaviors and community functions. IET mechanisms described so far are based on diffusion of redox chemical species and/or direct contact in cell aggregates. Here, we show another possibility that IET also occurs via electric currents through natural conductive minerals. Our investigation revealed that electrically conductive magnetite nanoparticles facilitated IET from Geobacter sulfurreducens to Thiobacillus denitrificans, accomplishing acetate oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction. This two-species cooperative catabolism also occurred, albeit one order of magnitude slower, in the presence of Fe ions that worked as diffusive redox species. Semiconductive and insulating iron-oxide nanoparticles did not accelerate the cooperative catabolism. Our results suggest that microbes use conductive mineral particles as conduits of electrons, resulting in efficient IET and cooperative catabolism. Furthermore, such natural mineral conduits are considered to provide ecological advantages for users, because their investments in IET can be reduced. Given that conductive minerals are ubiquitously and abundantly present in nature, electric interactions between microbes and conductive minerals may contribute greatly to the coupling of biogeochemical reactions. PMID:22665802

  14. Controlling time scales for electron transfer through proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot Wherland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Electron transfer processes within proteins constitute key elements in biological energy conversion processes as well as in a wide variety of biochemical transformations. Pursuit of the parameters that control the rates of these processes is driven by the great interest in the latter reactions. Here, we review a considerable body of results emerging from investigation of intramolecular electron transfer (ET reactions in two types of proteins, all done by the use of the pulse-radiolysis method: first are described results of extensive studies of a model system, the bacterial electron mediating protein azurin, where an internal ET between the disulfide radical ion and the Cu(II is induced. Impact of specific structural changes introduced into azurin on the reaction rates and the parameters controlling it are discussed. Then, the presentation is extended to results of investigations of intra-protein ET reactions that are part of catalytic cycles of multi-copper containing enzymes. Again, the rates and the parameters controlling them are presented and discussed in the context of their efficacy and possible constraints set on their evolution.

  15. 36 CFR 1235.48 - What documentation must agencies transfer with electronic records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... documentation for the following types of electronic records: (i) E-mail messages with attachments; (ii) Scanned... agencies transfer with electronic records? 1235.48 Section 1235.48 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... agencies transfer with electronic records? (a) General. Agencies must transfer documentation adequate to...

  16. Comparison of dynamical aspects of nonadiabatic electron, proton, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Soudackov, Alexander; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in solution are analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations. The rate for nonadiabatic PCET is expressed in terms of a time-dependent probability flux correlation function. The impact of the proton donor-acceptor and solvent dynamics on the probability flux is examined. The dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function is dominated by a solvent damping term that depends on the energy gap correlation function. The proton donor-acceptor motion does not impact the dynamical behavior of the probability flux correlation function but does influence the magnitude of the rate. The approximations previously invoked for the calculation of PCET rates are tested. The effects of solvent damping on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion are found to be negligible, and the short-time solvent approximation, in which only equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent are considered, is determined to be valid for these types of reactions. The analysis of PCET reactions is compared to previous analyses of single electron and proton transfer reactions. The dynamical behavior is qualitatively similar for all three types of reactions, but the time scale of the decay of the probability flux correlation function is significantly longer for single proton transfer than for PCET and single electron transfer due to a smaller solvent reorganization energy for proton transfer

  17. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-08-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer.

  18. Single Electron Transfer Living Radical Polymerization via a New Initiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xiongxiong; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Ai, Lingling; Cheng, Chuanjie

    2014-01-01

    Research and development of novel initiating system such as single electron transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP) is of high importance in polymer chemistry. A new SET-LRP initiator was synthesized and applied to prepare end-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) in this study. α-Trichloromethyl benzyl alcohol was firstly synthesized, followed by preparation of PMMA under SET-LRP conditions. Conversion of MMA was 81.9%, and the molecular weight of PMMA was about 2.5 kDa at 60 °C for 1 h. Consistency of the number-average molecular weight of PMMA from NMR, GPC and theoretical calculation indicated that the polymerization featured controllable property. Broad molecular weight distribution (MWD) may be ascribed to branched polymers formed by initiation and chain transfer

  19. Front-End Electron Transfer Dissociation: A New Ionization Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Lee; Anderson, Lissa C.; Bai, Dina L.; Mullen, Christopher; Syka, John E. P.; English, A. Michelle; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques; Stafford, George C.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Compton, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD), a technique that provides efficient fragmentation while depositing little energy into vibrational modes, has been widely integrated into proteomics workflows. Current implementations of this technique, as well as other ion–ion reactions like proton transfer, involve sophisticated hardware, lack robustness, and place severe design limitations on the instruments to which they are attached. Described herein is a novel, electrical discharge-based reagent ion source that is located in the first differentially pumped region of the mass spectrometer. The reagent source was found to produce intense reagent ion signals over extended periods of time while having no measurable impact on precursor ion signal. Further, the source is simple to construct and enables implementation of ETD on any instrument without modification to footprint. Finally, in the context of hybrid mass spectrometers, relocation of the reagent ion source to the front of the mass spectrometer enables new approaches to gas phase interrogation of intact proteins. PMID:23909443

  20. Advances in Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer From Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroshi; Wei, Jinjia

    This paper reviews recent advances in enhancing boiling heat transfer from electronic components immersed in dielectric liquids by use of surface microstructures. The microstructures developed include rough surfaces produced by sanding, vapor blasting hard particles, sputtering of SiO2 followed by wet etching of the surface, chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 film etc., laser-drilled cavities, a brush-like structure (dendritic structure), reentrant and micro-reentrant cavities, microfins, and porous structures fabricated by alumina particle spraying and painting of silver flakes, diamond particles, aluminum particles and copper particles. Heat sink studs with drilled holes, microfins, multi-layered micro-channels and pores, and pin fins with and without microporous coating have also been developed. The height of microstructure ranges from 0 to 12mm. The primary issues discussed are the mitigation of temperature overshoot at boiling incipience, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer and increasing the critical heat flux.

  1. Molecular Choreography of Isomerization and Electron Transfer Using One and Two Dimensional Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David Paul

    Chemical reactions are defined by the change in the relative positions and bonding of nuclei in molecules. I have used femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to probe these transformations with structural specificity and high time precision revealing the mechanisms of two important classes of reactions; isomerization about an N=N bond and interfacial/intermolecular electron transfer. Isomerization about a double bond is one of the simplest, yet most important, photochemical reactions. In contrast to carbon double bonds, nitrogen double bonds can react via two possible mechanisms; rotation or inversion. To determine which pathway is predominant, I studied an azobenzene derivative using both FSRS and impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (ISRS). The FSRS experiments demonstrated that the photochemical reaction occurs concomitantly with the 700 fs non-radiative decay of the excited state; because no major change in N=N stretching frequency was measured, I surmised that the reaction proceeds through an inversion pathway. My subsequent ISRS experiments confirmed this hypothesis; I observed a highly displaced, low frequency, inversion-like mode, indicating that initial movement out of the Franck-Condon region proceeds along an inversion coordinate. To probe which nuclear motions facilitate electron transfer and charge recombination, I used FSRS and the newly developed 2D-FSRS techniques to study two model systems, triphenylamine dyes bound to TiO2 nanoparticles and a molecular charge transfer (CT) dimer. In the dye-nanoparticle system I discovered that charge separation persists much longer (> 100 ps) than previously thought by using the juxtaposition of the FSRS and transient absorption data to separate the dynamics of the dye from that of the injected electron. Additionally, I discovered that dye constructs with an added vinyl group were susceptible to quenching via isomerization. The CT dimer offered an opportunity to study a system in which charge

  2. Electronic state selectivity in dication-molecule single electron transfer reactions: NO+ + NO

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parkes, M. A.; Lockyear, J. F.; Schröder, Detlef; Roithová, J.; Price, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 41 (2011), s. 18386-18392 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1223 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : coincidence experiments * dications * electron transfer * energy partitioning * state selectivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.573, year: 2011

  3. Electron Transfer and Solvent-Mediated Electronic Localization in Molecular Photocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Harlang, Tobias B.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides a detailed mechanism for electron transfer in a heterodinuclear complex designed as a model system in which to study homogeneous molecular photocatalysis. With efficient Born–Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, we show how intermediate, charge-separated states can mediate...

  4. Fröhlich Coherent States: Implications for Interaction in Biological Systems and Information Transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jiří

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (1995), s. 831-847 ISSN 1210-0552. [Biophysical Aspects of Coherence. Praha, 11.09.1995-15.09.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR 202/94/1055 Keywords : cellular biophysics * self-organising storage * information theory

  5. Entanglement transfer from electrons to photons in quantum dots: an open quantum system approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budich, Jan C; Trauzettel, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    We investigate entanglement transfer from a system of two spin-entangled electron-hole pairs, each placed in a separate single mode cavity, to the photons emitted due to cavity leakage. Dipole selection rules and a splitting between the light hole and the heavy hole subbands are the crucial ingredients establishing a one-to-one correspondence between electron spins and circular photon polarizations. To account for the measurement of the photons as well as dephasing effects, we choose a stochastic Schroedinger equation and a conditional master equation approach, respectively. The influence of interactions with the environment as well as asymmetries in the coherent couplings on the photon entanglement is analysed for two concrete measurement schemes. The first one is designed to violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, while the second one employs the visibility of interference fringes to prove the entanglement of the photons. Because of the spatial separation of the entangled electronic system over two quantum dots, a successful verification of entangled photons emitted by this system would imply the detection of nonlocal spin entanglement of massive particles in a solid state structure.

  6. Large momentum transfer electron scattering from few-nucleon systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, R.G.

    1979-08-01

    A review is given of the experimental results from a series of measurements at SLAC of large momentum transfer (Q 2 > 20 fm -2 ) electron scattering at forward angles from nuclei with A less than or equal to 4. Theoretical interpretations of these data in terms of traditional nuclear physics models and in terms of quark constituent models are described. Some physics questions for future experiments are explored, and a preview of possible future measurements of magnetic structure functions of light nuclei at large Q 2 is given

  7. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force...... is apparently only marginally involved in electron transfer in wild-type azurin. Pathway calculations also suggest that a longer, through-backbone path is more efficient than the shorter one involving Trp48. The former pathway yields an exponential decay factor, beta, of 6.6 nm-1. Another mutation, raising...

  8. Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Boisen, Anja; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electron-transfer dynamics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) iso-l-cytochrome c adsorbed on Au(lll) electrodes in aqueous phosphate buffer media. This cytochrome possesses a thiol group dos e to the protein surface (Cysl02) suitable for linking the protein...... negative ofthe equilibrium potential of YCC, where the protein is electrochemically functional. The MCS data show tensile differential stress signals when YCC is adsorbed on a gold-coate d MCS, with distinguishable adsorption phases in the time range from

  9. Fabrication of shuttle-junctions for nanomechanical transfer of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, A V; Gordeev, S N [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down Road, Bath BA2 7AS (United Kingdom); Koentjoro, O F; Raithby, P R; French, R W; Marken, F [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AS (United Kingdom); Savel' ev, S, E-mail: A.Moskalenko@bath.ac.u [Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-02

    We report on the fabrication of nanomechanical devices for shuttling of electrons from one electrode to another. Each device consists of a 20 nm diameter gold nanoparticle embedded within the gap between two gold electrodes. In two different kinds of shuttle-junctions the nanoparticle is attached to the electrodes through either (i) a single layer of 1,8-octanedithiol or (ii) a multilayer of 1-octanethiol molecules. The thiol layers play the role of 'damped springs', such that when a sufficient voltage bias is applied to the junction, the nanoparticle is expected to start oscillating and thereby transferring electrons from one electrode to the other. For both kinds of shuttle-junctions we observed an abrupt increase in the transmitted current above a threshold voltage, which can be attributed to a transition from the stationary to the oscillating regime. The threshold voltage was found to be lower for single-layer shuttle-junctions.

  10. Effect of electrostatic interactions on electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    Fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulsed radiolysis. By this technique radicals and ionic radicals with high redox potentials are created homogeneously in the solution in about 10 -8 second. For solvated electron effect of electrostatic interaction on kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is obtained with a good approximation by the Debye equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from the theory occurs in ion pair formation, which is evidenced experimentally in reactions between anions when cations are complexed by a cryptate. Slow reactions k 8 M -1 s -1 are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than reactions limited by diffusion. When there is no ion pair formation the velocity constant depends upon dielectric constant of the solvent and reaction distance. 17 refs

  11. Resolution of two distinct electron transfer sites on azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Blatt, Y; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    reaction rates of the Cr(III)-modified protein are attenuated. This decreased reactivity of Cr(III)-labeled azurin toward one of its physiological partners suggests the involvement of the labeled region in the electron transfer reaction with cytochrome c551. Furthermore, the presence of a second active......Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin is stoichiometrically and specifically labeled upon reduction by Cr(II)aq ions, yielding a substitution-inert Cr(III) adduct on the protein surface. We investigated the effect of this chemical modification on the reactivity of azurin with two of its presumed partners...... in the redox system of the bacterium. The Pseudomonas cytochrome oxidase catalyzed oxidation of reduced native and Cr(III)-labeled azurin by O2 was found to be unaffected by the modification. The kinetics of the electron exchange reaction between native or Cr(III)-labeled azurin and cytochrome c551 were...

  12. The electronic transfer of information and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Bishop, Ann P.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Increasing reliance on and investment in information technology and electronic networking systems presupposes that computing and information technology will play a motor role in the diffusion of aerospace knowledge. Little is known, however, about actual information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The authors state that the potential contributions of information technology to increased productivity and competitiveness will be diminished unless empirically derived knowledge regarding the information-seeking behavior of the members of the social system - those who are producing, transferring, and using scientific and technical information - is incorporated into a new technology policy framework. Research into the use of information technology and electronic networks by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists, collected as part of a research project designed to study aerospace knowledge diffusion, is presented in support of this assertion.

  13. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of Er3+:Y2SiO5 for coherent optical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillot-Noel, O.; Goldner, Ph.; Le Du, Y.; Baldit, E.; Monnier, P.; Bencheikh, K.

    2008-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of rare earth ions in crystals is an interesting tool to analyze the hyperfine structure of the rare earth ground state. This can be useful for coherent spectroscopy and quantum information applications where the hyperfine structure of the electronic levels is used. In this work, we give a detailed analysis of the hyperfine structure of the ground state ( 4 I 15/2 (0)) of Er 3+ ions in Y 2 SiO 5

  15. Electron beam excitation of coherent sub-terahertz radiation in periodic structures manufactured by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, A. R.; MacLachlan, A. J.; Robertson, C. W.; Zhang, L.; Konoplev, I. V.; Cross, A. W.; Phelps, A. D. R.

    2017-07-01

    For the creation of novel coherent sub-THz sources excited by electron beams there is a requirement to manufacture intricate periodic structures to produce and radiate electromagnetic fields. The specification and the measured performance is reported of a periodic structure constructed by additive manufacturing and used successfully in an electron beam driven sub-THz radiation source. Additive manufacturing, or "3D printing", is promising to be quick and cost-effective for prototyping these periodic structures.

  16. Concept of a tunable source of coherent THz radiation driven by a plasma modulated electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Konoplev, I. V.; Doucas, G.; Smith, J.

    2018-04-01

    We have carried out numerical studies which consider the modulation of a picosecond long relativistic electron beam in a plasma channel and the generation of a micro-bunched train. The subsequent propagation of the micro-bunched beam in the vacuum area was also investigated. The same numerical model was then used to simulate the radiation arising from the interaction of the micro-bunched beam with a metallic grating. The dependence of the radiation spectrum on the parameters of the micro-bunched beam has been studied and the tunability of the radiation by the variation of the micro-bunch spacing has been demonstrated. The micro-bunch spacing can be changed easily by altering the plasma density without changing the beam energy or current. Using the results of these studies, we develop a conceptual design of a tunable source of coherent terahertz (THz) radiation driven by a plasma modulated beam. Such a source would be a potential and useful alternative to conventional vacuum THz tubes and THz free-electron laser sources.

  17. The LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Timur; Bostedt, Christoph; Castagna, J.-C.; Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Maximilian; Montero, Sebastian C.; Swiggers, Michele L.; Obaid, Razib; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Bozek, John D.; Berrah, Nora

    2018-03-01

    The Laser Applications in Materials Processing (LAMP) instrument is a new end-station for soft X-ray imaging, high-field physics, and ultrafast X-ray science experiments that is available to users at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron laser. While the instrument resides in the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science hutch, its components can be used at any LCLS beamline. The end-station has a modular design that provides high flexibility in order to meet user-defined experimental requirements and specifications. The ultra-high-vacuum environment supports different sample delivery systems, including pulsed and continuous atomic, molecular, and cluster jets; liquid and aerosols jets; and effusive metal vapor beams. It also houses movable, large-format, high-speed pnCCD X-ray detectors for detecting scattered and fluorescent photons. Multiple charged-particle spectrometer options are compatible with the LAMP chamber, including a double-sided spectrometer for simultaneous and even coincident measurements of electrons, ions, and photons produced by the interaction of the high-intensity X-ray beam with the various samples. Here we describe the design and capabilities of the spectrometers along with some general aspects of the LAMP chamber and show some results from the initial instrument commissioning.

  18. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  19. Charge amplification and transfer processes in the gas electron multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, S.; Bressan, A.; Ropelewski, L.; Sauli, F.; Sharma, A.; Moermann, D.

    1999-01-01

    We report the results of systematic investigations on the operating properties of detectors based on the gas electron multiplier (GEM). The dependence of gain and charge collection efficiency on the external fields has been studied in a range of values for the hole diameter and pitch. The collection efficiency of ionization electrons into the multiplier, after an initial increase, reaches a plateau extending to higher values of drift field the larger the GEM voltage and its optical transparency. The effective gain, fraction of electrons collected by an electrode following the multiplier, increases almost linearly with the collection field, until entering a steeper parallel plate multiplication regime. The maximum effective gain attainable increases with the reduction in the hole diameter, stabilizing to a constant value at a diameter approximately corresponding to the foil thickness. Charge transfer properties appear to depend only on ratios of fields outside and within the channels, with no interaction between the external fields. With proper design, GEM detectors can be optimized to satisfy a wide range of experimental requirements: tracking of minimum ionizing particles, good electron collection with small distortions in high magnetic fields, improved multi-track resolution and strong ion feedback suppression in large volume and time-projection chambers

  20. Coherence limits and chirp control in long pulse free electron laser oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Socol

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We report experimental studies of the spectral linewidth and chirp characteristics of the mm-wave rf radiation of the Israeli Electrostatic-Accelerator free electron laser (EA-FEL, along with theory and numerical simulations. The simulations, matching the experimental data, were carried out using a space-frequency-domain model. EA-FELs have the capacity to generate long pulses of tens microseconds and more, that in principle can be elongated indefinitely (cw operation. Since a cold beam FEL is by nature a “homogeneously broadened laser,” EA-FEL can operate, unlike other kinds of FELs, at a single longitudinal mode (single frequency. This allows the generation of very coherent radiation. The current status of the Israeli Tandem Electrostatic-Accelerator FEL, which is based on an electrostatic Van de Graaff accelerator, allows the generation of pulses of tens microseconds duration. It has been operated recently past saturation, and produced single-mode coherent radiation of record narrow inherent relative linewidth ∼Δf/f=10^{-6} at frequencies near 100 GHz. A frequency chirp was observed during the pulses of tens of microseconds (0.3–0.5  MHz/ms. This is essentially a drifting “frequency-pulling effect,” associated with the accelerator voltage drop during the pulse. Additionally, damped relaxation of the FEL oscillator was experimentally measured at the beginning and the end of the lasing pulse, in good correspondence to our theory and numerical simulations. We propose using the chirped signal of the pulsed EA-FEL for single pulse sweep spectroscopy of very fine resolution. The characteristics of this application are analyzed based on the experimental data.

  1. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  2. Concerted Proton-Electron Transfers: Fundamentals and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    Proton-coupled electron transfers (PCET) are ubiquitous in natural and synthetic processes. This review focuses on reactions where the two events are concerted. Semiclassical models of such reactions allow their kinetic characterization through activation versus driving force relationships, estimates of reorganization energies, effects of the nature of the proton acceptor, and H/D kinetic isotope effect as well as their discrimination from stepwise pathways. Several homogeneous reactions (through stopped-flow and laser flash-quench techniques) and electrochemical processes are discussed in this framework. Once the way has been rid of the improper notion of pH-dependent driving force, water appears as a remarkable proton acceptor in terms of reorganization energy and pre-exponential factor, thanks to its H-bonded and H-bonding properties, similarly to purposely synthesized “H-bond train” molecules. The most recent developments are in modeling and description of emblematic concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) reactions associated with the breaking of a heavy-atom bond in an all-concerted process.

  3. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. I. Theory for a dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Peters, William K; Jonas, David M

    2017-10-21

    Non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance in the excited electronic states of natural photosynthetic antennas drastically alters the adiabatic framework, in which electronic energy transfer has been conventionally studied, and suggests the possibility of exploiting non-adiabatic dynamics for directed energy transfer. Here, a generalized dimer model incorporates asymmetries between pigments, coupling to the environment, and the doubly excited state relevant for nonlinear spectroscopy. For this generalized dimer model, the vibrational tuning vector that drives energy transfer is derived and connected to decoherence between singly excited states. A correlation vector is connected to decoherence between the ground state and the doubly excited state. Optical decoherence between the ground and singly excited states involves linear combinations of the correlation and tuning vectors. Excitonic coupling modifies the tuning vector. The correlation and tuning vectors are not always orthogonal, and both can be asymmetric under pigment exchange, which affects energy transfer. For equal pigment vibrational frequencies, the nonadiabatic tuning vector becomes an anti-correlated delocalized linear combination of intramolecular vibrations of the two pigments, and the nonadiabatic energy transfer dynamics become separable. With exchange symmetry, the correlation and tuning vectors become delocalized intramolecular vibrations that are symmetric and antisymmetric under pigment exchange. Diabatic criteria for vibrational-excitonic resonance demonstrate that anti-correlated vibrations increase the range and speed of vibronically resonant energy transfer (the Golden Rule rate is a factor of 2 faster). A partial trace analysis shows that vibronic decoherence for a vibrational-excitonic resonance between two excitons is slower than their purely excitonic decoherence.

  4. Stochasticity induced by coherent wavepackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, V.; Krapchev, V.; Ram, A.; Bers, A.

