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Sample records for cognitive procedural learning

  1. COGNITIVE FATIGUE FACILITATES PROCEDURAL SEQUENCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo eBorragán

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced procedural learning has been evidenced in conditions where cognitive control is diminished, including hypnosis, disruption of prefrontal activity and non-optimal time of the day. Another condition depleting the availability of controlled resources is cognitive fatigue. We tested the hypothesis that cognitive fatigue, eventually leading to diminished cognitive control, facilitates procedural sequence learning. In a two-day experiment, twenty-three young healthy adults were administered a serial reaction time task (SRTT following the induction of high or low levels of cognitive fatigue, in a counterbalanced order. Cognitive fatigue was induced using the Time load Dual-back (TloadDback paradigm, a dual working memory task that allows tailoring cognitive load levels to the individual's optimal performance capacity. In line with our hypothesis, reaction times in the SRTT were faster in the high- than in the low-level fatigue condition, and performance improvement showed more of a benefit from the sequential components than from motor. Altogether, our results suggest a paradoxical, facilitating impact of cognitive fatigue on procedural motor sequence learning. We propose that facilitated learning in the high-level fatigue condition stems from a reduction in the cognitive resources devoted to cognitive control processes that normally oppose automatic procedural acquisition mechanisms.

  2. Procedural learning in Parkinson's disease: intact and impaired cognitive components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, O; Thomas-Antérion, C; Laurent, B

    1999-09-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study procedural learning in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. In Experiment 1, ten patients and their normal controls participated in a classical mirror reading task and in an inverted reading task where word-stimuli made of non inverted letters had to be processed from right to left (e.g., ygoloruen). In both tasks, reading times for new stimuli were compared to reading times for stimuli that repeated over blocks. Although PD patients and their controls exhibited learning for repeated words in both tasks, PD patients did not respond faster with practice for new words in the inverted reading task. In Experiment 2, PD patients and their controls were presented with an original dot counting task in which participants were asked to process a horizontal series of black and white dots from right to left and to indicate whether a dot that had been designated by a number at the beginning of each trial was black or white. Results showed that PD patients, in contrast to controls, did not exhibit learning in this task. Results are discussed in terms of the cognitive components involved in these tasks. It is suggested that PD patients are impaired in the acquisition of a right-to-left visual scanning skill that could be studied directly in Experiment 2.

  3. Brain structural substrates of cognitive procedural learning in alcoholic patients early in abstinence

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    Ritz, Ludivine; Segobin, Shailendra; Le Berre, Anne Pascale; Lannuzel, Coralie; Boudehent, Céline; Vabret, François; Eustache, Francis; Pitel, Anne Lise; Beaunieux, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Background Procedural learning allows for the acquisition of new behavioral skills. Previous studies have shown that chronic alcoholism is characterized by impaired cognitive procedural learning and brain abnormalities affecting regions that are involved in the automation of new cognitive procedures in healthy individuals. The goal of the present study was to investigate the brain structural substrates of cognitive procedural learning in alcoholic patients (ALs) early in abstinence. Methods Thirty-one ALs and 31 control participants (NCs) performed the Tower of Toronto task (4 daily learning sessions, each comprising 10 trials) to assess cognitive procedural learning. We also assessed episodic and working memory, executive functions, and visuospatial abilities. ALs underwent 1.5T structural magnetic resonance imaging. Results The initial cognitive phase was longer in the AL group than in the NC group, whereas the autonomous phase was shorter. In ALs, the longer cognitive phase was predicted by poorer planning and visuospatial working memory abilities, and by smaller gray matter (GM) volumes in the angular gyrus and caudate nucleus. ALs’ planning abilities correlated with smaller GM volume in the angular gyrus. Conclusions Cognitive procedural learning was impaired in ALs, with a delayed transition from the cognitive to the autonomous phase. This slowdown in the automation of the cognitive procedure was related to lower planning abilities, which may have hampered the initial generation of the procedure to be learned. In agreement with this neuropsychological finding, a persistent relationship was found between learning performance and the GM volumes of the angular gyrus and caudate nucleus, which are usually regarded as markers of planning and initial learning of the cognitive procedure. PMID:25156613

  4. Learning and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gr ver Aukrust, Vibeke, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection of 58 articles from the recently-published third edition of the International Encyclopedia of Education focuses on learning, memory, attention, problem solving, concept formation, and language. Learning and cognition is the foundation of cognitive psychology and encompasses many topics including attention, memory, categorization,…

  5. Flexible Execution of Cognitive Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-30

    Rosenbloom. P. (1988). Symbolic Architectures. In Posner, M. (Ed.), FoundatiCns of Cogniive Science . Cambridge. MKA MIT Press. In preparation. Nii. P. , 1986...Procedures 00 Technical Report PCG-5 14 Kurt VanLehn and William Ball Departments of Psychology and Computer Science Carnegie-Mellon University...Psychology and Computer Science Carnegie-Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 U.S.A 30 June 1987 Running head: Flexible Execution of Cognitive

  6. Learning Potential and Cognitive Modifiability

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    Kozulin, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between thinking and learning constitutes one of the fundamental problems of cognitive psychology. Though there is an obvious overlap between the domains of thinking and learning, it seems more productive to consider learning as being predominantly acquisition while considering thinking as the application of the existent concepts…

  7. Rheoencephalographic and electroencephalographic measures of cognitive workload: analytical procedures

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    Montgomery, L. D.; Montgomery, R. W.; Guisado, R.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation demonstrates the feasibility of mental workload assessment by rheoencephalographic (REG) and multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring. During the performance of this research, unique testing, analytical and display procedures were developed for REG and EEG monitoring that extend the current state of the art and provide valuable tools for the study of cerebral circulatory and neural activity during cognition. REG records are analyzed to provide indices of the right and left hemisphere hemodynamic changes that take place during each test sequence. The EEG data are modeled using regression techniques and mathematically transformed to provide energy-density distributions of the scalp electrostatic field. These procedures permit concurrent REG/EEG cognitive testing not possible with current techniques. The introduction of a system for recording and analysis of cognitive REG/EEG test sequences facilitates the study of learning and memory disorders, dementia and other encephalopathies.

  8. Illustration of a Learning Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghouts-van Erp, J. W. M.

    The paper describes evolution of an approach to teaching mathematically disabled and slow learning students through a Piagetian framework. It is explained that a step-by-step procedure is used to internalize material actions into mental actions via perception and verbalization. Formulae are introduced early, and emphasis is placed on promoting…

  9. Cognitive and Learning Impairments

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    Lewis, Clayton

    People with cognitive disabilities are gaining in a long struggle for recognition of their right to control their lives. In the information society access to the Web is essential to this control. Cognitive barriers to this access are diverse, reflecting the complexity of human cognitive faculties. These barriers are not well managed in current accessibility practice and policy, in part because cognitive accessibility, like usability, cannot be reduced to a checklist of simple attributes. Advances in representing the meaning as well as the form of information, and in supporting configurable presentation and interaction methods, will yield progress. Increased inclusion of people with cognitive disabilities in the processes of technology development and policy making will also pay off.

  10. Understanding Cognitive Language Learning Strategies

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    Sergio Di Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over time, definitions and taxonomies of language learning strategies have been critically examined. This article defines and classifies cognitive language learning strategies on a more grounded basis. Language learning is a macro-process for which the general hypotheses of information processing are valid. Cognitive strategies are represented by the pillars underlying the encoding, storage and retrieval of information. In order to understand the processes taking place on these three dimensions, a functional model was elaborated from multiple theoretical contributions and previous models: the Smart Processing Model. This model operates with linguistic inputs as well as with any other kind of information. It helps to illustrate the stages, relations, modules and processes that occur during the flow of information. This theoretical advance is a core element to classify cognitive strategies. Contributions from cognitive neuroscience have also been considered to establish the proposed classification which consists of five categories. Each of these categories has a different predominant function: classification, preparation, association, elaboration and transfer-practice. This better founded taxonomy opens the doors to potential studies that would allow a better understanding of the interdisciplinary complexity of language learning. Pedagogical and methodological implications are also discussed. Keywords: cognitive processes, cognitive neuroscience, information processing, second and foreign language acquisition, Smart Processing Model

  11. Learning and cognition in insects.

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    Giurfa, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Insects possess small brains but exhibit sophisticated behavioral performances. Recent works have reported the existence of unsuspected cognitive capabilities in various insect species, which go beyond the traditional studied framework of simple associative learning. In this study, I focus on capabilities such as attention, social learning, individual recognition, concept learning, and metacognition, and discuss their presence and mechanistic bases in insects. I analyze whether these behaviors can be explained on the basis of elemental associative learning or, on the contrary, require higher-order explanations. In doing this, I highlight experimental challenges and suggest future directions for investigating the neurobiology of higher-order learning in insects, with the goal of uncovering l architectures underlying cognitive processing.

  12. Perceptual and cognitive spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, F L

    1993-06-01

    Ss were taught novel mappings between visual space and motor space with either a variant on a prism adaptation paradigm (Experiments 1 and 2) or a nonperceptual cognitive task (Experiments 3 and 4). First, discrimination training specified that 1 visual location required a new pointing response but another location did not. This led to unusual generalization unlike typical generalization decrement. Second, training at 9 locations specified that 1 location required a new response but that the remaining 8 did not. This simple isolation mapping was unlearnable and instead a flat function fit through all of space. In contrast, for the cognitive paradigm, not only was isolation of one region of space easily learned, it was the preferred pattern of generalization. Implications for perceptual learning, as well as the qualitative distinctions between perceptual and cognitive learning, are discussed.

  13. Cognitive Synergy in Multimedia Learning

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    Kim, Daesang; Kim, Dong-Joong; Whang, Woo-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of our study was to investigate multimedia effects that had different results from the findings of existing multimedia learning studies. First, we describe and summarize three experimental studies we conducted from 2006 to 2010. Then we analyze our findings to explore learner characteristics that may impact the cognitive processes…

  14. Learning about primates' learning, language, and cognition

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    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of many years of research on the methods of teaching primates the language and cognitive skills which were long considered to be unteachable to particular species of primates. It was found that chimpanzee subjects could not only learn a number of 'stock sentences' but to use them in variations and several combinations for the purpose of solving various problems. Apes placed in different rooms could be taught to communicate via computer, and collaborate with each other on doing specific tasks. Contrary to expectations, young rhesus monkeys proved to be able to learn as much as the chimpanzee species.

  15. Learning about primates' learning, language, and cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of many years of research on the methods of teaching primates the language and cognitive skills which were long considered to be unteachable to particular species of primates. It was found that chimpanzee subjects could not only learn a number of 'stock sentences' but to use them in variations and several combinations for the purpose of solving various problems. Apes placed in different rooms could be taught to communicate via computer, and collaborate with each other on doing specific tasks. Contrary to expectations, young rhesus monkeys proved to be able to learn as much as the chimpanzee species.

  16. Learning procedures from interactive natural language instructions

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    Huffman, Scott B.; Laird, John E.

    1994-01-01

    Despite its ubiquity in human learning, very little work has been done in artificial intelligence on agents that learn from interactive natural language instructions. In this paper, the problem of learning procedures from interactive, situated instruction is examined in which the student is attempting to perform tasks within the instructional domain, and asks for instruction when it is needed. Presented is Instructo-Soar, a system that behaves and learns in response to interactive natural language instructions. Instructo-Soar learns completely new procedures from sequences of instruction, and also learns how to extend its knowledge of previously known procedures to new situations. These learning tasks require both inductive and analytic learning. Instructo-Soar exhibits a multiple execution learning process in which initial learning has a rote, episodic flavor, and later executions allow the initially learned knowledge to be generalized properly.

  17. Developmental stress, song-learning, and cognition.

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    Peters, Susan; Searcy, William A; Nowicki, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The evolution of enhanced cognitive ability has sometimes been attributed to sexual selection. An association between the mating success of males and their cognitive ability could arise either through male-male competition or through female choice. Specifically in the latter case, sexual selection would act more readily if males advertized their cognitive ability through display. Most traits involved in sexual display, however, seem unlikely to have any inherent relationship with cognition beyond that which arises through the effect of cognitive abilities on acquisition of resources and, in turn, the effect of resources on development of the display trait. In contrast, for displays whose development and expression require learning, a direct link with cognition is possible because of a shared dependence on brain function. The parallel effects of developmental stress on song-learning and cognition provide a compelling explanation for an association between attributes of the song and cognitive ability. We outline the hypothesis that sexually selected qualities of song serve as an indicator of cognitive abilities. We first present evidence that song-learning is itself a challenging cognitive task. We then give evidence that sexual selection favors well-learned song. Next, we review evidence that song and cognitive ability both are affected by developmental stresses. We consider recent experimental data testing the relationship between song and cognitive ability. Finally, we suggest that the accuracy with which songs are learned may be an optimal indicator of other cognitive abilities.

  18. Using Classroom Assessment and Cognitive Scaffolding to Enhance the Power of Small-Group Learning

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    Cooper, James L.; Robinson, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe several types of classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and cognitive scaffolding procedures that they have developed over the years. They then bring the procedures together in a sample lecture/group learning class presentation.

  19. Using Classroom Assessment and Cognitive Scaffolding to Enhance the Power of Small-Group Learning

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    Cooper, James L.; Robinson, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe several types of classroom assessment techniques (CATs) and cognitive scaffolding procedures that they have developed over the years. They then bring the procedures together in a sample lecture/group learning class presentation.

  20. Human Uniqueness, Cognition by Description, and Procedural Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bolender

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence will be reviewed suggesting a fairly direct link between the human ability to think about entities which one has never perceived — here called “cognition by description” — and procedural memory. Cognition by description is a uniquely hominid trait which makes religion, science, and history possible. It is hypothesized that cognition by description (in the manner of Bertrand Russell’s “knowledge by description” requires variable binding, which in turn utilizes quantifier raising. Quantifier raising plausibly depends upon the computational core of language, specifically the element of it which Noam Chomsky calls “internal Merge”. Internal Merge produces hierarchical structures by means of a memory of derivational steps, a process plausibly involving procedural memory. The hypothesis is testable, predicting that procedural memory deficits will be accompanied by impairments in cognition by description. We also discuss neural mechanisms plausibly underlying procedural memory and also, by our hypothesis, cognition by description.

  1. Age-related differences in perceptuomotor procedural learning in children.

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    Lejeune, Caroline; Catale, Corinne; Schmitz, Xavier; Quertemont, Etienne; Meulemans, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Procedural learning is generally considered to proceed in a series of phases, with cognitive resources playing an important role during the initial step. From a developmental perspective, little is known about the development of procedural learning or the role played by explicit cognitive processes during learning. The main objectives of this study were (a) to determine whether procedural learning performance improves with age by comparing groups of 7-year-old children, 10-year-old children, and adults and (b) to investigate the role played by executive functions during the acquisition in these three age groups. The 76 participants were assessed on a computerized adaptation of the mirror tracing paradigm. Results revealed that the youngest children had more difficulty in adapting to the task (they were slower and committed more errors at the beginning of the learning process) than 10-year-olds, but despite this age effect observed at the outset, all children improved performance across trials and transferred their skill to a different figure as well as adults. Correlational analyses showed that inhibition abilities play a key role in the performance of 10-year-olds and adults at the beginning of the learning but not in that of 7-year-olds. Overall, our results suggest that the age-related differences observed in our procedural learning task are at least partly due to the differential involvement of inhibition abilities, which may facilitate learning (so long as they are sufficiently developed) during the initial steps of the learning process; however, they would not be a necessary condition for skill learning to occur. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. It's complicated: The relation between cognitive change procedures, cognitive change, and symptom change in cognitive therapy for depression.

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    Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo; German, Ramaris E; DeRubeis, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Many attempts have been made to discover and characterize the mechanisms of change in psychotherapies for depression, yet no clear, evidence-based account of the relationship between therapeutic procedures, psychological mechanisms, and symptom improvement has emerged. Negatively-biased thinking plays an important role in the phenomenology of depression, and most theorists acknowledge that cognitive changes occur during successful treatments. However, the causal role of cognitive change procedures in promoting cognitive change and alleviating depressive symptoms has been questioned. We describe the methodological and inferential limitations of the relevant empirical investigations and provide recommendations for addressing them. We then develop a framework within which the possible links between cognitive procedures, cognitive change, and symptom change can be considered. We conclude that cognitive procedures are effective in alleviating symptoms of depression and that cognitive change, regardless of how it is achieved, contributes to symptom change, a pattern of findings that lends support to the cognitive theory of depression.

  3. Learning figurative idioms via cognitive semantic pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In FTL contexts, traditional view treats idiomatic language as essentially arbitrary, which has typically led to the belief that they can only be learned through blind memoriztion. However, the cognitive semantic idea considers that idioms are typically motivated, which can help learners to identify their senses. This paper demonstrates how to learn figurative idioms through cognitive semantic pathway by taking anger as one example.

  4. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives.

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    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-07-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom's taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom's taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  5. An agent architecture with on-line learning of both procedural and declarative knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, R.; Peterson, T.; Merrill, E. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In order to develop versatile cognitive agents that learn in situated contexts and generalize resulting knowledge to different environments, we explore the possibility of learning both declarative and procedural knowledge in a hybrid connectionist architecture. The architecture is based on the two-level idea proposed earlier by the author. Declarative knowledge is represented symbolically, while procedural knowledge is represented subsymbolically. The architecture integrates reactive procedures, rules, learning, and decision-making in a unified framework, and structures different learning components (including Q-learning and rule induction) in a synergistic way to perform on-line and integrated learning.

  6. Cognitive Learning Styles of EFL Students

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    Srichanyachon, Napaporn

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to study cognitive learning styles of EFL students, compare language learning styles among students categorized by their background, and investigate the relationship between English background knowledge and language learning styles. The samples were 210 undergraduate students enrolled in Fundamental English course at Bangkok…

  7. Cognition and procedure representational requirements for predictive human performance models

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    Corker, K.

    1992-01-01

    Models and modeling environments for human performance are becoming significant contributors to early system design and analysis procedures. Issues of levels of automation, physical environment, informational environment, and manning requirements are being addressed by such man/machine analysis systems. The research reported here investigates the close interaction between models of human cognition and models that described procedural performance. We describe a methodology for the decomposition of aircrew procedures that supports interaction with models of cognition on the basis of procedures observed; that serves to identify cockpit/avionics information sources and crew information requirements; and that provides the structure to support methods for function allocation among crew and aiding systems. Our approach is to develop an object-oriented, modular, executable software representation of the aircrew, the aircraft, and the procedures necessary to satisfy flight-phase goals. We then encode in a time-based language, taxonomies of the conceptual, relational, and procedural constraints among the cockpit avionics and control system and the aircrew. We have designed and implemented a goals/procedures hierarchic representation sufficient to describe procedural flow in the cockpit. We then execute the procedural representation in simulation software and calculate the values of the flight instruments, aircraft state variables and crew resources using the constraints available from the relationship taxonomies. The system provides a flexible, extensible, manipulative and executable representation of aircrew and procedures that is generally applicable to crew/procedure task-analysis. The representation supports developed methods of intent inference, and is extensible to include issues of information requirements and functional allocation. We are attempting to link the procedural representation to models of cognitive functions to establish several intent inference methods

  8. Locating Cognition in Second Language Interaction and Learning: Inside the Skull or in Public View?

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    Kasper, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    A key question in the debate on conversation analysis as an approach to SLA concerns the role of cognition in interaction and learning. Where is cognition located, and how is understanding in interaction achieved? For an empirically grounded answer, I will explore the procedural apparatus that sustains socially shared cognition. Following a brief…

  9. Measuring Cognitive Load in Embodied Learning Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Skulmowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research on embodied cognition has inspired a number of studies on multimedia learning and instructional psychology. However, in contrast to traditional research on education and multimedia learning, studies on embodied learning (i.e., focusing on bodily action and perception in the context of education in some cases pose new problems for the measurement of cognitive load. This review provides an overview over recent studies on embodied learning in which cognitive load was measured using surveys, behavioral data, or physiological measures. The different methods are assessed in terms of their success in finding differences of cognitive load in embodied learning scenarios. At the same time, we highlight the most important challenges for researchers aiming to include these measures into their study designs. The main issues we identified are: (1 Subjective measures must be appropriately phrased to be useful for embodied learning; (2 recent findings indicate potentials as well as problematic aspects of dual-task measures; (3 the use of physiological measures offers great potential, but may require mobile equipment in the context of embodied scenarios; (4 meta-cognitive measures can be useful extensions of cognitive load measurement for embodied learning.

  10. Measuring Cognitive Load in Embodied Learning Settings

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    Skulmowski, Alexander; Rey, Günter Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, research on embodied cognition has inspired a number of studies on multimedia learning and instructional psychology. However, in contrast to traditional research on education and multimedia learning, studies on embodied learning (i.e., focusing on bodily action and perception in the context of education) in some cases pose new problems for the measurement of cognitive load. This review provides an overview over recent studies on embodied learning in which cognitive load was measured using surveys, behavioral data, or physiological measures. The different methods are assessed in terms of their success in finding differences of cognitive load in embodied learning scenarios. At the same time, we highlight the most important challenges for researchers aiming to include these measures into their study designs. The main issues we identified are: (1) Subjective measures must be appropriately phrased to be useful for embodied learning; (2) recent findings indicate potentials as well as problematic aspects of dual-task measures; (3) the use of physiological measures offers great potential, but may require mobile equipment in the context of embodied scenarios; (4) meta-cognitive measures can be useful extensions of cognitive load measurement for embodied learning. PMID:28824473

  11. Cognitive load theory and e-learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Mierlo, Christa; Jarodzka, Halszka; Kirschner, Femke; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Van Mierlo, C. M., Jarodzka, H., Kirschner, F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012). Cognitive load theory in e-learning. In Z. Yan (Ed.), Encyclopedia of cyber behavior (pp. 1178-1211). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

  12. Enhancing cognitive learning in Veterinary Osteology through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with the help of student hands on projects to evaluate the student motivation, attitude and cognition behavior in learning veterinary anatomy. Materials .... of on student motivation was assessed using class attendance and a five scale measure ...

  13. Music cognition: Learning and processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohrmeier, M.; Rebuschat, P.; Honing, H.; Loui, P.; Wiggins, G.; Pearce, M.T.; Müllensiefen, D.; Taatgen, N.; van Rijn, H.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the study of music perception and cognition has witnessed an enormous growth of interest. Music cognition is an intrinsically interdisciplinary subject which combines insights and research methods from many of the cognitive sciences. This trend is clearly reflected, for example, in

  14. Cognitive Learning Theory Takes a Backseat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby-Jensen, Cecilie K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the consequences of a cognitive management development program for middle managers in a public organization. The objective was to teach transformational leadership and teamwork but it occasioned a very limited improved articulation of transformational leadership and teamwork...... and only a modest change in the managers' actions in the workplace. Meanwhile, the simultaneous implementation of teamwork in the organization also invoked action and situated learning methods. Theses are recommended above cognitive learning....

  15. Designing e-learning cognitively: TSOI Hybrid Learning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Fie Tsoi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Research on learning has proposed various models for learning. However, generally, there has been an inadequate research of the application of these models for learning for example the Kolb’s experiential learning cycle or the Jarvis’s model of reflection and learning to the development of e-learning materials. This is more so especially due to lack of effective yet practical design model for designing interactive e-learning materials. Having this in mind, the TSOI Hybrid Learning Model can be used as a pedagogic model for the cognitive design of e-learning. This Model represents learning as a cyclical cognitive process. A major feature is to promote active cognitive processing in the learner for meaningful learning proceeding from inductive to deductive. Design specificity in science and chemistry education is illustrated in terms of instructional storyboarding and the research-based e-learning product developed. Learners’ cognitive abilities will be addressed as part of the research data collected.

  16. The Learning Way: Meta-Cognitive Aspects of Experiential Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Alice Y.; Kolb, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary research on meta-cognition has reintroduced conscious experience into psychological research on learning and stimulated a fresh look at classical experiential learning scholars who gave experience a central role in the learning process--William James, John Dewey, Kurt Lewin, Carl Rogers, and Paulo Freire. In particular James's…

  17. Autonomous Learning from a Social Cognitive Perspective

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    Ponton, Michael K.; Rhea, Nancy E.

    2006-01-01

    The current perspective of autonomous learning defines it as the agentive exhibition of resourcefulness, initiative, and persistence in self-directed learning. As a form of human agency, it has been argued in the literature that this perspective should be consistent with Bandura's (1986) Social Cognitive Theory (SCT). The purpose of this article…

  18. Situated Cognition and the Culture of Learning.

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    Brown, John Seely; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conventional schooling too often ignores the influence of school culture on what is learned in school. Knowledge is situated, being in part a product of the activity, context, and culture in which it is developed and used; this is known as cognitive apprenticeship. Implications for understanding learning and teaching are discussed. (Author/BJV)

  19. Learning Tools and Applications for Cognitive Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Drigas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning technologies are an indispensable tool for students’ cognitive improvement and assessment. ICTs in coordination with a concrete pedagogical framework may provide students and teachers flexible, engaging, cost-effective and above all, personalized learning experiences, which focus on the adoption of the 21st century cognitive skills into the actual learning process. Such higher order thinking skills (HOTS entail critical thinking, problem solving, independent inquiry, creativity, communication, collaboration, digital literacy. Therefore, technologically-supported educational environments aim at self-regulated and inquisitive, constructivist, knowledge building rather than knowledge accumulation.

  20. Probabilistic Sequence Learning in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezso eNemeth

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI causes slight but noticeable disruption in cognitive systems, primarily executive and memory functions. However, it is not clear if the development of sequence learning is affected by an impaired cognitive system and, if so, how. The goal of our study was to investigate the development of probabilistic sequence learning, from the initial acquisition to consolidation, in MCI and healthy elderly control groups. We used the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task (ASRT to measure probabilistic sequence learning. Individuals with MCI showed weaker learning performance than the healthy elderly group. However, using the reaction times only from the second half of each learning block – after the reactivation phase - we found intact learning in MCI. Based on the assumption that the first part of each learning block is related to reactivation/recall processes, we suggest that these processes are affected in MCI. The 24-hour offline period showed no effect on sequence-specific learning in either group but did on general skill learning: the healthy elderly group showed offline improvement in general reaction times while individuals with MCI did not. Our findings deepen our understanding regarding the underlying mechanisms and time course of sequence acquisition and consolidation.

  1. Cognitive Learning Styles as Reflected in the Test Makeup of English Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Al-Quran

    2007-01-01

    The cognitive learning style is an indispensable variable in the composite of the teaching-learning process. Pedagogically, it can be useful if instructors explore what type of learners they are in addition to the mode of learning preference their students depict. This can bridge the gap between training and evaluating procedures. The study…

  2. Cognitive Analytics Driven Personalized Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudivada, Venkat N.

    2017-01-01

    Various types of structured data collected by learning management systems such as Moodle have been used to improve student learning outcomes. Learning analytics refers to an assortment of data analysis methods used for this task. These methods typically do not consider unstructured data such as blogs, discussions, e-mail, and course messages.…

  3. Learning Science: Some Insights from Cognitive Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, P. S. C.

    Theories of teaching and learning, including those associated with constructivism, often make no overt reference to an underlying assumption that they make; that is, human cognition depends on domain-free, general-purpose processing by the brain. This assumption is shown to be incompatible with evidence from studies of children's early learning. Rather, cognition is modular in nature, and often domain-specific. Recognition of modularity requires a re-evaluation of some aspects of current accounts of learning science. Especially, children's ideas in science are sometimes triggered rather than learned. It is in the nature of triggered conceptual structures that they are not necessarily expressible in language, and that they may not be susceptible to change by later learning.

  4. When the poor excel: Poverty facilitates procedural learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Bin; Mao, Lihua

    2016-08-01

    Recent research has shown that poverty directly impeded cognitive functions because the poor could be easily distracted by monetary concerns. We argue that this effect may be limited to functions relying on working memory. For functions that rely on proceduralized processes however, monetary concerns elicited by reminding of financial demands would be conducive rather than harmful. Our results supported this hypothesis by showing that participants with lower income reached the learning criterion of the information-integration categorization task faster than their more affluent counterparts after reminding of financial demands.

  5. Situated Cognition and Strategies for Meaningful Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Díaz Barriga Arceo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the principles underlying situated cognition linked to the Vygotskian sociocultural perspective, which state that situated cognition is both a part and the result of activity, context and culture. It highlights the importance of mediation, the joint construction of meaning and the mechanism of adapted assistance. There are examples of instructional approaches which vary in cultural relevance and the type of social activity they elicit. It also presents a number of meaningful learning strategies based on situated experiential teaching (authentic problem solving, learning while in service, case studies, projects, situated simulation, among others. Finally, the paper deals with the potentiality of empowerment.

  6. A Cognitive Approach to e-Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Rice, Douglas M.; Eaton, Sharon L.; Perkins, Michael C.; Scott, Ryan T.; Burnette, John R.; Robertson, Sarah R.

    2003-12-01

    Like traditional classroom instruction, distributed learning derives from passive training paradigms. Just as student-centered classroom teaching methods have been applied over several decades of classroom instruction, interactive approaches have been encouraged for distributed learning. While implementation of multimedia-based training features may appear to produce active learning, sophisticated use of multimedia features alone does not necessarily enhance learning. This paper describes the results of applying cognitive science principles to enhance learning in a student-centered, distributed learning environment, and lessons learned in developing and delivering this training. Our interactive, scenario-based approach exploits multimedia technology within a systematic, cognitive framework for learning. The basis of the application of cognitive principles is the innovative use of multimedia technology to implement interaction elements. These simple multimedia interactions, which are used to support new concepts, are later combined with other interaction elements to create more complex, integrated practical exercises. This technology-based approach may be applied in a variety of training and education contexts, but is especially well suited for training of equipment operators and maintainers. For example, it has been used in a sustainment training application for the United States Army's Combat Support System Automated Information System Interface (CAISI). The CAISI provides a wireless communications capability that allows various logistics systems to communicate across the battlefield. Based on classroom training material developed by the CAISI Project Office, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory designed and developed an interactive, student-centered distributed-learning application for CAISI operators and maintainers. This web-based CAISI training system is also distributed on CD media for use on individual computers, and material developed for the

  7. Learning a Procedure from Multimedia Instructions: The Effects of Film and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Baggett, in press, b) the soundtrack of a film was shifted, so that an object shown in the visual image and its corresponding verbal label could be in...INSTITUTE OF COGNITIVE S CIENCE Learning a Procedure from Multimedia Instructions: Iwo* The Effects of Film and Practice Deprtment of psyhology...5ettlafej S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Learning a procedure from multimedia instructions: The effects of film and practice I. PERFORMING ORG

  8. Exploration and Learning for Cognitive Robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudinac, M.

    2013-01-01

    Before a future with household robots is really feasible, those robots need to be easily adaptable to novel environments and users, be able to apply previously acquired knowledge, and able to learn from perceiving and interacting with the world and users around them. This thesis proposes a cognitive

  9. Business Simulations and Cognitive Learning: Developments, Desires, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip H.; Lawton, Leigh

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the research associated with the assessment of the cognitive learning that occurs through participation in a simulation exercise. It summarizes the "objective" evidence regarding cognitive learning versus the "perceptions" of cognitive learning achieved as reported by participants and instructors. The authors also explain…

  10. How Emotional Mechanism Helps Episodic Learning in a Cognitive Agent

    CERN Document Server

    Faghihi, Usef; Nkambou, Roger; Poirier, Pierre; Mayers, Andre

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose the CTS (Concious Tutoring System) technology, a biologically plausible cognitive agent based on human brain functions.This agent is capable of learning and remembering events and any related information such as corresponding procedures, stimuli and their emotional valences. Our proposed episodic memory and episodic learning mechanism are closer to the current multiple-trace theory in neuroscience, because they are inspired by it [5] contrary to other mechanisms that are incorporated in cognitive agents. This is because in our model emotions play a role in the encoding and remembering of events. This allows the agent to improve its behavior by remembering previously selected behaviors which are influenced by its emotional mechanism. Moreover, the architecture incorporates a realistic memory consolidation process based on a data mining algorithm.

  11. Managing Cognitive Load in Adaptive ICT-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava Kalyuga

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The history of technological innovations in education has many examples of failed high expectations. To avoid becoming another one, current multimedia ICT tools need to be designed in accordance with how the human mind works. There are well established characteristics of its architecture that should be taken into account when evaluating, selecting, and using educational technology. This paper starts with a review of the most important features of human cognitive architecture and their implications for ICT-based learning. Expertise reversal effect relates to the interactions between levels of learner prior knowledge and effectiveness of different instructional techniques and procedures. Designs and techniques that are effective with low-knowledge learners can lose their effectiveness and even have negative consequences for more proficient learners. The paper describes recent empirical findings associated with the expertise reversal effect in multimedia and hypermedia learning environments, their interpretation within a cognitive load framework, and implications for the design of learner-tailored multimedia.

  12. Cognitive Strategies in Learning Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormrod, Jeanne Ellis; And Others

    This report presents two experiments that compared the performance of map experts to that of novices. Subjects (from the areas of geography, educational psychology, and sociology) were 13 university faculty members in experiment one and 12 undergraduate students in experiment two. Following a practice trial, the learning of a logical map and a…

  13. THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF COGNITIVE LEARNING STYLES IN ELT CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Yagcioglu

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted. Games on cognitive learning styles will be explained. Sample classroom activities will be shared. Useful books, videos and websites on cognitive learni...

  14. THE POSITIVE EFFECTS OF COGNITIVE LEARNING STYLES IN ELT CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Yagcioglu

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted. Games on cognitive learning styles will be explained. Sample classroom activities will be shared. Useful books, videos and websites on cognitive learni...

  15. Reduced procedural motor learning in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eLévesque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the deaf suggest that cross-modal neuroplastic changes may vary across modalities. Only a handful of studies have examined motor capacities in the profoundly deaf. These studies suggest the presence of deficits in manual dexterity and delays in movement production. As of yet, the ability to learn complex sequential motor patterns has not been explored in deaf populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the procedural learning skills of deaf adults. A serial reaction-time task (SRTT was performed by 18 deaf subjects and 18 matched controls to investigate possible motor alteration subsequent to auditory deprivation. Deaf participants had various degrees of hearing loss. Half of the experimental group were early-deaf adults mostly using hearing aids, the remaining half were late-deaf adults using a cochlear implant. Participants carried out a repeating 12-item sequence of key presses along with random blocks containing no repeating sequence. Non-specific and sequence-specific learning was analyzed in relation to individual features related to the hearing loss. The results revealed significant differences between groups in sequence-specific learning, with deaf subjects being less efficient than controls in acquiring sequence-specific knowledge. We interpret the results in light of cross-modal plasticity and the auditory scaffolding hypothesis.

  16. Kindergarten students' cognitive engagement in science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Fang

    The study is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 3rd year of the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP), a federally funded research project that examines how kindergarten students learn science in inquiry settings (Mantzicopoulos, Patrick, & Samarapungavan, 2005). Videotapes of classroom lessons implemented as part of the Year 3 intervention were analyzed to identify kindergarten students' patterns of cognitive engagement during inquiry-based science learning, as well as to identify patterns of teacher discourse that promoted students' cognitive engagement. The data for the current study were drawn from videotapes and transcriptions of classroom discourse in 3 intervention classrooms that participated in the SLP. Three teachers and 55 kindergarten students participated in the study. Twelve categories of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement and eleven categories of teacher discourse were identified. The initial 12 student and 11 teacher discourse categories were further grouped into two superordinate categories (Higher Order and Basic) respectively. Chi Square analyses indicated that there was a statistically significant association between student and teacher superordinate discourse (alpha = .05). MANOVA analyses indicated that there was no significant difference on overall rates of kindergarten students' cognitive engagement by class (alpha = .05).

