WorldWideScience

Sample records for coherent anti-stokes raman

  1. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  2. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp(3) vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  3. Abnormal anti-Stokes Raman emission as a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering-like process in disordered media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltog, Ioan; Baibarac, Mihaela; Smaranda, Ion; Lefrant, Serge

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that, by continuous single beam excitation, one can generate an abnormal anti-Stokes Raman emission (AASRE) whose properties are similar to a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The effect has been observed in materials which possess intrinsically nonlinear properties (LiNbO 3 and CdS), which have the electric susceptibility of third order different from zero, χ (3) ≠ 0, as well as in materials that become nonlinear under resonant optical excitation. In the latter case, we used poly-3,4-ethylendioxythiophene (PEDOT) in its undoped state deposited electrochemically on Au support. Raman studies corroborated with images of optical microscopy demonstrate that the production of AASRE is conditioned by the existence of a particular morphology of the sample able to ensure efficient transport of the light inside the sample through a multiple light scattering mechanism. In this context, it was found that LiNbO 3 and CdS in powder form as well as the PEDOT films layered on a rough Au substrate are suitable morphological forms. We explain AASRE as resulting from a wave-mixing mechanism of the incident laser light ω l with a Stokes-shifted Raman light ω S produced by a spontaneous Raman light scattering process, both strongly scattered inside the sample. As a CARS process, AASRE is conditioned by the achievement of phase-matching requirements, which makes the difference between the wave vectors of mixing light close to zero, Δk =/2k l - k S - k CARS /∼ 0. In condensed media, the small dispersion of the refractive index makes Δk ∼ 0 so that the formation of a favourable phase-matching geometry may be accomplished even at a crossing angle θ of travelling scattered light ω l and ω S . For tightly focused beams, the requirement of phase matching relaxes; it is no longer sensitive to the Raman shift, so that a wide intense anti-Stokes Raman spectrum is observed at an angle larger than the Stokes Raman spectrum.

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, H.N.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup is demonstra......A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup...

  5. Supercontinuum generation for coherent anti- Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Isomäki, Antti; Hansen, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) designs with two zero-dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs) are experimentally investigated in order to suggest a novel PCF for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. From our investigation, we select the optimum PCF design and demonstrate a tailored spectru...

  6. Broadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy employing photonic-crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Esben Ravn; Paulsen, Henrik Nørgaard; Birkedal, Victoria

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate spectral multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy and microscopy based on a single Ti:sapphire oscillator and a nonlinear photonic-crystal fiber (PCF). The Stokes pulse is generated by spectral conversion of the laser pulse in a PCF. The pump pulse is eit...

  7. Interpreting coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra measured with multimode Nd:YAG pump lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrow, R.L.; Rahn, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    We report comparisons of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements using single-axial-and multiaxial-mode Nd:YAG lasers. Our results demonstrate the validity of a recently proposed convolution expression for unresolved CARS spectra. The results also support the use of a relative delay of several coherence lengths between pump-beam paths for reducing the effects of pump-field statistics on the CARS spectral profile

  8. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal

  9. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscope/microscope based on a widely tunable laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dementjev, A.; Gulbinas, V.; Serbenta, A.; Kaucikas, M.; Niaura, G.

    2010-03-01

    We present a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope based on a robust and simple laser source. A picosecond laser operating in a cavity dumping regime at the 1 MHz repetition rate was used to pump a traveling wave optical parametric generator, which serves as a two-color excitation light source for the CARS microscope. We demonstrate the ability of the presented CARS microscope to measure CARS spectra and images by using several detection schemes.

  10. Wide-Field Vibrational Phase Contrast Imaging Based on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Yong-Gang; Ji Zi-Heng; Dong Da-Shan; Gong Qi-Huang; Shi Ke-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We propose and implement a wide-field vibrational phase contrast detection to obtain imaging of imaginary components of third-order nonlinear susceptibility in a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope with full suppression of the non-resonant background. This technique is based on the unique ability of recovering the phase of the generated CARS signal based on holographic recording. By capturing the phase distributions of the generated CARS field from the sample and from the environment under resonant illumination, we demonstrate the retrieval of imaginary components in the CARS microscope and achieve background free coherent Raman imaging. (paper)

  11. Analysis of organic pollutant degradation in pulsed plasma by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoneta; Hieda, Junko; Umemura, Tomonari; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in water was investigated by the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method, in which the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity corresponding to the vibrational transitions of the molecule is monitored during and after solution plasma processing (SPP). In the beginning of SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensity of the ring vibrational molecular transitions at 1233 and 1660 cm -1 increases under the influence of the electric field of the plasma, depending on the delay time between the plasma pulse and the laser firing pulse. At the same time, the plasma contributes to the degradation of p-BQ molecules by generating hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which decompose p-BQ into different carboxylic acids. After SPP, the CARS signal intensity of the vibrational bands of p-BQ ceased and the degradation of p-BQ was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography analysis.

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and spontaneous Raman scattering diagnostics of nonequilibrium plasmas and flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-10-01

    The paper provides an overview of the use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and spontaneous Raman scattering for diagnostics of low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas and nonequilibrium high-enthalpy flows. A brief review of the theoretical background of CARS, four-wave mixing and Raman scattering, as well as a discussion of experimental techniques and data reduction, are included. The experimental results reviewed include measurements of vibrational level populations, rotational/translational temperature, electric fields in a quasi-steady-state and transient molecular plasmas and afterglow, in nonequilibrium expansion flows, and behind strong shock waves. Insight into the kinetics of vibrational energy transfer, energy thermalization mechanisms and dynamics of the pulse discharge development, provided by these experiments, is discussed. Availability of short pulse duration, high peak power lasers, as well as broadband dye lasers, makes possible the use of these diagnostics at relatively low pressures, potentially with a sub-nanosecond time resolution, as well as obtaining single laser shot, high signal-to-noise spectra at higher pressures. Possibilities for the development of single-shot 2D CARS imaging and spectroscopy, using picosecond and femtosecond lasers, as well as novel phase matching and detection techniques, are discussed.

  13. Rapid spectro-polarimetry to probe molecular symmetry in multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würthwein, Thomas; Brinkmann, Maximilian; Hellwig, Tim; Fallnich, Carsten

    2017-11-21

    We present the simultaneous detection of the spectrum and the complete polarization state of a multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering signal with a fast division-of-amplitude spectro-polarimeter. The spectro-polarimeter is based on a commercial imaging spectrograph, a birefringent wedge prism, and a segmented polarizer. Compared to the standard rotating-retarder fixed-analyzer spectro-polarimeter, only a single measurement is required and an up to 21-fold reduced acquisition time is shown. The measured Stokes parameters allow us to differentiate between vibrational symmetries and to determine the depolarization ratio ρ by data post-processing.

  14. Study of high-temperature multiplex HCl coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J P; Yueh, F Y; Kao, W; Cook, R L

    1993-02-20

    A feasibility study of temperature measurement with multiplex HCl coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is investigated. The HCl CARS spectra of a 100% HCl gas sample are recorded in a quartz sample cell placed in a furnace at 1 atm pressure and at different temperatures. The nonlinear susceptibility of HCl (chi(nr)(HCl)), which is measured with the present CARS experimental setup, is reported. The experimental spectra are fit by using a library of simulated HCl CARS spectra with a least-squares-fitting program to infer the temperature. The inferred temperatures from HCl CARS spectra are in agreement with thermocouple temperatures.

  15. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H 2 , rovibrational excitation of H 2 produced by the reaction H + HBr → H 2 + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr

  16. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering rigid endoscope toward robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Fukushima, S; Niioka, H; Deguchi, S; Hashimoto, M

    2018-02-01

    Label-free visualization of nerves and nervous plexuses will improve the preservation of neurological functions in nerve-sparing robot-assisted surgery. We have developed a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) rigid endoscope to distinguish nerves from other tissues during surgery. The developed endoscope, which has a tube with a diameter of 12 mm and a length of 270 mm, achieved 0.91% image distortion and 8.6% non-uniformity of CARS intensity in the whole field of view (650 μm diameter). We demonstrated CARS imaging of a rat sciatic nerve and visualization of the fine structure of nerve fibers.

  17. Polarization Sensitive Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy of DCVJ in Doped Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    Coherent Raman Microscopy is an emerging technic and method to image biological samples such as living cells by recording vibrational fingerprints of molecules with high spatial resolution. The race is on to record the entire image during the shortest time possible in order to increase the time resolution of the recorded cellular events. The electronically enhanced polarization sensitive version of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is one of the method which can shorten the recording time and increase the sharpness of an image by enhancing the signal level of special molecular vibrational modes. In order to show the effectiveness of the method a model system, a highly fluorescence sample, DCVJ in a polymer matrix is investigated. Polarization sensitive resonance CARS spectra are recorded and analyzed. Vibrational signatures are extracted with model independent methods. Details of the measurements and data analysis will be presented. The author gratefully acknowledge the UWF for financial support.

  18. Tunable optical setup with high flexibility for spectrally resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, G; Akimov, D; Bartelt, H; Dietzek, B; Popp, J; Schlücker, S

    2011-01-01

    A simplified setup for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is introduced, which allows for recording CARS images with 30 cm -1 excitation bandwidth for probing Raman bands between 500 and 900 cm -1 with minimal requirements for alignment. The experimental arrangement is based on electronic switching between CARS images recorded at different Raman resonances by combining a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as broadband light source and an acousto-optical programmable dispersive filter (AOPDF) as tunable wavelength filter. Such spatial light modulator enables selection of a narrow-band spectrum to yield high vibrational contrast and hence chemical contrast in the resultant CARS images. Furthermore, an experimental approach to reconstruct spectral information from CARS image contrast is introduced

  19. Stimulated-emission pumping enabling sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of stimulated emission pumping to achieve sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A pair of control light fields is used to prepopulate the Raman state involved in the CARS process prior to the CARS

  20. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS): Instrumentation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaker, Nadia; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Marguet, Didier; Colonna, Anne; Hadjur, Christophe; Rigneault, Herve

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser physics have permitted the development of a new kind of microscopy based on stimulated Raman scattering. This new technique known as Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. We review recent advances in CARS microscopy, with applications to chemical and biological systems. We also present an application of CARS microscopy with high optical resolution and spectral selectivity, in resolving structures in surface ex vivo stratum corneum by looking at the CH 2 stretching vibrational band. A strong CARS signal is backscattered from an intense forward generated CARS signal in thick samples. This makes noninvasive imaging of deep structures possible, without labeling or chemical treatments

  1. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kideog; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-08-01

    We report the quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using the circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CP-CARS) technique together with Stokes parameters in the Poincaré sphere. The pump and Stokes excitation beams are circularly polarized to suppress both the linear polarization-dependent artifacts and the nonresonant background of tissue CARS imaging, enabling quantitative CP-CARS image analysis. This study shows that CP-CARS imaging uncovers significantly increased phase retardance of injured spinal cord tissue as compared to normal tissue, suggesting that CP-CARS is an appealing label-free imaging tool for determining the degree of tissue phase retardance, which could serve as a unique diagnostic parameter associated with nervous tissue injury.

  2. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  3. Label-free cellular imaging by broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Sapun H; Lee, Young Jong; Aamer, Khaled A; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2010-10-20

    Raman microspectroscopy can provide the chemical contrast needed to characterize the complex intracellular environment and macromolecular organization in cells without exogenous labels. It has shown a remarkable ability to detect chemical changes underlying cell differentiation and pathology-related chemical changes in tissues but has not been widely adopted for imaging, largely due to low signal levels. Broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (B-CARS) offers the same inherent chemical contrast as spontaneous Raman but with increased acquisition rates. To date, however, only spectrally resolved signals from the strong CH-related vibrations have been used for CARS imaging. Here, we obtain Raman spectral images of single cells with a spectral range of 600-3200 cm⁻¹, including signatures from weakly scattering modes as well as CH vibrations. We also show that B-CARS imaging can be used to measure spectral signatures of individual cells at least fivefold faster than spontaneous Raman microspectroscopy and can be used to generate maps of biochemical species in cells. This improved spectral range and signal intensity opens the door for more widespread use of vibrational spectroscopic imaging in biology and clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of moderate pump and Stokes chirp on chirped-probe pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Mingming; Satija, Aman; Lucht, Robert P.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of moderate levels of chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses on chirped-probe-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CPP fs CARS) were investigated. The frequency chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses was introduced

  5. Rapid-scan Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy with heterodyne detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Luo, Yizhi; Ideguchi, Takuro; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    High-speed Raman spectroscopy has become increasingly important for analyzing chemical dynamics in real time. To address the need, rapid-scan Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (FT-CARS) spectroscopy has been developed to realize broadband CARS measurements at a scan rate of more than 20,000 scans/s. However, the detection sensitivity of FT-CARS spectroscopy is inherently low due to the limited number of photons detected during each scan. In this Letter, we show our experimental demonstration of enhanced sensitivity in rapid-scan FT-CARS spectroscopy by heterodyne detection. Specifically, we implemented heterodyne detection by superposing the CARS electric field with an external local oscillator (LO) for their interference. The CARS signal was amplified by simply increasing the power of the LO without the need for increasing the incident power onto the sample. Consequently, we achieved enhancement in signal intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio by factors of 39 and 5, respectively, compared to FT-CARS spectroscopy with homodyne detection. The sensitivity-improved rapid-scan FT-CARS spectroscopy is expected to enable the sensitive real-time observation of chemical dynamics in a broad range of settings, such as combustion engines and live biological cells.

  6. Vibrational imaging and microspectroscopies based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    For noninvasive characterization of chemical species or biological components within a complex heterogeneous system, their intrinsic molecular vibrational properties can be used in contrast mechanisms in optical microscopy. A series of recent advances have made coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy a powerful technique that allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability. In this review, we discuss theoretical and experimental aspects of CARS microscopy in a collinear excitation beam geometry. Particular attention is given to the underlying physical principles behind the new features of CARS signal generation under tight focusing conditions. We provide a brief overview of the instrumentation of CARS microscopy and its experimental characterization by means of imaging of model systems and live unstained cells. CARS microscopy offers the possibility of spatially resolved vibrational spectroscopy, providing chemical and physical structure information of molecular specimens on the sub-micrometre length scale. We review multiplex CARS microspectroscopy allowing fast acquisition of frequency-resolved CARS spectra, time-resolved CARS microspectroscopy recording ultrafast Raman free induction decays and CARS correlation spectroscopy probing dynamical processes with chemical selectivity. (topical review)

  7. Investigation of lipid homeostasis in living Drosophila by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2012-12-01

    To improve our understanding of lipid metabolism, Drosophila is used as a model animal, and its lipid homeostasis is monitored by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. We are able to achieve in vivo imaging of larval fat body (analogous to adipose tissue in mammals) and oenocytes (analogous to hepatocytes) in Drosophila larvae at subcellular level without any labeling. By overexpressing two lipid regulatory proteins-Brummer lipase (Bmm) and lipid storage droplet-2 (Lsd-2)-we found different phenotypes and responses under fed and starved conditions. Comparing with the control larva, we observed more lipid droplet accumulation by ˜twofold in oenocytes of fat-body-Bmm-overexpressing (FB-Bmm-overexpressing) mutant under fed condition, and less lipid by ˜fourfold in oenocytes of fat-body-Lsd-2-overexpressing (FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing) mutant under starved condition. Moreover, together with reduced size of lipid droplets, the lipid content in the fat body of FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant decreases much faster than that of the control and FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing mutant during starvation. From long-term starvation assay, we found FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant has a shorter lifespan, which can be attributed to faster consumption of lipid in its fat body. Our results demonstrate in vivo observations of direct influences of Bmm and Lsd-2 on lipid homeostasis in Drosophila larvae.

  8. Coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy: a novel technique for imaging the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masihzadeh, Omid; Ammar, David A; Kahook, Malik Y; Lei, Tim C

    2013-05-01

    To image the cellular and noncellular structures of the retina in an intact mouse eye without the application of exogenous fluorescent labels using noninvasive, nondestructive techniques. Freshly enucleated mouse eyes were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). Cross sectional transverse sections and sequential flat (en face) sagittal sections were collected from a region of sclera approximately midway between the limbus and optic nerve. Imaging proceeded from the surface of the sclera to a depth of ∼60 μm. The fluorescent signal from collagen fibers within the sclera was evident in the TPAF channel; the scleral collagen fibers showed no organization and appeared randomly packed. The sclera contained regions lacking TPAF and CARS fluorescence of ∼3 to 15 μm in diameter that could represent small vessels or scleral fibroblasts. Intense punctate CARS signals from the retinal pigment epithelial layer were of a size and shape of retinyl storage esters. Rod outer segments could be identified by the CARS signal from their lipid-rich plasma membranes. CARS microscopy can be used to image the outer regions of the mammalian retina without the use of a fluorescent dye or exogenously expressed recombinant protein. With technical advancements, CARS/TPAF may represent a new avenue for noninvasively imaging the retina and might complement modalities currently used in clinical practice.

  9. Intracellular imaging of docosanol in living cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sixian; Liu, Yuan; Arp, Zane; Zhao, Youbo; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-07-01

    Docosanol is an over-the-counter topical agent that has proved to be one of the most effective therapies for treating herpes simplex labialis. However, the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation remains poorly understood. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we investigated the uptake of docosanol in living cells using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. Based on direct visualization of the deuterated docosanol, we observed highly concentrated docosanol inside living cells 24 h after drug treatment. In addition, different spatial patterns of drug accumulation were observed in different cell lines. In keratinocytes, which are the targeted cells of docosanol, the drug molecules appeared to be docking at the periphery of the cell membrane. In contrast, the drug molecules in fibroblasts appeared to accumulate in densely packed punctate regions throughout the cytoplasm. These results suggest that this molecular imaging approach is suitable for the longitudinal tracking of drug molecules in living cells to identify cell-specific trafficking and may also have implications for elucidating the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation.

  10. Insights into Caco-2 cell culture structure using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Jukka; Sözeri, Erkan; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Peltonen, Leena; Santos, Hélder A; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-05-15

    We have used coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel and rapid, label-free and non-destructive imaging method to gain structural insights into live intestinal epithelial cell cultures used for drug permeability testing. Specifically we have imaged live Caco-2 cells in (bio)pharmaceutically relevant conditions grown on membrane inserts. Imaging conditions were optimized, including evaluation of suitable membrane materials and media solutions, as well as tolerable laser powers for non-destructive imaging of the live cells. Lipid structures, in particular lipid droplets, were imaged within the cells on the insert membranes. The size of the individual lipid droplets increased substantially over the 21-day culturing period up to approximately 10% of the volume of the cross section of individual cells. Variation in lipid content has important implications for intestinal drug permeation testing during drug development but has received limited attention to date due to a lack of suitable analytical techniques. CARS microscopy was shown to be well suited for such analysis with the potential for in situ imaging of the same individual cell-cultures that are used for permeation studies. Overall, the method may be used to provide important information about cell monolayer structure to better understand drug permeation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy temperature measurements in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Don; Driver, H. Steve T.; Hutcheon, Richard J.; Lockett, Russel J.; Robertson, Gerald N.

    1994-09-01

    Part of a project to investigate the physics and chemistry of alternative fuels in internal combustion engines is reported. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to probe the fuel-air mixture in the cylinder of a Richardo E6 variable compression ratio research engine. The laser system comprises a passively Q- switched single-longitudinal-mode frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and a broadband dye laser, both with a pulse length of 15 ns. A crankshaft encoder and electronic delay are used to fire the lasers at specified times during the engine cycle, and CARS spectra are acquired using a 0.75 m spectrometer and a 1024 optical multichannel analyzer. Because of the uncertainties associated with collisional narrowing in the theoretical modeling of high-pressure CARS spectra, temperatures are determined by comparing the engine spectra with a library of experimental CARS spectra from a calibrated high-pressure, high- temperature cell. This purely experimental technique is shown to be superior to two theoretical models under the considered conditions, giving temperatures during the compression stroke of the engine with standard deviations of typically 10 K and a possible systematic error of 15 K. Together with pressure records, this information is used as input data for chemical kinetic modeling of the combustion process.

  12. Nonequilibrium Supersonic Freestream Studied Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Andrew D.; Cantu, Luca M.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Baurle, Rob; Danehy, Paul M.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Measurements were conducted at the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility of the flow in a constant-area duct downstream of a Mach 2 nozzle. The airflow was heated to approximately 1200 K in the facility heater upstream of the nozzle. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy was used to measure the rotational and vibrational temperatures of N2 and O2 at two planes in the duct. The expectation was that the vibrational temperature would be in equilibrium, because most scramjet facilities are vitiated air facilities and are in vibrational equilibrium. However, with a flow of clean air, the vibrational temperature of N2 along a streamline remains approximately constant between the measurement plane and the facility heater, the vibrational temperature of O2 in the duct is about 1000 K, and the rotational temperature is consistent with the isentropic flow. The measurements of N2 vibrational temperature enabled cross-stream nonuniformities in the temperature exiting the facility heater to be documented. The measurements are in agreement with computational fluid dynamics models employing separate lumped vibrational and translational/rotational temperatures. Measurements and computations are also reported for a few percent steam addition to the air. The effect of the steam is to bring the flow to thermal equilibrium, also in agreement with the computational fluid dynamics.

  13. Temperature Measurements in Reacting Flows Using Time-Resolved Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (fs-CARS) Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Sukesh; Kinnius, Paul J; Lucht, Robert P; Gord, James R

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy of the nitrogen molecule is used for the measurement of temperature in atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic, hydrogen-air diffusion flames...

  14. Imaging chemical interfaces perpendicular to the optical axis with focus-engineered coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamachari, Vishnu Vardhan; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2007-01-01

    In vibrational microscopy, it is often necessary to distinguish between chemically distinct microscopic objects and to highlight the 'chemical interfaces' present in the sample under investigation. Here we apply the concept of focus engineering to enhance the sensitivity of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy to these interfaces. Based on detailed numerical simulations, we show that using a focused Stokes field with a sharp phase jump along the longitudinal direction leads to the suppression of the signal from bulk regions and improves the signal contrast from vibrational resonant interfaces oriented perpendicular to the axis of beam propagation. We also demonstrate that the CARS spectral response from chemical interfaces exhibits a clean, Raman-like band-shape with such a phase-shaped excitation. This phenomenon of interface highlighting is a consequence of the coherent nature of CARS signal generation and it involves a complex interplay of the spectral phase of the sample and the spatial phase of the excitation fields

  15. Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy of brain tissue with higher ranking data classification for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohling, Christoph; Bocklitz, Thomas; Duarte, Alex S.; Emmanuello, Cinzia; Ishikawa, Mariana S.; Dietzeck, Benjamin; Buckup, Tiago; Uckermann, Ortrud; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Motzkus, Marcus

    2017-06-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) microscopy was carried out to map a solid tumor in mouse brain tissue. The border between normal and tumor tissue was visualized using support vector machines (SVM) as a higher ranking type of data classification. Training data were collected separately in both tissue types, and the image contrast is based on class affiliation of the single spectra. Color coding in the image generated by SVM is then related to pathological information instead of single spectral intensities or spectral differences within the data set. The results show good agreement with the H&E stained reference and spontaneous Raman microscopy, proving the validity of the MCARS approach in combination with SVM.

  16. A high-resolution two-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectrum using a spectral amplitude modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chenhui; Zhang, Shian; Wu, Meizhen; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra suffer from low spectral resolution because of the broadband laser spectrum. In this paper, we propose a feasible scheme to achieve a high-resolution two-pulse CARS spectrum by shaping both the pump and probe pulses using rectangular amplitude modulation. We show that a narrowband hole in the CARS spectrum can be created by the amplitude-shaped laser pulse, the position of which is correlated with the Raman resonant frequency of the molecule. Thus, by observing holes in the CARS spectrum, we are able to obtain a high-resolution CARS spectrum and the energy-level diagram of the molecule. (paper)

  17. Detection of chemical interfaces in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Dk-CARS. I. Axial interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-12-01

    We develop a full vectorial theoretical investigation of the chemical interface detection in conventional coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In Part I, we focus on the detection of axial interfaces (i.e., parallel to the optical axis) following a recent experimental demonstration of the concept [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 213905 (2010)]. By revisiting the Young's double slit experiment, we show that background-free microscopy and spectroscopy is achievable through the angular analysis of the CARS far-field radiation pattern. This differential CARS in k space (Dk-CARS) technique is interesting for fast detection of interfaces between molecularly different media. It may be adapted to other coherent and resonant scattering processes.

  18. Combining deep learning and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging for automated differential diagnosis of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Sheng; Xu, Xiaoyun; Li, Jiasong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is capable of providing cellular-level images and resolving pathologically related features on human lung tissues. However, conventional means of analyzing CARS images requires extensive image processing, feature engineering, and human intervention. This study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a deep learning algorithm to automatically differentiate normal and cancerous lung tissue images acquired by CARS. We leverage the features learned by pretrained deep neural networks and retrain the model using CARS images as the input. We achieve 89.2% accuracy in classifying normal, small-cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma lung images. This computational method is a step toward on-the-spot diagnosis of lung cancer and can be further strengthened by the efforts aimed at miniaturizing the CARS technique for fiber-based microendoscopic imaging.

  19. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J., E-mail: cjkliew@sandia.gov [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

  20. Evans blue dye-enhanced imaging of the brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ram Lee

    Full Text Available We performed dye-enhanced imaging of mouse brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SF-CARS microscopy. The resonant signals from C-H stretching in forward CARS usually show high background intensity in tissues, which makes CARS imaging of microvessels difficult. In this study, epi-detection of back-scattered SF-CARS signals showed a negligible background, but the overall intensity of resonant CARS signals was too low to observe the network of brain microvessels. Therefore, Evans blue (EB dye was used as contrasting agent to enhance the back-scattered SF-CARS signals. Breakdown of brain microvessels by inducing hemorrhage in a mouse was clearly visualized using backward SF-CARS signals, following intravenous injection of EB. The improved visualization of brain microvessels with EB enhanced the sensitivity of SF-CARS, detecting not only the blood vessels themselves but their integrity as well in the brain vasculature.

  1. Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N 2 , H 2 , CO 2 , O 2 , and CH 4 . Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location

  2. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  3. Label-free evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis with multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuc T Le

    Full Text Available Hepatic microvesicular steatosis is a hallmark of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and early-stage fatty liver disease. Current histopathology techniques are inadequate for the clinical evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis. In this paper, we explore the use of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy for the detection and characterization of hepatic microvesicular steatosis. We show that CARS microscopy is more sensitive than Oil Red O histology for the detection of microvesicular steatosis. Computer-assisted analysis of liver lipid level based on CARS signal intensity is consistent with triglyceride measurement using a standard biochemical assay. Most importantly, in a single measurement procedure on unprocessed and unstained liver tissues, multimodal CARS imaging provides a wealth of critical information including the detection of microvesicular steatosis and quantitation of liver lipid content, number and size of lipid droplets, and lipid unsaturation and packing order of lipid droplets. Such information can only be assessed by multiple different methods on processed and stained liver tissues or tissue extracts using current standard analytical techniques. Multimodal CARS microscopy also permits label-free identification of lipid-rich non-parenchymal cells. In addition, label-free and non-perturbative CARS imaging allow rapid screening of mitochondrial toxins-induced microvesicular steatosis in primary hepatocyte cultures. With its sensitivity and versatility, multimodal CARS microscopy should be a powerful tool for the clinical evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis.

  4. Detection of Lipid-Rich Prostate Circulating Tumour Cells with Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Ranjana; Chao, Olivia; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Goodman, Oscar B; Le, Thuc T

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) are an important indicator of metastasis and associated with a poor prognosis. Detection sensitivity and specificity of CTC in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patient remain a technical challenge. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy was employed to examine the lipid content of CTC isolated from the peripheral blood of metastatic prostate cancer patients. CARS microscopy was also employed to evaluate lipid uptake and mobilization kinetics of a metastatic human prostate cancer cell line. One hundred CTC from eight metastatic prostate cancer patients exhibited strong CARS signal which arose from intracellular lipid. In contrast, leukocytes exhibited weak CARS signal which arose mostly from cellular membrane. On average, CARS signal intensity of prostate CTC was 7-fold higher than that of leukocytes (P<0.0000001). When incubated with human plasma, C4-2 metastatic human prostate cancer cells exhibited rapid lipid uptake kinetics and slow lipid mobilization kinetics. Higher expression of lipid transport proteins in C4-2 cells compared to non-transformed RWPE-1 and non-malignant BPH-1 prostate epithelial cells further indicated strong affinity for lipid of metastatic prostate cancer cells. Intracellular lipid could serve as a biomarker for prostate CTC which could be sensitively detected with CARS microscopy in a label-free manner. Strong affinity for lipid by metastatic prostate cancer cells could be used to improve detection sensitivity and therapeutic targeting of prostate CTC

  5. Effects of moderate pump and Stokes chirp on chirped-probe pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Mingming

    2018-01-08

    The effects of moderate levels of chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses on chirped-probe-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CPP fs CARS) were investigated. The frequency chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses was introduced by placing SF11 glass disks with thicknesses of 10 mm or 20 mm in the optical path for these beams. The magnitude of the chirp in the probe beam was much greater and was induced by placing a 30-cm rod of SF10 glass in the beam path. The temperature measurements were performed in hydrogen/air non-premixed flames stabilized on a Hencken burner at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0. We performed measurements with no disks in pump and Stokes beam paths, and then with disks of 10 mm and 20 mm placed in both beam paths. The spectrum of the nonresonant background four-wave mixing signal narrowed considerably with increasing pump and Stokes chirp, while the resonant CARS signal was relatively unaffected. Consequently, the interference of the nonresonant background with the resonant CARS signal in the frequency-spread dephasing region of the spectrum was minimized. The increased rate of decay of the resonant CARS signal with increasing temperature was thus readily apparent. We have started to analyze the CPP fs CARS thermometry data and initial results indicate improved accuracy and precision are obtained due to moderate chirp in the pump and Stokes laser pulses.

  6. Nitric oxide concentration measurements in atmospheric pressure flames using electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, N.; Kulatilaka, W. D.; Naik, S. V.; Laurendeau, N. M.; Lucht, R. P.; Kuehner, J. P.; Roy, S.; Katta, V. R.; Gord, J. R.

    2007-06-01

    We report the application of electronic-resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ERE-CARS) for measurements of nitric oxide concentration ([NO]) in three different atmospheric pressure flames. Visible pump (532 nm) and Stokes (591 nm) beams are used to probe the Q-branch of the Raman transition. A significant resonance enhancement is obtained by tuning an ultraviolet probe beam (236 nm) into resonance with specific rotational transitions in the (v’=0, v”=1) vibrational band of the A2Σ+-X2Π electronic system of NO. ERE-CARS spectra are recorded at various heights within a hydrogen-air flame producing relatively low concentrations of NO over a Hencken burner. Good agreement is obtained between NO ERE-CARS measurements and the results of flame computations using UNICORN, a two-dimensional flame code. Excellent agreement between measured and calculated NO spectra is also obtained when using a modified version of the Sandia CARSFT code for heavily sooting acetylene-air flames (φ=0.8 to φ=1.6) on the same Hencken burner. Finally, NO concentration profiles are measured using ERE-CARS in a laminar, counter-flow, non-premixed hydrogen-air flame. Spectral scans are recorded by probing the Q1 (9.5), Q1 (13.5) and Q1 (17.5) Raman transitions. The measured shape of the [NO] profile is in good agreement with that predicted using the OPPDIF code, even without correcting for collisional effects. These comparisons between [NO] measurements and predictions establish the utility of ERE-CARS for detection of NO in flames with large temperature and concentration gradients as well as in sooting environments.

  7. Coherent Anti-Stokes and Coherent Stokes in Raman Scattering by Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detector for Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annepu Venkata Naga Vamsi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reported the measurement of temperature by using coherent anti-Stroke and coherent Stroke Raman scattering using superconducting nano wire single-photon detector. The measured temperatures by both methods (Coherent Anti-Raman scattering & Coherent Stroke Raman scattering and TC 340 are in good accuracy of ± 5 K temperature range. The length of the pipe line under test can be increased by increasing the power of the pump laser. This methodology can be widely used to measure temperatures at instantaneous positions in test pipe line or the entire temperature of the pipe line under test.

  8. Remote detection of chem/bio hazards via coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing lnstnJctions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and... time remote detection of hazardous microparticles in atmosphere and to evaluate the range of distances for typical species and the parameters of laser...detectable photons from a prototype molecule at a distance. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS Stimulated Raman scattering, Remote detection, biochemical agents, explosives

  9. Analysis of detection limit to time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering nanoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Liu Shuang-Long; Chen Dan-Ni; Niu Han-Ben

    2014-01-01

    In the implementation of CARS nanoscopy, signal strength decreases with focal volume size decreasing. A crucial problem that remains to be solved is whether the reduced signal generated in the suppressed focal volume can be detected. Here reported is a theoretical analysis of detection limit (DL) to time-resolved CARS (T-CARS) nanoscopy based on our proposed additional probe-beam-induced phonon depletion (APIPD) method for the low concentration samples. In order to acquire a detailed shot-noise limited signal-to-noise (SNR) and the involved parameters to evaluate DL, the T-CARS process is described with full quantum theory to estimate the extreme power density levels of the pump and Stokes beams determined by saturation behavior of coherent phonons, which are both actually on the order of ∼ 10 9 W/cm 2 . When the pump and Stokes intensities reach such values and the total intensity of the excitation beams arrives at a maximum tolerable by most biological samples in a certain suppressed focal volume (40-nm suppressed focal scale in APIPD method), the DL correspondingly varies with exposure time, for example, DL values are 10 3 and 10 2 when exposure times are 20 ms and 200 ms respectively. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Femtosecond pulse laser notch shaping via fiber Bragg grating for the excitation source on the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2015-03-01

    Single-pulse coherently controlled nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is the simplest method among the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy systems. In recent research, it has been proven that notch-shaped femtosecond pulse laser can be used to collect the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signals. In this study, we applied a fiber Bragg grating to the notch filtering component on the femtosecond pulse lasers. The experiment was performed incorporating a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source with a 100 mm length of 780-HP fiber which is inscribed 30 mm of Bragg grating. The fiber Bragg grating has 785 nm Bragg wavelength with 0.9 nm bandwidth. We proved that if the pulse lasers have above a certain level of positive group delay dispersion, it is sufficient to propagate in the fiber Bragg grating without any spectral distortion. After passing through the fiber Bragg grating, the pulse laser is reflected on the chirped mirror for 40 times to make the transform-limited pulse. Finally, the pulse time duration was 37 fs, average power was 50mW, and showed an adequate notch shape. Furthermore, the simulation of third order polarization signal is performed using MATLAB tools and the simulation result shows that spectral characteristic and time duration of the pulse is sufficient to use as an excitation source for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In conclusion, the proposed method is more simple and cost-effective than the methods of previous research which use grating pairs and resonant photonic crystal slab.

  11. Nanosecond retinal structure changes in K-590 during the room-temperature bacteriorhodopsin photocycle: picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Weidlich, O.; Ujj, L.; Jäger, F.; Atkinson, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Time-resolved vibrational spectra are used to elucidate the structural changes in the retinal chromophore within the K-590 intermediate that precedes the formation of the L-550 intermediate in the room-temperature (RT) bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle. Measured by picosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PTR/CARS), these vibrational data are recorded within the 750 cm-1 to 1720 cm-1 spectral region and with time delays of 50-260 ns after the RT/BR photocycle is optical...

  12. Clinical coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton tomography of human skin with a femtosecond laser and photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; König, Karsten; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E; Sterry, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    We report on in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS), two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation imaging on human skin with a novel multimodal clinical CARS/multiphoton tomograph. CARS imaging is realized by a combination of femtosecond pulses with broadband continuum pulses generated by a photonic crystal fiber. The images reveal the microscopic distribution of (i) non-fluorescent lipids, (ii) endogenous fluorophores and (iii) the collagen network inside the human skin in vivo with subcellular resolution. Examples of healthy as well as cancer-affected skin are presented. (letter)

  13. Clinical coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton tomography of human skin with a femtosecond laser and photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E.; Sterry, Wolfram; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    We report on in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS), two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation imaging on human skin with a novel multimodal clinical CARS/multiphoton tomograph. CARS imaging is realized by a combination of femtosecond pulses with broadband continuum pulses generated by a photonic crystal fiber. The images reveal the microscopic distribution of (i) non-fluorescent lipids, (ii) endogenous fluorophores and (iii) the collagen network inside the human skin in vivo with subcellular resolution. Examples of healthy as well as cancer-affected skin are presented.

  14. Continuous anti-Stokes Raman laser operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitisch, A.; Muller, T.; Welling, H.; Wellegehausen, B.

    1988-01-01

    The anti-Stokes Raman laser (ASRL) process has proved to be a method that works well for frequency upconversion and for the generation of powerful tunable narrowband (pulsed) laser radiation in the UV and VUV spectral range. This conversion process allows large-frequency shifts in single step, high output energies, and high efficiencies. A basic requirement is population inversion on a two-photon transition, where, in general, the upper level of the transition should be metastable. Up to now the ASRL technique has only been demonstrated for the pulsed regime, where the necessary population inversion was generated by photodissociation or inner shell photoionization. These inversion techniques, however, cannot be transferred to cw operation of an ASRL, and, therefore, other inversion techniques have to be developed. Here a novel approach for the creation of the necessary population inversion is proposed, that uses well-known cw gas lasers as the active material for the conversion process. The basic idea is to use either existing two-photon population inversions in a cw laser material or to generate the necessary population inversion by applying a suitable population transfer process to the material. A natural two-photon inversion situation in a laser material is evident whenever a cascade laser can be operated. Cascade laser-based anti-Stokes schemes are possible in a He-Ne laser discharge, and investigations of these schemes are discussed

  15. Three-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes/Stokes Raman scattering (CARS/CSRS) microspectroscopy using a white-light laser source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bito, Kotatsu; Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have developed a simultaneous measurement system of CARS and CSRS. ► We can obtain information on the electronic resonance effect with the measurement. ► The simultaneous measurement provides us with more reliable spectral information. - Abstract: We have developed a three-pulse non-degenerate multiplex coherent Raman microspectroscopic system using a white-light laser source. The fundamental output (1064 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is used for the pump radiation with the white-light laser output (1100–1700 nm) for the Stokes radiation to achieve broadband multiplex excitations of vibrational coherences. The second harmonic (532 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser is used for the probe radiation. Thanks to the large wavelength difference between the pump and probe radiations, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS) can be detected simultaneously. Simultaneous detection of CARS and CSRS enables us to obtain information on the electronic resonance effect that affects differently the CARS and CSRS signals. Simultaneous analysis of the CARS and CSRS signals provides us the imaginary part of χ (3) without introducing any arbitrary parameter in the maximum entropy method (MEM)

  16. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  17. In planta imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T; Korai, Roza P; Frater, Eric H; Korterik, Jeroen P; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  18. Investigation of protein distribution in solid lipid particles and its impact on protein release using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip C.; Birch, Ditlev; Saarinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain new insights into protein distribution in solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) and subsequent release mechanisms using a novel label-free chemical imaging method, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Lysozyme-loaded SLMs were prepared using...... in the solid lipid matrix, which required full lipolysis of the entire matrix to release lysozyme completely. Therefore, SLMs with lysozyme incorporated in an aqueous solution released lysozyme much faster than with lysozyme incorporated as a solid. In conclusion, CARS microscopy was an efficient and non......-destructive method for elucidating the distribution of lysozyme in SLMs. The interpretation of protein distribution and release during lipolysis enabled elucidation of protein release mechanisms. In future, CARS microscopy analysis could facilitate development of a wide range of protein-lipid matrices with tailor...

  19. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Kai; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms

  20. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Kai [School of Science, Tianjin University of Technology and Education, Tianjin, 300222 (China); Lee, Soo-Y., E-mail: sooying@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics & Applied Physics, and Division of Chemistry & Biological Chemistry, School of Physical & Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms.