    1983-02-01

    We consider the momentum transfer and diffusion of electrons periodically interacting with a coherent longitudinal wavepacket. Such a problem arises, for example, in lower-hybrid current drive. We establish the stochastic threshold, the stochastic region δv/sub stoch/ in velocity space, the associated momentum transfer j, and the diffusion coefficient D. We concentrate principally on the weak-field regime, tau/sub autocorrelation/ < tau/sub bounce/

  5. Exogenous electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens 200: electrochemical parameters and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yundang; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-19

    Despite the importance of exogenous electron shuttles (ESs) in extracellular electron transfer (EET), a lack of understanding of the key properties of ESs is a concern given their different influences on EET processes. Here, the ES-mediated EET capacity of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was evaluated by examining the electricity generated in a microbial fuel cell. The results indicated that all the ESs substantially accelerated the current generation compared to only SP200. The current and polarization parameters were linearly correlated with both the standard redox potential (E(ES)(0)) and the electron accepting capacity (EAC) of the ESs. A thermodynamic analysis of the electron transfer from the electron donor to the electrode suggested that the EET from c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) to ESs is a crucial step causing the differences in EET capacities among various ESs. Based on the derived equations, both E(ES)(0) and EAC can quantitatively determine potential losses (ΔE) that reflect the potential loss of the ES-mediated EET. In situ spectral kinetic analysis of ES reduction by c-Cyts in a living SP200 suspension was first investigated with the E(ES), E(c-Cyt), and ΔE values being calculated. This study can provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ESs in EET.

  6. Layered Black Phosphorus: Strongly Anisotropic Magnetic, Electronic, and Electron-Transfer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Sedmidubský, David; Huber, Štěpán; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Boothroyd, Chris; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Layered elemental materials, such as black phosphorus, exhibit unique properties originating from their highly anisotropic layered structure. The results presented herein demonstrate an anomalous anisotropy for the electrical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties of black phosphorus. It is shown that heterogeneous electron transfer from black phosphorus to outer- and inner-sphere molecular probes is highly anisotropic. The electron-transfer rates differ at the basal and edge planes. These unusual properties were interpreted by means of calculations, manifesting the metallic character of the edge planes as compared to the semiconducting properties of the basal plane. This indicates that black phosphorus belongs to a group of materials known as topological insulators. Consequently, these effects render the magnetic properties highly anisotropic, as both diamagnetic and paramagnetic behavior can be observed depending on the orientation in the magnetic field. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant...... cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  8. Radiolytic and electron-transfer reactions in supercritical CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, D. M.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Jonah, C. D.; Takahashi, K.

    2000-01-01

    Using supercritical fluids as solvents is useful for both practical and theoretical reasons. It has been proposed to use supercritical CO 2 as a solvent for synthesis because it eliminates the air pollution arising from other solvents. The properties of supercritical fluids can be easily varied with only modest changes in temperature and density, so they provide a way of testing theories of chemical reactions. It has also been proposed to use supercritical fluids for the treatment of hazardous mixed waste. For these reasons the authors have studied the production of radiolytic species in supercritical CO 2 and have measured their reactivity as a function of density. They have shown that the C 2 O 4 + is formed. They also have shown that the electron transfer reactions of dimethylaniline to C 2 O 4 + and CO 2 (e - ) to benzoquinone are diffusion controlled over a considerable density range

  9. Intramolecular electron transfer in single-site-mutated azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Skov, L K; Pascher, T

    1993-01-01

    . Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 6968-6972]. The RSSR- radical produced in the above reaction was reoxidized in a slower intramolecular electron-transfer process (30-70 s-1 at 298 K) concomitant with a further reduction of the Cu(II) ion. The temperature dependence of the latter rates was determined...... and used to derive information on the possible effects of the mutations. The substitution of residue Phe114, situated on the opposite side of Cu relative to the disulfide, by Ala resulted in a rate increase by a factor of almost 2. By assuming that this effect is only due to an increase in driving force......Single-site mutants of the blue, single-copper protein, azurin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were reduced by CO2- radicals in pulse radiolysis experiments. The single disulfide group was reduced directly by CO2- with rates similar to those of the native protein [Farver, O., & Pecht, I. (1989) Proc...

  10. Electron transfer reactions to probe the electrode/solution interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitanio, F.; Guerrini, E.; Colombo, A.; Trasatti, S. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Dept. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2008-07-01

    The reactions that occur at the interface between an electrode and an electrolyte were examined with particular reference to the interaction of different electrode surfaces with redox couples. A semi-integration or convolution technique was used to study the kinetics of electron transfer on different electrode materials with different hydrophilic behaviour, such as Boron-Doped-Diamond (BDD), Au and Pt. Standard reversible redox couples were also investigated, including (Fe3+/2+, Fe(CN)63-/4-, Ru(NH3)63+/2+, Co(NH3)63+/2+, Ir4+/3+, V4+/5+ and V3+/2+). The proposed method proved to be simple, straightforward and reliable since the obtained kinetic information was in good agreement with data in the literature. It was concluded that the kinetics of the electrode transfer reactions depend on the chemical nature of the redox couple and electrode material. The method should be further extended to irreversible couples and other electrode materials such as mixed oxide electrodes. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Laser-induced forward transfer for printed electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Sopeña, P.; González-Torres, S.; Arrese, J.; Cirera, A.; Serra, P.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a printing technique based on the action of a laser pulse that is focused on a thin film of a precursor ink for getting the transfer of a droplet onto a receiver substrate. The experiments presented in this article aim to demonstrate the ability of LIFT to produce electronic circuits on paper, a substrate that is flexible, cheap and recyclable. Tests were conducted to study the printing of conductive tracks with an Ag ink. The printing of a suspension of carbon nanofibers was also studied to demonstrate the ability of LIFT for printing inks with particles with some microns in size that provoke inkjet nozzles to clog. As a proof-of-concept of the LIFT possibilities, both inks were used to print entirely by LIFT a functional humidity sensor on a piece of paper. All the LIFT experiments were performed with a Nd:YAG laser that delivers pulses of a few hundreds of ns in an attempt to approach the technique to laser systems that are already introduced in many production lines for marking and labeling.

  12. Spatial coherence of electron beams from field emitters and its effect on the resolution of imaged objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana, E-mail: tatiana@physik.uzh.ch

    2017-04-15

    Sub-nanometer and nanometer-sized tips provide high coherence electron sources. Conventionally, the effective source size is estimated from the extent of the experimental biprism interference pattern created on the detector by applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem. Previously reported experimental intensity distributions on the detector exhibit Gaussian distribution and our simulations show that this is an indication that such electron sources must be at least partially coherent. This, in turn means that strictly speaking the Van Cittert Zernike theorem cannot be applied, since it assumes an incoherent source. The approach of applying the van Cittert Zernike theorem is examined in more detail by performing simulations of interference patterns for the electron sources of different size and different coherence length, evaluating the effective source size from the extent of the simulated interference pattern and comparing the obtained result with the pre-defined value. The intensity distribution of the source is assumed to be Gaussian distributed, as it is observed in experiments. The visibility or the contrast in the simulated holograms is found to be always less than 1 which agrees well with previously reported experimental results and thus can be explained solely by the Gaussian intensity distribution of the source. The effective source size estimated from the extent of the interference pattern turns out to be of about 2–3 times larger than the pre-defined size, but it is approximately equal to the intrinsic resolution of the imaging system. A simple formula for estimating the intrinsic resolution, which could be useful when employing nano-tips in in-line Gabor holography or point-projection microscopy, is provided. - Highlights: • van Cittert Zernike theorem for nano- and sub-nano electron emitting tips is revised. • Simulations show that nano- and sub-nano electron emitting tips are at least partially coherent. • A simple formula for evaluating

  13. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in the 22 MeV Accelerator for a Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Justin [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CeC) offers a potential new method of cooling hadron beams in colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the future electron ion collider eRHIC. A 22 MeV linear accelerator is currently being built as part of a proof of principle experiment for CeC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this thesis we present a simulation of electron beam dynamics including space charge in the 22 MeV CeC proof of principle experiment using the program ASTRA (A Space charge TRacking Algorithm).

  14. Coherent population transfer in multi-level Allen-Eberly models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Cen, Li-Xiang

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the solvability of multi-level extensions of the Allen-Eberly model and the population transfer yielded by the corresponding dynamical evolution. We demonstrate that, under a matching condition of the frequency, the driven two-level system and its multi-level extensions possess a stationary-state solution in a canonical representation associated with a unitary transformation. As a consequence, we show that the resulting protocol is able to realize complete population transfer in a nonadiabatic manner. Moreover, we explore the imperfect pulsing process with truncation and display that the nonadiabatic effect in the evolution can lead to suppression to the cutoff error of the protocol.

  15. Allosteric control of internal electron transfer in cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Kroneck, Peter M H; Zumft, Walter G

    2003-01-01

    Cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase is a bifunctional multiheme enzyme catalyzing the one-electron reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide and the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the internal electron transfer process in the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme have...... been studied and found to be dominated by pronounced interactions between the c and the d1 hemes. The interactions are expressed both in dramatic changes in the internal electron-transfer rates between these sites and in marked cooperativity in their electron affinity. The results constitute a prime...... example of intraprotein control of the electron-transfer rates by allosteric interactions....

  16. Observation of coherent population transfer in a four-level tripod system with a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hayato; Ichimura, Kouichi

    2007-01-01

    Coherent population transfer in a laser-driven four-level system in a tripod configuration is experimentally investigated with a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal (Pr 3+ :Y 2 SiO 5 ). The population transfers observed here indicate that a main process inducing them is not optical pumping, which is an incoherent process inducing population transfer. Moreover, numerical simulation, which well reproduces the experimental results, also shows that the process inducing the observed population transfers is similar to stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) in the sense that this process possesses characteristic features of STIRAP

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer reaction in polymer-surfactant aggregates: Photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and 7-amino coumarin dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Anjan; Seth, Debabrata; Setua, Palash; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2008-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between coumarin dyes and N,N-dimethylaniline has been investigated by using steady state and picosecond time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles and PVP-polyvinyl pyrrolidone (SDS) polymer-surfactant aggregates. A slower rate of electron transfer is observed in PVP-SDS aggregates than in polymer-free SDS micelles. A Marcus type inversion is observed in the correlation of free energy change in comparison with the electron transfer rate. The careful investigation reveals that C-151 deviates from the normal Marcus inverted region compared to its analogs C-152 and C-481 due to slower rotational relaxation and smaller translational diffusion coefficient

  18. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  19. Distinguishing between coherent magnetization rotation and generation of incoherent spin waves in a spin-transfer effect experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw; Jones, Barbara

    2002-03-01

    Electric current flowing from one metallic ferromagnet to another induces an interaction between them [1,2]. This interaction is qualitatively different from the one observed in equilibrium and creates a so-called ``spin-transfer'' torque - a subject of recent interest in the field of spintronics. Technologically spin-transfer effect is very interesting due to its possible usefulness for the memory writing process based on ``current induced switching" in metallic magnetic structures. Physics of spin-transfer torque involves interesting issues of spin-injection, spin-accumulation and excitation of different types of magnetic modes in the ferromagnets. The result of spin-transfer torque action depends on which magnetic mode is most easily excited by the spin-polarized current. Currently there are two views on the nature of this mode. In one approach [1] it is assumed that a coherent rotation of magnetization is induced and in the other [2,3] - that incoherent spin waves are generated. While in a real experiment both modes are probably excited at the same time, intuitively it seems natural that coherent rotation is more likely to happen when the angle between injected spins and magnetization is large. On the contrary in a collinear case spin-wave generation is more likely to happen. In the experiments done so far [4] the effect of spin-transfer torque was studied in the collinear setup. In [5] we applied the general approach of Ref.1 to this experiment and were able to give exact predictions for the particular magnetic anisotropy of the experiment [4]. While those predictions do not completely agree with the experimental results, a theory based on spin-wave generation [6] also seems to be ruled out by [4]. Here we propose a relatively easy modification of experiment [4] in which the spin-polarization of incoming current is no longer collinear with magnetization and recalculate the switching behavior of the device. We expect that a better agreement with experiment will

  20. Coherent bremsstrahlung and channeling radiation from electrons of one to three MeV in silicon and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of sharp peaks in the x-ray spectrum from 1 to 3 MeV electrons striking thin single crystals of silicon and gold is reported. These peaks were observed in the range 1 to 25 keV. The peaks are of two different origins, both direct results of the periodic nature of the target crystals. The first kind of radiation is caused by the interference of incoming and scattered electron wave functions. Because of the periodicity of the target material there is a coherence effect for certain bremsstrahlung wave vectors. This coherent bremsstrahlung, though well known at very high electron energies, has never been adequately studied at electron energies below several hundred MeV. Detailed agreement between theoretical prediction and observation in silicon is shown. The second kind of radiation is caused by electrons channeled along major crystal axes. The electrons enter certain quantized orbits as they channel and may emit photons as a consequence of transitions between the various orbits. Observations of channeling radiation for various crystal axes in silicon are presented. Both phenomena were observed in gold, the first such observation for any metallic target

  1. Dynamic-Stark-effect-induced coherent mixture of virtual paths in laser-dressed helium: energetic electron impact excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueny, Hicham; Makhoute, Abdelkader; Dubois, Alain

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum virtual path interference caused by the dynamic Stark effect in bound-bound electronic transitions. The effect is studied in an intermediate resonant region and in connection with the energetic electron impact excitation of a helium atom embedded in a weak low-frequency laser field. The process under investigation is dealt with via a Born-Floquet approach. Numerical calculations show a resonant feature in laser-assisted cross sections. The latter is found to be sensitive to the intensity of the laser field dressing. We show that this feature is a signature of quantum beats which result from the coherent mixture of different quantum virtual pathways, and that excitation may follow in order to end up with a common final channel. This mixture arises from the dynamic Stark effect, which produces a set of avoided crossings in laser-dressed states. The effect allows one to coherently control quantum virtual path interference by varying the intensity of the laser field dressing. Our findings suggest that the combination of an energetic electron and a weak laser field is a useful tool for the coherent control of nonadiabatic transitions in an intermediate resonant region.

  2. Control of Electron Transfer from Lead-Salt Nanocrystals to TiO 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hyun, Byung-Ryool

    2011-05-11

    The roles of solvent reorganization energy and electronic coupling strength on the transfer of photoexcited electrons from PbS nanocrystals to TiO 2 nanoparticles are investigated. We find that the electron transfer depends only weakly on the solvent, in contrast to the strong dependence in the nanocrystal-molecule system. This is ascribed to the larger size of the acceptor in this system, and is accounted for by Marcus theory. The electronic coupling of the PbS and TiO 2 is varied by changing the length, aliphatic and aromatic structure, and anchor groups of the linker molecules. Shorter linker molecules consistently lead to faster electron transfer. Surprisingly, linker molecules of the same length but distinct chemical structures yield similar electron transfer rates. In contrast, the electron transfer rate can vary dramatically with different anchor groups. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Late-onset form of beta-electron transfer flavoprotein deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curcoy, A; Olsen, R K J; Ribes, A

    2003-01-01

    Multiple acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) or glutaric aciduria type II (GAII) are a group of metabolic disorders due to deficiency of either electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). We report the clinical features and bioch......Multiple acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) or glutaric aciduria type II (GAII) are a group of metabolic disorders due to deficiency of either electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). We report the clinical features...

  4. Electron transfer reactions of macrocyclic compounds of cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1978-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of reduction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, and I/sub 2/ by various macrocyclic tetraaza complexes of cobalt(II), including Vitamin B/sub 12r/, were studied. The synthetic macrocycles studied were all 14-membered rings which varied in the degree of unsaturation,substitution of methyl groups on the periphery of the ring, and substitution within the ring itself. Scavenging experiments demonstrated that the reductions of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produce free hydroxyl radicals only in the case of Co((14)ane)/sup 2 +/ but with none of the others. In the latter instances apparently H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ simultaneously oxidizes the metal center and the ligand. The reductions of Br/sub 2/ and I/sub 2/ produce an aquohalocobalt(III) product for all reductants (except B/sub 12r/ + Br/sub 2/, which was complicated by bromination of the corrin ring). The mechanism of halogen reduction was found to involve rate-limiting inner-sphere electron transfer from cobalt to halogen to produce a dihalide anion coordinated to the cobalt center. This intermediate subsequently decomposes in rapid reactions to halocobalt(III) and halogen atom species or reacts with another cobalt(II) center to give two molecules of halocobalt(III). The reductions of halomethylcobaloximes and related compounds and diamminecobaloxime by Cr/sup 2 +/ were also studied. The reaction was found to be biphasic in all cases with the reaction products being halomethane (for the halomethylcobaloximes), Co/sup 2 +/ (in less than 100 percent yield), a Cr(III)-dimethylglyoxime species, a small amount of free dmgH/sub 2/, and a highly-charged species containing both cobalt and chromium. The first-stage reaction occurs with a stoichiometry of 1:1 producing an intermediate with an absorption maximum at 460 nm for all starting reagents. The results were interpreted in terms of inner-sphere coordination of the cobaloxime to the Cr(II) and electron transfer through the oxime N-O bond.

  5. Structural factors influencing the intramolecular charge transfer and photoinduced electron transfer in tetrapyrazinoporphyrazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Veronika; Hladík, Petr; Filandrová, Tereza; Zajícová, Ivana; Krepsová, Veronika; Miletin, Miroslav; Lenčo, Juraj; Zimcik, Petr

    2014-03-21

    A series of unsymmetrical tetrapyrazinoporphyrazines (TPyzPzs) from the group of azaphthalocyanines with one peripherally attached amino substituent (donor) were synthesized, and their photophysical properties (fluorescence quantum yield and singlet oxygen quantum yield) were determined. The synthesized TPyzPzs were expected to undergo intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) as the main pathway for deactivating their excited states. Several structural factors were found to play a critical role in ICT efficiency. The substituent in the ortho position to the donor center significantly influences the ICT, with tert-butylsulfanyl and butoxy substituents inducing the strongest ICTs, whereas chloro, methyl, phenyl, and hydrogen substituents in this position reduce the efficiency. The strength of the donor positively influences the ICT efficiency and correlates well with the oxidation potential of the amines used as the substituents on the TPyzPz as follows: n-butylamine ICT (with conjugated donors and acceptors) in the TPyzPz also proved to be much stronger than a photoinduced electron transfer in which the donor and the acceptor are connected through an aliphatic linker.

  6. Forbidden coherent transfer observed between two realizations of quasi-harmonic spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorescu, Irinel; Yue, Guang; Dutoit, Charles-Emanuel; Bertaina, Sylvain

    Using a multi-level quantum system, we demonstrate Rabi oscillations between states belonging to different realizations of quasi-harmonic oscillators. The Mn ions diluted in a MgO matrix have tunable equally-spaced Sz spin states. The hyperfine field is large enough to separate sets of states {Iz ,Sz = - 5 / 2 ¦ + 5 / 2 } of consecutive Iz values. Due to the combined action of the hyperfine and crystal-field operators, such sets are coupled. If this coupling is strong enough and the coherence times of the electro-nuclear states are large enough, a level repulsion of corresponding dressed states is to be observed. Experimentally, we have been able to implement a two-tone technique allowing us to excite the multi-level system at any detuning, and then read it with a resonant pulse. This technique allows us to achieve a strong coupling regime when a splitting between Rabi oscillations of the electro-nuclear states is observable, although the states belong to different Iz values. This demonstrates the possibility of including long-lived nuclear states as a degree of freedom in quantum computing based on multi-level systems. Supported by the NSF Cooperative Agreement DMR-1157490, the State of Florida, the Grant NSF DMR- 1206267, CNRS-PICS CoDyLow and CNRS research federation RENARD (FR3443).

  7. Quantifying electron-phonon coupling in CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} nanocrystals via coherent phonon manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spann, B. T.; Xu, X., E-mail: xxu@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-08-25

    We employ ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with temporal pulse shaping to manipulate coherent phonon excitation and quantify the strength of electron-phonon coupling in CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} nanocrystals (NCs). Raman active CdSe and CdTe longitudinal optical phonon (LO) modes are excited and probed in the time domain. By temporally controlling pump pulse pairs to coherently excite and cancel coherent phonons in the CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} NCs, we estimate the relative amount of optical energy that is coupled to the coherent CdSe LO mode.

  8. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  9. Comparing Fourier optics and contrast transfer function modeling of image formation in low energy electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K M; Locatelli, A; Altman, M S

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical understanding of image formation in cathode lens microscopy can facilitate image interpretation. We compare Fourier Optics (FO) and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) approaches that were recently adapted from other realms of microscopy to model image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Although these two approaches incorporate imaging errors from several sources similarly, they differ in the way that the image intensity is calculated. The simplification that is used in the CTF calculation advantageously leads to its computational efficiency. However, we find that lens aberrations, and spatial and temporal coherence may affect the validity of the CTF approach to model LEEM image formation under certain conditions. In particular, these effects depend strongly on the nature of the object being imaged and also become more pronounced with increasing defocus. While the use of the CTF approach appears to be justified for objects that are routinely imaged with LEEM, comparison of theory to experimental observations of a focal image series for rippled, suspended graphene reveals one example where FO works, but CTF does not. This work alerts us to potential pitfalls and guides the effective use of FO and CTF approaches. It also lays the foundation for quantitative image evaluation using these methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficient Computation of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Taking into Account 6D Phase Space Distribution of Emitting Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubar, O.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2007-01-01

    CPU-efficient method for calculation of the frequency domain electric field of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) taking into account 6D phase space distribution of electrons in a bunch is proposed. As an application example, calculation results of the CSR emitted by an electron bunch with small longitudinal and large transverse sizes are presented. Such situation can be realized in storage rings or ERLs by transverse deflection of the electron bunches in special crab-type RF cavities, i.e. using the technique proposed for the generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses (A. Zholents et. al., 1999). The computation, performed for the parameters of the SOLEIL storage ring, shows that if the transverse size of electron bunch is larger than the diffraction limit for single-electron SR at a given wavelength -- this affects the angular distribution of the CSR at this wavelength and reduces the coherent flux. Nevertheless, for transverse bunch dimensions up to several millimeters and a longitudinal bunch size smaller than hundred micrometers, the resulting CSR flux in the far infrared spectral range is still many orders of magnitude higher than the flux of incoherent SR, and therefore can be considered for practical use

  11. Development of a coherent THz radiation source based on the ultra-short electron beam and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Sei, N.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K.