  17. Prospection in Cognition: The Case for Joint Episodic-Procedural Memory in Cognitive Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eVernon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prospection lies at the core of cognition: it is the means by which an agent — a person or a cognitive robot — shifts its perspective from immediate sensory experience to anticipate future events, be they the actions of other agents or the outcome of its own actions. Prospection, accomplished by internal simulation, requires mechanisms for both perceptual imagery and motor imagery. While it is known that these two forms of imagery are tightly entwined in the mirror neuron system, we do not yet have an effective model of the mentalizing network which would provide a framework to integrate declarative episodic and procedural memory systems and to combine experiential knowledge with skillful know-how. Such a framework would be founded on joint perceptuo-motor representations. In this paper we examine the case for this form of representation, contrasting sensory-motor theory with ideo-motor theory, and we discuss how such a framework could be realized by joint episodic-procedural memory. We argue that such a representation framework has several advantages for cognitive robotics. Since episodic memory operates by recombining imperfectly recalled past experience, this allows it to simulate new or unexpected events. Furthermore, by virtue of its associative nature, joint episodic-procedural memory allows the internal simulation to be conditioned by current context, semantic memory, and the agent’s value system. Context and semantics constrain the combinatorial explosion of potential perception-action associations and allow effective action selection in the pursuit of goals, while the value system provides the motives that underpin the agent’s autonomy and cognitive development. This joint episodic-procedural memory framework is neutral regarding the final implementation of these episodic and procedural memories, which can be configured sub-symbolically as associative networks or symbolically as content-addressable image databases and databases

  18. A Preliminary Study of Cognitive Strategies in English Vocabulary Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亚丽

    2009-01-01

    The paper tries to put forward some methods to learn English words effectively from the perspective of cognitive psychology. According to objective cognition rules: human are easier to know things from near surroundings, from similar group, from familiar situations and so on. The article explores that some cognitive strategies such as category, semantic net, context, and chunk are helpful for English vocabulary learning.

  19. Complex Mobile Learning That Adapts to Learners' Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning is cognitively demanding and frequently the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing means that mobile devices are used in cognitively demanding environments. This paper examines the use of mobile devices from a Learning, Usability and Cognitive Load Theory perspective. It suggests scenarios where these fields interact and presents an…

  20. Complex Mobile Learning That Adapts to Learners' Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning is cognitively demanding and frequently the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing means that mobile devices are used in cognitively demanding environments. This paper examines the use of mobile devices from a Learning, Usability and Cognitive Load Theory perspective. It suggests scenarios where these fields interact and presents an…

  1. Concurrent Data Elicitation Procedures, Processes, and the Early Stages of L2 Learning: A Critical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Ronald P.; Grey, Sarah; Marijuan, Silvia; Moorman, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Given the current methodological interest in eliciting direct data on the cognitive processes L2 learners employ as they interact with L2 data during the early stages of the learning process, this article takes a critical and comparative look at three concurrent data elicitation procedures currently employed in the SLA literature: Think aloud (TA)…

  2. Concurrent Data Elicitation Procedures, Processes, and the Early Stages of L2 Learning: A Critical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Ronald P.; Grey, Sarah; Marijuan, Silvia; Moorman, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Given the current methodological interest in eliciting direct data on the cognitive processes L2 learners employ as they interact with L2 data during the early stages of the learning process, this article takes a critical and comparative look at three concurrent data elicitation procedures currently employed in the SLA literature: Think aloud (TA)…

  3. Individual Differences in Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge when Learning Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Darcy; Nunes, Terezinha; Bryant, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on children's conceptual and procedural understanding of fractions, and other arithmetic skills, has led to contradictory conclusions. Some research suggests that children learn conceptual knowledge before procedural knowledge, some suggests that they learn procedural knowledge before conceptual knowledge, and other research…

  4. Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I review recent findings in cognitive neuroscience in learning, particularly in the learning of mathematics and of reading. I argue that while cognitive neuroscience is in its infancy as a field, theories of learning will need to incorporate and account for this growing body of empirical data.

  5. Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I review recent findings in cognitive neuroscience in learning, particularly in the learning of mathematics and of reading. I argue that while cognitive neuroscience is in its infancy as a field, theories of learning will need to incorporate and account for this growing body of empirical data.

  6. DIALOGIC LEARNING: A SOCIAL COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nouri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents an exploration of the educational value of dialogue as a teaching strategy in contemporary classrooms in light of recent evidences grounded in knowledge produced by social and cognitive neuroscience research. The relevant literature suggests that dialogue is a unique feature of humans and no other animal is able to dialogue as they do. Humans are biologically wired for dialogue and interaction with one another in socially and culturally shaped contexts. This dynamic interdependence of social and cognitive processes plays a critically important role in construction of knowledge and cognitive development. It is also well established that social processing in the brain is strongly interrelated with the processing of emotion. Children therefore, are social learners who actively construct meaning and knowledge as they interact with their cultural and social environment through dialogue. In conclusion, recent advance in cognitive and social neuroscience is providing a new basis for the communicative conception of learning in which authentic interaction and dialogue are key components. This suggests new avenues of research that need to empirically investigate the role of dialogue on students' mind and brain development.

  7. Assessing the effect of cognitive styles with different learning modes on learning outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chechen; Chuang, Shu-Hui

    2007-08-01

    In this study, similarities and differences in learning outcome associated with individual differences in cognitive styles are examined using the traditional (face-to-face) and web-based learning modes. 140 undergraduate students were categorized as having analytic or holistic cognitive styles by their scores on the Style of Learning and Thinking questionnaire. Four different conditions were studies; students with analytic cognitive style in a traditional learning mode, analytic cognitive style in a web-based learning mode, holistic cognitive style in a traditional learning mode, and holistic cognitive style in a web-based learning mode. Analysis of the data show that analytic style in traditional mode lead to significantly higher performance and perceived satisfaction than in other conditions. Satisfaction did not differ significantly between students with analytic style in web-based learning and those with holistic style in traditional learning. This suggest that integrating different learning modes into the learning environment may be insufficient to improve learners' satisfaction.

  8. Patients with Parkinson's Disease Learn to Control Complex Systems via Procedural as Well as Non-Procedural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Beigi, Mazda; Castaneda, Cristina Sanchez; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2008-01-01

    The striatum is considered to mediate some forms of procedural learning. Complex dynamic control (CDC) tasks involve an individual having to make a series of sequential decisions to achieve a specific outcome (e.g. learning to operate and control a car), and they involve procedural learning. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that…

  9. Patients with Parkinson's Disease Learn to Control Complex Systems via Procedural as Well as Non-Procedural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Magda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Beigi, Mazda; Castaneda, Cristina Sanchez; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2008-01-01

    The striatum is considered to mediate some forms of procedural learning. Complex dynamic control (CDC) tasks involve an individual having to make a series of sequential decisions to achieve a specific outcome (e.g. learning to operate and control a car), and they involve procedural learning. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that…

  10. Embodied Language Learning and Cognitive Bootstrapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, C.E.; Nehaniv, C. L.; Saunders, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Co-development of action, conceptualization and social interaction mutually scaffold and support each other within a virtuous feedback cycle in the development of human language in children. Within this framework, the purpose of this article is to bring together diverse but complementary accounts...... of research methods that jointly contribute to our understanding of cognitive development and in particular, language acquisition in robots. Thus, we include research pertaining to developmental robotics, cognitive science, psychology, linguistics and neuroscience, as well as practical computer science...... the humanoid robot iCub are reported, while human learning relevant to developmental robotics has also contributed useful results. Disparate approaches are brought together via common underlying design principles. Without claiming to model human language acquisition directly, we are nonetheless inspired...

  11. A Cognitive Skill Classification Based On Multi Objective Optimization Using Learning Vector Quantization for Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Aries Syufagi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, serious games and game technology are poised to transform the way of educating and training students at all levels. However, pedagogical value in games do not help novice students learn, too many memorizing and reduce learning process due to no information of player’s ability. To asses the cognitive level of player ability, we propose a Cognitive Skill Game (CSG. CSG improves this cognitive concept to monitor how players interact with the game. This game employs Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ for optimizing the cognitive skill input classification of the player. CSG is using teacher’s data to obtain the neuron vector of cognitive skill pattern supervise. Three clusters multi objective target will be classified as; trial and error, carefully and, expert cognitive skill. In the game play experiments using 33 respondent players demonstrates that 61% of players have high trial and error cognitive skill, 21% have high carefully cognitive skill, and 18% have high expert cognitive skill. CSG may provide information to game engine when a player needs help or when wanting a formidable challenge. The game engine will provide the appropriate tasks according to players’ ability. CSG will help balance the emotions of players, so players do not get bored and frustrated. Players have a high interest to finish the game if the player is emotionally stable. Interests in the players strongly support the procedural learning in a serious game.

  12. Situated Cognition and Problem-Based Learning: Implications for Learning and Instruction with Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the foundational principles of situated cognition and substantiates its theoretical underpinnings with a transactional worldview; draws connections between situated cognition and problem-based learning; and draws implications from situated cognition and problem-based learning to learning and instruction with technology. Suggests that…

  13. Immune Genetic Learning of Fuzzy Cognitive Map

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-mei; HE Yue; TANG Bing-yong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid methodology of automatically constructing fuzzy cognitive map (FCM). The method uses immune genetic algorithm to learn the connection matrix of FCM. In the algorithm, the DNA coding method is used and an immune operator based on immune mechanism is constructed. The characteristics of the system and the experts' knowledge are abstracted as vaccine for restraining the degenerative phenomena during evolution so as to improve the algorithmic efficiency. Finally, an illustrative example is provided, and its results suggest that the method is capable of automatically generating FCM model.

  14. Cognitive theories and the design of e-learning environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillani, Bijan; O'Guinn, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive development refers to a mental process by which knowledge is acquired, stored, and retrieved to solve problems. Therefore, cognitive developmental theories attempt to explain cognitive activities that contribute to students' intellectual development and their capacity to learn and solve problems. Cognitive developmental research has had a great impact on the constructivism movement in education and educational technology. In order to appreciate how cognitive developmental theories have contributed to the design, process and development of constructive e-learning environments, we shall first present Piaget's cognitive theory and derive an inquiry training model from it that will support a constructivism approach to teaching and learning. Second, we will discuss an example developed by NASA that used the Web as an appropriate instructional delivery medium to apply Piaget's cognitive theory to create e-learning environments.

  15. Cognitive Learning Theories as One Effective Foundation of Second Lan-guage Teaching and Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Li

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive theory is based on the work of psychologists and psycholinguists working on the internal factors of individu-al’s mind. As language learning is a complex mental process therefore the focus of cognitive learning theories is the learning process in learners’minds. This paper aims to show that cognitive learning theories are the theoretical foundation of second lan-guage teaching and learning according to the comparison of theories between Anderson and McLaughlin. The comparing result indicates that cognitive learning theories play a significant role in second language teaching and learning but the learners’exter-nal factors cannot be neglected either.

  16. Procedural Learning in Children With Developmental Coordination, Reading, and Attention Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magallón, Sara; Crespo-Eguílaz, Nerea; Narbona, Juan

    2015-10-01

    The aim is to assess repetition-based learning of procedures in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), reading disorder (RD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants included 187 children, studied in 4 groups: (a) DCD comorbid with RD and ADHD (DCD+RD+ADHD) (n = 30); (b) RD comorbid with ADHD (RD+ADHD) (n = 48); (c) ADHD (n = 19); and typically developing children (control group) (n = 90). Two procedural learning tasks were used: Assembly learning and Mirror drawing. Children were tested on 4 occasions for each task: 3 trials were consecutive and the fourth trial was performed after an interference task. Task performance by DCD+RD+ADHD children improved with training (P DCD+RD+ADHD improve in their use of cognitive-motor procedures over a short training period. Aims of intervention in DCD+RD+ADHD should be based on individual learning abilities.

  17. The Cognition of Priapo. Caricature procedures in Carlo Emilio Gadda’s Eros e Priapo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paolo Gervasi

    2017-01-01

    .... The present paper scrutinises rhetorical and stylistic procedures through which Gadda elaborates within literary writing both the techniques and the perceptive and cognitive bases of caricature...

  18. Cognitive characteristics of learning Java, an object-oriented programming language

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Garry Lynn

    Industry and Academia are moving from procedural programming languages (e.g., COBOL) to object-oriented programming languages, such as Java for the Internet. Past studies in the cognitive aspects of programming have focused primarily on procedural programming languages. Some of the languages used have been Pascal, C, Basic, FORTAN, and COBOL. Object-oriented programming (OOP) represents a new paradigm for computing. Industry is finding that programmers are having difficulty shifting to this new programming paradigm. This instruction in OOP is currently starting in colleges and universities across the country. What are the cognitive aspects for this new OOP language Java? When is a student developmentally ready to handle the cognitive characteristics of the OOP language Java? Which cognitive teaching style is best for this OOP language Java? Questions such as the aforementioned are the focus of this research Such research is needed to improve understanding of the learning process and identify students' difficulties with OOP methods. This can enhance academic teaching and industry training (Scholtz, 1993; Sheetz, 1997; Rosson, 1990). Cognitive development as measured by the Propositional Logic Test, cognitive style as measured by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator, and physical hemispheric dominance as measured by a self-report survey were obtained from thirty-six university students studying Java programming. Findings reveal that physical hemispheric dominance is unrelated to cognitive and programming language variables. However, both procedural and object oriented programming require Piaget's formal operation cognitive level as indicated by the Propositional Logic Test. This is consistent with prior research A new finding is that object oriented programming also requires formal operation cognitive level. Another new finding is that object oriented programming appears to be unrelated to hemispheric cognitive style as indicated by the Hemispheric Mode Indicator (HMI

  19. Seriacion: Un Procedimiento De Aprendizaje (Seriation: A Learning Procedure.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Mercedes; And Others

    The development and application of a learning procedure for the seriation structure of children in the oscilatory state are described. The procedure was based on the structural genetic theory of learning. A study consisting of design and verification stages was carried out in Cali, Colombia. In the design stage six seriation treatments involving…

  20. Seriacion: Un Procedimiento De Aprendizaje (Seriation: A Learning Procedure.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Mercedes; And Others

    The development and application of a learning procedure for the seriation structure of children in the oscilatory state are described. The procedure was based on the structural genetic theory of learning. A study consisting of design and verification stages was carried out in Cali, Colombia. In the design stage six seriation treatments involving…

  1. Cognitive Skills: A Modest Way of Learning through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethy, Satya Sundar

    2012-01-01

    Learning is an ever-present phenomenon. It takes place irrespective of time and place. It engages learners in their interested topic/content. Learning absorbs many skills, such as; reading skills, writing skills, technological skills, emotional skills, behavioral skills, cognitive skills, and language skills. Out of all these, cognitive skills…

  2. The Positive Effects of Cognitive Learning Styles in ELT Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagcioglu, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    In the EFL, ESL, ESP and in the ELT classes, students are taught their courses with different kinds of methods and approaches. Cognitive learning styles are the most essential styles in foreign language education. In this paper, the positive effects of cognitive learning styles will be handled. The benefits of these styles will be highlighted.…

  3. Proactive learning for artificial cognitive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Young

    2010-04-01

    The Artificial Cognitive Systems (ACS) will be developed for human-like functions such as vision, auditory, inference, and behavior. Especially, computational models and artificial HW/SW systems will be devised for Proactive Learning (PL) and Self-Identity (SI). The PL model provides bilateral interactions between robot and unknown environment (people, other robots, cyberspace). For the situation awareness in unknown environment it is required to receive audiovisual signals and to accumulate knowledge. If the knowledge is not enough, the PL should improve by itself though internet and others. For human-oriented decision making it is also required for the robot to have self-identify and emotion. Finally, the developed models and system will be mounted on a robot for the human-robot co-existing society. The developed ACS will be tested against the new Turing Test for the situation awareness. The Test problems will consist of several video clips, and the performance of the ACSs will be compared against those of human with several levels of cognitive ability.

  4. Cognitive Skills: A Modest Way of Learning through Technology

    OpenAIRE

    SETHY, Satya Sundar

    2012-01-01

    Learning is an ever-present phenomenon. It takes place irrespective of time and place. It engages learners in their interested topic/content. Learning absorbs many skills, such as; reading skills, writing skills, technological skills, emotional skills, behavioral skills, cognitive skills, and language skills. Out of all these, cognitive skills play significant role for apprehending a concept and comprehending a discussion. In the context of distance education (DE), learning never restrains to...

  5. The interplay between dialogue, cognitive schemata and kinesthetic learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    We ask how students use communicative signs (e.g., speech and gesture) to shape and develop cognitive schemata during a bodily exploration of force and motion in a physics teaching-learning activity. We refer to this interplay between dialogue, cognition, and bodily exploration as kinesthetic...... learning. In essence we ask: to an outside observer (e.g. a teacher), what signs exist that students derive formally correct meaning and understanding from kinesthetic learning?...

  6. Bloom’s taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom’s taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom’s taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  7. SUPPORT PROBLEM FOR COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IN THE E-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov S. Lisitsyna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Successful development of such important human cognitive functions as attention, perception and information processing speed, working and long-term memory, thinking, etc. is a necessary foundation for increasing the effectiveness of e-learning. One way for further developments of students' cognitive functions in the process of e-learning consists in computer cognitive training sessions, which are included in the individual learning paths to promote a learner to the successful implementation of specific learning tasks of e-course. Analysis of the estimating problems for cognitive training effects (severity, stability and transfer is done and the ways for their solution are proposed. It is shown that the biological basis for cognitive training effects consists in the processes of neuroplasticity of the brain that influence the duration and intensity of training. An approach to the organization of research for the effects of cognitive training, based on the usage of random methods is suggested. The prospects of game mechanics application for cognitive training implementation in elearning are shown. A detailed analysis of the approaches to the training of the basic cognitive functions, including working memory of learners, is carried out. The practical significance of this paper is to identify priorities for research and development of cognitive training in e-learning.

  8. EFFICIENT SPECTRUM UTILIZATION IN COGNITIVE RADIO THROUGH REINFORCEMENT LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning schemes can be employed in cognitive radio systems to intelligently locate the spectrum holes with some knowledge about the operating environment. In this paper, we formulate a variation of Actor Critic Learning algorithm known as Continuous Actor Critic Learning Automaton (CACLA and compare this scheme with Actor Critic Learning scheme and existing Q–learning scheme. Simulation results show that our CACLA scheme has lesser execution time and achieves higher throughput compared to other two schemes.

  9. Neuromorphic cognitive systems a learning and memory centered approach

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Qiang; Hu, Jun; Tan Chen, Kay

    2017-01-01

    This book presents neuromorphic cognitive systems from a learning and memory-centered perspective. It illustrates how to build a system network of neurons to perform spike-based information processing, computing, and high-level cognitive tasks. It is beneficial to a wide spectrum of readers, including undergraduate and postgraduate students and researchers who are interested in neuromorphic computing and neuromorphic engineering, as well as engineers and professionals in industry who are involved in the design and applications of neuromorphic cognitive systems, neuromorphic sensors and processors, and cognitive robotics. The book formulates a systematic framework, from the basic mathematical and computational methods in spike-based neural encoding, learning in both single and multi-layered networks, to a near cognitive level composed of memory and cognition. Since the mechanisms for integrating spiking neurons integrate to formulate cognitive functions as in the brain are little understood, studies of neuromo...

  10. Nondeclarative learning in children with specific language impairment: predicting regularities in the visuomotor, phonological, and cognitive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor-Dubois, C; Zesiger, P; Van der Linden, M; Roulet-Perez, E

    2014-01-01

    Ullman (2004) suggested that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) results from a general procedural learning deficit. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated children with SLI via procedural learning tasks exploring the verbal, motor, and cognitive domains. Results showed that compared with a Control Group, the children with SLI (a) were unable to learn a phonotactic learning task, (b) were able but less efficiently to learn a motor learning task and (c) succeeded in a cognitive learning task. Regarding the motor learning task (Serial Reaction Time Task), reaction times were longer and learning slower than in controls. The learning effect was not significant in children with an associated Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), and future studies should consider comorbid motor impairment in order to clarify whether impairments are related to the motor rather than the language disorder. Our results indicate that a phonotactic learning but not a cognitive procedural deficit underlies SLI, thus challenging Ullmans' general procedural deficit hypothesis, like a few other recent studies.

  11. Intervention Procedures to Accelerate Rate of Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara B.

    The paper reports on a study of the rate of language learning of 12 children aged 2 to 10 with severe to profound bilateral hearing losses. Intended to help deaf children learn spoken language at the same rate as average hearing Ss, the intervention stressed three qualities of linguistic information: (1) clarity, (2) appropriateness, and (3)…

  12. Researching Cognition and Technology: How We Learn across the Lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrina, Stephen; Feng, Franc; Kim, Juyun

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses how we learn technology across the lifespan. After outlining findings of research into how children, adolescents, teens and adults learn technology, we address theoretical shifts from sociocultural to technocultural theories of cognition and reorientations from mediated to cyborgenic learning. The balance of the article…

  13. Reggio Emilia Inspired Learning Groups: Relationships, Communication, Cognition, and Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Bock; Shaffer, LaShorage; Han, Jisu

    2017-01-01

    A key aspect of the Reggio Emilia inspired curriculum is a learning group approach that fosters social and cognitive development. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a Reggio Emilia inspired learning group approach works for children with and without disabilities. This study gives insight into how to form an appropriate learning group…

  14. Food Science Education and the Cognitive Science of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, I argue that the traditional view of teaching, that the teacher's responsibility is to present information that students are solely responsible for learning, has been rendered untenable by cognitive science research in learning. The teacher can have a powerful effect on student learning by teaching not only content, but how to…

  15. The Inseparability of Cognition and Emotion in Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Merrill

    2013-01-01

    The scholarly literature about the process of second language (L2) learning has focused to a considerable extent on cognitive processes. Left aside are questions about how emotions fit into an understanding of L2 learning. One goal of this plenary is to demonstrate that we have limited our understanding of L2 learning by failing to take into…

  16. Cognitive styles and mental rotation ability in map learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzaglia, Francesca; Moè, Angelica

    2013-11-01

    In inspecting, learning and reproducing a map, a wide range of abilities is potentially involved. This study examined the role of mental rotation (MR) and verbal ability, together with that of cognitive styles in map learning. As regards cognitive styles, the traditional distinction between verbalizers and visualizers has been taken into account, together with a more recent distinction between two styles of visualization: spatial and object. One hundred and seven participants filled in two questionnaires on cognitive styles: the Verbalizer-Visualizer Questionnaire (Richardson in J Ment Imag 1:109-125, 1977) and the Object-Spatial Imagery Questionnaire (Blajenkova et al. in Appl Cogn Psych 20:239-263, 2006), performed MR and verbal tests, learned two maps, and were then tested for their recall. It was found that MR ability and cognitive styles played a role in predicting map learning, with some distinctions within cognitive styles: verbal style favoured learning of one of the two maps (the one rich in verbal labels), which in turn was disadvantaged by the adoption of spatial style. Conversely, spatial style predicted learning of the other map, rich in visual features. The discussion focuses on implications for cognitive psychology and everyday cognition.

  17. Understanding the cognitive processes involved in writing to learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kathleen M; Umanath, Sharda; Thio, Kara; Reilly, Walter B; McDaniel, Mark A; Marsh, Elizabeth J

    2017-06-01

    Writing is often used as a tool for learning. However, empirical support for the benefits of writing-to-learn is mixed, likely because the literature conflates diverse activities (e.g., summaries, term papers) under the single umbrella of writing-to-learn. Following recent trends in the writing-to-learn literature, the authors focus on the underlying cognitive processes. They draw on the largely independent writing-to-learn and cognitive psychology learning literatures to identify important cognitive processes. The current experiment examines learning from 3 writing tasks (and 1 nonwriting control), with an emphasis on whether or not the tasks engaged retrieval. Tasks that engaged retrieval (essay writing and free recall) led to better final test performance than those that did not (note taking and highlighting). Individual differences in structure building (the ability to construct mental representations of narratives; Gernsbacher, Varner, & Faust, 1990) modified this effect; skilled structure builders benefited more from essay writing and free recall than did less skilled structure builders. Further, more essay-like responses led to better performance, implicating the importance of additional cognitive processes such as reorganization and elaboration. The results highlight how both task instructions and individual differences affect the cognitive processes involved when writing-to-learn, with consequences for the effectiveness of the learning strategy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Constructivism, the so-called semantic learning theories, and situated cognition versus the psychological learning theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Juan José; Rodríguez Moneo, María

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, the perspective of situated cognition, which gave rise both to the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning and has probably become the most representative standpoint of constructivism, is examined. We consider the claim of situated cognition to provide alternative explanations of the learning phenomenon to those of psychology and, especially, to those of the symbolic perspective, currently predominant in cognitive psychology. The level of analysis of situated cognition (i.e., global interactive systems) is considered an inappropriate approach to the problem of learning. From our analysis, it is concluded that the pragmatic theories and the so-called semantic theories of learning which originated in situated cognition can hardly be considered alternatives to the psychological learning theories, and they are unlikely to add anything of interest to the learning theory or to contribute to the improvement of our knowledge about the learning phenomenon.

  19. Social incentives improve deliberative but not procedural learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlick, Marissa A; Maddox, W Todd

    2015-01-01

    Age-related deficits are seen across tasks where learning depends on asocial feedback processing, however plasticity has been observed in some of the same tasks in social contexts suggesting a novel way to attenuate deficits. Socioemotional selectivity theory suggests this plasticity is due to a deliberative motivational shift toward achieving well-being with age (positivity effect) that reverses when executive processes are limited (negativity effect). The present study examined the interaction of feedback valence (positive, negative) and social salience (emotional face feedback - happy; angry, asocial point feedback - gain; loss) on learning in a deliberative task that challenges executive processes and a procedural task that does not. We predict that angry face feedback will improve learning in a deliberative task when executive function is challenged. We tested two competing hypotheses regarding the interactive effects of deliberative emotional biases on automatic feedback processing: (1) If deliberative emotion regulation and automatic feedback are interactive we expect happy face feedback to improve learning and angry face feedback to impair learning in older adults because cognitive control is available. (2) If deliberative emotion regulation and automatic feedback are not interactive we predict that emotional face feedback will not improve procedural learning regardless of valence. Results demonstrate that older adults show persistent deficits relative to younger adults during procedural category learning suggesting that deliberative emotional biases do not interact with automatic feedback processing. Interestingly, a subgroup of older adults identified as potentially using deliberative strategies tended to learn as well as younger adults with angry relative to happy feedback, matching the pattern observed in the deliberative task. Results suggest that deliberative emotional biases can improve deliberative learning, but have no effect on procedural learning.

  20. Cognitive learning and its future in urology: surgical skills teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Somayeh B; Hussein, Ahmed A; Guru, Khurshid A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the current status of novel cognitive training approaches in surgery and to investigate the potential role of cognitive training in surgical education. Kinematics of end-effector trajectories, as well as cognitive state features of surgeon trainees and mentors have recently been studied as modalities to objectively evaluate the expertise level of trainees and to shorten the learning process. Virtual reality and haptics also have shown promising in research results in improving the surgical learning process by providing feedback to the trainee. 'Cognitive training' is a novel approach to enhance training and surgical performance. The utility of cognitive training in improving motor skills in other fields, including sports and rehabilitation, is promising enough to justify its utilization to improve surgical performance. However, some surgical procedures, especially ones performed during human-robot interaction in robot-assisted surgery, are much more complicated than sport and rehabilitation. Cognitive training has shown promising results in surgical skills-acquisition in complicated environments such as surgery. However, these methods are mostly developed in research groups using limited individuals. Transferring this research into the clinical applications is a demanding challenge. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current status of these novel cognitive training approaches in surgery and to investigate the potential role of cognitive training in surgical education.

  1. Basic Design Procedures for E-learning Courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter; Hummel, Hans; Manderveld, Jocelyn

    2005-01-01

    Sloep, P., Hummel, H. & Manderveld, J. (2005). Basic Design Procedures for E-learning Courses. In: Koper, R. & Tattersall, C., Learning Design: A Handbook on Modelling and Delivering Networked Education and Training (pp. 139-160). Berlin-Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

  2. Prescriptive Profile Procedure for Children With Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Eleanor; Fineman, Carol

    The Prescriptive Profile Procedure (PPP) attempts to provide teachers of learning disabled elementary school children with a procedure of individualized diagnosis and educational prescription which encompasses strengths and weaknesses in prerequisite skills, basic school subjects, and behavioral factors. A competency statement and six to 12…

  3. Learning style consistency across cognitive and motor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, C A

    1995-12-01

    23 athletes were asked to complete the Learning Styles Inventory first focusing on classroom learning, then on learning in their sport. Analysis indicated that learning styles shift across cognitive and motor settings. As a result, to ensure the validity of the results, giving respondents a particular focus when taking the inventory may be necessary. The development of an instrument designed strictly for motor skills might be helpful to assess successfully learners' profiles for motor skill acquisition.

  4. Cognitive-Operative Model of Intelligent Learning Systems Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureano-Cruces, Ana Lilia; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Javier; Mora-Torres, Martha; de Arriaga, Fernando; Escarela-Perez, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper behavior during the teaching-learning process is modeled by means of a fuzzy cognitive map. The elements used to model such behavior are part of a generic didactic model, which emphasizes the use of cognitive and operative strategies as part of the student-tutor interaction. Examples of possible initial scenarios for the…

  5. Principles of Learning, Implications for Teaching: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Usha

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience aims to improve our understanding of aspects of human learning and performance by combining data acquired with the new brain imaging technologies with data acquired in cognitive psychology paradigms. Both neuroscience and psychology use the philosophical assumptions underpinning the natural sciences, namely the scientific…

  6. Cognitive-Operative Model of Intelligent Learning Systems Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureano-Cruces, Ana Lilia; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Javier; Mora-Torres, Martha; de Arriaga, Fernando; Escarela-Perez, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper behavior during the teaching-learning process is modeled by means of a fuzzy cognitive map. The elements used to model such behavior are part of a generic didactic model, which emphasizes the use of cognitive and operative strategies as part of the student-tutor interaction. Examples of possible initial scenarios for the…

  7. Cognitive engagement in the problem-based learning classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.I. Rotgans (Jerome); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the present study was to examine to what extent autonomy in problem-based learning (PBL) results in cognitive engagement with the topic at hand. To that end, a short self-report instrument was devised and validated. Moreover, it was examined how cognitive engagement deve

  8. Using Cognitive Tutor Software in Learning Linear Algebra Word Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai-Ju

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of twelve 10th grade students using Cognitive Tutor, a math software program, to learn linear algebra word concept. The study's purpose was to examine whether students' mathematics performance as it is related to using Cognitive Tutor provided evidence to support Koedlinger's (2002) four instructional principles used…

  9. Principles of Learning, Implications for Teaching: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Usha

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience aims to improve our understanding of aspects of human learning and performance by combining data acquired with the new brain imaging technologies with data acquired in cognitive psychology paradigms. Both neuroscience and psychology use the philosophical assumptions underpinning the natural sciences, namely the scientific…

  10. The interplay between dialogue, cognitive schemata and kinesthetic learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    We ask how students use communicative signs (e.g., speech and gesture) to shape and develop cognitive schemata during a bodily exploration of force and motion in a physics teaching-learning activity. We refer to this interplay between dialogue, cognition, and bodily exploration as kinesthetic...

  11. On the Possibility of a Reinforcement Theory of Cognitive Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kendon

    This paper discusses cognitive learning in terms of reinforcement theory and presents arguments suggesting that a viable theory of cognition based on reinforcement principles is not out of the question. This position is supported by a discussion of the weaknesses of theories based entirely on contiguity and of considerations that are more positive…

  12. Procedural learning difficulties in children with Specific Language Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Desmottes, Lise; Meulemans, Thierry; Maillart, Christelle

    2015-01-01

    Through a review of the literature, this paper shows that linguistic and non-linguistic disorders in children with specific language impairment might be linked to difficulties in procedural learning, especially regarding sequential abilities. Indeed, children with specific language impairment encounter difficulties to learn visuo-motor and linguistic sequences. These difficulties are not limited to initial learning but extend to the consolidation stage in long-term memory. Finally, recent ...

  13. The effects of autonomous learning on cognitive load and learning results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Chantal; Kester, Liesbeth; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Martens, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, C. J. J., Kester, L., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Martens, R. L. (2011, August). The Effects of Autonomous Learning on Cognitive Load and Learning Results. Presentation at the EARLI conference. Exeter, UK.

  14. Situating cognitive/socio-cognitive approaches to student learning in genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    2009-03-01

    In this volume, Furberg and Arnseth report on a study of genetics learning from a socio-cultural perspective, focusing on students' meaning making as they engage in collaborative problem solving. Throughout the paper, they criticize research on student understanding and conceptual change conducted from a cognitive/socio-cognitive perspective on several reasonable grounds. However, their characterization of work undertaken from this perspective sometimes borders on caricature, failing to acknowledge the complexities of the research and the contexts within which it has been carried out. In this commentary, I expand their characterization of the cognitive/socio-cognitive perspective in general and situate my own work on genetics learning so as to provide a richer view of the enterprise. From this richer, more situated view, I conclude that research from both perspectives and collaboration between those looking at learning from different perspectives will ultimately provide a more complete picture of science learning.

  15. CONCEPTIONS OF LEARNING THROUGH LEARNING STYLES AND COGNITIVE DIMENSION IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Mohaffyza Binti Mohamad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Individual learning preferences and learning styles have been defined in several different ways according to theoretical models. In the context of vocational education, students have different characteristics compared to their counterparts in other fields of education, since learning orientation is more on job focused. However, the cognitive dimension is still need to be measured especially for learners at school level. This article addresses the relationship between learning styles and cognitive dimension in vocational education at secondary school level. Based on the Felder-Silverman Learning Styles and Cognitive Dimension Model, the authors highlighted students’ dimension of learning styles, students’ preferences on learning preference, and the conceptual of knowledge, skills and problem solving construct according to taxonomy. It is concluded that the vocational students are more incline to be visual learner. This learning preference and learning styles will contribute to their engagement on the concept of learning in vocational education.

  16. Cognitive Science Questions for Cognitive Development: The Concepts of Learning, Analogy, and Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Graeme S.; McCredden, J. E.

    1998-01-01

    The implications of three concepts from cognitive science for understanding of cognitive development are reviewed. These are (1) learning (and induction), (2) analogy, and (3) capacity. A model of analogical reasoning is discussed that specifies changes in representations over age that explain phenomena previously thought to be stage-related. (SLD)

  17. Cognitive and metacognitive processes in self-regulation of learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Tomec

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate differences among secondary school students in cognitive and metacognitive processes in self-regulated learning (SRL according to year of education, learning program, sex and achievement. Beside this, the autors were interested in the relationship between (metacognitive components of self-regulated learning. The theoretical framework of the research was the four-component model of self-regulated learning by Hofer, Yu and Pintrich (1998. The focus was on the first part of the model which is about cognitive structure and cognitive strategies.Metacognitive awareness inventory (Shraw and Sperling Dennison, 1994 and Cognitive strategies awareness questionnaire (Pečjak, 2000, in Peklaj and Pečjak, 2002 were applied. In a sample of 321 students, differences in perception of importance of cognitive strategies among students attending different grades (1st and 4th, students attending different learning programs, students of different gender and students with different achievements emerged. Students' achievement in the whole sample was related to amount of metacognitive awareness. In the sample of 4-year students and students attending professional secondary schools, students' achievement was additionally related to appraisal of importance elaboration and organizational strategies. Further statistical analyses of relationship between components in SRL showed high positive correlation between cognitive and metacognitive components.