  1. What are the intensities and line-shapes of the twenty four polarization terms in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is conventionally described by just one diagram/term where the three electric field interactions act on the ket side in a Feynman dual time-line diagram in a specific time order of pump, Stokes and probe pulses. In theory, however, any third-order nonlinear spectroscopy with three different electric fields interacting with a molecule can be described by forty eight diagrams/terms. They reduce to just 24 diagrams/terms if we treat the time ordering of the electric field interactions on the ket independently of those on the bra, i.e. the ket and bra wave packets evolve independently. The twenty four polarization terms can be calculated in the multidimensional, separable harmonic oscillator model to obtain the intensities and line-shapes. It is shown that in fs/ps CARS, for the two cases of off-resonance CARS in toluene and resonance CARS in rhodamine 6G, where we use a fs pump pulse, a fs Stokes pulse and a ps probe pulse, we obtain sharp vibrational lines in four of the polarization terms where the pump and Stokes pulses can create a vibrational coherence on the ground electronic state, while the spectral line-shapes of the other twenty terms are broad and featureless. The conventional CARS term with sharp vibrational lines is the dominant term, with intensity at least one order of magnitude larger than the other terms.

  2. Label-free assessment of adipose-derived stem cell differentiation using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouras, Rabah; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Downes, Andrew R.; Elfick, Alistair P. D.

    2012-11-01

    Adult stem cells (SCs) hold great potential as likely candidates for disease therapy but also as sources of differentiated human cells in vitro models of disease. In both cases, the label-free assessment of SC differentiation state is highly desirable, either as a quality-control technology ensuring cells to be used clinically are of the desired lineage or to facilitate in vitro time-course studies of cell differentiation. We investigate the potential of nonlinear optical microscopy as a minimally invasive technology to monitor the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) into adipocytes and osteoblasts. The induction of ADSCs toward these two different cell lineages was monitored simultaneously using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, two photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and second harmonic generation at different time points. Changes in the cell's morphology, together with the appearance of biochemical markers of cell maturity were observed, such as lipid droplet accumulation for adipo-induced cells and the formation of extra-cellular matrix for osteo-induced cells. In addition, TPEF of flavoproteins was identified as a proxy for changes in cell metabolism that occurred throughout ADSC differentiation toward both osteoblasts and adipocytes. These results indicate that multimodal microscopy has significant potential as an enabling technology for the label-free investigation of SC differentiation.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of global vibrational spectra and dephasing times of molecular vibrational modes by broadband time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Jun; Yu Ling-Yao; Liu Xing; Wan Hui; Lin Zi-Yang; Niu Han-Ben

    2011-01-01

    In broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy with supercontinuum (SC), the simultaneously detectable spectral coverage is limited by the spectral continuity and the simultaneity of various spectral components of SC in an enough bandwidth. By numerical simulations, the optimal experimental conditions for improving the SC are obtained. The broadband time-resolved CARS spectrography based on the SC with required temporal and spectral distributions is realised. The global molecular vibrational spectrum with well suppressed nonresonant background noise can be obtained in a single measurement. At the same time, the measurements of dephasing times of various molecular vibrational modes can be conveniently achieved from intensities of a sequence of time-resolved CARS signals. It will be more helpful to provide a complete picture of molecular vibrations, and to exhibit a potential to understand not only both the solvent dynamics and the solute-solvent interactions, but also the mechanisms of chemical reactions in the fields of biology, chemistry and material science. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Conceptual Design Study for Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) Diagnostics in the AMMRC Ballistic Compressor Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Hydrogen has a large Raman cross section and simple CARS spectrum making it an ideal thermometric species. It also has the advantage at this time that the...modes of operation have been considered. Hydrogen appears to be an ideal thermometric species for CARS diagnostics at high pressures. The large...low thermal conductivity in the host material. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), on the other hand, has a good thermal conductivity and therefore when

  5. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy in Caenorhabditis elegans and Globodera pallida: evidence for an ivermectin-activated decrease in lipid stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smus, Justyna P; Ludlow, Elizabeth; Dallière, Nicolas; Luedtke, Sarah; Monfort, Tual; Lilley, Catherine; Urwin, Peter; Walker, Robert J; O'Connor, Vincent; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2017-12-01

    Macrocyclic lactones are arguably the most successful chemical class with efficacy against parasitic nematodes. Here we investigated the effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on lipid homeostasis in the plant parasitic nematode Globodera pallida and provide new insight into its mode of action. A non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free and chemically selective technique called Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy was used to study lipid stores in G. pallida. We optimised the protocol using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and then used CARS to quantify lipid stores in the pre-parasitic, non-feeding J2 stage of G. pallida. This revealed a concentration of lipid stores in the posterior region of J2 s within 24 h of hatching which decreased to undetectable levels over the course of 28 days. We tested the effect of ivermectin on J2 viability and lipid stores. Within 24 h, ivermectin paralysed J2 s. Counterintuitively, over the same time-course ivermectin increased the rate of depletion of J2 lipid, suggesting that in ivermectin-treated J2 s there is a disconnection between the energy requirements for motility and metabolic rate. This decrease in lipid stores would be predicted to negatively impact on J2 infective potential. These data suggest that the benefit of macrocyclic lactones as seed treatments may be underpinned by a multilevel effect involving both neuromuscular inhibition and acceleration of lipid metabolism. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering for quantitative temperature and concentration measurements in a high-pressure gas turbine combustor rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariyan, Mathew Paul

    Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (DP-CARS) temperature and major species (CO2/N2) concentration measurements have been performed in an optically-accessible high-pressure gas turbine combustor facility (GTCF) and for partially-premixed and non-premixed flames in a laminar counter-flow burner. A window assembly incorporating pairs of thin and thick fused silica windows on three sides was designed, fabricated, and assembled in the GTCF for advanced laser diagnostic studies. An injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was used as a narrowband pump laser source in the dual-pump CARS system. Large prisms on computer-controlled translation stages were used to direct the CARS beams either into the main optics leg for measurements in the GTCF or to a reference optics leg for measurements of the nonresonant CARS spectrum and for aligning the CARS system. Combusting flows were stabilized with liquid fuel injection only for the central injector of a 9-element lean direct injection (LDI) device developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. The combustor was operated using Jet A fuel at inlet air temperatures up to 725 K and combustor pressures up to 1.03 MPa. Single-shot DP-CARS spectra were analyzed using the Sandia CARSFT code in the batch operation mode to yield instantaneous temperature and CO2/N2 concentration ratio values. Spatial maps of mean and standard deviations of temperature and CO2/N2 concentrations were obtained in the high-pressure LDI flames by translating the CARS probe volume in axial and vertical directions inside the combustor rig. The mean temperature fields demonstrate the effect of the combustor conditions on the overall flame length and the average flame structure. The temperature relative standard deviation values indicate thermal fluctuations due to the presence of recirculation zones and/or flame brush fluctuations. The correlation between the temperature and relative CO 2 concentration data has been studied at various combustor

  7. Electric field in a plasma channel in a high-pressure nanosecond discharge in hydrogen: a coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatom, S; Tskhai, S; Krasik, Ya E

    2013-12-20

    Experimental results of a study of the electric field in a plasma channel produced during nanosecond discharge at a H2 gas pressure of (2-3)×10(5)  Pa by the coherent anti-Stokes scattering method are reported. The discharge was ignited by applying a voltage pulse with an amplitude of ∼100  kV and a duration of ∼5  ns to a blade cathode placed at a distance of 10 and 20 mm from the anode. It was shown that this type of gas discharge is characterized by the presence of an electric field in the plasma channel with root-mean-square intensities of up to 30  kV/cm. Using polarization measurements, it was found that the direction of the electric field is along the cathode-anode axis.

  8. Measurement of the surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) due to the 1574 cm(-1) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mode of benzenethiol using low-power (CW diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Roshan L; Farrar, Lewis W; Greeneltch, Nathan G; Van Duyne, Richard P; Polla, Dennis L

    2013-02-01

    The surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of benzenethiol on a silver-coated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been measured for the 1574 cm(-1) SERS mode. A value of 9.6 ± 1.7×10(-14) W was determined for the resonant component of the SECARS signal using 17.8 mW of 784.9 nm pump laser power and 7.1 mW of 895.5 nm Stokes laser power; the pump and Stokes lasers were polarized parallel to each other but perpendicular to the grooves of the diffraction grating in the spectrometer. The measured value of resonant component of the SECARS signal is in agreement with the calculated value of 9.3×10(-14) W using the measured value of 8.7 ± 0.5 cm(-1) for the SERS linewidth Γ (full width at half-maximum) and the value of 5.7 ± 1.4×10(-7) for the product of the Raman cross section σSERS and the surface concentration Ns of the benzenethiol SAM. The xxxx component of the resonant part of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility |3 χxxxx((3)R)| for the 1574 cm(-1) SERS mode has been determined to be 4.3 ± 1.1×10(-5) cm·g(-1)·s(2). The SERS enhancement factor for the 1574 cm(-1) mode was determined to be 3.6 ± 0.9×10(7) using the value of 1.8×10(15) molecules/cm(2) for Ns.

  9. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  10. Method and system to measure temperature of gases using coherent anti-stokes doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mark

    2013-12-17

    A method of measuring a temperature of a noble gas in a chamber includes providing the noble gas in the chamber. The noble gas is characterized by a pressure and a temperature. The method also includes directing a first laser beam into the chamber and directing a second laser beam into the chamber. The first laser beam is characterized by a first frequency and the second laser beam is characterized by a second frequency. The method further includes converting at least a portion of the first laser beam and the second laser beam into a coherent anti-Stokes beam, measuring a Doppler broadening of the coherent anti-Stokes beam, and computing the temperature using the Doppler broadening.

  11. Parametric Raman crystalline anti-Stokes laser at 503 nm with collinear beam interaction at tangential phase matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, S. N.; Jelínek, M.; Kubeček, V.

    2017-07-01

    Stimulated-Raman-scattering in crystals can be used for the single-pass frequency-conversion to the Stokes-shifted wavelengths. The anti-Stokes shift can also be achieved but the phase-matching condition has to be fulfilled because of the parametric four-wave mixing process. To widen the angular-tolerance of four-wave mixing and to obtain high-conversion-efficiency into the anti-Stokes, we developed a new scheme of the parametric Raman anti-Stokes laser at 503 nm with phase-matched collinear beam interaction of orthogonally-polarized Raman components in calcite oriented at the phase-matched angle under 532 nm 20 ps laser excitation. The excitation laser beam was split into two orthogonally-polarized components entering the calcite at the certain incidence angles to fulfill the nearly collinear phase-matching and also to compensate walk-off of extraordinary waves for collinear beam interaction. The phase matching of parametric Raman interaction is tangential and insensitive to the angular mismatch if the Poynting vectors of the biharmonic pump and parametrically generated (anti-Stokes) waves are collinear. For the first time it allows to achieve experimentally the highest conversion efficiency into the anti-Stokes wave (503 nm) up to 30% from the probe wave and up to 3.5% from both pump and probe waves in the single-pass picosecond parametric calcite Raman laser. The highest anti-Stokes pulse energy was 1.4 μJ.

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing f...

  13. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman generation in monoisotopic CVD {sup 12}C-diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lux, Oliver; Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J. [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Ralchenko, Victor G.; Bolshakov, Andrey P. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shirakawa, Akira; Yoneda, Hitoki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We determined, for the first time, the room temperature phonon energy related to the F{sub 2g} vibration mode (ω{sub SRS(12C)} ∝ 1333.2 cm{sup -1}) in a mono-crystalline single-isotope CVD {sup 12}C-diamond crystal by means of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy. Picosecond one-micron excitation using a Nd{sup 3+}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}-laser generates a nearly two-octave spanning SRS frequency comb (∝12000 cm{sup -1}) consisting of higher-order Stokes and anti-Stokes components. The spacing of the spectral lines was found to differ by Δω{sub SRS} ∝ 0.9 cm{sup -1} from the comb spacing (ω{sub SRS(natC)} ∝ 1332.3 cm{sup -1}) when pumping a conventional CVD diamond crystal with a natural composition of the two stable carbon isotopes {sup 12}C (98.93%) and {sup 13}C (1.07%). (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Polarization Sensitive Coherent Raman Measurements of DCVJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Josiah; Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Shiver, Tegan; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    Coherent Raman spectroscopy which recently developed into coherent Raman microscopy has been used to produce label free imaging of thin layers of material and find the spatial distributions of certain chemicals within samples, e.g. cancer cells.(1) Not all aspects of coherent scattering have been used for imaging. Among those for example are special polarization sensitive measurements. Therefore we have investigated the properties of polarization sensitive CARS spectra of a highly fluorescent molecule, DCVJ.(2) Spectra has been recorded by using parallel polarized and perpendicular polarized excitations. A special polarization arrangement was developed to suppress the non-resonant background scattering from the sample. These results can be used to improve the imaging properties of a coherent Raman microscope in the future. This is the first time coherent Raman polarization sensitive measurements have been used to characterize the vibrational modes of DCVJ. 1: K. I. Gutkowski, et al., ``Fluorescence of dicyanovinyl julolidine in a room temperature ionic liquid '' Chemical Physics Letters 426 (2006) 329 - 333 2: Fouad El-Diasty, ``Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering: Spectroscopy and microscopy'' Vibrational Spectroscopy 55 (2011) 1-37

  15. Anti-Stokes effect CCD camera and SLD based optical coherence tomography for full-field imaging in the 1550nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Full-field Optical coherence tomography is an en-face interferometric imaging technology capable of carrying out high resolution cross-sectional imaging of the internal microstructure of an examined specimen in a non-invasive manner. The presented system is based on competitively priced optical components available at the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. It consists of a superluminescent diode and an anti-stokes imaging device. The single mode fibre coupled SLD was connected to a multi-mode fibre inserted into a mode scrambler to obtain spatially incoherent illumination, suitable for OCT wide-field modality in terms of crosstalk suppression and image enhancement. This relatively inexpensive system with moderate resolution of approximately 24um x 12um (axial x lateral) was constructed to perform a 3D cross sectional imaging of a human tooth. To our knowledge this is the first 1550 nm full-field OCT system reported.

  16. 1550 nm superluminescent diode and anti-Stokes effect CCD camera based optical coherence tomography for full-field optical metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a promising non-invasive imaging technology capable of carrying out 3D high-resolution cross-sectional images of the internal microstructure of examined material. However, almost all of these systems are expensive, requiring the use of complex optical setups, expensive light sources and complicated scanning of the sample under test. In addition most of these systems have not taken advantage of the competitively priced optical components available at wavelength within the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. A comparatively simple and inexpensive full-field OCT system (FF-OCT), based on a superluminescent diode (SLD) light source and anti-stokes imaging device was constructed, to perform 3D cross-sectional imaging. This kind of inexpensive setup with moderate resolution could be easily applicable in low-level biomedical and industrial diagnostics. This paper involves calibration of the system and determines its suitability for imaging structures of biological tissues such as teeth, which has low absorption at 1550 nm.

  17. Nanophotonics with Surface Enhanced Coherent Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Alexander

    Nonlinear nanophotonics is a rapidly developing field of research that aims at detecting and disentangling weak congested optical signatures on the nanoscale. Sub-wavelength field confinement of the local electromagnetic fields and the resulting field enhancement is achieved by utilizing plasmonic near-field antennas. This allows for probing nanoscopic volumes, a property unattainable by conventional far-field microscopy techniques. Combination of plasmonics and nonlinear optical microscopy provides a path to visualizing a small chemical and spatial subset of target molecules within an ensemble. This is achieved while maintaining rapid signal acquisition, which is necessary for capturing biological processes in living systems. Herein, a novel technique, wide-field surface enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (wfSE-CARS) is presented. This technique allows for isolating weak vibrational signals in nanoscopic proximity to the surface by using chemical sensitivity of coherent Raman microspectroscopy (CRM) and field confinement from surface plasmons supported on a thin gold film. Uniform field enhancement over a large field of view, achieved with surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in wfSE-CARSS, allows for biomolecular imaging demonstrated on extended structures like phospholipid droplets and live cells. Surface selectivity and chemical contrast are achieved at 70 fJ/mum2 incident energy densities, which is over five orders of magnitude lower than used in conventional point scanning CRM. Next, a novel surface sensing imaging technique, local field induced metal emission (LFIME), is introduced. Presence of a sample material at the surface influences the local fields of a thin flat gold film, such that nonlinear fluorescence signal of the metal can be detected in the far-field. Nanoscale nonmetallic, nonfluorescent objects can be imaged with high signal-to-background ratio and diffraction limited lateral resolution using LFIME. Additionally, structure of the

  18. In situ dissolution analysis of pharmaceutical dosage forms using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A. L.; Garbacik, E. T.; Löbmann, K.; Offerhaus, H. L.; Kleinebudde, P.; Strachan, Clare J.

    2014-01-01

    A custom-built intrinsic flow-through dissolution setup was developed and incorporated into a home-built CARS microscope consisting of a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and an inverted microscope with a 20X/0.5NA objective. CARS dissolution images (512×512 pixels) were

  19. Distinguishing non-resonant four-wave-mixing noise in coherent stokes and anti-stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L. (Inventor); Boppart, Stephen A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of examining a sample comprises exposing the sample to a pump pulse of electromagnetic radiation for a first period of time, exposing the sample to a stimulant pulse of electromagnetic radiation for a second period of time which overlaps in time with at least a portion of the first exposing, to produce a signal pulse of electromagnetic radiation for a third period of time, and interfering the signal pulse with a reference pulse of electromagnetic radiation, to determine which portions of the signal pulse were produced during the exposing of the sample to the stimulant pulse. The first and third periods of time are each greater than the second period of time.

  20. Coherent Raman scattering in high-pressure/high-temperature fluids: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The present understanding of high-pressure/high-temperature dense-fluid behavior is derived almost exclusively from hydrodynamic and thermodynamic measurements. Such results average over the microscopic aspects of the materials and are, therefore, insufficient for a complete understanding of fluid behavior. At the present, dense-fluid models can be verified only to the extend that they agree with the macroscopic measurements. Recently, using stimulated Raman scattering, Raman induced Kerr effect scattering, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, we have been able to probe some of the microscopic phenomenology of these dense fluids. In this paper, we discuss primarily the use of CARS in conjunction with a two-stage light-gas gun to obtain vibrational spectra of shock-compressed liquid N 2 , O 2 , CO, their mixtures, CH 3 NO 2 , and N 2 O. These experimental spectra are compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and best fit vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman linewidths. For O 2 , the possibility of resonance enhancement from collision-induced absorption is addressed. Shifts in the vibrational frequencies reflect the influence of increased density and temperature on the intramolecular motion. The derived parameters suggest thermal equilibrium of the vibrational levels is established less than a few nanoseconds after shock passage. Vibrational temperatures are obtained that agree with those derived from equation-of-state calculations. Measured linewidths suggest that vibrational dephasing times have decreased to subpicosecond values at the highest shock pressures

  1. Observation of anomalous Stokes versus anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    We grow hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor, with chemical vapor transport methods and investigate its atomic layers with Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. We report observation of all six types of zone center optical phonons. Quite remarkably, the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, creating an illusion of 'negative temperature'. This effect is tunable, and can be switched from anti-Stokes enhancement to suppression by varying the excitation wavelength. We interpret this observation to be a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center, which are robust even for multiple layers of MoTe2. The intense anti-Stokes Raman scattering provides a cooling channel for the crystal and opens up opportunities for laser cooling of atomically thin TMDC semiconductor devices. Supported by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the National Science Foundation Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CMMI-1025020) and Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-1433496).

  2. CARS and Raman spectroscopy of function-related conformational changes of chymotrypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, N.N.; Chikishev, A.Yu.; Chikishev, A.Y.; Greve, Jan; Koroteev, N.I.; Otto, Cornelis; Sakodinskaya, I.K.; Sakodynskaya, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the comparative analysis of the conformation-sensitive bands of free enzyme (chymotrypsin), liganded enzyme (chymotrypsin anthranilate) and enzyme complex with 18-crown-6. The studies were carried out by Raman scattering spectroscopy and polarization-sensitive coherent anti-Stokes Raman

  3. Coherent Raman scattering microscopy for label-free imaging of live amphioxus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhilong; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Xiannian; Shen, Jie; Chen, Junyuan; Huang, Yanyi

    2012-03-01

    The existence of notochord distinguishes chordates from other phyla. Amphioxus is the only animal that keeps notochord during the whole life. Notochord is a unique organ for amphioxus, with its vertically arranged muscular notochordal plates, which is different from notochords in embryos of other chordates. We use stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy as a non-invasive technique to image the chemical components in amphioxus notochord. SRS provides chemical specificity as spontaneous Raman does and offers a higher sensitivity for fast acquisition. Unlike coherent anti- Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, SRS microscopy doesn't have non-resonant background and can better differentiate different components in the specimen. We verify that the notochord is a protein-rich organ, which agrees well with the result of conventional staining methods. Detailed structures in notochordal plates and notochordal sheath are revealed by SRS microscopy with diffraction limited resolution. Our experiment shows that SRS microscopy is an excellent imaging tool for biochemical research with its intrinsic chemical selectivity, high spatiotemporal resolution and native 3D optical sectioning ability.

  4. Ex vivo and in vivo coherent Raman imaging of the peripheral and central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry Brandon

    A hallmark of nervous system disorders is damage or degradation of the myelin sheath. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying myelin degeneration and repair represent one of the great challenges in medicine. This thesis work details the development and utilization of advanced optical imaging methods to gain insight into the structure and function of myelin in both healthy and diseased states in the in vivo environment. This first part of this thesis discusses ex vivo studies of the effects of high-frequency stimulation of spinal tissues on the structure of the node of Ranvier as investigated by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging (manuscript submitted to Journal of Neurosciece). Reversible paranodal myelin retraction at the nodes of Ranvier was observed during 200 Hz electrical stimulation, beginning minutes after the onset and continuing for up to 10 min after stimulation was ceased. A mechanistic study revealed a Ca2+ dependent pathway: high-frequency stimulation induced paranodal myelin retraction via pathologic calcium influx into axons, calpain activation, and cytoskeleton degradation through spectrin break-down. Also, the construction of dual-scanning CARS microscope for large area mapping of CNS tissues is detailed (Optics Express, 2008, 16:19396-193409). A confocal scanning head equipped with a rotating polygon mirror provides high speed, high resolution imaging and is coupled with a motorized sample stage to generate high-resolution large-area images of mouse brain coronal section and guinea pig spinal cord cross section. The polygon mirror decreases the mosaic acquisition time significantly without reducing the resolution of individual images. The ex vivo studies are then extended to in vivo imaging of mouse sciatic nerve tissue by CARS and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging (Journal of Microscopy, 2007, 225: 175-182). Following a minimally invasive surgery to open the skin, CARS imaging of myelinated axons and SHG imaging of the

  5. Coherent Raman scattering: Applications in imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng

    In this thesis, I discuss the theory, implementation and applications of coherent Raman scattering to imaging and sensing. A time domain interferometric method has been developed to collect high resolution shot-noise-limited Raman spectra over the Raman fingerprint regime and completely remove the electronic background signal in coherent Raman scattering. Compared with other existing coherent Raman microscopy methods, this time domain approach is proved to be simpler and more robust in rejecting background signal. We apply this method to image polymers and biological samples and demonstrate that the same setup can be used to collect two photon fluorescence and self phase modulation signals. A signal to noise ratio analysis is performed to show that this time domain method has a comparable signal to noise ratio to spectral domain methods, which we confirm experimentally. The coherent Raman method is also compared with spontaneous Raman scattering. The conditions under which coherent methods provide signal enhancement are discussed and experiments are performed to compare coherent Raman scattering with spontaneous Raman scattering under typical biological imaging conditions. A critical power, above which coherent Raman scattering is more sensitive than spontaneous Raman scattering, is experimentally determined to be ˜1mW in samples of high molecule concentration with a 75MHz laser system. This finding is contrary to claims that coherent methods provide many orders of magnitude enhancement under comparable conditions. In addition to the far field applications, I also discuss the combination of our time domain coherent Raman method with near field enhancement to explore the possibility of sensing and near field imaging. We report the first direct time-resolved coherent Raman measurement performed on a nanostructured substrate for molecule sensing. The preliminary results demonstrate that sub 20 fs pulses can be used to obtain coherent Raman spectra from a small number

  6. CARS (Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering) Spectroscopy of the Reaction Zone of Methane-Nitrous Oxide and RDX Propellant Flames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    IB, L. Watermier A. Barrows G. Adams R. Fifer M. Miller T. Coffee J. Heimeryl C. Nelson J. Vanderhoff J. Anderson Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005...Electronics Research and Development Command ATTN: ANSEL -ED DELSD-L 0 Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703-5301 Commander U.S. Army Missile Command ATTN: AMSMI-R

  7. Ultrafast Saturation of Electronic-Resonance-Enhanced Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and Comparison for Pulse Durations in the Nanosecond to Femtosecond Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-05

    near sat- uration limit of the probe intensity [16]. In such spectro - scopic techniques, while it is important to obtain spec- trum of the intended...There are a few literature that exist on the ultrafast UV -laser excitation of NO, e.g., Lopez-Marten et al. have shown that the laser intensi- ties in...observe ac-Stark shift (see Ref. [40]). Though, to the best of our knowledge, no study has been reported for ionization of NO by UV pulse of 236 nm at 10

  8. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  9. Construction of coherent antistokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Jazmati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent Antistokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) has been built. It consists of a Raman cell, which is filled with CO 2 gas at 5 atm pressure and a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser pumped dye laser. The two beams are focused by means of a bi-convex lens into Raman cell. The Antistokes signals (CARS signals) are generated due to Four-wave mixing process. The antistokes signals were directed to monochrometer entrance slit by prism . The signals are detected by photomultiplier detector which is fixed on the exit slit and connected to data acquisition card located inside the computed case. The dye laser frequency has to be tuned to satisfy the energy difference between the ν 1 beam (Nd- YAG laser beam) and the ν 2 beam (the stokes beam or the dye laser beam) exactly corresponds to a vibrational - rotational Raman resonance (ν 2 - ν 1 = ν M ) in the 12 CO 2 or 13 CO 2 molecule, then the antistokes signals (ν 3 ) will be generated. The spectra of the CARS signals have been recorded to determine the isotope shift of 12 CO 2 , 13 CO 2 , which is 18.3 cm -1 . (author)

  10. Investigation of Surface Enhanced Coherent Raman Scattering on Nano-patterned Insect Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, Laszlo; Lawhead, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Many insect wings (cicadas, butterflies, mosquitos) poses nano-patterned surface structure. Characterization of surface morphology and chemical composition of insect wings is important to understand the extreme mechanical properties and the biophysical functionalities of the wings. We have measured the image of the membrane of a cicada's wing with the help of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results confirm the existing periodic structure of the wing measured previously. In order to identify the chemical composition of the wing, we have deposited silver nanoparticles on it and applied Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy to measure the vibrational spectra of the molecules comprising the wing for the first time. The measured spectra are consistent with the original assumption that the wing membrane is composed of protein, wax, and chitin. The results of these studies can be used to measure other nano-patterned surfaces and to make artificial materials in the future. Authors grateful for financial support from the Department of Physics of the College of Sciences Engineering and Health of UWF and the Pall Corporation for SEM imaging.

  11. Coherent Raman Imaging of Live Muscle Sarcomeres Assisted by SFG Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunmin; Kim, Do-Young; Joo, Kyung-Il; Kim, Jung-Hye; Jeong, Soon Moon; Lee, Eun Seong; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Kyuhyung; Moon, Dae Woon

    2017-08-23

    In this study, we used spectrally focused coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (spCARS) microscopy assisted by sum-frequency generation (SFG) to monitor the variations in the structural morphology and molecular vibrations of a live muscle of Caenorhabditis elegans. The subunits of the muscle sarcomeres, such as the M-line, myosin, dense body, and α-actinin, were alternatively observed using spCARS microscopy for different sample orientations, with the guidance of a myosin positional marker captured by SFG microscopy. Interestingly enough, the beam polarization dependence of the spCARS contrasts for two parallel subunits (dense body and myosin) showed a ~90° phase difference. The chemically sensitive spCARS spectra induced by the time-varying overlap of two pulses allowed (after a robust subtraction of the non-resonant background using a modified Kramers-Krönig transformation method) high-fidelity detection of various genetically modified muscle sarcomeres tuned to the C-H vibration (2800-3100 cm -1 ). Conversely, SFG image mapping assisted by phase-retrieved spCARS spectra also facilitated label-free monitoring of the changes in the muscle content of C. elegans that are associated with aging, based on the hypothesis that the C-H vibrational modes could serve as qualitative chemical markers sensitive to the amount and/or structural modulation of the muscle.

  12. A theoretical investigation of super-resolution CARS imaging via coherent and incoherent saturation of transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, W.P.; Beeker, Willem; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, Petra; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2011-01-01

    We review two approaches to achieving sub-diffraction-limited resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy (Beeker et al., Opt. Express, 2009, 17, 22632 and Beeker et al., J. Herek, Phys. Rev. A, 2010, 81, 012507). We performed a numerical investigation, based on the density

  13. Emerging technology: applications of Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Rachel E; Tucker, Stephanie C; Killian, Kevin; Trexler, Micaela; Honn, Kenneth V; Auner, Gregory W

    2014-09-01

    There is a need in prostate cancer diagnostics and research for a label-free imaging methodology that is nondestructive, rapid, objective, and uninfluenced by water. Raman spectroscopy provides a molecular signature, which can be scaled from micron-level regions of interest in cells to macroscopic areas of tissue. It can be used for applications ranging from in vivo or in vitro diagnostics to basic science laboratory testing. This work describes the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy and complementary techniques including surface enhanced Raman scattering, resonance Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, confocal Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy. Clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy to prostate cancer will be discussed, including screening, biopsy, margin assessment, and monitoring of treatment efficacy. Laboratory applications including cell identification, culture monitoring, therapeutics development, and live imaging of cellular processes are discussed. Potential future avenues of research are described, with emphasis on multiplexing Raman spectroscopy with other modalities.

  14. Coherent control through near-resonant Raman transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xingcan; Lerch, Eliza-Beth W.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The phase of an electronic wave function is shown to play an important role in coherent control experiments. By using a pulse shaping system with a femtosecond laser, we explore the phase relationships among resonant and off-resonant Raman transitions in Li 2 by measuring the phases of the resulting wave packets, or quantum beats. Specific pixels in a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator are used to isolate the resonant and off-resonant portions of the Raman transitions in Li 2 . The off-resonant Raman transitions have an approximately 90 degree sign phase shift with respect to the resonant Raman transition, and there is an approximately 180 degree sign phase shift between the blue-detuned and the red-detuned off-resonant Raman transitions. Calculations using second-order time-dependent perturbation theory for the electronic transitions agree with the experimental results for the laser pulse intensities used here. Interferences between the off-resonant Raman transitions as a function of detuning are used to demonstrate coherent control of the Raman quantum wave packet

  15. Anti-Stokes Luminescence in High Quality Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinattieri, A.; Bogani, F.; Miotto, A.; Ceccherini, S.

    1997-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the anti-Stokes (AS) luminescence which originates from exciton recombination when below gap excitation is used, in a set of high quality quantum well structures. We observe strong excitonic resonances in the AS signal as measured from photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectra. We demonstrate that neither the electromagnetic coupling between the wells nor the morphological disorder can explain this up-conversion effect. Time-resolved luminescence data after ps excitation and fs correlation spectroscopy results provide clear evidence of the occurrence of a two-step absorption which is assisted by the exciton population resonantly excited by the first photon.

  16. Single fiber temperature probe configuration using anti-Stokes luminescence from Cr:GdAlO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2018-06-01

    Single-photon excitation of anti-Stokes-shifted emission from a thermographic phosphor allows operation of a luminescence decay-based single fiber temperature probe with negligible interference from background fiber-generated Raman scattering. While single fiber probe configurations for luminescence-based fiber optic thermometers offer advantages of simple design, compactness, and superior emission light collection efficiency, their effective use has been limited by interference from Raman scattering in the fiber probe and excitation delivery fiber that produces distortion of the luminescence decay that follows the excitation pulse. The near elimination of interference by background fiber-generated Raman scattering was demonstrated by incorporating a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor as the sensing element at the end of a single fiber luminescence decay-based thermometer and detecting anti-Stokes-shifted luminescence centered at 542 or 593 nm produced by 695 nm excitation. Measurements were performed using both silica (up to 1150 °C) and single-crystal YAG (up to 1200 °C) fiber-based thermometers. Selection of emission detection centered at 542 nm greatly benefited the YAG fiber probe measurements by practically eliminating detection of otherwise significant luminescence from Cr3+ impurities in the YAG fiber. For both the silica and YAG fiber probes, the relative benefit of adopting single-photon excitation of anti-Stokes-shifted luminescence was evaluated by comparison with results obtained by conventional 532 nm excitation of Stokes-shifted luminescence.

  17. Raman spectroscopy in nanomedicine: current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Mark E; Byrne, Hugh J

    2013-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a branch of vibration spectroscopy that is capable of probing the chemical composition of materials. Recent advances in Raman microscopy have significantly added to the range of applications, which now extend from medical diagnostics to exploring the interfaces between biological organisms and nanomaterials. In this review, Raman is introduced in a general context, highlighting some of the areas in which the technique has been successful in the past, as well as some of the potential benefits it offers over other analytical modalities. The subset of Raman techniques that specifically probe the nanoscale, namely surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, will be described and specific applications relevant to nanomedical applications will be reviewed. Progress in the use of traditional label-free Raman for investigation of nanoscale interactions will be described, and recent developments in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering will be explored, particularly its applications to biomedical and nanomedical fields.

  18. Two-dimensional atom localization via Raman-driven coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmatullah,; Qamar, Sajid, E-mail: sajid_qamar@comsats.edu.pk

    2014-02-07

    A scheme for two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via Raman-driven coherence in a four-level diamond-configuration system is suggested. The atom interacts with two orthogonal standing-wave fields where each standing-wave field is constructed from the superposition of the two-standing wave fields along the corresponding directions. Due to the position-dependent atom–field interaction, the frequency of the spontaneously emitted photon carries the position information about the atom. We investigate the effect of the detunings and phase shifts associated with standing-wave fields. Unique position information of the single atom is obtained by properly adjusting the system parameters. This is an extension of our previous proposal for one-dimensional atom localization via Raman-driven coherence.

  19. Picosecond anti-Stokes generation in a photonic-crystal fiber for interferometric CARS microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Søren Rud

    2006-01-01

    We generate tunable picosecond anti-Stokes pulses by four-wave mixing of two picosecond pump and Stokes pulse trains in a photonic-crystal fiber. The visible, spectrally narrow anti-Stokes pulses with shifts over 150 nm are generated without generating other spectral features. As a demonstration,...

  20. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  1. Observation of correlated anti-Stokes emissions by multiwave mixing in sodium vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motomura, Koji; Tsukamoto, Mayumi; Wakiyama, Akira; Harada, Ken-ichi; Mitsunaga, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    We study experimentally nonlinear optical processes in which Stokes and anti-Stokes fields build up under strong, resonant, counterpropagating pump laser excitation in atomic sodium vapor. We find that, at some pump frequency, two off-axis anti-Stokes emissions propagating along reflection-symmetric directions are strongly temporally correlated, with a correlation time of 0.5 μs and a correlation range of 1 mrad. It is shown by the numerical analysis based on six-wave mixing process involving pump, Stokes, and anti-Stokes waves in the forward and the backward directions that such correlated anti-Stokes emissions are possible when the medium is opaque for the Stokes field and transparent for the anti-Stokes field. Possibilities of quantum correlation for entangled photon generation using this system are discussed

  2. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy in Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Delong; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy have enabled label-free visualization and analysis of functional, endogenous biomolecules in living systems. When compared with spontaneous Raman microscopy, a key advantage of CRS microscopy is the dramatic improvement in imaging speed, which gives rise to real-time vibrational imaging of live biological samples. Using molecular vibrational signatures, recently developed hyperspectral CRS microscopy has improved the readout of chemical information available from CRS images. In this article, we review recent achievements in CRS microscopy, focusing on the theory of the CRS signal-to-noise ratio, imaging speed, technical developments, and applications of CRS imaging in bioscience and clinical settings. In addition, we present possible future directions that the use of this technology may take. PMID:26514285

  3. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  4. Vibrational spectrum of the K-590 intermediate in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle at room temperature: picosecond time-resolved resonance coherent anti-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, L.; Jäger, F.; Popp, A.; Atkinson, G. H.

    1996-12-01

    The vibrational spectrum of the K-590 intermediate, thought to contribute significantly to the energy storage and transduction mechanism in the bacteriorhodopsin (BR) photocycle, is measured at room temperature using picosecond time-resolved resonance coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PTR/CARS). The room-temperature BR photocycle is initiated by the 3 ps, 570 nm excitation of the ground-state species, BR-570, prepared in both H 2O and D 2O suspensions of BR. PTR/CARS data, recorded 50 ps after BR-570 excitation, at which time only BR-570 and K-590 are present, have an excellent S/N which provides a significantly more detailed view of the K-590 vibrational degrees of freedom than previously available. Two picosecond (6 ps FWHM) laser pulses, ω1 (633.4 nm) and ωS (675-700 nm), are used to record PTR/CARS data via electronic resonance enhancement in both BR-570 and K-590, each of which contains a distinct retinal structure (assigned as 13- rans, 15- anti, 13- cis, respectively). To obtain the vibrational spectrum of K-590 separately, the PTR/CARS spectra from the mixture of isomeric retinals is quantitatively analyzed in terms of third-order susceptibility ( η(3)) relationships. PTR/CARS spectra of K-590 recorded from both H 2O and D 2O suspensions of BR are compared with the analogous vibrational data obtained via spontaneous resonance Raman (RR) scattering at both low (77 K) and room temperature. Analyses of these vibrational spectra identify temperature-dependent effects and changes assignable to the substitution of deuterium at the Schiff-base nitrogen not previously reported.

  5. Cutaneous porphyrins exhibit anti-stokes fluorescence that is detectable in sebum (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Giselle; Zeng, Haishan; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Lui, Harvey; Mclean, David I.

    2016-02-01

    Porphyrins produced by Propionibacterium acnes represent the principal fluorophore associated with acne, and appear as orange-red luminescence under the Wood's lamp. Assessment of acne based on Wood's lamp (UV) or visible light illumination is limited by photon penetration depth and has limited sensitivity for earlier stage lesions. Inducing fluorescence with near infrared (NIR) excitation may provide an alternative way to assess porphyrin-related skin disorders. We discovered that under 785 nm CW laser excitation PpIX powder exhibits fluorescence emission in the shorter wavelength range of 600-715 nm with an intensity that is linearly dependent on the excitation power. We attribute this shorter wavelength emission to anti-Stokes fluorescence. Similar anti-Stokes fluorescence was also detected focally in all skin-derived samples containing porphyrins. Regular (Stokes) fluorescence was present under UV and visible light excitation on ex vivo nasal skin and sebum from uninflamed acne, but not on nose surface smears or sebum from inflamed acne. Co-registered CW laser-excited anti-Stokes fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence images of PpIX powder showed similar features. In the skin samples because of the anti-Stokes effect, the NIR-induced fluorescence was presumably specific for porphyrins since there appeared to be no anti-Stokes emission signals from other typical skin fluorophores such as lipids, keratins and collagen. Anti-Stokes fluorescence under NIR CW excitation is more sensitive and specific for porphyrin detection than UV- or visible light-excited regular fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence. This approach also has higher image contrast compared to NIR fs laser-based multi-photon fluorescence imaging. The anti-Stokes fluorescence of porphyrins within sebum could potentially be applied to detecting and targeting acne lesions for treatment via fluorescence image guidance.

  6. Coherent phonon dynamics in micro- and nanocrystalline diamond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozák, M.; Trojánek, F.; Galář, P.; Varga, Marián; Kromka, Alexander; Malý, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 25 (2013), s. 31521-31529 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794; GA ČR GA13-12386S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : optical nonlinearities of condensed matter * spectroscopy * coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering * ultrafast spectroscopy * nanomaterials Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.525, year: 2013 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-21-25-31521

  7. Monitoring agrochemical diffusion through cuticle wax with coherent Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Thomson, Niall; Padia, Faheem; Moger, Julian

    2018-02-01

    The world's population is increasing rapidly and higher calorific diets are becoming more common; as a consequence the demand for grain is predicted to increase by more than 50% by 2050 without a significant increase in the available agricultural land. Maximising the productivity of the existing agricultural land is key to maintaining food security and agrochemicals continue to be a key enabler for the efficiency gains required. However, agrochemicals can be susceptible to significant losses and thus often require further chemical to be applied to compensate. Sources of such losses include spray drift, poor spray retention/capture by the target and poor penetration through the plant cuticle. Adjuvants can be used to help mitigate such losses but characterising how they alter the movement of the active ingredients (AIs) can be challenging. In this contribution we demonstrate the use of coherent Raman Scattering (CRS) as a tool to enable in-situ, real-time, label free characterisation of agrochemical AI as they move through wax.