    2011-01-01

    At the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), a coherent terahertz (THz) radiation source has been developed based on an ultra-short electron beam using an S-band compact electron linac. The designed THz pulse has a high peak power of more than 1 kW in the frequency range 0.1-2 THz. The entire system is located in one research room of about 10 m square. The linac consists of a laser photocathode rf gun (BNL type) with a Cs 2 Te photocathode load-lock system and two 1.5-m-long S-band accelerator tubes. The electron beam can be accelerated up to approximately 42 MeV. The electron bunch was compressed to less than 1 ps (rms) with a magnetic bunch compressor. The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of the THz region was generated from the ultra-short electron bunch at the 90 o bending magnet, and it was extracted from a z-cut quartz window for THz applications. In this work, the THz scanning transmission imaging was successfully demonstrated for measuring the freshness of a vegetable leaf over a period of time.

  12. Direct electron transfer from glucose oxidase immobilized on a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghighi, Behzad, E-mail: haghighi@iasbs.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizi, Mahmoud Amouzadeh [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P.O. Box 45195-1159, Gava Zang, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: > A direct electron transfer reaction of glucose oxidase was observed on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode. > A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed at the formal potential of approximately -0.439 V. > The apparent electron transfer rate constant was measured to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. > A mechanism for the observed direct electron transfer reaction was proposed, which consists of a two-electron and a two-proton transfer. - Abstract: A pair of well-defined and reversible redox peaks was observed for the direct electron transfer (DET) reaction of an immobilized glucose oxidase (GOx) on the surface of a nano-porous glassy carbon electrode at the formal potential (E{sup o}') of -0.439 V versus Ag/AgCl/saturated KCl. The electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) was calculated to be 5.27 s{sup -1}. The dependence of E{sup o}' on pH indicated that the direct electron transfer of the GOx was a two-electron transfer process, coupled with two-proton transfer. The results clearly demonstrate that the nano-porous glassy carbon electrode is a cost-effective and ready-to-use scaffold for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor.

  13. Hybrid organic-inorganic coatings via electron transfer behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubi, Wail Al; Min, Ji Hoon; Ko, Young Gun

    2017-08-01

    A novel method to functionalize the surface of inorganic coating by growing organic coating has been investigated based on microstructural interpretation, electrochemical assessment, and quantum chemical analysis. For this purpose, inorganic coating with magnesium aluminate, magnesium oxide, and titanium dioxide was prepared on magnesium alloy via plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), and, then, subsequent dip-coating method was used to tailor organic coating using diethyl-5-hydroxyisophthalate (DEIP) as organic molecules. The incorporation of TiO 2 particles worked as a sealing agent to block the micro-defects which resulted mainly from the intense plasma sparks during PEO. In addition, such incorporation played an important role in enhancing the adhesion between inorganic and organic coatings. The use of DEIP as organic corrosion inhibitor resulted in a significant decrease in porosity of inorganic coating. Quantum chemical calculation was used to clarify the corrosion inhibition mechanism which was activated by introduction of DEIP. Thus, the electrochemical analysis based on potentiodynamic polarization and impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution suggested that corrosion resistance of magnesium alloy sample was enhanced significantly due to a synergistic effect arising from the hybrid inorganic and organic coatings. This phenomenon was explained in relation to electron transfer behaviour between inorganic and organic coatings.

  14. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K.; Dean, Dennis R.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2013-01-01

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s−1, 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s−1, 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s−1, 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s−1, 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein–protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Feox(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein. PMID:24062462

  15. Electron transfer precedes ATP hydrolysis during nitrogenase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Simon; Danyal, Karamatullah; Shaw, Sudipta; Lytle, Anna K; Dean, Dennis R; Hoffman, Brian M; Antony, Edwin; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2013-10-08

    The biological reduction of N2 to NH3 catalyzed by Mo-dependent nitrogenase requires at least eight rounds of a complex cycle of events associated with ATP-driven electron transfer (ET) from the Fe protein to the catalytic MoFe protein, with each ET coupled to the hydrolysis of two ATP molecules. Although steps within this cycle have been studied for decades, the nature of the coupling between ATP hydrolysis and ET, in particular the order of ET and ATP hydrolysis, has been elusive. Here, we have measured first-order rate constants for each key step in the reaction sequence, including direct measurement of the ATP hydrolysis rate constant: kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C. Comparison of the rate constants establishes that the reaction sequence involves four sequential steps: (i) conformationally gated ET (kET = 140 s(-1), 25 °C), (ii) ATP hydrolysis (kATP = 70 s(-1), 25 °C), (iii) Phosphate release (kPi = 16 s(-1), 25 °C), and (iv) Fe protein dissociation from the MoFe protein (kdiss = 6 s(-1), 25 °C). These findings allow completion of the thermodynamic cycle undergone by the Fe protein, showing that the energy of ATP binding and protein-protein association drive ET, with subsequent ATP hydrolysis and Pi release causing dissociation of the complex between the Fe(ox)(ADP)2 protein and the reduced MoFe protein.

  16. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  17. Cooperative electrocatalytic alcohol oxidation with electron-proton-transfer mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2016-07-01

    electron-proton-transfer mediators, such as TEMPO, may be used in combination with first-row transition metals, such as copper, to achieve efficient two-electron electrochemical processes, thereby introducing a new concept for the development of non-precious-metal electrocatalysts.

  18. 77 FR 50243 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ..., senders should be informed they would not receive actual notice of the price of the transfer or of the... threshold might exclude from the rule's coverage both a person who makes few transfers, but at a high price, and a person who offers many more transfers for free or at a very low price, as a value-added service...

  19. Generating high-brightness and coherent soft x-ray pulses in the water window with a seeded free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaishang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new scheme to generate high-brightness and temporal coherent soft x-ray radiation in a seeded free-electron laser. The proposed scheme is based on the coherent harmonic generation (CHG and superradiant principles. A CHG scheme is first used to generate a coherent signal at ultrahigh harmonics of the seed. This coherent signal is then amplified by a series of chicane-undulator modules via the fresh bunch and superradiant processes in the following radiator. Using a representative of a realistic set of parameters, three-dimensional simulations have been carried out and the simulations results demonstrated that 10 GW-level ultrashort (∼20  fs coherent radiation pulses in the water window can be achieved by using a 1.6 GeV electron beam based on the proposed technique.

  20. Characterization of temporal coherence of hard X-ray free-electron laser pulses with single-shot interferograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taito Osaka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Temporal coherence is one of the most fundamental characteristics of light, connecting to spectral information through the Fourier transform relationship between time and frequency. Interferometers with a variable path-length difference (PLD between the two branches have widely been employed to characterize temporal coherence properties for broad spectral regimes. Hard X-ray interferometers reported previously, however, have strict limitations in their operational photon energies, due to the specific optical layouts utilized to satisfy the stringent requirement for extreme stability of the PLD at sub-ångström scales. The work presented here characterizes the temporal coherence of hard X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL pulses by capturing single-shot interferograms. Since the stability requirement is drastically relieved with this approach, it was possible to build a versatile hard X-ray interferometer composed of six separate optical elements to cover a wide photon energy range from 6.5 to 11.5 keV while providing a large variable delay time of up to 47 ps at 10 keV. A high visibility of up to 0.55 was observed at a photon energy of 10 keV. The visibility measurement as a function of time delay reveals a mean coherence time of 5.9 ± 0.7 fs, which agrees with that expected from the single-shot spectral information. This is the first result of characterizing the temporal coherence of XFEL pulses in the hard X-ray regime and is an important milestone towards ultra-high energy resolutions at micro-electronvolt levels in time-domain X-ray spectroscopy, which will open up new opportunities for revealing dynamic properties in diverse systems on timescales from femtoseconds to nanoseconds, associated with fluctuations from ångström to nanometre spatial scales.

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer from semiconductor quantum dots to metal oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvrdy, Kevin; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Kamat, Prashant V

    2011-01-04

    Quantum dot-metal oxide junctions are an integral part of next-generation solar cells, light emitting diodes, and nanostructured electronic arrays. Here we present a comprehensive examination of electron transfer at these junctions, using a series of CdSe quantum dot donors (sizes 2.8, 3.3, 4.0, and 4.2 nm in diameter) and metal oxide nanoparticle acceptors (SnO(2), TiO(2), and ZnO). Apparent electron transfer rate constants showed strong dependence on change in system free energy, exhibiting a sharp rise at small driving forces followed by a modest rise further away from the characteristic reorganization energy. The observed trend mimics the predicted behavior of electron transfer from a single quantum state to a continuum of electron accepting states, such as those present in the conduction band of a metal oxide nanoparticle. In contrast with dye-sensitized metal oxide electron transfer studies, our systems did not exhibit unthermalized hot-electron injection due to relatively large ratios of electron cooling rate to electron transfer rate. To investigate the implications of these findings in photovoltaic cells, quantum dot-metal oxide working electrodes were constructed in an identical fashion to the films used for the electron transfer portion of the study. Interestingly, the films which exhibited the fastest electron transfer rates (SnO(2)) were not the same as those which showed the highest photocurrent (TiO(2)). These findings suggest that, in addition to electron transfer at the quantum dot-metal oxide interface, other electron transfer reactions play key roles in the determination of overall device efficiency.

  2. Estimating side-chain order in methyl-protonated, perdeuterated proteins via multiple-quantum relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hechao; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2012-01-01

    Relaxation violated coherence transfer NMR spectroscopy (Tugarinov et al. in J Am Chem Soc 129:1743–1750, 2007) is an established experimental tool for quantitative estimation of the amplitudes of side-chain motions in methyl-protonated, highly deuterated proteins. Relaxation violated coherence transfer experiments monitor the build-up of methyl proton multiple-quantum coherences that can be created in magnetically equivalent spin-systems as long as their transverse magnetization components relax with substantially different rates. The rate of this build-up is a reporter of the methyl-bearing side-chain mobility. Although the build-up of multiple-quantum 1 H coherences is monitored in these experiments, the decay of the methyl signal during relaxation delays occurs when methyl proton magnetization is in a single-quantum state. We describe a relaxation violated coherence transfer approach where the relaxation of multiple-quantum 1 H– 13 C methyl coherences during the relaxation delay period is quantified. The NMR experiment and the associated fitting procedure that models the time-dependence of the signal build-up, are applicable to the characterization of side-chain order in [ 13 CH 3 ]-methyl-labeled, highly deuterated protein systems up to ∼100 kDa in molecular weight. The feasibility of extracting reliable measures of side-chain order is experimentally verified on methyl-protonated, perdeuterated samples of an 8.5-kDa ubiquitin at 10°C and an 82-kDa Malate Synthase G at 37°C.

  3. Photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer kinetics in small unilamellar vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Sharmistha Dutta; Kumbhakar, Manoj; Nath, Sukhendu; Pal, Haridas

    2007-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) from N,N-dimethylaniline to some coumarin derivatives has been studied in small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of the phospholipid, DL-α-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine, using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, both below and above the phase transition temperature of the vesicles. The primary interest was to examine whether Marcus inversion [H. Sumi and R. A. Marcus, J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] could be observed for the present ET systems in these organized assemblies. The influence of the topology of SUVs on the photophysical properties of the reactants and consequently on their ET kinetics has also been investigated. Absorption and fluorescence spectral data of the coumarins in SUVs and the variation of their fluorescence decays with temperature indicate that the dyes are localized in the bilayer of the SUVs. Time-resolved area normalized emission spectra analysis, however, reveals that the dyes are distributed in two different microenvironments in the SUVs, which we attribute to the two leaflets of the bilayer, one toward bulk water and the other toward the inner water pool. The microenvironments in the two leaflets are, however, not indicated to be that significantly different. Time-resolved anisotropy decays were biexponential for all the dyes in SUVs, and this has been interpreted in terms of the compound motion model according to which the dye molecules can experience a fast wobbling-in-cone type of motion as well as a slow overall rotating motion of the cone containing the molecule. The expected bimolecular diffusion-controlled rates in SUVs, as estimated by comparing the microviscosities in SUVs (determined from rotational correlation times) and that in acetonitrile solution, are much slower than the observed fluorescence quenching rates, suggesting that reactant diffusion (translational) does not play any role in the quenching kinetics in the present systems. Accordingly, clear inversions are

  4. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner, E-mail: hwfink@physik.uzh.ch

    2015-12-15

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. - Highlights: • Structural biology of single proteins. • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Holography. • Low-energy electrons. • Coherent diffraction and phase retrieval.

  5. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  6. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  7. Ultrafast electron and energy transfer in dye-sensitized iron oxide and oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Huse, Nils

    2013-01-01

    –310 fs were found for all samples. Comparison between TA dynamics on uncoated and dye-sensitized hematite nanoparticles revealed the dye de-excitation pathway to consist of a competition between electron and energy transfer to the nanoparticles. We analyzed the TA data for hematite nanoparticles using...... a four-state model of the dye-sensitized system, finding electron and energy transfer to occur on the same ultrafast timescale. The interfacial electron transfer rates for iron oxides are very close to those previously reported for DCF-sensitized titanium dioxide (for which dye–oxide energy transfer...... photo-initiated interfacial electron transfer. This approach enables time-resolved study of the fate and mobility of electrons within the solid phase. However, complete analysis of the ultrafast processes following dye photoexcitation of the sensitized iron(iii) oxide nanoparticles has not been reported...

  8. A short comparison of electron and proton transfer processes in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The main differences between electron and proton transfers that take place in biological systems are examined. The relation between the distance dependence of the rate constant and the mass of the transferred particle is analyzed in detail. Differences between the two processes have important consequences at the experimental level, which are discussed. The various mechanisms that ensure the coupling between electron and proton transfers are briefly described

  9. Pulse radiolytic and electrochemical investigations of intramolecular electron transfer in carotenoporphyrins and carotenoporphyrin-quinone triads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, E.J.; Lexa, D.; Bensasson, R.V.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L.; Liddell, P.A.; Nemeth, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions in carotenoporphyrin dyads and carotenoid-porphyrin-quinone triads have been studied by using pulse radiolysis and cyclic voltammetry. Rapid (<1 μs) electron transfer from carotenoid radical anions to attached porphyrins has been inferred. Carotenoid cations, on the other hand, do not readily accept electrons from attached porphyrins or pyropheophorbides. Electrochemical studies provide the thermodynamic basis for these observations and also allow estimation of the energetics of photoinitiated two-step electron transfer and two-step charge recombination in triad models for photosynthetic charge separation

  10. Contribution of charge-transfer processes to ion-induced electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, M.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Charge changing events of ions moving inside metals are shown to contribute significantly to electron emission in the intermediate velocity regime via electrons coming from projectile ionization. Inclusion of equilibrium charge state fractions, together with two-electron Auger processes and resonant-coherent electron loss from the projectile, results in reasonable agreement with previous calculations for frozen protons, though a significant part of the emission is now interpreted in terms of charge exchange. The quantal character of the surface barrier transmission is shown to play an important role. The theory compares well with experimental observations for H projectiles. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for stationary and coherent states of an electron in a uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagrov, V.G.; Gitman, D.M.; Skarzhinskiy, V.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect that arises from a quantum-mechanical description of electron motion in a magnetic field in the presence of an infinitely thin and long solenoid is examined. In the stationary states this effect is manifest in the appearance of an additional series of energy levels shifted with respect to the Landau levels by a magnitude dependent on the magnetic field flux in the solenoid. Quantum states similar to coherent states are formulated that describe quasi-classical electron motion. In these states the existence of the solenoid causes additional electron oscillations with respect to a classical orbit and changes the relations between the parameters of classical motion. This makes it possible to provide a simple interpretation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect

  12. Partially coherent imaging and spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, Roman

    2003-03-01

    A description of spatially partially coherent imaging based on the propagation of second order spatial coherence wavelets and marginal power spectra (Wigner distribution functions) is presented. In this dynamics, the spatial coherence wavelets will be affected by the system through its elementary transfer function. The consistency of the model with the both extreme cases of full coherent and incoherent imaging was proved. In the last case we obtained the classical concept of optical transfer function as a simple integral of the elementary transfer function. Furthermore, the elementary incoherent response function was introduced as the Fourier transform of the elementary transfer function. It describes the propagation of spatial coherence wavelets form each object point to each image point through a specific point on the pupil planes. The point spread function of the system was obtained by a simple integral of the elementary incoherent response function. (author)

  13. High-energy coherent terahertz radiation emitted by wide-angle electron beams from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Brunetti, Enrico; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2018-04-01

    High-charge electron beams produced by laser-wakefield accelerators are potentially novel, scalable sources of high-power terahertz radiation suitable for applications requiring high-intensity fields. When an intense laser pulse propagates in underdense plasma, it can generate femtosecond duration, self-injected picocoulomb electron bunches that accelerate on-axis to energies from 10s of MeV to several GeV, depending on laser intensity and plasma density. The process leading to the formation of the accelerating structure also generates non-injected, sub-picosecond duration, 1–2 MeV nanocoulomb electron beams emitted obliquely into a hollow cone around the laser propagation axis. These wide-angle beams are stable and depend weakly on laser and plasma parameters. Here we perform simulations to characterise the coherent transition radiation emitted by these beams if passed through a thin metal foil, or directly at the plasma–vacuum interface, showing that coherent terahertz radiation with 10s μJ to mJ-level energy can be produced with an optical to terahertz conversion efficiency up to 10‑4–10‑3.

  14. 77 FR 77187 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... flexibility regarding the disclosure of foreign taxes, as well as fees imposed by a designated recipient's... transfer provider's obligation to disclose foreign taxes to those imposed by a country's central government... comprehensive consumer protection regime for remittance transfers sent by consumers in the United States to...

  15. 78 FR 30661 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... Bureau staff conducted outreach with various parties about the issues raised by the December Proposal or... and fees imposed on a remittance transfer by an agent of the provider at pick-up for receiving the... the recipient picks up the transfer from an agent. In these cases, all fees imposed on the remittance...

  16. Theory of proton coupled electron transfer reactions: Assessing the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the proton motion using an analytically solvable model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Renhui; Jing Yuanyuan; Chen Liping; Shi Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: An analytically solvable model was employed to study proton coupled electron transfer reactions. Approximated theories are assessed, and vibrational coherence is observed in case of small reorganization energy. Research highlights: → The Duschinsky rotation effect in PCET reactions. → Assessment of the BO approx. for proton motion using an analytically solvable model. → Vibrational coherence in PCET in the case of small reorganization energy. - Abstract: By employing an analytically solvable model including the Duschinsky rotation effect, we investigated the applicability of the commonly used Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation for separating the proton and proton donor-acceptor motions in theories of proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. Comparison with theories based on the BO approximation shows that, the BO approximation for the proton coordinate is generally valid while some further approximations may become inaccurate in certain range of parameters. We have also investigated the effect of vibrationally coherent tunneling in the case of small reorganization energy, and shown that it plays an important role on the rate constant and kinetic isotope effect.

  17. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piot, P.; Maxwell, T. J.; Sun, Y.-E; Ruan, J.; Lumpkin, A. H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Rihaoui, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f≅20% at f≅0.5THz) transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. The bunch train is generated via a transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchange technique. We also show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  18. Modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency of electron bombarded charge coupled device detector for low energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 9 (2005), 093704:1-6 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/1575 Keywords : electron bombarded CCD * modulation transfer function * detective quantum efficiency Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.235, year: 2005

  19. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure Graphene Electron Transfer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of nanostructure graphene thin films as electron transfer layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs was demonstrated. The effect of a nanostructure graphene thin film in DSSC structure was examined. The nanostructure graphene thin films provides a great electron transfer channel for the photogenerated electrons from TiO2 to indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Obvious improvements in short-circuit current density of the DSSCs were observed by using the graphene electron transport layer modified photoelectrode. The graphene electron transport layer reduces effectively the back reaction in the interface between the ITO transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC.

  20. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  1. Syntrophic growth with direct interspecies electron transfer as the primary mechanism for energy exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Aklujkar, Muktak

    2013-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) through biological electrical connections is an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for electron exchange in syntrophic cultures. However, it has not previously been determined whether electrons received via DIET yield energy....... The lack of acetate metabolism resulted in less fumarate reduction and lower cell abundance of G. sulfurreducens. RNAseq analysis of transcript abundance was consistent with a lack of acetate metabolism in G. sulfurreducens and revealed gene expression levels for the uptake hydrogenase, formate...... dehydrogenase, the pilus-associated c-type cytochrome OmcS and pili consistent with electron transfer via DIET. These results suggest that electrons transferred via DIET can serve as the sole energy source to support anaerobic respiration....

  2. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in the C2H4--Br2 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; George, Lisa; Reid, Scott A.

    2011-06-01

    We have used a new dual-nozzle late-mixing scheme for the trapping and interrogation of pre-reactive donor-acceptor complexes to examine photoinduced electron transfer in the prototypical Mulliken donor-acceptor (halogen bonded) π-complex, C2H4--Br2. The charge transfer transition of this band was measured for the first time, and the position and intensity of this band is in excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. Excitation into the intense charge transfer band of the complex leads exclusively to the anti-conformer of the single reaction product, 1,2-dibromoethane, in agreement with the Mulliken theory of electron transfer.

  3. Characterization and mitigation of coherent-optical-transition-radiation signals from a compressed electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Lumpkin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Photon Source (APS injector complex includes an option for rf photocathode (PC gun beam injection into the 450-MeV S-band linac. At the 150-MeV point, a four-dipole chicane was used to compress the micropulse bunch length from a few ps to sub-0.5 ps (FWHM. Noticeable enhancements of the optical transition radiation (OTR signal sampled after the APS chicane were then observed as has been reported in the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS injector commissioning. A far-infrared (FIR coherent transition radiation detector and interferometer were used to monitor the bunch compression process and correlate the appearance of localized spikes of OTR signal (5 to 10 times brighter than adjacent areas within the beam-image footprint. We have performed spectral-dependency measurements at 375 MeV with a series of bandpass filters centered in 50-nm increments from 400 to 700 nm and with an imaging spectrometer and observed a broadband enhancement in these spikes. Mitigation concepts of the observed coherent OTR, which exhibits an intensity enhancement in the red part of the visible spectrum as compared to incoherent OTR, are described.