  18. A Cognitive Analysis of Armor Procedural Task Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    chunking and organization in the process of recall. In G. H. Bower (Ed.), The psychology of learning and memory (Vol. 4). New York: Academic Press. Mandler...G, (1967). Organization and memory. In K. W. Spence & J. T. Spence (Eds.), The psychology of learning and memory (Vol. 1). New York: Aca- demic Press

  19. Web-Based Learning: Cognitive Styles and Instructional Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomyan, Hesham Raji

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study, which investigated whether different instructional strategies might interact with individual's cognitive style in learning. A web-based learning package was designed employing three strategies, Interactive Concept Maps, Illustration with Embedded Text and Text-Only. Group Embedded Figure Test was administered to 178…

  20. Assessing Student Learning in Academic Advising Using Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning apply to academic advising for measuring student learning outcomes. Community college students (N = 120) participated in an individual academic-advising session. We assessed students' post-intervention self-efficacy in academic planning and…

  1. Assessing Student Learning in Academic Advising Using Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning apply to academic advising for measuring student learning outcomes. Community college students (N = 120) participated in an individual academic-advising session. We assessed students' post-intervention self-efficacy in academic planning and…

  2. Assessing Student Learning in Academic Advising Using Social Cognitive Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene F.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning apply to academic advising for measuring student learning outcomes. Community college students (N = 120) participated in an individual academic-advising session. We assessed students' post-intervention self-efficacy in academic planning…

  3. Cognitive and Metacognitive Learning Strategies among Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusri, Ghazali; Rahimi, Nik Mohd; Shah, Parilah M.; Wah, Wan Haslina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive and metacognitive strategies in learning oral Arabic among students at Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Malaysia. The concept of these strategies was derived from the self-regulated learning framework, which consists of five components, namely rehearsal, elaboration, organization, critical thinking, and…

  4. Cognitive Learning Styles: Can You Engineer a "Perfect" Match?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuzzan, Sharifah Mazlina Syed; Goulding, Jack Steven

    2016-01-01

    Education and training is widely acknowledged as being one of the key factors for leveraging organisational success. However, it is equally acknowledged that skills development and the acquisition of learning through managed cognitive approaches has yet to provide a "perfect" match. Whilst it is argued that an ideal learning scenario…

  5. Cognitive and Metacognitive Learning Strategies among Arabic Language Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusri, Ghazali; Rahimi, Nik Mohd; Shah, Parilah M.; Wah, Wan Haslina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates cognitive and metacognitive strategies in learning oral Arabic among students at Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Malaysia. The concept of these strategies was derived from the self-regulated learning framework, which consists of five components, namely rehearsal, elaboration, organization, critical thinking, and…

  6. Cognitive Framework Underlying Learning Strategies for Academic Speaking

    OpenAIRE

    Irawati, Lulus

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to discuss about cognitive framework underlying learning strategies for acadeic speaking. Cognitive framework underlies learning strategies, since there are four stages of encoding process that cover not only the way store things to be learnt but also the way people organize way store things to be learnt but also the way people organize. Moreover, the learning strategies are helpful for motivating the students  to  be  active  and  creative  in  order  to  develop  their  co...

  7. Self-Directed Learning: A Cognitive and Computational Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gureckis, Todd M; Markant, Douglas B

    2012-09-01

    A widely advocated idea in education is that people learn better when the flow of experience is under their control (i.e., learning is self-directed). However, the reasons why volitional control might result in superior acquisition and the limits to such advantages remain poorly understood. In this article, we review the issue from both a cognitive and computational perspective. On the cognitive side, self-directed learning allows individuals to focus effort on useful information they do not yet possess, can expose information that is inaccessible via passive observation, and may enhance the encoding and retention of materials. On the computational side, the development of efficient "active learning" algorithms that can select their own training data is an emerging research topic in machine learning. This review argues that recent advances in these related fields may offer a fresh theoretical perspective on how people gather information to support their own learning. © The Author(s) 2012.

  8. [Relationship Between General Cognitive Abilities and School Achievement: The Mediation Role of Learning Behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, H M; Rücker, S; Büttner, P; Petermann, F; Daseking, M

    2015-10-01

    General cognitive abilities are still considered as the most important predictor of school achievement and success. Whether the high correlation (r=0.50) can be explained by other variables has not yet been studied. Learning behavior can be discussed as one factor that influences the relationship between general cognitive abilities and school achievement. This study examined the relationship between intelligence, school achievement and learning behavior. Mediator analyses were conducted to check whether learning behavior would mediate the relationship between general cognitive abilities and school grades in mathematics and German. Statistical analyses confirmed that the relationship between general cognitive abilities and school achievement was fully mediated by learning behavior for German, whereas intelligence seemed to be the only predictor for achievement in mathematics. These results could be confirmed by non-parametric bootstrapping procedures. RESULTS indicate that special training of learning behavior may have a positive impact on school success, even for children and adolescents with low IQ. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Phases of learning: How skill acquisition impacts cognitive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenison, Caitlin; Fincham, Jon M; Anderson, John R

    2016-06-01

    This fMRI study examines the changes in participants' information processing as they repeatedly solve the same mathematical problem. We show that the majority of practice-related speedup is produced by discrete changes in cognitive processing. Because the points at which these changes take place vary from problem to problem, and the underlying information processing steps vary in duration, the existence of such discrete changes can be hard to detect. Using two converging approaches, we establish the existence of three learning phases. When solving a problem in one of these learning phases, participants can go through three cognitive stages: Encoding, Solving, and Responding. Each cognitive stage is associated with a unique brain signature. Using a bottom-up approach combining multi-voxel pattern analysis and hidden semi-Markov modeling, we identify the duration of that stage on any particular trial from participants brain activation patterns. For our top-down approach we developed an ACT-R model of these cognitive stages and simulated how they change over the course of learning. The Solving stage of the first learning phase is long and involves a sequence of arithmetic computations. Participants transition to the second learning phase when they can retrieve the answer, thereby drastically reducing the duration of the Solving stage. With continued practice, participants then transition to the third learning phase when they recognize the problem as a single unit and produce the answer as an automatic response. The duration of this third learning phase is dominated by the Responding stage.

  10. Digital Learning As Enhanced Learning Processing? Cognitive Evidence for New insight of Smart Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Di Giacomo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Large use of technology improved quality of life across aging and favoring the development of digital skills. Digital skills can be considered an enhancing to human cognitive activities. New research trend is about the impact of the technology in the elaboration information processing of the children. We wanted to analyze the influence of technology in early age evaluating the impact on cognition. We investigated the performance of a sample composed of n. 191 children in school age distributed in two groups as users: high digital users and low digital users. We measured the verbal and visuoperceptual cognitive performance of children by n. 8 standardized psychological tests and ad hoc self-report questionnaire. Results have evidenced the influence of digital exposition on cognitive development: the cognitive performance is looked enhanced and better developed: high digital users performed better in naming, semantic, visual memory and logical reasoning tasks. Our finding confirms the data present in literature and suggests the strong impact of the technology using not only in the social, educational and quality of life of the people, but also it outlines the functionality and the effect of the digital exposition in early age; increased cognitive abilities of the children tailor digital skilled generation with enhanced cognitive processing toward to smart learning.

  11. Classifying cognitive profiles using machine learning with privileged information in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanin Hamdan Alahmadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of dementia is critical for assessing disease progression and potential treatment. State-or-the-art machine learning techniques have been increasingly employed to take on this diagnostic task. In this study, we employed Generalised Matrix Learning Vector Quantization (GMLVQ classifiers to discriminate patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI from healthy controls based on their cognitive skills. Further, we adopted a ``Learning with privileged information'' approach to combine cognitive and fMRI data for the classification task. The resulting classifier operates solely on the cognitive data while it incorporates the fMRI data as privileged information (PI during training. This novel classifier is of practical use as the collection of brain imaging data is not always possible with patients and older participants.MCI patients and healthy age-matched controls were trained to extract structure from temporal sequences. We ask whether machine learning classifiers can be used to discriminate patients from controls based on the learning performance and whether differences between these groups relate to individual cognitive profiles. To this end, we tested participants in four cognitive tasks: working memory, cognitive inhibition, divided attention, and selective attention. We also collected fMRI data before and after training on the learning task and extracted fMRI responses and connectivity as features for machine learning classifiers. Our results show that the PI guided GMLVQ classifiers outperform the baseline classifier that only used the cognitive data. In addition, we found that for the baseline classifier, divided attention is the only relevant cognitive feature. When PI was incorporated, divided attention remained the most relevant feature while cognitive inhibition became also relevant for the task. Interestingly, this analysis for the fMRI GMLVQ classifier suggests that (1 when overall fMRI signal for structured stimuli is

  12. Intact Acquisition and Short-Term Retention of Non-Motor Procedural Learning in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel T N Panouillères

    Full Text Available Procedural learning is a form of memory where people implicitly acquire a skill through repeated practice. People with Parkinson's disease (PD have been found to acquire motor adaptation, a form of motor procedural learning, similarly to healthy older adults but they have deficits in long-term retention. A similar pattern of normal learning on initial exposure with a deficit in retention seen on subsequent days has also been seen in mirror-reading, a form of non-motor procedural learning. It is a well-studied fact that disrupting sleep will impair the consolidation of procedural memories. Given the prevalence of sleep disturbances in PD, the lack of retention on following days seen in these studies could simply be a side effect of this well-known symptom of PD. Because of this, we wondered whether people with PD would present with deficits in the short-term retention of a non-motor procedural learning task, when the test of retention was done the same day as the initial exposure. The aim of the present study was then to investigate acquisition and retention in the immediate short term of cognitive procedural learning using the mirror-reading task in people with PD. This task involved two conditions: one where triads of mirror-inverted words were always new that allowed assessing the learning of mirror-reading skill and another one where some of the triads were presented repeatedly during the experiment that allowed assessing the word-specific learning. People with PD both ON and OFF their normal medication were compared to healthy older adults and young adults. Participants were re-tested 50 minutes break after initial exposure to probe for short-term retention. The results of this study show that all groups of participants acquired and retained the two skills (mirror-reading and word-specific similarly. These results suggest that neither healthy ageing nor the degeneration within the basal ganglia that occurs in PD does affect the mechanisms

  13. Intact Acquisition and Short-Term Retention of Non-Motor Procedural Learning in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panouillères, Muriel T N; Tofaris, George K; Brown, Peter; Jenkinson, Ned

    2016-01-01

    Procedural learning is a form of memory where people implicitly acquire a skill through repeated practice. People with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been found to acquire motor adaptation, a form of motor procedural learning, similarly to healthy older adults but they have deficits in long-term retention. A similar pattern of normal learning on initial exposure with a deficit in retention seen on subsequent days has also been seen in mirror-reading, a form of non-motor procedural learning. It is a well-studied fact that disrupting sleep will impair the consolidation of procedural memories. Given the prevalence of sleep disturbances in PD, the lack of retention on following days seen in these studies could simply be a side effect of this well-known symptom of PD. Because of this, we wondered whether people with PD would present with deficits in the short-term retention of a non-motor procedural learning task, when the test of retention was done the same day as the initial exposure. The aim of the present study was then to investigate acquisition and retention in the immediate short term of cognitive procedural learning using the mirror-reading task in people with PD. This task involved two conditions: one where triads of mirror-inverted words were always new that allowed assessing the learning of mirror-reading skill and another one where some of the triads were presented repeatedly during the experiment that allowed assessing the word-specific learning. People with PD both ON and OFF their normal medication were compared to healthy older adults and young adults. Participants were re-tested 50 minutes break after initial exposure to probe for short-term retention. The results of this study show that all groups of participants acquired and retained the two skills (mirror-reading and word-specific) similarly. These results suggest that neither healthy ageing nor the degeneration within the basal ganglia that occurs in PD does affect the mechanisms that underpin the

  14. Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategies in English learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田田

    2011-01-01

    English learning strategy is one of the popular research fields in educational psychology, In spite of too much research on teaching; the other side of pedagogy learning has been neglected. The research on English learning strategy is an important way to

  15. On Cognitive Style in English Web-based Autonomous Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘茜

    2014-01-01

    Since Henry Holec first put forward the term‘Autonomy’in 1980’s, autonomous learning has been drawing the uni⁃versal attention of scholars both at home and abroad. Promoting learners’ability of self-regulated learning has been taken as one of the important goals of modern education. College English autonomous learning based on network environment does not mean free study without any restraints or monitoring, but rather involves the self-monitoring and external monitoring. Meanwhile, dif⁃ferent learners may have different cognitive styles in their learning processes, which may have an influence on the improvement of the learners’efficiency in the autonomous language learning. Proper monitoring models coordinating with the students ’differ⁃ent field cognitive styles.

  16. Relational Analysis of High School Students' Cognitive Self-Regulated Learning Strategies and Conceptions of Learning Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Özlem

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relation between students' cognitive learning strategies and conceptions of learning biology. The two scales, "Cognitive Learning Strategies" and "Conceptions of Learning Biology", were revised and adapted to biology in order to measure the students' learning strategies and…

  17. Classifying Cognitive Profiles Using Machine Learning with Privileged Information in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmadi, Hanin H.; Shen, Yuan; Fouad, Shereen; Luft, Caroline Di B.; Bentham, Peter; Kourtzi, Zoe; Tino, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of dementia is critical for assessing disease progression and potential treatment. State-or-the-art machine learning techniques have been increasingly employed to take on this diagnostic task. In this study, we employed Generalized Matrix Learning Vector Quantization (GMLVQ) classifiers to discriminate patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from healthy controls based on their cognitive skills. Further, we adopted a “Learning with privileged information” approach to combine cognitive and fMRI data for the classification task. The resulting classifier operates solely on the cognitive data while it incorporates the fMRI data as privileged information (PI) during training. This novel classifier is of practical use as the collection of brain imaging data is not always possible with patients and older participants. MCI patients and healthy age-matched controls were trained to extract structure from temporal sequences. We ask whether machine learning classifiers can be used to discriminate patients from controls and whether differences between these groups relate to individual cognitive profiles. To this end, we tested participants in four cognitive tasks: working memory, cognitive inhibition, divided attention, and selective attention. We also collected fMRI data before and after training on a probabilistic sequence learning task and extracted fMRI responses and connectivity as features for machine learning classifiers. Our results show that the PI guided GMLVQ classifiers outperform the baseline classifier that only used the cognitive data. In addition, we found that for the baseline classifier, divided attention is the only relevant cognitive feature. When PI was incorporated, divided attention remained the most relevant feature while cognitive inhibition became also relevant for the task. Interestingly, this analysis for the fMRI GMLVQ classifier suggests that (1) when overall fMRI signal is used as inputs to the classifier, the post

  18. Classifying Cognitive Profiles Using Machine Learning with Privileged Information in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmadi, Hanin H; Shen, Yuan; Fouad, Shereen; Luft, Caroline Di B; Bentham, Peter; Kourtzi, Zoe; Tino, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of dementia is critical for assessing disease progression and potential treatment. State-or-the-art machine learning techniques have been increasingly employed to take on this diagnostic task. In this study, we employed Generalized Matrix Learning Vector Quantization (GMLVQ) classifiers to discriminate patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) from healthy controls based on their cognitive skills. Further, we adopted a "Learning with privileged information" approach to combine cognitive and fMRI data for the classification task. The resulting classifier operates solely on the cognitive data while it incorporates the fMRI data as privileged information (PI) during training. This novel classifier is of practical use as the collection of brain imaging data is not always possible with patients and older participants. MCI patients and healthy age-matched controls were trained to extract structure from temporal sequences. We ask whether machine learning classifiers can be used to discriminate patients from controls and whether differences between these groups relate to individual cognitive profiles. To this end, we tested participants in four cognitive tasks: working memory, cognitive inhibition, divided attention, and selective attention. We also collected fMRI data before and after training on a probabilistic sequence learning task and extracted fMRI responses and connectivity as features for machine learning classifiers. Our results show that the PI guided GMLVQ classifiers outperform the baseline classifier that only used the cognitive data. In addition, we found that for the baseline classifier, divided attention is the only relevant cognitive feature. When PI was incorporated, divided attention remained the most relevant feature while cognitive inhibition became also relevant for the task. Interestingly, this analysis for the fMRI GMLVQ classifier suggests that (1) when overall fMRI signal is used as inputs to the classifier, the post

  19. Cognitive-motivational dimmensions and self-regulated learning

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses schoollearning from a cognitive-motivational perspective. A number of relevant ideas are highlighted as relevant to undersrand the cognitive-motivational factors that influence school learning. El artículo analiza el aprendizaje escolar donde una perspectiva cognitivo- motivacional, en la que se destacan una serie de ideas relevantes de profundizar en la comprensión de los factores cognitivo-motivacionales que inciden en el aprendizaje escolar.

  20. Effect of Mastery Learning on Senior Secondary School Students' Cognitive Learning Outcome in Quantitative Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitee, Telimoye Leesi; Obaitan, Georgina N.

    2015-01-01

    The cognitive learning outcome of Senior Secondary School chemistry students has been poor over the years in Nigeria. Poor mathematical skills and inefficient teaching methods have been identified as some of the major reasons for this. Bloom's theory of school learning and philosophy of mastery learning assert that virtually all students are…

  1. Intact Procedural Motor Sequence Learning in Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Caroline; Catale, Corinne; Willems, Sylvie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the possibility of a procedural learning deficit among children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). We tested 34 children aged 6-12 years with and without DCD using the serial reaction time task, in which the standard keyboard was replaced by a touch screen in order to minimize the impact…

  2. Hierarchical control of procedural and declarative category-learning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Benjamin O; Crossley, Matthew J; Ashby, F Gregory

    2017-02-16

    Substantial evidence suggests that human category learning is governed by the interaction of multiple qualitatively distinct neural systems. In this view, procedural memory is used to learn stimulus-response associations, and declarative memory is used to apply explicit rules and test hypotheses about category membership. However, much less is known about the interaction between these systems: how is control passed between systems as they interact to influence motor resources? Here, we used fMRI to elucidate the neural correlates of switching between procedural and declarative categorization systems. We identified a key region of the cerebellum (left Crus I) whose activity was bidirectionally modulated depending on switch direction. We also identified regions of the default mode network (DMN) that were selectively connected to left Crus I during switching. We propose that the cerebellum-in coordination with the DMN-serves a critical role in passing control between procedural and declarative memory systems.

  3. Cognitive biases, linguistic universals, and constraint-based grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Smolensky, Paul; Wilson, Colin

    2013-07-01

    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology-the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages-and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial grammar experiments on noun-phrase word order (Culbertson, Smolensky, & Legendre, 2012). Our proposal has several novel properties that distinguish it from prior work in the domains of linguistic theory, computational cognitive science, and machine learning. This study illustrates how ideas from these domains can be synthesized into a model of language learning in which biases range in strength from hard (absolute) to soft (statistical), and in which language-specific and domain-general biases combine to account for data from the macro-level scale of typological distribution to the micro-level scale of learning by individuals. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. Applying cognitive learning theories to understanding of learning in vulnerable groups of adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Kuran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-twentieth century cognitive learning theories appeared as a criticism of behaviourism, and were later replaced by constructivist and connectivist learning theories. In the last two decades psychological research into cognition experienced a revival thanks to new methodological possibilities. This article brings a selection of research studies related to adult edu- cation in various ways: post-formal cognitive development stage, cognitive ageing, the meaning of crystallized intelligence in adulthood, and research into learning styles. The article proceeds with an account of research of literacy in vulnerable social groups and ends with a final chapter, which brings useful findings for researchers and adult education practitioners. In this article, the author has drawn from two separate sources. The first source are the professional premises underlying conceptualization of multi-media contents, prepared by the Slovenian Institute for Adult Education within the framework of the project titled Literacy development, and Assessment and Acknowledgement of Non-formal Learning between 2009 – 2011. The theoretical part of the underlying professional premises dealt, among other, with cognitive aspects of adult learning, which represent the basis of this article. The second source is the authorØs personal involvement in the field of cognitive psychology, or rather, in the field of cognitive sciences, in which even today learning and education of vulnerable groups of adults is given only marginal consideration in research.

  5. A Cognitive Approach to Student-Centered e-Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2002-09-30

    Like traditional classroom instruction, distance/electronic learning (e-Learning) derives from largely behaviorist computer-based instruction paradigms that tend to reflect passive training philosophies. Over the past thirty years, more flexible, student-centered classroom teaching methods have been advocated based on the concepts of ''discovery'' learning and ''active'' learning; student-centered approaches are likewise encouraged in the development of e-Learning applications. Nevertheless, many e-Learning applications that employ state-of-the art multimedia technology in which students interact with simulations, animations, video, and sounds still fail to meet their expected training potential. Implementation of multimedia-based training features may give the impression of engaging the student in more active forms of learning, but sophisticated use of multimedia features does not necessarily produce the desired effect. This paper briefly reviews some general guidelines for applying cognitive science principles to development of student-centered e-Learning applications and describes a cognitive approach to e-Learning development that is being undertaken for the US Army.

  6. Decreasing Cognitive Load for Learners: Strategy of Web-Based Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive load is one of the important factors that influence the effectiveness and efficiency of web-based foreign language learning. Cognitive load theory assumes that human's cognitive capacity in working memory is limited and if it overloads, learning will be hampered, so that high level of cognitive load can affect the performance of learning…

  7. The Spiral and the Lattice: Changes in Cognitive Learning Theory with Implications for Art Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efland, Arthur D.

    1995-01-01

    Contrasts recent views of learning and cognition with cognitive learning theories of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Maintains that Jerome Bruner's spiral curriculum approach, still valuable, is not sufficient to explain cognitive development. Proposes a lattice-like cognitive development structure, inviting differing paths of exploration. (CFR)

  8. The Spiral and the Lattice: Changes in Cognitive Learning Theory with Implications for Art Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efland, Arthur D.

    1995-01-01

    Contrasts recent views of learning and cognition with cognitive learning theories of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Maintains that Jerome Bruner's spiral curriculum approach, still valuable, is not sufficient to explain cognitive development. Proposes a lattice-like cognitive development structure, inviting differing paths of exploration. (CFR)

  9. Learning to choose: Cognitive aging and strategy selection learning in decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Rui; von Helversen, Bettina; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2010-06-01

    Decision makers often have to learn from experience. In these situations, people must use the available feedback to select the appropriate decision strategy. How does the ability to select decision strategies on the basis of experience change with age? We examined younger and older adults' strategy selection learning in a probabilistic inference task using a computational model of strategy selection learning. Older adults showed poorer decision performance compared with younger adults. In particular, older adults performed poorly in an environment favoring the use of a more cognitively demanding strategy. The results suggest that the impact of cognitive aging on strategy selection learning depends on the structure of the decision environment.

  10. Brain-Based Aspects of Cognitive Learning Approaches in Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza Navid; Araghi, Seyed Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Language learning process is one of the complicated behaviors of human beings which has called many scholars and experts' attention especially after the middle of last century by the advent of cognitive psychology that later on we see its implication to education. Unlike previous thought of schools, cognitive psychology deals with the way in which…

  11. The Teacher, Motivation, Acquisition and Cognitive Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dede Wilson

    2006-01-01

    @@ English is a world language spoken by a great number of non-native speakers, the majority of whom learn to speak and communicate in the language in the classroom. Many factors contribute to learning in the language classroom but the key to success lies in the teacher and students' motivation and the use of motivational teaching strategies that maintain motivation and facilitate the process.

  12. Self-Regulated Learning, Social Cognitive Theory, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack

    2004-01-01

    The conception and theory of agency as self-regulation that is contained within Bandura's social cognitive theory is examined and elaborated in the context of the relevant philosophical history of ideas and through consideration of recent work in theoretical developmental psychology. Implications for self-regulated learning in classrooms are…

  13. Problem based learning: Cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.S. de Grave; H.P.A. Boshuizen (Henny); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAn important phase of problem-based learning in a tutorial group is problem analysis. This article describes a study investigating the ongoing cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis, by analysing the verbal communication among group members, and their thinking proc

  14. Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning: Technology for Improving Student Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stozhko, Natalia; Bortnik, Boris; Mironova, Ludmila; Tchernysheva, Albina; Podshivalova, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    The article studies a way of enhancing student cognition by using interdisciplinary project-based learning (IPBL) in a higher education institution. IPBL is a creative pedagogic approach allowing students of one area of specialisation to develop projects for students with different academic profiles. The application of this approach in the Ural…

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Training in Spelling for Learning Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.; Hall, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of effective cognitive-behavioral training approaches for students with learning handicaps in academic domains, such as spelling, requires greater concern for teachers' knowledge of the academic domain, as well as their pedagogical expertise in finely and precisely adjusting their instructional use of language to communicate that…

  16. Neural Substrates of Cognitive Skill Learning in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, M. H.; Dagher, A.; Panisset, M.; Doyon, J.

    2008-01-01

    While cognitive skill learning is normally acquired implicitly through frontostrial circuitry in healthy individuals, neuroimaging studies suggest that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) do so by activating alternate, intact brain areas associated with explicit memory processing. To further test this hypothesis, 10 patients with PD and 12…

  17. Problem based learning: Cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.S. de Grave; H.P.A. Boshuizen (Henny); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAn important phase of problem-based learning in a tutorial group is problem analysis. This article describes a study investigating the ongoing cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis, by analysing the verbal communication among group members, and their thinking

  18. Cognitive and Emotional Factors in Children with Mathematical Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passolunghi, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Emotional and cognitive factors were examined in 18 children with mathematical learning disabilities (MLD), compared with 18 normally achieving children, matched for chronological age, school level, gender and verbal IQ. Working memory, short-term memory, inhibitory processes, speed of processing and level of anxiety in mathematics were assessed…

  19. Cognitive styles, cultural pluralism and effective teaching and learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. R.

    1988-09-01

    In a pluralistic society, there is a need for increased sensitivity in the selection of teaching styles. This paper considers evidence which shows that future responses to teaching and learning style are determined in pre-school years by the child's socio-cultural environment. The teaching methods in common use in Britain, however, presuppose cognitive styles current in white middle-class culture, which may be inappropriate to children from other backgrounds. While some will respond only to co-operative, social methods, others will act analytically and competitively. Factors of social class are also considered. The paper argues that curriculum, methodology and materials should allow all children to identify with the educational process, and should enable them eventually to function bi-cognitively. Teachers will therefore need to recognize the range of cognitive and learning styles among their pupils.

  20. MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT, SELF-REGULATED LEARNING AND COGNITIVE STYLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela Camargo Uribe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the relationship among high school students’ mathematics achievement, use of self-regulated learning strategies and cognitive style in the field dependence-independence dimension is examined. Subjects were 128 tenth graders of a public school at Bogotá, Colombia. The MSLQ Questionnaire was used to assess students’ level of self-regulation and the EFT test was used to measure students’ field dependence-independence cognitive style. Mathematics achievement was indicated by the grades obtained by the students during the academic year. Results show that self-regulated learning and cognitive style are related to Math achievement, each one separately. Additionally, complex relations between self-regulation and field dependence-independence were found.

  1. FORUM: Affective Learning. Affective Learning from a Cognitive Neuroscientific Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of "Communication Education" is to publish the best research on communication and learning. Researchers study the communication-learning interface in many ways, but a common approach is to explore how instructor and student communication can lead to better learning outcomes. Although scholars have long classified learning…

  2. Cognitive independence in foreign language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maylín Rodríguez Sánchez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is intended to describe a didactic strategy to contribute to the development of foreign languages course students’ cognitive independence at Camagüey University. In its theoretical conception it is re-defined the concept “cognitive independence”, springing from the context in which the research is carried out, and the distinguishing features that characterize this capacity in students of foreign languages for pedagogical purposes are determined. The strategy comprises four stages: diagnosis, planning, execution, and evaluation. It is included the exemplification of the actions comprised in each stage, as well as the valuation of its effectiveness by means of experts’ opinions. Theoretical and empirical methods were applied, allowing the identification of the scientific problem and the modeling of its solution.

  3. Cognitive Load Theory and Complex Learning: Recent Developments and Future Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Sweller, J.

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) has focused on instructional methods to decrease extraneous cognitive load so that available cognitive resources can be fully devoted to learning. This article strengthens the cognitive base of CLT by linking cognitive processes to the processes used by

  4. Transfer of instances in cognitive skill learning: adult age differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eredita, Michael A; Hoyer, William J

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments assessed the utilization of pretrained problem-solution associations (i.e., instances) in memory-based cognitive skill learning in younger and older adults. In Experiment 1, participants were given practice with repeated alphabet-arithmetic problems and then trained on a compound skill-learning task that incorporated the pretrained alphabet-arithmetic items. In Experiment 2, participants were pretrained with compound problems, and then trained on just the alphabet-arithmetic items that were part of the compound problems. In both experiments, utilization of pretrained instances was much greater for younger adults than for older adults. These findings can be taken to imply that failure to retrieve and apply reoccurring instances is a primary source of age-related deficits in the transfer of cognitive skill learning across task situations.

  5. Social Cognition as Reinforcement Learning: Feedback Modulates Emotion Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Jamil; Kallman, Seth; Wimmer, G Elliott; Ochsner, Kevin; Shohamy, Daphna

    2016-09-01

    Neuroscientific studies of social cognition typically employ paradigms in which perceivers draw single-shot inferences about the internal states of strangers. Real-world social inference features much different parameters: People often encounter and learn about particular social targets (e.g., friends) over time and receive feedback about whether their inferences are correct or incorrect. Here, we examined this process and, more broadly, the intersection between social cognition and reinforcement learning. Perceivers were scanned using fMRI while repeatedly encountering three social targets who produced conflicting visual and verbal emotional cues. Perceivers guessed how targets felt and received feedback about whether they had guessed correctly. Visual cues reliably predicted one target's emotion, verbal cues predicted a second target's emotion, and neither reliably predicted the third target's emotion. Perceivers successfully used this information to update their judgments over time. Furthermore, trial-by-trial learning signals-estimated using two reinforcement learning models-tracked activity in ventral striatum and ventromedial pFC, structures associated with reinforcement learning, and regions associated with updating social impressions, including TPJ. These data suggest that learning about others' emotions, like other forms of feedback learning, relies on domain-general reinforcement mechanisms as well as domain-specific social information processing.

  6. Social cognitive theory, metacognition, and simulation learning in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Helen; Mancuso, Lorraine

    2012-10-01

    Simulation learning encompasses simple, introductory scenarios requiring response to patients' needs during basic hygienic care and during situations demanding complex decision making. Simulation integrates principles of social cognitive theory (SCT) into an interactive approach to learning that encompasses the core principles of intentionality, forethought, self-reactiveness, and self-reflectiveness. Effective simulation requires an environment conducive to learning and introduces activities that foster symbolic coding operations and mastery of new skills; debriefing builds self-efficacy and supports self-regulation of behavior. Tailoring the level of difficulty to students' mastery level supports successful outcomes and motivation to set higher standards. Mindful selection of simulation complexity and structure matches course learning objectives and supports progressive development of metacognition. Theory-based facilitation of simulated learning optimizes efficacy of this learning method to foster maturation of cognitive processes of SCT, metacognition, and self-directedness. Examples of metacognition that are supported through mindful, theory-based implementation of simulation learning are provided. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Mesh Learning for Classifying Cognitive Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ozay, Mete; Öztekin, Uygar; Vural, Fatos T Yarman

    2012-01-01

    The major goal of this study is to model the encoding and retrieval operations of the brain during memory processing, using statistical learning tools. The suggested method assumes that the memory encoding and retrieval processes can be represented by a supervised learning system, which is trained by the brain data collected from the functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) measurements, during the encoding stage. Then, the system outputs the same class labels as that of the fMRI data collected during the retrieval stage. The most challenging problem of modeling such a learning system is the design of the interactions among the voxels to extract the information about the underlying patterns of brain activity. In this study, we suggest a new method called Mesh Learning, which represents each voxel by a mesh of voxels in a neighborhood system. The nodes of the mesh are a set of neighboring voxels, whereas the arc weights are estimated by a linear regression model. The estimated arc weights are used to form Local Re...

  8. Informed consent procedures with cognitively impaired patients: A review of ethics and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Lindy Marie; Calvert, James Douglas

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this article are to discuss ethical issues of informed consent in cognitively impaired patients and review considerations for capacity determination. We will also discuss how to evaluate capacity, determine competence, and obtain informed consent when a patient is deemed incompetent. This review emphasizes how to carry out informed consent procedures when capacity is questionable and discusses measures supported for use when determining cognitively impaired patients' ability to consent. Information was gathered from medical and psychological codes of ethics, peer-reviewed journals, published guidelines from health-care organizations (e.g., American Medical Association), and scholarly books. Google Scholar and PsycINFO were searched for articles related to 'informed consent' and 'cognitive impairment' published in English between 1975 and 2014. Relevant sources referenced in retrieved publications were subsequently searched and reviewed. We selected 49 sources generated by our search. Sources were included in our review if they presented information related to at least one of our focus areas. These areas included: review of informed consent ethics and procedures, review of cognitive impairment evaluations, recommendations for measuring cognitive capacity, and alternative forms of informed consent. Patients' cognitive impairments can hinder the ability of patients to understand treatment options. Evaluating the capacity of patients with cognitive impairment to understand treatment options is vital for valid informed consent and should be guided by best practices. Thus, proper identification of patients with questionable capacity, capacity evaluation, and determination of competence, as well as reliance upon appropriate alternative consent procedures, are paramount. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. The Impact of Cognitive Load Theory on Learning Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Every student is different, which is the challenge of astronomy education research (AER) and teaching astronomy. This difference also provides the greatest goal for education researchers - our GUT - we need to be able to quantify these differences and provide explanatory and predictive theories to curriculum developers and teachers. One educational theory that holds promise is Cognitive Load Theory. Cognitive Load Theory begins with the well-established fact that everyone's working memory can hold 7 ± 2 unique items. This quirk of the human brain is why phone numbers are 7 digits long. This quirk is also why we forget peoples’ names after just meeting them, leave the iron on when we leave the house, and become overwhelmed as students of new material. Once the intricacies of Cognitive Load are understood, it becomes possible to design learning environments to marshal the resources students have and guide them to success. Lessons learned from Cognitive Load Theory can and should be applied to learning astronomy. Classroom-ready ideas will be presented.

  10. Learning curve estimation in medical devices and procedures: hierarchical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajulu, Usha S; Stillo, Marco; Goldfarb, David; Matheny, Michael E; Resnic, Frederic S

    2017-07-30

    In the use of medical device procedures, learning effects have been shown to be a critical component of medical device safety surveillance. To support their estimation of these effects, we evaluated multiple methods for modeling these rates within a complex simulated dataset representing patients treated by physicians clustered within institutions. We employed unique modeling for the learning curves to incorporate the learning hierarchy between institution and physicians and then modeled them within established methods that work with hierarchical data such as generalized estimating equations (GEE) and generalized linear mixed effect models. We found that both methods performed well, but that the GEE may have some advantages over the generalized linear mixed effect models for ease of modeling and a substantially lower rate of model convergence failures. We then focused more on using GEE and performed a separate simulation to vary the shape of the learning curve as well as employed various smoothing methods to the plots. We concluded that while both hierarchical methods can be used with our mathematical modeling of the learning curve, the GEE tended to perform better across multiple simulated scenarios in order to accurately model the learning effect as a function of physician and hospital hierarchical data in the use of a novel medical device. We found that the choice of shape used to produce the 'learning-free' dataset would be dataset specific, while the choice of smoothing method was negligibly different from one another. This was an important application to understand how best to fit this unique learning curve function for hierarchical physician and hospital data. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Learning of Chunking Sequences in Cognition and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Neftci, Emre; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    We often learn and recall long sequences in smaller segments, such as a phone number 858 534 22 30 memorized as four segments. Behavioral experiments suggest that humans and some animals employ this strategy of breaking down cognitive or behavioral sequences into chunks in a wide variety of tasks, but the dynamical principles of how this is achieved remains unknown. Here, we study the temporal dynamics of chunking for learning cognitive sequences in a chunking representation using a dynamical model of competing modes arranged to evoke hierarchical Winnerless Competition (WLC) dynamics. Sequential memory is represented as trajectories along a chain of metastable fixed points at each level of the hierarchy, and bistable Hebbian dynamics enables the learning of such trajectories in an unsupervised fashion. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate the learning of a chunking representation of sequences and their robust recall. During learning, the dynamics associates a set of modes to each information-carrying item in the sequence and encodes their relative order. During recall, hierarchical WLC guarantees the robustness of the sequence order when the sequence is not too long. The resulting patterns of activities share several features observed in behavioral experiments, such as the pauses between boundaries of chunks, their size and their duration. Failures in learning chunking sequences provide new insights into the dynamical causes of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Schizophrenia.