  8. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  9. Inverse Raman scattering in silicon: A free-carrier enhanced effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solli, D. R.; Koonath, P.; Jalali, B.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering has been harnessed to produce the first silicon lasers and amplifiers. The Raman effect can also produce intensity-dependent nonlinear loss through a corollary process, inverse Raman scattering (IRS). This process has never been observed in a semiconductor. We demonstrate IRS in silicon--a process that is substantially modified by optically generated free carriers--achieving attenuation levels >15 dB with a pump intensity of 4 GW/cm 2 . Surprisingly, free-carrier absorption, the detrimental effect that generally suppresses nonlinear effects in silicon, actually facilitates IRS by delaying the onset of contamination from coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. Silicon-based IRS could be a valuable tool for chip-scale signal processing.

  10. Multiphonon-assisted anti-Stokes and Stokes fluorescence of triply ionized rare-earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzel, F.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental demonstration of multiphonon-assisted anti-Stokes and Stokes excitation of rare-earth ions (R 3+ ) in different hosts, that is, in a weak-coupling ion-lattice interaction case, is obtained. An exponential behavior of excitation probabilities with respect to energy difference between excitation and electronic line is found just as for multiphonon-assisted nonradiative decay and energy transfer. Exponential parameters α/sub As/ and α/sub S/ for anti-Stokes and Stokes excitation are measured and linked to the Miyakawa-Dexter α parameter for decay, leading to estimates for Pekar-Huang-Rhys coupling parameter S 0 of about 0.04, in agreement with values obtained from one-phonon spectra or nonradiative-decay measurements. A semiempirical formula is deduced to obtain α from only one parameter, an effective phonon energy

  11. Raman Microscopy: A Noninvasive Method to Visualize the Localizations of Biomolecules in the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Yuichi; Akiyama, Toshihiro; Segawa, Hiroki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    In vivo and in situ visualization of biomolecules without pretreatment will be important for diagnosis and treatment of ocular disorders in the future. Recently, multiphoton microscopy, based on the nonlinear interactions between molecules and photons, has been applied to reveal the localizations of various molecules in tissues. We aimed to use multimodal multiphoton microscopy to visualize the localizations of specific biomolecules in rat corneas. Multiphoton images of the corneas were obtained from nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, third-order sum frequency generation, and second-harmonic generation. The localizations of the adhesion complex-containing basement membrane and Bowman layer were clearly visible in the third-order sum frequency generation images. The fine structure of type I collagen was observed in the corneal stroma in the second-harmonic generation images. The localizations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) was obtained in the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images. Imaging technologies have progressed significantly and been applied in medical fields. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy are widely used but do not provide information on the molecular structure of the cornea. By contrast, multiphoton microscopy provides information on the molecular structure of living tissues. Using this technique, we successfully visualized the localizations of various biomolecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in the cornea. We speculate that multiphoton microscopy will provide essential information on the physiological and pathological conditions of the cornea, as well as molecular localizations in tissues without pretreatment.

  12. Resolving fine spectral features in lattice vibrational modes using femtosecond coherent spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Card

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We show resolution of fine spectral features within several Raman active vibrational modes in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP crystal. Measurements are performed using a femtosecond time-domain coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy technique that is capable of delivering equivalent spectral resolution of 0.1 cm−1. The Raman spectra retrieved from our measurements show several spectral components corresponding to vibrations of different symmetry with distinctly different damping rates. In particular, linewidths for unassigned optical phonon mode triplet centered at around 820 cm−1 are found to be 7.5 ± 0.2 cm−1, 9.1 ± 0.3 cm−1, and 11.2 ± 0.3 cm−1. Results of our experiments will ultimately help to design an all-solid-state source for sub-optical-wavelength waveform generation that is based on stimulated Raman scattering.

  13. Remote Raman microimaging using an AOTF and a spatially coherent microfiber optical probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trey Skinner, H.; Cooney, T.F.; Sharma, S.K.; Angel, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber-optic Raman microimaging probe is described that is suitable for acquiring high-spatial-resolution Raman images in sampling situations with no clear line of sight. A high-power near-infrared diode laser combined with an acousto-optic tunable filter and a spatially coherent optical fiber bundle allow fluorescence-free Raman images of remotely located samples to be acquired at distances up to several meters. The feasibility of this technique is demonstrated with Raman images of (1) a pellet containing a mixture of a highly scattering sample, bis-methylstyrylbenzene (BMSB), KCl, and graphite, and (2) a partially graphitized diamond. These images clearly show phase boundaries over an area of approximately 0.1 mm 2 with ∼4-μm resolution. copyright 1996 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  14. Development of fiber lasers and devices for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Erin Stranford

    As ultrafast laser technology has found expanding application in machining, spectroscopy, microscopy, surgery, and numerous other areas, the desire for inexpensive and robust laser sources has grown. Until recently, nonlinear effects in fiber systems due to the tight confinement of the light in the core have limited their performance. However, with advances in managing nonlinearity through pulse propagation physics and the use of large core fibers, the performance of fiber lasers can compete with that of their solid-state counterparts. As specific applications, such as coherent Raman scattering microscopy, emerge that stand to benefit from fiber technology, new performance challenges in areas such as laser noise are anticipated. This thesis studies nonlinear pulse propagation in fiber lasers and fiber parametric devices. Applications of dissipative solitons and self-similar pulse propagation to low-repetition rate oscillators that have the potential to simplify short-pulse amplification schemes will be examined. The rest of this thesis focuses on topics relevant to fiber laser development for coherent Raman scattering microscopy sources. Coherent pulse division and recombination inside the laser cavity will be introduced as an energy-scaling mechanism and demonstrated for a fiber soliton laser. The relative intensity noise properties of mode-locked fiber lasers, with a particular emphasis on normal dispersion lasers, will be explored in simulation and experiment. A fiber optical parametric oscillator will be studied in detail for low noise frequency conversion of picosecond pulses, and its utility for coherent Raman imaging will be demonstrated. Spectral compression of femtosecond pulses is used to generate picosecond pulses to pump this device, and this technique provides a route to future noise reduction in the system. Furthermore, this device forms a multimodal source capable of providing the picosecond pulses for coherent Raman scattering microscopy and the

  15. Dual-Comb Coherent Raman Spectroscopy with Lasers of 1-GHz Pulse Repetition Frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Mohler, Kathrin J.; Bohn, Bernhard J.; Yan, Ming; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate spectra of liquids, which span 1100 cm$^{-1}$ of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6 cm$^{-1}$, their measurement time may be as short as 5 microseconds for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved ten-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequen...

  16. Dual-comb coherent Raman spectroscopy with lasers of 1-GHz pulse repetition frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Bohn, Bernhard J; Yan, Ming; Mélen, Gwénaëlle; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2017-01-15

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate a spectra of liquids, which span 1100  cm-1 of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6  cm-1, their measurement time may be as short as 5 μs for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved 10-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  17. Equations describing coherent and partially coherent multilevel molecular excitation induced by pulsed Raman transitions: III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.; Sacks, R.; Karr, T.

    1987-01-01

    This memo discusses the equations of motion used to describe multilevel molecular excitation induced by Raman transitions. These equations are based upon the time-dependent Schroedinger equation expressed in a basis of molecular energy states. A partition of these states is made into two sets, those that are far from resonance (and hence unpopulated) and those that are close to resonance, either by one-photon transition or two-photon (Raman) processes. By adiabatic elimination an effective Schroedinger equation is obtained for the resonance states alone. The effective Hamiltonian is expressible in terms of a polarizibility operator

  18. Laser induced broad band anti-Stokes white emission from LiYbF4 nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. Marciniak; R. Tomala; M. Stefanski; D. Hreniak; W. Strek

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of tetragonal LiYbF4 nanocrystals under high dense NIR excitation at vacuum condition were in-vestigated. White, broad band emission covering whole visible part of the spectrum from LiYbF4 nanocrystals was observed. Its in-tensity strongly depended on the excitation power, excitation wavelength and ambient pressure. Temperature of the nanocrystals un-der 975 nm excitation was determined as a function of excitation power. Strong photo-induced current was observed from LiYbF4 pallet. The emission kinetic was analyzed. The mechanism of the anti-Stokes white emission was discussed in terms of the la-ser-induced charge transfer emission from Yb2+ states.

  19. Utilization of IR laser pumped anti-Stokes emission of Er-Yb doped systems for identification of securities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, A.N.; Ryabtsev, G.I.; Ketko, G.A.; Gorelenko, A.Yu.; Demidovich, A.A.; Strek, W.; Maruszewicz, K.; Deren, P.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we present a utilization of anti-Stokes luminescence of Er-Yb systems for identification of securities. A simple method of detection of an up-conversion phenomenon in such system by means of IR laser operating in the region 960-1010 nm is proposed. (author)

  20. Raman Spectroscopy and Microscopy of Individual Cells andCellular Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; Fore, S; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S; Huser, T

    2008-05-15

    Raman spectroscopy provides the unique opportunity to non-destructively analyze chemical concentrations on the submicron length scale in individual cells without the need for optical labels. This enables the rapid assessment of cellular biochemistry inside living cells, and it allows for their continuous analysis to determine cellular response to external events. Here, we review recent developments in the analysis of single cells, subcellular compartments, and chemical imaging based on Raman spectroscopic techniques. Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy provides for the full spectral assessment of cellular biochemistry, while coherent Raman techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering is primarily used as an imaging tool comparable to confocal fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are complemented by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, which provides higher sensitivity and local specificity, and also extends the techniques to chemical indicators, i.e. pH sensing. We review the strengths and weaknesses of each technique, demonstrate some of their applications and discuss their potential for future research in cell biology and biomedicine.

  1. Dispersion-based stimulated Raman scattering spectroscopy, holography, and optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E; Fischer, Martin C; Warren, Warren S

    2016-01-11

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) enables fast, high resolution imaging of chemical constituents important to biological structures and functional processes, both in a label-free manner and using exogenous biomarkers. While this technology has shown remarkable potential, it is currently limited to point scanning and can only probe a few Raman bands at a time (most often, only one). In this work we take a fundamentally different approach to detecting the small nonlinear signals based on dispersion effects that accompany the loss/gain processes in SRS. In this proof of concept, we demonstrate that the dispersive measurements are more robust to noise compared to amplitude-based measurements, which then permit spectral or spatial multiplexing (potentially both, simultaneously). Finally, we illustrate how this method may enable different strategies for biochemical imaging using phase microscopy and optical coherence tomography.

  2. Electric field measurement in an atmospheric or higher pressure gas by coherent Raman scattering of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Mueller, Sarah; Luggenhoelscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The feasibility of electric field measurement based on field-induced coherent Raman scattering is demonstrated for the first time in a nitrogen containing gas at atmospheric or higher pressure, including open air. The technique is especially useful for the determination of temporal and spatial profiles of the electric field in air-based microdischarges, where nitrogen is abundant. In our current experimental setup, the minimum detectable field strength in open air is about 100 V mm -1 , which is sufficiently small compared with the average field present in typical microdischarges. No further knowledge of other gas/plasma parameters such as the nitrogen density is required. (fast track communication)

  3. Dicke coherent narrowing in two-photon and Raman spectroscopy of thin vapor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutier, Gabriel; Todorov, Petko; Hamdi, Ismahene; Maurin, Isabelle; Saltiel, Solomon; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial

    2005-01-01

    The principle of coherent Dicke narrowing in a thin vapor cell, in which sub-Doppler spectral line shapes are observed under a normal irradiation for a λ/2 thickness, is generalized to two-photon spectroscopy. Only the sum of the two wave vectors must be normal to the cell, making the two-photon scheme highly versatile. A comparison is provided between the Dicke narrowing with copropagating fields, and the residual Doppler broadening occurring with counterpropagating geometries. The experimental feasibility is discussed on the basis of a first observation of a two-photon resonance in a 300-nm-thick Cs cell. Extension to the Raman situation is finally considered

  4. Two-Dimensional Resonance Raman Signatures of Vibronic Coherence Transfer in Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P; Cheshire, Thomas P; Moran, Andrew M

    2017-11-02

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has been developed for studies of photochemical reaction mechanisms and structural heterogeneity in condensed phase systems. 2DRR spectroscopy is motivated by knowledge of non-equilibrium effects that cannot be detected with traditional resonance Raman spectroscopy. For example, 2DRR spectra may reveal correlated distributions of reactant and product geometries in systems that undergo chemical reactions on the femtosecond time scale. Structural heterogeneity in an ensemble may also be reflected in the 2D spectroscopic line shapes of both reactive and non-reactive systems. In this chapter, these capabilities of 2DRR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of recent applications to the photodissociation reactions of triiodide. We show that signatures of "vibronic coherence transfer" in the photodissociation process can be targeted with particular 2DRR pulse sequences. Key differences between the signal generation mechanisms for 2DRR and off-resonant 2D Raman spectroscopy techniques are also addressed. Overall, recent experimental developments and applications of the 2DRR method suggest that it will be a valuable tool for elucidating ultrafast chemical reaction mechanisms.

  5. In vivo chemical and structural analysis of plant cuticular waxes using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, George R; Mansfield, Jessica C; Parker, David; Lind, Rob; Perfect, Sarah; Seymour, Mark; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Love, John; Moger, Julian

    2015-05-01

    The cuticle is a ubiquitous, predominantly waxy layer on the aerial parts of higher plants that fulfils a number of essential physiological roles, including regulating evapotranspiration, light reflection, and heat tolerance, control of development, and providing an essential barrier between the organism and environmental agents such as chemicals or some pathogens. The structure and composition of the cuticle are closely associated but are typically investigated separately using a combination of structural imaging and biochemical analysis of extracted waxes. Recently, techniques that combine stain-free imaging and biochemical analysis, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy microscopy, have been used to investigate the cuticle, but the detection sensitivity is severely limited by the background signals from plant pigments. We present a new method for label-free, in vivo structural and biochemical analysis of plant cuticles based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. As a proof of principle, we used SRS microscopy to analyze the cuticles from a variety of plants at different times in development. We demonstrate that the SRS virtually eliminates the background interference compared with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy imaging and results in label-free, chemically specific confocal images of cuticle architecture with simultaneous characterization of cuticle composition. This innovative use of the SRS spectroscopy may find applications in agrochemical research and development or in studies of wax deposition during leaf development and, as such, represents an important step in the study of higher plant cuticles. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Raman-based imaging uncovers the effects of alginate hydrogel implants in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Tamosaityte, Sandra; Koch, Maria; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim H.; Later, Robert; Uckermann, Ortrud; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Gelinsky, Michael; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Koch, Edmund; Steiner, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    The treatment of spinal cord injury by using implants that provide a permissive environment for axonal growth is in the focus of the research for regenerative therapies. Here, Raman-based label-free techniques were applied for the characterization of morphochemical properties of surgically induced spinal cord injury in the rat that received an implant of soft unfunctionalized alginate hydrogel. Raman microspectroscopy followed by chemometrics allowed mapping the different degenerative areas, while multimodal multiphoton microscopy (e.g. the combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), endogenous two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation on the same platform) enabled to address the morphochemistry of the tissue at cellular level. The regions of injury, characterized by demyelination and scarring, were retrieved and the distribution of key tissue components was evaluated by Raman mapping. The alginate hydrogel was detected in the lesion up to six months after implantation and had positive effects on the nervous tissue. For instance, multimodal multiphoton microscopy complemented the results of Raman mapping, providing the micromorphology of lipid-rich tissue structures by CARS and enabling to discern lipid-rich regions that contained myelinated axons from degenerative regions characterized by myelin fragmentation and presence of foam cells. These findings demonstrate that Raman-based imaging methods provide useful information for the evaluation of alginate implant effects and have therefore the potential to contribute to new strategies for monitoring degenerative and regenerative processes induced in SCI, thereby improving the effectiveness of therapies.

  7. Precision in single atom localization via Raman-driven coherence: Role of detuning and phase shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmatullah,; Qamar, Sajid, E-mail: sajid_qamar@comsats.edu.pk

    2013-10-01

    Role of detuning and phase shift associated with the standing-wave driving fields is revisited for precision position measurement of single atom during its motion through two standing-wave fields. A four-level atomic system in diamond configuration is considered where the intermediate levels are coupled to upper and lower level via standing-wave driving fields and atomic decay channels, respectively. The former is responsible for the generation of quantum mechanical coherence via two-photon Raman transition while the latter leads to spontaneous emission of a photon. Due to standing-wave driving fields the atom–field interaction becomes position-dependent and measurement of the frequency of spontaneously emitted photon gives the position information of the atom. The unique position of the atom with much higher spatial resolution, i.e., of the order of λ/100 is observed using detuning and phase shift associated with the standing-wave driving fields.

  8. New techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laubereau, A.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the field of spectroscopic applications of ultrashort laser pulses. This paper examines two approaches toward studying ultrafast relaxation processes in condensed matter: an IR technique which complements coherent Raman scattering; and a Fourier Raman method with high frequency resolution. The time domain IR spectroscopy technique has been applied to various vibration-rotation transitions of pure HCl gas and in mixtures with Ar buffer gas. The advantage of the time domain measurements instead of frequency spectroscopy is readily visualized when one recalls that a frequency resolution of 10 -3 cm -1 corresponds to time observations over 10 -8 , which are readily feasible. As a first demonstration of the FT-Raman technique the author presents experimental data on the Q-branch of the v 1 -vibrational mode of methane. An example for the experimental data obtained approximately 2 mm behind the nozzle is presented; the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signal is plotted versus delay time. A complicated beating structure and the decay of the signal envelope are readily seen. The desired spectroscopic information is obtained by numerical Fourier transformation of the experimental points presented

  9. Theoretical treatments of stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Youichi; Sasaki, Wataru

    1981-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a phenomenon, in which the coherent light (Stokes emission) with a shifted wavelength specific to a kind of material mixes in scattered monochromatic light, when the intense monochromatic light (laser light) is scattered by projecting it to the above material. According to the theoretical researches together with the experiments on SRS, it is qualitatively understood to be the phenomenon, in which laser energy is transferred to Stokes emission by the interaction through the optical non-linearity of a material between incident laser beam and the Stokes emission generated by spontaneous emission. The authors have been interested in the application of SRS to plasma diagnostics, and have studied it theoretically for the purpose of investigating its feasibility. Here, the theories reported so far are introduced arranging them. First, the derivation of SRS fundamental equations is explained, though it is limited to the SRS theory for ultrashort pulse laser (TSRS), and Raman media were assumed to be gas or liquid phase. Next, the solution of the equations and the basic properties of TSRS are described. Then, the extension of the TSRS to the cases when the several assumptions, which were set in the solution of the equations, were removed is explained. The extension includes the cases for phase fluctuation, dispersion, existence of anti-Stokes emission, and the presence of laser beam attenuation. Finally, the SRS by the broad band laser is introduced. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Control of ultrafast pulses in a hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber by Raman coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, F.; Abdolvand, A.; Travers, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and numerical investigation into temporally nonlocal coherent interactions between ultrashort pulses, mediated by Raman coherence, in a gas-filled kagome-style hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. A pump pulse first sets up the Raman coherence, creating a refractive index spatiotemporal grating in the gas that travels at the group velocity of the pump pulse. Varying the arrival time of a second, probe, pulse allows a high degree of control over its evolution as it propagates along the fiber through the grating. Of particular interest are soliton-driven effects such as self-compression and dispersive wave (DW) emission. In the experiments reported, a DW is emitted at ˜300 nm and exhibits a wiggling effect, with its central frequency oscillating periodically with pump-probe delay. The results demonstrate that a strong Raman coherence, created in a broadband guiding gas-filled kagome photonic-crystal fiber, can be used to control the nonlinear dynamics of ultrashort probe pulses, even in difficult-to-access spectral regions such as the deep and vacuum ultraviolet.

  11. Non-Gaussian statistics of extreme events in stimulated Raman scattering: The role of coherent memory and source noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Yashar E.; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.

    2017-10-01

    We explore theoretically and numerically extreme event excitation in stimulated Raman scattering in gases. We consider gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers as a particular system realization. We show that moderate amplitude pump fluctuations obeying Gaussian statistics lead to the emergence of heavy-tailed non-Gaussian statistics as coherent seed Stokes pulses are amplified on propagation along the fiber. We reveal the crucial role that coherent memory effects play in causing non-Gaussian statistics of the system. We discover that extreme events can occur even at the initial stage of stimulated Raman scattering when one can neglect energy depletion of an intense, strongly fluctuating Gaussian pump source. Our analytical results in the undepleted pump approximation explicitly illustrate power-law probability density generation as the input pump noise is transferred to the output Stokes pulses.

  12. Multi-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography for the discrimination of colonic adenocarcinoma from normal colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Bellini, Nicola; Riches, Andrew; Dholakia, Kishan; Herrington, C. Simon

    2013-01-01

    We report a multimodal optical approach using both Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in tandem to discriminate between colonic adenocarcinoma and normal colon. Although both of these non-invasive techniques are capable of discriminating between normal and tumour tissues, they are unable individually to provide both the high specificity and high sensitivity required for disease diagnosis. We combine the chemical information derived from Raman spectroscopy with the texture parameters extracted from OCT images. The sensitivity obtained using Raman spectroscopy and OCT individually was 89% and 78% respectively and the specificity was 77% and 74% respectively. Combining the information derived using the two techniques increased both sensitivity and specificity to 94% demonstrating that combining complementary optical information enhances diagnostic accuracy. These data demonstrate that multimodal optical analysis has the potential to achieve accurate non-invasive cancer diagnosis. PMID:24156073

  13. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy for Evaluation of Head and Neck Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesli, Rebecca C; Orringer, Daniel A; McHugh, Jonathan B; Spector, Matthew E

    2017-09-01

    Objective We aim to describe a novel, label-free, real-time imaging technique, coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, for histopathological evaluation of head and neck cancer. We evaluated the ability of CRS microscopy to delineate between tumor and nonneoplastic tissue in tissue samples from patients with head and neck cancer. Study Design Prospective case series. Setting Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Patients eligible were surgical candidates with biopsy-proven, previously untreated head and neck carcinoma and were consented preoperatively for participation in this study. Tissue was collected from 50 patients, and after confirmation of tumor and normal specimens by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), there were 42 tumor samples and 42 normal adjacent controls. Results There were 42 confirmed carcinoma specimens on H&E, and CRS microscopy identified 37 as carcinoma. Of the 42 normal specimens, CRS microscopy identified 40 as normal. This resulted in a sensitivity of 88.1% and specificity of 95.2% in distinguishing between neoplastic and nonneoplastic images. Conclusion CRS microscopy is a unique label-free imaging technique that can provide rapid, high-resolution images and can accurately determine the presence of head and neck carcinoma. This holds potential for implementation into standard practice, allowing frozen margin evaluation even at institutions without a histopathology laboratory.

  14. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  15. Spectral quantum fluctuations in a stimulated Raman generator: a description in terms of temporally coherent modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, I A

    1992-03-15

    The probability density of the single-shot mean Stokes frequency from a linear Raman generator is calculated. It is shown that the fluctuations in the Stokes pulse energy spectrum that arise from the quantum initiation of the Stokes light are reduced in the transient regime of amplification. Also, it appears that saturation of the Raman gain does not reduce the phase fluctuations of the Stokes light below those present in the unsaturated gain (linear) regime.

  16. Rotational Raman scattering using molecular nitrogen gas for calibration of Thomson-scattering apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    Anti-Stokes rotational Raman lines in molecular nitrogen gas were used for the calibration of Thomson-scattering apparatus. It was found that molecular nitrogen gas is suitable for a vessel having strong stray light. The polarization ratio was 0.16 using linear-polarized laser light. (author)

  17. Anti-Stokes emissions and determination of Stark sub-level diagram of Er3+ ions in KY3F10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulma, E; Diaf, M; Jouart, J P; Bouffard, M; Doualan, J L; Moncorge, R

    2006-01-01

    We are interested, in this work, in determining the Stark sub-level of Er 3+ ions doping a KY 3 F 10 single crystal with a molar concentration of 1%. We have used a new method of measurement of energies of the ground level and emitting levels from excitation and anti-Stokes emission spectra recorded at liquid nitrogen temperature. This technique is based on a spectral analysis of the anti-Stokes emissions recorded after selective excitation with a red dye tunable laser. Thus, we could determine the Stark sub-levels of the ground and the principal emitting levels in the infrared, visible and near-UV ranges with a very good precision

  18. Observation of prolonged coherence time of the collective spin wave of an atomic ensemble in a paraffin-coated 87Rb vapor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shuo; Luo Xiaoming; Chen Liqing; Ning Bo; Chen Shuai; Wang Jingyang; Zhong Zhiping; Pan Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    We report a prolonged coherence time of the collective spin wave of a thermal 87 Rb atomic ensemble in a paraffin-coated cell. The spin wave is prepared through a stimulated Raman process. The long coherence time is achieved by prolonging the lifetime of the spins with paraffin coating and minimize dephasing with optimal experimental configuration. The observation of the long-time-delayed-stimulated Stokes signal in the writing process suggests the prolonged lifetime of the prepared spins; a direct measurement of the decay of anti-Stokes signal in the reading process shows the coherence time is up to 300 μs after minimizing dephasing. This is 100 times longer than the reported coherence time in the similar experiments in thermal atomic ensembles based on the Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller and its improved protocols. This prolonged coherence time sets the upper limit of the memory time in quantum repeaters based on such protocols, which is crucial for the realization of long-distance quantum communication. The previous reported fluorescence background in the writing process due to collision in a sample cell with buffer gas is also reduced in a cell without buffer gas.

  19. Goos-Hänchen shifts of partially coherent light beams from a cavity with a four-level Raman gain medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate spatial and angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts (both negative and positive) in the reflected light for a partial coherent light incident on a cavity. A four-level Raman gain atomic medium is considered in a cavity. The effects of spatial coherence, beam width, and mode index of partial coherent light fields on spatial and angular GH shifts are studied. Our results reveal that a large magnitude of negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light is achievable with the introduction of partial coherent light fields. Furthermore, the amplitude of spatial (negative and positive) GH shifts are sharply affected by the partial coherent light beam as compared to angular (negative and positive) GH shifts in the reflected light.

  20. Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure by coherent Raman scattering of laser beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Mueller, Sarah; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Electric field measurements at near-atmospheric pressure environments based on electric-field induced Raman scattering are applied to repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharges. The results have revealed that the peak electric field near the centre of the gap is almost independent of the applied voltage. Minimum sustainable voltage measurements suggests that, at each discharge pulse, charged particles that remain from the previous pulse serve as discharge seeds and play an important role for generation of uniform glow-like discharges.

  1. Optimization of anisotropic photonic density of states for Raman cooling of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Ghosh, Indronil; Schleife, André; Carney, P. Scott; Bahl, Gaurav

    2018-04-01

    Optical refrigeration of solids holds tremendous promise for applications in thermal management. It can be achieved through multiple mechanisms including inelastic anti-Stokes Brillouin and Raman scattering. However, engineering of these mechanisms remains relatively unexplored. The major challenge lies in the natural unfavorable imbalance in transition rates for Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering. We consider the influence of anisotropic photonic density of states on Raman scattering and derive expressions for cooling in such photonically anisotropic systems. We demonstrate optimization of the Raman cooling figure of merit considering all possible orientations for the material crystal and two example photonic crystals. We find that the anisotropic description of the photonic density of states and the optimization process is necessary to obtain the best Raman cooling efficiency for systems having lower symmetry. This general result applies to a wide array of other laser cooling methods in the presence of anisotropy.

  2. Theory of Graphene Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas; Chen, Wei; Fang, Shiang; Borunda, Mario; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-23

    Raman scattering plays a key role in unraveling the quantum dynamics of graphene, perhaps the most promising material of recent times. It is crucial to correctly interpret the meaning of the spectra. It is therefore very surprising that the widely accepted understanding of Raman scattering, i.e., Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac theory, has never been applied to graphene. Doing so here, a remarkable mechanism we term"transition sliding" is uncovered, explaining the uncommon brightness of overtones in graphene. Graphene's dispersive and fixed Raman bands, missing bands, defect density and laser frequency dependence of band intensities, widths of overtone bands, Stokes, anti-Stokes anomalies, and other known properties emerge simply and directly.

  3. Phonon populations by nanosecond-pulsed Raman scattering in Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compaan, A.; Lee, M.C.; Trott, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the first time-resolved Raman studies of phonon populations under pulsed-laser-annealing conditions, a number of cw Raman studies have been performed which provide a much improved basis for interpreting the pulsed Raman data. Here we present new pulsed Raman results and interpret them with reference to temperature-dependent resonance effects, high-carrier-density effects, phonon anharmonicity, and laser-induced strain effects. The pulsed Raman data: Stokes to anti-Stokes ratios, shift and shape of the first-order peak, and second-order spectra: indicate the existence of a phase in which the Raman signal disappears followed by a rapidly cooling solid which begins within 300 K of the 1685 K normal melting temperature of Si. We identify a major difficulty in pulsed Raman studies in Si to be the decrease in Raman intensity at high temperatures

  4. Pseudo-HE images derived from CARS/TPEF/SHG multimodal imaging in combination with Raman-spectroscopy as a pathological screening tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocklitz, Thomas W.; Salah, Firas Subhi; Vogler, Nadine; Heuke, Sandro; Chernavskaia, Olga; Schmidt, Carsten; Waldner, Maximilian J.; Greten, Florian R.; Bräuer, Rolf; Schmitt, Michael; Stallmach, Andreas; Petersen, Iver; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Due to the steadily increasing number of cancer patients worldwide the early diagnosis and treatment of cancer is a major field of research. The diagnosis of cancer is mostly performed by an experienced pathologist via the visual inspection of histo-pathological stained tissue sections. To save valuable time, low quality cryosections are frequently analyzed with diagnostic accuracies that are below those of high quality embedded tissue sections. Thus, alternative means have to be found that enable for fast and accurate diagnosis as the basis of following clinical decision making. In this contribution we will show that the combination of the three label-free non-linear imaging modalities CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering), TPEF (two-photon excited autofluorescence) and SHG (second harmonic generation) yields information that can be translated into computational hematoxylin and eosin (HE) images by multivariate statistics. Thereby, a computational HE stain is generated resulting in pseudo-HE overview images that allow for identification of suspicious regions. The latter are analyzed further by Raman-spectroscopy retrieving the tissue’s molecular fingerprint. The results suggest that the combination of non-linear multimodal imaging and Raman-spectroscopy possesses the potential as a precise and fast tool in routine histopathology. As the key advantage, both optical methods are non-invasive enabling for further pathological investigations of the same tissue section, e.g. a direct comparison with the current pathological gold-standard

  5. First observations of stimulated emission and of stimulated Raman scattering in acentric cubic Nd3+:Bi12SiO20 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminskii, Alexandr A; Bagayev, S N; Garsia, Sole J; Jaque, D; Eichler, H J; Findeisen, J; Fernandez, J; Balda, R; Agullo, Rueda F

    1999-01-01

    Laser action (in the 4 F 3/2 - 4 I 11/2 channel) and stimulated Raman scattering were excited for the first time in an Nd 3+ :Bi 12 SiO 20 single crystal at room temperature. All the observed stimulated emission and multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes lines were identified. (letters to the editor)

  6. Photodetection-induced relative timing jitter in synchronized time-lens source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized time-lens source is a novel method to generate synchronized optical pulses to mode-locked lasers, and has found widespread applications in coherent Raman scattering microscopy. Relative timing jitter between the mode-locked laser and the synchronized time-lens source is a key parameter for evaluating the synchronization performance of such synchronized laser systems. However, the origins of the relative timing jitter in such systems are not fully determined, which in turn prevents the experimental efforts to optimize the synchronization performance. Here, we demonstrate, through theoretical modeling and numerical simulation, that the photodetection could be one physical origin of the relative timing jitter. Comparison with relative timing jitter due to the intrinsic timing jitter of the mode-locked laser is also demonstrated, revealing different qualitative and quantitative behaviors. Based on the nature of this photodetection-induced timing jitter, we further propose several strategies to reduce the relative timing jitter. Our theoretical results will provide guidelines for optimizing synchronization performance in experiments.

  7. Coherent counter-steaming electrostatic wave Raman interaction system utilizing opposing electron beams for the production of coherent microwaves in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiby, C.C. Jr.; Prasad, B.

    1977-01-01

    The generation of controlled, electromagnetic, coherent, microwave radiation from a warm, uniform plasma at approximately twice the electron plasma frequency by means of two oppositely directed streams of high energy electrons and the coupling of the resulting coherent, electromagnetic radiation from a cavity resonator into external circuitry, wherein the two opposing streams of high energy electrons directed into the warm, uniform plasma result in a conversion of electron beam and plasma energies into transverse electromagnetic radiation from 10 to 100 times that which is possible with a single electron beam-plasma system. 7 claims, 4 figures

  8. How to Drive CARS in Reverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    and ‘heats’ this plasma creating an electron avalanche , analogous to the electric discharge used in traditional nitrogen lasers. These schemes are all... pulse . This pulse is then used to drive a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering scheme, resulting in a strong chemically specific signal propagating...generation of a backward propagating stimulated Raman pulse . This pulse is then used to drive a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering scheme, resulting in a

  9. Long reach and enhanced power budget DWDM radio-over-fibre link supported by Raman amplification and coherent detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Fernandez, Amaya

    2009-01-01

    We report on a scalable and enhanced power budget radio-over-fibre system for hybrid-wireless access networks operating at 12.5 GHz DWDM spacing for 5 GHz RF carriers over a 60 km fibre link with Raman amplification....

  10. Laser-Raman spectroscopy of living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations into the laser-Raman shift spectra of bacterial and mammalian cells have revealed that many Raman lines observed at 4-6 K, do not appear in the spectra of cells held at 300 K. At 300 K, Raman activity, at set frequencies, is observed only when the cells are metabolically active; however, the actual live cell spectrum, between 0 and 3400 cm -1 , has been found to alter in a specific way with time as the cells' progress through their life cycles. Lines above 300 cm -1 , from in vivo Raman active states, appear to shift to higher wave numbers whereas those below 300 cm -1 seem to shift to lower ones. The transient nature of many shift lines observed and the intensity of them when present in the spectrum indicates that, in, vivo, a metabolically induced condensation of closely related states occurs at a set time in the life of a living cell. In addition, the calculated ratio between the intensities of Stokes and anti-Stokes lines observed suggests that the metabolically induced 'collective' Raman active states are produced, in vivo, by non thermal means. It appears, therefore, that the energetics of the well established cell 'time clock' may be studied by laser-Raman spectroscopy; moreover, Raman spectroscopy may yield a new type of information regarding the physics of such biological phenomena as nutrition, virus infection and oncogenesis. (orig.)

  11. Coherent population transfer and superposition of atomic states via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage using an excited-doublet four-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Shiqi; Gong Shangqing; Li Ruxin; Xu Zhizhan

    2004-01-01

    Coherent population transfer and superposition of atomic states via a technique of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in an excited-doublet four-level atomic system have been analyzed. It is shown that the behavior of adiabatic passage in this system depends crucially on the detunings between the laser frequencies and the corresponding atomic transition frequencies. Particularly, if both the fields are tuned to the center of the two upper levels, the four-level system has two degenerate dark states, although one of them contains the contribution from the excited atomic states. The nonadiabatic coupling of the two degenerate dark states is intrinsic, it originates from the energy difference of the two upper levels. An arbitrary superposition of atomic states can be prepared due to such nonadiabatic coupling effect

  12. Determining the Effect of Calculus, Hypocalcification, and Stain on Using Optical Coherence Tomography and Polarized Raman Spectroscopy for Detecting White Spot Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Huminicki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS have been shown as useful methods for distinguishing sound enamel from carious lesions ex vivo. However, factors in the oral environment such as calculus, hypocalcification, and stain could lead to false-positive results. OCT and PRS were used to investigate extracted human teeth clinically examined for sound enamel, white spot lesion (WSL, calculus, hypocalcification, and stain to determine whether these factors would confound WSL detection with these optical methods. Results indicate that OCT allowed differentiating caries from sound enamel, hypocalcification, and stain, with calculus deposits recognizable on OCT images. ANOVA and post-hoc unequal N HSD analyses to compare the mean Raman depolarization ratios from the various groups showed that the mean values were statistically significant at P<.05, except for several comparison pairs. With the current PRS analysis method, the mean depolarization ratios of stained enamel and caries are not significantly different due to the sloping background in the stained enamel spectra. Overall, calculus and hypocalcification are not confounding factors affecting WSL detection using OCT and PRS. Stain does not influence WSL detection with OCT. Improved PRS analysis methods are needed to differentiate carious from stained enamel.

  13. Performance Improvement of Raman Distributed Temperature System by Using Noise Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Li, Yunting; Zhang, Mingjiang; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jianzhong; Yan, Baoqiang; Wang, Dong; Jin, Baoquan

    2018-06-01

    In Raman distributed temperature system, the key factor for performance improvement is noise suppression, which seriously affects the sensing distance and temperature accuracy. Therefore, we propose and experimentally demonstrate dynamic noise difference algorithm and wavelet transform modulus maximum (WTMM) to de-noising Raman anti-Stokes signal. Experimental results show that the sensing distance can increase from 3 km to 11.5 km and the temperature accuracy increases to 1.58 °C at the sensing distance of 10.4 km.

  14. Imaging unsteady three-dimensional transport phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) are examples that ... The camera may be interfaced with a personal computer (HCL, 1 GB ..... convolution back-projection (CBP) and algebraic reconstruction (ART) have ...

  15. Non-linear optical imaging – Introduction and pharmaceutical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Isomaki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging is an emerging technology with much potential in pharmaceutical analysis. The technique encompasses a range of optical phenomena, including coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), and twophoton excited fluorescence (TPEF). The

  16. High-resolution narrowband CARS spectroscopy in the spectral fingerprint region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chimento, P.F.; Jurna, M.; Bouwmans, H.S.P.; Garbacik, E.T.; Garbacik, E.T.; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is an important technique for spectroscopy and chemically selective microscopy, but wider implementation requires dedicated versatile tunable sources. We describe an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on a magnesium oxide-doped

  17. Photon induced resonant Raman scattering in CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzart, J.; Lluesma, E.G.; Arguello, C.A.; Leite, R.C.C.

    1975-01-01

    A novel aspect of resonant Raman scattering is observed in CdS by means of the ratio of Stokes to anti-Stokes intensities. With increasing temperature, as the forbidden band energy approaches a value that is twice the incident photon energy, (from a Nd-Yag-laser) a large enhancement of the above ratio is observed for both the LO and the 2LO phonon Raman intensities. The results indicate a resonance with the scattered photon. Resonance is only observed for high incident photon intensities. A possible explanation for the above observations is that flooding of the crystal with photons of energy hν induces states of energy hν displaced from the electronic bands by mixing of electronic and photon states

  18. Stokes and anti-Stokes photoluminescence towards five different In-x(Al0.17Ga0.83)(1-x)As/Al0.17Ga0.83As quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machida, S.; Tadakuma, T.; Satake, A.

    2005-01-01

    Stokes and anti-Stokes photoluminescence (AS-PL) has been investigated in a step-graded Inx(Al0.17Ga0.83)1–xAs/Al0.17Ga0.83As quantum-well (QW) heterostructure consisting of five QWs with different x values. Stokes PL spectra of this sample show a significant difference in PL intensity between...... the wells under indirect excitation conditions due to the existence of competitive resonant and nonresonant capture processes, while they exhibit a rather uniform PL intensity distribution under direct excitation. When the excitation wavelength is tuned to 810 nm for AS-PL detection, it is transparent...... is basically determined by the competitive capture of photoexcited carriers through the thick barriers, generated far from the five wells due to the nonlinear excitation processes in GaAs. ©2005 American Institute of Physics...