  4. Generation and Amplification of Coherent Radiation with Optical Orbital Angular Momentum in a Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsing, Erik Willard

    The object of this work is to examine how coherent light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM) can be generated and amplified in a single pass, high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) at the fundamental operating frequency. This concept unites two rapidly expanding, but at present largely non-overlapping fields of study: high-order OAM light modes, which interact in new ways with matter, and FELs, in which a relativistically energetic electron beam emits coherent, ultra high-brightness, highly frequency-tunable light. The ability to generate OAM light in an FEL enables new regimes of laser interaction physics to be explored at wavelengths down to hard x-rays. The theoretical portion of this dissertation attempts to provide a new predictive mathematical framework. It builds on existing work, and describes the three-dimensional electromagnetic field of the high-gain FEL as a sum of OAM modes such that the amplification properties of individual modes can be characterized. The effects of uncorrelated energy spread, longitudinal space charge, energy detuning, and transverse emittance in the electron beam are included, as is the diffraction of the laser light. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by detailed numerical Genesis 1.3 simulations. When the theory is extended to frequency harmonics, a novel interaction is uncovered that generates a helical electron beam density distribution. These predictions are also supported by numerical Tredi simulations. This type of highly correlated structure is shown to naturally emit OAM light, and forms the basis of a new high-gain, high-mode generation (HGHMG) scheme proposed in its entirety here. The experimental section examines the helical microbunching concept in a proof-of-principle experiment dubbed HELIX, performed at the UCLA Neptune laboratory. We present detailed measurement of the coherent transition radiation emitted by the 12.5 MeV electron beam that is microbunched in a second harmonic interaction with an input

  5. Electro-Optical Detection of Coherent Radiation Induced by Relativistic Electron Bunches in the Near and Far Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Anania, M.; Bisesto, F.; Botton, M.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Galletti, M.; Giulietti, D.; Henis, Z.; Petrarca, M.; Pompili, R.; Schleifer, E.; Zigler, A.

    2018-02-01

    Coherent radiation produced by relativistic charged bunches is nowadays of great interest for user-oriented applications and high-resolution diagnostics. Here we present experimental results obtained by using a temporal monitor based on the electro-optical sampling that allows us to reveal the features of the radiation emitted in terahertz range by ultrashort electron bunches moving in proximity to a nonlinear crystal. We investigate the radiation properties both in near- and far-field conditions by employing electron beams accelerated by a conventional photoinjector and through laser-plasma interactions. Our results indicate that the emitted radiation moves collinearly with the beam in one case, while its properties resemble those of the classical Cherenkov radiation in a second case.

  6. Dynamics of charge-transfer excitons in type-II semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, M.; Lammers, C.; Richter, P.-H.; Fuchs, C.; Stolz, W.; Koch, M.; Vänskä, O.; Weseloh, M. J.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.

    2018-03-01

    The formation, decay, and coherence properties of charge-transfer excitons in semiconductor heterostructures are investigated by applying four-wave-mixing and terahertz spectroscopy in combination with a predictive microscopic theory. A charge-transfer process is identified where the optically induced coherences decay directly into a charge-transfer electron-hole plasma and exciton states. It is shown that charge-transfer excitons are more sensitive to the fermionic electron-hole substructure than regular excitons.

  7. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...

  8. Photochemical reactions of electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine via photoinduced electron-transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yang; Zhao Junshu; Ji Yuanyuan; Yan Lei; Yu Shuqin

    2006-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of several electron-deficient olefins with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in acetonitrile solution have been studied by using laser flash photolysis technique and steady-state fluorescence quenching method. Laser pulse excitation of TMB yields 3 TMB* after rapid intersystem crossing from 1 TMB*. The triplet which located at 480 nm is found to undergo fast quenching with the electron acceptors fumaronitrile (FN), dimethyl fumarate (DMF), diethyl fumarate (DEF), cinnamonitrile (CN), α-acetoxyacrylonitrile (AAN), crotononitrile (CrN) and 3-methoxyacrylonitrile (MAN). Substituents binding to olefin molecule own different electron-donating/withdrawing powers, which determine the electron-deficient property (π-cloud density) of olefin molecule as well as control the electron transfer rate constant directly. The detection of ion radical intermediates in the photolysis reactions confirms the proposed electron transfer mechanism, as expected from thermodynamics. The quenching rate constants of triplet TMB by these olefins have been determined at 510 nm to avoid the disturbance of formed TMB cation radical around 475 nm. All the k q T values approach or reach to the diffusion-controlled limit. In addition, fluorescence quenching rate constants k q S have been also obtained by calculating with Stern-Volmer equation. A correlation between experimental electron transfer rate constants and free energy changes has been explained by Marcus theory of adiabatic outer-sphere electron transfer. Disharmonic k q values for CN and CrN in endergonic region may be the disturbance of exciplexs formation. e of exciplex formation

  9. Pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer processes and applications to solar photochemistry. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neta, P.

    1995-02-01

    The pulse radiolysis technique is applied to the study of electron transfer processes in a variety of chemical systems. Reactive intermediates are produced in solution by electron pulse irradiation and the kinetics of their reactions are followed by time resolved absorption spectrophotometry. Complementary experiments are carried out with excimer laser flash photolysis. These studies are concerned with mechanisms, kinetics, and thermodynamics of reactions of organic and inorganic radicals and unstable oxidation states of metal ions. Reactions are studied in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. The studies focus on the unique ability of pulse radiolysis to provide absolute rate constants for reactions of many inorganic radicals and organic peroxyl radicals, species that are key intermediates in many chemical processes. A special concern of this work is the study of electron transfer reactions of metalloporphyrins, which permits evaluation of these molecules as intermediates in solar energy conversion. Metalloporphyrins react with free radicals via electron transfer, involving the ligand or the metal center, or via bonding to the metal, leading to a variety of chemical species whose behavior is also investigated. The highlights of the results during the past three years are summarized below under the following sections: (a) electron transfer reactions of peroxyl radicals, concentrating on the characterization of new peroxyl radicals derived from vinyl, phenyl, other aryl, and pyridyl; (b) solvent effects on electron transfer reactions of inorganic and organic peroxyl radicals, including reactions with porphyrins, and (c) electron transfer and alkylation reactions of metalloporphyrins and other complexes.

  10. Electron transfer of nitrogen, oxygen and silicon in vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhazha, V.M.; Chernyj, B.P.; Ryabchikov, L.N.

    1975-01-01

    In order to assess the possibility of refining vanadium by the electricity transfer method, the process of electricity transfer of impurities of nitrogen, oxygen and silicon in vanadium is studied. The diffusion coefficients for these impurities in the temperature range of 1565-1665 0 C are determined. The distribution of impurities over the length of a specimen is determined by methods of potentials and eddy currents. The electricity transfer is performed in a hermetically sealed flask in argon atmosphere. The diffusion coefficient values for O 2 , N 2 , Si in V at 1665 0 C are measured to be 1.0x10 -5 ; 0.38x10 -5 ; 4.7x10 -5 cm.g/sec, respectively, which corresponds to an activation energy of 12, 20 and 24 kcal/mol. Also estimated are their effective valence and charge carrier density per atom of vanadium. The data obtained stubstantiate the ''hole'' mechanism of vanadium conductivity

  11. Electron transfer from CO2lg-bullet- to perylene in cyclohexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.; Jonah, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    CO 2 lg-bullet- formed by the reactions of the electron with CO 2 in cyclohexane transfers an electron to perylene with a rate constant of 2.9 x 10 10 M -1 s -1 . Gε 580nm for the perylene radical anion is 9 x 10 3 molecules (100 eV) -1 M -1 cm -1 . The transfer of an electron from CO 2 lg-bullet+ to an aromatic molecule is a significant process when CO 2 is used as an electron scavenger in solution where the production of excited states of the aromatic molecule is studied. 24 refs., 6 figs

  12. Electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II) complexes with polyphenolic acids in micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Chemistry, Fatima College, Madurai 625 018 (India); Ramdass, Arumugam [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Research Department of Chemistry, Aditanar College of Arts and Science, Tiruchendur 628 216 (India); Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Department of Industrial Chemistry, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Rajagopal, Seenivasan, E-mail: rajagopalseenivasan@yahoo.com [School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India)

    2016-02-15

    The electron transfer in a microhetrogeneous system is a perfect mimic of biological electron transfer. The electron transfer between biologically important phenolic acids and ruthenium (II) complexes is systematically studied in the presence of anionic and cationic micelles. The photophysical properties of these ruthenium (II) complexes with anionic and cationic micelles and their binding abilities with these two type of micelles are also studies using absorption, emission and excited state lifetime spectral techniques. Pseudophase Ion Exchange (PIE) Model is applied to derive mechanism of electron transfer in two types of micelles. - Highlights: • Effect of microhetrogeneous system is studied using ruthenium (II) complexes and gallic acid is studied. • Pseudophase Ion exchange model is applied to derive the mechanism. • Binding constants are in the range of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} M{sup −1}.

  13. 77 FR 34127 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Transfer Account (ETA) Financial Agency Agreement AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management...

  14. 77 FR 71035 - Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Financial Management Service; Proposed Collection of Information: Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) Market Research Study AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and Request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management...

  15. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic behaviour of mixed self-assembled ferrocenes and SWCNT layers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron transfer dynamics and electrocatalytic behaviour of ferrocene-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), co-adsorbed with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a gold electrode, have been interrogated for the first time...

  16. Transferred metal electrode films for large-area electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jin-Guo [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, Medical Drive, Singapore S117456 (Singapore); Kam, Fong-Yu [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); Chua, Lay-Lay [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Lower Kent Ridge Road, Singapore S117543 (Singapore)

    2014-11-10

    The evaporation of metal-film gate electrodes for top-gate organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) limits the minimum thickness of the polymer gate dielectric to typically more than 300 nm due to deep hot metal atom penetration and damage of the dielectric. We show here that the self-release layer transfer method recently developed for high-quality graphene transfer is also capable of giving high-quality metal thin-film transfers to produce high-performance capacitors and OFETs with superior dielectric breakdown strength even for ultrathin polymer dielectric films. Dielectric breakdown strengths up to 5–6 MV cm{sup −1} have been obtained for 50-nm thin films of polystyrene and a cyclic olefin copolymer TOPAS{sup ®} (Zeon). High-quality OFETs with sub-10 V operational voltages have been obtained this way using conventional polymer dielectrics and a high-mobility polymer semiconductor poly[2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-2,5-diyl]. The transferred metal films can make reliable contacts without damaging ultrathin polymer films, self-assembled monolayers and graphene, which is not otherwise possible from evaporated or sputtered metal films.

  17. 76 FR 81019 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    .... A financial institution may combine the required disclosures into a single statement for a consumer... statement within 60 days of the financial institution's transmittal of the statement to avoid liability for.... (3) Business days. The financial institution's business days. (4) Types of transfers; limitations...

  18. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... final rule, published elsewhere in today's Federal Register, that implements section 1073 of the Dodd... business'' in the definition of ``remittance transfer provider.'' This definition determines whether a..., on official business days between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern Time. You can make an...

  19. Role of ligand substitution on long-range electron transfer in azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Jeuken, L J; Canters, G W

    2000-01-01

    Azurin contains two potential redox sites, a copper centre and, at the opposite end of the molecule, a cystine disulfide (RSSR). Intramolecular electron transfer between a pulse radiolytically produced RSSR- radical anion and the blue Cu(II) ion was studied in a series of azurins in which single-...... activation enthalpy and activation entropy was observed. These results are discussed in terms of reorganization energies, driving force and possible electron-transfer pathways....

  20. Electron Transfer Studies of Ruthenium(II) Complexes with Biologically Important Phenolic Acids and Tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeswari, Angusamy; Ramdass, Arumugam; Muthu Mareeswaran, Paulpandian; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2016-03-01

    The ruthenium(II) complexes having 2,2'-bipyridine and phenanthroline derivatives are synthesized and characterized. The photophysical properties of these complexes at pH 12.5 are studied. The electron transfer reaction of biologically important phenolic acids and tyrosine are studied using absorption, emission and transient absorption spectral techniques. Semiclassical theory is applied to calculate the rate of electron transfer between ruthenium(II) complexes and biologically important phenolic acids.

  1. Effect of resonant-to-bulk electron momentum transfer on the efficiency of electron-cyclotron current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Smith, G.R.; Cohen, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Efficiency of current drive by electron-cyclotron waves is investigated numerically by a bounce-average Fokker-Planck code to elucidate the effects of momentum transfer from resonant to bulk electrons, finite bulk temperature relative to the energy of resonant electrons, and trapped electrons. Comparisons are made with existing theories to assess their validity and quantitative difference between theory and code results. Difference of nearly a factor of 2 was found in efficiency between some theory and code results. 4 refs., 4 figs

  2. Design of Photoactive Ruthenium Complexes to Study Electron Transfer and Proton Pumping in Cytochrome Oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the development and application of photoactive ruthenium complexes to study electron transfer and proton pumping reactions in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO uses four electrons from Cc to reduce O2 to two waters, and pumps four protons across the membrane. The electron transfer reactions in cytochrome oxidase are very rapid, and cannot be resolved by stopped-flow mixing techniques. Methods have been developed to covalently attach a photoactive tris(bipyridine)ruthenium group [Ru(II)] to Cc to form Ru-39-Cc. Photoexcitation of Ru(II) to the excited state Ru(II*), a strong reductant, leads to rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group in Cc, followed by electron transfer to CuA in CcO with a rate constant of 60,000 s−1. Ruthenium kinetics and mutagenesis studies have been used to define the domain for the interaction between Cc and CcO. New ruthenium dimers have also been developed to rapidly inject electrons into CuA of CcO with yields as high as 60%, allowing measurement of the kinetics of electron transfer and proton release at each step in the oxygen reduction mechanism. PMID:21939635

  3. Electronic state alignment, orientation, and coherence produced by beam-foil collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    The cylindrically symmetric beam-foil collision produces excitation and alignment of atom and ion levels similar, but not identical, to that resulting at comparable energies from ion-atom or ion-molecule collisions. When the foil is tilted, the macroscopic change acts on the microscopic scale to produce coherent alignment and orientation of the excited levels. The maximum beam energy range bounding this interaction has not yet been defined. The dynamic interaction which produces these effects is currently not predicted by any theory, although the dynamics of the ions subsequent to the collision are well understood. Refinement of current experimental technique can be expected to better define the final foil surface. The beam-tilted-foil collision promises to be useful in the study of ionic structure via quantum beat, radio-frequency and level-crossing spectroscopy techniques, and may provide a useful probe for certain surface interactions. 4 figs, 48 refs

  4. Online monitoring of printed electronics by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Alarousu, Erkki

    2013-03-28

    Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is an optical method capable of 3D imaging of object\\'s internal structure with micron-scale resolution. Modern SD-OCT tools offer the speed capable of online monitoring of printed devices. This paper demonstrates the use of SD-OCT in a simulated roll-to-roll (R2R) process through monitoring some structural properties of moving screen printed interdigitated electrodes. It is shown that structural properties can be resolved for speeds up to ca. 1m/min, which is the first step towards application of this method in real manufacturing processes, including roll-to-roll (R2R) printing.

  5. Online monitoring of printed electronics by Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarousu, Erkki; AlSaggaf, Ahmed; Jabbour, Ghassan E

    2013-01-01

    Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is an optical method capable of 3D imaging of object's internal structure with micron-scale resolution. Modern SD-OCT tools offer the speed capable of online monitoring of printed devices. This paper demonstrates the use of SD-OCT in a simulated roll-to-roll (R2R) process through monitoring some structural properties of moving screen printed interdigitated electrodes. It is shown that structural properties can be resolved for speeds up to ca. 1 m/min, which is the first step towards application of this method in real manufacturing processes, including roll-to-roll (R2R) printing.

  6. Excited state electron spin coherence (ESESC) studies of triplet states in molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrasch, M.E.

    1978-02-01

    The field of coherent spectroscopy of two-level systems is applied to the lowest triplet state of organic molecules. By neglecting the triplet sublevel not coupled by the field, it is possible to describe the remaining two levels with Feynman-Vernon-Hellwarth geometrical representation of a general two-level system. The equations of motion of the pseudomagnetization are derived after transformation to the rotating frame, as are Bloch-type equations which include phenomenological relaxation times. The loss of coherence due to exchange between triplet states with different Larmor frequencies but identical zero-field dipolar tensor axes is then discussed. By writing two sets of coupled Bloch equations, expressions for the effective decay rate and frequency shift of the experimentally monitored triplet system are derived and discussed in the limits of slow and rapid exchange. This analysis is applied to intramolecular tunneling between different configurations of cyclopentanone. It is shown by both spin locking and CW spectra that the tunneling rate is considerably slower than the phosphorescence decay rate of the lowest triplet state. Rotary echoes are considered, both on- and off-resonance, with Average Hamiltonian theory. It is shown that relaxation fields perpendicular to the driving field are averaged while those parallel to it are not. The inhomogeneity in the broadening mechanism is completely removed by on-resonance rotary echoes but only partially eliminated by off-resonance rotary echoes. Calculations for off-resonance rotary echo intensities are presented and extended to include triplet sublevel population kinetics and inhomogeneous broadening. Finally, experimental observation of rotary echoes in several 1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene systems is reported and compared with the theoretical predictions made.

  7. "Super-Reducing" Photocatalysis: Consecutive Energy and Electron Transfers with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasholz, Malte

    2017-08-21

    Donation welcome: Recent developments in visible-light photocatalysis allow the utilization of increasingly negative reduction potentials. Successive energy and electron transfer with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons enables the catalytic formation of strongly reducing arene radical anions, classical stoichiometric reagents for one-electron reduction in organic synthesis. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, John; Martin, Michael C; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando; Schönlein, Robert W; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max S

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the "femtoslicing" beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. This CSR, whose measured intensity is routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing experiments, represents a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for its characterization and in this paper an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation is presented.

  9. Electronic Bottleneck and Coherent Vibrational Effect on Relaxation Dynamics of Photoexcited Ions in Crystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfano, R. R

    2000-01-01

    .... The resonance energy transfer from a local mode of 733 cm(sup -1) in Cr( sup 4+): Ca2GeO4 to resonance phonon mode of the host crystal was found to dominate the initial step of the energy relaxation of the photoexcited impurity ions...

  10. Tailored Electron Transfer Pathways in Aucore /Ptshell -Graphene Nanocatalysts for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Ding, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Au@Pt NPs with atomically thin Pt shells are attached on graphene via L-cysteine (Cys), which serves as linkers controlling NP loading and dispersion, enhancing the Au@Pt NP stability, and facilitating interfacial electron transfer. The increased activity of G-Cys-Au@Pt, compared to non......-chemically immobilized G-Au@Pt and commercial platinum NPs catalyst (C-Pt), is a result of (1) the tailored electron transfer pathways of covalent bonds integrating Au@Pt NPs into the graphene framework, and (2) synergetic electronic effects of atomically thin Pt shells on Au cores. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation...

  11. Molecular view of an electron transfer process essential for iron–sulfur protein biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Calderone, Vito; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Giachetti, Andrea; Jaiswal, Deepa; Mikolajczyk, Maciej; Piccioli, Mario; Winkelmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Biogenesis of iron–sulfur cluster proteins is a highly regulated process that requires complex protein machineries. In the cytosolic iron–sulfur protein assembly machinery, two human key proteins—NADPH-dependent diflavin oxidoreductase 1 (Ndor1) and anamorsin—form a stable complex in vivo that was proposed to provide electrons for assembling cytosolic iron–sulfur cluster proteins. The Ndor1–anamorsin interaction was also suggested to be implicated in the regulation of cell survival/death mechanisms. In the present work we unravel the molecular basis of recognition between Ndor1 and anamorsin and of the electron transfer process. This is based on the structural characterization of the two partner proteins, the investigation of the electron transfer process, and the identification of those protein regions involved in complex formation and those involved in electron transfer. We found that an unstructured region of anamorsin is essential for the formation of a specific and stable protein complex with Ndor1, whereas the C-terminal region of anamorsin, containing the [2Fe-2S] redox center, transiently interacts through complementary charged residues with the FMN-binding site region of Ndor1 to perform electron transfer. Our results propose a molecular model of the electron transfer process that is crucial for understanding the functional role of this interaction in human cells. PMID:23596212

  12. Photochemistry and electron-transfer mechanism of transition metal oxalato complexes excited in the charge transfer band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hua; Tomov, Ivan V; Ding, Xunliang; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2008-10-07

    The photoredox reaction of trisoxalato cobaltate (III) has been studied by means of ultrafast extended x-ray absorption fine structure and optical transient spectroscopy after excitation in the charge-transfer band with 267-nm femtosecond pulses. The Co-O transient bond length changes and the optical spectra and kinetics have been measured and compared with those of ferrioxalate. Data presented here strongly suggest that both of these metal oxalato complexes operate under similar photoredox reaction mechanisms where the primary reaction involves the dissociation of a metal-oxygen bond. These results also indicate that excitation in the charge-transfer band is not a sufficient condition for the intramolecular electron transfer to be the dominant photochemistry reaction mechanism.

  13. Comparison of the coherent radiation-induced microbunching instability in a free-electron laser and a magnetic chicane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Reiche

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL is a device which is based on the creation of a very intense, relativistic electron beam which has very little temperature in all three phase planes. The beam in this system is described as having “high brightness,” and when it is bent repetitively in a magnetic undulator, undergoes a radiation-mediated microbunching instability. This instability can amplify the original radiation amplitude at a particular, resonant wavelength by many orders of magnitude. In order to obtain high brightness beams, it is necessary to compress them to obtain higher currents than available from the electron source. Compression is accomplished by the use of magnetic chicanes, which are quite similar to, if much longer than, a single period of the undulator. It should not be surprising that such chicanes also support a radiation-mediated microbunching interaction, which has recently been investigated, and has been termed coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR instability. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the characteristics of the closely related FEL and CSR microbunching instabilities. We show that a high-gain regime of the CSR instability exists which is formally similar to the FEL instability.

  14. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2015-12-01

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effect of morphology and defect density on electron transfer of electrochemically reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan, E-mail: yanzhang@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Hao, Huilian, E-mail: huilian.hao@sues.edu.cn [School of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wang, Linlin, E-mail: wlinlin@mail.ustc.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Different morphologies of ERGO on the surface of GCE were prepared via different methods. • The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. • A higher defect density of ERGO accelerates electron transfer rate. • ERGO with more exposed edge planes shows significantly higher electron transfer kinetics. • Both edge planes and defect density contribute to electron transfer of ERGO. - Abstract: Electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) is widely used to construct electrochemical sensors. Understanding the electron transfer behavior of ERGO is essential for its electrode material applications. In this paper, different morphologies of ERGO were prepared via two different methods. Compared to ERGO/GCEs prepared by electrochemical reduction of pre-deposited GO, more exposed edge planes of ERGO are observed on the surface of ERGO-GCE that was constructed by electrophoretic deposition of GO. The defect densities of ERGO were controlled by tuning the mass or concentration of GO. The electron transfer kinetics (k{sup 0}) of GCE with different ERGOs was comparatively investigated. Owing to increased surface areas and decreased defect density, the k{sup 0} values of ERGO/GCE initially increase and then decrease with incrementing of GO mass. When the morphology and surface real areas of ERGO-GCE are the same, an increased defect density induces an accelerated electron transfer rate. k{sup 0} valuesof ERGO-GCEs are about 1 order of magnitude higher than those of ERGO/GCEs due to the difference in the amount of edge planes. This work demonstrates that both defect densities and edge planes of ERGO play crucial roles in electron transfer kinetics.