  12. Learning of Chunking Sequences in Cognition and Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Fonollosa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We often learn and recall long sequences in smaller segments, such as a phone number 858 534 22 30 memorized as four segments. Behavioral experiments suggest that humans and some animals employ this strategy of breaking down cognitive or behavioral sequences into chunks in a wide variety of tasks, but the dynamical principles of how this is achieved remains unknown. Here, we study the temporal dynamics of chunking for learning cognitive sequences in a chunking representation using a dynamical model of competing modes arranged to evoke hierarchical Winnerless Competition (WLC dynamics. Sequential memory is represented as trajectories along a chain of metastable fixed points at each level of the hierarchy, and bistable Hebbian dynamics enables the learning of such trajectories in an unsupervised fashion. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate the learning of a chunking representation of sequences and their robust recall. During learning, the dynamics associates a set of modes to each information-carrying item in the sequence and encodes their relative order. During recall, hierarchical WLC guarantees the robustness of the sequence order when the sequence is not too long. The resulting patterns of activities share several features observed in behavioral experiments, such as the pauses between boundaries of chunks, their size and their duration. Failures in learning chunking sequences provide new insights into the dynamical causes of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Schizophrenia.

  13. Cognitive aspects in games workshops for learning a foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ferrareto Lopes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to analyze the cognitive aspects related to learning English as a foreign language, by means of games workshops with students of the 6th grade of elementary school from a state school in Londrina. The paper is grounded on Piagetian theory and is descriptive-interpretative study with a qualitative perspective. Two guiding questions motivate the study: what is the role of games workshops for learning English as a foreign language? In what way the cognitive processes are held in the games workshops for learning English? To meet the proposed goals, workshops were implemented with games containing the linguistic contents studied in English classes. The games workshops enabled the observation and analysis of the cognitive aspects involved in learning a foreign language. Results show that the games workshops promote the participation of the students motivating action and output, evidencing gaps on the knowledge and providing equilibration processes. Subjects are asked to produce outputs via games demands, thus evoking knowhow, as well as the thinking about their own products, suggesting a conscious-awareness process.

  14. International Association for Cognitive Education and Psychology. European Regional Conference: Cognitive Development and Learning from Kindergarten to University. Program and Abstracts

    OpenAIRE

    Hessels, Marco G.P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts and program of the 2012 European Regional Conference "Cognitive development and learning from kindergarten to university" of the International Association for Cognitive Education and Psychology.

  15. International Association for Cognitive Education and Psychology. European Regional Conference: Cognitive Development and Learning from Kindergarten to University. Program and Abstracts

    OpenAIRE

    Hessels, Marco G.P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts and program of the 2012 European Regional Conference "Cognitive development and learning from kindergarten to university" of the International Association for Cognitive Education and Psychology.

  16. Stress facilitates late reversal learning using a touchscreen-based visual discrimination procedure in male Long Evans rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bryce, Courtney A.; Howland, John G.

    2014-01-01

    The stress response is essential to the survival of all species as it maintains internal equilibrium and allows organisms to respond to threats in the environment. Most stress research has focused on the detrimental impacts of stress on cognition and behavior. Reversal learning, which requires a change in response strategy based on one dimension of the stimuli, is one type of behavioral flexibility that is facilitated following some brief stress procedures. The current study investigated a po...

  17. The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions in reduction of distress resulting from dentistry procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasemi A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Dental anxiety is a common problem in pediatric dentistry and results in behaviors like fear and anger that can negatively affect dental treatments. Exposure to various dental treatments and distressful experiences are reasons for anxiety during dental treatments. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of cognitive behavioral interventions in reduction of stress during dental procedures in children. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 42 boys and girls, undergoing dental treatments were selected from dental clinics in Tehran. Patients were assigned to cognitive-behavioral interventions, placebo and control conditions. The fear scale, anger facial scale, pain facial scale and physiologic measure of pulse beat were evaluated. One way ANOVA and Tukey test were used to analyze the results and p<0.05 was the level of significance. Results: Results showed significant differences between cognitive-behavioral interventions, placebo and control groups regarding fear, anger, pain and pulse beat. Comparison tests revealed that cognitive-behavioral interventions were more effective in reducing fear, anger, pain and pulse beat compared to the placebo or control.Conclusion: According to the results of this study cognitive-behavioral interventions can be used to reduce distress of children undergoing dental procedures.

  18. Learning to Effectively Implement Constant Time Delay Procedures To Teach Spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Trudie A.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Keel, Marie C.

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the effectiveness of a training procedure in teaching a special educator the constant time delay procedure and the effectiveness of the procedure in teaching spelling to a 12-year-old with learning disabilities. The teacher successfully implemented the procedure and the student learned to spell all 15 words. (Contains references.)…

  19. A study on cognition: invention, learning and Mathematical Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani Cammarota

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a dialogue between the notion of invention andmathematical instruction, mainly, the mathematics classroom. The discussion is based upon an episode of fi eld research, carried out in the Cartography method in a public school in Juiz de Fora/MG. Around this episode, two discourses are articulated about cognition and learning: the Conceptual Field Theory, by Gérard Vergnaud, andthe Semantic Field Model, by Rômulo Lins. The invention crosses both discourses transversally, creating possibilities of thinking learning as a co-production of self-world.

  20. A cognitive learning model of clinical nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Jacinthe; Dubois, Sylvie; Girard, Francine; Tardif, Jacques; Ha, Laurence

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive modeling of competencies is important to facilitate learning and evaluation. Clinical nursing leadership is considered a competency, as it is a "complex know-act" that students and nurses develop for the quality of care of patients and their families. Previous research on clinical leadership describes the attributes and characteristics of leaders and leadership, but, to our knowledge, a cognitive learning model (CLM) has yet to be developed. The purpose of our research was to develop a CLM of the clinical nursing leadership competency, from the beginning of a nursing program to expertise. An interpretative phenomenological study design was used 1) to document the experience of learning and practicing clinical leadership, and 2) to identify critical-learning turning points. Data was gathered from interviews with 32 baccalaureate students and 21 nurses from two clinical settings. An inductive analysis of data was conducted to determine the learning stages experienced: awareness of clinical leadership in nursing; integration of clinical leadership in actions; active leadership with patient/family; active leadership with the team; and, embedded clinical leadership extended to organizational level and beyond. The resulting CLM could have significant impact on both basic and continuing nursing education. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cognitive Factors in Learning and Retention of Procedural Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    tion, and W a representation that provides the basis for straightforward transfer to the task ( Arnheim , 1969; Riley, 1981). Mayer (1975) found that...University, Department of Psychology. Arnheim , R. (1969). Visual thinking. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. Baggett, P. (1983a

  2. Dream self-reflectiveness as a learned cognitive skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, S; Mullington, J; Moffitt, A; Hoffmann, R; Pigeau, R

    1986-01-01

    This research was directed toward the contradiction sustained by cognitive dream psychology, which on the one hand regards dreaming as higher symbolic activity and, on the other, sees its organizational and functional characteristics as derivative and/or inferior to those of waking consciousness. Study 1 evaluates the degree of self-reflective meta-cognition in dreams from different sleep stages. Subjects were 24 college students selected such that half were self-reported high-frequency dream recallers and half were low-frequency recallers. Both groups were composed equally of men and women. Greater self-reflectiveness (SR) was found in REM dreams as compared with those from stages 2 and 4, which did not differ. High-frequency recallers showed more dream SR than did low-frequency recallers. Study 2 assessed the extent to which self-reflective and lucid dreaming can be learned as a cognitive skill by varying levels of intention and attention paid to dreaming. After 3 weeks of home dream collection, results showed that four experimental groups had greater dream SR than did a baseline group. The most effective treatment was the mnemonic, wherein attention patterning schemas learned in waking resulted in more self-reflective and lucid dreaming than did either baseline or attention-control conditions. These results provide evidence that dreaming is not single-minded but variable along a self-reflective process continuum, and suggest functional and organizational levels that are consistent with the conception of dreaming as higher order cognitive activity.

  3. Social inequalities in health: Biological, cognitive and learning theory perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, Hege R.; Holger Ursin

    2009-01-01

    Increasing social inequalities in health have been ascribed to unequal distribution of resources, and to exposure factors. We propose that these differences also may be explained by principles from cognitive stress theory. There seems to be consensus in the stress literature that the stress response is not predicted from the external situation. The acquired expectancies to stimuli and response outcome are determining the response. These expectancies are learned. Based on available...

  4. Absorptive capacity in organizational theories: learning, innovation, managerial cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Vasylieva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies an important issue of absorptive capacity that enables the companies to strengthen their position in the competitive global market. The concept of absorptive capacity in open innovation paradigm is defined within the following organizational theories: learning, innovation and managerial cognition. The model which links together and clarifies in a detailed way the relationships between absorptive capacity and the components is proposed.

  5. [Procedural learning and anxiolytic effects: electroencephalographic, motor and attentional measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portella, Claudio Elidio; Silva, Julio Guilherme; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Machado, Dionis; Cunha, Marlo; Cagy, Maurício; Basile, Luis; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2006-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate attentional, motor and electroencephalographic (EEG) parameters during a procedural task when subjects have ingested 6 mg of bromazepam. The sample consisted of 26 healthy subjects, male or female, between 19 and 36 years of age. The control (placebo) and experimental (bromazepam 6 mg) groups were submitted to a typewriting task in a randomized, double-blind design. The findings did not show significant differences in attentional and motor measures between groups. Coherence measures (qEEG) were evaluated between scalp regions, in theta, alpha and beta bands. A first analysis revealed a main effect for condition (Anova 2-way--condition versus blocks). A second Anova 2-way (condition versus scalp regions) showed a main effect for both factors. The coherence measure was not a sensitive tool at demonstrating differences between cortical areas as a function of procedural learning.

  6. Mobile Learning Application Interfaces: First Steps to a Cognitive Load Aware System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Mobile learning is a cognitively demanding application and more frequently the ubiquitous nature of mobile computing means that mobile devices are used in cognitively demanding environments. This paper examines the nature of this use of mobile devices from a Learning, Usability and Cognitive Load Theory perspective. It suggests scenarios where…

  7. Errorless learning in cognitive rehabilitation: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Erica L; Schwartz, Myrna F

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation research is increasingly exploring errorless learning interventions, which prioritise the avoidance of errors during treatment. The errorless learning approach was originally developed for patients with severe anterograde amnesia, who were deemed to be at particular risk for error learning. Errorless learning has since been investigated in other memory-impaired populations (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) and acquired aphasia. In typical errorless training, target information is presented to the participant for study or immediate reproduction, a method that prevents participants from attempting to retrieve target information from long-term memory (i.e., retrieval practice). However, assuring error elimination by preventing difficult (and error-permitting) retrieval practice is a potential major drawback of the errorless approach. This review begins with discussion of research in the psychology of learning and memory that demonstrates the importance of difficult (and potentially errorful) retrieval practice for robust learning and prolonged performance gains. We then review treatment research comparing errorless and errorful methods in amnesia and aphasia, where only the latter provides (difficult) retrieval practice opportunities. In each clinical domain we find the advantage of the errorless approach is limited and may be offset by the therapeutic potential of retrieval practice. Gaps in current knowledge are identified that preclude strong conclusions regarding a preference for errorless treatments over methods that prioritise difficult retrieval practice. We offer recommendations for future research aimed at a strong test of errorless learning treatments, which involves direct comparison with methods where retrieval practice effects are maximised for long-term gains.

  8. Medication adherence as a learning process: insights from cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottman, Benjamin Margolin; Marcum, Zachary A; Thorpe, Carolyn T; Gellad, Walid F

    2017-03-01

    Non-adherence to medications is one of the largest contributors to sub-optimal health outcomes. Many theories of adherence include a 'value-expectancy' component in which a patient decides to take a medication partly based on expectations about whether it is effective, necessary, and tolerable. We propose reconceptualising this common theme as a kind of 'causal learning' - the patient learns whether a medication is effective, necessary, and tolerable, from experience with the medication. We apply cognitive psychology theories of how people learn cause-effect relations to elaborate this causal-learning challenge. First, expectations and impressions about a medication and beliefs about how a medication works, such as delay of onset, can shape a patient's perceived experience with the medication. Second, beliefs about medications propagate both 'top-down' and 'bottom-up', from experiences with specific medications to general beliefs about medications and vice versa. Third, non-adherence can interfere with learning about a medication, because beliefs, adherence, and experience with a medication are connected in a cyclic learning problem. We propose that by conceptualising non-adherence as a causal-learning process, clinicians can more effectively address a patient's misconceptions and biases, helping the patient develop more accurate impressions of the medication.

  9. A Study on Meta-cognitive Learning Strategies and English Proficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙力华

    2011-01-01

    Meta-cognitive learning strategies play an important role in enhancing learner autonomy and improving English proficiency.Based on a questionnaire,a study was conducted on meta-cognitive learning strategies employed by 60 students of non-English major coming from Beijing Information Science and Technology University and the study results reveal that the high-achieving students apply meta-cognitive learning strategies to their learning more frequently than the lower-scoring ones and meta-cognitive learning s...

  10. Multi-dimensional profiling of medical students' cognitive models about learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J

    2006-02-01

    In current constructivist paradigms, learners' previous subject-matter knowledge, or cognitive models, provide the foundations for the construction of new knowledge. Learners' cognitive models about learning also mediate students' capacities to learn in their chosen topics of study. The diverse backgrounds of students entering medicine suggest that they might come to medical studies equipped with a wide variety of cognitive models about learning. Some current theories tend to reduce students' cognitions about learning to parsimonious representations, such as surface-deep approaches or mastery-performance goals. It is possible that such reduced representations underrepresent, or misrepresent, the complexity of students' cognitive models about learning. Good quality teaching needs to take account of learners' cognitive models, not just about subject matter, but also about learning. This study investigated the diversity and complexity of medical students' cognitive models about learning. A total of 7 graduate entry, clinical-year medical students volunteered for in-depth interviews about learning. NUD*IST text analysis software and correspondence analysis were employed to identify dimensions and to profile students' responses. The correspondence analysis identified a significant 4-dimensional solution that illustrates the contributions of multiple variables to students' cognitive models about learning. Individual profiles highlight diversity between participants. This study provides evidence that students' cognitive models about learning are complex and highly differentiated. Representations of what students know about learning need to take account of such complexity in order to inform instructional practice more adequately.

  11. Web-Based Learning Programs: Use by Learners with Various Cognitive Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Hsiu

    2010-01-01

    To consider how Web-based learning program is utilized by learners with different cognitive styles, this study presents a Web-based learning system (WBLS) and analyzes learners' browsing data recorded in the log file to identify how learners' cognitive styles and learning behavior are related. In order to develop an adapted WBLS, this study also…

  12. A Study of the Relationship between Learning Styles and Cognitive Abilities in Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, E.; Baker, M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning preferences have been indirectly linked to student success in engineering programmes, without a significant body of research to connect learning preferences with cognitive abilities. A better understanding of the relationship between learning styles and cognitive abilities will allow educators to optimise the classroom experience for…

  13. The Relation between Assessment for Learning and Elementary Students' Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Diana; Castelijns, Jos; Vermeulen, Marjan; Martens, Rob; Segers, Mien

    2015-01-01

    Background: Assessment for Learning (AfL) is believed to create a rich learning environment in which students develop their cognitive and metacognitive strategies. Monitoring student growth and providing scaffolds that shed light on the next step in the learning process are hypothesized to be essential elements of AfL that enhance cognitive and…

  14. Digital Game-Based Learning Supports Student Motivation, Cognitive Success, and Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jeng-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Traditional multimedia learning is primarily based on the cognitive load concept of information processing theory. Recent digital game-based learning (DGBL) studies have focused on exploring content support for learning motivation and related game characteristics. Motivation, volition, and performance (MVP) theory indicates that cognitive load and…

  15. Dissecting sequences of regulation and cognition: statistical discourse analysis of primary school children's collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.; Chiu, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Extending past research showing that regulative activities (metacognitive and relational) can aid learning, this study tests whether sequences of cognitive, metacognitive and relational activities affect subsequent cognition. Scaffolded by a computer avatar, 54 primary school students (working in 18

  16. The AI&M procedure for learning from incomplete data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We investigate methods for parameter learning from incomplete data that is not missing at random. Likelihood-based methods then require the optimization of a profile likelihood that takes all possible missingness mechanisms into account. Optimizing this profile likelihood poses two main difficult......We investigate methods for parameter learning from incomplete data that is not missing at random. Likelihood-based methods then require the optimization of a profile likelihood that takes all possible missingness mechanisms into account. Optimizing this profile likelihood poses two main...... difficulties: multiple (local) maxima, and its very high-dimensional parameter space. In this paper a new method is presented for optimizing the profile likelihood that addresses the second difficulty: in the proposed AI\\&M (adjusting imputation and maximization) procedure the optimization is performed...... by operations in the space of data completions, rather than directly in the parameter space of the profile likelihood. We apply the AI\\&M method to learning parameters for Bayesian networks. The method is compared against conservative inference, which takes into account each possible data completion...

  17. Topological schemas of cognitive maps and spatial learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey eBabichev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial navigation in mammals is based on building a mental representation of their environment---a cognitive map. However, both the nature of this cognitive map and its underpinning in neural structures and activity remains vague. A key difficulty is that these maps are collective, emergent phenomena that cannot be reduced to a simple combination of inputs provided by individual neurons. In this paper we suggest computational frameworks for integrating the spiking signals of individual cells into a spatial map, which we call schemas. We provide examples of four schemas defined by different types of topological relations that may be neurophysiologically encoded in the brain and demonstrate that each schema provides its own large-scale characteristics of the environment---the schema integrals. Moreover, we find that, in all cases, these integrals are learned at a rate which is faster than the rate of complete training of neural networks. Thus, the proposed schema framework differentiates between the cognitive aspect of spatial learning and the physiological aspect at the neural network level.

  18. Topological Schemas of Cognitive Maps and Spatial Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babichev, Andrey; Cheng, Sen; Dabaghian, Yuri A

    2016-01-01

    Spatial navigation in mammals is based on building a mental representation of their environment-a cognitive map. However, both the nature of this cognitive map and its underpinning in neural structures and activity remains vague. A key difficulty is that these maps are collective, emergent phenomena that cannot be reduced to a simple combination of inputs provided by individual neurons. In this paper we suggest computational frameworks for integrating the spiking signals of individual cells into a spatial map, which we call schemas. We provide examples of four schemas defined by different types of topological relations that may be neurophysiologically encoded in the brain and demonstrate that each schema provides its own large-scale characteristics of the environment-the schema integrals. Moreover, we find that, in all cases, these integrals are learned at a rate which is faster than the rate of complete training of neural networks. Thus, the proposed schema framework differentiates between the cognitive aspect of spatial learning and the physiological aspect at the neural network level.

  19. Cognitive subtypes of mathematics learning difficulties in primary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelet, Dimona; Ansari, Daniel; Vaessen, Anniek; Blomert, Leo

    2014-03-01

    It has been asserted that children with mathematics learning difficulties (MLD) constitute a heterogeneous group. To date, most researchers have investigated differences between predefined MLD subtypes. Specifically MLD children are frequently categorized a priori into groups based on the presence or absence of an additional disorder, such as a reading disorder, to examine cognitive differences between MLD subtypes. In the current study 226 third to six grade children (M age=131 months) with MLD completed a selection of number specific and general cognitive measures. The data driven approach was used to identify the extent to which performance of the MLD children on these measures could be clustered into distinct groups. In particular, after conducting a factor analysis, a 200 times repeated K-means clustering approach was used to classify the children's performance. Results revealed six distinguishable clusters of MLD children, specifically (a) a weak mental number line group, (b) weak ANS group, (c) spatial difficulties group, (d) access deficit group, (e) no numerical cognitive deficit group and (f) a garden-variety group. These findings imply that different cognitive subtypes of MLD exist and that these can be derived from data-driven approaches to classification. These findings strengthen the notion that MLD is a heterogeneous disorder, which has implications for the way in which intervention may be tailored for individuals within the different subtypes.

  20. Individual Differences in Learning: Cognitive Control, Cognitive Style, and Learning Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This paper assesses the value of three learning style tests when used to examine the design of educational materials for teaching computer science at a distance. The paper presents three studies where three different learning styles were used to discriminate preference and performance in different contexts. The studies indicate that the Learning…

  1. Cognitive and mathematical profiles for different forms of learning difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Paul T; Fuchs, Lynn S; Elias, John T; Powell, Sarah R; Schumacher, Robin F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare subgroups of students with various forms of learning difficulties (language) and on mathematics measures of foundational numerical competencies, computation, and problem solving. Results revealed expected level differences among groups in both domains: NoLD outperformed RD, and MD outperformed MDRD. Profile differences were noted among pairs of subgroups on cognitive measures. On mathematics measures, profile differences were noted between RD and other subgroups, but not between MD and MDRD subgroups. The most discriminating cognitive measures were processing speed and language; the most discriminating mathematics measures depended on the subgroups being compared. Results were further evaluated according to more severe (< 10th percentile) criteria for MD and RD, which generally affected level differences more than the profile patterns. Results have implications for understanding comorbid MD and RD and for conceptualizing core deficits in MD.

  2. Robot Cognitive Control with a Neurophysiologically Inspired Reinforcement Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamassi, Mehdi; Lallée, Stéphane; Enel, Pierre; Procyk, Emmanuel; Dominey, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in modern robotics is to liberate robots from controlled industrial settings, and allow them to interact with humans and changing environments in the real-world. The current research attempts to determine if a neurophysiologically motivated model of cortical function in the primate can help to address this challenge. Primates are endowed with cognitive systems that allow them to maximize the feedback from their environment by learning the values of actions in diverse situations and by adjusting their behavioral parameters (i.e., cognitive control) to accommodate unexpected events. In such contexts uncertainty can arise from at least two distinct sources – expected uncertainty resulting from noise during sensory-motor interaction in a known context, and unexpected uncertainty resulting from the changing probabilistic structure of the environment. However, it is not clear how neurophysiological mechanisms of reinforcement learning and cognitive control integrate in the brain to produce efficient behavior. Based on primate neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, we propose a novel computational model for the interaction between lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex reconciling previous models dedicated to these two functions. We deployed the model in two robots and demonstrate that, based on adaptive regulation of a meta-parameter β that controls the exploration rate, the model can robustly deal with the two kinds of uncertainties in the real-world. In addition the model could reproduce monkey behavioral performance and neurophysiological data in two problem-solving tasks. A last experiment extends this to human–robot interaction with the iCub humanoid, and novel sources of uncertainty corresponding to “cheating” by the human. The combined results provide concrete evidence for the ability of neurophysiologically inspired cognitive systems to control advanced robots in the real-world. PMID:21808619

  3. Augmented Reality in the Science Museum: Lessons Learned in Scaffolding for Conceptual and Cognitive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Susan A.; Elinich, Karen; Wang, Joyce; Van Schooneveld, Jacqueline G.

    2012-01-01

    This research follows on previous studies that investigated how digitally augmented devices and knowledge scaffolds enhance learning in a science museum. We investigated what combination of scaffolds could be used in conjunction with the unique characteristics of informal participation to increase conceptual and cognitive outcomes. 307 students…

  4. Digital Leisure-Time Activities, Cognition, Learning Behaviour and Information Literacy: What Are Our Children Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, Mick

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in digital technology have resulted in the unprecedented uptake of digital technology engagement as a leisure-time pursuit across the age span. This has resulted in the speculation that such use of digital technology is responsible for changes in cognition and learning behaviour. This study investigated two groups of…

  5. The Neural Circuitry of Expertise: Perceptual Learning and Social Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHarre

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While this is an enormous task, we may already have at hand many of the tools we need. This article is intended to review some of the recent results in neuro-cognitive research and show how they can be extended to two very specific types of expertise: perceptual expertise and social cognition. These two cognitive skills span a vast range of our genetic heritage. Perceptual expertise developed very early in our evolutionary history and is likely a highly developed part of all mammals' cognitive ability. On the other hand social cognition is most highly developed in humans in that we are able to maintain larger and more stable long term social connections with more behaviourally diverse individuals than any other species. To illustrate these ideas I will discuss board games as a toy model of social interactions as they include many of the relevant concepts: perceptual learning, decision-making, long term planning and understanding the mental states of other people. Using techniques that have been developed in mathematical psychology, I show that we can represent some of the key features of expertise using stochastic differential equations. Such models demonstrate how an expert's long exposure to a particular context influences the information they accumulate in order to make a decision.These processes are not confined to board games, we are all experts in our daily lives through long exposure to the many regularities of daily tasks and

  6. The neural circuitry of expertise: perceptual learning and social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harré, Michael

    2013-12-17

    Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While this is an enormous task, we may already have at hand many of the tools we need. This article is intended to review some of the recent results in neuro-cognitive research and show how they can be extended to two very specific and interrelated types of expertise: perceptual expertise and social cognition. These two cognitive skills span a vast range of our genetic heritage. Perceptual expertise developed very early in our evolutionary history and is a highly developed part of all mammals' cognitive ability. On the other hand social cognition is most highly developed in humans in that we are able to maintain larger and more stable long term social connections with more behaviorally diverse individuals than any other species. To illustrate these ideas I will discuss board games as a toy model of social interactions as they include many of the relevant concepts: perceptual learning, decision-making, long term planning and understanding the mental states of other people. Using techniques that have been developed in mathematical psychology, I show that we can represent some of the key features of expertise using stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Such models demonstrate how an expert's long exposure to a particular context influences the information they accumulate in order to make a decision.These processes are not confined to board games, we are all experts in our daily lives through long exposure to the many regularities of daily tasks and social

  7. The neural circuitry of expertise: perceptual learning and social cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harré, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the most significant questions we are confronted with today include the integration of the brain's micro-circuitry, our ability to build the complex social networks that underpin society and how our society impacts on our ecological environment. In trying to unravel these issues one place to begin is at the level of the individual: to consider how we accumulate information about our environment, how this information leads to decisions and how our individual decisions in turn create our social environment. While this is an enormous task, we may already have at hand many of the tools we need. This article is intended to review some of the recent results in neuro-cognitive research and show how they can be extended to two very specific and interrelated types of expertise: perceptual expertise and social cognition. These two cognitive skills span a vast range of our genetic heritage. Perceptual expertise developed very early in our evolutionary history and is a highly developed part of all mammals' cognitive ability. On the other hand social cognition is most highly developed in humans in that we are able to maintain larger and more stable long term social connections with more behaviorally diverse individuals than any other species. To illustrate these ideas I will discuss board games as a toy model of social interactions as they include many of the relevant concepts: perceptual learning, decision-making, long term planning and understanding the mental states of other people. Using techniques that have been developed in mathematical psychology, I show that we can represent some of the key features of expertise using stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Such models demonstrate how an expert's long exposure to a particular context influences the information they accumulate in order to make a decision.These processes are not confined to board games, we are all experts in our daily lives through long exposure to the many regularities of daily tasks and social

  8. A Commentary on Parent-Child Cognitive Learning Interaction Research: What Have We Learned from Two Decades of Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Yvette R; Almutairi, Seham

    2016-01-01

    The role of family influences on preschool and school age cognitive development has received considerable empirical attention from cognitive developmental psychology researchers in the last few decades. As a result of the interest, investigators have focused their attention on developing coding/observational systems to capture the interactions occurring between mothers and their young children. This paper reviews a select body of research on parent-child cognitive learning interactions with the goal of determining how the researchers have operationalized the behaviors that occur within learning interactions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the suggestions on next steps for conducting parent-child cognitive learning interaction research in the future.

  9. Manufacturing Phenomena or Preserving Phenomena? Core Issues in the Identification of Peer Social Groups with Social Cognitive Mapping Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Xie, Hongling

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on the "Multiple Meanings of Peer Groups in Social Cognitive Mapping," Thomas W. Farmer and Hongling Xie discuss core issues in the identification of peer social groups in natural settings using the social cognitive mapping (SCM) procedures. Farmer and Xie applaud the authors for their efforts to advance the study of…

  10. Manufacturing Phenomena or Preserving Phenomena? Core Issues in the Identification of Peer Social Groups with Social Cognitive Mapping Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Xie, Hongling

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary on the "Multiple Meanings of Peer Groups in Social Cognitive Mapping," Thomas W. Farmer and Hongling Xie discuss core issues in the identification of peer social groups in natural settings using the social cognitive mapping (SCM) procedures. Farmer and Xie applaud the authors for their efforts to advance the study of…

  11. Learning styles and disciplinary differences from a situated cognition approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara Ventura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Students who enter college are invited to share language, habits and customs that may contradict your thoughts, knowledge and skills previously learned. This could be a problem for student because it could learn a new way of thinking and behaving to identify with their teachers. There are agreements in the scientific literature about the university learning of a discipline involves the appropriation of concepts and the acquisition of skills and typical learning styles. This process may be explained from situated cognition approach that consider a functional relationship between way of thinking and types of activities. The gap is what effects produces higher education on learning styles. Hence, the aim of this paper is to analyze the empirical studies that compare the learning styles of students from different disciplinary in Ibero American context. For this purpose, a descriptive review was carried out of the Scielo, Dialnet, Redalyc y Doaj data bases. Descriptors used in the research for information were the key words: learning styles, disciplinary differences and higher education. We found 9 specific empirical studies that complying with all the criteria for inclusion (time period 2000-2012, research article and university sample. However, the evidence does not sufficient to achieve a point of agreement on this problematic. These results, from a point of view scientific, could open to new research lines. On the other hand, from a pedagogical-didactic view this study allow introduce the discussion of different formats educational, can be distinguished teaching strategies towards acquisition of typical styles of own discipline or teaching strategies to strengthen with the diversity of styles preexisting of students.

  12. Space Stirling Cryocooler Contamination Lessons Learned and Recommended Control Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, D. S.; Price, K.; Gully, W.; Castles, S.; Reilly, J.

    The most important characteristic of a space cryocooler is its reliability over a lifetime typically in excess of 7 years. While design improvements have reduced the probability of mechanical failure, the risk of internal contamination is still significant and has not been addressed in a consistent approach across the industry. A significant fraction of the endurance test and flight units have experienced some performance degradation related to internal contamination. The purpose of this paper is to describe and assess the contamination issues inside long life, space cryocoolers and to recommend procedures to minimize the probability of encountering contamination related failures and degradation. The paper covers the sources of contamination, the degradation and failure mechanisms, the theoretical and observed cryocooler sensitivity, and the recommended prevention procedures and their impact. We begin with a discussion of the contamination sources, both artificial and intrinsic. Next, the degradation and failure mechanisms are discussed in an attempt to arrive at a contaminant susceptibility, from which we can derive a contamination budget for the machine. This theoretical sensitivity is then compared with the observed sensitivity to illustrate the conservative nature of the assumed scenarios. A number of lessons learned on Raytheon, Ball, Air Force Research Laboratory, and NASA GSFC programs are shared to convey the practical aspects of the contamination problem. Then, the materials and processes required to meet the proposed budget are outlined. An attempt is made to present a survey of processes across industry.

  13. Machine learning based Intelligent cognitive network using fog computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyang; Li, Lun; Chen, Genshe; Shen, Dan; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a Cognitive Radio Network (CRN) based on artificial intelligence is proposed to distribute the limited radio spectrum resources more efficiently. The CRN framework can analyze the time-sensitive signal data close to the signal source using fog computing with different types of machine learning techniques. Depending on the computational capabilities of the fog nodes, different features and machine learning techniques are chosen to optimize spectrum allocation. Also, the computing nodes send the periodic signal summary which is much smaller than the original signal to the cloud so that the overall system spectrum source allocation strategies are dynamically updated. Applying fog computing, the system is more adaptive to the local environment and robust to spectrum changes. As most of the signal data is processed at the fog level, it further strengthens the system security by reducing the communication burden of the communications network.

  14. Cognitive versus stimulus-response theories of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Peter C

    2008-08-01

    In his 1948 address to the Division of Theoretical-Experimental Psychology of the American Psychological Association, Kenneth W. Spence discussed six distinctions between cognitive and stimulus-response (S-R) theories of learning. In this article, I first review these six distinctions and then focus on two of them in the context of my own research. This research concerns the specification of stimulus-stimulus associations in associative learning and the characterization of the neural systems underlying those associations. In the course of describing Spence's views and my research, I hope to communicate some of the richness of Spence's S-R psychology and its currency within modern scientific analyses of behavior.

  15. Q-learning-based cross-layer Learning Engine design for cognitive radio network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Congbin; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Yanchao; Ma, Jinghui

    2013-03-01

    In cognitive radio (CR) networks, Learning Engine has considerable significance on dynamic spectrum access (DSA) and implementation of cognitive function. In this paper, a cross-layer learning engine design scheme is proposed by jointly considering physical-layer dynamic channel selection, modulation and coding scheme, data-link layer frame length in CR networks, with the purpose to maximize system throughput and simultaneously meet heterogeneous Quality of Service (QoS) requirements. The wireless fading channel is modeled as a continuous state space Markov decision process (MDP) and the licensed network activity is abstracted as a finite-state one. We introduce Q-learning algorithm to realize the function of learning from state space and adapt wireless environment. And meanwhile a large scale Qfunction approximator based on support vector machine (SVM) is employed to effectively reduce storage requirement and decrease the operation complexity. A cross-layer learning engine communication platform is realized by using Matlab simulator. the simulation results demonstrate that while lacking system prior knowledge, the learning engine can effectively achieve configuration function by system cross-layer learning approach, and furthermore, it can converge to the best—i.e., realize reconfiguration function in CR networks while meeting users' QoS.

  16. Effects of prior knowledge and concept-map structure on disorientation, cognitive load, and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadieu, Franck; Van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred; Tricot, André; Mariné, Claudette

    2009-01-01

    Citation: Amadieu, F., Van Gog, T., Paas, F., Tricot, A., & Mariné, C. (2009). Effects of prior knowledge and concept-map structure on disorientation, cognitive load, and learning. Learning and Instruction, 19, 376-386.

  17. Reinforcement Learning for Routing in Cognitive Radio Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan A. A. Al-Rawi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio (CR enables unlicensed users (or secondary users, SUs to sense for and exploit underutilized licensed spectrum owned by the licensed users (or primary users, PUs. Reinforcement learning (RL is an artificial intelligence approach that enables a node to observe, learn, and make appropriate decisions on action selection in order to maximize network performance. Routing enables a source node to search for a least-cost route to its destination node. While there have been increasing efforts to enhance the traditional RL approach for routing in wireless networks, this research area remains largely unexplored in the domain of routing in CR networks. This paper applies RL in routing and investigates the effects of various features of RL (i.e., reward function, exploitation, and exploration, as well as learning rate through simulation. New approaches and recommendations are proposed to enhance the features in order to improve the network performance brought about by RL to routing. Simulation results show that the RL parameters of the reward function, exploitation, and exploration, as well as learning rate, must be well regulated, and the new approaches proposed in this paper improves SUs’ network performance without significantly jeopardizing PUs’ network performance, specifically SUs’ interference to PUs.

  18. Reinforcement learning for routing in cognitive radio ad hoc networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Hasan A A; Yau, Kok-Lim Alvin; Mohamad, Hafizal; Ramli, Nordin; Hashim, Wahidah

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) enables unlicensed users (or secondary users, SUs) to sense for and exploit underutilized licensed spectrum owned by the licensed users (or primary users, PUs). Reinforcement learning (RL) is an artificial intelligence approach that enables a node to observe, learn, and make appropriate decisions on action selection in order to maximize network performance. Routing enables a source node to search for a least-cost route to its destination node. While there have been increasing efforts to enhance the traditional RL approach for routing in wireless networks, this research area remains largely unexplored in the domain of routing in CR networks. This paper applies RL in routing and investigates the effects of various features of RL (i.e., reward function, exploitation, and exploration, as well as learning rate) through simulation. New approaches and recommendations are proposed to enhance the features in order to improve the network performance brought about by RL to routing. Simulation results show that the RL parameters of the reward function, exploitation, and exploration, as well as learning rate, must be well regulated, and the new approaches proposed in this paper improves SUs' network performance without significantly jeopardizing PUs' network performance, specifically SUs' interference to PUs.