  19. Quantitative tradeoffs between spatial, temporal, and thermometric resolution of nonresonant Raman thermometry for dynamic experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Goodwin, Peter M; Dattelbaum, Dana M

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of Stokes to anti-Stokes nonresonant spontaneous Raman can provide an in situ thermometer that is noncontact, independent of any material specific parameters or calibrations, can be multiplexed spatially with line imaging, and can be time resolved for dynamic measurements. However, spontaneous Raman cross sections are very small, and thermometric measurements are often limited by the amount of laser energy that can be applied without damaging the sample or changing its temperature appreciably. In this paper, we quantitatively detail the tradeoff space between spatial, temporal, and thermometric accuracy measurable with spontaneous Raman. Theoretical estimates are pinned to experimental measurements to form realistic expectations of the resolution tradeoffs appropriate to various experiments. We consider the effects of signal to noise, collection efficiency, laser heating, pulsed laser ablation, and blackbody emission as limiting factors, provide formulae to help choose optimal conditions and provide estimates relevant to planning experiments along with concrete examples for single-shot measurements.

  20. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, A; Chesnoy, J

    1988-03-15

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution.

  1. Resonant Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, A.; Chesnoy, J.

    1988-01-01

    Using a femtosecond dye laser, we observe in real-time vibrational oscillations excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) close to an electronic resonance. We perform single-beam Raman excitation and probe the driven coherence by a polarization-sensitive detection. We demonstrate for the first time impulsively Raman-induced dichroism, birefringence as well as frequency and time delay shifts. We analyse the characteristics of resonant ISRS on a vibrational mode of a dye molecule (malachite green) in solution

  2. Subfemtosecond pulse generation by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering with modulated Raman excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kun; Wu Jian; Zeng Heping

    2003-01-01

    Subfemtosecond (sub-fs) pulses can be generated by cascade-stimulated Raman scattering in a Raman medium with modulated Raman excitations, driven by two sufficiently intense laser beams, one of which is amplitude modulated. The nonadiabatic Raman interaction establishes a strong modulated Raman coherence, which supports compression of the generated broadband Raman sidebands to a train of sub-fs pulses regardless of whether the carrier frequencies of the driving lasers are tuned above, below or on two-photon Raman resonance. (letter to the editor)

  3. High precision stress measurements in semiconductor structures by Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Stress in silicon structures plays an essential role in modern semiconductor technology. This stress has to be measured and due to the ongoing miniaturization in today's semiconductor industry, the measuring method has to meet certain requirements. The present thesis deals with the question how Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the state of stress in semiconductor structures. In the first chapter the relation between Raman peakshift and stress in the material is explained. It is shown that detailed stress maps with a spatial resolution close to the diffraction limit can be obtained in structured semiconductor samples. Furthermore a novel procedure, the so called Stokes-AntiStokes-Difference method is introduced. With this method, topography, tool or drift effects can be distinguished from stress related influences in the sample. In the next chapter Tip-enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) and its application for an improvement in lateral resolution is discussed. For this, a study is presented, which shows the influence of metal particles on the intensity and localization of the Raman signal. A method to attach metal particles to scannable tips is successfully applied. First TERS scans are shown and their impact on and challenges for high resolution stress measurements on semiconductor structures is explained. (orig.)

  4. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  5. Tackling field-portable Raman spectroscopy of real world samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Neil C.

    2008-10-01

    A major challenge confronting first responders, customs authorities and other security-related organisations is the accurate, rapid, and safe identification of potentially hazardous chemicals outside a laboratory environment. Currently, a range of hand portable Raman equipment is commercially available that is low cost and increasingly more sophisticated. These systems are generally based on the 785nm Stokes shifted Raman technique with many using dispersive grating spectrometers. This technique offers a broad range of capabilities including the ability to analyse illicit drugs, explosives, chemical weapons and pre-cursors but still has some fundamental constraints. 'Real world' samples, such as those found at a crime scene, will often not be presented in the most accessible manner. Simple issues such as glass fluorescence can make an otherwise tractable sample impossible to analyse in-situ. A new generation of portable Raman equipment is currently being developed to address these issues. Consideration is given to the use of longer wavelength for fluorescence reduction. Alternative optical designs are being tested to compensate for the signal reduction incurred by moving to longer wavelengths. Furthermore, the use of anti-Stokes spectroscopy is being considered as well as investigating the robustness and portability of traditional Fourier Transform interferometer designs along with future advances in detector technology and ultra small spectrometers.

  6. Resonance Polarization and Phase-Mismatched CARS of Pheophytin b Excited in the Qy Band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boeij, W.P.; Lucassen, G.W.; Lucassen, Gerald; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    Resonance polarization and phase-mismatched coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) measurements were performed on pheophytin b dissolved in acetone excited in the Qy absorption band, where strong broad fluorescence makes spontaneous Raman spectroscopy impossible. The phase-mismatching

  7. STRUCTURE FEATURES OF THE SODIUM-GERMANATE GLASSES DOPED WITH YTTERBIUM ERBIUM RETRIEVED FROM RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Sevastianova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research.The paper deals with study of Raman spectra and luminescence spectra in the visible region of the sodium-germanate glass: 49 GeO2 – 13 Na2O – 27 Yb2O3 – 11 La2O3 - 0,25 Er2O3 and presents research results. In addition, this glass is doped with 5 mol% of the following components MgO, BaO, Al2O3, PbO, Nb2O5, TiO2, SiO2, P2O5 in order to study the effect of these additives on the structure of the glassy matrix and the anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of erbium ions. Method. Raman scatteringspectra were recorded by Renishaw inVia Raman Microscope. Excitation source is a helium neon laser (λ= 633 nm with power equal to 50Wt. Anti-Stokes luminescence of erbium ions was registered in spectral region of 450–750 nm at room temperature (excitation laser wavelength is 975 nm, power is 1Wt. Main Results. It was shown that the structure of the initial glass does not change with the introduction of niobium as Nb2O5 in any coordination plays a role of network forming, building a single mixed grid with tetrahedrons [GeO4]. Introduction of the second glass former P2O5 leads to loosening germanate structure due to the appearance of the phosphate sublattice. This leads to a redistribution of the relative intensity of up-conversion luminescence bands with maxima at 540 and 670 nm compared with the initial glass. Introduction of additives PbO, MgO, Al2O3, TiO2 results in a multicenter structure. In case of titanium oxide addition it leads to a change in the relative intensities of the erbium luminescence.

  8. Planar Spontaneous Raman-Scattering Spectroscopy for Reacting Jet-Flow Diagnostics Using Lyot-Ehman Tunable Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaborin, D. K.; Markovich, D. M.; Dulin, V. M.

    2018-01-01

    The spatial-density distribution in burning a premixed methane-air swirling turbulent jet has been studied by measuring the intensity of the Stokes branch of spontaneous Raman scattering for vibrational-rotational transitions in nitrogen. An optical system comprising a Nd:YAG laser and the liquid-crystalline Lyot-Ehman tunable filter has been created and tested by measuring the temperature and density fields in a cone-shaped laminar flame. It has been established that the difference of data obtained using the Stokes component of Raman scattering in nitrogen and its ratio to the anti-Stokes component does not exceed 5% in a temperature range from 300 to 1800 K.

  9. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  10. Impact of firing temperature on multi-wavelength selective Stokes and anti-Stokes luminescent behavior by Gd2O2S:Er,Yb phosphor and its application in solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, V.; Mehta, D. S.

    2018-04-01

    Erbium (Er3+)-ytterbium (Yb3+) doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S) phosphor has been developed via a facile method of solid-state flux fusion, and offers two-fold spectrum modification with highly intense Stokes and anti-Stokes shift. The effect of the firing cycle on the photoluminescent response and morphology of Gd2O2S:Er,Yb is scrutinized, wherein the firing temperature was varied (1000 °C-1250 °C), keeping firing time and all other parameters constant. Interestingly, the nanostructures fired below 1150 °C showed nanorods of diameter ~200 nm and length ~1-2 µm, whereas firing at 1150 °C and above rendered nanospheres with small diameter, ~350 nm. Highly bright upconversion (UC) emission was achieved even under an extremely low excitation power density of 800 µW cm-2 from a 980 nm laser, and was comfortably visible to the naked eye. The incident power dependent studies disclosed increase in UC-emission intensity with increasing excitation power and a quasi-linear dependence on excitation power density. Intense characteristic UC-emission of Er3+ excited states at 525 nm, 556 nm and 668 nm were observed, and the green emission band was found to be dominant over the red band in intensity. Concurrently, downconversion (DC) emission at 556 nm and 669 nm was also exhibited under ultraviolet excitation (285 nm and 380 nm), with the red band being more powerful than the green, unlike UC-emission. Firing temperature dependent studies divulged the dependence of luminescence intensity on the firing cycle of the luminophore and formation of the respective luminescent phase. The UC-emission intensity was found to be maximum for samples fired at 1150 °C, whereas samples fired at 1000 °C showed the highest DC-emission intensity. The excitation and emission profile of single Gd2O2S:Er,Yb phosphor lying in the desired spectral region and as a dual spectral converter marks its possible application for enhanced harvesting of sunlight.

  11. Investigation of the Brill transition in nylon 6,6 by Raman, THz-Raman, and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldo Menezes, D; Reyer, A; Musso, M

    2018-02-05

    The Brill transition is a phase transition process in polyamides related with structural changes between the hydrogen bonds of the lateral functional groups (CO) and (NH). In this study, we have used the potential of Raman spectroscopy for exploring this phase transition in polyamide 6,6 (nylon 6,6), due to the sensitivity of this spectroscopic technique to small intermolecular changes affecting vibrational properties of relevant functional groups. During a step by step heating and cooling process of the sample we collected Raman spectra allowing us from two-dimensional Raman correlation spectroscopy to identify which spectral regions suffered the largest influence during the Brill transition, and from Terahertz Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy to obtain complementary information, e.g. on the temperature of the sample. This allowed us to grasp signatures of the Brill transition from peak parameters of vibrational modes associated with (CC) skeletal stretches and (CNH) bending, and to verify the Brill transition temperature at around 160°C, as well as the reversibility of this phase transition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Raman scattering study of the anharmonic effects in CeO2-y nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Z. V.; Dohčević-Mitrović, Z.; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the F2g Raman mode phonon frequency and broadening in CeO2-y nanocrystals. The phonon softening and phonon linewidth are calculated using a model which takes into account the three-and four-phonon anharmonic processes. A detailed comparison of the experimental data with theoretical calculations revealed the predominance of four-phonon anharmonic processes in the temperature dependence of the phonon energy and broadening of the nanocrystals. On the other hand, three-phonon processes dominate the temperature behavior of phonons in polycrystalline samples. The anti-Stokes/Stokes peak intensity ratio was also investigated and found to be smaller for nanosized CeO2 powders than in the bulk counterpart.

  13. Raman scattering study of the anharmonic effects in CeO2-y nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, Z V; Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Z; Cros, A; Cantarero, A

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the F 2g Raman mode phonon frequency and broadening in CeO 2-y nanocrystals. The phonon softening and phonon linewidth are calculated using a model which takes into account the three-and four-phonon anharmonic processes. A detailed comparison of the experimental data with theoretical calculations revealed the predominance of four-phonon anharmonic processes in the temperature dependence of the phonon energy and broadening of the nanocrystals. On the other hand, three-phonon processes dominate the temperature behavior of phonons in polycrystalline samples. The anti-Stokes/Stokes peak intensity ratio was also investigated and found to be smaller for nanosized CeO 2 powders than in the bulk counterpart

  14. Raman scattering study of the anharmonic effects in CeO{sub 2-y} nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, Z V [Center for Solid State Physics and New Materials, Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Dohcevic-Mitrovic, Z [Center for Solid State Physics and New Materials, Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia); Cros, A [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, P O Box 22085, E-46071, Valencia (Spain); Cantarero, A [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, P O Box 22085, E-46071, Valencia (Spain)

    2007-12-12

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the F{sub 2g} Raman mode phonon frequency and broadening in CeO{sub 2-y} nanocrystals. The phonon softening and phonon linewidth are calculated using a model which takes into account the three-and four-phonon anharmonic processes. A detailed comparison of the experimental data with theoretical calculations revealed the predominance of four-phonon anharmonic processes in the temperature dependence of the phonon energy and broadening of the nanocrystals. On the other hand, three-phonon processes dominate the temperature behavior of phonons in polycrystalline samples. The anti-Stokes/Stokes peak intensity ratio was also investigated and found to be smaller for nanosized CeO{sub 2} powders than in the bulk counterpart.

  15. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  16. Quantum statistics of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering by master equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, P.S.; Dash, J.

    1991-01-01

    A quantum theoretical density matrix formalism of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering using master equation approach is presented. The atomic system is described by two energy levels. The effects of upper level population and the cavity loss are incorporated. The photon statistics, coherence characteristics and the building up of the Stokes field are investigated. (author). 8 figs., 5 refs

  17. Effect of a Nitrogen Impurity on the Fundamental Raman Band of Diamond Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, G. A.; Samtsov, M. P.; Voropay, E. S.

    2018-05-01

    The effect of nitrogen defects in natural and synthetic diamond single crystals on the position and half-width of the fundamental Raman band was investigated. Samples containing the main types of nitrogen lattice defects at impurity contents of 1-1500 ppm were studied. The parameters of the Stokes and anti-Stokes components in Raman spectra of crystals situated in a cell with distilled water to minimize the influence of heating by the exciting laser radiation were analyzed to determine the effect of a nitrogen impurity in the diamond crystal lattice. It was shown that an increase of impurity atoms in the crystals in the studied concentration range resulted in broadening of the Raman band from 1.61 to 2.85 cm-1 and shifting of the maximum to lower frequency from 1332.65 to 1332.3 cm-1. The observed effect was directly proportional to the impurity concentration and depended on the form of the impurity incorporated into the diamond lattice. It was found that the changes in the position and half-width of the fundamental Raman band for diamond were consistent with the magnitude of crystal lattice distortions due to the presence of impurity defects and obeyed the Gruneisen law.

  18. Raman analysis of phonon modes in a short period AlN/GaN superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Ketaki; Datta, Debopam; Gosztola, David J.; Shi, Fengyuan; Nicholls, Alan; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    2018-03-01

    AlN/GaN-based optoelectronic devices have been the subject of intense research underlying the commercialization of efficient devices. Areas of considerable interest are the study of their lattice dynamics, phonon transport, and electron-phonon interactions specific to the interface of these heterostructures which results in additional optical phonon modes known as interface phonon modes. In this study, the framework of the dielectric continuum model (DCM) has been used to compare and analyze the optical phonon modes obtained from experimental Raman scattering measurements on AlN/GaN short-period superlattices. We have observed the localized E2(high), A1(LO) and the E1(TO) modes in superlattice measurements at frequencies shifted from their bulk values. To the best of our knowledge, the nanostructures used in these studies are among the smallest yielding useful Raman signatures for the interface modes. In addition, we have also identified an additional spread of interface phonon modes in the TO range resulting from the superlattice periodicity. The Raman signature contribution from the underlying AlxGa1-xN ternary has also been observed and analyzed. A temperature calibration was done based on Stokes/anti-Stokes ratio of A1(LO) using Raman spectroscopy in a broad operating temperature range. Good agreement between the experimental results and theoretically calculated calibration plot predicted using Bose-Einstein statistics was obtained.

  19. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  20. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L., E-mail: david.andrews@physics.org [School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-07

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  1. Construction of CARS Spectroscopy for Determination of Isotope shift of Hydrogen H2, D2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Jazmati, A.; Manni, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectrometer has been built. It consists of Raman cell, which is filled with a H2 gas at 5 atm pressure, and a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser. The two beams are focused by means of a bi-convex 400 mm lens into the Raman cell. The anti-Stokes signal (CARS beam) is generated due to four-wave mixing process. The anti-Stokes signal is directed to a monochrometer entrance slit by prism to be detected by a photomultiplier, which is connected to a computer. The dye laser frequency has to be tuned to satisfy the energy difference between the V 1 beam (Nd:YAG laser beam) and the V 2 beam (the Stokes beam or the dye laser beam) that exactly corresponds to a vibrational or a rotational Raman resonance (E 2 -E 1 ) in the hydrogen molecule, then the anti-Stokes signal ( V 3 ) is generated. The spectra of the anti-Stokes signal has been recorded to determine the isotope shift between H 2 , and D 2 , which is 1161 cm -1 .

  2. Nonlinear Optics Approaches Towards Subdiffraction Resolution in CARS Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boller, Klaus J.; Beeker, W.P.; Cleff, C.; Kruse, K.; Lee, Christopher James; Gross, P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Fallnich, Carsten; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Fornasiero, E.F.; Rizzoli, S.O.

    2014-01-01

    In theoretical investigations, we review several nonlinear optical approaches towards subdiffraction-limited resolution in label-free imaging via coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). Using a density matrix model and numerical integration, we investigate various level schemes and

  3. Epi-detecting label-free multimodal imaging platform using a compact diode-pumped femtosecond solid-state laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreana, Marco; Le, Tuan; Hansen, Anders Kragh

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an epi-detected multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy platform based on a compact and cost-effective laser source featuring simultaneous acquisition of signals arising from hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence, and second harmonic...

  4. Secondary structure of bovine albumin as studied by polarization-sensitive multiplex CARS spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voroshilov, A.; Voroshilov, Artemy; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1996-01-01

    The first application of polarization-sensitive multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (MCARS) in the absence of resonance enhancement to the resolution of the secondary structure of a protein in solution is reported. Polarization MCARS spectra of bovine albumin in D2O were obtained in

  5. Nonequilibrium Molecular Energy Coupling and Conversion Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-28

    resolved temperature measurements, by pure rotational picosecond broadband Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy ( CARS ), and kinetic modeling...rotational ps CARS for thermometry measurements in highly transient nonequilibrium plasmas. Rotational-translational temperatures are measured for time...primarily on localized flow heating on sub-acoustic time scale, and for assessing feasibility of high-speed aerodynamic flow control by vibrational

  6. Vibrational bands of luminescent zinc(II)-octaethyl-porphyrin using a polarization-sensitive 'microcopic' multiplex CARS technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; Voroshilov, A.; Voroshilov, Artemy; Kruglik, S.; Kruglik, S.G.; Greve, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive, multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (ps-MCARS) has been used to detect the vibrational bands of the highly luminescent zinc(II)-octaethylporphyrin (Zn-OEP). We show here that ps-MCARS can be used to measure the vibrational bands under resonant conditions.

  7. Polarization-Sensitive CARS of the Amide I Band of Pure and Liganded Chymotrypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikishev, A.Y.; Chikishev, A.Yu.; Koroteev, N.I.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Polarization-sensitive coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (PSCARS) is used to investigate the secondary structure of the protein chymotrypsin, both free and bound to antranilic acid. Advantage is taken of the extreme sensitivity of the PSCARS spectra to the orientation of the analyser. Clear

  8. Femtosecond spectral phase shaping for CARS spectroscopy and imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, S.; van Rhijn, A.C.W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Corkum, P.; de Silvestri, S.; Nelson, K.A.; Riedle, E.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) is a third-order non-linear optical process that provides label-free, chemically selective microscopy by probing the internal vibrational structure of molecules. Due to the resonant enhancement of the CARS process, faster imaging is possible compared to

  9. Investigation of Gas Heating by Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Glow Discharges Used for Actuation of a Laminar Methane-Air Flame

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna; Lee, Byeong Jun; Satija, Aman; Krishna, S.; Steinmetz, Scott; Al Khesho, Issam; Hazzaa, Omar; Lucht, Robert P.; Cha, Min; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    , determined from current and voltage measurements, is 1 W, i.e. about 0.9 % of the thermal power of the flame. Broadband vibrational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of nitrogen is used to determine the temperature of the flame with and without plasma

  10. Non-Catalytic Reforming with Applications to Portable Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Mokhov, and H.B. Levinsky, A laser-induced fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering study of NO formation in preheated, laminar, rich...Flame, 1995. 100(4): p. 571- 590 . 43. Evertsen, R., J.A. Van Oijen, R.T.E. Hermanns, L.P.H. De Goey, and J.J. Ter Meulen, Measurements of absolute

  11. Thermal Nonequilibrium in Hypersonic Separated Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    and rotational temperature of nitric oxide and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) point measurements of rotational and vibrational...temperature T∞ [K] 590 165 freestream density ρ∞ [kg/m3] 0.0020 0.0060 freestream velocity u∞ [m/s] 4550 2500 Figure 7 shows the nozzle reservoir

  12. Macro and micro Raman spectroscopy of YBa2Cu3O7 films and microbridges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the present work Raman spectroscopy is used as a method to characterize the properties of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 -films. This is done in the usual (macro-)Raman set-up as well as in the micro-Raman set-up where the spatial resolution is about one micron. To obtain comparable results the Raman spectra have to be corrected for the spectral response of the spectrometer. Therefore a calibration of the set-up was performed. The calibration can be used to determine spot temperatures by comparing Stokes and Anti-Stokes spectra. Two different methods are developed to correct for the straylight which is additionally observed in Raman-spectra of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 -films. Macro- as well as micro-Raman measurements are used to characterize the film properties, where care has been taken to avoid damages by the laser itself. The macro-Raman set-up is used to identify the properties of the film, such as orientation, oxygen-content and morphology. Outgrowths and other particles on the surface are on the other hand investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology is additionally characterized by scanning-electron-microscopy. This is compared to the Raman data. Raman spectra of epitaxial YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 -films are taken as a function of the temperature and exciting wavelength. The influence on the phonons and on the electronic background is discussed separately. The obtained results are analyzed by comparison with single-crystal measurements. The investigation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 -microbridges in the macro-Raman set-up allows a correlation between the local optical and electrical properties of the bridge. A method is presented which can account for the heating in the laser spot with high accuracy. This method allows to determine local critical current densities as well as local critical temperatures on the microbridge. It provides also the possibility to take Raman spectra at precise spot temperatures. (orig./WL)

  13. (2+1)-dimensional stable spatial Raman solitons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shverdin, M.Y.; Yavuz, D.D.; Walker, D.R.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the formation, propagation, and interaction of stable two-frequency (2+1)-dimensional solitons, formed in a Raman media driven near maximum molecular coherence. The propagating light is trapped in the two transverse dimensions

  14. Spectral properties and anti-Stokes luminescence of TeO2-BaF2:Ho3+, Ho3+/Yb3+ ceramics and glass excited by 1.9-μm radiation of a Tm:LiYF4 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savikin, A. P.; Egorov, A. S.; Budruev, A. V.; Perunin, I. Yu.; Krasheninnikova, O. V.; Grishin, I. A.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the up-conversion of Tm:LiYF4 infrared (IR) laser radiation with 1908-nm wavelength into visible light with a spectral maximum at 650 nm by ceramics with a composition of (100 - x)TeO2- xBaF2 - 1 wt % HoF3- yYbF3, where x = 20, 30, or 40 mol % and y = 0 or 0.5 wt %. The samples of 60TeO2-40BaF2 - 1 wt % HoF3 - 0.5 wt % YbF3 exhibited anti-Stokes luminescence at a threshold radiation power density of 1.0-1.5 W cm-2.

  15. Investigations of a Dual Seeded 1178 nm Raman Laser System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-14

    was obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in a variably strained polarization- maintaining fiber with a record-high...Calia, D.B., “50W CW visible laser source at 589 nm obtained via frequency doubling of three coherently combined narrow-band Raman fiber amplifiers...AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0009 AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0009 INVESTIGATIONS OF A DUAL SEEDED 1178 NM RAMAN LASER SYSTEM Leanne Henry, et al. 14 January

  16. CV Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    formatted to take advantage of the changes in publishing methods in the past thirty ..... This work would not have been possible without the support and en- couragement of ..... in which Raman made his decision, have a deeper significance than .... Light in Water and the Colour of the Sea within a month of his return to India ...

  17. Raman Chandrasekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Raman Chandrasekar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 430-439 General Article. How Children Learn to Use Language - An Overview of R. Narasimhan's Ideas on Child Language Acquisition.

  18. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field tries to drive the electron with its frequency. If the applied field is of the form E = E0eiωt , the driving ..... (CARS),8 coherent Stokes Raman scattering (CSRS), ... gain or loss process in which only two beams are required and it is a self ...

  19. Quasiperiodic Raman technique for ultrashort pulse generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavuz, D.D.; Walker, D.R.; Shverdin, M.Y.; Yin, G.Y.; Harris, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new Raman technique that produces 200 sidebands, ranging in wavelength from 3 μm to 195 nm. By studying multiphoton ionization of nitric oxide (NO) molecules, we show mutual phase coherence among 15 visible sidebands covering 0.63 octaves of bandwidth

  20. Raman scattering signatures of the unusual vibronic interaction of molecules in liquid helium-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehver, I., E-mail: imbi.tehver@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Benedek, G. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC) and University of the Basque Country (EHU), Paseo de Lardizabal 4, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Hizhnyakov, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2015-10-16

    Highlights: • Theory of resonance Raman scattering (RRS) of molecules in {sup 3}He liquid is proposed. • Fermi excitations give essential contribution to RRS. • RRS spectra of glyoxal molecule in {sup 3}He droplets are calculated. - Abstract: Light scattering in quantum liquid helium-3 may involve a unique mechanism – the creation and annihilation of atom excitations across the Fermi level. The density of states of particle–hole excitations in the low-energy limit is strongly enhanced as compared to that of collective excitations of phonons in helium-3. This makes possible to directly observe Fermi excitations in the resonant Raman scattering (RRS) by {sup 3}He droplets doped by impurity molecules. The RRS spectra essentially depend on the excitation frequency. In case of excitation in the anti-Stokes side of absorption the first order RRS is directly determined by the particle–hole excitations in the vicinity of the impurity molecule and the contribution of phonons mainly given by the localized spherical vibration. The calculations are made for a {sup 3}He droplet doped by a glyoxal molecule.

  1. Surface-enhanced FAST CARS: en route to quantum nano-biophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronine, Dmitri V.; Zhang, Zhenrong; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum nano-biophotonics as the science of nanoscale light-matter interactions in biological systems requires developing new spectroscopic tools for addressing the challenges of detecting and disentangling weak congested optical signals. Nanoscale bio-imaging addresses the challenge of the detection of weak resonant signals from a few target biomolecules in the presence of the nonresonant background from many undesired molecules. In addition, the imaging must be performed rapidly to capture the dynamics of biological processes in living cells and tissues. Label-free non-invasive spectroscopic techniques are required to minimize the external perturbation effects on biological systems. Various approaches were developed to satisfy these requirements by increasing the selectivity and sensitivity of biomolecular detection. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies provide many orders of magnitude enhancement of chemically specific Raman signals. Femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for CARS (FAST CARS) were developed to suppress the nonresonant background and optimize the efficiency of the coherent optical signals. This perspective focuses on the application of these techniques to nanoscale bio-imaging, discussing their advantages and limitations as well as the promising opportunities and challenges of the combined coherence and surface enhancements in surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) and tip-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TECARS) and the corresponding surface-enhanced FAST CARS techniques. Laser pulse shaping of near-field excitations plays an important role in achieving these goals and increasing the signal enhancement.

  2. Coherent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, C R; Church, S; Gaier, T; Lai, R; Ruf, C; Wollack, E

    2009-01-01

    Coherent systems offer significant advantages in simplicity, testability, control of systematics, and cost. Although quantum noise sets the fundamental limit to their performance at high frequencies, recent breakthroughs suggest that near-quantum-limited noise up to 150 or even 200 GHz could be realized within a few years. If the demands of component separation can be met with frequencies below 200 GHz, coherent systems will be strong competitors for a space CMB polarization mission. The rapid development of digital correlator capability now makes space interferometers with many hundreds of elements possible. Given the advantages of coherent interferometers in suppressing systematic effects, such systems deserve serious study.

  3. Coherent detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, C R [M/C 169-327, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Church, S [Room 324 Varian Physics Bldg, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Gaier, T [M/C 168-314, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Lai, R [Northrop Grumman Corporation, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Ruf, C [1533 Space Research Building, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States); Wollack, E, E-mail: charles.lawrence@jpl.nasa.go [NASA/GSFC, Code 665, Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Coherent systems offer significant advantages in simplicity, testability, control of systematics, and cost. Although quantum noise sets the fundamental limit to their performance at high frequencies, recent breakthroughs suggest that near-quantum-limited noise up to 150 or even 200 GHz could be realized within a few years. If the demands of component separation can be met with frequencies below 200 GHz, coherent systems will be strong competitors for a space CMB polarization mission. The rapid development of digital correlator capability now makes space interferometers with many hundreds of elements possible. Given the advantages of coherent interferometers in suppressing systematic effects, such systems deserve serious study.

  4. High vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscope based on a scanning tunneling microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Sun, Mengtao

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present the construction of a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) system that allows in situ sample preparation and measurement. A detailed description of the prototype instrument is presented with experimental validation of its use and novel ex situ experimental results using the HV-TERS system. The HV-TERS system includes three chambers held under a 10(-7) Pa vacuum. The three chambers are an analysis chamber, a sample preparation chamber, and a fast loading chamber. The analysis chamber is the core chamber and contains a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a Raman detector coupled with a 50 × 0.5 numerical aperture objective. The sample preparation chamber is used to produce single-crystalline metal and sub-monolayer molecular films by molecular beam epitaxy. The fast loading chamber allows ex situ preparation of samples for HV-TERS analysis. Atomic resolution can be achieved by the STM on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. We demonstrate the measurement of localized temperature using the Stokes and anti-Stokes TERS signals from a monolayer of 1,2-benzenedithiol on a gold film using a gold tip. Additionally, plasmonic catalysis can be monitored label-free at the nanoscale using our device. Moreover, the HV-TERS experiments show simultaneously activated infrared and Raman vibrational modes, Fermi resonance, and some other non-linear effects that are not observed in atmospheric TERS experiments. The high spatial and spectral resolution and pure environment of high vacuum are beneficial for basic surface studies.

  5. High vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscope based on a scanning tunneling microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yurui [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603-146, Beijing 100190 (China); Bionanophotonics, Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, SE 41296 (Sweden); Zhang, Zhenglong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603-146, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, 710062 Xi’an (China); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Sun, Mengtao, E-mail: mtsun@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 603-146, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, we present the construction of a high-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) system that allows in situ sample preparation and measurement. A detailed description of the prototype instrument is presented with experimental validation of its use and novel ex situ experimental results using the HV-TERS system. The HV-TERS system includes three chambers held under a 10{sup −7} Pa vacuum. The three chambers are an analysis chamber, a sample preparation chamber, and a fast loading chamber. The analysis chamber is the core chamber and contains a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a Raman detector coupled with a 50 × 0.5 numerical aperture objective. The sample preparation chamber is used to produce single-crystalline metal and sub-monolayer molecular films by molecular beam epitaxy. The fast loading chamber allows ex situ preparation of samples for HV-TERS analysis. Atomic resolution can be achieved by the STM on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. We demonstrate the measurement of localized temperature using the Stokes and anti-Stokes TERS signals from a monolayer of 1,2-benzenedithiol on a gold film using a gold tip. Additionally, plasmonic catalysis can be monitored label-free at the nanoscale using our device. Moreover, the HV-TERS experiments show simultaneously activated infrared and Raman vibrational modes, Fermi resonance, and some other non-linear effects that are not observed in atmospheric TERS experiments. The high spatial and spectral resolution and pure environment of high vacuum are beneficial for basic surface studies.

  6. Dynamic optical bistability in resonantly enhanced Raman generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, I.; Phillips, D.F.; Zibrov, A.S.; Andre, A.; Walsworth, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    We report observations of novel dynamic behavior in resonantly enhanced stimulated Raman scattering in Rb vapor. In particular, we demonstrate a dynamic hysteresis of the Raman scattered optical field in response to changes of the drive laser field intensity and/or frequency. This effect may be described as a dynamic form of optical bistability resulting from the formation and decay of atomic coherence. We have applied this phenomenon to the realization of an all-optical switch

  7. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-01-01

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency

  8. Measurement and Simulation of Spontaneous Raman Scattering Spectra in High-Pressure, Fuel-Rich H2-Air Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2003-01-01

    Rotational vibrational spontaneous Raman spectra (SRS) of H2, N2, and H2O have been measured in H2-air flames at pressures up to 30 atm as a first stem towards establishing a comprehensive Raman spectral database for temperatures and species in high-pressure combustion. A newly developed high-pressure burner facility provides steady, reproducible flames with a high degree of flow precision. We have obtained an initial set of measurements that indicate the spectra are of sufficient quality in terms of spectral resolution, wavelength coverage, and signal-to-noise ratio for use in future reference standards. The fully resolved Stokes and anti-Stokes shifted SRS spectra were collected in the visible wavelength range (400-700 nm) using pulse-stretched 532 nm excitation and a non-intensified CCD spectrograph with a high-speed shutter. Reasonable temperatures were determined via the intensity distribution of rotational H2 lines at stoichiometry and fuel-rich conditions. Theoretical Raman spectra of H2 were computed using a semi-classical harmonic-oscillator model with recent pressure broadening data and were compared with experimental results. The data and simulation indicated that high-J rotational lines of H2 might interfere with the N2 vibrational Q-branch lines, and this could lead to errors in N2-Raman thermometry based on the line-fitting method. From a comparison of N2 Q-branch spectra in lean H2 low-pressure (1.2 atm) and high-pressure (30 atm) flames, we found no significant line-narrowing or -broadening effects at the current spectrometer resolution of 0.04 nm.

  9. Coherence and Sense of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Constraints in the implementation of models of blended learning can be explained by several causes, but in this paper, it is illustrated that lack of sense of coherence is a major factor of these constraints along with the referential whole of the perceived learning environments. The question exa...

  10. Introductory Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    2012-01-01

    Praise for Introductory Raman Spectroscopy Highlights basic theory, which is treated in an introductory fashion Presents state-of-the-art instrumentation Discusses new applications of Raman spectroscopy in industry and research.

  11. Density and temperature measurement using CARS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirth, A.; Vollrath, K.

    1979-01-01

    Coherent Anti Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) a technique derived from nonlinear optics offers two major advantages compared with the spontaneous Raman method: improved scattering efficiency and spatial coherence of the scattered signal. The theory of the coherent mixing in resonant media serves as a quantitative background of the CARS technique. A review of several applications on plasma physics and gasdynamics is given, which permits to consider the CARS spectroscopy as a potential method for nonintrusive measurement of local concentration and temperature in gas flows and reactive media. (Auth.)

  12. Coherence and relaxation in energy transfer processes in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelby, R.M.

    1978-03-01

    Investigations of electronic triplet and vibrational energy transfer dynamics and relaxation processes are presented. Emphasis is placed on understanding the role of coherence and interactions which tend to destroy the coherence. In the case of triplet excitons at low temperatures, the importance of coherence in energy migration can be established, and the average coherence parameters can be experimentally determined. In the case of vibrational excitations, both picosecond spectroscopic studies of vibrational relaxation and spontaneous Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the dynamics and give increased insight into the nature of the mechanisms responsible for vibrational dephasing. The design and operation of the picosecond apparatus used in these experiments is also described

  13. High-speed Vibrational Imaging and Spectral Analysis of Lipid Bodies by Compound Raman Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Le, Thuc T.; Chen, Hongtao; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Cells store excess energy in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. At present, it is unclear how different types of fatty acids contribute to the formation of lipid-droplets. We describe a compound Raman microscope capable of both high-speed chemical imaging and quantitative spectral analysis on the same platform. We use a picosecond laser source to perform coherent Raman scattering imaging of a biological sample and confocal Raman spectral analysis at points of interest. The potential of t...

  14. Label-free imaging of acanthamoeba using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tsubasa; Cha, Yu-Rok; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Kano, Hideaki

    2018-02-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a disease in which amoebae named Acanthamoeba invade the cornea of an eye. To diagnose this disease before it becomes serious, it is important to detect the cyst state of Acanthamoeba in the early stage of infection. In the present study, we explored spectroscopic signitures of the cyst state of Acanthamoeba using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy with the channels of multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), and third harmonic generation (THG). A sharp band at around 1603 cm-1 in the CARS (Im[χ(3)]) spectrum was found at the cyst state of Acanthamoeba, which possibly originates from ergosterol and/or 7-dehydrostigmasterol. It can be used as a maker band of Acanthamoeba for medical treatment. Keyword: Acanthamoeba keratitis, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, CARS, second harmonic generation, SHG, microspectroscopy, multiphoton microscopy

  15. Coherent Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Garbrecht, B; Schmidt, M G; Garbrecht, Bjorn; Prokopec, Tomislav; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new baryogenesis scenario based on coherent production and mixing of different fermionic species. The mechanism is operative during phase transitions, at which the fermions acquire masses via Yukawa couplings to scalar fields. Baryon production is efficient when the mass matrix is nonadiabatically varying, nonsymmetric and when it violates CP and B-L directly, or some other charges that are eventually converted to B-L. We first consider a toy model, which involves two mixing fermionic species, and then a hybrid inflationary scenario embedded in a supersymmetric Pati-Salam GUT. We show that, quite generically, a baryon excess in accordance with observation can result.

  16. Army Research Office and Air Force Office of Scientific Research Contractors’ Meeting in Chemical Propulsion Held in Arlington, Virginia on June 12-14, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    conditions, we have implemented a two-line thermometric approach using both direct absorption and wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS). WMS...modulation spectroscopy. Ultrafast Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering for Thermometry. Most previous CARS thermometric measurements in gas-phase or reacting...peak power output about 19-20 kW. Three wire materials, aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), and nickel (Ni), were tested along with three capillary materials

  17. Multifunctional Fuel Additives for Reduced Jet Particulate Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Propulsion, Santiago , Chile , Mar. 8-11, 2005. Montgomery, C. J., Sarofim, A. F., Preciado, I., Marsh, N. D., Eddings, E. G., and Bozzelli, J. W...34Temperature and CO2 concentration measurements in the exhaust stream of a liquid- fueled combustor using dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering...injection pressure, and oxygen concentration . Additives were found to be most effective under highly oxidizing conditions. Soot reductions of over 90% were

  18. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Gotoh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD. PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  19. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  20. Realisation of four-wave mixing phase matching for frequency components at intracavity stimulated Raman scattering in a calcite crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Fedin, Aleksandr V; Shurygin, Anton S

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of implementing four-wave mixing (FWM) phase matching at stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a birefringent SRS-active crystal placed in a cavity with highly reflecting mirrors have been theoretically and experimentally investigated. Phase-matching angles providing conditions for five types of phase matching are determined for a calcite crystal. These types are characterised by different combinations of polarisation directions for the interacting waves and ensure FWM generation of either an anti-Stokes wave or the second Stokes SRS component. In agreement with the calculation results, low-threshold generation of the second Stokes SRS component with a wavelength 0.602 μm was observed at angles of incidence on a calcite crystal of 4.8° and 18.2°, under SRS pumping at a wavelength of 0.532 μm. This generation is due to the FWM coupling of the first and second Stokes SRS components with the SRS-pump wave. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Electronic resonances in broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batignani, G.; Pontecorvo, E.; Giovannetti, G.; Ferrante, C.; Fumero, G.; Scopigno, T.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a formidable tool to probe molecular vibrations. Under electronic resonance conditions, the cross section can be selectively enhanced enabling structural sensitivity to specific chromophores and reaction centers. The addition of an ultrashort, broadband femtosecond pulse to the excitation field allows for coherent stimulation of diverse molecular vibrations. Within such a scheme, vibrational spectra are engraved onto a highly directional field, and can be heterodyne detected overwhelming fluorescence and other incoherent signals. At variance with spontaneous resonance Raman, however, interpreting the spectral information is not straightforward, due to the manifold of field interactions concurring to the third order nonlinear response. Taking as an example vibrational spectra of heme proteins excited in the Soret band, we introduce a general approach to extract the stimulated Raman excitation profiles from complex spectral lineshapes. Specifically, by a quantum treatment of the matter through density matrix description of the third order nonlinear polarization, we identify the contributions which generate the Raman bands, by taking into account for the cross section of each process.