  16. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; J. Karki, Khadga

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene...... interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s−1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid...... matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets...

  17. Electronic energy transfer through non-adiabatic vibrational-electronic resonance. II. 1D spectra for a dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Jonas, David M.

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational-electronic resonance in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes invalidates Förster's adiabatic framework for interpreting spectra and energy transfer, thus complicating determination of how the surrounding protein affects pigment properties. This paper considers the combined effects of vibrational-electronic resonance and inhomogeneous variations in the electronic excitation energies of pigments at different sites on absorption, emission, circular dichroism, and hole-burning spectra for a non-degenerate homodimer. The non-degenerate homodimer has identical pigments in different sites that generate differences in electronic energies, with parameters loosely based on bacteriochlorophyll a pigments in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein. To explain the intensity borrowing, the excited state vibrational-electronic eigenvectors are discussed in terms of the vibrational basis localized on the individual pigments, as well as the correlated/anti-correlated vibrational basis delocalized over both pigments. Compared to those in the isolated pigment, vibrational satellites for the correlated vibration have the same frequency and precisely a factor of 2 intensity reduction through vibrational delocalization in both absorption and emission. Vibrational satellites for anti-correlated vibrations have their relaxed emission intensity reduced by over a factor 2 through vibrational and excitonic delocalization. In absorption, anti-correlated vibrational satellites borrow excitonic intensity but can be broadened away by the combination of vibronic resonance and site inhomogeneity; in parallel, their vibronically resonant excitonic partners are also broadened away. These considerations are consistent with photosynthetic antenna hole-burning spectra, where sharp vibrational and excitonic satellites are absent. Vibrational-excitonic resonance barely alters the inhomogeneously broadened linear absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra from those for a

  18. Challenges in reduction of dinitrogen by proton and electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Cornelis J M; Koper, Marc T M; Hetterscheid, Dennis G H

    2014-08-07

    Ammonia is an important nutrient for the growth of plants. In industry, ammonia is produced by the energy expensive Haber-Bosch process where dihydrogen and dinitrogen form ammonia at a very high pressure and temperature. In principle one could also reduce dinitrogen upon addition of protons and electrons similar to the mechanism of ammonia production by nitrogenases. Recently, major breakthroughs have taken place in our understanding of biological fixation of dinitrogen, of molecular model systems that can reduce dinitrogen, and in the electrochemical reduction of dinitrogen at heterogeneous surfaces. Yet for efficient reduction of dinitrogen with protons and electrons major hurdles still have to be overcome. In this tutorial review we give an overview of the different catalytic systems, highlight the recent breakthroughs, pinpoint common grounds and discuss the bottlenecks and challenges in catalytic reduction of dinitrogen.

  19. Electronic Structure of the Perylene / Zinc Oxide Interface: A Computational Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer and Impact of Surface Defects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingrui

    2015-07-29

    The electronic properties of dye-sensitized semiconductor surfaces consisting of pery- lene chromophores chemisorbed on zinc oxide via different spacer-anchor groups, have been studied at the density-functional-theory level. The energy distributions of the donor states and the rates of photoinduced electron transfer from dye to surface are predicted. We evaluate in particular the impact of saturated versus unsaturated aliphatic spacer groups inserted between the perylene chromophore and the semiconductor as well as the influence of surface defects on the electron-injection rates.

  20. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  1. Electron emission in energetic ion-atom collisions in the presence of coherent electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciappina, M F; Madsen, L B

    2006-01-01

    We consider the effect of a low-frequency electromagnetic field on the spectra of electron emission in energetic nonrelativistic ion-atom collisions. The field is assumed to have linear polarization and to be weak compared to the typical atomic field. The incorporation of the projectile interaction opens a new scenario to the combined study of electromagnetic and atomic interactions. Our work suggests that the electromagnetic field can have a profound effect on two of the most important structures that appear in the electron emission spectra: the electron capture into the continuum and binary encounter (BE) peaks. We show that in the BE peak region the result for the laser-assisted scattering depends on the theory applied for the collision part, the first Born approximation or the distorted wave Born approximation

  2. Quantum fluctuations and coherence in high-precision single-electron capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashcheyevs, Vyacheslavs; Timoshenko, Janis

    2012-11-21

    The phase of a single quantum state is undefined unless the history of its creation provides a reference point. Thus, quantum interference may seem hardly relevant for the design of deterministic single-electron sources which strive to isolate individual charge carriers quickly and completely. We provide a counterexample by analyzing the nonadiabatic separation of a localized quantum state from a Fermi sea due to a closing tunnel barrier. We identify the relevant energy scales and suggest ways to separate the contributions of quantum nonadiabatic excitation and back tunneling to the rare noncapture events. In the optimal regime of balanced decay and nonadiabaticity, our simple electron trap turns into a single-lead Landau-Zener back tunneling interferometer, revealing the dynamical phase accumulated between the particle capture and leakage. The predicted "quantum beats in back tunneling" may turn the error of a single-electron source into a valuable signal revealing essentially nonadiabatic energy scales of a dynamic quantum dot.

  3. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complex BH3NH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yirong; Song, Lingchun; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Qianer

    2004-03-31

    As a simple yet strongly binding electron donor-acceptor (EDA) complex, BH(3)NH(3) serves as a good example to study the electron pair donor-acceptor complexes. We employed both the ab initio valence bond (VB) and block-localized wave function (BLW) methods to explore the electron transfer from NH(3) to BH(3). Conventionally, EDA complexes have been described by two diabatic states: one neutral state and one ionic charge-transferred state. Ab initio VB self-consistent field (VBSCF) computations generate the energy profiles of the two diabatic states together with the adiabatic (ground) state. Our calculations evidently demonstrated that the electron transfer between NH(3) and BH(3) falls in the abnormal regime where the reorganization energy is less than the exoergicity of the reaction. The nature of the NH(3)-BH(3) interaction is probed by an energy decomposition scheme based on the BLW method. We found that the variation of the charge-transfer energy with the donor-acceptor distance is insensitive to the computation levels and basis sets, but the estimation of the amount of electron transferred heavily depends on the population analysis procedures. The recent resurgence of interest in the nature of the rotation barrier in ethane prompted us to analyze the conformational change of BH(3)NH(3), which is an isoelectronic system with ethane. We found that the preference of the staggered structure over the eclipsed structure of BH(3)NH(3) is dominated by the Pauli exchange repulsion.

  4. Correlation between biological activity and electron transferring of bovine liver catalase: Osmolytes effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehrani, H. Sepasi; Moosavi-Movahedi, A.A.; Ghourchian, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proline increases ET in Bovine Liver Catalase (BLC) whereas histidine decreases it. • Proline also increased the biological activity, whereas histidine decreased it. • Electron transferring and biological activity for BLC are directly correlated. • Proline causes favorable ET for BLC shown by positive E 1/2 (E°′) and negative ΔG. • Histidine makes ET unfavorable for BLC, manifested by E 1/2 (E°′) 0. -- Abstract: Catalase is a crucial antioxidant enzyme that protects life against detrimental effects of H 2 O 2 by disproportionating it into water and molecular oxygen. Effect of proline as a compatible and histidine as a non compatible osmolyte on the electron transferring and midpoint potential of catalase has been investigated. Proline increases the midpoint potential (ΔE m > 0), therefore causing the ΔG ET to be less positive and making the electron transfer reaction more facile whereas histidine decreases the E m (ΔE m ET , thereby rendering the electron transfer reaction less efficient. These results indicate the inhibitory effect of histidine evident by a −37% decrease in the cathodic peak current compared to 16% increase in the case of proline indicative of activation. The insight paves the tedious way towards our ultimate goal of elucidating a correlation between biological activity and electron transferring

  5. Theory of Coherent Radiation from a Grating-Waveguide Free-Electron Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Y C

    2005-01-01

    A Smith-Purcell radiator produces transversely asymmetric radiation modes due to the arrangement of a grating on one side of the electron beam. This asymmetric output could limit the usefulness of such a device in the THz spectrum where diffraction of waves is severe. It is possible to produce symmetric radiation from a double-grating waveguide driven by an electron beam traversing the waveguide gap. We derive a theory that describes the modes and small signal gain of this novel grating-waveguide free-electron laser. Our theory shows that extremely high laser gain is obtained when the electron beam is phase matched to the middle or edge of the radiation bands where the radiation modes have zero group velocity. In our calculation we obtained 66dB/mm gain at 298 µm for a 5 mA, 30keV driving beam in a grating waveguide with a 50-micron, 40% duty-cycle grating period, a 60-micron groove depth, and a 150 micron waveguide gap. This extremely high gain indicates that this novel device establishes resonance...

  6. In situ raman spectroelectrochemistry of electron transfer between glassy carbon and a chemisorbed nitroazobenzene monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takashi; McCreery, Richard L

    2002-09-11

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor 4-nitroazobenzene (NAB) in an electrochemical cell, both as a free molecule and as a chemisorbed monolayer on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode surface. Reduction of free NAB exhibited two well-defined voltammetric couples in acetonitrile, and the accompanying spectral changes supported a mechanism involving two successive 1-e(-) transfers. Raman spectra of NAB chemisorbed to GC via diazonium ion reduction were obtained in acetonitrile with a high-sensitivity, line-focused CCD spectrometer. The chemisorbed NAB spectra were quite different from the free NAB spectra, and were sufficiently strong to monitor as a function of applied potential. In the potential range of +400 to -800 mV vs Ag/Ag(+), the intensity of the Raman bands associated with the phenyl-NO(2) moiety varied, implying an electronic interaction between the pi system of the graphitic substrate and the chemisorbed NAB molecules. Negative of -800 mV, a 1-e(-) voltammetric reduction peak was observed, which was reversible on the positive voltage scan. This peak was accompanied by significant spectral changes, particularly the loss of the N=N and NO(2) stretches. The spectra are consistent with formation of a quinoid structure containing a C=C double bond between the NAB and the graphitic surface. The electron transfer and spectral changes occurred over a wider potential range than expected for a conventional Nernstian equilibrium, but did not appear to be broadened by slow electron-transfer kinetics. The results imply a significant perturbation of electron transfer between the GC and the monolayer, caused by strong electronic coupling between the graphitic pi system and the NAB orbitals. Rather than a discrete electron transfer to a free molecule, the electron transfer to chemisorbed NAB is more gradual, and is presumably driven by the electric field at the electrode/solution interface.

  7. Activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene in the presence of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khezri, Khezrollah, E-mail: kh.khezri@ut.ac.ir [School of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, PO Box 14155-6455, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roghani-Mamaqani, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, PO Box 51335-1996, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Effect of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-41) on the activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP) is investigated. Decrement of conversion and number average molecular weight and also increment of polydispersity index (PDI) values are three main results of addition of MCM-41 nanoparticles. Incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles in the polystyrene matrix can clearly increase thermal stability and decrease glass transition temperature of the nanocomposites. - Highlights: • Spherical morphology, hexagonal structure, and high surface area with regular pore diameters of the synthesized MCM-41 nanoparticles are examined. • AGET ATRP of styrene in the presence of MCM-41 nanoparticles is performed. • Effect of MCM-41 nanoparticles addition on the polymerization rate, conversion and molecular weights of the products are discussed. • Improvement in thermal stability of the nanocomposites and decreasing T{sub g} values was also observed by incorporation of MCM-41 nanoparticles. - Abstract: Activator generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization was employed to synthesize well-defined mesoporous silica nanoparticles/polystyrene composites. Inherent features of spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherm, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis techniques. Conversion and molecular weight evaluations were carried out using gas and size exclusion chromatography respectively. By the addition of only 3 wt% mesoporous silica nanoparticles, conversion decreases from 81 to 58%. Similarly, number average molecular weight decreases from 17,116 to 12,798 g mol{sup −1}. However, polydispersity index (PDI) values increases from 1.24 to 1.58. A peak around 4.1–4.2 ppm at proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results clearly confirms the living nature of the polymerization. Thermogravimetric

  8. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA2(NCS2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules.

  9. Camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-x-ray free-electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajt, Sasa; Chapman, Henry N.; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Alameda, Jennifer B.; Woods, Bruce W.; Frank, Matthias; Bogan, Michael J.; Barty, Anton; Boutet, Sebastien; Marchesini, Stefano; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Hajdu, Janos; Shapiro, David

    2008-01-01

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-x-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The camera consists of a laterally graded multilayer mirror, which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter for both the wavelength and the angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from nonsample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10 14 W/cm 2 . The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates onto a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beam stop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) FEL (i.e., between 6 and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32, 16, 13.5, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH FEL with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance

  10. Electron beam bunch length characterizations using incoherent and coherent transition radiation on the APS SASE FEL project

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Berg, W J; Lewellen, J W; Sereno, N S; Happek, U

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector linac has been reconfigured with a low-emittance RF thermionic gun and a photocathode (PC) RF gun to support self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) experiments. One of the most critical parameters for optimizing SASE performance (gain length) is the electron beam peak current, which requires a charge measurement and a bunch length measurement capability. We report here initial measurements of the latter using both incoherent optical transition radiation (OTR) and coherent transition radiation (CTR). A visible light Hamamatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera was used to measure the thermionic RF gun beam's bunch length (sigma approx 2-3 ps) via OTR generated by the beam at 220 MeV and 200 mA macropulse average current. In addition, a CTR monitor (Michelson Interferometer) based on a Golay cell as the far-infrared (FIR) detector has been installed at the 40-MeV station in the beamline. Initial observations of CTR signal strength variation wi...

  11. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  12. Quantum fluid model of coherent stimulated radiation by a dense relativistic cold electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, L. F.; Serbeto, A.; Tsui, K. H. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niterói, RJ 24210-346 (Brazil); Mendonça, J. T.; Galvão, R. M. O. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP 05508-090 (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Using a quantum fluid model, the linear dispersion relation for FEL pumped by a short wavelength laser wiggler is deduced. Subsequently, a new quantum corrected resonance condition is obtained. It is shown that, in the limit of low energy electron beam and low frequency pump, the quantum recoil effect can be neglected, recovering the classical FEL resonance condition, k{sub s}=4k{sub w}γ{sup 2}. On the other hand, for short wavelength and high energy electron beam, the quantum recoil effect becomes strong and the resonance condition turns into k{sub s}=2√(k{sub w}/λ{sub c})γ{sup 3/2}, with λ{sub c} being the reduced Compton wavelength. As a result, a set of nonlinear coupled equations, which describes the quantum FEL dynamics as a three-wave interaction, is obtained. Neglecting wave propagation effects, this set of equations is solved numerically and results are presented.

  13. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  14. Three-dimensional optical transfer functions in the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L; Nellist, P D

    2014-05-01

    In the scanning transmission electron microscope, hardware aberration correctors can now correct for the positive spherical aberration of round electron lenses. These correctors make use of nonround optics such as hexapoles or octupoles, leading to the limiting aberrations often being of a nonround type. Here we explore the effect of a number of potential limiting aberrations on the imaging performance of the scanning transmission electron microscope through their resulting optical transfer functions. In particular, the response of the optical transfer function to changes in defocus are examined, given that this is the final aberration to be tuned just before image acquisition. The resulting three-dimensional optical transfer functions also allow an assessment of the performance of a system for focal-series experiments or optical sectioning applications. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  15. Nobel Prize 1992: Rudolph A. Marcus: theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulate Segura, Diego Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A review of the theory developed by Rudolph A. Marcus is presented, who for his rating to the theory of electron transfer in chemical systems was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992. Marcus theory has constituted not only a good extension of the use of a spectroscopic principle, but also has provided an energy balance and the application of energy conservation for electron transfer reactions. A better understanding of the reaction coordinate is exposed in terms energetic and establishing the principles that govern the transfer of electrons, protons and some labile small molecular groups as studied at present. Also, the postulates and equations described have established predictive models of reaction time, very useful for industrial environments, biological, metabolic, and others that involve redox processes. Marcus theory itself has also constituted a large contribution to the theory of complex transition [es

  16. Transfer function restoration in 3D electron microscopy via iterative data refinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorzano, C O S; Marabini, R; Herman, G T; Censor, Y; Carazo, J M

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy (3D-EM) is a powerful tool for visualizing complex biological systems. As with any other imaging device, the electron microscope introduces a transfer function (called in this field the contrast transfer function, CTF) into the image acquisition process that modulates the various frequencies of the signal. Thus, the 3D reconstructions performed with these CTF-affected projections are also affected by an implicit 3D transfer function. For high-resolution electron microscopy, the effect of the CTF is quite dramatic and limits severely the achievable resolution. In this work we make use of the iterative data refinement (IDR) technique to ameliorate the effect of the CTF. It is demonstrated that the approach can be successfully applied to noisy data

  17. Conservation of vibrational coherence in ultrafast electronic relaxation: The case of diplatinum complexes in solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monni, R.; Auböck, G.; Kinschel, D.; Aziz-Lange, K. M.; Gray, H. B.; Vlček, Antonín; Chergui, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 683, SEP 2017 (2017), s. 112-120 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14129; GA ČR GA17-01137S Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1201 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : vibrational energy * electronic energy * diplatinum complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2016

  18. Conservation of vibrational coherence in ultrafast electronic relaxation: The case of diplatinum complexes in solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monni, R.; Auböck, G.; Kinschel, D.; Aziz-Lange, K. M.; Gray, H. B.; Vlček, Antonín; Chergui, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 683, SEP 2017 (2017), s. 112-120 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD14129; GA ČR GA17-01137S Grant - others: COST (XE) CM1201 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : vibrational energy * electronic energy * diplatinum complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 1.815, year: 2016

  19. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  20. Electron transfer across anodic films formed on tin in carbonate-bicarbonate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasi, C.A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas; Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria; Folquer, M.E. [Universidad Nacional de Tucaman (Argentina). Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Vallejo, A.E. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Facultad de Ingenieria; Alvarez, P.E. [Universidad Nacional de Tucaman (Argentina). Inst. de Fisica

    2005-01-15

    Impedance and steady-state data were recorded in order to study the kinetics of electron transfer between passive tin electrodes and an electrolytic solution containing the K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6}-K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6} redox couple. Film thickness plays a key role in determining the type of electronic conduction of these oxide covered electrodes. Electron exchange with the oxide takes place with participation of the conduction band in the semiconducting film. A mechanism involving direct electron tunneling through the space charge barrier is the most suitable to interpret the experimental evidence. (Author)

  1. A structural basis for electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.R.; DiMagno, T.J.; Angerhofer, A.; Chang, C.H.; El-Kabbani, O.; Schiffer, M.

    1989-01-01

    Triplet data for the primary donor in single crystals of bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas viridis are interpreted in terms of the corresponding x-ray structures. The analysis of electron paramagnetic resonance data from single crystals (triplet zero field splitting and cation and triplet linewidth of the primary special pair donor of bacterial reaction centers) is extended to systems of a non-crystalline nature. A unified interpretation based on frontier molecular orbitals concludes that the special pair behaves like a supermolecule in all wild-type bacteria investigated here. However, in heterodimers of Rb. capsulatus (His M200 changed to Leu or Phe with the result that the M-half of the special pair is converted to bacteriopheophytin) the special pair possesses the EPR properties more appropriately described in terms of a monomer. In all cases the triplet state and cation EPR properties appear to be dominated by the highest occupied molecular orbitals. These conclusions derived from EPR experiments are supplemented by data from Stark spectroscopy of reaction centers from Rb. capsulatus. 41 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Electron transfer with TD-Split, a linear response time-dependent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartell, Lizette A.; Reslan, Randa; Wall, Michael R.; Kennedy, Robert D.; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple method, time-dependent split (TD-Split) is developed for electron transfer through a TD evaluation of the lowest excitation energy from the ground state of the combined charged system. As an example, we study transfer between substituted fullerenes, primarily PCBM. Numerical linearization reduces the number of required iterations, and trends similar to experiment are found. Highlights: ► Electron transmission from charged-dimer transition-state excitation. ► Starting point: extended dimer charged (above-gap) homo, which is then excited. ► Excitation by real-time and linear response TD propagation. ► Analogous to two level system, but with full polarization included. ► TD-Split much larger than from static LUMO + 1–LUMO splitting for fullerene dimers. - Abstract: We present a simple method, time-dependent split (TD-Split) for A → B electron transfer by a TD evaluation of the lowest excitation energy from the ground state of the combined (AB) − system. As an example, we study transfer between substituted fullerenes, primarily PCBM. Electron transfer in such fullerene systems is important as it is often the bottleneck in organic solar cells. The TD-Split method is described in detail, including numerical linearization which reduces the number of required iterations, and comparison to other possible approaches. We also compare to other molecules such as C 60 Me 5 H, and find similar trends as experiment.

  3. Conceptual density functional theory for electron transfer and transport in mesoscopic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Paulo R; Miranda, David A

    2017-02-22

    Molecular and supramolecular systems are essentially mesoscopic in character. The electron self-exchange, in the case of energy fluctuations, or electron transfer/transport, in the case of the presence of an externally driven electrochemical potential, between mesoscopic sites is energetically driven in such a manner where the electrochemical capacitance (C [small mu, Greek, macron] ) is fundamental. Thus, the electron transfer/transport through channels connecting two distinct energetic (ΔE [small mu, Greek, macron] ) and spatially separated mesoscopic sites is capacitively modulated. Remarkably, the relationship between the quantum conductance (G) and the standard electrochemical rate constant (k r ), which is indispensable to understanding the physical and chemical characteristics governing electron exchange in molecular scale systems, was revealed to be related to C [small mu, Greek, macron] , that is, C [small mu, Greek, macron] = G/k r . Accordingly, C [small mu, Greek, macron] is the proportional missing term that controls the electron transfer/transport in mesoscopic systems in a wide-range, and equally it can be understood from first principles density functional quantum mechanical approaches. Indeed the differences in energy between states is calculated (or experimentally accessed) throughout the electrochemical capacitance as ΔE [small mu, Greek, macron] = β/C [small mu, Greek, macron] , and thus constitutes the driving force for G and/or k r , where β is only a proportional constant that includes the square of the unit electron charge times the square of the number of electron particles interchanged.