  19. Embodied Language Learning and Cognitive Bootstrapping: Methods and Design Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Lyon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Co-development of action, conceptualization and social interaction mutually scaffold and support each other within a virtuous feedback cycle in the development of human language in children. Within this framework, the purpose of this article is to bring together diverse but complementary accounts of research methods that jointly contribute to our understanding of cognitive development and in particular, language acquisition in robots. Thus, we include research pertaining to developmental robotics, cognitive science, psychology, linguistics and neuroscience, as well as practical computer science and engineering. The different studies are not at this stage all connected into a cohesive whole; rather, they are presented to illuminate the need for multiple different approaches that complement each other in the pursuit of understanding cognitive development in robots. Extensive experiments involving the humanoid robot iCub are reported, while human learning relevant to developmental robotics has also contributed useful results. Disparate approaches are brought together via common underlying design principles. Without claiming to model human language acquisition directly, we are nonetheless inspired by analogous development in humans and consequently, our investigations include the parallel co-development of action, conceptualization and social interaction. Though these different approaches need to ultimately be integrated into a coherent, unified body of knowledge, progress is currently also being made by pursuing individual methods.

  20. Applying Social Cognitive Theory to Academic Advising to Assess Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Richard J.; Russ-Eft, Darlene

    2011-01-01

    Review of social cognitive theory constructs of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning is applied to academic advising for the purposes of assessing student learning. A brief overview of the history of student learning outcomes in higher education is followed by an explanation of self-efficacy and self-regulated learning constructs and how they…

  1. An Examination of Game-Based Learning from Theories of Flow Experience and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chu, Chih-Ming; Liu, Hsiang-Hsuan; Yang, Shun-Bo; Chen, Wei-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to discuss whether game-based learning with the integration of games and digital learning could enhance not only the flow experience in learning but achieve the same flow experience in pure games. In addition, the authors discovered that whether the game-based learning could make learners to reveal higher cognitive load. The…

  2. An Examination of Game-Based Learning from Theories of Flow Experience and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chu, Chih-Ming; Liu, Hsiang-Hsuan; Yang, Shun-Bo; Chen, Wei-Hsuan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to discuss whether game-based learning with the integration of games and digital learning could enhance not only the flow experience in learning but achieve the same flow experience in pure games. In addition, the authors discovered that whether the game-based learning could make learners to reveal higher cognitive load. The…

  3. A Consideration of Cognitive Factors in the Learning and Education of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Prem S.

    1992-01-01

    Considers the unique cognitive and intellectual factors that influence the learning and education of older adults. Reviews research on patterns of intellectual and cognitive aging and the implications of patterns in attention, memory, information retrieval, and tolerance for interference in the development of cognitive training programs for older…

  4. Learning Disabilities and Cognitive Strategies: A Case for Training or Constraining Problem Solving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between cognitive strategy and theoretical constructs associated with cognitive style, cognitive behavior modification, and metacognition, particularly regarding the education of learning disabled students, is examined. Future research directions, including the relationship between a tactual repertoire and metacognitive status,…

  5. Cognitive Load Imposed by Ultrasound-Facilitated Teaching Does Not Adversely Affect Gross Anatomy Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamniczky, Heather A.; Cotton, Darrel; Paget, Michael; Ramji, Qahir; Lenz, Ryan; McLaughlin, Kevin; Coderre, Sylvain; Ma, Irene W. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used in medical education, but its impact on learning outcomes is unclear. Adding ultrasound may facilitate learning, but may also potentially overwhelm novice learners. Based upon the framework of cognitive load theory, this study seeks to evaluate the relationship between cognitive load associated with using…

  6. Comparative Effect of Memory and Cognitive Strategies Training on EFL Intermediate Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banisaeid, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the effect of memory and cognitive strategies training on vocabulary learning of intermediate proficiency group of Iranian learners of English as a foreign language. It is to check how memory and cognitive strategies training affect word learning of EFL intermediate learners (N = 60) who were homogenized…

  7. Cognitive Tools and Student-Centred Learning: Rethinking Tools, Functions and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, Toru; Hannafin, Michael J.; Wang, Feng

    2005-01-01

    Although student-centred learning environments have recently attracted attention, such systems often place an unusual cognitive burden on the learner. Recent research suggests that cognitive tools can scaffold student-centred learning in these types of environments. This paper introduces and analyses problems and issues in the design and use of…

  8. Confronting Social Injustice: Cognitive Dissonance and Civic Development in Higher Education Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Leslie Cohen

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative, insider account of student civic development in a university service-learning course has two primary goals. One is to propose frameworks for describing the process of civic development of service-learning students that are situated in theories of civic identity, cognitive development, and cognitive dissonance. The other is to…

  9. Learning in "As-If" Worlds: Cognition in Drama in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The field of drama in education has been developing a rich tradition of practice separate from the literature of educational and cognitive psychology. This article draws links between the practice of drama in education and cognitive theory, focusing specifically on the area of situated learning. Rather than confine learning to the context of the…

  10. The Impact of Cognitive Assessment on the Identity of People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Terence; Smith, Hilary; Burns, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians have hypothesised that cognitive assessments have the power to influence the self-identity of people with learning disabilities. This research aimed to explore the experience of a sample of people who had been given a cognitive assessment by a psychologist based in a team for people with learning disabilities. Five…

  11. "Assessment Drives Learning": Do Assessments Promote High-Level Cognitive Processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, M. J.; Alt, H.

    2011-01-01

    Students tend to learn in the way they know, or think, they will be assessed. Therefore, to ensure deep, meaningful learning, assessments must be geared to promote cognitive processing that requires complex, contextualised thinking to construct meaning and create knowledge. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive levels is used worldwide to assist in…

  12. Effects of Online Student Question-Generation with Multiple Procedural Guides on Elementary Students’ Use of Cognitive Strategies and Academic Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Yun Yu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Student question-generation (SQG procedural guides differ in terms of level of concreteness, demands on cognitive skills and appropriateness for respective instructional units. Because existing studies exclusively examine the effects of individual guides, this study was aimed at aninvestigation oftheeffects ofonline SQG with multiple guides intended to promote elementary students’ use of cognitive strategies and to improve academic performancewhile learning Chinese and science. Aquasi-experimental research method and an onlinelearning system with dynamic scaffolding designs were adopted to support student learning of Chinese and science via the SQG approach. Two fifth-grade classes (N=56 participatedfor eightweeks.Twice per week, in accordancewith the instructors’schedules, students engaged in online SQG or self-study activities in their randomly assigned groups. The results of the analysis of covariance indicatedsignificantdifferences between the two treatment groups in their use of cognitive strategies while learning Chinese and science,withstudents in the SQG group scoringsignificantly higher than those inthe comparison group. However, academic achievement between the two groupsdidnot differ significantly. Suggestions for instructional implementations and future studies are provided.

  13. An Empirical Investigation of the Relationships among Cognitive Abilities, Cognitive Style, and Learning Preferences in Students Enrolled in Specialized Degree Courses at a Canadian College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jean; Sardar, Shaila

    2011-01-01

    Although specific cognitive abilities, cognitive style, and learning preferences are assumed to be inter-related, the empirical evidence supporting this assumption is mixed. Cognitive style refers to how individuals represent information, and learning preference refers to how individuals prefer the presentation of information (Mayer & Massa,…

  14. Augmenting cognitive learning of community nutrition by tutorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, S

    1998-01-01

    Community health interventions are increasingly being considered a priority area in medical curriculum. In the topic of nutrition, a situation analysis of final MBBS students in our institution revealed significantly lower levels of knowledge in community applications as compared to basics and clinical aspects, indicating the need for some educational intervention. An improvised tutorial was conducted to address this deficiency at cognitive level. The intervention was a special scheme of flow of discussion with a positive bias in favour of nutritional applications at community level. Half of the learners were given routine tutorial, as part of existing teaching schedule in nutrition and the remaining were subjected to educational intervention, to provide control and study groups respectively. Before and after assessment of the recall of learners on community applications demonstrated a positive impact of improvised tutorial. The learners' level of knowledge in two groups was comparable before the tutorial but it was significantly higher ('P' < 0.001) in study group as compared to control, after the tutorial (mean scores: 134.38/150 and 91.20/150 respectively). No extra resources, tutor time or student's learning hours were needed for the improvised tutorial. Tutor's positive bias in favour of applied aspects can bring about a desired change even in conventional teaching-learning process, without asking for extra resources. It can be a supplement to community-based learning.

  15. Effect of Internet-Based Cognitive Apprenticeship Model (i-CAM) on Statistics Learning among Postgraduate Students: e0129938

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farzaneh Saadati; Rohani Ahmad Tarmizi; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Ayub; Kamariah Abu Bakar

    2015-01-01

    ... is 'value added' because it facilitates the conventional method of learning mathematics. Many researchers emphasize the effectiveness of cognitive apprenticeship in learning and problem solving in the workplace...

  16. Self-Assessment in University Assessment of Prior Learning Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinke, D. Joosten-Ten; Sluijsmans, D. M. A.; Jochems, W. M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Competency-based university education, in which lifelong learning and flexible learning are key elements, demands a renewed vision on assessment. Within this vision, Assessment of Prior Learning (APL), in which learners have to show their prior learning in order for their goals to be recognised, becomes an important element. This article focuses…

  17. Development of an Adaptive Learning System with Multiple Perspectives based on Students' Learning Styles and Cognitive Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Chi; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yang, Stephen Jen-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an adaptive learning system is developed by taking multiple dimensions of personalized features into account. A personalized presentation module is proposed for developing adaptive learning systems based on the field dependent/independent cognitive style model and the eight dimensions of Felder-Silverman's learning style. An…

  18. Exploring Learning Performance toward Cognitive Approaches of a Virtual Companion System in LINE App for m-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Min-Ping

    2013-01-01

    This paper used a Virtual Companion System (VCS) to examine how specific design variables within virtual learning companion affect the learning process of learners as defined by the cognitive continuum of field-dependent, field-independent and field-mixed learners in LINE app for m-learning. The data were collected from 198 participants in a…

  19. Optimizing Learning in College: Tips From Cognitive Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Adam L; Sungkhasettee, Victor W; Roediger, Henry L

    2016-09-01

    Every fall, thousands of college students begin their first college courses, often in large lecture settings. Many students, even those who work hard, flounder. What should students be doing differently? Drawing on research in cognitive psychology and our experience as educators, we provide suggestions about how students should approach taking a course in college. We discuss time management techniques, identify the ineffective study strategies students often use, and suggest more effective strategies based on research in the lab and the classroom. In particular, we advise students to space their study sessions on a topic and to quiz themselves, as well as using other active learning strategies while reading. Our goal was to provide a framework for students to succeed in college classes.

  20. Working Memory Underpins Cognitive Development, Learning, and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Nelson

    2014-06-01

    Working memory is the retention of a small amount of information in a readily accessible form. It facilitates planning, comprehension, reasoning, and problem-solving. I examine the historical roots and conceptual development of the concept and the theoretical and practical implications of current debates about working memory mechanisms. Then I explore the nature of cognitive developmental improvements in working memory, the role of working memory in learning, and some potential implications of working memory and its development for the education of children and adults. The use of working memory is quite ubiquitous in human thought, but the best way to improve education using what we know about working memory is still controversial. I hope to provide some directions for research and educational practice.

  1. Hand Gesture Data Collection Procedure Using a Myo Armband for Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Data Collection Procedure Using a Myo Armband for Machine Learning by Michael Lee and Nikhil Rao Computational and Information Sciences...Hand Gesture Data Collection Procedure Using a Myo Armband for Machine Learning 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Battlefield Information Processing Branch investigated using machine learning (ML) to identify military hand gestures. A Naïve Bayes model was

  2. Procedural learning as a measure of functional impairment in a mouse model of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Jérôme; Van de Beeck, Lise; Plumier, Jean-Christophe; Ferrara, André

    2016-07-01

    Basal ganglia stroke is often associated with functional deficits in patients, including difficulties to learn and execute new motor skills (procedural learning). To measure procedural learning in a murine model of stroke (30min right MCAO), we submitted C57Bl/6J mice to various sensorimotor tests, then to an operant procedure (Serial Order Learning) specifically assessing the ability to learn a simple motor sequence. Results showed that MCAO affected the performance in some of the sensorimotor tests (accelerated rotating rod and amphetamine rotation test) and the way animals learned a motor sequence. The later finding seems to be caused by difficulties regarding the chunking of operant actions into a coherent motor sequence; the appeal for food rewards and ability to press levers appeared unaffected by MCAO. We conclude that assessment of motor learning in rodent models of stroke might improve the translational value of such models.

  3. A Comparison of Learning Outcomes in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Existential Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Dræby

    the lived experience of the learning outcomes of these approaches. The study also clarifies the differences between existential psychotherapy as an art of learning directed at existential learning of authenticity and cognitive- behavioural therapy as a learning-based medical treatment technology directed...... of the outcome of psychotherapy through qualitative research. The precise aim is to draw attention to the special characteristics of this outcome in terms of learning outcome. This regards both existential therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy and to clarify the possible differences and similarities between...

  4. Effects of a structured problem-solving procedure on pre-sleep cognitive arousal in college students with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Waters, William F

    2006-01-01

    Pre-sleep cognitive arousal, more specifically worry, is often reported as a distressing symptom that interferes with sleep. Using a controlled group design, a "constructive worry" intervention, similar to Espie and Lindsay's (1987) "worry control" procedure, was tested for its effects on pre-sleep cognitive arousal in an undergraduate population reporting insomnia. After 2 baseline nights, participants (N = 33) either recorded possible solutions to worries (constructive worry group) or recorded worries and completed worry questionnaires (worry group) for 5 nights. As hypothesized, the constructive worry group had decreased pre-sleep cognitive arousal relative to the worry group and relative to baseline scores. This study provides further support for augmenting existing insomnia treatments with cognitive interventions to successfully treat the complaint of pre-sleep cognitive arousal.

  5. Understanding Why a Child Is Struggling to Learn: The Role of Cognitive Processing Evaluation in Learning Disability Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evelyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) have long been presumed to be a neurological disorder resulting from a deficit in 1 or more cognitive processes. Although the emphasis on cognitive processing disorders has been included in the definition since the term was coined, and although it arguably represents the key distinguishing characteristic of LDs, it also…

  6. Understanding Why a Child Is Struggling to Learn: The Role of Cognitive Processing Evaluation in Learning Disability Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evelyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Learning disabilities (LDs) have long been presumed to be a neurological disorder resulting from a deficit in 1 or more cognitive processes. Although the emphasis on cognitive processing disorders has been included in the definition since the term was coined, and although it arguably represents the key distinguishing characteristic of LDs, it also…

  7. A Study of the Relationship between Cognitive Styles and Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changju

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between cognitive styles and learning strategies of 184 second-year English majors from the Foreign Language School of a university in Wuhan. In this study, quantitative data is presented. Two self-reported inventories are employed. Learning Style Survey is used to examine the learning styles of the…

  8. The Effects of Positive and Negative Mood on Cognition and Motivation in Multimedia Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Tze Wei; Tan, Su-Mae

    2016-01-01

    The Cognitive-Affective Theory of Learning with Media framework posits that the multimedia learning process is mediated by the learner's mood. Recent studies have shown that positive mood has a facilitating effect on multimedia learning. Though literature has shown that negative mood encourages an individual to engage in a more systematic,…

  9. Applications of Cognitive Load Theory to Multimedia-Based Foreign Language Learning: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, I-Jung; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Yen-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the multimedia instructional design literature based on cognitive load theory (CLT) in the context of foreign language learning. Multimedia are of particular importance in language learning materials because they incorporate text, image, and sound, thus offering an integrated learning experience of the four language skills…

  10. The relation between Assessment for Learning and elementary students’ cognitive and metacognitive strategy use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Diana; Castelijns, Jos; Vermeulen, Marjan; Martens, Rob; Segers, Mein

    2016-01-01

    Assessment for Learning (AfL) is believed to create a rich learning environment in which students develop their cognitive and metacognitive strategies. Monitoring student growth and providing scaffolds that shed light on the next step in the learning process are hypothesized to be essential elements

  11. The Relationships between Cognitive Style of Field Dependence and Learner Variables in E-Learning Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozcu, Omer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between cognitive styles of field dependent learners with their attitudes towards e-learning (distance education) and instructional behavior in e-learning instruction. The Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) and the attitude survey (for students' preferences) towards e-learning instruction as distance education…

  12. The Influence of Visual Cognitive Style when Learning from Instructional Animations and Static Pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffler, Tim N.; Prechtl, Helmut; Nerdel, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In a 2 x 2 design, we examined the role of visual cognitive style in two multimedia-based learning environments (text plus static pictures/animations). A statistically significant interaction was obtained for deeper comprehension: Highly developed visualizers (HDV) who learned with static pictures performed better than HDV who learned with…

  13. Procedural Learning and Memory Rehabilitation in Korsakoff's Syndrome - a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudman, Erik; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Korsakoff's syndrome (KS) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder caused by alcohol abuse and thiamine deficiency. Patients with KS show restricted autonomy due to their severe declarative amnesia and executive disorders. Recently, it has been suggested that procedural learning and memory are relatively preserved in KS and can effectively support autonomy in KS. In the present review we describe the available evidence on procedural learning and memory in KS and highlight advances in memory rehabilitation that have been demonstrated to support procedural memory. The specific purpose of this review was to increase insights in the available tools for successful memory rehabilitation and give suggestions how to apply these tools in clinical practice to increase procedural learning in KS. Current evidence suggests that when memory rehabilitation is adjusted to the specific needs of KS patients, this will increase their ability to learn procedures and their typically compromised autonomy gets enhanced.

  14. Cognitive Issues in Learning Advanced Physics: An Example from Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    We are investigating cognitive issues in learning quantum mechanics in order to develop effective teaching and learning tools. The analysis of cognitive issues is particularly important for bridging the gap between the quantitative and conceptual aspects of quantum mechanics and for ensuring that the learning tools help students build a robust knowledge structure. We discuss the cognitive aspects of quantum mechanics that are similar or different from those of introductory physics and their implications for developing strategies to help students develop a good grasp of quantum mechanics.

  15. Modeling of Learners’ Interest in Blended Learning: Insights from Emotional Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hai-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In blended learning, how to explore and evaluate the learner’s interest is very important. In this paper, we study on modeling of learners’ interest from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. Emotional cognitive theory and brain cognitive process for situational learning interest were introduced. In addition, in order to solve the problem of quantitative assessment of interest, learner’s online operation behaviour was summarized through data mining methods, and the learners' interest regression model was built. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the model is more than 91% and it has good applicability in blended learning.

  16. The cognitive impact of interactive design features for learning complex materials in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyuksoon S; Pusic, Martin; Nick, Michael W; Sarpel, Umut; Plass, Jan L; Kalet, Adina L

    2014-02-01

    To identify the most effective way for medical students to interact with a browser-based learning module on the symptoms and neurological underpinnings of stroke syndromes, this study manipulated the way in which subjects interacted with a graphical model of the brain and examined the impact of functional changes on learning outcomes. It was hypothesized that behavioral interactions that were behaviorally more engaging and which required deeper consideration of the model would result in heightened cognitive interaction and better learning than those whose manipulation required less deliberate behavioral and cognitive processing. One hundred forty four students were randomly assigned to four conditions whose model controls incorporated features that required different levels of behavioral and cognitive interaction: Movie (low behavioral/low cognitive, n = 40), Slider (high behavioral/low cognitive, n = 36), Click (low behavioral/high cognitive, n = 30), and Drag (high behavioral/high cognitive, n = 38). Analysis of Covariates (ANCOVA) showed that students who received the treatments associated with lower cognitive interactivity (Movie and Slider) performed better on a transfer task than those receiving the module associated with high cognitive interactivity (Click and Drag, partial eta squared = .03). In addition, the students in the high cognitive interactivity conditions spent significantly more time on the stroke locator activity than other conditions (partial eta squared = .36). The results suggest that interaction with controls that were tightly coupled with the model and whose manipulation required deliberate consideration of the model's features may have overtaxed subjects' cognitive resources. Cognitive effort that facilitated manipulation of content, though directed at the model, may have resulted in extraneous cognitive load, impeding subjects in recognizing the deeper, global relationships in the materials. Instructional designers must, therefore, keep in

  17. Stress facilitates late reversal learning using a touchscreen-based visual discrimination procedure in male Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Courtney A; Howland, John G

    2015-02-01

    The stress response is essential to the survival of all species as it maintains internal equilibrium and allows organisms to respond to threats in the environment. Most stress research has focused on the detrimental impacts of stress on cognition and behavior. Reversal learning, which requires a change in response strategy based on one dimension of the stimuli, is one type of behavioral flexibility that is facilitated following some brief stress procedures. The current study investigated a potential mechanism underlying this facilitation by blocking glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) during stress. Thirty-seven male Long Evans rats learned to discriminate between two images on a touchscreen, one of which was rewarded. Once a criterion was reached, rats received stress (30 min of restraint stress or no stress) and drug (GR antagonist RU38486 or vehicle) administration prior to each of the first 3 days of reversal learning. We expected that stress would facilitate reversal learning and RU38486 (10 mg/kg) would prevent this facilitation in both early (50% correct in one session) stages of reversal learning. Results showed that stressed rats performed better than unstressed rats (fewer days for late reversal, fewer correction trials, and fewer errors) in the late but not early stage of reversal learning. RU38486 did not block the facilitation of RL by stress, although it dramatically increased response, but not reward, latencies. These results confirm the facilitation of late reversal by stress in a touchscreen-based operant task in rats and further our understanding of how stress affects higher level cognitive functioning and behavior.

  18. Socio-cognitive profiles for visual learning in young and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eChristian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is common wisdom that practice makes perfect; but why do some adults learn better than others? Here, we investigate individuals’ cognitive and social profiles to test which variables account for variability in learning ability across the lifespan. In particular, we focused on visual learning using tasks that test the ability to inhibit distractors and select task-relevant features. We tested the ability of young and older adults to improve through training in the discrimination of visual global forms embedded in a cluttered background. Further, we used a battery of cognitive tasks and psycho-social measures to examine which of these variables predict training-induced improvement in perceptual tasks and may account for individual variability in learning ability. Using partial least squares regression modelling, we show that visual learning is influenced by cognitive (i.e. cognitive inhibition, attention and social (strategic and deep learning factors rather than an individual’s age alone. Further, our results show that independent of age, strong learners rely on cognitive factors such as attention, while weaker learners use more general cognitive strategies. Our findings suggest an important role for higher-cognitive circuits involving executive functions that contribute to our ability to improve in perceptual tasks after training across the lifespan.

  19. NEW SCIENCE OF LEARNING: COGNITION, COMPUTERS AND COLLABORATION IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Onur DONMEZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs have pervaded and changed much of our lives both on individual and societal scales. PCs, notebooks, tablets, cell phones, RSS feeds, emails, podcasts, tweets, social networks are all technologies we are familiar with and we are intensively using them in our daily lives. It is safe to say that our lives are becoming more and more digitized day by day.We have already invented bunch of terms to refer effects of these technologies on our lives. Digital nomads, grasshopper minds, millennium learners, digital natives, information age, knowledge building, knowledge society, network society are all terms invented to refer societal changes motivated by ICTs. New opportunities provided by ICTs are also shaping skill and quality demands of the next age. Individuals have to match these qualities if they want to earn their rightful places in tomorrow‘s world. Education is of course the sole light to guide them in their transformation to tomorrow‘s individual. One question arises however: ―are today‘s educational paradigms and practices ready to confront such a challenge?‖ There is a coherent and strong opinion among educators that the answer is ―NO‖. ―Today‘s students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors‖(Prensky, 2001. And education has to keep pace with these students and their needs. But how? Khine & Saleh managed to gather distinguished colleagues around this question within their book titled ―New Science of Learning: Cognition, Computers and Collaboration‖. The book is composed of 29 chapters within three major topics which are: cognition, computers and collaboration.

  20. Situated Cognition, Vygotskian Thought and Learning from the Communities of Practice Perspective: Implications for the Design of Web-based E-Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David W. L.; Chen, Der Thanq

    2001-01-01

    Describes situated cognition, Vygotskian thought, the Zone of Proximal Development, and learning from the community of practice perspective. Conceptualizes learning principles for instructional design of Web-based electronic learning environments, including situatedness, commonality, interdependency, and infrastructure that includes…

  1. Distributed Practice and Procedural Memory Consolidation in Musicians' Skill Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    This research was designed to determine whether musicians' learning is affected by the time intervals interposed between practice sessions. Twenty-nine non-pianist musicians learned a 9-note sequence on a piano keyboard in three practice sessions that were separated by 5 min, 6 hr, or 24 hr. Significant improvements in performance accuracy were…

  2. Transferring Road Maps for Learning and Assessment Procedures to Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Learning is a lifelong process. It is therefore worthwhile looking at instances where learning takes place outside educational institutions and see how educational principles can be applied there. In a market economy companies have to quest for profit to ensure their long-term survival. In the end, their educational goals have to serve themselves.…

  3. Transferring Road Maps for Learning and Assessment Procedures to Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberger, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Learning is a lifelong process. It is therefore worthwhile looking at instances where learning takes place outside educational institutions and see how educational principles can be applied there. In a market economy companies have to quest for profit to ensure their long-term survival. In the end, their educational goals have to serve themselves.…

  4. Social Meta-Cognition: The Efficacy of Cognitive Training for Social Adjustment of Learning Disabled Delinquents. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Katherine A.; Gerber, Michael M.

    The study tests the efficacy of social meta-cognitive training for enhancing social competence in 34 learning disabled (LD) and 35 non LD low achieving incarcerated delinquents. Ss were randomly assigned to treatment, attention control and test-only control groups. Overt social behavior measures were examined in a pretest-posttest control group…

  5. Affective Factors in STEM Learning and Scientific Inquiry: Assessment of Cognitive Conflict and Anxiety

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Lei; Raplinger, Amy; Han, Jing; Koenig, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive conflict is well recognized as an important factor in conceptual change and is widely used in developing inquiry-based curricula. However, cognitive conflict can also contribute to student anxiety during learning, which can have both positive and negative impacts on students' motivation and learning achievement. Therefore, instructors need to be informed of the impacts of introducing cognitive conflicts during teaching. To get this information, teachers need a practical instrument that can help them identify the existence and features of cognitive conflict introduced by the instruction and the resulting anxiety. Based on the literature on studies of cognitive conflict and student anxiety, a quantitative instrument, the In-class Conflict and Anxiety Recognition Evaluation (iCARE), was developed and used to monitor the status of students' cognitive conflict and anxiety in the Physics by Inquiry (PBI) classes. This paper introduces this instrument and discusses the types of information that can be meas...

  6. Practice-Oriented Retest Learning as the Basic Form of Cognitive Plasticity of the Aging Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that aging is associated with declines in a variety of cognitive functions. A growing body of research shows that the age-related cognitive declines are reversible through cognitive training programs, suggesting maintained cognitive plasticity of the aging brain. Retest learning represents a basic form of cognitive plasticity. It has been consistently demonstrated for adults in young-old and old-old ages. Accumulated research indicates that retest learning is effective, robust, endurable and could occur at a more conceptual level beyond item-specific memorization. Recent studies also demonstrate promisingly broader transfer effects from retest practice of activities involving complex executive functioning to other untrained tasks. The results shed light on the development of self-guided mental exercise programs to improve cognitive performance and efficiency of the aging brain. The relevant studies were reviewed, and the findings were discussed in light of their limitations, implications, and future directions.

  7. The relationship between learning mathematics and general cognitive ability in primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Richard; Hurry, Jane; Midouhas, Emily

    2017-08-12

    Three relationships between learning mathematics and general cognitive ability have been hypothesized: The educational hypothesis that learning mathematics develops general cognitive skills, the psychometric hypothesis that differences in general cognitive ability cause differences in mathematical attainment, and the reciprocal influence hypothesis that developments in mathematical ability and general cognitive ability influence each other. These hypotheses are assessed with a sample of 948 children from the Twins Early Development Study who were assessed at 7, 9, and 10 years on mathematics, English, and general cognitive ability. A cross-lagged path analysis with mathematics and general cognitive ability measures supports the reciprocal influence hypothesis between 7 and 9 and between 9 and 10. A second analysis including English assessments only provides evidence of a reciprocal relationship between 7 and 9. Statement of Contribution What is already known on this subject? The correlations between mathematical attainment, literacy, and measures of general cognitive skills are well established. The role of literacy in developing general cognitive skills is emerging. What the present study adds? Mathematics contributes to the development of general cognitive skills. General cognitive ability contributes to mathematical development between 7 and 10. These findings support the hypothesis of reciprocal influence between mathematics and general cognitive ability, at least between 7 and 9. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Biological lifestyle factors in adult distance education: predicting cognitive and learning performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M. (2015, 20 October). Biological lifestyle factors in adult distance education: predicting cognitive and learning performance. Presentation given for the inter-faculty Data Science group at the Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  9. Individual and group-based learning from complex cognitive tasks: Effects on retention and transfer efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Paas, F., & Kirschner, P. (2009). Individual and group-based learning from complex cognitive tasks: Effects on retention and transfer efficiency. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 306-314.

  10. Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2010, 4 November). Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective. Presentation at ICO-Toogdag, Amstelveen, The Netherlands: VU Amsterdam.

  11. Mechanisms of peer tutoring on optimizing cognitive load during knowledge sharing in learning networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2010, 15 April). Mechanisms of peer tutoring on optimizing cognitive load during knowledge sharing in learning networks. Presentation at NELLL Colloqium, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  12. Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsiao, Amy; Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hsiao, Y. P., Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2010). Effect of using peer tutoring to support knowledge sharing in Learning Networks: A cognitive load perspective. ICO-Toogdag. November, 4, 2010, Amstelveen, The Netherlands: VU Amsterdam.

  13. A Cognitive Neural Architecture Able to Learn and Communicate through Natural Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosio, Bruno; Cangelosi, Angelo; Gamotina, Olesya; Masala, Giovanni Luca

    2015-01-01

    Communicative interactions involve a kind of procedural knowledge that is used by the human brain for processing verbal and nonverbal inputs and for language production. Although considerable work has been done on modeling human language abilities, it has been difficult to bring them together to a comprehensive tabula rasa system compatible with current knowledge of how verbal information is processed in the brain. This work presents a cognitive system, entirely based on a large-scale neural architecture, which was developed to shed light on the procedural knowledge involved in language elaboration. The main component of this system is the central executive, which is a supervising system that coordinates the other components of the working memory. In our model, the central executive is a neural network that takes as input the neural activation states of the short-term memory and yields as output mental actions, which control the flow of information among the working memory components through neural gating mechanisms. The proposed system is capable of learning to communicate through natural language starting from tabula rasa, without any a priori knowledge of the structure of phrases, meaning of words, role of the different classes of words, only by interacting with a human through a text-based interface, using an open-ended incremental learning process. It is able to learn nouns, verbs, adjectives, pronouns and other word classes, and to use them in expressive language. The model was validated on a corpus of 1587 input sentences, based on literature on early language assessment, at the level of about 4-years old child, and produced 521 output sentences, expressing a broad range of language processing functionalities.

  14. A Cognitive Neural Architecture Able to Learn and Communicate through Natural Language.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Golosio

    Full Text Available Communicative interactions involve a kind of procedural knowledge that is used by the human brain for processing verbal and nonverbal inputs and for language production. Although considerable work has been done on modeling human language abilities, it has been difficult to bring them together to a comprehensive tabula rasa system compatible with current knowledge of how verbal information is processed in the brain. This work presents a cognitive system, entirely based on a large-scale neural architecture, which was developed to shed light on the procedural knowledge involved in language elaboration. The main component of this system is the central executive, which is a supervising system that coordinates the other components of the working memory. In our model, the central executive is a neural network that takes as input the neural activation states of the short-term memory and yields as output mental actions, which control the flow of information among the working memory components through neural gating mechanisms. The proposed system is capable of learning to communicate through natural language starting from tabula rasa, without any a priori knowledge of the structure of phrases, meaning of words, role of the different classes of words, only by interacting with a human through a text-based interface, using an open-ended incremental learning process. It is able to learn nouns, verbs, adjectives, pronouns and other word classes, and to use them in expressive language. The model was validated on a corpus of 1587 input sentences, based on literature on early language assessment, at the level of about 4-years old child, and produced 521 output sentences, expressing a broad range of language processing functionalities.

  15. A Computational Model of the Temporal Dynamics of Plasticity in Procedural Learning: Sensitivity to Feedback Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian V. Valentin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evidence is now good that different memory systems mediate the learning of different types of category structures. In particular, declarative memory dominates rule-based (RB category learning and procedural memory dominates information-integration (II category learning. For example, several studies have reported that feedback timing is critical for II category learning, but not for RB category learning – results that have broad support within the memory systems literature. Specifically, II category learning has been shown to be best with feedback delays of 500ms compared to delays of 0 and 1000ms, and highly impaired with delays of 2.5 seconds or longer. In contrast, RB learning is unaffected by any feedback delay up to 10 seconds. We propose a neurobiologically detailed theory of procedural learning that is sensitive to different feedback delays. The theory assumes that procedural learning is mediated by plasticity at cortical-striatal synapses that are modified by dopamine-mediated reinforcement learning. The model captures the time-course of the biochemical events in the striatum that cause synaptic plasticity, and thereby accounts for the empirical effects of various feedback delays on II category learning.

  16. A report of cognitive, academic, and linguistic profiles for college students with and without learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, M; Leuenberger, J

    1990-01-01

    A comparison of cognitive, academic, and linguistic profiles for 74 college students with learning disabilities and 37 college students without learning disabilities resulted in significant differences in achievement for reading, writing, listening, and speaking. No significant differences were found for gender or the presence of a Verbal-Performance split in cognitive ability. Instruments for measuring academic and linguistic skills were similar in their ability to classify students with and without learning disabilities. These findings support the importance of using measures of multidimensional attributes, including language, for making decisions concerning the criteria for learning disabilities.

  17. Establishing Reliable Cognitive Change in Children with Epilepsy: The Procedures and Results for a Sample with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iterson, Loretta; Augustijn, Paul B.; de Jong, Peter F.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate reliable cognitive change in epilepsy by developing computational procedures to determine reliable change index scores (RCIs) for the Dutch Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children. First, RCIs were calculated based on stability coefficients from a reference sample. Then, these RCIs were applied to a…

  18. Establishing reliable cognitive change in children with epilepsy: The procedures and results for a sample with epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iterson, L.; Augustijn, P.B.; de Jong, P.F.; van der Leij, A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate reliable cognitive change in epilepsy by developing computational procedures to determine reliable change index scores (RCIs) for the Dutch Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children. First, RCIs were calculated based on stability coefficients from a referenc

  19. Establishing Reliable Cognitive Change in Children with Epilepsy: The Procedures and Results for a Sample with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iterson, Loretta; Augustijn, Paul B.; de Jong, Peter F.; van der Leij, Aryan

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate reliable cognitive change in epilepsy by developing computational procedures to determine reliable change index scores (RCIs) for the Dutch Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children. First, RCIs were calculated based on stability coefficients from a reference sample. Then, these RCIs were applied to a…

  20. Optimizing Spectrum Trading in Cognitive Mesh Network Using Machine Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Alsarhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a cognitive wireless mesh network, licensed users (primary users, PUs may rent surplus spectrum to unlicensed users (secondary users, SUs for getting some revenue. For such spectrum sharing paradigm, maximizing the revenue is the key objective of the PUs while that of the SUs is to meet their requirements. These complex contradicting objectives are embedded in our reinforcement learning (RL model that is developed and implemented as shown in this paper. The objective function is defined as the net revenue gained by PUs from renting some of their spectrum. RL is used to extract the optimal control policy that maximizes the PUs’ profit continuously over time. The extracted policy is used by PUs to manage renting the spectrum to SUs and it helps PUs to adapt to the changing network conditions. Performance evaluation of the proposed spectrum trading approach shows that it is able to find the optimal size and price of spectrum for each primary user under different conditions. Moreover, the approach constitutes a framework for studying, synthesizing and optimizing other schemes. Another contribution is proposing a new distributed algorithm to manage spectrum sharing among PUs. In our scheme, PUs exchange channels dynamically based on the availability of neighbor’s idle channels. In our cooperative scheme, the objective of spectrum sharing is to maximize the total revenue and utilize spectrum efficiently. Compared to the poverty-line heuristic that does not consider the availability of unused spectrum, our scheme has the advantage of utilizing spectrum efficiently.