  2. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  3. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  4. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of shock-compressed fluid N2 and O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, S.C.; Moore, D.S.; Shaw, M.S.; Johnson, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Single-pulse multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) was used to observe the vibrational spectra of liquid N 2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 41 GPa and 5200 K and liquid O 2 shock-compressed to several pressures and temperatures up to 10 GPa and 1000 K. For N 2 , the experimental spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated using a semiclassical model for CARS intensities and estimated vibrational frequencies, peak Raman susceptibilities, and Raman line widths. The question of excited state populations in the shock-compressed state is addressed

  6. Optimal control of population and coherence in three-level Λ systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.

    2011-08-01

    Optimal control theory (OCT) implementations for an efficient population transfer and creation of maximum coherence in a three-level system are considered. We demonstrate that the half-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage scheme for creation of the maximum Raman coherence is the optimal solution according to the OCT. We also present a comparative study of several implementations of OCT applied to the complete population transfer and creation of the maximum coherence. Performance of the conjugate gradient method, the Zhu-Rabitz method and the Krotov method has been analysed.

  7. Optimal control of population and coherence in three-level Λ systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Malinovskaya, Svetlana A; Malinovsky, Vladimir S

    2011-01-01

    Optimal control theory (OCT) implementations for an efficient population transfer and creation of maximum coherence in a three-level system are considered. We demonstrate that the half-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage scheme for creation of the maximum Raman coherence is the optimal solution according to the OCT. We also present a comparative study of several implementations of OCT applied to the complete population transfer and creation of the maximum coherence. Performance of the conjugate gradient method, the Zhu-Rabitz method and the Krotov method has been analysed.

  8. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in Tm3+:YAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A. L.; Lauro, R.; Louchet, A.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Tm 3+ :YAG crystal. Tm 3+ :YAG is a promising material for use in quantum information processing applications, but as yet there are few experimental investigations of coherent Raman processes in this material. We investigate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening and Rabi frequency on the transfer efficiency and the width of the two-photon spectrum. Simulations of the complete Tm 3+ :YAG system are presented along with the corresponding experimental results

  10. Contributed Review: Experimental characterization of inverse piezoelectric strain in GaN HEMTs via micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagnall, Kevin R.; Wang, Evelyn N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Micro-Raman thermography is one of the most popular techniques for measuring local temperature rise in gallium nitride (GaN) high electron mobility transistors with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, accurate temperature measurements based on changes in the Stokes peak positions of the GaN epitaxial layers require properly accounting for the stress and/or strain induced by the inverse piezoelectric effect. It is common practice to use the pinched OFF state as the unpowered reference for temperature measurements because the vertical electric field in the GaN buffer that induces inverse piezoelectric stress/strain is relatively independent of the gate bias. Although this approach has yielded temperature measurements that agree with those derived from the Stokes/anti-Stokes ratio and thermal models, there has been significant difficulty in quantifying the mechanical state of the GaN buffer in the pinched OFF state from changes in the Raman spectra. In this paper, we review the experimental technique of micro-Raman thermography and derive expressions for the detailed dependence of the Raman peak positions on strain, stress, and electric field components in wurtzite GaN. We also use a combination of semiconductor device modeling and electro-mechanical modeling to predict the stress and strain induced by the inverse piezoelectric effect. Based on the insights gained from our electro-mechanical model and the best values of material properties in the literature, we analyze changes in the E{sub 2} high and A{sub 1} (LO) Raman peaks and demonstrate that there are major quantitative discrepancies between measured and modeled values of inverse piezoelectric stress and strain. We examine many of the hypotheses offered in the literature for these discrepancies but conclude that none of them satisfactorily resolves these discrepancies. Further research is needed to determine whether the electric field components could be affecting the phonon frequencies apart from the

  11. Contributed Review: Experimental characterization of inverse piezoelectric strain in GaN HEMTs via micro-Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, Kevin R.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-Raman thermography is one of the most popular techniques for measuring local temperature rise in gallium nitride (GaN) high electron mobility transistors with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, accurate temperature measurements based on changes in the Stokes peak positions of the GaN epitaxial layers require properly accounting for the stress and/or strain induced by the inverse piezoelectric effect. It is common practice to use the pinched OFF state as the unpowered reference for temperature measurements because the vertical electric field in the GaN buffer that induces inverse piezoelectric stress/strain is relatively independent of the gate bias. Although this approach has yielded temperature measurements that agree with those derived from the Stokes/anti-Stokes ratio and thermal models, there has been significant difficulty in quantifying the mechanical state of the GaN buffer in the pinched OFF state from changes in the Raman spectra. In this paper, we review the experimental technique of micro-Raman thermography and derive expressions for the detailed dependence of the Raman peak positions on strain, stress, and electric field components in wurtzite GaN. We also use a combination of semiconductor device modeling and electro-mechanical modeling to predict the stress and strain induced by the inverse piezoelectric effect. Based on the insights gained from our electro-mechanical model and the best values of material properties in the literature, we analyze changes in the E_2 high and A_1 (LO) Raman peaks and demonstrate that there are major quantitative discrepancies between measured and modeled values of inverse piezoelectric stress and strain. We examine many of the hypotheses offered in the literature for these discrepancies but conclude that none of them satisfactorily resolves these discrepancies. Further research is needed to determine whether the electric field components could be affecting the phonon frequencies apart from the inverse

  12. Surface-enhanced FAST CARS: en route to quantum nano-biophotonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronine Dmitri V.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantum nano-biophotonics as the science of nanoscale light-matter interactions in biological systems requires developing new spectroscopic tools for addressing the challenges of detecting and disentangling weak congested optical signals. Nanoscale bio-imaging addresses the challenge of the detection of weak resonant signals from a few target biomolecules in the presence of the nonresonant background from many undesired molecules. In addition, the imaging must be performed rapidly to capture the dynamics of biological processes in living cells and tissues. Label-free non-invasive spectroscopic techniques are required to minimize the external perturbation effects on biological systems. Various approaches were developed to satisfy these requirements by increasing the selectivity and sensitivity of biomolecular detection. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS spectroscopies provide many orders of magnitude enhancement of chemically specific Raman signals. Femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for CARS (FAST CARS were developed to suppress the nonresonant background and optimize the efficiency of the coherent optical signals. This perspective focuses on the application of these techniques to nanoscale bio-imaging, discussing their advantages and limitations as well as the promising opportunities and challenges of the combined coherence and surface enhancements in surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS and tip-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (TECARS and the corresponding surface-enhanced FAST CARS techniques. Laser pulse shaping of near-field excitations plays an important role in achieving these goals and increasing the signal enhancement.

  13. Holographic Raman lidar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We have constructed a Raman lidar system that incorporates a holographic optical element. By resolving just 3 nitrogen lines in the Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) spectrum, temperature fits as good as 1% at altitudes of 20km can be made in 30 minutes. Due to the narrowband selectivity of the HOE, the lidar provides measurements over a continuous 24hr period. By adding a 4th channel to capture the Rayleigh backscattered light, temperature profiles can be extended to 80km

  14. Multicomponent chemical imaging of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms with broadband CARS microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartshorn, Christopher M; Lee, Young Jong; Camp, Charles H; Liu, Zhen; Heddleston, John; Canfield, Nicole; Rhodes, Timothy A; Hight Walker, Angela R; Marsac, Patrick J; Cicerone, Marcus T

    2013-09-03

    We compare a coherent Raman imaging modality, broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) microscopy, with spontaneous Raman microscopy for quantitative and qualitative assessment of multicomponent pharmaceuticals. Indomethacin was used as a model active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and was analyzed in a tabulated solid dosage form, embedded within commonly used excipients. In comparison with wide-field spontaneous Raman chemical imaging, BCARS acquired images 10× faster, at higher spatiochemical resolution and with spectra of much higher SNR, eliminating the need for multivariate methods to identify chemical components. The significant increase in spatiochemical resolution allowed identification of an unanticipated API phase that was missed by the spontaneous wide-field method and bulk Raman spectroscopy. We confirmed the presence of the unanticipated API phase using confocal spontaneous Raman, which provided spatiochemical resolution similar to BCARS but at 100× slower acquisition times.

  15. Cohering power of quantum operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Kaifeng, E-mail: bkf@zju.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kumar, Asutosh, E-mail: asukumar@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Zhang, Lin, E-mail: linyz@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Mathematics, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wu, Junde, E-mail: wjd@zju.edu.cn [School of Mathematical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2017-05-18

    Highlights: • Quantum coherence. • Cohering power: production of quantum coherence by quantum operations. • Study of cohering power and generalized cohering power, and their comparison for differentmeasures of quantum coherence. • Operational interpretation of cohering power. • Bound on cohering power of a generic quantum operation. - Abstract: Quantum coherence and entanglement, which play a crucial role in quantum information processing tasks, are usually fragile under decoherence. Therefore, the production of quantum coherence by quantum operations is important to preserve quantum correlations including entanglement. In this paper, we study cohering power–the ability of quantum operations to produce coherence. First, we provide an operational interpretation of cohering power. Then, we decompose a generic quantum operation into three basic operations, namely, unitary, appending and dismissal operations, and show that the cohering power of any quantum operation is upper bounded by the corresponding unitary operation. Furthermore, we compare cohering power and generalized cohering power of quantum operations for different measures of coherence.

  16. Partially coherent imaging and spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, Roman

    2003-03-01

    A description of spatially partially coherent imaging based on the propagation of second order spatial coherence wavelets and marginal power spectra (Wigner distribution functions) is presented. In this dynamics, the spatial coherence wavelets will be affected by the system through its elementary transfer function. The consistency of the model with the both extreme cases of full coherent and incoherent imaging was proved. In the last case we obtained the classical concept of optical transfer function as a simple integral of the elementary transfer function. Furthermore, the elementary incoherent response function was introduced as the Fourier transform of the elementary transfer function. It describes the propagation of spatial coherence wavelets form each object point to each image point through a specific point on the pupil planes. The point spread function of the system was obtained by a simple integral of the elementary incoherent response function. (author)

  17. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  18. On Longitudinal Spectral Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif

    1979-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the longitudinal spectral coherence differs significantly from the transversal spectral coherence in its dependence on displacement and frequency. An expression for the longitudinal coherence is derived and it is shown how the scale of turbulence, the displacement between ...... observation sites and the turbulence intensity influence the results. The limitations of the theory are discussed....

  19. Development of cryo-cell for infrared Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Tetsuro; Ohmori, Takao; Saito, Hideaki

    1984-01-01

    Laser isotope separation (LIS) for uranium enrichment is remarkable for its higher efficiency and cost effectiveness over the gaseous diffusion process. A prototype Raman Laser apparatus for uranium enrichment was developed and manufactured by IHI for the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. This apparatus is capable of emitting tunable infrared Laser beam of a wave length from 13 μm to 17 μm from its multiple pass resonator by injecting a highly coherent CO 2 Laser beam into the para-hydrogen gas vessel (kept at 100 K) to induce Raman scattering. This paper describes the Laser oscillation mechanism and the structure of the multiple pass cell; it also discusses the technical aspects that are essential for a Raman Laser apparatus. Moreover, the cooling characteristics of the present apparatus are reported by analyzing the results of tests conducted in actual service thermal conditions. (author)

  20. Development of a combined OCT-Raman probe for the prospective in vivo clinical melanoma skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenka, M.; Behrendt, L.; Meinhardt-Wollweber, M.; Morgner, U.; Roth, B.

    2017-10-01

    A combined optical coherence tomography (OCT)-Raman probe was designed and built into a spectral domain OCT head, and its performance was evaluated and compared to the most common Raman probe setups, based on a fiber bundle and confocal free space optics. Due to the use of the full field of view of an OCT scanning lens, the combined probe has a superior performance within maximum permissible exposure limits, compared to the other two probes. Skin Raman spectra, recorded in vivo, further prove the feasibility of the OCT-Raman probe for the future in vivo clinical applications in skin cancer screening.

  1. Coherent Control of Four-Wave Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2011-01-01

    "Coherent Control of Four-Wave Mixing" discusses the frequency, temporal and spatial domain interplays of four-wave mixing (FWM) processes induced by atomic coherence in multi-level atomic systems. It covers topics in five major areas: the ultrafast FWM polarization beats due to interactions between multi-color laser beams and multi-level media; coexisting Raman-Rayleigh-Brillouin-enhanced polarization beats due to color-locking noisy field correlations; FWM processes with different kinds of dual-dressed schemes in ultra-thin, micrometer and long atomic cells; temporal and spatial interference between FWM and six-wave mixing (SWM) signals in multi-level electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) media; spatial displacements and splitting of the probe and generated FWM beams, as well as the observations of gap soliton trains, vortex solitons, and stable multicomponent vector solitons in the FWM signals. The book is intended for scientists, researchers, advanced undergraduate and graduate students in Nonlin...

  2. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.; Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.

    2012-11-05

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    weak Raman signal, which facilitates identification in chemi- cal and biological systems. Recently, single-molecule Raman scattering has enhanced the detection sensitivity limit of ... was working on the molecular diffraction of light, which ulti-.

  5. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  6. Simultaneous acquisition of pure rotational and vibrational nitrogen spectra using three-laser CARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucht, R.P.; Maris, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author used three-laser coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering to acquire simultaneously the pure rotational and vibrational spectra from the nitrogen molecule. The energy level schematic for the three-laser CARS process is shown in this paper. Frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser radiation at frequency ω/sub 1/ is used to pump a broadband dye laser which lasers at a range of frequencies ω/sub s/ and a narrowband dye laser with frequency ω/sub 2/. The three-beams are focused to a common CARS probe volume using a three-dimensional phase-matching geometry. A CARS polarization is established when the frequency difference ω/sub 1/ - ω/sub s/ corresponds to a vibrational Raman resonance. The vibrational polarization scatters the incident ω/sub 2/ beam to produce anti-Stokes radiation at frequency ω/sub 1/ - ω/sub s/ + ω/sub 2/. In a similar fashion, a CARS polarization is also established when the frequency difference ω/sub 2/ - ω/sub s/ is equal to a pure rotational Raman resonance. The pure rotational polarization scatters the Nd:YAG laser radiation at ω/sub 1/ to produce anti-Stokes radiation at ω/sub 2/ - ω/sub s/ + ω/sub 1/

  7. Development of Raman spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.I.

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the Raman spectrophotometer HG.2S Jobin Yvon rebuilt and developed, the Raman setup provided as a gift for Neelian University from Amsterdam University. The main parts, which were replaced, include monochromator, an air-cooled photomultiplier tube RCA IP 28, log amplifier, hand scanning lab VIEW card for computer interfacing. The components assembled and the whole device was tested successfully. The developed setup was checked using some standard solutions, which showed perfect consistency with literature in the references and published papers. Solutions included hexane, cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and sodium sulfate.(Author)

  8. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnally, Michael O; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Van Duyne, Richard P; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-07

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gpu|(2)ImχR(ω)gst (2)/ImχR(ω), where |gpu|(2) is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  9. Topological charge algebra of optical vortices in nonlinear interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Alexandra A; Shutova, Mariia; Bahari, Aysan; Zhi, Miaochan; Sokolov, Alexei V

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the transfer of orbital angular momentum among multiple beams involved in a coherent Raman interaction. We use a liquid crystal light modulator to shape pump and Stokes beams into optical vortices with various integer values of topological charge, and cross them in a Raman-active crystal to produce multiple Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands. We measure the resultant vortex charges using a tilted-lens technique. We verify that in every case the generated beams' topological charges obey a simple relationship, resulting from angular momentum conservation for created and annihilated photons, or equivalently, from phase-matching considerations for multiple interacting beams.

  10. Spectrometric techniques 4

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume IV discusses three widely diversified areas of spectrometric techniques. The book focuses on three spectrometric methods. Chapter 1 discusses the phenomenology and applications of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS), the most commonly used optical technique that exploit the Raman effect. The second chapter is concerned with diffraction gratings and mountings for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectral Region. Chapter 3 accounts the uses of mass spectrometry, detectors, types of spectrometers, and ion sources. Physicists and chemists will find the book a go

  11. Quantum-Chemical Calculation and Visualization of the Vibrational Modes of Graphene in Different Points of the Brillouin Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedieva, Tetiana; Gubanov, Victor; Dovbeshko, Galyna; Pidhirnyi, Denys

    2015-12-01

    Different notations of graphene irreducible representations and optical modes could be found in the literature. The goals of this paper are to identify the correspondence between available notations, to calculate the optical modes of graphene in different points of the Brillouin zone, and to compare them with experimental data obtained by Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. The mechanism of the resonance enhancement of vibration modes of the molecules adsorbed on graphene in CARS experiments is proposed. The possibility of appearance of the discrete breathing modes is discussed.

  12. Coherent control of plasma dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan

    2014-10-01

    The concept of coherent control - precise measurement or determination of a process through control of the phase of an applied oscillating field - has been applied to numerous systems with great success. Here, we demonstrate the use of coherent control on plasma dynamics in a laser wakefield electron acceleration experiment. A tightly focused femtosecond laser pulse (10 mJ, 35 fs) was used to generate electron beams by plasma wakefield acceleration in the density down ramp. The technique is based on optimization of the electron beam using a deformable mirror adaptive optical system with an iterative evolutionary genetic algorithm. The image of the electrons on a scintillator screen was processed and used in a fitness function as direct feedback for the optimization algorithm. This coherent manipulation of the laser wavefront leads to orders of magnitude improvement to the electron beam properties such as the peak charge and beam divergence. The laser beam optimized to generate the best electron beam was not the one with the ``best'' focal spot. When a particular wavefront of laser light interacts with plasma, it can affect the plasma wave structures and trapping conditions of the electrons in a complex way. For example, Raman forward scattering, envelope self-modulation, relativistic self-focusing, and relativistic self-phase modulation and many other nonlinear interactions modify both the pulse envelope and phase as the pulse propagates, in a way that cannot be easily predicted and that subsequently dictates the formation of plasma waves. The optimal wavefront could be successfully determined via the heuristic search under laser-plasma conditions that were not known a priori. Control and shaping of the electron energy distribution was found to be less effective, but was still possible. Particle-in-cell simulations were performed to show that the mode structure of the laser beam can affect the plasma wave structure and trapping conditions of electrons, which

  13. Raman spectra of graphene ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, R; Furukawa, M; Dresselhaus, G; Dresselhaus, M S

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectra of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag and armchair edges are calculated within non-resonant Raman theory. Depending on the edge structure and polarization direction of the incident and scattered photon beam relative to the edge direction, a symmetry selection rule for the phonon type appears. These Raman selection rules will be useful for the identification of the edge structure of graphene nanoribbons.

  14. Precise Control of Molecular Dynamics with a Femtosecond Frequency Comb - A Weak Field Route to Strong Field Coherent Control

    OpenAIRE

    Pe'er, Avi; Shapiro, Evgeny A.; Stowe, Matthew C.; Shapiro, Moshe; Ye, Jun

    2006-01-01

    We present a general and highly efficient scheme for performing narrow-band Raman transitions between molecular vibrational levels using a coherent train of weak pump-dump pairs of shaped ultrashort pulses. The use of weak pulses permits an analytic description within the framework of coherent control in the perturbative regime, while coherent accumulation of many pulse pairs enables near unity transfer efficiency with a high spectral selectivity, thus forming a powerful combination of pump-d...

  15. High resolution humidity, temperature and aerosol profiling with MeteoSwiss Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinoev, Todor; Arshinov, Yuri; Bobrovnikov, Sergei; Serikov, Ilya; Calpini, Bertrand; van den Bergh, Hubert; Parlange, Marc B.; Simeonov, Valentin

    2010-05-01

    derive vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter ratio and aerosol extinction at 355 nm. Set of Stokes and anti-Stokes PRR lines are separated by the polychromator to derive temperature profiles. The humidity profiles have vertical resolution from 15 m (within the boundary layer) to 100-450 m (within the free troposphere), time resolution of 30 min and 5 km vertical range at daytime and 10 km at night-time. The aerosol backscatter ratio and extinction profiles have similar resolution with vertical range of approximately 10 km. The temperature profiles are derived from PRR lidar signals, simultaneously recorded in analog and photon counting mode, allowing vertical range of approximately 10 km. Vaisala RS-92 and Snow-White chilled mirror hygrometer radiosondes were used for calibration of the water vapor and temperature channels. Continuous temperature profiles were obtained and were coupled with the available water vapor mixing ratio profiles to obtain relative humidity time series. Lidar derived aerosol backscatter ratio profiles will be used for estimation of the boundary layer height and validation of NWP model results. Optical thickness time series are currently compared to independent measurements from a collocated sun photometer to assess the performance of the aerosol channel.

  16. Designing of Raman laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Al-Awad, F.; Alsous, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we describe the design of the Raman laser pumped by Frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser (λ=532 nm) to generate new laser wavelengths by shifting the frequency of the Nd-YAG laser to Stokes region (λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm, λ 3 =1579.5 nm) and Antistokes region (λ ' 1 =435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm, λ ' 3=319.8 nm). Laser resonator has been designed to increase the laser gain. It consists of two mirrors, the back mirror transmits the pump laser beam (λ=532 nm) through the Raman tube and reflects all other generated Raman laser lines. Four special front mirrors were made to be used for the four laser lines λ 1 =683 nm, λ 2 =953.6 nm and λ ' 1 = 435 nm, λ ' 2 =369.9 nm. The output energy for the lines υ 1 s, υ 2 s, υ 1 as,υ 2 as was measured. The output energy of the Raman laser was characterized for different H 2 pressure inside the tube. (Author)

  17. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  18. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  19. Multiphoton Microscopy for Ophthalmic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Gibson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We review multiphoton microscopy (MPM including two-photon autofluorescence (2PAF, second harmonic generation (SHG, third harmonic generation (THG, fluorescence lifetime (FLIM, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS with relevance to clinical applications in ophthalmology. The different imaging modalities are discussed highlighting the particular strength that each has for functional tissue imaging. MPM is compared with current clinical ophthalmological imaging techniques such as reflectance confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging. In addition, we discuss the future prospects for MPM in disease detection and clinical monitoring of disease progression, understanding fundamental disease mechanisms, and real-time monitoring of drug delivery.

  20. Nonlinear optics at interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of surface nonlinear optics are explored in this thesis. The first part is a theoretical and experimental study of nonlinear intraction of surface plasmons and bulk photons at metal-dielectric interfaces. The second part is a demonstration and study of surface enhanced second harmonic generation at rough metal surfaces. A general formulation for nonlinear interaction of surface plasmons at metal-dielectric interfaces is presented and applied to both second and third order nonlinear processes. Experimental results for coherent second and third harmonic generation by surface plasmons and surface coherent antiStokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) are shown to be in good agreement with the theory

  1. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratescu, M.A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography

  2. Analysis of benzoquinone decomposition in solution plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratescu, M. A.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    The decomposition of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in Solution Plasma Processing (SPP) was analyzed by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) by monitoring the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity of the vibrational transitions of the molecule, during and after SPP. Just in the beginning of the SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensities of the ring vibrational molecular transitions increased under the influence of the electric field of plasma. The results show that plasma influences the p-BQ molecules in two ways: (i) plasma produces a polarization and an orientation of the molecules in the local electric field of plasma and (ii) the gas phase plasma supplies, in the liquid phase, hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which reduce or oxidize the molecules, respectively, generating different carboxylic acids. The decomposition of p-BQ after SPP was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography.

  3. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  4. Electromagnetic spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, R.; Garcia-Sucerquia, J.

    2005-10-01

    The recently introduced concept of spatial coherence wavelets is generalized for describing the propagation of electromagnetic fields in the free space. For this aim, the spatial coherence wavelet tensor is introduced as an elementary amount, in terms of which the formerly known quantities for this domain can be expressed. It allows analyzing the relationship between the spatial coherence properties and the polarization state of the electromagnetic wave. This approach is completely consistent with the recently introduced unified theory of coherence and polarization for random electromagnetic beams, but it provides a further insight about the causal relationship between the polarization states at different planes along the propagation path. (author)

  5. Hot phonon generation by split-off hole band electrons in AlxGa1-xAs alloys investigated by picosecond Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, J.M.; Kim, D.S.; Zhou, J.F.; Song, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The initial generation of hot LO phonons by the relaxation of hot carriers in GaAs and Al x Ga 1-x As alloy semiconductors is studied. Within the initial 2ps of photoexcitation, only those electrons originating from the split-off hole bands are found to generate a significant number of I-valley hot phonons when photon energies of 2.33eV are used. A picosecond Raman scattering technique is used to determine the hot phonon occupation number in a series of MBE grown Al x Ga 1-x As samples with 0≤x≤0.39. The Stokes and anti-Stokes lines were measured for both GaAs-like and AlAs-like LO phonon modes to determine their occupation numbers. The authors observe a rapid decrease in the phonon occupation numbers as the aluminum concentration increases beyond x = 0.2. This rapid decrease is explained by considering only those electrons photoexcited from the split-off hole band. Almost all of the electrons originating from the heavy and light-hole bands are shown to quickly transfer and remain in the X and L valleys without generating significant numbers of hot LO phonons during the initial 2ps and at a carrier density of 10 17 cm -3 . A model based upon the instantaneous thermalization of hot electrons photoexcited from the split-off hole bands is used to fit the data. They have obtained very good agreement between experiment and theory. This work provides a clear understanding to the relaxation of Γ valley hot electrons by the generation of hot phonons on subpicosecond and picosecond time scales, which has long standing implications to previous time resolved Raman experiments

  6. Resonant surface-enhanced Raman scattering by optical phonons in a monolayer of CdSe nanocrystals on Au nanocluster arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milekhin, Alexander G., E-mail: milekhin@isp.nsc.ru [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sveshnikova, Larisa L.; Duda, Tatyana A. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Rodyakina, Ekaterina E. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Dzhagan, Volodymyr M. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Sheremet, Evgeniya [Solid Surfaces Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Gordan, Ovidiu D. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Himcinschi, Cameliu [Institut für Theoretische Physik, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, 09596 Freiberg (Germany); Latyshev, Alexander V. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, pr. Lavrentjeva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov str. 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Regular Au nanocluster and dimer arrays as well as single Au dimers are fabricated. • Resonant SERS by monolayers of CdSe nanocrystals deposited on the Au nanostructures is observed. • LO energy change for CdSe NCs on different single Au dimers indicates SERS by single or a few NCs. - Abstract: Here we present the results on an investigation of resonant Stokes and anti- Stokes surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by optical phonons in colloidal CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) homogeneously deposited on arrays of Au nanoclusters using the Langmuir–Blodgett technology. The thickness of deposited NCs, determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, amounts to approximately 1 monolayer. Special attention is paid to the determination of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) energy in the arrays of Au nanoclusters as a function of the nanocluster size by means of micro-ellipsometry. SERS by optical phonons in CdSe NCs shows a significant enhancement factor with a maximal value of 2 × 10{sup 3} which depends resonantly on the Au nanocluster size and thus on the LSPR energy. The deposition of CdSe NCs on the arrays of Au nanocluster dimers enabled us to study the polarization dependence of SERS. It was found that a maximal SERS signal is observed for the light polarization along the dimer axis. Finally, SERS by optical phonons was observed for CdSe NCs deposited on the structures with a single Au dimer. A difference of the LO phonon energy is observed for CdSe NCs on different single dimers. This effect is explained as the confinement-induced shift which depends on the CdSe nanocrystal size and indicates quasi-single NC Raman spectra being obtained.

  7. Raman study of ? crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, M. A.; Oliveira, M. A. S.; Bourson, P.; Crettez, J. M.

    1997-09-01

    In this work we present a polarized Raman study of 0953-8984/9/37/020/img7 single crystals for several values of the concentration 0953-8984/9/37/020/img8 made using different scattering geometries. The Raman spectra, composed of broad bands, have been fitted in accordance with a symmetry analysis which allowed us to assign the vibrational modes, and determine their frequencies and damping constants. The results are compatible with an average hexagonal symmetry for the solid solutions with x in the range 0953-8984/9/37/020/img9. In each of the spectra we found two bands at about 590 and 0953-8984/9/37/020/img10, probably associated with the existence of 0953-8984/9/37/020/img11 structures in the solid solutions.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  9. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan K; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya; Smith, Zachary J

    2017-07-07

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  10. [Study of alkaline lignin from Arundo donax linn based on FT Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ting-ting; Ma, Jian-feng; Guo, Si-qin; Xu, Feng

    2014-08-01

    Arundo donax linn, as a perennial energy crop, has promising application prospect. In the present study, Fourier transform Raman (FT Raman) spectroscopy was applied to determine the structural information of materials, milled wood lignin (MWL), and alkaline lignins (AL, under different treated time) from A. donax stem nondestructively. The results indicated that, extractable compounds in A. donax had negative contribution to the Raman spectra without rising new Raman peaks. FT Raman spectrum of MWL indicated that MWL from A. donax was HGS type lignins. Compared with the spectra of MWL from wood materials, the peak at 1173 cm(-1) was much higher in intensity for the MWL from A. donax stem, which may be assigned to hydroxycinnamic acid by analyzing the standard. With respect to FT Raman spectra of ALs, the relatively highest intensity of 1173 cm(-1) was found in alkaline lignin (AL2), which was treated for 40 min by alkaline. Moreover, the peak of coniferaldehyde/sinapaldehyde (1630 cm(-1)) was lowest in intensity while the band attributed to coniferyl alcohol/sinapyl alcohol (1660 cm(-1)) was almost disappeared in AL2. It could be inferred that AL2 demonstrated a highest content of phenolic acid, which may improve its potential application, such as for antioxidant activity. Furthermore, the results obtained by FT Raman spectra were verified by two dimensional heteronuclear singlequantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. Above all, FT Raman spectroscopy provided alternative safe, rapid, accurate, and nondestructive technology for lignin structure determination.

  11. Text Coherence in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanping

    2009-01-01

    In the thesis a coherent text is defined as a continuity of senses of the outcome of combining concepts and relations into a network composed of knowledge space centered around main topics. And the author maintains that in order to obtain the coherence of a target language text from a source text during the process of translation, a translator can…

  12. Coherent Multistatic ISAR Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Ph. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Verzeilberg, J.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents methods for Coherent Multistatic Radar Imaging for Non Cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) with a network of radar sensors. Coherent Multistatic Radar Imaging is based on an extension of existing monostatic ISAR algorithms to the multistatic environment. The paper describes the

  13. VCSEL Based Coherent PONs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Rodes, Roberto; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of research performed in the area of coherent access technologies employing vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs). Experimental demonstrations of optical transmission over a passive fiber link with coherent detection using VCSEL local oscillators and directly modula...

  14. Scalable coherent interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnaes, K.; Kristiansen, E.H.; Gustavson, D.B.; James, D.V.

    1990-01-01

    The Scalable Coherent Interface (IEEE P1596) is establishing an interface standard for very high performance multiprocessors, supporting a cache-coherent-memory model scalable to systems with up to 64K nodes. This Scalable Coherent Interface (SCI) will supply a peak bandwidth per node of 1 GigaByte/second. The SCI standard should facilitate assembly of processor, memory, I/O and bus bridge cards from multiple vendors into massively parallel systems with throughput far above what is possible today. The SCI standard encompasses two levels of interface, a physical level and a logical level. The physical level specifies electrical, mechanical and thermal characteristics of connectors and cards that meet the standard. The logical level describes the address space, data transfer protocols, cache coherence mechanisms, synchronization primitives and error recovery. In this paper we address logical level issues such as packet formats, packet transmission, transaction handshake, flow control, and cache coherence. 11 refs., 10 figs

  15. Measuring coherence with entanglement concurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xianfei; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2017-07-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental manifestation of the quantum superposition principle. Recently, Baumgratz et al (2014 Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 140401) presented a rigorous framework to quantify coherence from the view of theory of physical resource. Here we propose a new valid quantum coherence measure which is a convex roof measure, for a quantum system of arbitrary dimension, essentially using the generalized Gell-Mann matrices. Rigorous proof shows that the proposed coherence measure, coherence concurrence, fulfills all the requirements dictated by the resource theory of quantum coherence measures. Moreover, strong links between the resource frameworks of coherence concurrence and entanglement concurrence is derived, which shows that any degree of coherence with respect to some reference basis can be converted to entanglement via incoherent operations. Our work provides a clear quantitative and operational connection between coherence and entanglement based on two kinds of concurrence. This new coherence measure, coherence concurrence, may also be beneficial to the study of quantum coherence.

  16. Observation of stimulated Raman scattering in polar tetragonal crystals of barium antimony tartrate trihydrate, Ba[Sb{sub 2}((+)C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminskii, Alexander A. [Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rhee, Hanjo; Eichler, Hans J.; Lux, Oliver [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, Technical University of Berlin (Germany); Nemec, Ivan [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Yoneda, Hitoki; Shirakawa, Akira [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan); Becker, Petra; Bohaty, Ladislav [Section Crystallography, Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    The non-centrosymmetric polar tetragonal (P4{sub 1}) barium antimony tartrate trihydrate, Ba[Sb{sub 2}((+)C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O, was found to be an attractive novel semi-organic crystal manifesting numerous χ{sup (2)}- and χ{sup (3)}-nonlinear optical interactions. In particular, with picosecond single- and dual-wavelength pumping SHG and THG via cascaded parametric four-wave processes were observed. High-order Stokes and anti-Stokes lasing related to two SRS-promoting vibration modes of the crystal, with ω{sub SRS1} ∼ 575 cm{sup -1} and ω{sub SRS2} ∼ 2940 cm{sup -1}, takes place. Basing on a spontaneous Raman investigation an assignment of the two SRS-active vibration modes is discussed. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Albuquerque, Felipe N; Sotomi, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    By providing valuable information about the coronary artery wall and lumen, intravascular imaging may aid in optimizing interventional procedure results and thereby could improve clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT...

  18. Coherence in Industrial Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ulrik; Lauridsen, Erik Hagelskjær

    2003-01-01

    The notion of coherence is used to illustrate the general finding, that the impact of environmental management systems and environmental policy is highly dependent of the context and interrelatedness of the systems, procedures and regimes established in society....

  19. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fercher, A.F.; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a technique that is used to peer inside a body noninvasively. Tissue structure defined by tissue absorption and scattering coefficients, and the speed of blood flow, are derived from the characteristics of light remitted by the body. Singly backscattered light...... detected by partial coherence interferometry (PCI) is used to synthesize the tomographic image coded in false colors. A prerequisite of this technique is a low time-coherent but high space-coherent light source, for example, a superluminescent diode or a supercontinuum source. Alternatively, the imaging...... technique can be realized by using ultrafast wavelength scanning light sources. For tissue imaging, the light source wavelengths are restricted to the red and near-infrared (NIR) region from about 600 to 1300 nm, the so-called therapeutic window, where absorption (μa ≈ 0.01 mm−1) is small enough. Transverse...

  20. Raman and fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, H.W.; McNulty, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    We have formulated a model for fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in or in the vicinity of small particles. The model takes into account the size, shape, refractive index, and morphology of the host particles. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for spherical (one and more layers, including magnetic dipole transitions) cylindrical and spheroidal particles. Particular attention has been given to the spherical case with fluorescent/Raman scatterers uniformly distributed in the particles radiating both coherently and incohorently. Depolarization effects have been studied with suitable averaging process, and good agreement with experiment has been obtained. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for the elastic scattering of evanescent waves; these results are useful for the study of fluorescent under excitation by evanescent waves

  1. Raman scattering by hot and thermal polaritons in crystal quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogani, F.; Colocci, M.; Neri, M.; Querzoli, R.

    1984-11-01

    Nonlinear mixing of IR and visible radiation, i.e. coherent Raman scattering by polaritons driven by a CO/sub 2/ laser, has been used to obtain the dispersion curve and its width in q-space of the polariton associated to the E-phonon at 1065 cm/sup -1/ in crystal quartz. It is shown in this paper that a direct method to determine independently, with high precision, the refractive index and absorbance of a crystal can be obtained in this way. The results are compared with accurate data obtained from Raman scattering by polaritions in thermal equilibrium and very good agreement is found between the two measurements. It is finally shown that nonlinear-mixing techniques turn out to be completely consistent with the simple picture of scattering of light by hot polaritons.

  2. Coherent imaging at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Duesterer, S; Treusch, R; Barty, A; Benner, W H; Bogan, M J; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Woods, B W; Boutet, S; Cavalleri, A; Hajdu, J; Iwan, B; Seibert, M M; Timneanu, N; Marchesini, S; Sakdinawat, A; Sokolowski-Tinten, K

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out high-resolution single-pulse coherent diffractive imaging at the FLASH free-electron laser. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. In particular we are developing imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits, developing imaging of ultrafast processes, and testing methods to characterize and perform single-particle imaging.

  3. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  4. Imaging with extrinsic Raman labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N M; Duindam, J J; Puppels, G J; Otto, C; Greve, J

    1996-01-01

    In two separate examples we demonstrate the use of extrinsic Raman scattering probes for imaging of biological samples. First, the distribution of cholesterol in a rat eye Lens is determined with the use of the Raman scattered light from filipin, a molecule which binds specifically to cholesterol.

  5. Raman scattering tensors of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, M; Ezaki, Y; Aida, M; Suzuki, M; Yimit, A; Ushizawa, K; Ueda, T

    1998-01-01

    Polarized Raman scattering measurements have been made of a single crystal of L-tyrosine by the use of a Raman microscope with the 488.0-nm exciting beam from an argon ion laser. The L-tyrosine crystal belongs to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) (orthorhombic), and Raman scattering intensities corresponding to the aa, bb, cc, ab and ac components of the crystal Raman tensor have been determined for each prominent Raman band. A similar set of measurements has been made of L-tyrosine-d4, in which four hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring are replaced by deuterium atoms. The effects of NH3-->ND3 and OH-->OD on the Raman spectrum have also been examined. In addition, depolarization ratios of some bands of L-tyrosine in aqueous solutions of pH 13 and pH 1 were examined. For comparison with these experimental results, on the other hand, ab initio molecular orbital calculations have been made of the normal modes of vibration and their associated polarizability oscillations of the L-tyrosine molecule. On the basis of these experimental data and by referring to the results of the calculations, discussions have been presented on the Raman tensors associated to some Raman bands, including those at 829 cm-1 (benzene ring breathing), 642 cm-1 (benzene ring deformation), and 432 cm-1 (C alpha-C beta-C gamma bending).

  6. Miniature Raman spectrometer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvallet, Joseph; Auz, Bryan; Rodriguez, John; Olmstead, Ty

    2018-02-01

    The development of techniques to rapidly identify samples ranging from, molecule and particle imaging to detection of high explosive materials, has surged in recent years. Due to this growing want, Raman spectroscopy gives a molecular fingerprint, with no sample preparation, and can be done remotely. These systems can be small, compact, lightweight, and with a user interface that allows for easy use and sample identification. Ocean Optics Inc. has developed several systems that would meet all these end user requirements. This talk will describe the development of different Ocean Optics Inc miniature Raman spectrometers. The spectrometer on a phone (SOAP) system was designed using commercial off the shelf (COTS) components, in a rapid product development cycle. The footprint of the system measures 40x40x14 mm (LxWxH) and was coupled directly to the cell phone detector camera optics. However, it gets roughly only 40 cm-1 resolution. The Accuman system is the largest (290x220X100 mm) of the three, but uses our QEPro spectrometer and get 7-11 cm-1 resolution. Finally, the HRS-30 measuring 165x85x40 mm is a combination of the other two systems. This system uses a modified EMBED spectrometer and gets 7-12 cm-1 resolution. Each of these units uses a peak matching algorithm that then correlates the results to the pre-loaded and customizable spectral libraries.

  7. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  8. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media.

  9. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung-chi Lihn.

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  10. Squeezing, photon bunching, photon antibunching and nonclassical photon statistics in degenerate hyper Raman processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Biswajit; Mandal, Swapan

    2007-01-01

    An initially prepared coherent state coupled to a second-order nonlinear medium is responsible for stimulated and spontaneous hyper Raman processes. By using an intuitive approach based on perturbation theory, the Hamiltonian corresponding to the hyper Raman processes is analytically solved to obtain the temporal development of the field operators. It is true that these analytical solutions are valid for small coupling constants. However, the interesting part is that these solutions are valid for reasonably large time. Hence, the present analytical solutions are quite general and are fresh compared to those solutions under short-time approximations. By exploiting the analytical solutions of field operators for various modes, we investigate the squeezing, photon antibunching and nonclassical photon statistics for pure modes of the input coherent light responsible for hyper Raman processes. At least in one instance (stimulated hyper Raman processes for vibration phonon mode), we report the simultaneous appearance of classical (photon bunching) and nonclassical (squeezing) effects of the radiation field responsible for hyper Raman processes

  11. SAR image effects on coherence and coherence estimation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Radar coherence is an important concept for imaging radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This document quantifies some of the effects in SAR which modify the coherence. Although these effects can disrupt the coherence within a single SAR image, this report will focus on the coherence between separate images, such as for coherent change detection (CCD) processing. There have been other presentations on aspects of this material in the past. The intent of this report is to bring various issues that affect the coherence together in a single report to support radar engineers in making decisions about these matters.