  4. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getoff, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.getoff@univie.ac.a [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hartmann, Johannes [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schittl, Heike [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Gerschpacher, Marion [Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproduction, Medical University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Quint, Ruth Maria [Section of Radiation Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light ({lambda}=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  5. Photo-induced regeneration of hormones by electron transfer processes: Potential biological and medical consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getoff, Nikola; Hartmann, Johannes; Schittl, Heike; Gerschpacher, Marion; Quint, Ruth Maria

    2011-01-01

    Based on the previous results concerning electron transfer processes in biological substances, it was of interest to investigate if hormone transients resulting by e.g. electron emission can be regenerated. The presented results prove for the first time that the hormone transients originating by the electron emission process can be successfully regenerated by the transfer of electrons from a potent electron donor, such as vitamin C (VitC). Investigations were performed using progesterone (PRG), testosterone (TES) and estrone (E1) as representatives of hormones. By irradiation with monochromatic UV light (λ=254 nm) in a media of 40% water and 60% ethanol, the degradation as well as the regeneration of the hormones was studied with each hormone individually and in the mixture with VitC as a function of the absorbed UV dose, using HPLC. Calculated from the obtained initial yields, the determined regeneration of PRG amounted to 52.7%, for TES to 58.6% and for E1 to 90.9%. The consumption of VitC was determined in the same way. The reported results concerning the regeneration of hormones by the transfer of electrons from an electron donor offer a new, promising method for the therapy with hormones. As a consequence of the regeneration of hormones, a decreased formation of carcinogenic metabolites is expected.

  6. Studies of transfer reactions of photosensitized electrons involving complexes of transition metals in view of solar energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakubo, Masaaki

    1984-01-01

    This research thesis addresses electron transfer reactions occurring during photosynthesis, for example, photosensitized reaction in which chlorophyll is the sensitizer. More specifically, the author studied experimentally electron photo-transfers with type D sensitizers (riboflavin, phenoxazine and porphyrin), and various complexes of transition metals. After a presentation of these experiments, the author describes the photosensitisation process (photo-physics of riboflavin, oxygen deactivation, sensitized photo-oxidation and photo-reduction). The theoretical aspect of electron transfer is then addressed: generalities, deactivation of the riboflavin triplet, initial efficiency of electron transfer. Experimental results on three basic processes (non-radiative deactivation, energy transfer, electron transfer) are interpreted in a unified way by using the non-radiative transfer theory. Some applications are described: photo-electrochemical batteries, photo-oxidation and photo-reduction of the cobalt ion

  7. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O.; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2001-01-01

    rather than negative. Isotope effects are, however, also inherent in the nuclear reorganization Gibbs free energy and in the tunneling factor for the electron transfer process. A slightly larger thermal protein expansion in H2O than in D2O (0.001 nm K-1) is sufficient both to account for the activation......Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K-1 mol(-1...

  8. Subshell resolved L-K electron transfer and ionization of Yb with Si ion impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, A.K.; Tribedi, L.C.; Dhal, B.B.; Tiwari, U.; Tandon, P.N. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India)

    1999-07-01

    We have measured subshell resolved L-K electron transfer cross sections from the L subshell of the Yb target to the vacant K-shell of the Si projectile at energies varying between 2-4.5 MeV/A. In addition, the L subshell ionization cross sections are also obtained for Yb. It is observed that contrary to expectations, the L{sub 2} subshell electron transfer as well as ionization cross sections are substantially lower than the corresponding cross sections for the L{sub 1} subshell. (orig.)

  9. Direct electron transfer: an approach for electrochemical biosensors with higher selectivity and sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freire Renato S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The most promising approach for the development of electrochemical biosensors is to establish a direct electrical communication between the biomolecules and the electrode surface. This review focuses on advances, directions and strategies in the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors. Subjects covered include a brief description of the fundamentals of the electron transfer phenomenon and amperometric biosensor development (different types and new oriented enzyme immobilization techniques. Special attention is given to different redox enzymes and proteins capable of electrocatalyzing reactions via direct electron transfer. The analytical applications and future trends for third generation biosensors are also presented and discussed.

  10. Non-Markovian theory for the waiting time distributions of single electron transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welack, Sven; Yan, YiJing

    2009-09-21

    We derive a non-Markovian theory for waiting time distributions of consecutive single electron transfer events. The presented microscopic Pauli rate equation formalism couples the open electrodes to the many-body system, allowing to take finite bias and temperature into consideration. Numerical results reveal transient oscillations of distinct system frequencies due to memory in the waiting time distributions. Memory effects can be approximated by an expansion in non-Markovian corrections. This method is employed to calculate memory landscapes displaying preservation of memory over multiple consecutive electron transfers.

  11. [Studies on the electron transfer between etoposide (VP-16) and DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Shi, Jun; Wang, Shi-long; Sun, Xiao-yu; Zhang, Chao-jie

    2006-11-01

    In the present study, the electron transfer between Etoposide (VP-16) and GMP or DNA was investigated using pulse radiolysis and circular dichroism technology. The electron transfer between VP-16 and GMP was found, and the reaction rate constant was determined as 3.16 x 10(7) L x mol(-1) x s(-1) by pulse radiolysis. The authors found the interaction of VP-16 and DNA using the technology of circular dichroism. This study has provided theoretical reference for further study on the anti-tumor mechanism of VP-16.

  12. New aspects of electronic excitations at the bismuth surface: Topology, thermalization and coupling to coherent phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, L., E-mail: luca.perfetti@polytechnique.edu [Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, Ecole Polytechnique – CEA/DSM – CNRS UMR 7642, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Faure, J. [Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée, Ecole Polytechnique – ENSTA – CNRS UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Papalazarou, E.; Mauchain, J.; Marsi, M.; Goerbig, M.O. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 8502, Université Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France); Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Ohtsubo, Y. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin-BP 48, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2015-05-15

    We review measurements of angle and time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy on the surface states of the Bi(1 1 1) surface. The work covers several aspects of these surface states, discussing the topological properties, the strong anisotropy of the spin–orbit splitting and the dynamical relaxation of photoexcited electrons. Since time resolved experiments disentagle interaction processes in real time, the reported data offer a novel perspective on the motion of charge carriers in surface states and will serve as an unuseful reference for other systems with strong spin–orbit coupling.

  13. The Evolution of Spontaneous and Coherent Radiation in the Free Electron Laser Oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-16

    t A(z). AR(,t)Il (11) Z=z. where voz is the axial electron velocity in the wiggler. By substituting (1) and (2) into (11) and keeping the appropriate...ojt) = v oz Zoj./V + (I - Voz /Vo ) Lo + v ozt is the unperturbed orbit and Sz is the displacement due to the ponderomotive force. Equations (12) and (15...z .- 1. = - z .+ L" + c.c. 0 oJ 0 + t 0 oJ w- - ti (16) v v 0 0 where 6Oz = voz /c, n = Voz (kn + k W) - an = v ozk w- c k n(1 - R oz) is the

  14. Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging with X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Barty, A; Benner, W; Bogan, M; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S; London, R; Marchesini, S; Spiller, E; Szoke, A; Woods, B; Boutet, S; Hodgson, K; Hajdu, J; Bergh, M; Burmeister, F; Caleman, C; Huldt, G; Maia, F; Seibert, M M; der Spoel, D v

    2006-01-01

    The ultrafast pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers will enable imaging of non-periodic objects at near-atomic resolution [1, Neutze]. These objects could include single molecules, protein complexes, or virus particles. The specimen would be completely destroyed by the pulse in a Coulomb explosion, but that destruction will only happen after the pulse. The scattering from the sample will give structural information about the undamaged object. There are many technical challenges that must be addressed before carrying out such experiments at an XFEL, which we are doing so with experiments at FLASH, the soft-X-ray FEL at DESY

  15. Temperature dependence of the inverted regime electron transfer kinetics of betaine-30 and the role of molecular modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Eva; Johnson, Alan E.; Walker, Gilbert C.; Levinger, Nancy E.; Dubruil, Thomas P.

    1992-05-01

    The inverted regime photoinduced electron transfer kinetics of betaine-30 have been investigated over a broad temperature range, revealing very little temperature dependence. For example, for betaine-30 in a polystyrene film, the electron transfer rate constant, k(sub ET) changes by less than a factor of 3 from T = 293 K to T = 34 K. The results are in striking contrast to predictions of contemporary electron transfer theories which employ classical nuclear modes to accept some or all of the energy of the electron transfer event. The comparison of theory and experiment for the betaines demonstrates that a full quantum mechanical theory is necessary to accurately describe the electron transfer kinetics of the betaines in environments with slow dielectric relaxation. The conclusions drawn for the betaines may also apply to other molecular examples of inverted regime electron transfer in slowly relaxing environments.

  16. Ru(II)-diimine functionalized metalloproteins: From electron transfer studies to light-driven biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Quan; Kato, Mallory; Cheruzel, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    The unique photochemical properties of Ru(II)-diimine complexes have helped initiate a series of seminal electron transfer studies in metalloenzymes. It has thus been possible to experimentally determine rate constants for long-range electron transfers. These studies have laid the foundation for the investigation of reactive intermediates in heme proteins and for the design of light-activated biocatalysts. Various metalloenzymes such as hydrogenase, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, laccase and cytochrome P450 BM3 have been functionalized with Ru(II)-diimine complexes. Upon visible light-excitation, these photosensitized metalloproteins are capable of sustaining photocatalytic activity to reduce small molecules such as protons, acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide or activate molecular dioxygen to produce hydroxylated products. The Ru(II)-diimine photosensitizers are hence able to deliver multiple electrons to metalloenzymes buried active sites, circumventing the need for the natural redox partners. In this review, we will highlight the key achievements of the light-driven biocatalysts, which stem from the extensive electron transfer investigations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitric Oxide Synthases Reveal a Role for Calmodulin in Controlling Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Soud, Husam M.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    1993-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized within the immune, vascular, and nervous systems, where it acts as a wide-ranging mediator of mammalian physiology. The NO synthases (EC 1.14.13.39) isolated from neurons or endothelium are calmodulin dependent. Calmodulin binds reversibly to neuronal NO synthase in response to elevated Ca2+, triggering its NO production by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that calmodulin binding allows NADPH-derived electrons to pass onto the heme group of neuronal NO synthase. Calmodulin-triggered electron transfer to heme was independent of substrate binding, caused rapid enzymatic oxidation of NADPH in the presence of O_2, and was required for NO synthesis. An NO synthase isolated from cytokine-induced macrophages that contains tightly bound calmodulin catalyzed spontaneous electron transfer to its heme, consistent with bound calmodulin also enabling electron transfer within this isoform. Together, these results provide a basis for how calmodulin may regulate NO synthesis. The ability of calmodulin to trigger electron transfer within an enzyme is unexpected and represents an additional function for calcium-binding proteins in biology.

  18. CFD simulation and statistical analysis of moisture transfer into an electronic enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    Condensation and moisture related problems are the cause of failures in many cases and consequently serious concerns for reliability in electronics industry. Thus, it is important to control the moisture content and the relative humidity inside electronic enclosures. In this work, a computational...... fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to simulate moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure. In the first attempt, an isothermal case is de- veloped and compared against the well-known RC circuit analogy considering the behavior of an idealized electronic enclosure. It is shown that the RC...... method predicts a faster trend for the moisture transfer into the enclosure compared to the CFD. The effect of several important parameters, namely, position of the opening, initial relative humidity inside the enclosure, length and radius of the opening and temperature is studied using the devel- oped...

  19. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ h...... to the Desulfobulbaceae. The detection of similar Desulfobulbaceae at the oxic–anoxic interface of fresh sediment cores taken at a contaminated aquifer suggests that LDET may indeed be active at the capillary fringe in situ.......The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous ‘cable bacteria’ has...

  20. Analysis of the non-Markovianity for electron transfer reactions in an oligothiophene-fullerene heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangaud, E.; Meier, C.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2017-09-01

    The non-Markovianity of the electron transfer in an oligothiophene-fullerene heterojunction described by a spin-boson model is analyzed using the time dependent decoherence canonical rates and the volume of accessible states in the Bloch sphere. The dynamical map of the reduced electronic system is computed by the hierarchical equations of motion methodology (HEOM) providing an exact dynamics. Transitory witness of non-Markovianity is linked to the bath dynamics analyzed from the HEOM auxiliary matrices. The signature of the collective bath mode detected from HEOM in each electronic state is compared with predictions of the effective mode extracted from the spectral density. We show that including this main reaction coordinate in a one-dimensional vibronic system coupled to a residual bath satisfactorily describes the electron transfer by a simple Markovian Redfield equation. Non-Markovianity is computed for three inter fragment distances and compared with a priori criterion based on the system and bath characteristic timescales.

  1. Electron transfer reactions induced by the triplet state of thiacarbocyanine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibisov, Alexander K.; Slavnova, Tatyana D.; Goerner, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The photoinduced electron transfer between either cationic 5,5 ' -dichloro-3,3 ' ,9-triethylthiacarbocyanine (1) or a structurally similar anionic dye (2) and appropriate donors, e.g. ascorbic acid, and acceptors, e.g. methyl viologen, was studied by ns-laser photolysis. In aqueous solution the dyes in the ground state are present as an equilibrated mixture of dimers and monomers, whereas the triplet state is mainly populated from dimers. The triplet states of both dimers and monomers are quenched by electron donors or acceptors and the rate constant for quenching is generally 2-4 times higher for dimers than for monomers. The kinetics of triplet decay and radical formation and decay as a result of primary and secondary electron transfer were analyzed. While the one-electron reduced dimer decays due to back reactions, the one-electron oxidized dimer rapidly dissociates into the monomer and the monomeric dye radical. For the dimeric dye/donor/acceptor systems the primary photoinduced electron transfer occurs either from the donor or to the acceptor yielding the dimeric dye radicals. The one-electron reduced dimer can be efficiently oxidized by acceptors, e.g. the rate constant for reaction of the dimeric dye radical of 1 with methyl viologen (photoreductive pathway of sensitization) is 1.6x10 9 M -1 s -1 . The photooxidative pathway of sensitization is more complicated; after dissociation of the dimeric dye radical, the monomeric dye radical is reduced in a secondary electron transfer from ascorbic acid, e.g. with a rate constant of 1x10 9 M -1 s -1 for 2, yielding the monomer. On increasing the donor concentration the photooxidative pathway of sensitization is switched to a photoreductive one

  2. Corkscrew Motion of an Electron Beam due to Coherent Variations in Accelerating Potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-13

    Corkscrew motion results from the interaction of fluctuations of beam electron energy with accidental magnetic dipoles caused by misalignment of the beam transport solenoids. Corkscrew is a serious concern for high-current linear induction accelerators (LIA). A simple scaling law for corkscrew amplitude derived from a theory based on a constant-energy beam coasting through a uniform magnetic field has often been used to assess LIA vulnerability to this effect. We use a beam dynamics code to verify that this scaling also holds for an accelerated beam in a non-uniform magnetic field, as in a real accelerator. Results of simulations with this code are strikingly similar to measurements on one of the LIAs at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  3. Constraint-based modeling of carbon fixation and the energetics of electron transfer in Geobacter metallireducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Feist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species.

  4. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  5. Thermal Relaxation in Titanium Nanowires: Signatures of Inelastic Electron-Boundary Scattering in Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elo, Teemu; Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Golubev, Dmitri; Savin, Alexander; Arutyunov, Konstantin; Hakonen, Pertti

    2017-11-01

    We have employed noise thermometry for investigations of thermal relaxation between the electrons and the substrate in nanowires patterned from 40-nm-thick titanium film on top of silicon wafers covered by a native oxide. By controlling the electronic temperature T_e by Joule heating at the base temperature of a dilution refrigerator, we probe the electron-phonon coupling and the thermal boundary resistance at temperatures T_e= 0.5-3 K. Using a regular T^5-dependent electron-phonon coupling of clean metals and a T^4-dependent interfacial heat flow, we deduce a small contribution for the direct energy transfer from the titanium electrons to the substrate phonons due to inelastic electron-boundary scattering.

  6. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kouta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yoshida, Makoto [Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterial Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ohno, Hiroyuki [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuhumi, E-mail: nobu1@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of L-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. - Highlights: • pH dependencies of activity were different for the reduction of cyt c and DCPIP. • DET-based bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH was observed. • The similar pH-dependent profile was found with cyt c and electrode. • The present results suggested that IET reaction of CcPDH shows pH dependence.

  7. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  8. Long-range electron transfer in engineered azurins exhibits marcus inverted region behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Marshall, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    The Marcus theory of electron transfer (ET) predicts that while the ET rate constants increase with rising driving force until it equals a reaction’s reorganization energy, at higher driving force the ET rate decreases, having reached the Marcus inverted region. While experimental evidence...

  9. 36 CFR 1235.50 - What specifications and standards for transfer apply to electronic records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Interchange (ASCII) or Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code (EBCDIC) with all control... Records Administration, Electronic/Special Media Records Services Division (NWME), 8601 Adelphi Road... Road, College Park, MD 20740, phone number (301) 837-1578 to initiate transfer discussions. (b) Data...

  10. Charge distribution effects in polyatomic reactants involved in simple electron transfer reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fawcett, W. R.; Chavis, G. J.; Hromadová, Magdaléna

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 23 (2008), s. 6787-6792 ISSN 0013-4686 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electron transfer kinetics * charge distribution effects * double - layer effects in electrode kinetics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.078, year: 2008

  11. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  12. Electron transfer reactions, cyanide and O2 binding of truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Esther; Larsson, Jonas T.; McLean, Kirsty J.

    2013-01-01

    The truncated hemoglobin from Bacillus subtilis (trHb-Bs) possesses a surprisingly high affinity for oxygen and resistance to (auto)oxidation; its physiological role in the bacterium is not understood and may be connected with its very special redox and ligand binding reactions. Electron transfer...

  13. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology – The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ions are embedded in an environment (ligand. Box 2. A few examples of Electron Transfer Proteins. Protein. Metal ions. Cytochromes. Fe a, a3, b, c1, c, etc. cyt. aa3. Ferridoxins. Fe. Rubredoxins. Fe. Xanthine oxidase. Fe/Mo. Aldehyde oxidase. Fe/Mo. Succinate dehydrogenase. Stellacyanin, plastocyanin and azurin.

  14. QUANTUM CHEMICAL MODELING OF SPECTRAL PROPERTIES AND ELECTRON TRANSFER IN EXTENDED SYSTEMS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záliš, Stanislav; Kvapilová, Hana; Kratochvílová, Irena; Šebera, Jakub; Vlček, Antonín; Winter, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, č. 1 (2011), P1299 ISSN 1708-5284 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400702; GA MŠk LD11086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantum chemical modeling * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  15. Bistable switching in supercritical n+-n-n+GaAs transferred electron devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jøndrup, Peter; Jeppesen, Palle; Jeppson, Bert

    1976-01-01

    Bistable switching in supercritically doped n+-n-n+GaAs transferred electron devices (TED's) is investigated experimentally and interpreted in computer simulations, for which details of the computer program are given. Three switching modes all leading to stable anode domains are discussed, namely...

  16. Electron transfer between a quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase and an electrode via a redox polymer network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, E.C.A.; Jong, G.A.H. de; Jongejan, J.A.; Duine, J.A.; Lugt, J.P. van der; Somers, W.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (QH-EDH) from Comamonas testosteroni was immobilized on an electrode in a redox polymer network consisting of a polyvinylpyridine partially N-complexed with osmiumbis-(bipyridine)chloride. The enzyme effectively transfers electrons to the electrode via the

  17. Evidence for resonance electron transfer in photon excited X-ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is also measured. The measured relative intensities are compared with the theoretical estimates of Aberg. Keywords. X-ray satellites; resonance electron transfer; crystal spectrometer. PACS Nos 32.30.Rj; 32.80.Hd; 78.70.En. 1. Introduction. When an atom ionized simultaneously in different shells de-excites, X-ray satellites.

  18. Evidence for resonance electron transfer in photon excited X-ray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evidence for resonance electron transfer in photon excited X-ray satellite spectra of fluorine compounds. K Ram Narayana B Seetharami Reddy S S Raju T Seshi Reddy S Lakshmi Narayana K Premachand B M Rao M V R Murti L S Mombasawala. Research Articles Volume 65 Issue 2 August 2005 pp 285-290 ...

  19. Bond-formation versus electron transfer: C–C-Coupling reactions of hydrocarbon dications with benzene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roithová, Jana; Schröder, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2007), s. 731-738 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4040302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : benzene * C-C coupling * dications * electron transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2007

  20. Modelling microbial fuel cells with suspended cells and added electron transfer mediator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picoreanu, C.; Katuri, K.P.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Head, I.M.; Scott, K.

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of a mathematical model for microbial fuel cells (MFC) with suspended biomass and added electron-transfer mediator is described. The model is based on mass balances for several dissolved chemical species such as substrate, oxidized mediator and reduced mediator. Biological, chemical and

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer as a design concept for luminescent redox indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, David C

    2015-11-21

    The general design principle for developing luminescent redox indicators based on photoinduced electron transfer is described. The first part of the review introduces colorimetric and fluorimetric redox indicators. The second part of the review highlights recent developments regarding molecular luminescent redox switches and logic gates. Potential future applications in biology, environmental analysis, biomedical diagnostics, corrosion science and materials science are mentioned.

  2. Electron Transfer and Collision Induced Dissociation of Non-Derivatized and Derivatized Desmosine and Isodesmosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongay, Sara; Hermans, Jos; Bruins, Andries P.; Nieuwendijk, Adrianus M. C. H.; Overkleeft, Hermen; Bischoff, Rainer

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has attracted increasing interest due to its complementarity to collision-induced dissociation (CID). ETD allows the direct localization of labile post-translational modifications, which is of main interest in proteomics where differences and similarities between

  3. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology–The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Electrons Transfer in Chemistry and Biology - The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1201-1210. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology-The Primary Events in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 12. Electron Transfer in Chemistry and Biology – The Primary Events in Photosynthesis. V Krishnan. General Article Volume 2 Issue 12 December 1997 pp 77-86. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Role of ligand substitution on long-range electron transfer in azurins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Jeuken, L J; Canters, G W

    2000-01-01

    Azurin contains two potential redox sites, a copper centre and, at the opposite end of the molecule, a cystine disulfide (RSSR). Intramolecular electron transfer between a pulse radiolytically produced RSSR- radical anion and the blue Cu(II) ion was studied in a series of azurins in which single-...