  1. Student Difficulties in Learning Density: A Distributed Cognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Clarke, David

    2012-08-01

    Density has been reported as one of the most difficult concepts for secondary school students (e.g. Smith et al. 1997). Discussion about the difficulties of learning this concept has been largely focused on the complexity of the concept itself or student misconceptions. Few, if any, have investigated how the concept of density was constituted in classroom interactions, and what consequences these interactions have for individual students' conceptual understanding. This paper reports a detailed analysis of two lessons on density in a 7th Grade Australian science classroom, employing the theory of Distributed Cognition (Hollan et al. 1999; Hutchins 1995). The analysis demonstrated that student understanding of density was shaped strongly by the public classroom discussion on the density of two metal blocks. It also revealed the ambiguities associated with the teacher demonstration and the student practical work. These ambiguities contributed to student difficulties with the concept of density identified in this classroom. The results of this study suggest that deliberate effort is needed to establish shared understanding not only about the purpose of the activities, but also about the meaning of scientific language and the utility of tools. It also suggests the importance of appropriate employment of instructional resources in order to facilitate student scientific understanding.

  2. Designing an Adaptive Web-Based Learning System Based on Students' Cognitive Styles Identified Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jia-Jiunn; Chan, Ya-Chen; Yeh, Shiou-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This study developed an adaptive web-based learning system focusing on students' cognitive styles. The system is composed of a student model and an adaptation model. It collected students' browsing behaviors to update the student model for unobtrusively identifying student cognitive styles through a multi-layer feed-forward neural network (MLFF).…

  3. Designing an Adaptive Web-Based Learning System Based on Students' Cognitive Styles Identified Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Jia-Jiunn; Chan, Ya-Chen; Yeh, Shiou-Wen

    2012-01-01

    This study developed an adaptive web-based learning system focusing on students' cognitive styles. The system is composed of a student model and an adaptation model. It collected students' browsing behaviors to update the student model for unobtrusively identifying student cognitive styles through a multi-layer feed-forward neural network (MLFF).…

  4. Joint Development of Teacher Cognition and Identity through Learning to Teach L2 Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Michael; Chen, Honglin; Baker, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    The constructs of teacher cognition and teacher identity have recently gained considerable attention in second language teacher education research for their crucial roles in understanding teacher learning. While a number of current studies have examined the contributions of both constructs, the connections between cognition and identity are yet to…

  5. Instructional Control of Cognitive Load in the Design of Complex Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Kester, L., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). Instructional control of cognitive load in the design of complex learning environments. In J. L. Plass, R. Moreno, & Roland Brünken (Eds.), Cognitive Load Theory (pp. 109-130). New York: Cambridge University Press.

  6. Cognitive Support for Learning Computer-Based Tasks Using Animated Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cognitive support for learning computer-based tasks using animated demonstration (AD) on instructional efficiency. Cognitive support included (1) segmentation and learner control introducing interactive devices that allow content sequencing through a navigational menu, and content pacing through stop and…

  7. The Neuroscience of Mathematical Cognition and Learning. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Chung Yen; Thompson, Jacqueline; Krause, Beatrix; Kadosh, Roi Cohen

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic potential of cognitive neuroscience and education for efficient learning has attracted considerable interest from the general public, teachers, parents, academics and policymakers alike. This review is aimed at providing 1) an accessible and general overview of the research progress made in cognitive neuroscience research in…

  8. Cognitive Modeling and Self-Efficacy: Effects on Preservice Teachers' Learning of Teaching Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrell, Jeffrey; Capron, Earl

    1990-01-01

    Examines how cognitive modeling and self-efficacy affected preservice teachers' learning of teaching strategies. Two groups of students viewed videotaped training sessions with direct instruction or cognitive modeling. They then viewed either self-efficacy or task-oriented commentaries. Results indicated significant effects favoring cognitive…

  9. Does Implicit Learning in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease depend on the Level of Cognitive Functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbossche, Jochen; Deroost, Natacha; Soetens, Eric; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the level of cognitive functioning on sequence-specific learning in Parkinson's disease (PD). This was done by examining the relationship between the scales for outcomes in Parkinson's disease-cognition [SCOPA-COG, Marinus, J., Visser, M., Verwey, N. A., Verhey, F. R. J., Middelkoop, H. A. M.,Stiggelbout, A., et…

  10. What Does Distributed Cognition Tell Us about Student Learning of Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lihua; Clarke, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports multi-layered analyses of student learning in a science classroom using the theoretical lens of Distributed Cognition (Hollan et al. 1999; Hutchins 1995). Building on the insights generated from previous research employing Distributed Cognition, the particular focus of this study has been placed on the "public space of…

  11. Situated Cognition and Learning Environments: Roles, Structures, and Implications for Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Im; Hannafin, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Examines the theoretical underpinnings of situation cognition and derives implications for the design of situated learning environments. Highlights include a discussion of the four basic issues of the conceptual framework of situation cognition; these include the role of content, context, facilitation, and assessment. A table summarizes the…

  12. Applying Cognitive Psychology Based Instructional Design Principles in Mathematics Teaching and Learning: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, W.; Star, J.

    2017-01-01

    This special issue comprises contributions that address the breadth of current lines of recent research from cognitive psychology that appear promising for positively impacting students' learning of mathematics. More specifically, we included contributions (a) that refer to cognitive psychology based principles and techniques, such as explanatory…

  13. Growth of Cognitive Skills in Preschoolers: Impact of Sleep Habits and Learning-Related Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunjoo; Molfese, Victoria J.; Beswick, Jennifer; Jacobi-Vessels, Jill; Molnar, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study used a longitudinal design to identify how sleep habits and learning-related behaviors impact the development of cognitive skills in preschoolers (ages 3-5). Sixty- seven children with parental report and cognitive skill assessment data were included. Scores on the Differential Ability Scales (C. Elliott, 1990)…

  14. The Neuroscience of Mathematical Cognition and Learning. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Chung Yen; Thompson, Jacqueline; Krause, Beatrix; Kadosh, Roi Cohen

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic potential of cognitive neuroscience and education for efficient learning has attracted considerable interest from the general public, teachers, parents, academics and policymakers alike. This review is aimed at providing 1) an accessible and general overview of the research progress made in cognitive neuroscience research in…

  15. Social Cognition and Its Relation to Psychosocial Adjustment in Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galway, Tanya M.; Metsala, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined social cognitive skills in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) compared to normally achieving (NA) children. The relation between social cognitive skills and psychosocial adjustment was also investigated. There were no group differences on children's ability to represent orally presented social vignettes.…

  16. Situated Cognition and the Culture of Learning. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John Seely; And Others

    This paper explores the relationship between the concept of cognitive apprenticeship and situated cognition and the social construction of knowledge. Cognitive apprenticeship is the enculturation of students into authentic practices through authentic activity and social interaction in a way similar to that which is evident--and evidently…

  17. Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Sluijsmans, Dominique; Jochems, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Joosten-ten Brinke, D., Sluijsmans, D. M. A., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2010). Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(1), 59-74.

  18. Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Sluijsmans, Dominique; Jochems, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Joosten-ten Brinke, D., Sluijsmans, D. M. A., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2010). Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(1), 59-74.

  19. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sanday, Leandro [UNIFESP; Zanin, Karina Agustini [UNIFESP; Patti, Camilla de Lima [UNIFESP; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano [UNIFESP; Oliveira, Larissa C. [UNIFESP; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Andersen, Monica Levy [UNIFESP; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine be...

  20. Training Procedures for Enhancing Reserve Component Learning, Retention, and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Russian vocabulary. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory , 1, 126-133. Atkinson , R. C., & Shiffrin , R. M. (1968). Human memory ...interrepetition interval is too long, excessive forgetting occurs between repetitions and learning suffers ( Atkinson & Shiffrin , 1968). Unfortunately, the...the more stringent memory retrieval requirements of a recall test. 12. Questions should be asked within the context of the training materials to

  1. Procedural learning, consolidation, and transfer of a new skill in Developmental Coordination Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Caroline; Wansard, Murielle; Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the differences in procedural learning abilities between children with DCD and typically developing children by investigating the steps that lead to skill automatization (i.e., the stages of fast learning, consolidation, and slow learning). Transfer of the skill to a new situation was also assessed. We tested 34 children aged 6-12 years with and without DCD on a perceptuomotor adaptation task, a form of procedural learning that is thought to involve the cerebellum and the basal ganglia (regions whose impairment has been associated with DCD) but also other brain areas including frontal regions. The results showed similar rates of learning, consolidation, and transfer in DCD and control children. However, the DCD children's performance remained slower than that of controls throughout the procedural task and they reached a lower asymptotic performance level; the difficulties observed at the outset did not diminish with practice.

  2. Learning and cognitive fatigue trajectories in multiple sclerosis defined using a burst measurement design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzer, Roee; Foley, Frederick; D'Orio, Vanessa; Spat, Jessica; Shuman, Melissa; Wang, Cuiling

    2013-10-01

    Compromised learning and cognitive fatigue are critical clinical features in multiple sclerosis. This study was designed to determine the effect of repeated exposures within and across study visits on performance measures of learning and cognitive fatigue in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Thirty patients with RRMS and 30 controls were recruited. Using a burst measurement design (i.e. repeated assessments within and across study visits) the oral version of the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) was administered three times during the baseline and two consecutive monthly follow-up visits for a total of nine test administrations. Learning was assessed within and across study visits whereas cognitive fatigue was assessed during the course of each test administration that was divided into three 30-second intervals. Linear mixed-effect models revealed compromised learning within (95% CI: 2.6355 to 3.9867) and across (95% CI: 1.3250 to 3.1861) visits and worse cognitive fatigue (95% CI: -2.1761 to -0.1720) in patients with RRMS compared with controls. Among patients with RRMS, worse self-rated cognitive dysfunction predicted poor learning within (95% CI: -0.1112 to -0.0020) and across (95% CI: -0.0724 to -0.0106) visits. Burst design is optimal to study learning and cognitive fatigue. This methodology, using the SDMT or other time-efficient tests as outcome measures, can be successfully implemented in longitudinal studies and clinical trials.

  3. Channel Decision in Cognitive Radio Enabled Sensor Networks: A Reinforcement Learning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Abolarinwa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in the field of cognitive radio technology have paved way for cognitive radio-based wireless sensor networks. This has been tipped to be the next generation sensor. Spectrum sensing and energy efficient channel access are two important operations in this network. In this paper, we propose the use of machine learning and decision making capability of reinforcement learning to address the problem of energy efficiency associated with channel access in cognitive radio aided sensor networks. A simple learning algorithm was developed to improve network parameters such as secondary user throughput, channel availability in relation to the sensing time. Comparing the results obtained from simulations with other channel access without intelligent learning such as random channel assignment and dynamic channel assignment, the learning algorithm produced better performance in terms of throughput, energy efficiency and other quality of service requirement of the network application.

  4. Developmental disorders: what can be learned from cognitive neuropsychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Anne; Kohnen, Saskia; Nickels, Lyndsey; Brock, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The discipline of cognitive neuropsychology has been important for informing theories of cognition and describing the nature of acquired cognitive disorders, but its applicability in a developmental context has been questioned. Here, we revisit this issue, asking whether the cognitive neuropsychological approach can be helpful for exploring the nature and causes of developmental disorders and, if so, how. We outline the key features of the cognitive neuropsychological approach, and then consider how some of the major challenges to this approach from a developmental perspective might be met. In doing so, we distinguish between challenges to the methods of cognitive neuropsychology and those facing its deeper conceptual underpinnings. We conclude that the detailed investigation of patterns of both associations and dissociations, and across both developmental and acquired cases, can assist in describing the cognitive deficits within developmental disorders and in delineating possible causal pathways to their acquisition.

  5. Between Deep and Surface: Procedural Approaches to Learning in Engineering Education Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jennifer; Marshall, Delia

    2004-01-01

    This article describes two approaches to learning (in addition to the classic deep and surface approaches) identified in studies of student learning in engineering contexts. The first study identified the 'procedural deep' approach in a group of engineering foundation programme students in the UK, while the second study identified the 'procedural…

  6. Learning strategies and general cognitive ability as predictors of gender- specific academic achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eRuffing

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has revealed that learning behavior is associated with academic achievement at the college level, but the impact of specific learning strategies on academic success as well as gender differences therein are still not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the incremental contribution of learning strategies over general cognitive ability in the prediction of academic achievement. The relationship between these variables was examined by correlation analyses. A set of t-tests was used to test for gender differences in learning strategies, whereas structural equation modelling as well as multi-group analyses were applied to investigate the incremental contribution of learning strategies for male and female students’ academic performance. The sample consisted of 461 students (mean age=21.2 years, SD=3.2. Correlation analyses revealed that general cognitive ability as well as the learning strategies effort, attention, and learning environment were positively correlated with academic achievement. Gender differences were found in the reported application of many learning strategies. Importantly, the prediction of achievement in structural equation modeling revealed that only effort explained incremental variance (10% over general cognitive ability. Results of multi-group analyses showed no gender differences in this prediction model. This finding provides further knowledge regarding gender differences in learning research and the specific role of learning strategies for academic achievement. The incremental assessment of learning strategy use as well as gender-differences in their predictive value contributes to the understanding and improvement of successful academic development.

  7. Learning strategies and general cognitive ability as predictors of gender- specific academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffing, Stephanie; Wach, F-Sophie; Spinath, Frank M; Brünken, Roland; Karbach, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that learning behavior is associated with academic achievement at the college level, but the impact of specific learning strategies on academic success as well as gender differences therein are still not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the incremental contribution of learning strategies over general cognitive ability in the prediction of academic achievement. The relationship between these variables was examined by correlation analyses. A set of t-tests was used to test for gender differences in learning strategies, whereas structural equation modeling as well as multi-group analyses were applied to investigate the incremental contribution of learning strategies for male and female students' academic performance. The sample consisted of 461 students (mean age = 21.2 years, SD = 3.2). Correlation analyses revealed that general cognitive ability as well as the learning strategies effort, attention, and learning environment were positively correlated with academic achievement. Gender differences were found in the reported application of many learning strategies. Importantly, the prediction of achievement in structural equation modeling revealed that only effort explained incremental variance (10%) over general cognitive ability. Results of multi-group analyses showed no gender differences in this prediction model. This finding provides further knowledge regarding gender differences in learning research and the specific role of learning strategies for academic achievement. The incremental assessment of learning strategy use as well as gender-differences in their predictive value contributes to the understanding and improvement of successful academic development.

  8. Examining the Utility of the Stimulus Pairing Observation Procedure with Preschool Children Learning a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Huffman, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a stimulus pairing observation procedure to facilitate tact and listener relations in preschool children learning a second language. This procedure resulted in the establishment of most listener relations as well as some tact relations. Multiple-exemplar training resulted in the establishment of most of the…

  9. Social Learning Theory: Toward a Unified Approach of Pediatric Procedural Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Lynn Olson; Blanchette, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Undermanaged procedural pain has been shown to have short and long term effects on children. While significant progress regarding empirically supported treatments has been made, theoretical bases for the development and management of procedural pain are lacking. This paper examines the role of social learning theory in our current understanding of…

  10. Estilos de pensamiento Cognitive styles: an approach to autonomous learning in L2 adult students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atehortúa Atehortúa José Nicolás

    2010-01-01

    a foreign language. This study was theoretically supported by concepts such as cognitive styles, metacognitive strategies, aptitude in learning, as well as autonomy and responsibility. The instruments used in the data collection procedures were first a test on cognitive styles, second, a semi structured questionnaire on decision making process, self description as learners, student´s perceptions on the teacher´s role, including the use of metacognitive strategies, third, an open interview aiming at measuring the impact of being aware of learning a foreign language from the perspective of cognitive styles. Results showed students’ inner expectations to recognize human abilities, the need to acquire strategic competence, the real need to openly participate in planning of goals and objectives, self assessment on formative learning process, as well as turning to be autonomous centered learners, rather that task oriented students.

  11. Modelling Human Cognitive Development with Explanation-Based Learning in Soar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-02

    of Pittsburgh BEST AVAILABLE COPY AXpprovedI for public rleaw4: distributimi unintilieu. 90 Z:L 0 Q3 7 MODELLING HUMAN COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT WITH...NO. No. ACCESSION NO N/A N/A N/A N/A I I TITLE (*XcA* SecsaiY O7fiCatl) Modelling human cognitive development with explanation-bsed learning in Soar...P I cognitive development Soar I I I j~n--qq~ learning 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if noeessary and identy by block -number) SEE REVERSE SIDE 20

  12. Cognitive Task Analysis of Experts in Designing Multimedia Learning Object Guideline (M-LOG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Palanisamy, Punithavathy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and develop a set of guidelines for multimedia learning objects to inform instructional designers (IDs) about the procedures involved in the process of content analysis. This study was motivated by the absence of standardized procedures in the beginning phase of the multimedia learning object design which is…

  13. Effect of Cognitive Style on Learning and Retrieval of Navigational Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Vecchione, Francesca; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Field independence (FI) has been found to correlate with a wide range of cognitive processes requiring cognitive restructuring. Cognitive restructuring, that is going beyond the information given by the setting, is pivotal in creating stable mental representations of the environment, the so-called "cognitive maps," and it affects visuo-spatial abilities underpinning environmental navigation. Here we evaluated whether FI, by fostering cognitive restructuring of environmental cues on the basis of an internal frame of reference, affects the learning and retrieval of a novel environment. Fifty-four participants were submitted to the Embedded Figure Test (EFT) for assessing their Cognitive Style (CS) and to the Perspective Taking/Spatial Orientation Test (PTSOT) and the Santa Barbara Sense of Direction Scale (SBSOD) for assessing their spatial perspective taking and orientation skills. They were also required to learn a path in a novel, real environment (route learning, RL), to recognize landmarks of this path among distracters (landmark recognition, LR), to order them (landmark ordering, LO) and to draw the learned path on a map (map drawing, MD). Retrieval tasks were performed both immediately after learning (immediate-retrieval) and the day after (24 h-retrieval). Performances on EFT significantly correlated with the time needed to learn the path, with MD (both in the immediate- and in the 24 h- retrievals), results on LR (in 24-retrieval) and performances on PTSOT. Interestingly, we found that gender interacted with CS on RL (time of learning) and MD. Females performed significantly worse than males only if they were classified as FD, but did not differ from males if they were classified as FI. These results suggest that CS affects learning and retrieval of navigational environment, especially when a map-like representation is required. We propose that CS may be pivotal in forming the cognitive map of the environment, likely due to the higher ability of FI

  14. EXAMINING THE UTILITY OF THE STIMULUS PAIRING OBSERVATION PROCEDURE WITH PRESCHOOL CHILDREN LEARNING A SECOND LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Huffman, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a stimulus pairing observation procedure to facilitate tact and listener relations in preschool children learning a second language. This procedure resulted in the establishment of most listener relations as well as some tact relations. Multiple-exemplar training resulted in the establishment of most of the remaining relations. The implications for the use of these procedures to establish simple vocabulary skills in children are discussed.

  15. Examining the utility of the stimulus pairing observation procedure with preschool children learning a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Rocio; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Huffman, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a stimulus pairing observation procedure to facilitate tact and listener relations in preschool children learning a second language. This procedure resulted in the establishment of most listener relations as well as some tact relations. Multiple-exemplar training resulted in the establishment of most of the remaining relations. The implications for the use of these procedures to establish simple vocabulary skills in children are discussed.

  16. An efficient learning procedure for deep Boltzmann machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2012-08-01

    We present a new learning algorithm for Boltzmann machines that contain many layers of hidden variables. Data-dependent statistics are estimated using a variational approximation that tends to focus on a single mode, and data-independent statistics are estimated using persistent Markov chains. The use of two quite different techniques for estimating the two types of statistic that enter into the gradient of the log likelihood makes it practical to learn Boltzmann machines with multiple hidden layers and millions of parameters. The learning can be made more efficient by using a layer-by-layer pretraining phase that initializes the weights sensibly. The pretraining also allows the variational inference to be initialized sensibly with a single bottom-up pass. We present results on the MNIST and NORB data sets showing that deep Boltzmann machines learn very good generative models of handwritten digits and 3D objects. We also show that the features discovered by deep Boltzmann machines are a very effective way to initialize the hidden layers of feedforward neural nets, which are then discriminatively fine-tuned.

  17. Teaching APA Style Documentation: Discovery Learning, Scaffolding and Procedural Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeen, Thomas; Zafonte, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Students struggle with learning correct documentation style as found in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and teachers are often at a loss for how to best instruct students in correct usage of APA style. As such, the first part of this paper discusses the current research on teaching documentation styles as well as…

  18. The AI&M procedure for learning from incomplete data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    We investigate methods for parameter learning from incomplete data that is not missing at random. Likelihood-based methods then require the optimization of a profile likelihood that takes all possible missingness mechanisms into account. Optimizing this profile likelihood poses two main difficult...

  19. Cognitive ability predicts motor learning on a virtual reality game in patients with TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Rochelle L; Skeel, Reid L; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality games and simulations have been utilized successfully for motor rehabilitation of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Little is known, however, how TBI-related cognitive decline affects learning of motor tasks in virtual environments. To fill this gap, we examined learning within a virtual reality game involving various reaching motions in 14 patients with TBI and 15 healthy individuals with different cognitive abilities. All participants practiced ten 90-second gaming trials to assess various aspects of motor learning. Cognitive abilities were assessed with a battery of tests including measures of memory, executive functioning, and visuospatial ability. Overall, participants with TBI showed both reduced performance and a slower learning rate in the virtual reality game compared to healthy individuals. Numerous correlations between overall performance and several of the cognitive ability domains were revealed for both the patient and control groups, with the best predictor being overall cognitive ability. The results may provide a starting point for rehabilitation programs regarding which cognitive domains interact with motor learning.

  20. How Cognitive Styles Affect the Learning Behaviors of Online Problem-Solving Based Discussion Activity: A Lag Sequential Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Hou, Huei-Tse

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive styles play an important role in influencing the learning process, but to date no relevant study has been conducted using lag sequential analysis to assess knowledge construction learning patterns based on different cognitive styles in computer-supported collaborative learning activities in online collaborative discussions. This study…

  1. Rethinking College Students' Self-Regulation and Sustained Attention: Does Text Messaging during Class Influence Cognitive Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang-Yi Flora; Wang, Y. Ken; Klausner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether texting during class influences students' cognitive learning. A theoretical model was proposed to study the relationships among college students' self-regulation, texting during class, sustained attention to classroom learning, and cognitive learning (i.e., grade-oriented academic performance and experience-oriented…

  2. A study of historical preservation learning based on cognitive development theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, K. H.; Yen, Y. N.; Wu, Y. W.

    2015-08-01

    The study is to explore how the youth forum activities help the participants establish their concept of property conservation and cognitive development by means of scaffolding instruction. First, the research begins by raising the issues of asset preservation with the establishment of the concept of field; the issues are the content of the scaffolding learning forum. Second, this study uses content analysis to explore the cognitive development and learning performance of the participants during the interactive process. The results show that interactive learning activities can effectively promote all the participants' cognitive development, on which different backgrounds have little influence. The participants' cognitive development is mostly concentrated in the application and analysis phase. The results can be used as a reference for future research.

  3. Self-regulated learning in female students with different cognitive styles: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinajero, Carolina; Castelo, Alba M; Adelina Guisande, M; Fernanda Páramo, M

    2010-08-01

    In the present study, the relationship between the cognitive style called field-dependence/independence and learning strategies was explored. Acquisition, encoding, retrieval, support, and meta-cognitive strategies of first-year psychology and social education students (all women; M age = 19.2 yr., SD=1.7) with upper and lower quartile scores on field-dependence/independence were assessed on two self-report questionnaires and compared. Field-dependent students reported greater use of some learning strategies, specifically Self-instructions, Counter-distractions, Self-questioning, Self-monitoring, and Self-evaluation. The possible mediation of cognitive style on the influence of social desirability and a failure to activate appropriate strategies on accuracy of self-reports of learning strategies are discussed. Arguments and data are presented in favour of a distinction among the association of cognitive style with a tendency and capacity to use specific strategies and the benefits and manner of their application.

  4. The Testing Effect for Learning Principles and Procedures from Texts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored whether a testing effect occurs not only for retention of facts but also for application of principles and procedures. For that purpose, 38 high school students either repeatedly studied a text on probability calculations or studied the text, took a test on the content, restudie

  5. An examination of the dimensionalities and common constructs of selected adult cognitive learning style instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    1995-01-01

    Though a widespread advocacy exists for the use of learning style instruments in adult education, accurate measurement and interpretation using existing instrumentation have proven problematic. Additionally, relatively little attempt has been made to empirically reconcile the different theoretical and conceptual frameworks underlying these instruments. The purpose of this study was to examine the dimensionality, reliability, and construct validity of a cognitive learning ...

  6. Toward a synthesis between cognitive load theory and self-directed learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.G. van Merriënboer; Dominique Sluijsmans

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the opportunities to apply cognitive load theory and four-component instructional design to self-directed learning. Learning tasks are defined as containing three elements: learners must (a) perform the tasks, (b) assess their task performance, and (c) select future tasks for

  7. When, What, and How Much to Reward in Reinforcement Learning-Based Models of Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Christian P.; Gray, Wayne D.

    Reinforcement learning approaches to cognitive modeling represent task acquisition as learning to choose the sequence of steps that accomplishes the task while maximizing a reward. However, an apparently unrecognized problem for modelers is choosing when, what, and how much to reward; that is, when

  8. Can Functional Brain Imaging Be Used to Explore Interactivity and Cognition in Multimedia Learning Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Barney; Kennedy, Gregor; Bennett, Sue

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews existing methods used to address questions about interactivity, cognition and learning in multimedia learning environments. Existing behavioural and self-report methods identified include observations, audit trails, questionnaires, interviews, video-stimulated recall, and think-aloud protocols. The limitations of these methods…

  9. Brain 3M--A New Approach to Learning about Brain, Behavior, and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Chaby, Lauren E.; Legault, Jennifer; Braithwaite, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    By combining emerging technologies with cognitive and education theories, we are capitalizing on recent findings from adaptive exploration and embodied learning research to address significant gaps in the education of brain sciences for school children and college level students. Through the development of virtual learning tools in combination…

  10. Bridging the Gap: Cognitive and Social Approaches to Research in Second Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulstijn, Jan H.; Young, Richard F.; Ortega, Lourdes; Bigelow, Martha; DeKeyser, Robert; Ellis, Nick C.; Lantolf, James P.; Mackey, Alison; Talmy, Steven

    2014-01-01

    For some, research in learning and teaching of a second language (L2) runs the risk of disintegrating into irreconcilable approaches to L2 learning and use. On the one side, we find researchers investigating linguistic-cognitive issues, often using quantitative research methods including inferential statistics; on the other side, we find…

  11. When, What, and How Much to Reward in Reinforcement Learning-Based Models of Cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Christian P.; Gray, Wayne D.

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement learning approaches to cognitive modeling represent task acquisition as learning to choose the sequence of steps that accomplishes the task while maximizing a reward. However, an apparently unrecognized problem for modelers is choosing when, what, and how much to reward; that is, when

  12. A Systematic Characterization of Cognitive Techniques for Learning from Textual and Pictorial Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetzner, Rolf; Lowe, Richard; Schlag, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Pictorial representations can play a pivotal role in both printed and digital learning material. Although there has been extensive research on cognitive techniques and strategies for learning from text, the same cannot be said for static and dynamic pictorial representations. In this paper we propose a systematic characterization of cognitive…

  13. Experiential learning and cognitive tools: The impact of simulations on conceptual change in continuing healthcare education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeves, Thomas; Reeves, Patricia; McKenney, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Reeves, T. C., Reeves, P. M., & McKenney, S. (2013). Experiential learning and cognitive tools: The impact of simulations on conceptual change in continuing healthcare education. In J. M. Spector, B. B. Lockee, S. E. Smaldino, & M. Herring (eds.), Learning, problem solving, and mindtools: Essays in

  14. From Neurons to Brainpower: Cognitive Neuroscience and Brain-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janet M.

    2005-01-01

    We have learned more about the brain in the past five years than the previous 100. Neuroimaging, lesion studies, and animal studies have revealed the intricate inner workings of the brain and learning. Synaptogenesis, pruning, sensitive periods, and plasticity have all become accepted concepts of cognitive neuroscience that are now being applied…

  15. Strategic Learning in Youth with Traumatic Brain Injury: Evidence for Stall in Higher-Order Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamino, Jacquelyn F.; Chapman, Sandra B.; Cook, Lori G.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about strategic learning ability in preteens and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Strategic learning is the ability to combine and synthesize details to form abstracted gist-based meanings, a higher-order cognitive skill associated with frontal lobe functions and higher classroom performance. Summarization tasks were…

  16. Deep Unsupervised Learning on a Desktop PC: A Primer for Cognitive Scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin; De Filippo De Grazia, Michele; Zorzi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Deep belief networks hold great promise for the simulation of human cognition because they show how structured and abstract representations may emerge from probabilistic unsupervised learning. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. However, learning in deep networks typically requires big datasets and it can involve millions of connection weights, which implies that simulations on standard computers are unfeasible. Developing realistic, medium-to-large-scale learning models of cognition would therefore seem to require expertise in programing parallel-computing hardware, and this might explain why the use of this promising approach is still largely confined to the machine learning community. Here we show how simulations of deep unsupervised learning can be easily performed on a desktop PC by exploiting the processors of low cost graphic cards (graphic processor units) without any specific programing effort, thanks to the use of high-level programming routines (available in MATLAB or Python). We also show that even an entry-level graphic card can outperform a small high-performance computing cluster in terms of learning time and with no loss of learning quality. We therefore conclude that graphic card implementations pave the way for a widespread use of deep learning among cognitive scientists for modeling cognition and behavior.

  17. Bridging the Gap: Cognitive and Social Approaches to Research in Second Language Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulstijn, Jan H.; Young, Richard F.; Ortega, Lourdes; Bigelow, Martha; DeKeyser, Robert; Ellis, Nick C.; Lantolf, James P.; Mackey, Alison; Talmy, Steven

    2014-01-01

    For some, research in learning and teaching of a second language (L2) runs the risk of disintegrating into irreconcilable approaches to L2 learning and use. On the one side, we find researchers investigating linguistic-cognitive issues, often using quantitative research methods including inferential statistics; on the other side, we find…

  18. When, What, and How Much to Reward in Reinforcement Learning-Based Models of Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Christian P.; Gray, Wayne D.

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement learning approaches to cognitive modeling represent task acquisition as learning to choose the sequence of steps that accomplishes the task while maximizing a reward. However, an apparently unrecognized problem for modelers is choosing when, what, and how much to reward; that is, when (the moment: end of trial, subtask, or some other…

  19. Cognitively Demanding Learning Materials with Texts and Instructional Pictures: Teachers' Diagnostic Skills, Pedagogical Beliefs and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElvany, Nele; Schroeder, Sascha; Baumert, Jurgen; Schnotz, Wolfgang; Horz, Holger; Ullrich, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Learning materials incorporating written texts as well as instructional pictures are the basis for learning in many subjects. However, text-picture integration makes high cognitive demands of learners, and it seems plausible that the development of this competence is influenced by teachers' instructional skills. The present studies investigated…

  20. Experiential learning and cognitive tools: The impact of simulations on conceptual change in continuing healthcare education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeves, Thomas; Reeves, Patricia; McKenney, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Reeves, T. C., Reeves, P. M., & McKenney, S. (2013). Experiential learning and cognitive tools: The impact of simulations on conceptual change in continuing healthcare education. In J. M. Spector, B. B. Lockee, S. E. Smaldino, & M. Herring (eds.), Learning, problem solving, and mindtools: Essays in

  1. Deep unsupervised learning on a desktop PC: A primer for cognitive scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eTestolin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep belief networks hold great promise for the simulation of human cognition because they show how structured and abstract representations may emerge from probabilistic unsupervised learning. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. However, learning in deep networks typically requires big datasets and it can involve millions of connection weights, which implies that simulations on standard computers are unfeasible. Developing realistic, medium-to-large-scale learning models of cognition would therefore seem to require expertise in programming parallel-computing hardware, and this might explain why the use of this promising approach is still largely confined to the machine learning community. Here we show how simulations of deep unsupervised learning can be easily performed on a desktop PC by exploiting the processors of low-cost graphic cards (GPUs without any specific programming effort, thanks to the use of high-level programming routines (available in MATLAB or Python. We also show that even an entry-level graphic card can outperform a small high-performance computing cluster in terms of learning time and with no loss of learning quality. We therefore conclude that graphic card implementations pave the way for a widespread use of deep learning among cognitive scientists for modeling cognition and behavior.

  2. Evaluating the relationship between white matter integrity, cognition, and varieties of video game learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Nicholas R; O'Connell, Margaret A; Nashiro, Kaoru; Smith, Evan T; Qin, Shuo; Basak, Chandramallika

    2017-01-01

    Many studies are currently researching the effects of video games, particularly in the domain of cognitive training. Great variability exists among video games however, and few studies have attempted to compare different types of video games. Little is known, for instance, about the cognitive processes or brain structures that underlie learning of different genres of video games. To examine the cognitive and neural underpinnings of two different types of game learning in order to evaluate their common and separate correlates, with the hopes of informing future intervention research. Participants (31 younger adults and 31 older adults) completed an extensive cognitive battery and played two different genres of video games, one action game and one strategy game, for 1.5 hours each. DTI scans were acquired for each participant, and regional fractional anisotropy (FA) values were extracted using the JHU atlas. Behavioral results indicated that better performance on tasks of working memory and perceptual discrimination was related to enhanced learning in both games, even after controlling for age, whereas better performance on a perceptual speed task was uniquely related with enhanced learning of the strategy game. DTI results indicated that white matter FA in the right fornix/stria terminalis was correlated with action game learning, whereas white matter FA in the left cingulum/hippocampus was correlated with strategy game learning, even after controlling for age. Although cognition, to a large extent, was a common predictor of both types of game learning, regional white matter FA could separately predict action and strategy game learning. Given the neural and cognitive correlates of strategy game learning, strategy games may provide a more beneficial training tool for adults suffering from memory-related disorders or declines in processing speed, particularly older adults.

  3. Changes in cerebello-motor connectivity during procedural learning by actual execution and observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Lo Gerfo, Emanuele; Salerno, Silvia; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2011-02-01

    The cerebellum is involved in motor learning of new procedures both during actual execution of a motor task and during observational training. These processes are thought to depend on the activity of a neural network that involves the lateral cerebellum and primary motor cortex (M1). In this study, we used a twin-coil TMS technique to investigate whether execution and observation of a visuomotor procedural learning task is related to modulation of cerebello-motor connectivity. We observed that, at rest, a magnetic conditioning pulse applied over the lateral cerebellum reduced the motor-evoked potentials obtained by stimulating the contralateral M1, indicating activation of a cerebello-motor connection. Furthermore, during procedural learning, cerebellar stimulation resulted in selective facilitation, not inhibition, of contralateral M1 excitability. The effects were evident when motor learning was obtained by actual execution of the task or by observation, but they disappeared if procedural learning had already been acquired by previous observational training. These results indicate that changes in cerebello-motor connectivity occur in relation to specific phases of procedural learning, demonstrating a complex pattern of excitatory and inhibitory drives modulated across time.