  12. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  13. Detection of latent prints by Raman imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Linda Anne [Andersonville, TN; Connatser, Raynella Magdalene [Knoxville, TN; Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur

    2011-01-11

    The present invention relates to a method for detecting a print on a surface, the method comprising: (a) contacting the print with a Raman surface-enhancing agent to produce a Raman-enhanced print; and (b) detecting the Raman-enhanced print using a Raman spectroscopic method. The invention is particularly directed to the imaging of latent fingerprints.

  14. Frequency shifts in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinth, W.; Kaiser, W.

    1980-01-01

    The nonresonant contributions to the nonlinear susceptibility chisup(()3) produce a frequency chirp during stimulated Raman scattering. In the case of transient stimulated Raman scattering, the spectrum of the generated Stokes pulse is found at higher frequencies than expected from spontaneous Raman data. The frequency difference can be calculated from the theory of stimulated Raman scattering. (orig.)

  15. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  16. COHERENT Experiment: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, D; Belov, V; Bolozdynya, A; Burenkov, A; Albert, J B; Del Valle Coello, M; D’Onofrio, M; Awe, C; Barbeau, P S; Cervantes, M; Becker, B; Cabrera-Palmer, B; Collar, J I; Cooper, R J; Cooper, R L; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J; Eberhardt, A; Dean, D; Dolgolenko, A G

    2017-01-01

    The COHERENT Collaboration is realizing a long term neutrino physics research program. The main goals of the program are to detect and study elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEνNS). This process is predicted by Standard Model but it has never been observed experimentally because of the very low energy of the recoil nucleus. COHERENT is using different detector technologies: CsI[Na] and NaI scintillator crystals, a single-phase liquid Ar and a Ge detectors. The placement of all the detector setups is in the basement of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The current status of the COHERENT experimental program is presented. (paper)

  17. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M., E-mail: mxu@fairfield.edu [Physics Department, Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT 06824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  18. On Sagnac frequency splitting in a solid-state ring Raman laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Griffith, Robert; De Cuir, Edwin; Kim, Steven; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute

    2017-11-15

    We report on an accurate measurement of the frequency splitting of an optical rotating ring microcavity made out of calcium fluoride. By measuring the frequencies of the clockwise and counter-clockwise coherent Raman emissions confined in the cavity modes, we show that the frequency splitting is inversely proportional to the refractive index of the cavity host material. The measurement has an accuracy of 1% and unambiguously confirms the classical theoretical prediction based on special theory of relativity. This Letter also demonstrates the usefulness of the ring Raman microlaser for rotation measurements.

  19. Laser-induced gratings in the gas phase excited via Raman-active transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, D N [General Physics Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We report on a new time resolved coherent Raman technique that is based on the generation of thermal gratings following a population change among molecular levels induced by stimulated Raman pumping. This is achieved by spatially and temporally overlapping intensity interference patterns generated independently by two lasers. When this technique is used in carbon dioxide, employing transitions which belong to the Q-branches of the {nu}{sub 1}/2{nu}{sub 2} Fermi dyad, it is possible to investigate molecular energy transfer processes. (author) 2 figs., 10 refs.

  20. Maintaining Web Cache Coherency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Document coherency is a challenging problem for Web caching. Once the documents are cached throughout the Internet, it is often difficult to keep them coherent with the origin document without generating a new traffic that could increase the traffic on the international backbone and overload the popular servers. Several solutions have been proposed to solve this problem, among them two categories have been widely discussed: the strong document coherency and the weak document coherency. The cost and the efficiency of the two categories are still a controversial issue, while in some studies the strong coherency is far too expensive to be used in the Web context, in other studies it could be maintained at a low cost. The accuracy of these analysis is depending very much on how the document updating process is approximated. In this study, we compare some of the coherence methods proposed for Web caching. Among other points, we study the side effects of these methods on the Internet traffic. The ultimate goal is to study the cache behavior under several conditions, which will cover some of the factors that play an important role in the Web cache performance evaluation and quantify their impact on the simulation accuracy. The results presented in this study show indeed some differences in the outcome of the simulation of a Web cache depending on the workload being used, and the probability distribution used to approximate updates on the cached documents. Each experiment shows two case studies that outline the impact of the considered parameter on the performance of the cache.

  1. Abstracts of the 5. International Conference on Lasers and their Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    New results have been presented in the fields of laser physics and laser applications including the development of new laser light sources, new laser frequencies in the UV and VUV spectral regions using anti-Stokes Raman scattering, nonlinear optical effects for the formation of ultrashort optical pulses, laser spectroscopy, collisionless multiphoton excitation processes using molecular beams, selective generation of free radicals by laser, laser applications in medicine, plasma diagnostics analysing X-ray spectra for studying laser fusion problems, coherence properties in phase-sampling interferometric techniques, and fundamental problems in quantum physics and nonlinear processes

  2. M-CARS and EFISHG study of the influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, E.; Louot, C.; Ould-Moussa, N.; Lefort, C.; Kaneyasu, J. F.; Kano, H.; Pagnoux, D.; Couderc, V.; Leproux, P.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of a static electric field on a non-polar molecule has been studied by means of multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS). A parallel measurement of electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISHG) has also been led. Both techniques suggest a reorientation of the molecule due to the presence of an electric field. This phenomenon can be used to increase the chemical selectivity and the signal to non-resonant background ratio, namely, the sensitivity of the M-CARS spectroscopy.

  3. On the potential of CARS spectroscopy in low-temperature plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrazyavichyus, A.B.; Gladkov, S.M.; Grigajtis, Yu.P.; Koroteev, N.I.

    1989-01-01

    The principles of coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and its application to the diagnostics of technological plasmas are briefly discussed. THe CARS spectrometer is described, developed in IPTPE, Caunas for investigations of a nitrogen plasma stream generated by an industrial plasmatron, and several CARS spectra of nitrogen molecules are presented. As the CARS signal from vibrational-rotational energy levels decreases substantially at plasma temperatures above 2000 K, an alternative scheme using electronlevels of atoms or ions has to be used. To test the method, CARS signals from the lines of the first nitrogen ion were studied in a low-voltage spark discharge. (J.U.)

  4. A novel clinical multimodal multiphoton tomograph for AF, SHG, CARS imaging, and FLIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    We report on a flexible nonlinear medical tomograph with multiple miniaturized detectors for simultaneous acquisition of two-photon autofluorescence (AF), second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) images. The simultaneous visualization of the distribution of endogenous fluorophores NAD(P)H, melanin and elastin, SHG-active collagen and as well as non-fluorescent lipids within human skin in vivo is possible. Furthermore, fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM) can be generated using time-correlated single photon counting.

  5. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Themstrup, Lotte; Banzhaf, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described as the o......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has developed rapidly since its first realisation in medicine and is currently an emerging technology in the diagnosis of skin disease. OCT is an interferometric technique that detects reflected and backscattered light from tissue and is often described...

  7. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  8. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... in the visible range can be performed. The simultaneous delivery of the excitation light and collection of the Raman signal from the sample are achieved by means of a doubleclad fiber, whose core and inner cladding act as \\independent" transmission channels. A double-clad fiber coupler allows for the recovery...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work...

  10. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  11. Heating by the Raman instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the reflection and heating due to stimulated Raman backscatter of intense laser light in large regions of underdense plasma. The heated electron distribution is found to be approximately a Maxwellian of temperature (m/sub e//2)v/sub p/ 2 , where v/sub p/ is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave. A simple model of the reflection is presented. Raman may cause a pre-heat problem with large laser fusion reactor targets

  12. The Puzzle of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Bendix; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Background During the past decade, politicians and healthcare providers have strived to create a coherent healthcare system across primary and secondary healthcare sectors in Denmark. Nevertheless, elderly patients with chronic diseases (EPCD) continue to report experiences of poor-quality care a...

  13. Coherence in quantum estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorda, Paolo; Allegra, Michele

    2018-01-01

    The geometry of quantum states provides a unifying framework for estimation processes based on quantum probes, and it establishes the ultimate bounds of the achievable precision. We show a relation between the statistical distance between infinitesimally close quantum states and the second order variation of the coherence of the optimal measurement basis with respect to the state of the probe. In quantum phase estimation protocols, this leads to propose coherence as the relevant resource that one has to engineer and control to optimize the estimation precision. Furthermore, the main object of the theory i.e. the symmetric logarithmic derivative, in many cases allows one to identify a proper factorization of the whole Hilbert space in two subsystems. The factorization allows one to discuss the role of coherence versus correlations in estimation protocols; to show how certain estimation processes can be completely or effectively described within a single-qubit subsystem; and to derive lower bounds for the scaling of the estimation precision with the number of probes used. We illustrate how the framework works for both noiseless and noisy estimation procedures, in particular those based on multi-qubit GHZ-states. Finally we succinctly analyze estimation protocols based on zero-temperature critical behavior. We identify the coherence that is at the heart of their efficiency, and we show how it exhibits the non-analyticities and scaling behavior proper of a large class of quantum phase transitions.

  14. Coherence Multiplex System Topologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, Arjan; Taniman, R.O.; Heideman, G.H.L.M.; van Etten, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Coherence multiplexing is a potentially inexpensive form of optical code-division multiple access, which is particularly suitable for short-range applications with moderate bandwidth requirements, such as access networks, LANs, or interconnects. Various topologies are known for constructing an

  15. Coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoh, Tomonori

    2006-01-01

    This article presents basic properties of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with numerical examples and introduces the reader to important aspects of CSR in future accelerators with short bunches. We show interesting features of the single bunch instability due to CSR in storage rings and discuss the longitudinal CSR field via the impedance representation. (author)

  16. Interference due to coherence swapping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    particle is, its interaction with the beam splitter does not reveal this information .... If one shines a strong linearly polarised monochromatic laser beam, or a quasi .... to be a hindrance to coherence, can be suitably designed to create coherence.

  17. Full molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and carbon tetrachloride for two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Ju-Yeon, E-mail: ju8879@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ito, Hironobu, E-mail: h.ito@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanimura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-12-20

    Frequency-domain two-dimensional (2D) Raman signals, which are equivalent to coherent two-dimensional Raman scattering (COTRAS) signals, for liquid water and carbon tetrachloride were calculated using an equilibrium–nonequilibrium hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulation algorithm. An appropriate representation of the 2D Raman spectrum obtained from MD simulations provides an easy-to-understand depiction of structural and dynamical properties. We elucidate mechanisms governing the 2D signal profiles involving anharmonic mode–mode coupling and the nonlinearities of the polarizability for the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes. The predicted signal profiles and intensities can be utilized to analyze recently developed single-beam 2D spectra, whose signals are generated from a coherently controlled pulse, allowing the single-beam measurement to be carried out more efficiently. Moreover, the MD simulation results allow us to visualize the molecular structure and dynamics by comparing the accurately calculated spectrum with experimental result.

  18. High-speed vibrational imaging and spectral analysis of lipid bodies by compound Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Le, Thuc T; Chen, Hongtao; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-05-28

    Cells store excess energy in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. At present, it is unclear how different types of fatty acids contribute to the formation of lipid droplets. We describe a compound Raman microscope capable of both high-speed chemical imaging and quantitative spectral analysis on the same platform. We used a picosecond laser source to perform coherent Raman scattering imaging of a biological sample and confocal Raman spectral analysis at points of interest. The potential of the compound Raman microscope was evaluated on lipid bodies of cultured cells and live animals. Our data indicate that the in vivo fat contains much more unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) than the fat formed via de novo synthesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Furthermore, in vivo analysis of subcutaneous adipocytes and glands revealed a dramatic difference not only in the unsaturation level but also in the thermodynamic state of FAs inside their lipid bodies. Additionally, the compound Raman microscope allows tracking of the cellular uptake of a specific fatty acid and its abundance in nascent cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The high-speed vibrational imaging and spectral analysis capability renders compound Raman microscopy an indispensible analytical tool for the study of lipid-droplet biology.

  19. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10 4 to 10 6 and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference

  20. Coherent states in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R. de Lima; Fernandes Junior, Damasio; Batista, Sheyla Marques

    2001-12-01

    We present a review work on the coherent states is non-relativistic quantum mechanics analysing the quantum oscillators in the coherent states. The coherent states obtained via a displacement operator that act on the wave function of ground state of the oscillator and the connection with Quantum Optics which were implemented by Glauber have also been considered. A possible generalization to the construction of new coherent states it is point out. (author)

  1. Coherent states in quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, R D L; Fernandes, D

    2001-01-01

    We present a review work on the coherent states is non-relativistic quantum mechanics analysing the quantum oscillators in the coherent states. The coherent states obtained via a displacement operator that act on the wave function of ground state of the oscillator and the connection with Quantum Optics which were implemented by Glauber have also been considered. A possible generalization to the construction of new coherent states it is point out.

  2. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Bradly J [Jemez Springs, NM; Guenther, David C [Los Alamos, NM

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  3. Four-Wave Optical Parametric Amplification in a Raman-Active Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave optical parametric amplification (FWOPA in a Raman-active medium is experimentally investigated by use of an air-filled hollow fiber. A femtosecond pump pulse shorter than the period of molecular motion excites the coherent molecular motion of the Raman-active molecules during the parametric amplification of a signal pulse. The excited coherent motion modulates the frequency of the signal pulse during the parametric amplification, and shifts it to lower frequencies. The magnitude of the frequency redshift depends on the pump intensity, resulting in intensity-dependent spectral characteristics that are different from those in the FWOPA induced in a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber.

  4. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...

  5. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT-molecular orbi......Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  6. Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Leonard

    1995-01-01

    This book presents a systematic account of optical coherence theory within the framework of classical optics, as applied to such topics as radiation from sources of different states of coherence, foundations of radiometry, effects of source coherence on the spectra of radiated fields, coherence theory of laser modes, and scattering of partially coherent light by random media. The book starts with a full mathematical introduction to the subject area and each chapter concludes with a set of exercises. The authors are renowned scientists and have made substantial contributions to many of the topi

  7. Coherent imaging using SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Kimura, Takashi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Joti, Yasumasa; Bessho, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) with femtosecond pulse duration offer an innovative solution to transcend the spatial resolution limitation in conventional X-ray imaging for biological samples and soft matters by clearing up the radiation damage problem using the “diffraction-before-destruction” strategy. Building on this strategy, the authors are developing a method to image solution sample under controlled environment, pulsed coherent X-ray solution scattering (PCXSS), using XFELs and phase retrieval algorithms in coherent diffractive imaging (CDI). This article describes the basics of PCXSS and examples of PCXSS measurement, for a living cell and self-assemblies of gold nanoparticles, performed by the authors using SACLA. An attempt toward the industrial application of PCXSS is also described. (author)

  8. Coherent dynamics in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    enhanced in quantum confined lower-dimensional systems, where exciton and biexciton effects dominate the spectra even at room temperature. The coherent dynamics of excitons are at modest densities well described by the optical Bloch equations and a number of the dynamical effects known from atomic......Ultrafast nonlinear optical spectroscopy is used to study the coherent dynamics of optically excited electron-hole pairs in semiconductors. Coulomb interaction implies that the optical inter-band transitions are dominated, at least at low temperatures, by excitonic effects. They are further...... and molecular systems are found and studied in the exciton-biexciton system of semiconductors. At densities where strong exciton interactions, or many-body effects, become dominant, the semiconductor Bloch equations present a more rigorous treatment of the phenomena Ultrafast degenerate four-wave mixing is used...

  9. Generalized hypergeometric coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appl, Thomas; Schiller, Diethard H

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a large class of holomorphic quantum states by choosing their normalization functions to be given by generalized hypergeometric functions. We call them generalized hypergeometric states in general, and generalized hypergeometric coherent states in particular, if they allow a resolution of unity. Depending on the domain of convergence of the generalized hypergeometric functions, we distinguish generalized hypergeometric states on the plane, the open unit disc and the unit circle. All states are eigenstates of suitably defined lowering operators. We then study their photon number statistics and phase properties as revealed by the Husimi and Pegg-Barnett phase distributions. On the basis of the generalized hypergeometric coherent states we introduce new analytic representations of arbitrary quantum states in Bargmann and Hardy spaces as well as generalized hypergeometric Husimi distributions and corresponding phase distributions

  10. Femtosecond time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy using sub-7-fs pulses: Apparatus and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramochi, Hikaru [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei, E-mail: tahei@riken.jp [Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Ultrafast Spectroscopy Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (RAP), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We describe details of the setup for time-resolved impulsive stimulated Raman spectroscopy (TR-ISRS). In this method, snapshot molecular vibrational spectra of the photoreaction transients are captured via time-domain Raman probing using ultrashort pulses. Our instrument features transform-limited sub-7-fs pulses to impulsively excite and probe coherent nuclear wavepacket motions, allowing us to observe vibrational fingerprints of transient species from the terahertz to 3000-cm{sup −1} region with high sensitivity. Key optical components for the best spectroscopic performance are discussed. The TR-ISRS measurements for the excited states of diphenylacetylene in cyclohexane are demonstrated, highlighting the capability of our setup to track femtosecond dynamics of all the Raman-active fundamental molecular vibrations.

  11. Quantum coherence: Reciprocity and distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Asutosh, E-mail: asukumar@hri.res.in [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad-211019 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2017-03-18

    Quantum coherence is the outcome of the superposition principle. Recently, it has been theorized as a quantum resource, and is the premise of quantum correlations in multipartite systems. It is therefore interesting to study the coherence content and its distribution in a multipartite quantum system. In this work, we show analytically as well as numerically the reciprocity between coherence and mixedness of a quantum state. We find that this trade-off is a general feature in the sense that it is true for large spectra of measures of coherence and of mixedness. We also study the distribution of coherence in multipartite systems by looking at monogamy-type relation–which we refer to as additivity relation–between coherences of different parts of the system. We show that for the Dicke states, while the normalized measures of coherence violate the additivity relation, the unnormalized ones satisfy the same. - Highlights: • Quantum coherence. • Reciprocity between quantum coherence and mixedness. • Distribution of quantum coherence in multipartite quantum systems. • Additivity relation for distribution of quantum coherence in Dicke and “X” states.

  12. On coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polubarinov, I.V.

    1975-01-01

    A definition of the coherent state representation is given in this paper. In the representation quantum theory equations take the form of classical field theory equations (with causality inherent to the latter) not only in simple cases (free field and interactions with an external current or field), but also in the general case of closed systems of interacting fields. And, conversely, a classical field theory can be transformed into a form of a quantum one

  13. The Puzzle of Coherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Bendix; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Beedholm, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, politicians and health care providers have strived to create a coherent health care system across primary and secondary health care systems in Denmark. Nevertheless, elderly patients with chronic diseases (EPCD) continue to report experiences of poor-quality care and lack ...... both nationally and internationally in preparation of health agreements, implementation of new collaboration forms among health care providers, and in improvement of delegation and transfer of information and assignments across sectors in health care....

  14. Spectral coherence in windturbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojstrup, J. [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an experiment at a Danish wind farm to investigate the lateral and vertical coherences in the nonequilibrium turbulence of a wind turbine wake. Two meteorological masts were instrumented for measuring profiles of mean speed, turbulence, and temperature. Results are provided graphically for turbulence intensities, velocity spectra, lateral coherence, and vertical coherence. The turbulence was somewhat influenced by the wake, or possibly from aggregated wakes further upstream, even at 14.5 diameters. Lateral coherence (separation 5m) seemed to be unaffected by the wake at 7.5 diameters, but the flow was less coherent in the near wake. The wake appeared to have little influence on vertical coherence (separation 13m). Simple, conventional models for coherence appeared to be adequate descriptions for wake turbulence except for the near wake situation. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Coherent laser vision system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastion, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS) is being developed to provide precision real-time 3D world views to support site characterization and robotic operations and during facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning. Autonomous or semiautonomous robotic operations requires an accurate, up-to-date 3D world view. Existing technologies for real-time 3D imaging, such as AM laser radar, have limited accuracy at significant ranges and have variability in range estimates caused by lighting or surface shading. Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no-moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic to coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system

  16. Collision-induced coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1985-01-01

    Collision-induced coherence is based on the elimination of phase correlations between coherent Feynman-type pathways which happen to interfere destructively in the absence of damping for certain nonlinear processes. One consequence is the appearance of the extra resonances in four-wave light mixing experiments, for which the intensity increases with increasing buffer gas pressure. These resonances may occur between a pair of initially unpopulated excited states, or between a pair of initially equally populated ground states. The pair of levels may be Zeeman substrates which became degenerate in zero magnetic field. The resulting collision-enhanced Hanle resonances can lead to very sharp variations in the four-wave light mixing signal as the external magnetic field passes through zero. The theoretical description in terms of a coherence grating between Zeeman substrates is equivalent to a description in terms of a spin polarization grating obtained by collision-enhanced transverse optical pumping. The axis of quantization in the former case is taken perpendicular to the direction of the light beams; in the latter case is taken parallel to this direction

  17. Coherent laser vision system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastion, R.L. [Coleman Research Corp., Springfield, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS) is being developed to provide precision real-time 3D world views to support site characterization and robotic operations and during facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning. Autonomous or semiautonomous robotic operations requires an accurate, up-to-date 3D world view. Existing technologies for real-time 3D imaging, such as AM laser radar, have limited accuracy at significant ranges and have variability in range estimates caused by lighting or surface shading. Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no-moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic to coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  18. Coherent electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  19. Coherent radiation from pulsars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Interaction between a relativistic electrom stream and a plasma under conditions believed to exist in pulsar magnetospheres is shown to result in the simultaneous emission of coherent curvature radiation at radio wavelengths and incoherent curvature radiation at X-ray wavelengths from the same spatial volume. It is found that such a stream can propagate through a plasma parallel to a very strong magnetic field only if its length is less than a critical length L/sub asterisk/ic. Charge induced in the plasma by the stream co-moves with the stream and has the same limitation in longitudinal extent. The resultant charge bunching is sufficient to cause the relatively low energy plasma particles to radiate at radio wavelengths coherently while the relatively high energy stream particles radiate at X-ray wavelengths incoherently as the stream-plasma system moves along curved magnetic field lines. The effective number of coherently radiating particles per bunch is estimated to be approx.10 14 --10 15 for a tupical pulsar

  20. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  1. Raman chemical imaging technology for food and agricultural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents Raman chemical imaging technology for inspecting food and agricultural products. The paper puts emphasis on introducing and demonstrating Raman imaging techniques for practical uses in food analysis. The main topics include Raman scattering principles, Raman spectroscopy measurem...

  2. Coherent manipulation of a 40Ca+ spin qubit in a micro ion trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poschinger, U.G.; Huber, G.; Ziesel, F.

    2009-01-01

    the initialization and readout of the qubit levels with 99.5% efficiency. We employ a Raman transition close to the S1/2-P1/2 resonance for coherent manipulation of the qubit. We observe single qubit rotations with 96% fidelity and gate times below 5 µs. Rabi oscillations on the blue motional sideband are used...

  3. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  4. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  5. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrabba, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Raman Spectroscopy in the screening of soils, ground water, and surface waters for pollutants is described. A probe accessory for conducting surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is undergoing testing for dilute chlorinated solvents

  6. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  7. Dynamics of long ring Raman fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Sergey V.; Melnikov, Leonid A.; Mazhirina, Yulia A.

    2016-04-01

    The numerical model for dynamics of long fiber ring Raman laser is proposed. The model is based on the transport equations and Courant-Isaacson-Rees numerical method. Different regimes of a long ring fiber Raman laser are investigated.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  9. Micro-raman and tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy of carbon allotropes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, G.G.; With, de G.; Loos, J.

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectroscopic data are obtained on various carbon allotropes like diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene and single wall carbon nanotubes by micro-Raman spectroscopy, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging, and the potentials of these techniques for

  10. Challenges in higher order mode Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Nielsen, Kristian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2015-01-01

    A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed......A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed...

  11. Mixture analysis with laser raman spctroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.S.; Bark, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Trace amount of methyl orange was determined in colored medium by resonance Raman spectrometry. Without major modification of a commercial laser Raman spectrometer, the resonance Raman active molecule could be determined satisfactorily in 10sup(-5)M range when the background fluorescence was more than 20 times stronger than the signal. Use of fluorescence quenching agent was found helpful to improve the Raman signal. Suggestions for the improvement of analytical method is presented. (Author)

  12. Raman Microscopy and Microspectroscopy of Biological Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsema, N.M.; Otto, C.; Segers-Nolten, G.M.J.; Greve, J.; Merlin, Jean Claude; Turrell, Sylvia; Huvenne, Jean Pierre

    With a confocal Raman microspectrometer it is possible to collect Raman signal of a volume of only 1 µm3 Therefore, this technique offers the possibility to obtain information about the chemical composition of small cell structures like granules, without destroying the cell [1], This makes Raman

  13. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  14. Topological Properties of Spatial Coherence Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Rong, Ren; Tao, Zhu; Yi-Shi, Duan

    2008-01-01

    The topological properties of the spatial coherence function are investigated rigorously. The phase singular structures (coherence vortices) of coherence function can be naturally deduced from the topological current, which is an abstract mathematical object studied previously. We find that coherence vortices are characterized by the Hopf index and Brouwer degree in topology. The coherence flux quantization and the linking of the closed coherence vortices are also studied from the topological properties of the spatial coherence function

  15. Partially coherent isodiffracting pulsed beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivurova, Matias; Ding, Chaoliang; Turunen, Jari; Pan, Liuzhan

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a class of isodiffracting pulsed beams, which are superpositions of transverse modes supported by spherical-mirror laser resonators. By employing modal weights that, for stationary light, produce a Gaussian Schell-model beam, we extend this standard model to pulsed beams. We first construct the two-frequency cross-spectral density function that characterizes the spatial coherence in the space-frequency domain. By assuming a power-exponential spectral profile, we then employ the generalized Wiener-Khintchine theorem for nonstationary light to derive the two-time mutual coherence function that describes the space-time coherence of the ensuing beams. The isodiffracting nature of the laser resonator modes permits all (paraxial-domain) calculations at any propagation distance to be performed analytically. Significant spatiotemporal coupling is revealed in subcycle, single-cycle, and few-cycle domains, where the partial spatial coherence also leads to reduced temporal coherence even though full spectral coherence is assumed.

  16. Volitional Control of Neuromagnetic Coherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Sacchet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coherence of neural activity between circumscribed brain regions has been implicated as an indicator of intracerebral communication in various cognitive processes. While neural activity can be volitionally controlled with neurofeedback, the volitional control of coherence has not yet been explored. Learned volitional control of coherence could elucidate mechanisms of associations between cortical areas and its cognitive correlates and may have clinical implications. Neural coherence may also provide a signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. In the present study we used the Weighted Overlapping Segment Averaging (WOSA method to assess coherence between bilateral magnetoencephalograph (MEG sensors during voluntary digit movement as a basis for BCI control. Participants controlled an onscreen cursor, with a success rate of 124 of 180 (68.9%, sign-test p < 0.001 and 84 out of 100 (84%, sign-test p < 0.001. The present findings suggest that neural coherence may be volitionally controlled and may have specific behavioral correlates.

  17. Coherent quantum logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkelstein, D.

    1987-01-01

    The von Neumann quantum logic lacks two basic symmetries of classical logic, that between sets and classes, and that between lower and higher order predicates. Similarly, the structural parallel between the set algebra and linear algebra of Grassmann and Peano was left incomplete by them in two respects. In this work a linear algebra is constructed that completes this correspondence and is interpreted as a new quantum logic that restores these invariances, and as a quantum set theory. It applies to experiments with coherent quantum phase relations between the quantum and the apparatus. The quantum set theory is applied to model a Lorentz-invariant quantum time-space complex

  18. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  19. Hadron coherent production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dremin, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    The process of the coherent production of hadrons analogous to Cherenkov radiation of photons is considered. Its appearence and qualitative treatment are possible now because it is known from experiment that the real part of the πp (and pp) forward elastic scattering amplitude is positive at high energies. The threshold behaviour of the process as well as very typical angular and psub(T)-distributions where psub(t)-transverse momentum corresponding to the ring structure of the target diagram at rather large angles and to high-psub(T) jet production are emphasized [ru

  20. Optical coherence refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlins, Peter H; Woolliams, Peter; Hart, Christian; Beaumont, Andrew; Tedaldi, Matthew

    2008-10-01

    We introduce a novel approach to refractometry using a low coherence interferometer at multiple angles of incidence. We show that for plane parallel samples it is possible to measure their phase refractive index rather than the group index that is usually measured by interferometric methods. This is a significant development because it enables bulk refractive index measurement of scattering and soft samples, not relying on surface measurements that can be prone to error. Our technique is also noncontact and compatible with in situ refractive index measurements. Here, we demonstrate this new technique on a pure silica test piece and a highly scattering resin slab, comparing the results with standard critical angle refractometry.

  1. Coherent laser beam combining

    CERN Document Server

    Brignon, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the improvement of diode pumping in solid state lasers and the development of double clad fiber lasers have allowed to maintain excellent laser beam quality with single mode fibers. However, the fiber output power if often limited below a power damage threshold. Coherent laser beam combining (CLBC) brings a solution to these limitations by identifying the most efficient architectures and allowing for excellent spectral and spatial quality. This knowledge will become critical for the design of the next generation high-power lasers and is of major interest to many industrial, environme

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Ocular Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen; Gellermann, Warner

    The optically transparent nature of the human eye has motivated numerous Raman studies aimed at the non-invasive optical probing of ocular tissue components critical to healthy vision. Investigations include the qualitative and quantitative detection of tissue-specific molecular constituents, compositional changes occurring with development of ocular pathology, and the detection and tracking of ocular drugs and nutritional supplements. Motivated by a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cataract formation in the aging human lens, a great deal of work has centered on the Raman detection of proteins and water content in the lens. Several protein groups and the hydroxyl response are readily detectable. Changes of protein compositions can be studied in excised noncataractous tissue versus aged tissue preparations as well as in tissue samples with artificially induced cataracts. Most of these studies are carried out in vitro using suitable animal models and conventional Raman techniques. Tissue water content plays an important role in optimum light transmission of the outermost transparent ocular structure, the cornea. Using confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques, it has been possible to non-invasively measure the water to protein ratio as a measure of hydration status and to track drug-induced changes of the hydration levels in the rabbit cornea at various depths. The aqueous humor, normally supplying nutrients to cornea and lens, has an advantageous anterior location for Raman studies. Increasing efforts are pursued to non-invasively detect the presence of glucose and therapeutic concentrations of antibiotic drugs in this medium. In retinal tissue, Raman spectroscopy proves to be an important tool for research into the causes of macular degeneration, the leading cause of irreversible vision disorders and blindness in the elderly. It has been possible to detect the spectral features of advanced glycation and advanced lipooxydation end products in

  3. Coherent states and rational surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, Dorje C; Graefe, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    The state spaces of generalized coherent states associated with special unitary groups are shown to form rational curves and surfaces in the space of pure states. These curves and surfaces are generated by the various Veronese embeddings of the underlying state space into higher dimensional state spaces. This construction is applied to the parameterization of generalized coherent states, which is useful for practical calculations, and provides an elementary combinatorial approach to the geometry of the coherent state space. The results are extended to Hilbert spaces with indefinite inner products, leading to the introduction of a new kind of generalized coherent states.

  4. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented

  5. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented.

  6. Regulatory risk coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    As one of the most progressive users of risk assessment in decision making, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in a position to play an important role in influencing the development of standard government wide policies for the application of risk assessment in decision making. The NRC, with the support of the nuclear industry, should use the opportunity provided by its experience with risk assessment to actively encourage the adoption of standard national and international health-based safety goals and at the same time accelerate its own efforts to implement the safety goals it has already developed for itself. There are signs of increased recognition of the need for consistency and coherence in the application of risk assessment in government decision making. The NRC and the nuclear industry have recently taken a great step toward establishing a consistant and coherent risk assessment-based culture in the US nuclear industry. As a result of Generic Letter 88-20, which asks each commercial nuclear power plant licensee to perform an individual plant examination by September 1992, for the first time a risk assessment characterizing initiating events in each plant will exist

  7. Ordering states with various coherence measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long-Mei; Chen, Bin; Fei, Shao-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2018-04-01

    Quantum coherence is one of the most significant theories in quantum physics. Ordering states with various coherence measures is an intriguing task in quantification theory of coherence. In this paper, we study this problem by use of four important coherence measures—the l_1 norm of coherence, the relative entropy of coherence, the geometric measure of coherence and the modified trace distance measure of coherence. We show that each pair of these measures give a different ordering of qudit states when d≥3. However, for single-qubit states, the l_1 norm of coherence and the geometric coherence provide the same ordering. We also show that the relative entropy of coherence and the geometric coherence give a different ordering for single-qubit states. Then we partially answer the open question proposed in Liu et al. (Quantum Inf Process 15:4189, 2016) whether all the coherence measures give a different ordering of states.

  8. Improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery via Raman-based technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Todd; Lewis, Spencer; Freudiger, Christian W; Sunney Xie, X; Orringer, Daniel A

    2016-03-01

    Despite advances in the surgical management of brain tumors, achieving optimal surgical results and identification of tumor remains a challenge. Raman spectroscopy, a laser-based technique that can be used to nondestructively differentiate molecules based on the inelastic scattering of light, is being applied toward improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Here, the authors systematically review the application of Raman spectroscopy for guidance during brain tumor surgery. Raman spectroscopy can differentiate normal brain from necrotic and vital glioma tissue in human specimens based on chemical differences, and has recently been shown to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues during surgery. Raman spectroscopy also forms the basis for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, a technique that amplifies spontaneous Raman signals by 10,000-fold, enabling real-time histological imaging without the need for tissue processing, sectioning, or staining. The authors review the relevant basic and translational studies on CRS microscopy as a means of providing real-time intraoperative guidance. Recent studies have demonstrated how CRS can be used to differentiate tumor-infiltrated tissues from noninfiltrated tissues and that it has excellent agreement with traditional histology. Under simulated operative conditions, CRS has been shown to identify tumor margins that would be undetectable using standard bright-field microscopy. In addition, CRS microscopy has been shown to detect tumor in human surgical specimens with near-perfect agreement to standard H & E microscopy. The authors suggest that as the intraoperative application and instrumentation for Raman spectroscopy and imaging matures, it will become an essential component in the neurosurgical armamentarium for identifying residual tumor and improving the surgical management of brain tumors.

  9. Unusual photoluminescence phenomena : New insights in Stokes and anti-Stokes emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.

    2017-01-01

    Photoluminescent materials are applied in many devices that we use in our daily lives. For example in fluorescent lamps and LED-lamps, photoluminescent materials convert the source light to create white light. Photoluminescent materials can also play a role in more complicated devices, as for

  10. Some general properties of stimulated Raman propagation with pump depletion, transiency and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.; Lowder, S.; Johnson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This note considers some of the properties of the Stokes pulse that grows from a specified seed pulse in the presence of a strong pump pulse as it propagates through a dispersive atomic vapor. We first present an generic dimensionless form for the coupled equations that govern the propagation of pump and Stokes fields or collinear plane-wave pulses. By treating the two fields we permit pump depletion. We include transient atomic response (as embodied in the Raman coherence), but neglect changes in atomic populations. (Thus our equations pertain to the regime in which atoms are more numerous than photons). The equations employ a gain length, a dispersion time τ dis , and a Raman coherence time (or memory time) τ R as basic parameters: these two times, together with a single-photon stationary-atom detuning Δ, subsume the details of a particular atomic Raman transition and particular operating conditions. (The effects of Doppler shifts enters the equations through the coherence time). We discuss some general properties of these generic Raman propagation equations, and present illustrations of their solutions in the absence of dispersion. We comment on departures from exponential growth. We than show examples of behavior when dispersion is present and the pump pulse has a bandwidth that exceeds the transform limit. The illustrations presented here do not pertain to any specific atom (i.e. specific wavelengths and oscillator strengths) or to specific experimental conditions (i.e. number densities and pulse intensities). To permit the connection between the present generic results and particular experiments we conclude by providing expressions for the gain length and dispersion time in terms of atomic number density, polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, statistical weights, transition frequencies, and polarization directions. 11 figs

  11. Detecting Molecular Properties by Various Laser-Based Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, Tse-Ming [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Four different laser-based techniques were applied to study physical and chemical characteristics of biomolecules and dye molecules. These techniques are liole burning spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy, time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence microscopy. Results from hole burning and single molecule spectroscopy suggested that two antenna states (C708 & C714) of photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 are connected by effective energy transfer and the corresponding energy transfer time is ~6 ps. In addition, results from hole burning spectroscopy indicated that the chlorophyll dimer of the C714 state has a large distribution of the dimer geometry. Direct observation of vibrational peaks and evolution of coumarin 153 in the electronic excited state was demonstrated by using the fs/ps CARS, a variation of time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In three different solvents, methanol, acetonitrile, and butanol, a vibration peak related to the stretch of the carbonyl group exhibits different relaxation dynamics. Laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, along with the biomimetic containers-liposomes, allows the measurement of the enzymatic activity of individual alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestinal mucosa without potential interferences from glass surfaces. The result showed a wide distribution of the enzyme reactivity. Protein structural variation is one of the major reasons that are responsible for this highly heterogeneous behavior.

  12. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  13. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brückner, Michael [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Becker, Katja [Justus Liebig University Giessen, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute for Physical Chemistry, 07745 Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Abbe Centre of Photonics, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-09-24

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  14. Fiber array based hyperspectral Raman imaging for chemical selective analysis of malaria-infected red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brückner, Michael; Becker, Katja; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    A new setup for Raman spectroscopic wide-field imaging is presented. It combines the advantages of a fiber array based spectral translator with a tailor-made laser illumination system for high-quality Raman chemical imaging of sensitive biological samples. The Gaussian-like intensity distribution of the illuminating laser beam is shaped by a square-core optical multimode fiber to a top-hat profile with very homogeneous intensity distribution to fulfill the conditions of Koehler. The 30 m long optical fiber and an additional vibrator efficiently destroy the polarization and coherence of the illuminating light. This homogeneous, incoherent illumination is an essential prerequisite for stable quantitative imaging of complex biological samples. The fiber array translates the two-dimensional lateral information of the Raman stray light into separated spectral channels with very high contrast. The Raman image can be correlated with a corresponding white light microscopic image of the sample. The new setup enables simultaneous quantification of all Raman spectra across the whole spatial area with very good spectral resolution and thus outperforms other Raman imaging approaches based on scanning and tunable filters. The unique capabilities of the setup for fast, gentle, sensitive, and selective chemical imaging of biological samples were applied for automated hemozoin analysis. A special algorithm was developed to generate Raman images based on the hemozoin distribution in red blood cells without any influence from other Raman scattering. The new imaging setup in combination with the robust algorithm provides a novel, elegant way for chemical selective analysis of the malaria pigment hemozoin in early ring stages of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes. - Highlights: • Raman hyperspectral imaging allows for chemical selective analysis of biological samples with spatial heterogeneity. • A homogeneous, incoherent illumination is essential for reliable

  15. Geometry of spin coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chryssomalakos, C.; Guzmán-González, E.; Serrano-Ensástiga, E.

    2018-04-01

    Spin states of maximal projection along some direction in space are called (spin) coherent, and are, in many respects, the ‘most classical’ available. For any spin s, the spin coherent states form a 2-sphere in the projective Hilbert space \

  16. Damping of Coherent oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, L

    1996-01-01

    Damping of coherent oscillations by feedback is straightforward in principle. It has been a vital ingredient for the safe operation of accelerators since a long time. The increasing dimensions and beam intensities of the new generation of hadron colliders impose unprecedented demands on the performance of future systems. The arguments leading to the specification of a transverse feedback system for the CERN SPS in its role as LHC injector and the LHC collider itself are developped to illustrate this. The preservation of the transverse emittance is the guiding principle during this exercise keeping in mind the hostile environment which comprises: transverse impedance bent on developping coupled bunch instabilities, injection errors, unwanted transverse excitation, unavoidable tune spreads and noise in the damping loop.