  6. Energy partitioning in single-electron transfer events between gaseous dications and their neutral counterparts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2012), s. 139-148 ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1223 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : coincidence techniques * dications * electron transfer * energy partitioning * synchrotron radiation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2012

  7. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  8. Functional LH1 antenna complexes influence electron transfer in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.W.; Vulto, S.I.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Grondelle, R.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the light harvesting 1 (LH1) antenna complex on the driving force for light-driven electron transfer in the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center has been examined. Equilibrium redox titrations show that the presence of the LH1 antenna complex influences the free energy change for

  9. Single-electron transfer living radical copolymerization of SWCNT-g-PMMA via graft from approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaisankar, S. N.; Haridharan, N.; Murali, A.; Ponyrko, Sergii; Špírková, Milena; Mandal, A. B.; Matějka, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 13 (2014), s. 2959-2966 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1459 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : single electron transfer * single-walled carbon nanotubes * controlled radical polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2014

  10. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, John M.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Zholents, Alexander A.; Zolotorev, Max S.

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ''femtoslicing'' beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. These CSR pulses were first observed at the ALS, and the measurement of their intensity is now routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing x-ray experiments. At the same time, these CSR pulses synchronous with the modulating laser, represent a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for their characterization and in this paper we present an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation. In particular, we include more data on the interesting interaction, previously observed at the ALS, between the slicing and the microbunching instability (MBI), where under particular circumstances, the slicing seems to trigger the onset of the instability

  11. Quantifying height of ultraprecisely machined steps on oxygen-free electronic copper disc using Fourier-domain short coherence interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Montonen, Risto; Hæggström, Edward; Österberg, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The internal shape and alignment of accelerator discs is crucial for efficient collider operation at the future compact linear collider (CLIC). We applied a calibrated custom-made Fourier-domain short coherence interferometer to measure the height of 40 and 60μm60  μm ultraprecisely turned steps (surface roughness Ra≤25nmRa≤25  nm, flatness ≤2μm≤2  μm) on an oxygen-free electronic copper disc. The step heights were quantified to be (39.6±2.6)μm(39.6±2.6)  μm and (59.0±2.3)μm(59.0±2.3)  μm. The uncertainties are quoted at 95% confidence level and include contributions from calibration, refractive index of air, cosine error, surface roughness, and thermal expansion in comparison to standard temperature of 20°C. The results were verified by measuring the same steps using a commercial white light interferometer Veeco—NT3300. Our instrument can ensure that the accelerator discs of the CLIC are aligned within the tolerance required for efficient collider operation.

  12. Photoinduced electron-transfer from imidazole derivative to nano-semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, C; Jayabharathi, J; Jayamoorthy, K; Devi, K Brindha

    2012-04-01

    Bioactive imidazole derivative absorbs in the UV region at 305 nm. The interaction of imidazole derivative with nanoparticulate WO3, Fe2O3, Fe3O4, CuO, ZrO2 and Al2O3 has been studied by UV-visible absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopies. The imidazole derivative adsorbs strongly on the surfaces of nanosemiconductor, the apparent binding constants for the association between nanomaterials and imidazole derivative have been determined from the fluorescence quenching. In the case of nanocrystalline insulator, fluorescence quenching through electron transfer from the excited state of the imidazole derivative to alumina is not possible. However, a possible mechanism for the quenching of fluorescence by the insulator is energy transfer, that is, energy transferred from the organic molecule to the alumina lattice. Based on Forster's non-radiation energy transfer theory, the distance between the imidazole derivative and nanoparticles (r0∼2.00 nm) as well as the critical energy transfer distance (R0∼1.70 nm) has been calculated. The interaction between the imidazole derivative and nanosurfaces occurs through static quenching mechanism. The free energy change (ΔGet) for electron transfer process has been calculated by applying Rehm-Weller equation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Convective and conduction heat transfer study on a mig-type electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patire Junior, H.; Barroso, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    A convective and conducting heat transfer study of a magnetron injection electron gun has been made to minimize the temperature distribution in the gun elements while keeping the required operating temperature at 1000 0 C of the emitter. Appropriate materials were selected to reduce thermal losses and to improve the gun design from a constructional point of view aiming at extending the capabilities of the electron gun. A thermal probe to determine the air velocity and the convective heat transfer coefficient has been constructed to determine the external boundary condition of the ceramic shell and external flanges. A study the contact resistance for all the gun elements has been made to minimize the conduction thermal losses. A software has been used to simulate a thermal model considering the three processes of thermal transfer, namely, conduction, convection and radiation and the influence of the physical properties of the materials used. (author). 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Studies of heat-transfer in the crucible pool with the heat of the electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yiming; Wang Dewu

    2000-01-01

    It is important for the recycle of uranium to increase the production of uranium metal evaporation by the electron gun with high temperature in AVLIS. To decrease the pollution of impurity and the erosion of the crucible caused by the molten uranium, the heat-transfer character of the crucible pool with the solid and liquid interface is studied by solving the Navier-Stocks equation and the energy equation according to the practice of the uranium recycling system. The research emphasizes on the relation between the heat-transfer character and the interface geometry, the crucible height, the heat-conducting factor, the parameter of the electron gun. All the studies show more about the heat-transfer character of the pool and give more parameter for the design of the crucible

  15. Accessible coherence and coherence distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Zhao, Ming-Jing; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Fei, Shao-Ming; Long, Gui-Lu

    2017-04-01

    The definition of accessible coherence is proposed. Through local measurement on the other subsystem and one-way classical communication, a subsystem can access more coherence than the coherence of its density matrix. Based on the local accessible coherence, the part that cannot be locally accessed is also studied, which we call it remaining coherence. We study how the bipartite coherence is distributed by partition for both l1 norm coherence and relative entropy coherence, and the expressions for local accessible coherence and remaining coherence are derived. We also study some examples to illustrate the distribution.

  16. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E

    2011-01-01

    no significant capacity for conversion of hydrogen to methane. The aggregates converted formate to methane but at rates too low to account for the rates at which that the aggregates syntrophically metabolized ethanol, an important component of the reactor influent. Geobacter species comprised 25% of 16S r......, with conductivities 3-fold higher than the conductivities previously reported for dual-species aggregates of Geobacter species in which the two species appeared to exchange electrons via interspecies electron transfer. The temperature dependence response of the aggregate conductance was characteristic of the organic...... for electron exchange in some methanogenic systems....

  17. Electrochemical performance and microbial community profiles in microbial fuel cells in relation to electron transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uria, Naroa; Ferrera, Isabel; Mas, Jordi

    2017-10-18

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with complex microbial communities have been extensively reported in the past, and are commonly used in applications such as wastewater treatment, bioremediation or in-situ powering of environmental sensors. However, our knowledge on how the composition of the microbial community and the different types of electron transfer to the anode affect the performance of these bioelectrochemical systems is far from complete. To fill this gap of knowledge, we designed a set of three MFCs with different constrains limiting direct and mediated electron transfer to the anode. The results obtained indicate that MFCs with a naked anode on which a biofilm was allowed unrestricted development (MFC-A) had the most diverse archaeal and bacterial community, and offered the best performance. In this MFC both, direct and mediated electron transfer, occurred simultaneously, but direct electron transfer was the predominant mechanism. Microbial fuel cells in which the anode was enclosed in a dialysis membrane and biofilm was not allowed to develop (MFC-D), had a much lower power output (about 60% lower), and a prevalence of dissolved redox species that acted as putative electron shuttles. In the anolyte of this MFC, Arcobacter and Methanosaeta were the prevalent bacteria and archaea respectively. In the third MFC, in which the anode had been covered by a cation selective nafion membrane (MFC-N), power output decreased a further 5% (95% less than MFC-A). In this MFC, conventional organic electron shuttles could not operate and the low power output obtained was presumably attributed to fermentation end-products produced by some of the organisms present in the anolyte, probably Pseudomonas or Methanosaeta. Electron transfer mechanisms have an impact on the development of different microbial communities and in turn on MFC performance. Although a stable current was achieved in all cases, direct electron transfer MFC showed the best performance concluding

  18. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 μm) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 μm). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  19. A multi-channel THz and infrared spectrometer for femtosecond electron bunch diagnostics by single-shot spectroscopy of coherent radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesch, Stephan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Behrens, Christopher; Delsim-Hashemi, Hossein; Schmueser, Peter

    2011-08-15

    The high peak current required in free-electron lasers (FELs) is realized by longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to sub-picosecond length. In this paper, a frequency-domain diagnostic method is described that is capable of resolving structures in the femtosecond regime. A novel in-vacuum spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopy of coherent radiation in the THz and infrared range. The spectrometer is equipped with five consecutive dispersion gratings and 120 parallel readout channels; it can be operated either in short wavelength mode (5-44 {mu}m) or in long wavelength mode (45-430 {mu}m). Fast parallel readout permits the spectroscopy of coherent radiation from single electron bunches. Test measurements at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH, using coherent transition radiation, demonstrate excellent performance of the spectrometer. The high sensitivity down to a few micrometers allows study of short bunch features caused for example by microbunching e ects in magnetic chicanes. The device is planned for use as an online bunch profile monitor during regular FEL operation. (orig.)

  20. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  1. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk eBeyenal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA. We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl (cathodic mat system and +300 mVAg/AgCl (anodic mat system and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both anodic and cathodic mat systems. Interestingly, the cathodic mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the anodic mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the cathodic mats than in the anodic mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the cathodic mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that

  2. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Phuc T; Renslow, Ryan S; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N; Lindemann, Stephen R; Fredrickson, James K; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville (Washington, USA). We operated two reactors: graphite electrodes were polarized at potentials of -700 mVAg/AgCl [cathodic (CAT) mat system] and +300 mVAg/AgCl [anodic (AN) mat system] and the electron transfer rates between the electrode and mat were monitored. We observed a diel cycle of electron transfer rates for both AN and CAT mat systems. Interestingly, the CAT mats generated the highest reducing current at the same time points that the AN mats showed the highest oxidizing current. To characterize the physicochemical factors influencing electron transfer processes, we measured depth profiles of dissolved oxygen (DO) and sulfide in the mats using microelectrodes. We further demonstrated that the mat-to-electrode and electrode-to-mat electron transfer rates were light- and temperature-dependent. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, we determined that the electrode potential regulated the diffusivity and porosity of the microbial mats. Both porosity and diffusivity were higher in the CAT mats than in the AN mats. We also used NMR spectroscopy for high-resolution quantitative metabolite analysis and found that the CAT mats had significantly higher concentrations of osmoprotectants such as betaine and trehalose. Subsequently, we performed amplicon sequencing across the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene of incubated mats to understand the impact of electrode potential on microbial community structure. These data suggested that variation in the

  3. Electron transfer in reactions of ketones with organolithium reagents. A carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamataka, H.; Fujimura, N.; Kawafuji, Y.; Hanafusa, T.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects have been determined for reactions of ketones labeled with carbon-14 at the carbonyl carbon with MeLi and Me 2 CuLi in diethyl ether at 0 0 C. Observed isotope effects were as follows: (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + MeLi, 12 k/ 14 k = 1.000 +/- 0.002; (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + Me 2 CuLi, 1.029 +/- 0.005; 2,4,6-Me 3 C 6 H 2 COC 6 H 5 + MeLi, 1.023 +/- 0.004. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the competition experiments. These results are consistent with an electron-transfer step which is followed by a carbon-carbon bond-forming step that is or is not rate determining depending on the structure of ketones and reagents. The reaction of benzophenone with MeLi proceeds via rate-determining electron transfer; the change in nucleophile from MeLi to Me 2 CuLi shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination; the change in ketone from benzophenone to 2,4,6-trimethylbenzophenone also shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination because the latter step becomes slower for the more hindered ketone. The extent of the geometrical change of the substrate at the electron-transfer transition state of the reaction of benzophenone with MeLi was estimated to be small on the basis of the magnitude of the KIE and the rho value of the Hammett correlation

  4. Influence of chemical and structural evolution of dissolved organic matter on electron transfer capacity during composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Xiao-Song; Xi, Bei-Dou; Cui, Dong-Yu; Liu, Yong; Tan, Wen-Bin; Pan, Hong-Wei; Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated. • Composting treatment increased the ETC of DOM from municipal solid wastes. • The ETC increase related to humic matter, and molecule weight, and N and S content. - Abstract: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) can mediate electron transfer and change chemical speciation of heavy metals. In this study, the electron transfer capability (ETC) of compost-derived DOM was investigated through electrochemical approaches, and the factors influencing the ETC were studied using spectral and elemental analysis. The results showed that the electron accepting capacity (EAC) and electron donating capacity (EDC) of compost-derived DOM were 3.29–40.14 μmol e− (g C) −1 and 57.1– 346.07 μmol e− (g C) −1 , respectively. Composting treatment increased the fulvic- and humic-like substance content, oxygenated aliphatic carbon content, lignin-derived aromatic carbon content, molecule weight, and N and S content of DOM, but decreased the aliphatic carbon content and the C and H content. This conversion increased the EDC and EAC of the DOM during composting

  5. Large work function difference driven electron transfer from electrides to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Menamparambath, Mini Mol

    2014-06-23

    A difference in work function plays a key role in charge transfer between two materials. Inorganic electrides provide a unique opportunity for electron transfer since interstitial anionic electrons result in a very low work function of 2.4-2.6 eV. Here we investigated charge transfer between two different types of electrides, [Ca2N]+·e- and [Ca 24Al28O64]4+·4e-, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a work function of 4.73-5.05 eV. [Ca2N]+·e- with open 2-dimensional electron layers was more effective in donating electrons to SWNTs than closed cage structured [Ca24Al28O64] 4+·4e- due to the higher electron concentration (1.3 × 1022 cm-3) and mobility (∼200 cm 2 V-1 s-1 at RT). A non-covalent conjugation enhanced near-infrared fluorescence of SWNTs as high as 52%. The field emission current density of electride-SWNT-silver paste dramatically increased by a factor of 46000 (14.8 mA cm-2) at 2 V μm-1 (3.5 wt% [Ca2N]+·e-) with a turn-on voltage of 0.85 V μm-1. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  6. On the physics of electron transfer (drift) in the substance: about the reason of “abnormal” fast transfer of electrons in the plasma of tokamak and at known Bohm’s diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriev, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of the problem of so-called “abnormal” fast transfer of electrons in tokamak plasma, which turned out much faster than the result of accepted calculation, is given. Such transfer of hot electrons leads to unexpectedly fast destruction of the inner tokamak wall with ejection of its matter in plasma volume, what violates a condition of plasma confinement for controlled thermonuclear fusion. It is shown, taking into account real physics of electron drift in the gas (plasma) and using the conservation law for momentum of electron transfer (drift), that the drift velocity of elastically scattered electrons should be significantly greater than that of accepted calculation. The reason is that the relaxation time of the momentum of electron transfer, to which the electron drift velocity is proportional, is significantly greater (from 16 up to 4 times) than the electron free path time. Therefore, generally accepted replacement of the relaxation time, which is unknown a priori, by the electron free path time, leads to significant (16 times for thermal electrons) underestimation of electron drift velocity (mobility). This result means, that transfer of elastically (and isotropically) scattered electrons in the gas phase should be so fast, and corresponds to multiplying coefficient (16), introduced by D. Bohm to explain the observed by him “abnormal” fast diffusion of electrons.

  7. Construction of Vibronic Diabatic Hamiltonian for Excited-State Electron and Energy Transfer Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Jiang, Shengshi; Zheng, Jie; Lan, Zhenggang

    2017-12-21

    Photoinduced excited-state electron and energy transfer processes are crucial in biological photoharvesting systems and organic photovoltaic devices. We discuss the construction of a diabatic vibronic Hamiltonian for the proper treatment of these processes involving the projection approach acting on both electronic wave functions and vibrational modes. In the electronic part, the wave function projection approach is used to construct the diabatic Hamiltonian in which both local excited states and charge-transfer states are included on the same footing. For the vibrational degrees of freedom, the vibronic couplings in the diabatic Hamiltonian are obtained in the basis of the pseudonormal modes localized on each monomer site by applying delocalized-to-localized mode projection. This systematic approach allows us to construct the vibronic diabatic Hamiltonian in molecular aggregates.

  8. Large electron transfer rate effects from the Duschinsky mixing of vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sando, Gerald M.; Spears, Kenneth G; Hupp, Joseph T

    2001-01-01

    We systematically test how the Duschinsky mixing of normal coordinate vibrations affects transition rates for electron transfer (ET). We find that ET rates in the inverted region can increase many orders of magnitude from Duschinsky mixing, and both totally symmetric and nontotally symmetric...... vibrations are very important. The Duschinsky effect arises when two electronic states have vibrational normal mode coordinate systems that are rotated and translated relative to each other. We use a conventional quantum rate model for ET, and the examples include 6-8 vibrations, where two vibrational modes...... of magnitude for inverted electron transfer reactions and modest mixing. The peak location in a rate vs energy gap plot can depend on the degree of Duschinsky mixing, and therefore it corresponds to a sum of solvent and an effective vibrational reorganization energy that is not predictable by simple models...

  9. Tailored Electron Transfer Pathways in Aucore /Ptshell -Graphene Nanocatalysts for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seselj, Nedjeljko; Engelbrekt, Christian; Ding, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Aucore/Ptshell–graphene catalysts (G-Cys-Au@Pt) are prepared through chemical and surface chemical reactions. Au–Pt core–shell nanoparticles (Au@Pt NPs) covalently immobilized on graphene (G) are efficient electrocatalysts in low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The 9.5 ± 2 nm......-chemically immobilized G-Au@Pt and commercial platinum NPs catalyst (C-Pt), is a result of (1) the tailored electron transfer pathways of covalent bonds integrating Au@Pt NPs into the graphene framework, and (2) synergetic electronic effects of atomically thin Pt shells on Au cores. Enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation...... Au@Pt NPs with atomically thin Pt shells are attached on graphene via L-cysteine (Cys), which serves as linkers controlling NP loading and dispersion, enhancing the Au@Pt NP stability, and facilitating interfacial electron transfer. The increased activity of G-Cys-Au@Pt, compared to non...

  10. Visible-light-induced two-electron-transfer photoreductions on CdS: Effects of morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragami, Tsutomu; Pac, Chyongjin; Yanagida, Shozo (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1990-01-25

    Freshly prepared CdS suspensions (CdS-O) consisting of quantized particles and their loose aggregation catalyze photoreductions of aromatic ketones and olefins in methanol under visible light irradiation using triethylamine as sacrificial electron donor, yielding alcohols and dihydro compounds, respectively, which are more selective than photocatalysis of commercially available crystalline CdS (Aldrich) (CdS-Ald). Deuterium incorporation experiments in photolysis of dimethyl maleate in methanol-O-D revealed that CdS-O catalyzes sequential two-electron-transfer photoreduction, affording dideuterated dimethyl succinate, while CdS-Ald induces both photoreduction and photoisomerization through disproportionation between one-electron-transfer-reduction intermediates, yielding much trideuterated dimethyl succinate and monodeuterated dimethyl fumarate and maleate.

  11. Identification of an electron transfer locus in plastocyanin by chromium(II) affinity labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1981-01-01

    four potential ligands for the metal ion: aspartate-42 and -44 and glutamate-43 and -45. In the three-dimensional fold of plastocyanin, this stretch is very close to tyrosine-83. The emission intensity and its pH dependence observed for the tyrosines in this tryptophan-devoid protein differ markedly...... in the Cr(III) adduct. That difference is interpreted as reflecting proximity and interaction between the latter metal ion and tyrosine-83. The distance between the copper center and the suggested Cr(III) binding site is approximately 12 A. The intervening region contains an array of highly invariant...... aromatic residues. These are proposed to be involved in the electron transfer process. A mechanism for that process is presented that involves interaction between the d electrons of the metal ions with d pi-pi* delocalization through a weakly coupled pi* system. The rationale of this electron transfer...

  12. Variation among Desulfovibrio species in electron transfer systems used for syntrophic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Kuehl, Jennifer; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Price, Morgan N; Arkin, Adam P; Stahl, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mineralization of organic matter in anoxic environments relies on the cooperative activities of hydrogen producers and consumers linked by interspecies electron transfer in syntrophic consortia that may include sulfate-reducing species (e.g., Desulfovibrio). Physiological differences and various gene repertoires implicated in syntrophic metabolism among Desulfovibrio species suggest considerable variation in the biochemical basis of syntrophy. In this study, comparative transcriptional and mutant analyses of Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20 and Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough growing syntrophically with Methanococcus maripaludis on lactate were used to develop new and revised models for their alternative electron transfer and energy conservation systems. Lactate oxidation by strain G20 generates a reduced thiol-disulfide redox pair(s) and ferredoxin that are energetically coupled to H(+)/CO(2) reduction by periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase via a flavin-based reverse electron bifurcation process (electron confurcation) and a menaquinone (MQ) redox loop-mediated reverse electron flow involving the membrane-bound Qmo and Qrc complexes. In contrast, strain Hildenborough uses a larger number of cytoplasmic and periplasmic proteins linked in three intertwining pathways to couple H(+) reduction to lactate oxidation. The faster growth of strain G20 in coculture is associated with a kinetic advantage conferred by the Qmo-MQ-Qrc loop as an electron transfer system that permits higher lactate oxidation rates under elevated hydrogen levels (thereby enhancing methanogenic growth) and use of formate as the main electron-exchange mediator (>70% electron flux), as opposed to the primarily hydrogen-based exchange by strain Hildenborough. This study further demonstrates the absence of a conserved gene core in Desulfovibrio that would determine the ability for a syntrophic lifestyle.