  4. Learning and cognitive styles in web-based learning: theory, evidence, and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A

    2005-03-01

    Cognitive and learning styles (CLS) have long been investigated as a basis to adapt instruction and enhance learning. Web-based learning (WBL) can reach large, heterogenous audiences, and adaptation to CLS may increase its effectiveness. Adaptation is only useful if some learners (with a defined trait) do better with one method and other learners (with a complementary trait) do better with another method (aptitude-treatment interaction). A comprehensive search of health professions education literature found 12 articles on CLS in computer-assisted learning and WBL. Because so few reports were found, research from non-medical education was also included. Among all the reports, four CLS predominated. Each CLS construct was used to predict relationships between CLS and WBL. Evidence was then reviewed to support or refute these predictions. The wholist-analytic construct shows consistent aptitude-treatment interactions consonant with predictions (wholists need structure, a broad-before-deep approach, and social interaction, while analytics need less structure and a deep-before-broad approach). Limited evidence for the active-reflective construct suggests aptitude-treatment interaction, with active learners doing better with interactive learning and reflective learners doing better with methods to promote reflection. As predicted, no consistent interaction between the concrete-abstract construct and computer format was found, but one study suggests that there is interaction with instructional method. Contrary to predictions, no interaction was found for the verbal-imager construct. Teachers developing WBL activities should consider assessing and adapting to accommodate learners defined by the wholist-analytic and active-reflective constructs. Other adaptations should be considered experimental. Further WBL research could clarify the feasibility and effectiveness of assessing and adapting to CLS.

  5. The relationship between nonverbal immediacy, student motivation, and perceived cognitive learning among Japanese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribyl, CHARLES B.; Sakamoto, MASAHIRO; Keaten, JAMES A.

    2004-05-01

    Research in the United States has found a strong and consistent relationship between teacher behavior and learning. Data collected from American college students indicate that perceptions of teacher nonverbal immediacy (NVI) are associated with students' feelings toward learning and perceptions of cognitive learning. The purposes of this study were to accomplish the following: (1) develop standardized Japanese versions of the instruments used to measure teacher nonverbal immediacy, student motivation, and perceived cognitive learning (how much students think they have learned); and (2) assess the relationship between NVI, student motivation, and perceptions of cognitive learning among Japanese college students. Results note that Japanese students report (1) a positive relationship between reported levels of teacher NVI and student motivation; (2) a negative relationship between reported levels of teacher NVI and perceived learning loss; and (3) a negative relationship between student motivation (SM) and perceived learning loss (how much students think they did not learn with their teacher compared to an ideal teacher). Further, cross-cultural comparisons between Japanese and American students were conducted. Results from the cross-cultural comparison suggest that the relationships between reported teacher nonverbal immediacy, student motivation, and learning loss among Japanese college students are similar to those found among American college students, but the dimensional structure of the questionnaires was different.

  6. Driving to learn in a powered wheelchair: the process of learning joystick use in people with profound cognitive disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Lisbeth; Eklund, Mona; Nyberg, Per; Thulesius, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The Driving to Learn project explored ways to help people with profound cognitive disabilities practice operating a joystick-operated powered wheelchair. The project used a grounded theory approach with constant comparative analysis and was carried out over 12 yr. The participants were 45 children and adults with profound cognitive disabilities. Reference groups included 17 typically developing infants and 64 participants with lesser degrees of cognitive disability. The data sources included video recordings, field notes, open interviews, and a rich mixture of literature. The findings that emerged yielded strategies for facilitating achievements, an 8-phase learning process, an assessment tool, and a grounded theory of deplateauing explaining the properties necessary for participants to exceed expected limitations and plateaus. Eight participants with profound cognitive disabilities reached goal-directed driving or higher. Participants were empowered by attaining increased control over tool use, improving their autonomy and quality of life.

  7. The Effectiveness of Group Training of Procedural Emotion Regulation Strategies in Cognitive Coping of Individuals Suffering Substance Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali ghaedniay jahromi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of group training of procedural emotion regulation strategies in cognitive coping of individuals suffering substance abuse. Method: A quasi-experimental design along with pretest-posttest and control group was used for this study. Then, 16 patients suffering substance abuse were selected through convenience sampling and were randomly assigned to two control and experimental groups. The experimental group received 10 sessions of group training of procedural emotion regulation strategies while the control group received no treatment. Both groups before and after the treatment completed the Persian version of cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire (Hasani, 2011. Results: The results showed that group training of e procedural motion regulation strategies leads to a reduction in maladaptive strategies such as self-blame, rumination, catastrophizing, and other-blame and an increase in adaptive strategies such as refocus on planning, positive reappraisal, and perspective development. Conclusion: Training of procedural emotion regulation strategies via the reduction of maladaptive and increase of adaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies can provide the opportunity for the improvement and non-return to substance abuse.

  8. Meta-cognitive online sequential extreme learning machine for imbalanced and concept-drifting data classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Bilal; Lin, Zhiping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a meta-cognitive online sequential extreme learning machine (MOS-ELM) is proposed for class imbalance and concept drift learning. In MOS-ELM, meta-cognition is used to self-regulate the learning by selecting suitable learning strategies for class imbalance and concept drift problems. MOS-ELM is the first sequential learning method to alleviate the imbalance problem for both binary class and multi-class data streams with concept drift. In MOS-ELM, a new adaptive window approach is proposed for concept drift learning. A single output update equation is also proposed which unifies various application specific OS-ELM methods. The performance of MOS-ELM is evaluated under different conditions and compared with methods each specific to some of the conditions. On most of the datasets in comparison, MOS-ELM outperforms the competing methods.

  9. The impact of social context on learning and cognitive demands for interactive virtual human simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Lyons

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Interactive virtual human (IVH simulations offer a novel method for training skills involving person-to-person interactions. This article examines the effectiveness of an IVH simulation for teaching medical students to assess rare cranial nerve abnormalities in both individual and small-group learning contexts. Individual (n = 26 and small-group (n = 30 interaction with the IVH system was manipulated to examine the influence on learning, learner engagement, perceived cognitive demands of the learning task, and instructional efficiency. Results suggested the IVH activity was an equally effective and engaging instructional tool in both learning structures, despite learners in the group learning contexts having to share hands-on access to the simulation interface. Participants in both conditions demonstrated a significant increase in declarative knowledge post-training. Operation of the IVH simulation technology imposed moderate cognitive demand but did not exceed the demands of the task content or appear to impede learning.

  10. From cognitive capability to social reform? Shifting perceptions of learning in immersive virtual worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggi Savin-Baden

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning in immersive virtual worlds (simulations and virtual worlds such as Second Life could become a central learning approach in many curricula, but the socio-political impact of virtual world learning on higher education remains under-researched. Much of the recent research into learning in immersive virtual worlds centres around games and gaming and is largely underpinned by cognitive learning theories that focus on linearity, problem-solving and the importance of attaining the ‘right answer' or game plan. Most research to date has been undertaken into students' experiences of virtual learning environments, discussion forums and perspectives about what and how online learning has been implemented. This article reviews the literature relating to learning in immersive virtual worlds, and suggests that there needs to be a reconsideration of what ‘learning' means in such spaces.

  11. Stroop-like effects in a new-code learning task: A cognitive load theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan-Liran, Batel; Miller, Paul

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether and how learning is biased by competing task-irrelevant information that creates extraneous cognitive load, we assessed the efficiency of university students with a learning paradigm in two experiments. The paradigm asked participants to learn associations between eight words and eight digits. We manipulated congruity of the digits' ink colour with the words' semantics. In Experiment 1 word stimuli were colour words (e.g., blue, yellow) and in Experiment 2 colour-related word concepts (e.g., sky, banana). Marked benefits and costs on learning due to variation in extraneous cognitive load originating from processing task-irrelevant information were evident. Implications for cognitive load theory and schooling are discussed.

  12. A Framework for Re-thinking Learning in Science from Recent Cognitive Science Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytler, Russell; Prain, Vaughan

    2010-10-01

    Recent accounts by cognitive scientists of factors affecting cognition imply the need to reconsider current dominant conceptual theories about science learning. These new accounts emphasize the role of context, embodied practices, and narrative-based representation rather than learners' cognitive constructs. In this paper we analyse data from a longitudinal study of primary school children's learning to outline a framework based on these contemporary accounts and to delineate key points of difference from conceptual change perspectives. The findings suggest this framework provides strong theoretical and practical insights into how children learn and the key role of representational negotiation in this learning. We argue that the nature and process of conceptual change can be re-interpreted in terms of the development of students' representational resources.

  13. The time course and characteristics of procedural learning in schizophrenia patients and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eAdini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia have deficits in some types of procedural learning. Several mechanisms contribute to this learning in healthy individuals, including statistical and sequence-learning. To find preserved and impaired learning mechanisms in schizophrenia, we studied the time course and characteristics of implicitly-introduced sequence-learning (SRT task in 15 schizophrenia patients (7 mild and 8 severe and 9 healthy controls, in short sessions over multiple days (5-22. The data show speed gains of similar magnitude for all groups, but the groups differed in overall speed and in the characteristics of the learning. By analyzing the data according to its spatial-position and temporal-order components, we provide evidence for two types of learning that could differentiate the groups: while the learning of the slower, severe group was dominated by statistical learning, the control group moved from a fast learning phase of statistical-related performance to subsequence learning (chunking. Our findings oppose the naïve assumption that a similar gain of speed reflects a similar learning process; they indicate that the slower performance reflects the activation of a different motor plan than does the faster performance; and demonstrate that statistical learning and subsequence learning are two successive stages in implicit sequence learning, with chunks inferred from prior statistical computations. Our results indicate that statistical learning is intact in patients with schizophrenia, but is slower to develop in the severe patients. We suggest that this slow learning rate and the associated slow performance contribute to their deficit in developing sequence-specific learning by setting a temporal constraint on developing higher order associations.

  14. Precursors of Learning Experiences in Social Cognitive Career Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, David M.; Thompson, Mindi N.; Plaufcan, Melissa R.; Williams, Christine M.

    2007-01-01

    This study extended the research on Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; [Lent, R. W., Brown, S. D., & Hackett, G. (1994). Toward a unifying social cognitive theory of career and academic interest, choice, and performance. "Journal of Vocational Behavior," 45, 79-122]) by examining the contributions of 3 person inputs (personality, gender, and…

  15. Language Learning by Dint of Social Cognitive Advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Bincy; Raja, B. William Dharma

    2015-01-01

    Language is of vital importance to human beings. It is a means of communication and it has specific cognitive links. Advanced social cognition is necessary for children to acquire language, and sophisticated mind-reading abilities to assume word meanings and communicate pragmatically. Language can be defined as a bi-directional system that permits…

  16. Editorial: Digital systems supporting cognition and exploratory learning in 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrios G. Sampson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital systems and digital technologies are globally investigated for their potential to transform learning and teaching towards offering unique learning experiences to the 21st century learners. This Special Issue on Digital Systems supporting Cognition and Exploratory Learning in 21st Century aims to contribute to the dialogue between the educational technology and educational psychology research community and the educational practitioners on current issues towards large scale take-up of educational technology.

  17. Learning strategies and general cognitive ability as predictors of gender- specific academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie eRuffing; F.- Sophie eWach; Frank M. eSpinath; Roland eBrünken; Julia eKarbach

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that learning behavior is associated with academic achievement at the college level, but the impact of specific learning strategies on academic success as well as gender differences therein are still not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate gender differences in the incremental contribution of learning strategies over general cognitive ability in the prediction of academic achievement. The relationship between these variables was examined by ...

  18. Effects of Higher-order Cognitive Strategy Training on Gist Reasoning and Fact Learning in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn F Gamino

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving the reasoning skills of adolescents across the United States has become a major concern for educators and scientists who are dedicated to identifying evidence-based protocols to improve student outcome. This small sample randomized, control pilot study sought to determine the efficacy of higher-order cognitive training on gist-reasoning and fact-learning in an inner-city public middle school. The study compared gist-reasoning and fact-learning performances after training in a smaller sample when tested in Spanish, many of the students’ native language, versus English. The 54 eighth grade students who participated in this pilot study were enrolled in an urban middle school, predominantly from lower socio-economic status families, and were primarily of minority descent. The students were randomized into one of three groups, one that learned cognitive strategies promoting abstraction of meaning, a group that learned rote memory strategies, or a control group to ascertain the impact of each program on gist-reasoning and fact-learning from text-based information. We found that the students who had cognitive strategy instruction that entailed abstraction of meaning significantly improved their gist-reasoning and fact-learning ability. The students who learned rote memory strategies significantly improved their fact-learning scores from a text but not gist-reasoning ability. The control group showed no significant change in either gist-reasoning or fact-learning ability. A trend toward significant improvement in overall reading scores for the group that learned to abstract meaning as well as a significant correlation between gist-reasoning ability and the critical thinking on a state-mandated standardized reading test was also found. There were no significant differences between English and Spanish performance of gist reasoning and fact learning. Our findings suggest that teaching higher-order cognitive strategies facilitates gist

  19. Is the Latarjet procedure risky? Analysis of complications and learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauzère, Florence; Faraud, Amélie; Lebon, Julie; Faruch, Marie; Mansat, Pierre; Bonnevialle, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the learning curve and complication rate of the open Latarjet procedure. The first 68 Latarjet procedures performed by a single surgeon for chronic anterior shoulder instability were reviewed retrospectively. The standard open surgical technique was followed faithfully during each procedure. Post-operative complications were taken from patient medical records. Post-operative evaluation consisted of clinical and radiological assessments. The rate of early (Latarjet procedure remains low. A surgeon's experience significantly affects the surgery duration and the occurrence of early complications. The main radiological complication is partial lysis of the bone block. After a short learning curve, the clinical outcomes of the Latarjet procedure appear to be satisfactory and reproducible. IV.

  20. Using a learning needs assessment to identify knowledge deficits regarding procedural sedation for pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jest, Anne D; Tonge, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Procedural sedation is a cost-effective method of providing sedation and analgesia for patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Sedation ranges on a continuum from minimal sedation to deep sedation, so procedural sedation can pose many risks for patients (eg, compromised airway, depressed respirations, hypotension). The unique variables inherent in the pediatric population and the associated risks of procedural sedation make it imperative that RNs be knowledgeable and competent in monitoring and managing these patients. Through the use of a learning needs assessment, perioperative resource nurses at a pediatric hospital in a large, southeast metropolitan area identified practice concerns associated with staff RNs' management of pediatric patients undergoing procedural sedation. As a result of these findings, the perioperative resource nurses are in the process of implementing annual sedation competency skills testing in a special procedures laboratory for all nurses who participate in sedation procedures.

  1. Dopamine dependence in aggregate feedback learning: A computational cognitive neuroscience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Vivian V; Maddox, W Todd; Ashby, F Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Procedural learning of skills depends on dopamine-mediated striatal plasticity. Most prior work investigated single stimulus-response procedural learning followed by feedback. However, many skills include several actions that must be performed before feedback is available. A new procedural-learning task is developed in which three independent and successive unsupervised categorization responses receive aggregate feedback indicating either that all three responses were correct, or at least one response was incorrect. Experiment 1 showed superior learning of stimuli in position 3, and that learning in the first two positions was initially compromised, and then recovered. An extensive theoretical analysis that used parameter space partitioning found that a large class of procedural-learning models, which predict propagation of dopamine release from feedback to stimuli, and/or an eligibility trace, fail to fully account for these data. The analysis also suggested that any dopamine released to the second or third stimulus impaired categorization learning in the first and second positions. A second experiment tested and confirmed a novel prediction of this large class of procedural-learning models that if the to-be-learned actions are introduced one-by-one in succession then learning is much better if training begins with the first action (and works forwards) than if it begins with the last action (and works backwards).

  2. Making Sense of Crisis: Cognitive Barriers of Learning in Critical Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona PERGHEL

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role of cognitive issues in learning from crisis situations, in particular the managers’ mental representations of crisis and the relationship of these “maps” with the learning process through “sense-making”, as well as the possible cognitive barriers that might prevent the process of learning from crisis and thus allow the incubation of crises to develop in the company. Reviewing secondary data from the current literature, the paper focuses on the complexity of human “sense-making” and understanding the phenomena of crisis and the meaning people assign to it. Considerable attention and analysis has been done in order to assess the manner in which organizations can effectively learn to prevent crisis situations, addressing the theoretical frameworks that analyse the barriers that might occur in the learning from crisis process at an individual and group level, pointing out the need of recognition and sense-making that sometimes the current state of knowledge is not well. The paper argues that the effective organizational learning from crises requires changes in the core beliefs, values and assumptions of organizational members, which translate into sustained behavioural changes and that these changes are possible through intense cognitive processes, in particular through the way managers make sense of crisis situations.  Keywords: crisis, learning, cognitive barriers, sense-making, managers, literature review

  3. The Vienna comparative cognition technology (VCCT): an innovative operant conditioning system for various species and experimental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Michael Morten; Aust, Ulrike; Huber, Ludwig

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a laboratory system for running learning experiments in operant chambers with various species. It is based on a modern version of a classical learning chamber for operant conditioning, the so-called "Skinner box". Rather than constituting a stand-alone unit, as is usually the case, it is an integrated part of a comprehensive technical solution, thereby eliminating a number of practical problems that are frequently encountered in research on animal learning and behavior. The Vienna comparative cognition technology combines modern computer, stimulus presentation, and reinforcement technology with flexibility and user-friendliness, which allows for efficient, widely automatized across-species experimentation, and thus makes the system appropriate for use in a broad range of learning tasks.

  4. Cognitive apprenticeship in clinical practice: can it stimulate learning in the opinion of students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmeijer, Renée E; Dolmans, Diana H J M; Wolfhagen, Ineke H A P; Scherpbier, Albert J J A

    2009-10-01

    Learning in clinical practice can be characterised as situated learning because students learn by performing tasks and solving problems in an environment that reflects the multiple ways in which their knowledge will be put to use in their future professional practice. Collins et al. introduced cognitive apprenticeship as an instructional model for situated learning comprising six teaching methods to support learning: modelling, coaching, scaffolding, articulation, reflection and exploration. Another factor that is looked upon as conducive to learning in clinical practice is a positive learning climate. We explored students' experiences regarding the learning climate and whether the cognitive apprenticeship model fits students' experiences during clinical training. In focus group interviews, three groups of 6th-year medical students (N = 21) discussed vignettes representing the six teaching methods and the learning climate to explore the perceived occurrence of the teaching methods, related problems and possibilities for improvement. The students had experienced all six teaching methods during their clerkships. Modelling, coaching, and articulation were predominant, while scaffolding, reflection, and exploration were mainly experienced during longer clerkships and with one clinical teacher. The main problem was variability in usage of the methods, which was attributed to teachers' lack of time and formal training. The students proposed several ways to improve the application of the teaching methods. The results suggest that the cognitive apprenticeship model is a useful model for teaching strategies in undergraduate clinical training and a valuable basis for evaluation, feedback, self-assessment and faculty development of clinical teachers.

  5. Grammar Predicts Procedural Learning and Consolidation Deficits in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenius, Martina; Persson, Jonas; Tremblay, Antoine; Adi-Japha, Esther; Veríssimo, João; Dye, Cristina D.; Alm, Per; Jennische, Margareta; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Ullman, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    The Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH) posits that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) can be largely explained by abnormalities of brain structures that subserve procedural memory. The PDH predicts impairments of procedural memory itself, and that such impairments underlie the grammatical deficits observed in the disorder. Previous studies have indeed reported procedural learning impairments in SLI, and have found that these are associated with grammatical difficulties. The present study extends this research by examining the consolidation and longer-term procedural sequence learning in children with SLI. The Alternating Serial Reaction Time (ASRT) task was given to children with SLI and typically-developing (TD) children in an initial learning session and an average of three days later to test for consolidation and longer-term learning. Although both groups showed evidence of initial sequence learning, only the TD children showed clear signs of consolidation, even though the two groups did not differ in longer-term learning. When the children were re-categorized on the basis of grammar deficits rather than broader language deficits, a clearer pattern emerged. Whereas both the grammar impaired and normal grammar groups showed evidence of initial sequence learning, only those with normal grammar showed consolidation and longer-term learning. Indeed, the grammar-impaired group appeared to lose any sequence knowledge gained during the initial testing session. These findings held even when controlling for vocabulary or a broad non-grammatical language measure, neither of which were associated with procedural memory. When grammar was examined as a continuous variable over all children, the same relationships between procedural memory and grammar, but not vocabulary or the broader language measure, were observed. Overall, the findings support and further specify the PDH. They suggest that consolidation and longer-term procedural learning are impaired in SLI, but that

  6. Grammar predicts procedural learning and consolidation deficits in children with Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenius, Martina; Persson, Jonas; Tremblay, Antoine; Adi-Japha, Esther; Veríssimo, João; Dye, Cristina D; Alm, Per; Jennische, Margareta; Bruce Tomblin, J; Ullman, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    The Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (PDH) posits that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) can be largely explained by abnormalities of brain structures that subserve procedural memory. The PDH predicts impairments of procedural memory itself, and that such impairments underlie the grammatical deficits observed in the disorder. Previous studies have indeed reported procedural learning impairments in SLI, and have found that these are associated with grammatical difficulties. The present study extends this research by examining consolidation and longer-term procedural sequence learning in children with SLI. The Alternating Serial Reaction Time (ASRT) task was given to children with SLI and typically developing (TD) children in an initial learning session and an average of three days later to test for consolidation and longer-term learning. Although both groups showed evidence of initial sequence learning, only the TD children showed clear signs of consolidation, even though the two groups did not differ in longer-term learning. When the children were re-categorized on the basis of grammar deficits rather than broader language deficits, a clearer pattern emerged. Whereas both the grammar impaired and normal grammar groups showed evidence of initial sequence learning, only those with normal grammar showed consolidation and longer-term learning. Indeed, the grammar-impaired group appeared to lose any sequence knowledge gained during the initial testing session. These findings held even when controlling for vocabulary or a broad non-grammatical language measure, neither of which were associated with procedural memory. When grammar was examined as a continuous variable over all children, the same relationships between procedural memory and grammar, but not vocabulary or the broader language measure, were observed. Overall, the findings support and further specify the PDH. They suggest that consolidation and longer-term procedural learning are impaired in SLI, but that these

  7. Learning potential and cognitive abilities in preschool boys with fragile X and Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Naranjo, Nieves; Robles-Bello, Mª Auxiliadora

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing cognitive abilities is relevant when devising treatment plans. This study examined the performance of preschool boys with Down syndrome and fragile X syndrome in cognitive tasks (e.g., nonverbal reasoning and short-term memory), as well as in improving cognitive functions by means of a learning potential methodology. The basic scales corresponding to the Skills and Learning Potential Preschool Scale were administered to children with Down syndrome and others with fragile X syndrome, matched for chronological age and nonverbal cognitive development level. The fragile X syndrome group showed stronger performance on short-term memory tasks than the Down syndrome group prior to intervention, with no differences recorded in nonverbal reasoning tasks. In addition, both groups' cognitive performance improved significantly between pre- and post-intervention. However, learning potential relative to auditory memory was limited in both groups, and for rule-based categorization in Down syndrome children. The scale offered the opportunity to assess young children's abilities and identify the degree of cognitive modifiability. Furthermore, factors that may potentially affect the children's performance before and during learning potential assessment are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surprise responses in the human brain demonstrate statistical learning under high concurrent cognitive demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Marta Isabel; Teng, Chee Leong James; Taylor, Jeremy Alexander; Rowe, Elise Genevieve; Mattingley, Jason Brett

    2016-06-01

    The ability to learn about regularities in the environment and to make predictions about future events is fundamental for adaptive behaviour. We have previously shown that people can implicitly encode statistical regularities and detect violations therein, as reflected in neuronal responses to unpredictable events that carry a unique prediction error signature. In the real world, however, learning about regularities will often occur in the context of competing cognitive demands. Here we asked whether learning of statistical regularities is modulated by concurrent cognitive load. We compared electroencephalographic metrics associated with responses to pure-tone sounds with frequencies sampled from narrow or wide Gaussian distributions. We showed that outliers evoked a larger response than those in the centre of the stimulus distribution (i.e., an effect of surprise) and that this difference was greater for physically identical outliers in the narrow than in the broad distribution. These results demonstrate an early neurophysiological marker of the brain's ability to implicitly encode complex statistical structure in the environment. Moreover, we manipulated concurrent cognitive load by having participants perform a visual working memory task while listening to these streams of sounds. We again observed greater prediction error responses in the narrower distribution under both low and high cognitive load. Furthermore, there was no reliable reduction in prediction error magnitude under high-relative to low-cognitive load. Our findings suggest that statistical learning is not a capacity limited process, and that it proceeds automatically even when cognitive resources are taxed by concurrent demands.

  9. A Cognitive Skill Classification Based on Multi Objective Optimization Using Learning Vector Quantization for Serious Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Aries Syufagi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, serious games and game technology are poised to transform the way of educating and training students at all levels. However, pedagogical value in games do not help novice students learn, too many memorizing and reduce learning process due to no information of player’s ability. To asses the cognitive level of player ability, we propose a Cognitive Skill Game (CSG. CSG improves this cognitive concept to monitor how players interact with the game. This game employs Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ for optimizing the cognitive skill input classification of the player. CSG is using teacher’s data to obtain the neuron vector of cognitive skill pattern supervise. Three clusters multi objective XE "multi objective"  target will be classified as; trial and error, carefully and, expert cognitive skill. In the game play experiments employ 33 respondent players demonstrates that 61% of players have high trial and error, 21% have high carefully, and 18% have high expert cognitive skill. CSG may provide information to game engine when a player needs help or when wanting a formidable challenge. The game engine will provide the appropriate tasks according to players’ ability. CSG will help balance the emotions of players, so players do not get bored and frustrated. 

  10. Mathematical Cognition: A Volume in Current Perspectives on Cognition, Learning, and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, James M., Ed.

    This book deals addresses how the development of the human capacity for mathematical cognition occurs through educational experience. Chapters include: (1) "The Development of Math Competence in the Preschool and Early School Years: Cognitive Foundations and Instructional Strategies " (Sharon Griffin); (2) "Perspectives on Mathematics Strategy…

  11. Interference of left and right cerebellar rTMS with procedural learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torriero, Sara; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Koch, Giacomo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura

    2004-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests cerebellar involvement in procedural learning. To further analyze its role and to assess whether it has a lateralized influence, in the present study we used a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation interference approach in a group of normal subjects performing a serial reaction time task. We studied 36 normal volunteers: 13 subjects underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the left cerebellum and performed the task with the right (6 subjects) or left (7 subjects) hand; 10 subjects underwent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the right cerebellum and performed the task with the hand ipsilateral (5 subjects) or contralateral (5 subjects) to the stimulation; another 13 subjects served as controls and were not submitted to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; 7 of them performed the task with the right hand and 6 with the left hand. The main results show that interference with the activity of the lateral cerebellum induces a significant decrease of procedural learning: Interference with the right cerebellar hemisphere activity induces a significant decrease in procedural learning regardless of the hand used to perform the serial reaction time task, whereas left cerebellar hemisphere activity seems more linked with procedural learning through the ipsilateral hand. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that a transient interference with the functions of the cerebellar cortex results in an impairment of procedural learning in normal subjects and it provides new evidences for interhemispheric differences in the lateral cerebellum.

  12. E-learning, dual-task, and cognitive load: The anatomy of a failed experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Rogers, Kem A

    2016-01-01

    The rising popularity of commercial anatomy e-learning tools has been sustained, in part, due to increased annual enrollment and a reduction in laboratory hours across educational institutions. While e-learning tools continue to gain popularity, the research methodologies used to investigate their impact on learning remain imprecise. As new user interfaces are introduced, it is critical to understand how functionality can influence the load placed on a student's memory resources, also known as cognitive load. To study cognitive load, a dual-task paradigm wherein a learner performs two tasks simultaneously is often used, however, its application within educational research remains uncommon. Using previous paradigms as a guide, a dual-task methodology was developed to assess the cognitive load imposed by two commercial anatomical e-learning tools. Results indicate that the standard dual-task paradigm, as described in the literature, is insensitive to the cognitive load disparities across e-learning tool interfaces. Confounding variables included automation of responses, task performance tradeoff, and poor understanding of primary task cognitive load requirements, leading to unreliable quantitative results. By modifying the secondary task from a basic visual response to a more cognitively demanding task, such as a modified Stroop test, the automation of secondary task responses can be reduced. Furthermore, by recording baseline measures for the primary task as well as the secondary task, it is possible for task performance tradeoff to be detected. Lastly, it is imperative that the cognitive load of the primary task be designed such that it does not overwhelm the individual's ability to learn new material.

  13. Is attribution retraining necessary? Use of self-regulation procedures for enhancing the reading comprehension strategies of children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, A; Villaescusa, M I; Vidal-Abarca, E

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigates the need to include explicit attribution retraining in a program designed to teach reading comprehension strategies to children with learning disabilities (LD). The program had two versions: (a) self-regulation procedures and (b) self-regulation procedures plus explicit attributional retraining. Sixty children with LD were assigned to two training groups (with and without attributional retraining) and a control group. Twenty normally achieving students served as an additional control group. The effects were assessed via attribution measures and cognitive and metacognitive reading comprehension tests. Results indicated that children from both training groups improved on measures of cognitive strategies, but their gains were very low on metacognitive measures. In addition, regardless of training condition, students from both groups showed equally good attribution profiles.

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacologic Interventions for Children's Distress during Painful Medical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Susan M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated efficacy of cognitive-behavioral intervention package and low-risk pharmacologic intervention (oral Valium) as compared with minimal treatment-attention control condition, in reducing children leukemia patients' distress during bone marrow aspirations. The cognitive-behavioral therapy reduced behavioral distress, pain ratings and pulse…

  15. Development Strategy using Cognitive Domain in e-Requirement Engineering Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Azliana Akmal Jamaludin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Current trend of e-learning promote continuous learning environment. Unfortunately, it fails to optimize the learning between student and learner. Some factors are discussed to encounter the current problem. It should have suitable contents representations that will be remembered and applied in practice by the students. The e-learning discussed in context of Requirement Engineering domain. Maximize the usage of e-Requirement Engineering Learning System, the cognitive domain is suggested to cooperate with the e-learning system. It will help Higher Learning Education (HLE deliver students with employability skill with critical thinking strategy. In addition, it gives a big impact to software development project. Future work will be discussed on the quantitative analysis to measure the effectiveness of e-Requirement Engineering Learning System.

  16. Cognition and learning in horses (Equus caballus): What we know and why we should ask more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Lauren; Udell, Monique A R

    2016-05-01

    Horses (Equus caballus) have a rich history in their relationship with humans. Across different cultures and eras they have been utilized for work, show, cultural rituals, consumption, therapy, and companionship and continue to serve in many of these roles today. As one of the most commonly trained domestic animals, understanding how horses learn and how their relationship with humans and other horses impacts their ability to learn has implications for horse welfare, training, husbandry and management. Given that unlike dogs and cats, domesticated horses have evolved from prey animals, the horse-human relationship poses interesting and unique scientific questions of theoretical value. There is still much to be learned about the cognition and behaviour of horses from a scientific perspective. This review explores current research within three related areas of horse cognition: human-horse interactions, social learning and independent learning in horses. Research on these topics is summarized and suggestions for future research are provided.

  17. Biologically plausible learning in recurrent neural networks reproduces neural dynamics observed during cognitive tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miconi, Thomas

    2017-02-23

    Neural activity during cognitive tasks exhibits complex dynamics that flexibly encode task-relevant variables. Chaotic recurrent networks, which spontaneously generate rich dynamics, have been proposed as a model of cortical computation during cognitive tasks. However, existing methods for training these networks are either biologically implausible, and/or require a continuous, real-time error signal to guide learning. Here we show that a biologically plausible learning rule can train such recurrent networks, guided solely by delayed, phasic rewards at the end of each trial. Networks endowed with this learning rule can successfully learn nontrivial tasks requiring flexible (context-dependent) associations, memory maintenance, nonlinear mixed selectivities, and coordination among multiple outputs. The resulting networks replicate complex dynamics previously observed in animal cortex, such as dynamic encoding of task features and selective integration of sensory inputs. We conclude that recurrent neural networks offer a plausible model of cortical dynamics during both learning and performance of flexible behavior.

  18. Towards effective evaluation and reform in medical education: a cognitive and learning sciences perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L; Yoskowitz, Nicole A; Arocha, Jose F

    2009-12-01

    Health professions education is dealing with major transformations in light of the changing nature of the health care delivery system, including the use of technology for "just in time" delivery of care, evidence-based practice, personalized medical care and learning, as health professionals strive to integrate biomedical advances and clinical practice. This has forced the medical education community to reassess the current teaching and learning practices and more importantly, the evaluation of the medical education process. There have been recent advances in cognitive and learning sciences theories, some of which can inform medical educators about best teaching and learning practices and their impact on the evaluation process. An understanding of these theories provides a sound rationale for choosing specific instructional strategies and choosing evaluation measures that assess the curricular objectives. The review begins with an overview of evaluation and assessment in education, followed by an overview of major theories from the cognitive and learning sciences. Next, the role of cognitive and learning sciences theories in informing the process of medical education evaluation is discussed, including its impact on student learning, performance and professional competence, as well as recommendations for reform of medical curricula based on such theories. The paper continues with the elaboration of current trends in health sciences education, particularly medical education, and available evidence for the impact on student learning and performance as well as areas where more research is needed.

  19. COGNITIVE LOAD MEASUREMENT WITHIN THE RESEARCH OF EFFICIENT USAGE OF LEARNING SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana M. Derkach

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The methods of cognitive load measurement are described within the research of efficient usage of learning Software. Their classification is given, main advantages and disadvantages are analyzed, as well as area of use of these methods is defined. The article presents an overview of modern Software and Hardware that can be used for cognitive load measurement while studying with information technologies and practical examples of such methods. The use of the secondary task method is reasoned to be the most optimal for cognitive load measurement as well as for detection of optimal conditions for student work with different learning materials. This method allows to receive objective quantification of cognitive load and to investigate its dynamics accurately.

  20. Comprehensive Cognitive Assessments are not Necessary for the Identification and Treatment of Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jack M; Miciak, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    There is considerable controversy about the necessity of cognitive assessment as part of an evaluation for learning and attention problems. The controversy should be adjudicated through an evaluation of empirical research. We review five sources of evidence commonly provided as support for cognitive assessment as part of the learning disability (LD) identification process, highlighting significant gaps in empirical research and where existing evidence is insufficient to establish the reliability and validity of cognitive assessments used in this way. We conclude that current evidence does not justify routine cognitive assessment for LD identification. As an alternative, we offer an instructional conceptualization of LD: a hybrid model that directly informs intervention and is based on documenting low academic achievement, inadequate response to intensive interventions, and a consideration of exclusionary factors.

  1. Personality, punishment, and procedural learning: a test of J.A. Gray's anxiety theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, P J; Pickering, A D; Gray, J A

    1997-08-01

    Effects of punishment and personality on a phylogenetically old form of knowledge acquisition, procedural learning, were studied to test J. A. Gray's 1970, 1987, 1991) theory of anxiety. Broad measures of personality (extraversion, E.; neuroticism, N; and psychoticism, P) and specific measures of trait anxiety (Anx) and impulsivity (Imp) were taken. Punishment led to response invigoration, reducing reaction time latency, but this was not related to personality. A negative correlation of P and learning was observed in both punishment and control conditions. In support of Gray's theory, high Anx improved learning under punishment (and impaired learning under control), and low Anx improved learning under control (and impaired learning under punishment). These data are contrasted with H.J. Eysenck's (1967) arousal theory of personality. Results point to a new behavioral tool with which researchers can explore further the interaction of reinforcement, arousal, and personality.

  2. Multi-Objective Reinforcement Learning for Cognitive Radio-Based Satellite Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Paulo Victor R.; Paffenroth, Randy; Wyglinski, Alexander M.; Hackett, Timothy M.; Bilen, Sven G.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on cognitive radios has addressed the performance of various machine-learning and optimization techniques for decision making of terrestrial link properties. In this paper, we present our recent investigations with respect to reinforcement learning that potentially can be employed by future cognitive radios installed onboard satellite communications systems specifically tasked with radio resource management. This work analyzes the performance of learning, reasoning, and decision making while considering multiple objectives for time-varying communications channels, as well as different cross-layer requirements. Based on the urgent demand for increased bandwidth, which is being addressed by the next generation of high-throughput satellites, the performance of cognitive radio is assessed considering links between a geostationary satellite and a fixed ground station operating at Ka-band (26 GHz). Simulation results show multiple objective performance improvements of more than 3.5 times for clear sky conditions and 6.8 times for rain conditions.