  17. Quantum information and coherence

    CERN Document Server

    Öhberg, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to ten key topics in quantum information science and quantum coherent phenomena, aimed at graduate-student level. The chapters cover some of the most recent developments in this dynamic research field where theoretical and experimental physics, combined with computer science, provide a fascinating arena for groundbreaking new concepts in information processing. The book addresses both the theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject, and clearly demonstrates how progress in experimental techniques has stimulated a great deal of theoretical effort and vice versa. Experiments are shifting from simply preparing and measuring quantum states to controlling and manipulating them, and the book outlines how the first real applications, notably quantum key distribution for secure communication, are starting to emerge. The chapters cover quantum retrodiction, ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices, optomechanics, quantum algorithms, quantum key distribution, quantum cont...

  18. Utilizing Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy to investigate healthy and cancerous colon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzegar, A.; Rezaei, H.; Malekfar, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, spontaneous Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra have been investigated. The samples which were kept in the formalin solution selected from the human's healthy and cancerous colon tissues. The Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy spectra were collected by adding colloidal solution contained silver nanoparticles to the top of the samples. The recorded spectra were compared for the spontaneous Raman spectra of healthy and cancerous colon samples. The spontaneous and surface enhanced Raman scattering data were also collected and compared for both healthy and damaged samples.

  19. Integrated coherent matter wave circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, C.; Boshier, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    An integrated coherent matter wave circuit is a single device, analogous to an integrated optical circuit, in which coherent de Broglie waves are created and then launched into waveguides where they can be switched, divided, recombined, and detected as they propagate. Applications of such circuits include guided atom interferometers, atomtronic circuits, and precisely controlled delivery of atoms. We report experiments demonstrating integrated circuits for guided coherent matter waves. The circuit elements are created with the painted potential technique, a form of time-averaged optical dipole potential in which a rapidly moving, tightly focused laser beam exerts forces on atoms through their electric polarizability. Moreover, the source of coherent matter waves is a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Finally, we launch BECs into painted waveguides that guide them around bends and form switches, phase coherent beamsplitters, and closed circuits. These are the basic elements that are needed to engineer arbitrarily complex matter wave circuitry

  20. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  1. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  2. Raman spectra of SDW superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G.C. [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Department of Physics, Government Science College, Chatrapur, Orissa 761 020 (India)]. E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in; Bishoyi, K.C. [P.G. Department of Physics, F.M. College (Autonomous), Balasore, Orissa 756 001 (India); Behera, S.N. [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2005-03-15

    We report the calculation of the phonon response of the coexistent spin density wave (SDW) and superconducting (SC) state and predict the observation of SC gap in the Raman spectra of rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors. The SDW state normally does not couple to the lattice and hence, the phonons in the system are not expected to be affected by the SDW state. But there is a possibility of observing SC gap mode in the Raman spectra of a SDW superconductor due to the coupling of the SC gap excitation to the Raman active phonons in the system via the electron-phonon (e-p) interaction. A theoretical model is used for the coexistent phase and electron-phonon interaction. Phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique and the phonon self-energy due to e-p interaction which is given by electron density response function in the coexistent state corresponding to the SDW wave vector q = Q is evaluated. The results so obtained exhibit agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. Raman spectra of SDW superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G.C.; Bishoyi, K.C.; Behera, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    We report the calculation of the phonon response of the coexistent spin density wave (SDW) and superconducting (SC) state and predict the observation of SC gap in the Raman spectra of rare-earth nickel borocarbide superconductors. The SDW state normally does not couple to the lattice and hence, the phonons in the system are not expected to be affected by the SDW state. But there is a possibility of observing SC gap mode in the Raman spectra of a SDW superconductor due to the coupling of the SC gap excitation to the Raman active phonons in the system via the electron-phonon (e-p) interaction. A theoretical model is used for the coexistent phase and electron-phonon interaction. Phonon Green's function is calculated by Zubarev's technique and the phonon self-energy due to e-p interaction which is given by electron density response function in the coexistent state corresponding to the SDW wave vector q = Q is evaluated. The results so obtained exhibit agreement with the experimental observations

  4. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  5. Coherent spin-rotational dynamics of oxygen superrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Alexander A.; Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2014-09-01

    We use state- and time-resolved coherent Raman spectroscopy to study the rotational dynamics of oxygen molecules in ultra-high rotational states. While it is possible to reach rotational quantum numbers up to N≈ 50 by increasing the gas temperature to 1500 K, low population levels and gas densities result in correspondingly weak optical response. By spinning {{O}2} molecules with an optical centrifuge, we efficiently excite extreme rotational states with N≤slant 109 in high-density room temperature ensembles. Fast molecular rotation results in the enhanced robustness of the created rotational wave packets against collisions, enabling us to observe the effects of weak spin-rotation coupling in the coherent rotational dynamics of oxygen. The decay rate of spin-rotational coherence due to collisions is measured as a function of the molecular angular momentum and its dependence on the collisional adiabaticity parameter is discussed. We find that at high values of N, the rotational decoherence of oxygen is much faster than that of the previously studied non-magnetic nitrogen molecules, pointing at the effects of spin relaxation in paramagnetic gases.

  6. The effect of n- and p-type doping on coherent phonons in GaN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Kunie; Kato, Keiko; Ohashi, Naoki; Haneda, Hajime; Kitajima, Masahiro; Petek, Hrvoje

    2013-05-22

    The effect of doping on the carrier-phonon interaction in wurtzite GaN is investigated by pump-probe reflectivity measurements using 3.1 eV light in near resonance with the fundamental band gap of 3.39 eV. Coherent modulations of the reflectivity due to the E2 and A1(LO) modes, as well as the 2A1(LO) overtone are observed. Doping of acceptor and donor atoms enhances the dephasing of the polar A1(LO) phonon via coupling with plasmons, with the effect of donors being stronger. Doping also enhances the relative amplitude of the coherent A1(LO) phonon with respect to that of the high-frequency E2 phonon, though it does not affect the relative intensity in Raman spectroscopic measurements. We attribute this enhanced coherent amplitude to the transient depletion field screening (TDFS) excitation mechanism, which, in addition to impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS), contributes to the generation of coherent polar phonons even for sub-band gap excitation. Because the TDFS mechanism requires photoexcitation of carriers, we argue that the interband transition is made possible at a surface with photon energies below the bulk band gap through the Franz-Keldysh effect.

  7. Coherent control of bond making: the performance of rationally phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Liat; Amitay, Zohar; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Koch, Christiane P; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the coherent control of a photoinduced binary reaction is bond making or photoassociation. We have recently demonstrated coherent control of bond making in multi-photon femtosecond photoassociation of hot magnesium atoms, using linearly chirped pulses (Levin et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 233003). The detected yield of photoassociated magnesium dimers was enhanced by positively chirped pulses which is explained theoretically by a combination of purification and chirp-dependent Raman transitions. The yield could be further enhanced by pulse optimization resulting in pulses with an effective linear chirp and a sub-pulse structure, where the latter allows for exploiting vibrational coherences. Here, we systematically explore the efficiency of phase-shaped pulses for the coherent control of bond making, employing a parametrization of the spectral phases in the form of cosine functions. We find up to an order of magnitude enhancement of the yield compared to the unshaped transform-limited pulse. The highly performing pulses all display an overall temporally increasing instantaneous frequency and are composed of several overlapping sub-pulses. The time delay between the first two sub-pulses fits very well the vibrational frequency of the generated intermediate wavepacket. These findings are in agreement with chirp-dependent Raman transitions and exploitation of vibrational dynamics as underlying control mechanisms. (paper)

  8. Difference Raman spectroscopy of DNA molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, Andrey S; Yuzyuk, Yury I; Gorelik, Vladimir S; Dovbeshko, Galina I; Pyatyshev, Alexander Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the micro-Raman spectra of calf DNA for different points of DNA sample have been recorded. The Raman spectra were made with help of difference Raman spectroscopy technique. Raman spectra were recorded with high spatial resolution from different points of the wet and dry samples in different spectral range (100÷4000cm −1 ) using two lasers: argon (514.5 nm) and helium -neon (632.8 nm). The significant differences in the Raman spectra for dry and wet DNA and for different points of DNA molecules were observed. The obtained data on difference Raman scattering spectra of DNA molecules may be used for identification of DNA types and for analysis of genetic information associated with the molecular structure of this molecule

  9. Raman amplification in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Fiber Raman amplifiers are investigated with the purpose of identifying new applications and limitations for their use in optical communication systems. Three main topics are investigated, namely: New applications of dispersion compensating Raman amplifiers, the use Raman amplification to increase...... fiberbaserede Raman-forstærkere med henblik på at identificere både deres begrænsninger og nye anvendelsesmuligheder i optiske kommunikationssystemer. En numerisk forstærkermodel er blevet udviklet for bedre at forstå forstærkerens dynamik, dens gain- og støjbegrænsninger. Modellen bruges til at forudsige...... forstærkerens statiske og dynamiske egenskaber, og det eftervises at dens resultater er i god overensstemmelse med eksperimentelle forstærkermålinger. Dispersions-kompenserende fiber er på grund af sin store udbredelse og fiberens høje Raman gain effektivitet et meget velegnet Raman gain-medium. Tre nye...

  10. Raman technique application for rubber blends characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitthipong, W.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has been employed in a number of studies to examine the morphological changes in a variety of materials. It is a non-destructive analysis method and an equally useful method for the investigation of material structure. Recently, Raman spectroscopy has been developed to employ as an imaging instrumentation. Sample surface scanning in X- and Y-axis and sample depth (Z-axis can be carried out by modifying the focus of the laser beam from the Raman microscope. Therefore, three-dimensional images can be thus built by using special software. The surface and bulk properties of immiscible rubber blend were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The results obtained by Raman spectroscopy were in good agreement with those of Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The combination of Raman spectrometry and SEM clearly elucidates the identification of phases between the dispersed phase and the matrix (continuous phase of the immiscible rubber blends.

  11. Enhanced Raman scattering in porous silicon grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Jia, Zhenhong; Lv, Changwu

    2018-03-19

    The enhancement of Raman signal on monocrystalline silicon gratings with varying groove depths and on porous silicon grating were studied for a highly sensitive surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response. In the experiment conducted, porous silicon gratings were fabricated. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were then deposited on the porous silicon grating to enhance the Raman signal of the detective objects. Results show that the enhancement of Raman signal on silicon grating improved when groove depth increased. The enhanced performance of Raman signal on porous silicon grating was also further improved. The Rhodamine SERS response based on Ag NPs/ porous silicon grating substrates was enhanced relative to the SERS response on Ag NPs/ porous silicon substrates. Ag NPs / porous silicon grating SERS substrate system achieved a highly sensitive SERS response due to the coupling of various Raman enhancement factors.

  12. Dephasing of LO-phonon-plasmon hybrid modes in n-type GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, F.; Ganikhanov, F.; Bogani, F.

    1997-11-01

    The relaxation dynamics of coherent phononlike LO-phonon-plasmon hybrid modes is investigated in n-doped GaAs using an infrared time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique. Measurements performed for different crystal temperatures in the range 10-300 K as a function of the electron density injected by doping show a large reduction of the hybrid mode dephasing time compared to the bare LO-phonon one for densities larger than 1016 cm-3. The results are interpreted in terms of coherent decay of the LO-phonon-plasmon mixed mode in the weak-coupling regime and yield information on the plasmon and electron relaxation. The estimated average electron momentum relaxation times are smaller than those deduced from Hall mobility measurements, as expected from our theoretical model.

  13. International workshop on phase retrieval and coherent scattering. Coherence 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, K.A.; Fienup, J.R.; Van Dyck, D.; Van Aert, S.; Weitkamp, T.; Diaz, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cloetens, P.; Stampanoni, M.; Bunk, O.; David, C.; Bronnikov, A.V.; Shen, Q.; Xiao, X.; Gureyev, T.E.; Nesterets, Ya.I.; Paganin, D.M.; Wilkins, S.W.; Mokso, R.; Cloetens, P.; Ludwig, W.; Hignette, O.; Maire, E.; Faulkner, H.M.L.; Rodenburg, J.M.; Wu, X.; Liu, H.; Grubel, G.; Ludwig, K.F.; Livet, F.; Bley, F.; Simon, J.P.; Caudron, R.; Le Bolloc'h, D.; Moussaid, A.; Gutt, C.; Sprung, M.; Madsen, A.; Tolan, M.; Sinha, S.K.; Scheffold, F.; Schurtenberger, P.; Robert, A.; Madsen, A.; Falus, P.; Borthwick, M.A.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Livet, F.; Sutton, M.D.; Ehrburger-Dolle, F.; Bley, F.; Geissler, E.; Sikharulidze, I.; Jeu, W.H. de; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Robinson, I.K.; Chapman, H.N.; Barty, A.; Beetz, T.; Cui, C.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; He, H.; Stadler, L.M.; Sepiol, B.; Harder, R.; Robinson, I.K.; Zontone, F.; Vogl, G.; Howells, M.; London, R.; Marchesini, S.; Shapiro, D.; Spence, J.C.H.; Weierstall, U.; Eisebitt, S.; Shapiro, D.; Lima, E.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.R.; Huang, X.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A.; Sayre, D.; Thibault, P.; Vartanyants, I.A.; Robinson, I.K.; Onken, J.D.; Pfeifer, M.A.; Williams, G.J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Metzger, H.; Zhong, Z.; Bauer, G.; Nishino, Y.; Miao, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Koike, K.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Spence, J.C.H.; Doak, B.

    2005-01-01

    The contributions of the participants have been organized into 3 topics: 1) phase retrieval methods, 2) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and 3) coherent diffraction imaging. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations and of the posters

  14. International workshop on phase retrieval and coherent scattering. Coherence 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, K.A.; Fienup, J.R.; Van Dyck, D.; Van Aert, S.; Weitkamp, T.; Diaz, A.; Pfeiffer, F.; Cloetens, P.; Stampanoni, M.; Bunk, O.; David, C.; Bronnikov, A.V.; Shen, Q.; Xiao, X.; Gureyev, T.E.; Nesterets, Ya.I.; Paganin, D.M.; Wilkins, S.W.; Mokso, R.; Cloetens, P.; Ludwig, W.; Hignette, O.; Maire, E.; Faulkner, H.M.L.; Rodenburg, J.M.; Wu, X.; Liu, H.; Grubel, G.; Ludwig, K.F.; Livet, F.; Bley, F.; Simon, J.P.; Caudron, R.; Le Bolloc' h, D.; Moussaid, A.; Gutt, C.; Sprung, M.; Madsen, A.; Tolan, M.; Sinha, S.K.; Scheffold, F.; Schurtenberger, P.; Robert, A.; Madsen, A.; Falus, P.; Borthwick, M.A.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Livet, F.; Sutton, M.D.; Ehrburger-Dolle, F.; Bley, F.; Geissler, E.; Sikharulidze, I.; Jeu, W.H. de; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Lurio, L.B.; Hu, X.; Jiao, X.; Jiang, Z.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Naryanan, S.; Sinha, S.K.; Lal, J.; Robinson, I.K.; Chapman, H.N.; Barty, A.; Beetz, T.; Cui, C.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; He, H.; Stadler, L.M.; Sepiol, B.; Harder, R.; Robinson, I.K.; Zontone, F.; Vogl, G.; Howells, M.; London, R.; Marchesini, S.; Shapiro, D.; Spence, J.C.H.; Weierstall, U.; Eisebitt, S.; Shapiro, D.; Lima, E.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.R.; Huang, X.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A.; Sayre, D.; Thibault, P.; Vartanyants, I.A.; Robinson, I.K.; Onken, J.D.; Pfeifer, M.A.; Williams, G.J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Metzger, H.; Zhong, Z.; Bauer, G.; Nishino, Y.; Miao, J.; Kohmura, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Koike, K.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Spence, J.C.H.; Doak, B

    2005-07-01

    The contributions of the participants have been organized into 3 topics: 1) phase retrieval methods, 2) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, and 3) coherent diffraction imaging. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations and of the posters.

  15. Self-consistent finite-temperature model of atom-laser coherence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergusson, J.R.; Geddes, A.J.; Hutchinson, D.A.W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a mean-field model of a continuous-wave atom laser with Raman output coupling. The noncondensate is pumped at a fixed input rate which, in turn, pumps the condensate through a two-body scattering process obeying the Fermi golden rule. The gas is then coupled out by a Gaussian beam from the system, and the temperature and particle number are self-consistently evaluated against equilibrium constraints. We observe the dependence of the second-order coherence of the output upon the width of the output-coupling beam, and note that even in the presence of a highly coherent trapped gas, perfect coherence of the output matter wave is not guaranteed

  16. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  17. Perturbative coherence in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrovandi, R.; Kraenkel, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    A general condition for coherent quantization by perturbative methods is given, because the basic field equations of a fild theory are not always derivable from a Lagrangian. It's seen that non-lagrangian models way have well defined vertices, provided they satisfy what they call the 'coherence condition', which is less stringent than the condition for the existence of a Lagrangian. They note that Lagrangian theories are perturbatively coherent, in the sense that they have well defined vertices, and that they satisfy automatically that condition. (G.D.F.) [pt

  18. Models of coherent exciton condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littlewood, P B; Eastham, P R; Keeling, J M J; Marchetti, F M; Simons, B D; Szymanska, M H

    2004-01-01

    That excitons in solids might condense into a phase-coherent ground state was proposed about 40 years ago, and has been attracting experimental and theoretical attention ever since. Although experimental confirmation has been hard to come by, the concepts released by this phenomenon have been widely influential. This tutorial review discusses general aspects of the theory of exciton and polariton condensates, focusing on the reasons for coherence in the ground state wavefunction, the BCS to Bose crossover(s) for excitons and for polaritons, and the relationship of the coherent condensates to standard lasers

  19. Models of coherent exciton condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlewood, P B [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Eastham, P R [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Keeling, J M J [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Marchetti, F M [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Simons, B D [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Szymanska, M H [Theory of Condensed Matter, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-08

    That excitons in solids might condense into a phase-coherent ground state was proposed about 40 years ago, and has been attracting experimental and theoretical attention ever since. Although experimental confirmation has been hard to come by, the concepts released by this phenomenon have been widely influential. This tutorial review discusses general aspects of the theory of exciton and polariton condensates, focusing on the reasons for coherence in the ground state wavefunction, the BCS to Bose crossover(s) for excitons and for polaritons, and the relationship of the coherent condensates to standard lasers.

  20. Optimally cloned binary coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, C. R.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.; Andersen, U. L.

    2017-10-01

    Binary coherent state alphabets can be represented in a two-dimensional Hilbert space. We capitalize this formal connection between the otherwise distinct domains of qubits and continuous variable states to map binary phase-shift keyed coherent states onto the Bloch sphere and to derive their quantum-optimal clones. We analyze the Wigner function and the cumulants of the clones, and we conclude that optimal cloning of binary coherent states requires a nonlinearity above second order. We propose several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes and compare their cloning fidelity to the optimal cloner.

  1. Evolution of magnetic and superconducting fluctuations with doping of high-Tc superconductors. An electronic Raman scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, G.

    1998-01-01

    For YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+δ and Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 3±δ superconductors, electronic Raman scattering from high- and low-energy excitations has been studied in relation to the hole doping level, temperature, and energy of the incident photons. For underdoped superconductors, it is concluded that short range antiferromagnetic (AF) correlations persist with hole doping and doped single holes are incoherent in the AF environment. Above the superconducting (SC) transition temperature T c the system exhibits a sharp Raman resonance of B 1g symmetry and about 75 meV energy and a pseudogap for electron-hole excitations below 75 meV, a manifestation of a partially coherent state forming from doped incoherent quasi-particles. The occupancy of the coherent state increases with cooling until phase ordering at T c produces a global SC state

  2. Reduction of Raman scattering and fluorescence from anvils in high pressure Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierker, S. B.; Aronson, M. C.

    2018-05-01

    We describe a new design and use of a high pressure anvil cell that significantly reduces the Raman scattering and fluorescence from the anvils in high pressure Raman scattering experiments. The approach is particularly useful in Raman scattering studies of opaque, weakly scattering samples. The effectiveness of the technique is illustrated with measurements of two-magnon Raman scattering in La2CuO4.

  3. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  4. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  5. Influence of the ordered structure of short-chain polymer molecule all-trans-β-carotene on Raman scattering cross section in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Guan-Nan; Li Zuo-Wei; Sun Cheng-Lin; Ou Yang Shun-Li; Wang Wei-Wei; Men Zhi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    We measured the resonant Raman spectra of all-trans-β-carotene in solvents with different densities and concentrations at different temperatures. The results demonstrated that the Raman scattering cross section (RSCS) of short-chain polymer all-trans-β-carotene is extremely high in liquid. Resonance and strong coherent weakly damped CC bond vibrating properties play important roles under these conditions. Coherent weakly damped CC bond vibration strength is associated with molecular ordered structure. All-trans-β-carotene has highly ordered structure and strong coherent weakly damped CC bond vibrating properties, which lead to large RSCS in the solvent with large density and low concentration at low temperature. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  6. Raman microspectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, and stable-isotope Raman microspectroscopy for biofilm characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Kubryk, Patrick; Niessner, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Biofilms represent the predominant form of microbial life on our planet. These aggregates of microorganisms, which are embedded in a matrix formed by extracellular polymeric substances, may colonize nearly all interfaces. Detailed knowledge of microorganisms enclosed in biofilms as well as of the chemical composition, structure, and functions of the complex biofilm matrix and their changes at different stages of the biofilm formation and under various physical and chemical conditions is relevant in different fields. Important research topics include the development and improvement of antibiotics and medical devices and the optimization of biocides, antifouling strategies, and biological wastewater treatment. Raman microspectroscopy is a capable and nondestructive tool that can provide detailed two-dimensional and three-dimensional chemical information about biofilm constituents with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope and without interference from water. However, the sensitivity of Raman microspectroscopy is rather limited, which hampers the applicability of Raman microspectroscopy especially at low biomass concentrations. Fortunately, the resonance Raman effect as well as surface-enhanced Raman scattering can help to overcome this drawback. Furthermore, the combination of Raman microspectroscopy with other microscopic techniques, mass spectrometry techniques, or particularly with stable-isotope techniques can provide comprehensive information on monospecies and multispecies biofilms. Here, an overview of different Raman microspectroscopic techniques, including resonance Raman microspectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microspectroscopy, for in situ detection, visualization, identification, and chemical characterization of biofilms is given, and the main feasibilities and limitations of these techniques in biofilm research are presented. Future possibilities of and challenges for Raman microspectroscopy alone and in combination with other

  7. Injection locking method for Raman beams in atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Fei; Deng, Jianing; Zeng, Daji; Li, Tong; Sun, Mingli; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Kaikai; Lu, Xuanhui

    2018-03-01

    We present a novel method to generate two phase-locked beams with a frequency offset of 6.834 GHz. The output of the master laser is firstly modulated by an electric optical modulator (EOM), and then further injected into an Extended Cavity Diode Lasers (ECDL) which is used to filter out the unwanted mode and amplify the laser power. By locking to the first-order lower sideband of the modulated master laser, the average variance of the phase fluctuations is 5.6 x 10-3 rad2 , which implies phase coherence of 99.44% between the master laser and the slave ECDL. The line width of the beat notes is less than 1Hz. For the long term stability, with the delicate design of the electronic controller in ECDL, the phase coherence of the two laser beams can be stabilized over 200 hours without any adjustment. The Raman system is applicable for gravity detection with a preliminary sensitivity Δg/g of 4.5 x 10-7 for interrogation time of 1500 s.

  8. Elucidation of reactive wavepackets by two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhenkun; Molesky, Brian P.; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M., E-mail: ammoran@email.unc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Traditional second-order kinetic theories fail to describe sub-picosecond photochemical reactions when solvation and vibrational dephasing undermine the assumption of equilibrium initial conditions. Four-wave mixing spectroscopies may reveal insights into such non-equilibrium processes but are limited by the single “population time” available in these types of experiments. Here, we use two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy to expose correlations between coherent nuclear motions of the reactant and product in the photodissociation reaction of triiodide. It is shown that the transition of a nuclear wavepacket from the reactant (triiodide) to product (diiodide) states gives rise to a unique pattern of 2DRR resonances. Peaks associated with this coherent reaction mechanism are readily assigned, because they are isolated in particular quadrants of the 2DRR spectrum. A theoretical model in which the chemical reaction is treated as a vibronic coherence transfer transition from triiodide to diiodide reproduces the patterns of 2DRR resonances detected in experiments. These signal components reveal correlation between the nonequilibrium geometry of triiodide and the vibrational coherence frequency of diiodide. The 2DRR signatures of coherent reaction mechanisms established in this work may generalize to studies of ultrafast energy and charge transfer processes.

  9. Detuning-induced stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in dense two-level systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Lin, Gongwei; Niu, Yueping; Gong, Shangqing

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the coherence generation in dense two-level systems under detuning-induced stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (D-STIRAP). In the dense two-level system, the near dipole-dipole (NDD) interaction should be taken into consideration. With the increase in the strength of the NDD interaction, it is found that a switchlike transition of the generated coherence from maximum value to zero appears. Meanwhile, the adiabatic condition of the D-STIRAP is destroyed in the presence of the NDD interaction. In order to avoid the sudden decrease in the generated coherence and maintain the maximum value, we can use stronger detuning pulse or pump pulse, between which increasing the intensity of the detuning pulse is of more efficiency. Except for taking advantage of such maximum coherence in the high density case into areas like enhancing the four-wave mixing process, we also point out that the phenomenon of the coherence transition can be applied as an optical switch.

  10. Coherence of light. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perina, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book puts the theory of coherence of light on a rigorous mathematical footing. It deals with the classical and quantum theories and with their inter-relationships, including many results from the author's own research. Particular attention is paid to the detection of optical fields, using the correlation functions, photocount statistics and coherent state. Radiometry with light fields of arbitrary states of coherence is discussed and the coherent state methods are demonstrated by photon statistics of radiation in random and nonlinear media, using the Heisenberg-Langevin and Fokker-Planck approaches to the interaction of radiation with matter. Many experimental and theoretical results are compared. A full list of references to theoretical and experimental literature is provided. The book is intended for researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of quantum optics, quantum electronics, statistical optics, nonlinear optics, optical communication and optoelectronics. (Auth.)

  11. Spin Coherence in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flatte, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    ... dots, tuning of spin coherence times for electron spin, tuning of dipolar magnetic fields for nuclear spin, spontaneous spin polarization generation and new designs for spin-based teleportation and spin transistors...

  12. Soft gluon coherence at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaidot, A.

    1993-01-01

    After a brief overview of the experimental status on colour coherence at LEP we will focus on two recent approaches to the subject: the sub-jet multiplicities and the azimuthal correlations between pair of particles. (author)

  13. Coherence matrix of plasmonic beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    We consider monochromatic electromagnetic beams of surface plasmon-polaritons created at interfaces between dielectric media and metals. We theoretically study non-coherent superpositions of elementary surface waves and discuss their spectral degree of polarization, Stokes parameters, and the for...... of the spectral coherence matrix. We compare the polarization properties of the surface plasmonspolaritons as three-dimensional and two-dimensional fields concluding that the latter is superior....

  14. Raman spectra studies of dipeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Simone.

    1977-10-01

    This work deals with the homogenous and heterogeneous dipeptides derived from alanine and glycine, in the solid state or in aqueous solutions, in the zwitterions or chlorhydrates form. The Raman spectra comparative study of these various forms of hydrogenated or deuterated compounds allows to specify some of the attributions which are necessary in the conformational study of the like tripeptides. These compounds contain only one peptidic group; therefore there is no possibility of intramolecular hydrogen bond which caracterise vibrations of non bonded peptidic groups and end groups. Infrared spectra of solid dipeptides will be presented and discussed in the near future [fr

  15. Coherent systems with multistate components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarola, L.

    1980-01-01

    The basic rules of the Boolean algebra with restrictions on variables are briefly recalled. This special type of Boolean algebra allows one to handle fault trees of systems made of multistate (two or more than two states) components. Coherent systems are defined in the case of multistate components. This definition is consistent with that originally suggested by Barlow in the case of binary (two states) components. The basic properties of coherence are described and discussed. Coherent Boolean functions are also defined. It is shown that these functions are irredundant, that is they have only one base which is at the same time complete and irredundant. However, irredundant functions are not necessarily coherent. Finally a simplified algorithm for the calculation of the base of a coherent function is described. In the case that the function is not coherent, the algorithm can be used to reduce the size of the normal disjunctive form of the function. This in turn eases the application of the Nelson algorithm to calculate the complete base of the function. The simplified algorithm has been built in the computer program MUSTAFA-1. In a sample case the use of this algorithm caused a reduction of the CPU time by a factor of about 20. (orig.)

  16. Generation of Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions driven by ultraintense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jinming; Cheng, Ya

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric lasing has aroused much interest in the past few years. The ‘air–laser’ opens promising potential for remote chemical sensing of trace gases with high sensitivity and specificity. At present, several approaches have been successfully implemented for generating highly coherent laser beams in atmospheric condition, including both amplified-spontaneous emission, and narrow-bandwidth stimulated emission in the forward direction in the presence of self-generated or externally injected seed pulses. Here, we report on generation of multiple-wavelength Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions ({{{N}}}2+), driven by intense mid-infrared laser fields. Intuitively, the approach appears problematic for the small nonlinear susceptibility of {{{N}}}2+ ions, whereas the efficiency of Raman laser can be significantly promoted in near-resonant condition. More surprisingly, a Raman laser consisting of a supercontinuum spanning from ∼310 to ∼392 nm has been observed resulting from a series near-resonant nonlinear processes including four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering and cross phase modulation. To date, extreme nonlinear optics in molecular ions remains largely unexplored, which provides an alternative means for air–laser-based remote sensing applications.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Alberto Testoni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is an optical imaging modality that performs high-resolution, cross-sectional, subsurface tomographic imaging of the microstructure of tissues. The physical principle of OCT is similar to that of B-mode ultrasound imaging, except that it uses infrared light waves rather than acoustic waves. The in vivo resolution is 10–25 times better (about 10 µm than with high-frequency ultrasound imaging, but the depth of penetration is limited to 1–3 mm, depending on tissue structure, depth of focus of the probe used, and pressure applied to the tissue surface. In the last decade, OCT technology has evolved from an experimental laboratory tool to a new diagnostic imaging modality with a wide spectrum of clinical applications in medical practice, including the gastrointestinal tract and pancreatico-biliary ductal system. OCT imaging from the gastrointestinal tract can be done in humans by using narrow-diameter, catheter-based probes that can be inserted through the accessory channel of either a conventional front-view endoscope, for investigating the epithelial structure of the gastrointestinal tract, or a side-view endoscope, inside a standard transparent ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography catheter, for investigating the pancreatico-biliary ductal system. The esophagus and esophagogastric junction have been the most widely investigated organs so far; more recently, duodenum, colon, and the pancreatico-biliary ductal system have also been extensively investigated. OCT imaging of the gastrointestinal wall structure is characterized by a multiple-layer architecture that permits an accurate evaluation of the mucosa, lamina propria, muscularis mucosae, and part of the submucosa. The technique may therefore be used to identify preneoplastic conditions of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's epithelium and dysplasia, and evaluate the depth of penetration of early-stage neoplastic lesions. OCT imaging

  18. Development of Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy: Stimulated Raman Gain via Elimination of Cross Phase Modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Seung Min; Lee, Young Jong; Yu, Jong Wan; Kim, Seong Keun

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new femtosecond probe technique by using stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The cross phase modulation in femtosecond time scale associated with off-resonant interaction was shown to be eliminated by integrating the transient gain/loss signal over the time delay between the Raman pump pulse and the continuum pulse. The stimulated Raman gain of neat cyclohexane was obtained to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. Spectral and temporal widths of stimulated Raman spectra were controlled by using a narrow band pass filter. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy was proposed as a highly useful probe in time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

  19. Store operations to maintain cache coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Nair, Ravi; Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes encountering a store operation during a compile-time of a program, where the store operation is applicable to a memory line. It is determined, by a computer processor, that no cache coherence action is necessary for the store operation. A store-without-coherence-action instruction is generated for the store operation, responsive to determining that no cache coherence action is necessary. The store-without-coherence-action instruction specifies that the store operation is to be performed without a cache coherence action, and cache coherence is maintained upon execution of the store-without-coherence-action instruction.

  20. Store operations to maintain cache coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Nair, Ravi; Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-09-12

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes encountering a store operation during a compile-time of a program, where the store operation is applicable to a memory line. It is determined, by a computer processor, that no cache coherence action is necessary for the store operation. A store-without-coherence-action instruction is generated for the store operation, responsive to determining that no cache coherence action is necessary. The store-without-coherence-action instruction specifies that the store operation is to be performed without a cache coherence action, and cache coherence is maintained upon execution of the store-without-coherence-action instruction.

  1. [Fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in small particles]: Annual report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, H.; McNulty, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the model formulated for fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in or in the vicinity of small particles. The model takes into account the size, shape, refractive index, and morphology of the host particles. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for spherical (one and more layers, including magnetic dipole transitions), cylindrical, and spheroidal particles. Particular attention has been given to the spherical case with fluorescent/Raman scatterers uniformly distributed in the particles radiating both coherently and incoherently. Depolarization effects have been studied with suitable averaging process, and good agreement with experiment has been obtained. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for the elastic scattering of evanescent waves; these results are useful for the study of fluorescence under excitation by evanescent waves

  2. Improved efficiency of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in photoassociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackie, Matt; Suominen, Kalle-Antti; Haerkoenen, Kari; Collin, Anssi; Javanainen, Juha

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically examine Raman photoassociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate, revisiting stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). Due to collisional mean-field shifts, efficient molecular conversion requires strong coupling and low density, either of which can bring about rogue photodissociation to noncondensate modes. We demonstrate explicitly that rogue transitions are negligible for low excited-state fractions and photodissociation that is slower than the STIRAP time scale. Moreover, we derive a reduced-parameter model of collisions, and thereby find that a gain in the molecular conversion efficiency can be obtained by adjusting the atom-atom scattering length with off-resonant magnetoassociation. This gain saturates when the atom-atom scattering length is tuned to a specific fraction of either the molecule-molecule or atom-molecule scattering length. We conclude that a fully optimized STIRAP scheme may offer the best chance for achieving coherent conversion from an atomic to a molecular condensate with photoassociation

  3. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  4. Analysis of ancient pigments by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jian; Xu Cunyi

    1999-01-01

    Raman microscopy can be applied for the spatial resolution, and non-destructive in situ analysis of inorganic pigments in pottery, manuscripts and paintings. Compared with other techniques, it is the best single technique for this purpose. An overview is presented of the applications of Raman microscopy in the analysis of ancient pigments

  5. RAMAN-SPECTRA OF HUMAN DENTAL CALCULUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSUDA, H; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    Raman spectra of human dental calculus have been observed for the first time by use of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral features of calculus were influenced easily by heating caused by laser irradiation. Therefore, the measurements were carried out at relatively low power (5 mW, 1-mu m spot

  6. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  7. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  8. Characterization of Materials by Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper reports on the use of phonon spectra obtained with the Raman spectroscopy for characterization of different materials. The Raman scattering spectra obtained for zinc selenide crystals, mixed crystals zinc selenide admixtured with magnesium or beryllium, oxide crystals including strontium lanthanum gallate, molecular crystals of triammonium hydrogen diseleniate and a homologous series of polyoxyethylene glycols are analysed.

  9. INFRARED AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF ION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both n (CN) and n (CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  10. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  11. Confocal Raman Microscopy; applications in tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, Aart A.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the use of confocal Raman microscopy and spectroscopy in the field of tissue engineering. Moreover, it describes the combination of two already existing technologies, namely scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy in one apparatus for the enhancement

  12. Raman spectra of human dentin mineral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuda, H; Ruben, J; Arends, J

    Human dentin mineral has been investigated by using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Fluorescence and thermal problems were largely avoided by preparing dentin samples by grinding and ultrasonic agitation in acetone. The Raman spectral features were consistent with those of impure hydroxyapatite containing

  13. Development of a Raman spectrometer to study surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Nandita; Chadha, Ridhima; Kapoor, Sudhir; Sarkar, Sisir K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi

    2011-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an important tool, which provides enormous information on the vibrational and structural details of materials. This understanding is not only interesting due to its fundamental importance, but also of considerable importance in optoelectronics and device applications of these materials in nanotechnology. In this report, we begin with a brief introduction on the Raman effect and various Raman scattering techniques, followed by a detailed discussion on the development of an instrument with home-built collection optics attachment. This Raman system consists of a pulsed laser excitation source, a sample compartment, collection optics to collect the scattered light, a notch filter to reject the intense laser light, a monochromator to disperse the scattered light and a detector to detect the Raman signal. After calibrating the Raman spectrometer with standard solvents, we present our results on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) investigations on three different kinds of chemical systems. (author)

  14. Coherent communication with continuous quantum variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A.

    2007-06-01

    The coherent bit (cobit) channel is a resource intermediate between classical and quantum communication. It produces coherent versions of teleportation and superdense coding. We extend the cobit channel to continuous variables by providing a definition of the coherent nat (conat) channel. We construct several coherent protocols that use both a position-quadrature and a momentum-quadrature conat channel with finite squeezing. Finally, we show that the quality of squeezing diminishes through successive compositions of coherent teleportation and superdense coding.

  15. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yahong; Cai, Yangjian, E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Key Lab of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Technologies of Jiangsu Province and Key Lab of Modern Optical Technologies of Education Ministry of China, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ponomarenko, Sergey A., E-mail: serpo@dal.ca, E-mail: yangjiancai@suda.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2X4 (Canada)

    2016-08-08

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  16. High Fidelity Raman Chemical Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Venkata Nagamalli Koteswara Rao

    The development of high fidelity Raman imaging systems is important for a number of application areas including material science, bio-imaging, bioscience and healthcare, pharmaceutical analysis, and semiconductor characterization. The use of Raman imaging as a characterization tool for detecting the amorphous and crystalline regions in the biopolymer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is the precis of my thesis. In the first chapter, a brief insight about the basics of Raman spectroscopy, Raman chemical imaging, Raman mapping, and Raman imaging techniques has been provided. The second chapter contains details about the successful development of tailored sample of PLLA. Biodegradable polymers are used in areas of tissue engineering, agriculture, packaging, and in medical field for drug delivery, implant devices, and surgical sutures. Detailed information about the sample preparation and characterization of these cold-drawn PLLA polymer substrates has been provided. Wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was demonstrated in the early 1990s. The AOTF contributed challenges such as image walk, distortion, and image blur. A wide-field AOTF Raman imaging system has been developed as part of my research and methods to overcome some of the challenges in performing AOTF wide-field Raman imaging are discussed in the third chapter. This imaging system has been used for studying the crystalline and amorphous regions on the cold-drawn sample of PLLA. Of all the different modalities that are available for performing Raman imaging, Raman point-mapping is the most extensively used method. The ease of obtaining the Raman hyperspectral cube dataset with a high spectral and spatial resolution is the main motive of performing this technique. As a part of my research, I have constructed a Raman point-mapping system and used it for obtaining Raman hyperspectral image data of various minerals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Chapter four offers

  17. Dichromatic light halting using double spin coherence gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Byoung S; Hahn, Joonseong

    2011-01-01

    Light control by another light has drawn much attention in nonlinear quantum optics. Achieving all-optical control of the refractive index has been a key issue in all-optical information processing. Ultraslow light has been a good candidate for this purpose, where a giant phase shift can be achieved. The recent presentation of stationary light utilizing ultraslow light is an advanced example of such research. The stationary light functions as cavity quantum electrodynamics, where no high-Q-factor mirror pair is needed. In this paper, we report on two-color halted light pulses inside a solid medium, where the trapping time is comparable with that of ultraslow light but is much longer than quantum mapping storage time. The observed two-color halted light is achieved by means of double Raman optical field-excited spin coherence gratings, where slow light enhanced backward nondegenerate four-wave mixing processes play a major role.