  13. Modulation of the electron transfer processes in Au-ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, M. E.; Armanelli, A.; Perelstein, G.; Feldhoff, A.; Tolley, A. J.; Grela, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures comprising Au and ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the spontaneous reduction of HAuCl4 in ethylene glycol were used to assess the possibility of modulating the direction of the electron transfer processes at the interface. One electron UV reduction and visible oxidation of the reversible couple TEMPOL/TEMPOL-H was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy. The apparent quantum yield for TEMPOL-H conversion under continuous wave visible excitation depends on the irradiation wavelength, being 0.57% and 0.27% at 450 +/- 12 and 530 +/- 12 nm, respectively. These results indicate that both the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transition from the 5d to the 6s level of Au nanoparticles contribute to the visible activity of the nanostructure. In addition, by detecting free electron conduction band electrons in ZnO, after the visible excitation of Au/ZnO nanostructures, we provide direct evidence of the photoexcited electron transfer from gold nanoparticles to ZnO.Plasmonic nanostructures comprising Au and ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the spontaneous reduction of HAuCl4 in ethylene glycol were used to assess the possibility of modulating the direction of the electron transfer processes at the interface. One electron UV reduction and visible oxidation of the reversible couple TEMPOL/TEMPOL-H was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy. The apparent quantum yield for TEMPOL-H conversion under continuous wave visible excitation depends on the irradiation wavelength, being 0.57% and 0.27% at 450 +/- 12 and 530 +/- 12 nm, respectively. These results indicate that both the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transition from the 5d to the 6s level of Au nanoparticles contribute to the visible activity of the nanostructure. In addition, by detecting free electron conduction band electrons in ZnO, after the visible excitation of Au/ZnO nanostructures, we provide direct evidence of the photoexcited electron transfer from gold nanoparticles to ZnO. Electronic

  14. Study of photo-activated electron transfer reactions in the first excited singlet state by picosecond and nanosecond laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doizi, Denis

    1983-01-01

    Picosecond laser spectroscopy has been used to study two photo-activated electron transfer reactions: - a bimolecular electron transfer reaction between a sensitizer, DODCI, and an electron acceptor, methylviologen. The two radical ions created with an electron transfer efficiency γ ≅ 0.07 have been identified in picosecond and nanosecond laser absorption spectroscopy by adding selective solutes such as para-benzoquinone (an electron acceptor) or L(+) ascorbic acid (an electron donor). - an intramolecular electron transfer reaction in a triad molecule consisting of a tetra-aryl-porphyrin covalently linked to both a carotenoid and a quinone. The photoinduced charge separation occurs within 30 ps and leads, with a yield of 25 pc, to the formation of a zwitterion whose half-life is 2.5 μs. The experimental results obtained in these two studies show an effective decrease in the recombination rate of the two radical ions created in the encounter pair. (author) [fr

  15. On the length dependence of bridge-mediated electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; Shevchenko, Ye.V.; May, V.

    2003-01-01

    Bridge-mediated nonadiabatic donor-acceptor (D-A) electron transfer (ET) is studied for the case of a regular molecular bridge of N identical units. It is shown that the multi-exponential ET kinetics reduces to a single-exponential transfer if, and only if, the integral population of the bridge remains small (less than 10 -2 ). An analytical expression for the overall D-A ET rate is derived and the necessary and sufficient conditions are formulated at which the rate is given as a sum of a superexchange and a sequential contribution. To describe experimental data on the N-dependence of ET reactions an approximate form of the overall transfer rate is derived. This expression is used to reproduce experimental data on distant ET through polyproline chains. Finally it is noted that the obtained analytical results can also be used for the description of more complex two-electron transfer reactions if the latter comprises separate single-electron pathways

  16. Bond-formation versus electron transfer: C-C-coupling reactions of hydrocarbon dications with benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roithová, Jana; Schröder, Detlef

    2007-02-14

    The bimolecular reactions of several hydrocarbon dications C(m)H(n)(2+) (m = 6-10, n = 4-9) with neutral benzene are investigated by tandem mass spectrometry using a multipole instrument. Not surprisingly, the major reaction of C(m)H(n)(2+) with benzene corresponds to electron transfer from the neutral arene to the dication resulting in the pair of monocationic products C(m)H(n)(+) + C(6)H(6)(+). In addition, also dissociative electron transfer takes place, whereas proton transfer from the C(m)H(n)(2+) dication to neutral benzene is almost negligible. Interestingly, the excess energy liberated upon electron transfer from the neutral arene to the C(m)H(n)(2+) dication is not equally partitioned in the monocationic products in that the cations arising from the dicationic precursor have a higher internal energy content than the monocations formed from the neutral reaction partner. In addition to the reactions leading to monocationic product ions, bond-forming reactions with maintenance of the two-fold charge are observed, which lead to a condensation of the C(m)H(n)(2+) dications with neutral benzene under formation of intermediate C(m+6)H(n+6)(2+) species and then undergo subsequent losses of molecular hydrogen or neutral acetylene. This reaction complements a recently proposed dicationic route for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under extreme conditions such as they exist in interstellar environments.

  17. EPR investigations of electron transfer in one-electron reduced αα-1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Heteropoly blues of α-1,2 and α-1,4 isomers of [PV2W10O40]5– have been prepared by using the electrochemical technique. EPR spectra, measured as a function of temperature over a wide range (20–300 K), are explicable in terms of electron- hopping processes in heteropoly blues. Temperature dependence of ...

  18. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/kBT where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local modes immersed in the continuum harmonic medium is formulated for both classical and quantum regimes, and accounts explicitly for the mode/medium interaction. The kinetics of the energy exchange between the local ET subsystem and the surrounding environment essentially determine the total ET rate. The efficient computer code for rate computations is elaborated on. The computations are available for a wide range of system parameters, such as the temperature, external field, local mode frequency, and characteristics of mode/medium interaction. The relation of the

  19. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  20. A mapping variable ring polymer molecular dynamics study of condensed phase proton-coupled electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Sadrach; Duke, Jessica R.; Hele, Timothy J. H.; Ananth, Nandini

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the mechanisms of condensed phase proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) using Mapping-Variable Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (MV-RPMD), a recently developed method that employs an ensemble of classical trajectories to simulate nonadiabatic excited state dynamics. Here, we construct a series of system-bath model Hamiltonians for the PCET, where four localized electron-proton states are coupled to a thermal bath via a single solvent mode, and we employ MV-RPMD to simulate state population dynamics. Specifically, for each model, we identify the dominant PCET mechanism, and by comparing against rate theory calculations, we verify that our simulations correctly distinguish between concerted PCET, where the electron and proton transfer together, and sequential PCET, where either the electron or the proton transfers first. This work represents a first application of MV-RPMD to multi-level condensed phase systems; we introduce a modified MV-RPMD expression that is derived using a symmetric rather than asymmetric Trotter discretization scheme and an initialization protocol that uses a recently derived population estimator to constrain trajectories to a dividing surface. We also demonstrate that, as expected, the PCET mechanisms predicted by our simulations are robust to an arbitrary choice of the initial dividing surface.

  1. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s-1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications.

  2. A general theoretical model for electron transfer reactions in complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadei, Andrea; Daidone, Isabella; Aschi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-28

    In this paper we present a general theoretical-computational model for treating electron transfer reactions in complex atomic-molecular systems. The underlying idea of the approach, based on unbiased first-principles calculations at the atomistic level, utilizes the definition and the construction of the Diabatic Perturbed states of the involved reactive partners (i.e. the quantum centres in our perturbation approach) as provided by the interaction with their environment, including their mutual interaction. In this way we reconstruct the true Adiabatic states of the reactive partners characterizing the electron transfer process as the fluctuation of the electronic density due to the fluctuating perturbation. Results obtained by using a combination of Molecular Dynamics simulation and the Perturbed Matrix Method on a prototypical intramolecular electron transfer (from 2-(9,9'-dimethyl)fluorene to the 2-naphthalene group separated by a steroidal 5-α-androstane skeleton) well illustrate the accuracy of the method in reproducing both the thermodynamics and the kinetics of the process.

  3. Solvent dynamical effects in electron transfer: Evaluation of electronic matrix coupling elements for metallocene self-exchange reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManis, George E.; Nielson, Roger M.; Gochev, Alexander; Weaver, Michael J.

    1989-07-01

    The functional dependence of the rate constants for self exchange, k sub ex, for a series of metallocene redox couples to solvent-induced variations in the nuclear frequency factor, nu, engendered by alterations in the longitudinal solvent relaxation time, tau sub L, are utilized to deduce values of the electronic matrix coupling element, H12, for electron exchange. The analysis exploits the sensitivity of the k sub ex tau sub L -1 dependence to the degree of reaction adiabaticity and hence H12 for a given electron exchange reaction. Six metallocene couples are examined: Cp2Co+/o, Cp2Fe+/o (Cp = cyclopentadienyl) and the decamethyl derivatives Cp2Co+/o and Cp2Fe+/o scrutinized previously, additional solvent-dependent k sub ex values for carboxymethyl (cobaltocenium-cobaltocene) (Cp(e)Z Co+/o, e= ester) and hydroxymethyl (ferrocenium-ferrocene) (HMFc+/o.) Kinetic data are examined in 15 solvents, including 11 debye solvents for which it is anticipated that is proportioned to 1/tau sub L. Corrections to k sub ex for the solvent-dependent variations in the barrier height were obtained by corresponding measurements of the optical electron transfer energies for the related binuclear complex biferrocenylacetylene, yielding barrier corrected rate constants, k sub ex. The relationship between H12 superscript o and metallocene electronic structure is briefly discussed. The analysis also enables effective solvent relaxation times for adiabatic barrier crossing in non-Debye media including primary alcohols, to be extracted.

  4. Coherent population transfer and superposition of atomic states via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage using an excited-doublet four-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shiqi; Gong Shangqing; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2004-01-01

    Coherent population transfer and superposition of atomic states via a technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in an excited-doublet four-level atomic system have been analyzed. It is shown that the behavior of adiabatic passage in this system depends crucially on the detunings between the laser frequencies and the corresponding atomic transition frequencies. Particularly, if both the fields are tuned to the center of the two upper levels, the four-level system has two degenerate dark states, although one of them contains the contribution from the excited atomic states. The nonadiabatic coupling of the two degenerate dark states is intrinsic, it originates from the energy difference of the two upper levels. An arbitrary superposition of atomic states can be prepared due to such nonadiabatic coupling effect

  5. Study of the electron transfer in analog compounds of the Prussia blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero V, S.; Damaso C, L.F.; Reguera R, E.; Yee M, H.T.

    2006-01-01

    As answer to the necessity of the search of new nano structured materials, the present work was carried out that it studies the electron transfer in compound similar of the Prussia blue (CAAP), which are representative molecular materials, because its chromophore, magnetic, and electric properties, depend mainly on the processes that are made in their levels or orbital energy. It is known that these made up with octahedra symmetry that its are presented in form of powders, suffer processes of electron transfer when its are exposed to external stimulation by means of light (embracing the regions from the ultraviolet one until the infrared in the electromagnetic spectrum), because they are made up of mixed valency. To know that types of electronic transfers are those that are made in the study materials, 4 series of CAAP its were synthesized by the method of mixtures of aqueous solutions: M[Fe +3 CN) 6 ] 2 nH 2 O, M[Cr +3 (CN) 6 ] 2 nH 2 O, M[Mn +3 (CN) 6 ] 3 nH 2 O y M[Co +3 (CN) 6 ] 3 nH 2 O, and later on studied by means of the electron spectroscopy technique with a UV-SENSE spectrophotometer (Perkin-Elmer) in or n range of work of 250 to 1100 nm. Because to discuss the electronic structures of any compound, it is required the calculation of the energy levels, they took like reference the data tabulated by John Alexander and Harry Gray calculated by the modified theoretical approach of Wolfsberg-Helmhoz. When comparing the obtained spectra with the theoretical data, it was concludes that in the CAAP, its are carried out electronic transfers among orbital molecular metallic of the type d → d, and load transfer (TC) among orbital molecular of the ligand and metal. When being carried out a load transfer in the CAAP that initially are made up of under-spin these its are photoinduced to an excited state of high spin. In consequence it is possible to vary the interactions among the metals of transition of the CAAP and the ligands, allowing the extension of coordinated

  6. Boiling heat transfer in narrow channels with offset strip fins: Application to electronic chipsets cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulvirenti, B.; Matalone, A.; Barucca, U.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study on saturated flow boiling heat transfer of HFE-7100 in vertical rectangular channels with offset strip fins is presented. The experiments have been carried out at atmospheric pressure, over a wide range of vapour quality and heat fluxes up to 1.8 x 10 5 W/m 2 . The local boiling heat transfer coefficient has been obtained from experiments and analysed by means of Chen superposition method. Some correlations for convective boiling and nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients have been considered. A good agreement has been found with Feldman et al. correlation for convective boiling heat transfer and Kim and Sohn correlations for nucleate boiling heat transfer. A closed circuit for electronic chipsets cooling, with the same evaporator as that studied in the first part of the paper, has been studied. Thermal performances of this system have been measured and compared with those of a circuit with the same components but no internal fins in the evaporator. The results have shown that for high heat loads the inner geometry of evaporator does not influence the two-phase heat transfer. For low heat loads, offset strip fins evaporator gives better performances than no fins evaporator.

  7. Photochemical generation of strong one-electron reductants via light-induced electron transfer with reversible donors followed by cross reaction with sacrificial donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Schmehl, Russell

    2014-11-13

    This work illustrates a modified approach for employing photoinduced electron transfer reactions coupled to secondary irreversible electron transfer processes for the generation of strongly reducing equivalents in solution. Through irradiation of [Ru(LL)3](2+) (LL= diimine ligands) with tritolylamine (TTA) as quencher and various alkyl amines as sacrificial electron donors, yields in excess of 50% can be achieved for generation of reductants with E(0)(2+/1+) values between -1.0 and -1.2 V vs NHE. The key to the system is the fact that the TTA cation radical, formed in high yield in reaction with the photoexcited [Ru(LL)3](2+) complex, reacts irreversibly with various sacrificial electron donating amines that are kinetically unable to directly react with the photoexcited complex. The electron transfer between the TTA(+) and the sacrificial amine is an energetically uphill process. Kinetic analysis of these parallel competing reactions, consisting of bimolecular and pseudo first-order reactions, allows determination of electron transfer rate constants for the cross electron transfer reaction between the sacrificial donor and the TTA(+). A variety of amines were examined as potential sacrificial electron donors, and it was found that tertiary 1,2-diamines are most efficient among these amines for trapping the intermediate TTA(+). This electron-donating combination is capable of supplying a persistent reducing flux of electrons to catalysts used for hydrogen production.

  8. Coherent Bichromatic Force Deflection of Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Aldridge, Leland; Yu, Phelan; Eyler, Edward E.; Doyle, John M.

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate the effect of the coherent optical bichromatic force on a molecule, the polar free radical strontium monohydroxide (SrOH). A dual-frequency retroreflected laser beam addressing the X˜2Σ+↔A˜2Π1 /2 electronic transition coherently imparts momentum onto a cryogenic beam of SrOH. This directional photon exchange creates a bichromatic force that transversely deflects the molecules. By adjusting the relative phase between the forward and counterpropagating laser beams we reverse the direction of the applied force. A momentum transfer of 70 ℏk is achieved with minimal loss of molecules to dark states. Modeling of the bichromatic force is performed via direct numerical solution of the time-dependent density matrix and is compared with experimental observations. Our results open the door to further coherent manipulation of molecular motion, including the efficient optical deceleration of diatomic and polyatomic molecules with complex level structures.

  9. Hot electron and real space transfer in double-quantum-well structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Eiichi; Sawaki, Nobuhiko; Akasaki, Isamu; Kano, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Masafumi.

    1991-01-01

    The hot electron phenomena and real space transfer (RST) effect are studied in GaAs/AlGaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) structures, in which we have two kind of quantum wells with different widths. The drift velocity and the electron temperature at liquid helium temperature are investigated as a function of the external electric field applied parallel to the heterointerface. By increasing the field, the electron temperature rises and reaches a plateau in the intermediate region, followed by further rise in the high-field region. The appearance of the plateau is attributed to the RST effect between the two quantum wells. The threshold field for the appearance of the plateau is determined by the difference energy between the quantized levels in two wells. The energy loss rate as a function of the electron temperature indicates that the RST is assisted by LO phonon scattering. (author)

  10. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids. Progress report, September 1990--January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Basic thrust the research program involves use of microporous solids (zeolites, clays, layered and tunnel structure oxide semiconductors) as organizing media for artificial photosynthetic systems. Purpose of the microporous solid is twofold. First, it induces spatial organization of photoactive and electroactive components (sensitizers, semiconductor particles, electron relays, and catalysts) at the solid-solution interface, enhancing the quantum efficiency of charge separation and separating physically the ultimate electron donor and acceptor in the electron transport chain. Second, since the microcrystalline solid admits only molecules of a certain charge and size, it is possible to achieve permanent charge separation by sieving chemical photoproducts (e.g., H{sub 2} and I{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, or H{sub 2} and O{sub 2)} from each other. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods are used to study the kinetics of electron transfer reactions in these hybrid molecular/solid state assemblies.

  11. Self-localized states for electron transfer in nonlocal continuum deformable media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisneros-Ake, Luis A., E-mail: cisneros@esfm.ipn.mx

    2016-08-19

    We consider the problem of electron transport in a deformable continuum medium subjected to an external harmonic substrate potential. We then consider the quasi-stationary state of the full problem to find a Gross–Pitaevskii type equation with a nonlocal external potential, which is solved by variational and numerical means (considered as the exact solution) to find the parameter conditions for the existence of self-localized solutions. The variational approach predicts a threshold on the on-site or nonlocality parameter where localized solutions cease to exist from the Non-Linear Schrödinger soliton limit. A numerical continuation of stationary state solutions in the corresponding discrete system is used to confirm the prediction of the turning value in the on-site term. We finally study the full stationary state and make use of an approximation, proposed by Briedis et al. [17], for the nonlocal term, corresponding to strong nonlocalities, to find analytic expressions for self-localized states in terms of the series solutions of a nonlinear modified Bessel equation. - Highlights: • Nonlocality overcomes nonlinearity at a threshold value to cease the existence of coherent solutions. • Variational and series expansion solutions predict the formation of coherent structures in nonlocal deformable media. • Full numerical solutions confirm the persistence of localized solutions.

  12. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  13. Bridge mediated two-electron transfer reactions: Analysis of stepwise and concerted pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of nonadiabatic donor (D)-acceptor (A) two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a single regular bridge (B) is developed. The presence of different intermediate two-electron states connecting the reactant state D -- BA with the product state DBA -- results in complex multiexponential kinetics. The conditions are discussed at which a reduction to two-exponential as well as single-exponential kinetics becomes possible. For the latter case the rate K TET is calculated, which describes the bridge-mediated reaction as an effective two-electron D-A transfer. In the limit of small populations of the intermediate TET states D - B - A, DB -- A, D - BA - , and DB - A - , K TET is obtained as a sum of the rates K TET (step) and K TET (sup) . The first rate describes stepwise TET originated by transitions of a single electron. It starts at D -- BA and reaches DBA -- via the intermediate state D - BA - . These transitions cover contributions from sequential as well as superexchange reactions all including reduced bridge states. In contrast, a specific two-electron superexchange mechanism from D -- BA to DBA -- defines K TET (sup) . An analytic dependence of K TET (step) and K TET (sup) on the number of bridging units is presented and different regimes of D-A TET are studied

  14. Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ordered Macromolecular Assemblies. Final report for May 1, 1988 - June 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-02-11

    The final report describes studies over a 13 year period having to do with photoinduced electron transfer for active chromophores and redox agents, including assembly of the components in water soluble polymers or polypeptides. The findings include observation of long range charge separation and electron transport using laser phototransient spectroscopy. The systems targeted in these studies include peptide assemblies for which helical conformations and aggregation are documented. Oligomeric peptides modified with non-native redox active groups were also selected for investigation. Highly charged polymers or peptides were investigated as host agents that resemble proteins. The overall goal of these investigations focused on the design and characterization of systems capable of artificial photosynthesis.

  15. Mechanism of organophosphates (nerve gases and pesticides) and antidotes: electron transfer and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter

    2003-12-01

    Evidence indicates that nerve gas toxins operate in ways in addition to inhibition of acetylcholine esterase. Alternative bioactivities are discussed with focus on electron transfer. The main class, including pralidoxime (2-PAM), incorporates conjugated iminium and oxime moieties that are electron affinic. Various physiological properties of iminium and oxime species are reviewed. The organophosphates encompass both nerve gases and insecticides, possessing similar properties, but different activities. Toxic manifestations are apparently due, in part, to oxidative stress. Alkylation of DNA takes place which may lead to generation of reactive oxygen species. Structure-activity relationships are examined, including reduction potentials and the captodative effect.

  16. Toward Highlighting the Ultrafast Electron Transfer Dynamics at the Optically Dark Sites of Photocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canton, Sophie E.; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Building a detailed understanding of the structure–function relationship is a crucial step in the optimization of molecular photocatalysts employed in water splitting schemes. The optically dark nature of their active sites usually prevents a complete mapping of the photoinduced dynamics....... In this work, transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy highlights the electronic and geometric changes that affect such a center in a bimetallic model complex. Upon selective excitation of the ruthenium chromophore, the cobalt moiety is reduced through intramolecular electron transfer and undergoes a spin flip...

  17. Ultrafast static and diffusion-controlled electron transfer at Ag 29 nanocluster/molecular acceptor interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-10-29

    Efficient absorption of visible light and a long-lived excited state lifetime of silver nanoclusters (Ag29 NCs) are integral properties for these new clusters to serve as light-harvesting materials. Upon optical excitation, electron injection at Ag29 NC/methyl viologen (MV2+) interfaces is very efficient and ultrafast. Interestingly, our femto- and nanosecond time-resolved results demonstrate clearly that both dynamic and static electron transfer mechanisms are involved in photoluminescence quenching of Ag29 NCs. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Evolution of full stokes parameters in polarized radiative transfer of electron cyclotron waves on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idei, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tsumori, K.; Watari, T.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Takita, Y.; Yoshimura, Y.; Ohkubo, K.; Sakakibara, S.; Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Tanaka, K.; Morisaki, T.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Nakanishi, H.; Ohdachi, S.; Emoto, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Motojima, O.; Fujiwara, M. [LHD Experimental Group, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, 509-5292 (Japan); Notake, T. [Nagoya University, Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    To study polarized radiative transfer of electron cyclotron waves, a general equation of polarization evolution that includes the effects of both birefringence and dichroism is dealt with. Full Stokes parameters are used to describe the polarization state and the absorption rate in the equation. The evolution equation on polarization state is able to treat general cases in which two polarization states of Eigenmodes are not necessary to be orthogonal. Using this equation, a single absorption rate in second harmonic electron cyclotron heating is investigated on the Large Helical Device. (authors)

  19. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A; Chobot, Sarah E; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C; Leslie Dutton, P; Discher, Bohdana M

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preferred sites and pathways for electron transfer in blue copper proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1988-01-01

    of where and how electrons are transferred to and from the copper-ion have been investigated. One experimental approach developed in order to pursue these problems is that of reductively labeling several representative, yet structurally distinct blue single copper proteins; azurin, plastocyanin......, and stellacyanin with chromium ions. In all three cases, a substitution inert Cr(III)-adduct is formed when the oxidized protein is reduced by Cr(II)ag ions. In azurin, Cr(III) binds to the Glu-91 carboxylate approximately 10 A from the copper center. In both plastocyanin and stellacyanin the Cr(III) label is most...... probably also coordinated to carboxylate groups, present in plastocyanin, and in stellacyanin 12 A and 6 A, respectively, from the copper center. The salient feature emerging from examination of the three copper proteins is that a pi-facilitated electron transfer (E.T.) pathway may be operative; in azurin...