  18. Dichromatic light halting using double spin coherence gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Byoung S; Hahn, Joonseong, E-mail: bham@inha.ac.kr [Center for Photon Information Processing, School of Electrical Engineering, Inha University, 253 Yoghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Light control by another light has drawn much attention in nonlinear quantum optics. Achieving all-optical control of the refractive index has been a key issue in all-optical information processing. Ultraslow light has been a good candidate for this purpose, where a giant phase shift can be achieved. The recent presentation of stationary light utilizing ultraslow light is an advanced example of such research. The stationary light functions as cavity quantum electrodynamics, where no high-Q-factor mirror pair is needed. In this paper, we report on two-color halted light pulses inside a solid medium, where the trapping time is comparable with that of ultraslow light but is much longer than quantum mapping storage time. The observed two-color halted light is achieved by means of double Raman optical field-excited spin coherence gratings, where slow light enhanced backward nondegenerate four-wave mixing processes play a major role.

  19. Relaxation oscillations in stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachen, G.I.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    Light pulses created by stimulated Raman scattering having been found to exhibit a complex time dependence which resembles relaxation oscillations. A focused laser pulse generated both forward and backward Raman emissions which appeared as a series of pulses with durations much shorter than the incident laser pulse. Time dependence of the Raman emission was observed directly by use of a streak camera. The number of observed pulses increased with the intensity of the incident pulse, while separation of the pulses in time depended on the length of the focal region. Beam focusing was incorporated in the coupled wave equations for stimulated Raman scattering. These rate equations were then solved numerically, and the results are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The short Raman pulses are created by a process associated with depletion of the incident laser pulse. This process occurs under a broad range of conditions

  20. Raman spectra of filled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, S.M.; Behera, S.N.; Sarangi, S.N.; Entel, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Raman spectra of a metallic carbon nanotube filled with atoms or molecules have been investigated theoretically. It is found that there will be a three way splitting of the main Raman lines due to the interaction of the nanotube phonon with the collective excitations (plasmons) of the conduction electrons of the nanotube as well as its coupling with the phonon of the filling material. The positions and relative strengths of these Raman peaks depend on the strength of the electron-phonon interaction, phonon frequency of the filling atom and the strength of interaction of the nanotube phonon and the phonon of the filling atoms. Careful experimental studies of the Raman spectra of filled nanotubes should show these three peaks. It is also shown that in a semiconducting nanotube the Raman line will split into two and should be observed experimentally

  1. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Zauner, Dan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report low resolution surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) conducted with a chip based spectrometer. The flat field spectrometer presented here is fabricated in SU-8 on silicon, showing a resolution of around 3 nm and a free spectral range of around 100 nm. The output facet...... is projected onto a CCD element and visualized by a computer. To enhance the otherwise rather weak Raman signal, a nanosurface is prepared and a sample solutions is impregnated on this surface. The surface enhanced Raman signal is picked up using a Raman probe and coupled into the spectrometer via an optical...... fiber. The obtained spectra show that chip based spectrometer together with the SERS active surface can be used as Raman sensor....

  2. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan

    of the aromatics, Toluene and Naphthalene, in the gasoline. Chapter 6 shows examples of other applications of DUV Raman spectroscopy, for instance for the illegal red food additive: Sudan I. For this dye Raman spectra - useful to indicate an unwanted presence - could not be obtained with green or blue laser line...... Raman spectrometry was further applied to detect another illegal food additive, Melamine, in milk sample. It was shown that the DUV constitutes a more sensitive measurement method than traditional Raman spectrometry and realizes a direct detection in liquid milk. In another research field regarding...... spectra of the gasoline samples. It is virtually unimportant what the rest of the sample consisted of. The most intense characteristic band is located at 1381 cm-1. The Raman spectra of home-made artificial gasoline mixtures - with gradually increasing Naphthalene contents - can be used to determine...

  3. Raman scattering of Cisplatin near silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Duplanty, Michael; Torres, Marjorie; Moazzezi, Mojtaba; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2018-03-01

    The Raman scattering of Cisplatin (the first generation of anticancer drugs) has been studied. In the presence of silver nanoparticles, strong modifications of Raman spectra have been observed. The Raman frequencies have been shifted and the line profiles are broadened. We develop a theoretical model to explain the observed features of the Raman scattering. The model takes into account self-consistently the interaction of molecules with surface plasmonic waves excited in the silver nanoparticles, and it provides a qualitative agreement with the observed Raman spectra. We have demonstrated that the using silver nanoparticles can increase sensitivity of the technique, and potentially it has a broader range of applications to both spectroscopy and microscopy.

  4. Pulse compression by Raman induced cavity dumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rougemont, F.; Xian, D.K.; Frey, R.; Pradere, F.

    1985-01-01

    High efficiency pulse compression using Raman induced cavity dumping has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Through stimulated Raman scattering the electromagnetic energy at a primary frequency is down-converted and extracted from a storage cavity containing the Raman medium. Energy storage may be achieved either at the laser frequency by using a laser medium inside the storage cavity, or performed at a new frequency obtained through an intracavity nonlinear process. The storage cavity may be dumped passively through stimulated Raman scattering either in an oscillator or in an amplifier. All these cases have been studied by using a ruby laser as the pump source and compressed hydrogen as the Raman scatter. Results differ slightly accordingly to the technique used, but pulse shortenings higher than 10 and quantum efficiencies higher than 80% were obtained. This method could also be used with large power lasers of any wavelength from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared spectral region

  5. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  6. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Almost 100 years after the discovery of the Raman scattering phenomenon, related analytical techniques have emerged as important tools in biomedical sciences. Raman spectroscopy and microscopy are frontier, non-invasive analytical techniques amenable for diverse biomedical areas, ranging from...... molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...... application cases of Raman spectroscopy in early and late phase pharmaceutical development, process analysis and micro-structural analysis of drug delivery systems are introduced. Finally, potential areas of future advancement and application of Raman spectroscopic techniques are discussed....

  7. WEB COHERENCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Karlsudd

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a learning system constructed to facilitate teaching and learning by creating a functional web-based contact between schools and organisations which in cooperation with the school contribute to pupils’/students’ cognitive development. Examples of such organisations include science centres, museums, art and music workshops and teacher education internships. With the support of the “Web Coherence Learning” IT application (abbreviated in Swedish to Webbhang developed by the University of Kalmar, the aim is to reinforce learning processes in the encounter with organisations outside school. In close cooperation with potential users a system was developed which can be described as consisting of three modules. The first module, “the organisation page” supports the organisation in simply setting up a homepage, where overarching information on organisation operations can be published and where functions like calendar, guestbook, registration and newsletter can be included. In the second module, “the activity page” the activities offered by the organisation are described. Here pictures and information may prepare and inspire pupils/students to their own activities before future visits. The third part, “the participant page” is a communication module linked to the activity page enabling school classes to introduce themselves and their work as well as documenting the work and communicating with the educators responsible for external activities. When the project is finished, the work will be available to further school classes, parents and other interested parties. System development and testing have been performed in a small pilot study where two creativity educators at an art museum have worked together with pupils and teachers from a compulsory school class. The system was used to establish, prior to the visit of the class, a deeper contact and to maintain a more qualitative continuous dialogue during and after

  8. Optimizing laser crater enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V N; Sdvizhenskii, P A; Grishin, M Ya; Filichkina, V A; Shchegolikhin, A N; Pershin, S M

    2018-03-20

    Raman signal enhancement by laser crater production was systematically studied for 785 nm continuous wave laser pumping. Laser craters were produced in L-aspartic acid powder by a nanosecond pulsed solid state neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532 nm, 8 ns, 1 mJ/pulse), while Raman spectra were then acquired by using a commercial spectrometer with 785 nm laser beam pumping. The Raman signal enhancement effect was studied in terms of the number of ablating pulses used, the lens-to-sample distance, and the crater-center-laser-spot offset. The influence of the experiment parameters on Raman signal enhancement was studied for different powder materials. Maximum Raman signal enhancement reached 11 fold for loose powders but decreased twice for pressed tablets. Raman signal enhancement was demonstrated for several diverse powder materials like gypsum or ammonium nitrate with better results achieved for the samples tending to give narrow and deep craters upon the laser ablation stage. Alternative ways of cavity production (steel needle tapping and hole drilling) were compared with the laser cratering technique in terms of Raman signal enhancement. Drilling was found to give the poorest enhancement of the Raman signal, while both laser ablation and steel needle tapping provided comparable results. Here, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that a Raman signal can be enhanced 10 fold with the aid of simple cavity production by steel needle tapping in rough highly reflective materials. Though laser crater enhancement Raman spectroscopy requires an additional pulsed laser, this technique is more appropriate for automatization compared to the needle tapping approach.

  9. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage from an atomic to a molecular Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, P.D.; Kheruntsyan, K.V.; Heinzen, D.J.; Wynar, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    The process of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) provides a possible route for the generation of a coherent molecular Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) from an atomic BEC. We analyze this process in a three-dimensional mean-field theory, including atom-atom interactions and nonresonant intermediate levels. We find that the process is feasible, but at larger Rabi frequencies than anticipated from a crude single-mode lossless analysis, due to two-photon dephasing caused by the atomic interactions. We then identify optimal strategies in STIRAP allowing one to maintain high conversion efficiencies with smaller Rabi frequencies and under experimentally less demanding conditions

  10. Frequency Comb Driven Raman Transitions in the THz Range: High Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Ca+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    and frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) are used, and the two frequency comb systems used for the experiments are thoroughly characterized, a Coherent Mira Ti:sapph oscillator and a MenloSystems fiber based frequency comb system. The potential of frequency comb driven Raman transitions is shown...... transition frequencies typically are on the order of a few THz. High precision measurements on these ions have many intriguing applications, for example the test of time-variations of fundamental constants, ultracold chemistry on the quantum level, and quantum information and computing, to name just a few...

  11. Coherent states on Hilbert modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S Twareque; Bhattacharyya, T; Roy, S S

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the concept of coherent states, traditionally defined as special families of vectors on Hilbert spaces, to Hilbert modules. We show that Hilbert modules over C*-algebras are the natural settings for a generalization of coherent states defined on Hilbert spaces. We consider those Hilbert C*-modules which have a natural left action from another C*-algebra, say A. The coherent states are well defined in this case and they behave well with respect to the left action by A. Certain classical objects like the Cuntz algebra are related to specific examples of coherent states. Finally we show that coherent states on modules give rise to a completely positive definite kernel between two C*-algebras, in complete analogy to the Hilbert space situation. Related to this, there is a dilation result for positive operator-valued measures, in the sense of Naimark. A number of examples are worked out to illustrate the theory. Some possible physical applications are also mentioned.

  12. Progress in coherent laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable progress with coherent laser radar has been made over the last few years, most notably perhaps in the available range of high performance devices and components and the confidence with which systems may now be taken into the field for prolonged periods of operation. Some of this increasing maturity was evident at the 3rd Topical Meeting on Coherent Laser Radar: Technology and Applications. Topics included in discussions were: mesoscale wind fields, nocturnal valley drainage and clear air down bursts; airborne Doppler lidar studies and comparison of ground and airborne wind measurement; wind measurement over the sea for comparison with satellite borne microwave sensors; transport of wake vortices at airfield; coherent DIAL methods; a newly assembled Nd-YAG coherent lidar system; backscatter profiles in the atmosphere and wavelength dependence over the 9 to 11 micrometer region; beam propagation; rock and soil classification with an airborne 4-laser system; technology of a global wind profiling system; target calibration; ranging and imaging with coherent pulsed and CW system; signal fluctuations and speckle. Some of these activities are briefly reviewed.

  13. Coherent states in quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gazeau, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    This self-contained introduction discusses the evolution of the notion of coherent states, from the early works of Schrödinger to the most recent advances, including signal analysis. An integrated and modern approach to the utility of coherent states in many different branches of physics, it strikes a balance between mathematical and physical descriptions.Split into two parts, the first introduces readers to the most familiar coherent states, their origin, their construction, and their application and relevance to various selected domains of physics. Part II, mostly based on recent original results, is devoted to the question of quantization of various sets through coherent states, and shows the link to procedures in signal analysis. Title: Coherent States in Quantum Physics Print ISBN: 9783527407095 Author(s): Gazeau, Jean-Pierre eISBN: 9783527628292 Publisher: Wiley-VCH Dewey: 530.12 Publication Date: 23 Sep, 2009 Pages: 360 Category: Science, Science: Physics LCCN: Language: English Edition: N/A LCSH:

  14. Experimental study of coherence vortices: Local properties of phase singularities in a spatial coherence function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.; Duan, Z.H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2006-01-01

    By controlling the irradiance of an extended quasimonochromatic, spatially incoherent source, an optical field is generated that exhibits spatial coherence with phase singularities, called coherence vortices. A simple optical geometry for direct visualization of coherence vortices is proposed, an...

  15. Thermométrie DRASC appliquée aux milieux en combustion Cars Temperature Measurements in Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchardy P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available La diffusion Raman anti-Stokes cohérente (DRASC est devenue une technique de thermométrie aujourd'hui opérationnelle. Après un rappel du principe de la mesure, un montage de DRASC est décrit. Les diverses contraintes auxquelles l'expérimentateur doit faire face sont présentées. Les avantages et les inconvénients des spectroscopies DRASC par balayage et multiplex sont comparés. Deux expériences, l'une dans un écoulement à haute enthalpie, l'autre dans un foyer de simulation de turbomachine, illustrent, par leurs résultats, les performances obtenues ainsi que les difficultés le plus souvent rencontrées. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman diffusion (CARS has now become an operational thermometric technique. After reviewing the principle of the measurement, this article describes a CARS set-up. The different constraints that an experimenter must cope with are described. The advantages and disadvantages of CARS spectroscopy by scanning and multiplexing are compared. The results of two experiments, one in a high-enthalpy flow and the other in a turbojet engine simulation combustion chamber illustrate the performances obtained as well as the difficulties most often encountered.

  16. EDITORIAL: Coherent Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Helen; Shapiro, Moshe; Baumert, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Quantum mechanics, though a probabilistic theory, gives a 'deterministic' answer to the question of how the present determines the future. In essence, in order to predict future probabilities, we need to (numerically) propagate the time-dependent Schrödinger equation from the present to the future. It is interesting to note that classical mechanics of macroscopic bodies, though reputed to be a deterministic theory, does not allow, due to chaos (which unfortunately is more prevalent than integrability), such clear insights into the future. In contrast, small (e.g., atomic, molecular and photonic) systems which are best understood using the tools of quantum mechanics, do not suffer from chaos, rendering the prediction of the probability-distributions of future events possible. The field of quantum control deals with an important modification of this task, namely, it asks: given a wave function in the present, what dynamics, i.e. what Hamiltonian, guarantees a desired outcome or 'objective' in the future? In practice one may achieve this goal of modifying and finding the desired Hamiltonian by introducing external fields, e.g. laser light. It is then possible to reach the objective in a 'trial-and-error' fashion, performed either numerically or in the laboratory. We can guess or build a Hamiltonian, do an experiment, or propagate the initial wave function to the future, compare the result with the desirable objective, and correct the guess for the Hamiltonian until satisfactory agreement with the objective is reached. A systematic way of executing this procedure is the sub-field called 'optimal control'. The trial-and-error method is often very time consuming and rarely provides mechanistic insight. There are situations where analytical solutions exist, rendering the control strategies more transparent. This is especially so when one can identify quantum interferences as the heart of quantum control, the essence of the field called 'coherent control'. The experience

  17. The time resolved SBS and SRS research in heavy water and its application in CARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinbo; Gai, Baodong; Yuan, Hong; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Di; Xia, Xusheng; Wang, Pengyuan; Hu, Shu; Chen, Ying; Guo, Jingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2018-05-01

    We present the time-resolved character of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and backward stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS) in heavy water and its application in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) technique. A nanosecond laser from a frequency-doubled Nd: YAG laser is introduced into a heavy water cell, to generate SBS and BSRS beams. The SBS and BSRS beams are collinear, and their time resolved characters are studied by a streak camera, experiment show that they are ideal source for an alignment-free CARS system, and the time resolved property of SBS and BSRS beams could affect the CARS efficiency significantly. By inserting a Dye cuvette to the collinear beams, the time-overlapping of SBS and BSRS could be improved, and finally the CARS efficiency is increased, even though the SBS energy is decreased. Possible methods to improve the efficiency of this CARS system are discussed too.

  18. Nonlinear optical polarization analysis in chemistry and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, Garth J

    2017-01-01

    This rigorous yet accessible guide presents a molecular-based description of nonlinear optical polarization analysis of chemical and biological assemblies. It includes discussion of the most common nonlinear optical microscopy and interfacial measurements used for quantitative analysis, specifically second harmonic generation (SHG), two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF), vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG), and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy/stimulated Raman spectroscopy (CARS/SRS). A linear algebra mathematical framework is developed, allowing step-wise systematic connections to be made between the observable measurements and the molecular response. Effects considered include local field corrections, the molecular orientation distribution, rotations between the molecular frame, the local frame and the laboratory frame, and simplifications from molecular and macromolecular symmetry. Specific examples are provided throughout the book, working from the common and relatively simple case studies ...

  19. Multimodal nonlinear microscope based on a compact fiber-format laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafi, Francesco; Kumar, Vikas; Perri, Antonio; Marangoni, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio; Polli, Dario

    2018-01-01

    We present a multimodal non-linear optical (NLO) laser-scanning microscope, based on a compact fiber-format excitation laser and integrating coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and two-photon-excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a single platform. We demonstrate its capabilities in simultaneously acquiring CARS and SRS images of a blend of 6-μm poly(methyl methacrylate) beads and 3-μm polystyrene beads. We then apply it to visualize cell walls and chloroplast of an unprocessed fresh leaf of Elodea aquatic plant via SRS and TPEF modalities, respectively. The presented NLO microscope, developed in house using off-the-shelf components, offers full accessibility to the optical path and ensures its easy re-configurability and flexibility.

  20. An engineered CARS substrate with giant field enhancement in crisscross dimer nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Chen, Shu; Wang, Junqiao; Mu, Kaijun; Fan, Chunzhen; Liang, Erjun; Ding, Pei

    2018-01-15

    We theoretically investigate the optical properties of a nanostructure consisting of the two identical and symmetrically arranged crisscrosses. A plasmonic Fano resonance is induced by a strong interplay between bright mode and dark modes, where the bright mode is due to electric dipole resonance while dark modes originate from the magnetic dipole induced by LC resonances. In this article, we find that the electric field "hotspots" corresponding to three different wavelengths can be positioned at the same spatial position, and its spectral tunability is achieved by changing geometric parameters. The crisscrosses system can be designed as a plasmonic substrate for enhancing Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signal. This discovery provides a new method to achieve single molecule detection. At the same time, it also has many important applications for multi-photon imaging and other nonlinear optical processes, such as four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering.

  1. Coherent Waves in Seismic Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanov, A.; Seleznev, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    Development of digital processing algorithms of seismic wave fields for the purpose of useful event picking to study environment and other objects is the basis for the establishment of new seismic techniques. In the submitted paper a fundamental property of seismic wave field coherence is used. The authors extended conception of coherence types of observed wave fields and devised a technique of coherent component selection from observed wave field. Time coherence and space coherence are widely known. In this paper conception "parameter coherence" has been added. The parameter by which wave field is coherent can be the most manifold. The reason is that the wave field is a multivariate process described by a set of parameters. Coherence in the first place means independence of linear connection in wave field of parameter. In seismic wave fields, recorded in confined space, in building-blocks and stratified mediums time coherent standing waves are formed. In prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping head waves are coherent by parallel correlation course or, in other words, by one measurement on generalized plane of observation system. For detail prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping on basis of coherence property by one measurement of area algorithms have been developed, permitting seismic records to be converted to head wave time sections which have neither reflected nor other types of waves. Conversion in time section is executed on any specified observation base. Energy storage of head waves relative to noise on basis of multiplicity of observation system is realized within area of head wave recording. Conversion on base below the area of wave tracking is performed with lack of signal/noise ratio relative to maximum of this ratio, fit to observation system. Construction of head wave time section and dynamic plots a basis of automatic processing have been developed, similar to CDP procedure in method of

  2. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  3. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matrices; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  4. Coherent states for quadratic Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez C, David J; Velazquez, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    The coherent states for a set of quadratic Hamiltonians in the trap regime are constructed. A matrix technique which allows us to directly identify the creation and annihilation operators will be presented. Then, the coherent states as simultaneous eigenstates of the annihilation operators will be derived, and will be compared with those attained through the displacement operator method. The corresponding wavefunction will be found, and a general procedure for obtaining several mean values involving the canonical operators in these states will be described. The results will be illustrated through the asymmetric Penning trap.

  5. Coherent γ-ray production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolotti, M.; Sibilia, C.

    1985-01-01

    In this article the authors discuss a new approach for developing a coherent source of γ-rays. They offer a completely different scheme for development of the source that should overcome most of the problems encountered in ''classical γ-ray lasers,'' and in which the use of inverse Compton scattering of laser radiation onto a relativistic electron beam is made. This kind of interaction has been used to obtain γ-ray photons with good polarization and monochromaticity properties. The authors describe a new geometry of interaction which allows one to obtain coherent emission

  6. Characterization of conducting polyaniline blends by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose E. Pereira da; Temperini, Marcia L.A.; Torresi, Susana I. Cordoba de

    2005-01-01

    Raman and optical microscopy were used to investigate possible interactions between polyaniline (PANI) and different insulating polymers in conducting blends. Resonance Raman and optical micrographs were used to study the physical interaction in materials. Analysis Raman spectra was done investigating the relative intensity of bands at 574 and 607 cm -1 . A relationship between Raman bands and conductivity was also proposed. (author)

  7. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Chair. The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have ...

  8. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance Raman spectra are obtained of benzyl radicals created by laser flash photolysis of benzylchloride and diphenylacetone in solution. The spectra are obtained in resonance with the intense 2 2A2-1 B-2(2) transition of benzyl. The strong Raman bands are assigned to totally...... symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  9. Detection of laser damage by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchet, P.M.; Campbell, I.H.; Adar, F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that Raman miroscopy is a sensitive and quantitative tool to detect and characterize laser-induced damage in solids. After damage is induced with single or multiple high power laser pulses, a Raman microprobe maps the surface of the sample with one micron spatial resolution. By performing accurate measurements of the Stokes line, the authors have been able to measure stress, strain and crystallinity in various samples which had been exposed to high intensity pulses. These results are compared to those obtained using conventional tools such as Nomarski microscopy. Major advantages of Raman microscopy include sensitivity to subtle structural modifications and the fact that it gives quantitative measurements

  10. Raman band intensities of tellurite glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnichenko, V G; Sokolov, V O; Koltashev, V V; Dianov, E M; Grishin, I A; Churbanov, M F

    2005-05-15

    Raman spectra of TeO2-based glasses doped with WO3, ZnO, GeO2, TiO2, MoO3, and Sb2O3 are measured. The intensity of bands in the Raman spectra of MoO3-TeO2 and MoO3-WO3-TeO2 glasses is shown to be 80-95 times higher than that for silica glass. It is shown that these glasses can be considered as one of the most promising materials for Raman fiber amplifiers.

  11. Raman overtone intensities measured for H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelton, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the vibrational fundamental, first overtone and second overtone transitions of the H 2 molecule were recorded using visible and ultraviolet argon--ion laser excitation. The ratios of transition polarizability matrix elements, α 01,21 /α 01,11 and α 01,31 /α 01,11 , were determined from the measured intensities of the Q(1) Raman lines v,J=0,1→v',1 for v'=1,2,3. The experimentally determined value of the Raman first overtone matrix element is in good agreement with the value from the best ab initio calculation

  12. Mechanisms for the control of two-mode transient stimulated Raman scattering in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanner, Michael; Brumer, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Recent adaptive feedback control experiments demonstrated control of transient (i.e. nonimpulsive) Stokes emission from two closely spaced Raman-active modes in liquid methanol [e.g., B. J. Pearson et al., Phys. Rev. A 63, 063412 (2001)]. Optimally shaped pulses were found that selectively excited one of the two Stokes lines alone, optimized emission from both modes together, or completely suppressed all Stokes emission. Here, two general control mechanisms capable of affecting the ratio of intensities of the Stokes lines are identified. The first is operational when the duration of the pump pulse (t p ) is on the order of the collisional dephasing time (t d ). The ratio of the peak heights of the two Stokes lines can then be controlled by simply varying the duration and/or intensity of the pump pulse. The second operates when 1/t p is on the order of the energy separation of the two Raman modes, and hence when the two Raman modes are coupled due to overlapping nonlinear polarizations that drive the stimulated Raman scattering. In this regime, asymmetry in the spectral amplitudes within the pump pulse can control the asymmetry in the peak heights of the Stokes emission. Both these mechanisms have the same clear physical interpretation: shaping the pump pulse controls the nonlinear optical response of the medium, which in turn controls the stimulated Stokes emission, itself a χ (3) nonlinear effect. In neither mechanism does the ratio of peak heights in the Stokes spectrum reflect directly the ratio of excited-state populations associated with the two Raman modes, as was assumed in the experiments, nor does the control involve coherent quantum interference effects

  13. Mode-dependent dispersion in Raman line shapes: Observation and implications from ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umapathy, S.; Mallick, B.; Lakshmanna, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy (URLS) enables one to obtain the vibrational structural information of molecular systems including fluorescent materials. URLS, a nonlinear process analog to stimulated Raman gain, involves a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond broadband white light continuum. Under nonresonant condition, the Raman response appears as a negative (loss) signal, whereas, on resonance with the electronic transition the line shape changes from a negative to a positive through a dispersive form. The intensities observed and thus, the Franck-Condon activity (coordinate dependent), are sensitive to the wavelength of the white light corresponding to a particular Raman frequency with respect to the Raman pump pulse wavelength, i.e., there is a mode-dependent response in URLS.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy with simple optic components; Espectrometria Raman con componentes opticos simples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, Mario; Cunya, Eduardo; Olivera, Paula [Direccion de Investigacion y Desarrollo, Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)

    2014-07-01

    Raman Spectroscopy is .a high resolution photonics technique that provides chemical and structural information of almost any material, organic or inorganic compound. In this report we describe the implementation of a system based on the principle of Raman scattering, developed to analyze solid samples. The spectrometer integrates an optical bench coupled to an optical fiber and a green laser source of 532 nm. The spectrometer was tested obtaining the Naphthalene and the Yellow 74 Pigment Raman patterns. (authors).

  15. An Empirical Study on Raman Peak Fitting and Its Application to Raman Quantitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xueyin; Mayanovic, Robert A

    2017-10-01

    Fitting experimentally measured Raman bands with theoretical model profiles is the basic operation for numerical determination of Raman peak parameters. In order to investigate the effects of peak modeling using various algorithms on peak fitting results, the representative Raman bands of mineral crystals, glass, fluids as well as the emission lines from a fluorescent lamp, some of which were measured under ambient light whereas others under elevated pressure and temperature conditions, were fitted using Gaussian, Lorentzian, Gaussian-Lorentzian, Voigtian, Pearson type IV, and beta profiles. From the fitting results of the Raman bands investigated in this study, the fitted peak position, intensity, area and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the measured Raman bands can vary significantly depending upon which peak profile function is used in the fitting, and the most appropriate fitting profile should be selected depending upon the nature of the Raman bands. Specifically, the symmetric Raman bands of mineral crystals and non-aqueous fluids are best fit using Gaussian-Lorentzian or Voigtian profiles, whereas the asymmetric Raman bands are best fit using Pearson type IV profiles. The asymmetric O-H stretching vibrations of H 2 O and the Raman bands of soda-lime glass are best fit using several Gaussian profiles, whereas the emission lines from a florescent light are best fit using beta profiles. Multiple peaks that are not clearly separated can be fit simultaneously, provided the residuals in the fitting of one peak will not affect the fitting of the remaining peaks to a significant degree. Once the resolution of the Raman spectrometer has been properly accounted for, our findings show that the precision in peak position and intensity can be improved significantly by fitting the measured Raman peaks with appropriate profiles. Nevertheless, significant errors in peak position and intensity were still observed in the results from fitting of weak and wide Raman

  16. Biomedical Applications of Micro-Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    hydroxyapatite ; 1073cm-1, carbonate from carbonate apatite; 1442cm-1, cholesterol and cholesterol esters. 17 Table 1. Tentative assignment and Raman peak...allowed for the discrete location of atherosclerotic plaques. Raman peaks at 961 and 1073 cm-1 reveal the presence of calcium hydroxyapatite and... hydroxyapatite are located within the vessel wall. Similarly, Fig. 5 maps the Raman intensity of the peak at 1073cm-1, which is indicative of

  17. Direct pumping of ultrashort Ti:sapphire lasers by a frequency doubled diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Unterhuber, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    electro-optical efficiency of the diode laser. Autocorrelation measurements show that pulse widths of less than 20 fs can be expected with an average power of 52 mW when using our laser. These results indicate the high potential of direct diode laser pumped Ti: sapphire lasers to be used in applications....... When using our diode laser system, the optical conversion efficiencies from green to near-infrared light reduces to 75 % of the values achieved with the commercial pump laser. Despite this reduction the overall efficiency of the Ti: sapphire laser is still increased by a factor > 2 due to the superior...... like retinal optical coherence tomography (OCT) or pumping of photonic crystal fibers for CARS (coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy) microscopy....

  18. High-resolution imaging of the central nervous system: how novel imaging methods combined with navigation strategies will advance patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Hamza; Genis, Helen; Alarcon, Joseph; Vuong, Barry; Jivraj, Jamil; Yang, Victor X D; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Fehlings, Michael G; Cadotte, David W

    2015-01-01

    This narrative review captures a subset of recent advances in imaging of the central nervous system. First, we focus on improvements in the spatial and temporal profile afforded by optical coherence tomography, fluorescence-guided surgery, and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy. Next, we highlight advances in the generation and uses of imaging-based atlases and discuss how this will be applied to specific clinical situations. To conclude, we discuss how these and other imaging tools will be combined with neuronavigation techniques to guide surgeons in the operating room. Collectively, this work aims to highlight emerging biomedical imaging strategies that hold potential to be a valuable tool for both clinicians and researchers in the years to come. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gain assisted coherent control of microwave pulse in a one dimensional array of artificial atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Mohsin; Ayaz, M. Q.; Waseem, M.; Qamar, Sajid; Qamar, Shahid

    2018-06-01

    We study the coherent propagation of a microwave pulse through a one-dimensional array of artificial atoms. The scheme is based upon gain assisted propagation of the pulse using two-photon Raman transition in a three-level superconducting artificial atoms (SAAs) coupled to a microwave transmission line. Our results show that the group velocity can be significantly reduced by increasing the Rabi frequency of the pump fields which in turn can lead to an efficient storage of the pulse inside a 1D array of SAAs. Further, the intensity of the transmitted pulse increases with the number of artificial atoms owing to the gain associated with the two-photon Raman transition. Our results also show that the window width decreases for both scattering and negligible scattering cases with the increase in the number of SAAs. The fidelity of the system also remains high even after the passage of the pulse through a large number of SAAs.

  20. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...

  1. Coherent Radiation of Electron Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.

    2004-01-01

    The electron cloud in positron storage rings is pinched when a bunch passes by. For short bunches, the radiation due to acceleration of electrons of the cloud is coherent. Detection of such radiation can be used to measure the density of the cloud. The estimate of the power and the time structure of the radiated signal is given in this paper

  2. Asymmetric Penning trap coherent states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras-Astorga, Alonso; Fernandez, David J.

    2010-01-01

    By using a matrix technique, which allows to identify directly the ladder operators, the coherent states of the asymmetric Penning trap are derived as eigenstates of the appropriate annihilation operators. They are compared with those obtained through the displacement operator method.

  3. Coherent dynamics of plasma mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaury, C; George, H; Quere, F; Monot, P; Martin, Ph [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Serv Photons Atomes and Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Loch, R [Univ Twente, Laser Phys and Nonlinear Opt Grp, Fac Sci and Technol, MESA Inst Nanotechnol, NL-7500 AE Enschede, (Netherlands); Geindre, J P [Ecole Polytech, Lab Pour Utilisat Lasers Intenses, CNRS, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Coherent ultrashort X-ray pulses provide new ways to probe matter and its ultrafast dynamics. One of the promising paths to generate these pulses consists of using a nonlinear interaction with a system to strongly and periodically distort the waveform of intense laser fields, and thus produce high-order harmonics. Such distortions have so far been induced by using the nonlinear polarizability of atoms, leading to the production of atto-second light bursts, short enough to study the dynamics of electrons in matter. Shorter and more intense atto-second pulses, together with higher harmonic orders, are expected by reflecting ultra intense laser pulses on a plasma mirror - a dense (approximate to 10{sup 23} electrons cm{sup -3}) plasma with a steep interface. However, short-wavelength-light sources produced by such plasmas are known to generally be incoherent. In contrast, we demonstrate that like in usual low-intensity reflection, the coherence of the light wave is preserved during harmonic generation on plasma mirrors. We then exploit this coherence for interferometric measurements and thus carry out a first study of the laser-driven coherent dynamics of the plasma electrons. (authors)

  4. Optimally cloned binary coherent states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, C. R.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch

    2017-01-01

    their quantum-optimal clones. We analyze the Wigner function and the cumulants of the clones, and we conclude that optimal cloning of binary coherent states requires a nonlinearity above second order. We propose several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes and compare their cloning fidelity to the optimal...

  5. Coherent beam-beam effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Keil, E.

    1979-06-01

    The stability of the coherent beam-beam effect between rigid bunches is studied analytically and numerically for a linear force by evaluating eigenvalues. For a realistic force, the stability is investigated by following the bunches for many revolutions. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Optical coherent control in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    of quantum control including the recent applications to semiconductors and nanostructures. We study the influence of inhomogeneous broadening in semiconductors on CC results. Photoluminescence (PL) and the coherent emission in four-wave mixing (FWM) is recorded after resonant excitation with phase...

  7. Dialogue Coherence: A Generation Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beun, R.J.; Eijk, R.M. van

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for the generation of coherent elementary conversational sequences at the speech act level. We will embrace the notion of a cooperative dialogue game in which two players produce speech acts to transfer relevant information with respect to their commitments.

  8. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; van Welle, A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1984-01-01

    Raman spectra of intact chromosomes (Chinese hamster), recorded with a microspectrometer, are reported. The spectra could be assigned to protein and DNA contributions. Protein and DNA conformations and the ratio of base pairs in DNA were determined.

  9. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  10. Stimulated Raman scattering: old physics, new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Petrov, Georgi I; Zhang, Hao F; Noojin, Gary D; Denton, Michael L; Thomas, Robert J; Scully, Marlan O

    2009-10-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering as a promising way of expanding the tunability of ultrafast lasers and as an exciting new biomedical imaging modality capable of selective excitation and chemically-specific diagnostics of molecular species.

  11. Coherence for vectorial waves and majorization

    OpenAIRE

    Luis, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    We show that majorization provides a powerful approach to the coherence conveyed by partially polarized transversal electromagnetic waves. Here we present the formalism, provide some examples and compare with standard measures of polarization and coherence of vectorial waves.

  12. Development of simultaneous hyperspectral coherent Raman imaging for advancing reduced emission combustion technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohlin, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Overall aim and key objectives Advances in optical imaging techniques over the past decades have revolutionized our ability to study chemically reactive flows encountered in air-breathing combustion systems. Emerging technology for unravelling clean- and efficient

  13. Systems and methods for selective detection and imaging in coherent Raman microscopy by spectral excitation shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Freudiger, Christian; Min, Wei

    2016-03-15

    A microscopy imaging system is disclosed that includes a light source system, a spectral shaper, a modulator system, an optics system, an optical detector and a processor. The light source system is for providing a first train of pulses and a second train of pulses. The spectral shaper is for spectrally modifying an optical property of at least some frequency components of the broadband range of frequency components such that the broadband range of frequency components is shaped producing a shaped first train of pulses to specifically probe a spectral feature of interest from a sample, and to reduce information from features that are not of interest from the sample. The modulator system is for modulating a property of at least one of the shaped first train of pulses and the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of a train of pulses of interest transmitted or reflected through the common focal volume. The processor is for detecting a modulation at the modulation frequency of the integrated intensity of substantially all of the optical frequency components of the train of pulses of interest due to the non-linear interaction of the shaped first train of pulses with the second train of pulses as modulated in the common focal volume, and for providing an output signal for a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  14. Raman assisted lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level.......We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level....

  15. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  16. Electron beam instrumentation techniques using coherent radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.X.

    1997-01-01

    Much progress has been made on coherent radiation research since coherent synchrotron radiation was first observed in 1989. The use of coherent radiation as a bunch length diagnostic tool has been studied by several groups. In this paper, brief introductions to coherent radiation and far-infrared measurement are given, the progress and status of their beam diagnostic application are reviewed, different techniques are described, and their advantages and limitations are discussed

  17. On P-coherent endomorphism rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ring is called right -coherent if every principal right ideal is finitely presented. Let M R be a right -module. We study the -coherence of the endomorphism ring of M R . It is shown that is a right -coherent ring if and only if every endomorphism of M R has a pseudokernel in add M R ; S is a left -coherent ring if and ...

  18. Citrus fruits freshness assessment using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvapil, Fran; Brezestean, Ioana; Barchewitz, Daniel; Glamuzina, Branko; Chiş, Vasile; Cintă Pinzaru, Simona

    2018-03-01

    The freshness of citrus fruits commonly available in the market was non-destructively assessed by Raman spectroscopy. Intact clementine, mandarin and tangerine species were characterised concerning their carotenoids skin Raman signalling in a time course from the moment they were acquired as fresh stock, supplying the market, to the physical degradation, when they were no longer attractive to consumers. The freshness was found to strongly correlate to the peel Raman signal collected from the same area of the intact fruits in a time course of a maximum of 20days. We have shown that the intensity of the carotenoid Raman signal is indeed a good indicator of fruit freshness and introduced a Raman coefficient of freshness (C Fresh ), whose time course is linearly decreasing, with different slope for different citrus groups. Additionally, we demonstrated that the freshness assessment could be achieved using a portable Raman instrument. The results could have a strong impact for consumer satisfaction and the food industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ Raman mapping of art objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondeel, Ph.; Moens, L.; Vandenabeele, P.

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has grown to be one of the techniques of interest for the investigation of art objects. The approach has several advantageous properties, and the non-destructive character of the technique allowed it to be used for in situ investigations. However, compared with laboratory approaches, it would be useful to take advantage of the small spectral footprint of the technique, and use Raman spectroscopy to study the spatial distribution of different compounds. In this work, an in situ Raman mapping system is developed to be able to relate chemical information with its spatial distribution. Challenges for the development are discussed, including the need for stable positioning and proper data treatment. To avoid focusing problems, nineteenth century porcelain cards are used to test the system. This work focuses mainly on the post-processing of the large dataset which consists of four steps: (i) importing the data into the software; (ii) visualization of the dataset; (iii) extraction of the variables; and (iv) creation of a Raman image. It is shown that despite the challenging task of the development of the full in situ Raman mapping system, the first steps are very promising. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology’. PMID:27799424

  20. Visualizing cell state transition using Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ichimura

    Full Text Available System level understanding of the cell requires detailed description of the cell state, which is often characterized by the expression levels of proteins. However, understanding the cell state requires comprehensive information of the cell, which is usually obtained from a large number of cells and their disruption. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy, which can report changes in the cell state without introducing any label, as a non-invasive method with single cell capability. Significant differences in Raman spectra were observed at the levels of both the cytosol and nucleus in different cell-lines from mouse, indicating that Raman spectra reflect differences in the cell state. Difference in cell state was observed before and after the induction of differentiation in neuroblastoma and adipocytes, showing that Raman spectra can detect subtle changes in the cell state. Cell state transitions during embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation were visualized when Raman spectroscopy was coupled with principal component analysis (PCA, which showed gradual transition in the cell states during differentiation. Detailed analysis showed that the diversity between cells are large in undifferentiated ESC and in mesenchymal stem cells compared with terminally differentiated cells, implying that the cell state in stem cells stochastically fluctuates during the self-renewal process. The present study strongly indicates that Raman spectral morphology, in combination with PCA, can be used to establish cells' fingerprints, which can be useful for distinguishing and identifying different cellular states.