  3. Sex Hormones and Cognition: Neuroendocrine Influences on Memory and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamson, Dwayne K; Roes, Meighen M; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-06-13

    Sex differences in neurological disease exist in incidence, severity, progression, and symptoms and may ultimately influence treatment. Cognitive disturbances are frequent in neuropsychiatric disease with men showing greater cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, but women showing more severe dementia and cognitive decline with Alzheimer's disease. Although there are no overall differences in intelligence between the sexes, men, and women demonstrate slight but consistent differences in a number of cognitive domains. These include a male advantage, on average, in some types of spatial abilities and a female advantage on some measures of verbal fluency and memory. Sex differences in traits or behaviors generally indicate the involvement of sex hormones, such as androgens and estrogens. We review the literature on whether adult levels of testosterone and estradiol influence spatial ability in both males and females from rodent models to humans. We also include information on estrogens and their ability to modulate verbal memory in men and women. Estrone and progestins are common components of hormone therapies, and we also review the existing literature concerning their effects on cognition. We also review the sex differences in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex as they relate to cognitive performance in both rodents and humans. There has been greater recognition in the scientific literature that it is important to study both sexes and also to analyze study findings with sex as a variable. Only by examining these sex differences can we progress to finding treatments that will improve the cognitive health of both men and women. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1295-1337, 2016.

  4. A Cognitive Support System to Scaffold Students' Problem-Based Learning in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xun; Planas, Lourdes G.; Er, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of question prompts and peer review on scaffolding students' problem-based learning in a web-based cognitive support system. Ninety-six pharmacy students were randomly assigned to a treatment or control condition. The students in both conditions were asked to generate solutions to a…

  5. Cognitive load theory and multimedia learning, task characteristics, and learning engagement: The current state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Kester, Liesbeth; Corbalan, Gemma

    2010-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Kester, L., & Corbalan, G. (2011). Cognitive load theory and multimedia learning, task characteristics, and learner engagement: The current state of the art. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1-4. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2010.05.003

  6. Cognitive load theory and multimedia learning, task characteristics, and learning engagement: The current state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Kester, Liesbeth; Corbalan, Gemma

    2010-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Kester, L., & Corbalan, G. (2011). Cognitive load theory and multimedia learning, task characteristics, and learner engagement: The current state of the art. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1-4. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2010.05.003

  7. LCoMotion - Learning, Cognition and Motion; a multicomponent cluster randomized school-based intervention aimed at increasing learning and cognition - rationale, design and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anna; Tarp, Jakob; Ostergaard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    by a modified Eriksen flanker task and academic skills by a custom made mathematics test. PA was objectively measured by accelerometers (ActiGraph, GT3X and GT3X+) and aerobic fitness assessed by an intermittent shuttle-run test (the Andersen intermittent running test). Furthermore, compliance...... with the intervention was assessed by short message service (SMS)-tracking and questionnaires were delivered to students, parents and teachers. DISCUSSION: LCoMotion has ability to provide new insights on the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention on cognitive function and academic skills in 6th and 7th grade......BACKGROUND: The aim of the study; LCoMotion - Learning, Cognition and Motion was to develop, document, and evaluate a multi-component physical activity (PA) intervention in public schools in Denmark. The primary outcome was cognitive function. Secondary outcomes were academic skills, body...

  8. The role of cognitive apprenticeship in learning science in a virtual world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdass, Darshanand

    2012-12-01

    This article extends the discussion started by Margaret Beier, Leslie Miller, and Shu Wang's (2012) paper, Science games and the development of possible selves. In this paper, I suggest that a theoretical framework based on a sociocultural theory of learning is critical in learning in a virtual environment. I will discuss relevant research on the application of various components of the sociocultural perspective of learning in classroom environments and the potential for applying them in virtual worlds. I propose that research in science education should explore the processes underlying cognitive apprenticeship and determine how these processes can be used in virtual environments to help students learn science successfully.

  9. Learning to Play: Cognitive and Physical Development of Children and the Requirements of Playing the Piano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Carmichael

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Musical learning and performance has traditionally been understood as the process of cognitive ability and physical action. If a musician lacks or is underdeveloped in one of these areas it will either be harder or almost impossible to create music. In this presentation I will focus on the connection between them. Cognitive ability and knowledge increases with age as we gain more facts and experiences. Likewise, a child’s physical abilities expand and become more advanced with age. There is an increasing amount of evidence that cognitive abilities and physical developments are linked in children’s development.

  10. Multi-modal discriminative dictionary learning for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wu, Xia; Xu, Lele; Chen, Kewei; Yao, Li; Li, Rui

    2017-10-01

    The differentiation of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which is the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), from normal control (NC) is important as the recent research emphasis on early pre-clinical stage for possible disease abnormality identification, intervention and even possible prevention. The current study puts forward a multi-modal supervised within-class-similarity discriminative dictionary learning algorithm (SCDDL) we introduced previously for distinguishing MCI from NC. The proposed new algorithm was based on weighted combination and named as multi-modality SCDDL (mSCDDL). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and florbetapir PET data of 113 AD patients, 110 MCI patients and 117 NC subjects from the Alzheimer's disease Neuroimaging Initiative database were adopted for classification between MCI and NC, as well as between AD and NC. Adopting mSCDDL, the classification accuracy achieved 98.5% for AD vs. NC and 82.8% for MCI vs. NC, which were superior to or comparable with the results of some other state-of-the-art approaches as reported in recent multi-modality publications. The mSCDDL procedure was a promising tool in assisting early diseases diagnosis using neuroimaging data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Why Do Learning Goals (Not) Work: A Reexamination of the Hypothesized Effectiveness of Learning Goals Based on Students' Behaviour and Cognitive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lai; Elen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Explicitly informing students about learning goals has been argued to foster intentional learning. This study tested three theoretical hypotheses regarding the facilitating effects of learning goals by investigating 72 students' actual reading behaviour and cognitive processes (i.e., the use of learning goals). Participants studied a text…

  12. Effects of Comparison and Game-Challenge on Sixth Graders' Algebra Variable Learning Achievement, Learning Attitude, and Meta-Cognitive Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Zheng Sun; Chiou, Guey-Fa

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of comparison and game-challenge strategies on sixth graders' learning achievement of algebra variable, learning attitude towards algebra variable learning, and meta-cognitive awareness of algebra variable learning. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used, and 86 students were invited to participate in the experimental…

  13. A comparative analysis of three metaheuristic methods applied to fuzzy cognitive maps learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno A. Angélico

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the performance of three different population-based metaheuristic approaches applied to Fuzzy cognitive maps (FCM learning in qualitative control of processes. Fuzzy cognitive maps permit to include the previous specialist knowledge in the control rule. Particularly, Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, Genetic Algorithm (GA and an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO are considered for obtaining appropriate weight matrices for learning the FCM. A statistical convergence analysis within 10000 simulations of each algorithm is presented. In order to validate the proposed approach, two industrial control process problems previously described in the literature are considered in this work.

  14. Cognitive load imposed by ultrasound-facilitated teaching does not adversely affect gross anatomy learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamniczky, Heather A; Cotton, Darrel; Paget, Michael; Ramji, Qahir; Lenz, Ryan; McLaughlin, Kevin; Coderre, Sylvain; Ma, Irene W Y

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used in medical education, but its impact on learning outcomes is unclear. Adding ultrasound may facilitate learning, but may also potentially overwhelm novice learners. Based upon the framework of cognitive load theory, this study seeks to evaluate the relationship between cognitive load associated with using ultrasound and learning outcomes. The use of ultrasound was hypothesized to facilitate learning in anatomy for 161 novice first-year medical students. Using linear regression analyses, the relationship between reported cognitive load on using ultrasound and learning outcomes as measured by anatomy laboratory examination scores four weeks after ultrasound-guided anatomy training was evaluated in consenting students. Second anatomy examination scores of students who were taught anatomy with ultrasound were compared with historical controls (those not taught with ultrasound). Ultrasound's perceived utility for learning was measured on a five-point scale. Cognitive load on using ultrasound was measured on a nine-point scale. Primary outcome was the laboratory examination score (60 questions). Learners found ultrasound useful for learning. Weighted factor score on "image interpretation" was negatively, but insignificantly, associated with examination scores [F (1,135) = 0.28, beta = -0.22; P = 0.61]. Weighted factor score on "basic knobology" was positively and insignificantly associated with scores; [F (1,138) = 0.27, beta = 0.42; P = 0.60]. Cohorts exposed to ultrasound had significantly higher scores than historical controls (82.4% ± SD 8.6% vs. 78.8% ± 8.5%, Cohen's d = 0.41, P learning and may improve learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 10: 144-151. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Improving Students' Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlosky, John; Rawson, Katherine A; Marsh, Elizabeth J; Nathan, Mitchell J; Willingham, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    Many students are being left behind by an educational system that some people believe is in crisis. Improving educational outcomes will require efforts on many fronts, but a central premise of this monograph is that one part of a solution involves helping students to better regulate their learning through the use of effective learning techniques. Fortunately, cognitive and educational psychologists have been developing and evaluating easy-to-use learning techniques that could help students achieve their learning goals. In this monograph, we discuss 10 learning techniques in detail and offer recommendations about their relative utility. We selected techniques that were expected to be relatively easy to use and hence could be adopted by many students. Also, some techniques (e.g., highlighting and rereading) were selected because students report relying heavily on them, which makes it especially important to examine how well they work. The techniques include elaborative interrogation, self-explanation, summarization, highlighting (or underlining), the keyword mnemonic, imagery use for text learning, rereading, practice testing, distributed practice, and interleaved practice. To offer recommendations about the relative utility of these techniques, we evaluated whether their benefits generalize across four categories of variables: learning conditions, student characteristics, materials, and criterion tasks. Learning conditions include aspects of the learning environment in which the technique is implemented, such as whether a student studies alone or with a group. Student characteristics include variables such as age, ability, and level of prior knowledge. Materials vary from simple concepts to mathematical problems to complicated science texts. Criterion tasks include different outcome measures that are relevant to student achievement, such as those tapping memory, problem solving, and comprehension. We attempted to provide thorough reviews for each technique, so this

  16. Situated cognition and cognitive apprenticeship: a model for teaching and learning clinical skills in a technologically rich and authentic learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Norman N; Jarvis, Yvonne

    2007-01-01

    The acquisition of a range of diverse clinical skills is a central feature of the pre-registration nursing curriculum. Prior to exposure to clinical practice, it is essential that learners have the opportunity to practise and develop such skills in a safe and controlled environment under the direction and supervision of clinical experts. However, the competing demands of the HE nursing curriculum coupled with an increased number of learners have resulted in a reduced emphasis on traditional apprenticeship learning. This paper presents an alternative model for clinical skills teaching that draws upon the principles of cognitive apprenticeship [Collins, A., Brown, J.S., Newman, S., 1989. Cognitive Apprenticeship: teaching the crafts of reading, writing and mathematics. In: Resnick, L.B. (Ed.) Knowing. Learning and Instruction: Essays in Honor of Robert Glaser. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey, pp. 453-494] and situated cognition within a technologically rich and authentic learning environment. It will show how high quality DVD materials illustrating clinical skills performed by expert practitioners have been produced and used in conjunction with CCTV and digital recording technologies to support learning within a pedagogic framework appropriate to skills acquisition. It is argued that this model not only better prepares the student for the time they will spend in the practice setting, but also lays the foundation for the development of a clinically competent practitioner with the requisite physical and cognitive skills who is fit for purpose [UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice: The UKCC Commission for Nursing and Midwifery Education. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting, London].

  17. Improving the learning of clinical reasoning through computer-based cognitive representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clinical reasoning is usually taught using a problem-solving approach, which is widely adopted in medical education. However, learning through problem solving is difficult as a result of the contextualization and dynamic aspects of actual problems. Moreover, knowledge acquired from problem-solving practice tends to be inert and fragmented. This study proposed a computer-based cognitive representation approach that externalizes and facilitates the complex processes in learning clinical reasoning. The approach is operationalized in a computer-based cognitive representation tool that involves argument mapping to externalize the problem-solving process and concept mapping to reveal the knowledge constructed from the problems. Methods: Twenty-nine Year 3 or higher students from a medical school in east China participated in the study. Participants used the proposed approach implemented in an e-learning system to complete four learning cases in 4 weeks on an individual basis. For each case, students interacted with the problem to capture critical data, generate and justify hypotheses, make a diagnosis, recall relevant knowledge, and update their conceptual understanding of the problem domain. Meanwhile, students used the computer-based cognitive representation tool to articulate and represent the key elements and their interactions in the learning process. Results: A significant improvement was found in students’ learning products from the beginning to the end of the study, consistent with students’ report of close-to-moderate progress in developing problem-solving and knowledge-construction abilities. No significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores with the 4-week period. The cognitive representation approach was found to provide more formative assessment. Conclusions: The computer-based cognitive representation approach improved the learning of clinical reasoning in both problem solving and knowledge

  18. Learning anatomy via mobile augmented reality: Effects on achievement and cognitive load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçük, Sevda; Kapakin, Samet; Göktaş, Yüksel

    2016-10-01

    Augmented reality (AR), a new generation of technology, has attracted the attention of educators in recent years. In this study, a MagicBook was developed for a neuroanatomy topic by using mobile augmented reality (mAR) technology. This technology integrates virtual learning objects into the real world and allow users to interact with the environment using mobile devices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of learning anatomy via mAR on medical students' academic achievement and cognitive load. The mixed method was applied in the study. The random sample consisted of 70 second-year undergraduate medical students: 34 in an experimental group and 36 in a control group. Academic achievement test and cognitive load scale were used as data collection tool. A one-way MANOVA test was used for analysis. The experimental group, which used mAR applications, reported higher achievement and lower cognitive load. The use of mAR applications in anatomy education contributed to the formation of an effective and productive learning environment. Student cognitive load decreased as abstract information became concrete in printed books via multimedia materials in mAR applications. Additionally, students were able to access the materials in the MagicBook anytime and anywhere they wanted. The mobile learning approach helped students learn better by exerting less cognitive effort. Moreover, the sensory experience and real time interaction with environment may provide learning satisfaction and enable students to structure their knowledge to complete the learning tasks. Anat Sci Educ 9: 411-421. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. Improving the learning of clinical reasoning through computer-based cognitive representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bian; Wang, Minhong; Johnson, Janice M; Grotzer, Tina A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is usually taught using a problem-solving approach, which is widely adopted in medical education. However, learning through problem solving is difficult as a result of the contextualization and dynamic aspects of actual problems. Moreover, knowledge acquired from problem-solving practice tends to be inert and fragmented. This study proposed a computer-based cognitive representation approach that externalizes and facilitates the complex processes in learning clinical reasoning. The approach is operationalized in a computer-based cognitive representation tool that involves argument mapping to externalize the problem-solving process and concept mapping to reveal the knowledge constructed from the problems. Twenty-nine Year 3 or higher students from a medical school in east China participated in the study. Participants used the proposed approach implemented in an e-learning system to complete four learning cases in 4 weeks on an individual basis. For each case, students interacted with the problem to capture critical data, generate and justify hypotheses, make a diagnosis, recall relevant knowledge, and update their conceptual understanding of the problem domain. Meanwhile, students used the computer-based cognitive representation tool to articulate and represent the key elements and their interactions in the learning process. A significant improvement was found in students' learning products from the beginning to the end of the study, consistent with students' report of close-to-moderate progress in developing problem-solving and knowledge-construction abilities. No significant differences were found between the pretest and posttest scores with the 4-week period. The cognitive representation approach was found to provide more formative assessment. The computer-based cognitive representation approach improved the learning of clinical reasoning in both problem solving and knowledge construction.

  20. Sound as Affective Design Feature in Multimedia Learning--Benefits and Drawbacks from a Cognitive Load Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königschulte, Anke

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this paper investigates the potential effects of including non-speech audio such as sound effects into multimedia-based instruction taking into account Sweller's cognitive load theory (Sweller, 2005) and applied frameworks such as the cognitive theory of multimedia learning (Mayer, 2005) and the cognitive affective theory of…

  1. The Effect of Cognitive- and Metacognitive-Based Instruction on Problem Solving by Elementary Students with Mathematical Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzle-Martin, Tamieka

    2014-01-01

    Children who struggle in mathematics may also lack cognitive awareness in mathematical problem solving. The cognitively-driven program IMPROVE, a multidimensional method for teaching mathematics, has been shown to be helpful for students with mathematical learning difficulties (MLD). Guided by cognitive theory, the purpose of this…

  2. Biological and artificial cognition: what can we learn about mechanisms by modelling physical cognition problems using artificial intelligence planning techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jackie; Hawes, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Do we fully understand the structure of the problems we present to our subjects in experiments on animal cognition, and the information required to solve them? While we currently have a good understanding of the behavioural and neurobiological mechanisms underlying associative learning processes, we understand much less about the mechanisms underlying more complex forms of cognition in animals. In this study, we present a proposal for a new way of thinking about animal cognition experiments. We describe a process in which a physical cognition task domain can be decomposed into its component parts, and models constructed to represent both the causal events of the domain and the information available to the agent. We then implement a simple set of models, using the planning language MAPL within the MAPSIM simulation environment, and applying it to a puzzle tube task previously presented to orangutans. We discuss the results of the models and compare them with the results from the experiments with orangutans, describing the advantages of this approach, and the ways in which it could be extended. PMID:22927571

  3. Biological and artificial cognition: what can we learn about mechanisms by modelling physical cognition problems using artificial intelligence planning techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jackie; Hawes, Nick

    2012-10-05

    Do we fully understand the structure of the problems we present to our subjects in experiments on animal cognition, and the information required to solve them? While we currently have a good understanding of the behavioural and neurobiological mechanisms underlying associative learning processes, we understand much less about the mechanisms underlying more complex forms of cognition in animals. In this study, we present a proposal for a new way of thinking about animal cognition experiments. We describe a process in which a physical cognition task domain can be decomposed into its component parts, and models constructed to represent both the causal events of the domain and the information available to the agent. We then implement a simple set of models, using the planning language MAPL within the MAPSIM simulation environment, and applying it to a puzzle tube task previously presented to orangutans. We discuss the results of the models and compare them with the results from the experiments with orangutans, describing the advantages of this approach, and the ways in which it could be extended.

  4. A Commentary on Parent-Child Cognitive Interaction Research: What Have we Learned From Two Decades of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvette Renee Harris

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of family influences on preschool and school age cognitive development has received considerable empirical attention from cognitive developmental psychology researchers in the last few decades. As a result of the interest, investigators have focused their attention on developing coding/observational systems to capture the interactions occurring between mothers and their young children. This paper reviews a select body of research on parent child cognitive learning interactions with the goal of determining how the researchers have operationalized the behaviors that occur within learning interactions. The paper concludes with a discussion of the suggestions on next steps for conducting parent child cognitive learning interaction research in the future.

  5. Literacy processes cognitive flexibility in learning and teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Cartwright, Kelly B

    2015-01-01

    Reading and writing instruction require individuals--both students and teachers--to flexibly process many kinds of information, from a variety of sources. This is the first book to provide an in-depth examination of cognitive flexibility: how it develops across the lifespan; its role in specific literacy processes, such as phonemic awareness, word recognition, and comprehension; and implications for improving literacy instruction and teacher education. The contributors include leading researchers in literacy, psychology, and cognitive development, who summarize the current state of the science

  6. Matching/Mismatching in Web-Based Learning: A Perspective Based on Cognitive Styles and Physiological Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Hwang, Jan-Pan; Chen, Sherry Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive styles have been regarded as a crucial factor that affects the effectiveness of web-based learning (WBL). Previous research indicated that educational settings that match with students' cognitive styles can enhance students' learning performance, which is, however, linked to their emotion. Various physiological signals can be applied to…

  7. Situated Cognition and Learning Environments: Implications for Teachers On- and Offline in the New Digital Media Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Kimberley; Lee, Ung-Sang

    2015-01-01

    John Seely Brown suggested that learning environments should be spaces in which all work is public, is subject to iterative critique by instructors and peers, and in which social interaction is primary. In such spaces, students and teachers engage in a situated cognition approach to teaching and learning where "cognitive accomplishments rely…

  8. Dynamic testing of learning potential in adults with cognitive impairments: A systematic review of methodology and predictive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boosman, Hileen; Bovend'Eerdt, Thamar J H; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Nijboer, Tanja C W; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic testing includes procedures that examine the effects of brief training on test performance where pre- to post-training change reflects patients' learning potential. The objective of this systematic review was to provide clinicians and researchers insight into the concept and methodology of dynamic testing and to explore its predictive validity in adult patients with cognitive impairments. The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, PsychINFO, and Embase/Medline. Of 1141 potentially relevant articles, 24 studies met the inclusion criteria. The mean methodological quality score was 4.6 of 8. Eleven different dynamic tests were used. The majority of studies used dynamic versions of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. The training mostly consisted of a combination of performance feedback, reinforcement, expanded instruction, or strategy training. Learning potential was quantified using numerical (post-test score, difference score, gain score, regression residuals) and categorical (groups) indices. In five of six longitudinal studies, learning potential significantly predicted rehabilitation outcome. Three of four studies supported the added value of dynamic testing over conventional testing in predicting rehabilitation outcome. This review provides preliminary support that dynamic tests can provide a valuable addition to conventional tests to assess patients' abilities. Although promising, there was a large variability in methods used for dynamic testing and, therefore, it remains unclear which dynamic testing methods are most appropriate for patients with cognitive impairments. More research is warranted to further evaluate and refine dynamic testing methodology and to further elucidate its predictive validity concerning rehabilitation outcomes relative to other cognitive and functional status indices.

  9. Perceptual learning improves adult amblyopic vision through rule-based cognitive compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Yun; Cong, Lin-Juan; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M; Yu, Cong

    2014-04-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning in adults with amblyopia could be enabled to transfer completely to an orthogonal orientation, which would suggest that amblyopic perceptual learning results mainly from high-level cognitive compensation, rather than plasticity in the amblyopic early visual brain. Nineteen adults (mean age = 22.5 years) with anisometropic and/or strabismic amblyopia were trained following a training-plus-exposure (TPE) protocol. The amblyopic eyes practiced contrast, orientation, or Vernier discrimination at one orientation for six to eight sessions. Then the amblyopic or nonamblyopic eyes were exposed to an orthogonal orientation via practicing an irrelevant task. Training was first performed at a lower spatial frequency (SF), then at a higher SF near the cutoff frequency of the amblyopic eye. Perceptual learning was initially orientation specific. However, after exposure to the orthogonal orientation, learning transferred to an orthogonal orientation completely. Reversing the exposure and training order failed to produce transfer. Initial lower SF training led to broad improvement of contrast sensitivity, and later higher SF training led to more specific improvement at high SFs. Training improved visual acuity by 1.5 to 1.6 lines (P learning suggests that perceptual learning in amblyopia may reflect high-level learning of rules for performing a visual discrimination task. These rules are applicable to new orientations to enable learning transfer. Therefore, perceptual learning may improve amblyopic vision mainly through rule-based cognitive compensation.

  10. Behaviorism, latent learning, and cognitive maps: needed revisions in introductory psychology textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper critically assesses the scholarship in introductory psychology textbooks in relation to the topic of latent learning. A review of the treatment of latent learning in 48 introductory psychology textbooks published between 1948 and 2004, with 21 of these texts published since 1999, reveals that the scholarship on the topic of latent learning demonstrated in introductory textbooks warrants improvement. Errors that persist in textbooks include the assertion that the latent learning experiments demonstrate unequivocally that reinforcement was not necessary for learning to occur, that behavioral theories could not account for the results of the latent learning experiments, that B. F. Skinner was an S-R association behaviorist who argued that reinforcement is necessary for learning to occur, and that because behavioral theories (including that of B. F. Skinner) were unable explain the results of the latent learning experiments the cognitive map invoked by Edward Tolman is the only explanation for latent learning. Finally, the validity of the cognitive map is typically accepted without question. Implications of the presence of these errors for students and the discipline are considered. Lastly, remedies are offered to improve the scholarship found in introductory psychology textbooks.

  11. Effect of Neuroscience-Based Cognitive Skill Training on Growth of Cognitive Deficits Associated with Learning Disabilities in Children Grades 2-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtzon, Sarah Abitbol

    2012-01-01

    Working memory, executive functions, and cognitive processes associated with specific academic areas, are empirically identified as being the core underlying cognitive deficits in students with specific learning disabilities. Using Hebb's theory of neuroplasticity and the principle of automaticity as theoretical bases, this experimental study…

  12. Modeling language and cognition with deep unsupervised learning: a tutorial overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Marco; Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin P.

    2013-01-01

    Deep unsupervised learning in stochastic recurrent neural networks with many layers of hidden units is a recent breakthrough in neural computation research. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. In this article we discuss the theoretical foundations of this approach and we review key issues related to training, testing and analysis of deep networks for modeling language and cognitive processing. The classic letter and word perception problem of McClelland and Rumelhart (1981) is used as a tutorial example to illustrate how structured and abstract representations may emerge from deep generative learning. We argue that the focus on deep architectures and generative (rather than discriminative) learning represents a crucial step forward for the connectionist modeling enterprise, because it offers a more plausible model of cortical learning as well as a way to bridge the gap between emergentist connectionist models and structured Bayesian models of cognition. PMID:23970869

  13. Modeling Language and Cognition with Deep Unsupervised Learning:A Tutorial Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eZorzi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep unsupervised learning in stochastic recurrent neural networks with many layers of hidden units is a recent breakthrough in neural computation research. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. In this article we discuss the theoretical foundations of this approach and we review key issues related to training, testing and analysis of deep networks for modeling language and cognitive processing. The classic letter and word perception problem of McClelland and Rumelhart (1981 is used as a tutorial example to illustrate how structured and abstract representations may emerge from deep generative learning. We argue that the focus on deep architectures and generative (rather than discriminative learning represents a crucial step forward for the connectionist modeling enterprise, because it offers a more plausible model of cortical learning as well as way to bridge the gap between emergentist connectionist models and structured Bayesian models of cognition.

  14. Modeling language and cognition with deep unsupervised learning: a tutorial overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Marco; Testolin, Alberto; Stoianov, Ivilin P

    2013-01-01

    Deep unsupervised learning in stochastic recurrent neural networks with many layers of hidden units is a recent breakthrough in neural computation research. These networks build a hierarchy of progressively more complex distributed representations of the sensory data by fitting a hierarchical generative model. In this article we discuss the theoretical foundations of this approach and we review key issues related to training, testing and analysis of deep networks for modeling language and cognitive processing. The classic letter and word perception problem of McClelland and Rumelhart (1981) is used as a tutorial example to illustrate how structured and abstract representations may emerge from deep generative learning. We argue that the focus on deep architectures and generative (rather than discriminative) learning represents a crucial step forward for the connectionist modeling enterprise, because it offers a more plausible model of cortical learning as well as a way to bridge the gap between emergentist connectionist models and structured Bayesian models of cognition.

  15. The Impact of Cognitive Dissonance on Learning Work Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechawatanapaisal, Decha; Siengthai, Sununta

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This research proposes a framework, which identifies the underlying factors that shape learning behavior in the workplace. It takes organizational members' perspectives into consideration to gain better understanding on managing people and their behavior in the organizational learning process. Design/methodology/approach: Primary data…

  16. Robot assistance of motor learning: A neuro-cognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuer, Herbert; Lüttgen, Jenna

    2015-09-01

    The last several years have seen a number of approaches to robot assistance of motor learning. Experimental studies have produced a range of findings from beneficial effects through null-effects to detrimental effects of robot assistance. In this review we seek an answer to the question under which conditions which outcomes should be expected. For this purpose we derive tentative predictions based on a classification of learning tasks in terms of the products of learning, the mechanisms involved, and the modulation of these mechanisms by robot assistance. Consistent with these predictions, the learning of dynamic features of trajectories is facilitated and the learning of kinematic and dynamic transformations is impeded by robotic guidance, whereas the learning of dynamic transformations can profit from robot assistance with error-amplifying forces. Deviating from the predictions, learning of spatial features of trajectories is impeded by haptic guidance, but can be facilitated by divergent force fields. The deviations point to the existence of additional effects of robot assistance beyond the modulation of learning mechanisms, e.g., the induction of a passive role of the motor system during practice with haptic guidance.

  17. Visualizing complex processes using a cognitive-mapping tool to support the learning of clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bian; Wang, Minhong; Grotzer, Tina A; Liu, Jun; Johnson, Janice M

    2016-08-22

    Practical experience with clinical cases has played an important role in supporting the learning of clinical reasoning. However, learning through practical experience involves complex processes difficult to be captured by students. This study aimed to examine the effects of a computer-based cognitive-mapping approach that helps students to externalize the reasoning process and the knowledge underlying the reasoning process when they work with clinical cases. A comparison between the cognitive-mapping approach and the verbal-text approach was made by analyzing their effects on learning outcomes. Fifty-two third-year or higher students from two medical schools participated in the study. Students in the experimental group used the computer-base cognitive-mapping approach, while the control group used the verbal-text approach, to make sense of their thinking and actions when they worked with four simulated cases over 4 weeks. For each case, students in both groups reported their reasoning process (involving data capture, hypotheses formulation, and reasoning with justifications) and the underlying knowledge (involving identified concepts and the relationships between the concepts) using the given approach. The learning products (cognitive maps or verbal text) revealed that students in the cognitive-mapping group outperformed those in the verbal-text group in the reasoning process, but not in making sense of the knowledge underlying the reasoning process. No significant differences were found in a knowledge posttest between the two groups. The computer-based cognitive-mapping approach has shown a promising advantage over the verbal-text approach in improving students' reasoning performance. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of the cognitive-mapping approach in improving the construction of subject-matter knowledge on the basis of practical experience.

  18. An Exploration of Students' Science Learning Interest Related to Their Cognitive Anxiety, Cognitive Load, Self-Confidence and Learning Progress Using Inquiry-Based Learning With an iPad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2017-01-01

    Based on the cognitive-affective theory, the present study designed a science inquiry learning model, predict-observe-explain (POE), and implemented it in an app called "WhyWhy" to examine the effectiveness of students' science inquiry learning practice. To understand how POE can affect the cognitive-affective learning process, as well as the learning progress, a pretest and a posttest were given to 152 grade 5 elementary school students. The students practiced WhyWhy during six sessions over 6 weeks, and data related to interest in learning science (ILS), cognitive anxiety (CA), and extraneous cognitive load (ECL) were collected and analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis with structure equation modeling. The results showed that students with high ILS have low CA and ECL. In addition, the results also indicated that students with a high level of self-confidence enhancement showed significant improvement in the posttest. The implications of this study suggest that by using technology-enhanced science learning, the POE model is a practical approach to motivate students to learn.

  19. Improvement of cognitive test performance in patients undergoing primary CABG and other CPB-assisted cardiac procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Goor, Jm; Saxby, Bk; Tijssen, Jg; Wesnes, Ka; de Mol, Ba; Nieuwland, R

    2008-09-01

    Cardiac surgical procedures assisted by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) impair cognitive functions. Several studies, however, showed that cognitive functions were unaffected in patients undergoing either primary coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or more complex surgery assisted by CPB. Therefore, we conducted a straightforward study to compare patient groups who differed significantly in terms of risk factors such as prolonged CPB times. Consecutive patients (n = 54) were included, undergoing either non-primary CABG, e.g. valve and/or CABG, (n = 30) or primary CABG (n = 24), assisted by CPB. Cognitive function was determined pre-operatively on the day of hospital admission, and post-operatively after one and six months using the Cognitive Drug Research computerized assessment battery. Data from the fourteen individual task variables were summarized in four composite scores: Power of Attention (PoA), Continuity of Attention (CoA), Quality of Episodic Memory (QoEM), and Speed of Memory (SoM). In the non-primary CABG patients, both CoA and QoEM improved after 1 month (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016, respectively), whereas, after 6 months, CoA (p = 0.002), QoEM (p = 0.002) and SoM (p CPB in both non-primary CABG and in primary CABG patients.

  20. Intelligent Spectrum Handoff via Docitive Learning in Cognitive Radio Networks (CRNs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Learning based Cooperative Sensing in Sognitive Radio Ad HocNetworks,” in 21st IEEE Intl. Symposium Personal Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications...INTELLIGENT SPECTRUM HANDOFF VIA DOCITIVE LEARNING IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS (CRNs) THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA MARCH 2017 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...Government formulated or supplied the drawings, specifications, or other data does not license the holder or any other person or corporation; or

  1. The Effects of Cognitive Style on the Learning Preferences of Graduate School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Jungian Theory. Carl Jung published his theory of psychological types in 1921 (Portable, 1971:xx). His theory is based on individual cognitive style...Organizations (Seventh Edition). Homewood IL: Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1991. Jung , Carl G. "Psychological Types," The Portable Jung , edited by Joseph Campbell...Instructional and Learning Preference.......... 26 Relating MBTI Types to Learning Preferences.. 27 The Extraversion- Introversion Scale ..... 28 The

  2. Greater Cognitive Effort for Better Learning: Tailoring an Instructional Design for Learners with Different Levels of Knowledge and Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seffetullah Kuldas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity limitation of working memory is a widely recognised determinant of human learning. A cognitive load exceeding the capacity hampers learning. Cognitive load can be controlled by tailoring an instructional design to levels of learner prior knowledge. However, such as design does not necessarily motivate to use the available capacity for better learning. The present review examines literatures on the effects of instructional design, motivation, emotional state, and expertise level on cognitive load and cognitive effort, which ultimately affect working memory performance and learning. This examination suggests further studies on the effects of motivation and negative emotional states on the use of working memory. Prospective findings would help better explain and predict individual differences in the use of working memory for cognitive learning and task performance.

  3. Cognitive mapping as a learning method in hypermedia design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Svetoslav; Aroyo, Lora; Kommers, Piet; Ivanov, Ivan

    1997-01-01

    AThe effectiveness of cognitive mapping is defined operationally in the terms of general beneficial, differential, and compensation effects. The contribution of the concept mapping method will mainly be discussed in the context of student assignments in an ill-structured hypermedia design environmen

  4. Dyslexia and Dyscalculia: Two Learning Disorders with Different Cognitive Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerl, Karin; Fussenegger, Barbara; Moll, Kristina; Willburger, Edith

    2009-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that dyslexia and dyscalculia are associated with two largely independent cognitive deficits, namely a phonological deficit in the case of dyslexia and a deficit in the number module in the case of dyscalculia. In four groups of 8- to 10-year-olds (42 control, 21 dyslexic, 20 dyscalculic, and 26…

  5. Individual Differences in Learning Computer Programming: A Social Cognitive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akar, Sacide Guzin Mazman; Altun, Arif

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate and conceptualize the ranks of importance of social cognitive variables on university students' computer programming performances. Spatial ability, working memory, self-efficacy, gender, prior knowledge and the universities students attend were taken as variables to be analyzed. The study has been…

  6. A Social Cognitive Learning Theory of Homophobic Aggression among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The current study used social cognitive theory as a framework to investigate self-reported homophobic aggressive behavior at school. Participants included 863 students of 49 classes, enrolled in Grades 9-13 in 10 Italian public high schools. The results from the multilevel mediation model (1-2-1) showed that class-level homophobic attitudes toward…

  7. Teaching and Learning in Medicine: A Cognitive Science Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Mariana G. A'B.; And Others

    A method to facilitate medical students' skill in diagnosis, based on cognitive science, was studied. A teaching intervention consisting of a 6-week seminar was used with sixth-year medical students in pediatric cardiology, which was their last rotation. Students were instructed to think about medicine as experts do (i.e., to conceptualize…

  8. Learning online community citizenship behavior: a socio-cognitive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Sheng-Wuu; Lin, Chieh-Peng

    2008-06-01

    This study postulates personal and environmental factors as key drivers of online community citizenship behavior (OCCB). OCCB reveals that the individual chooses to perform a behavior that is beneficial to others. Empirical results confirm the applicability of social cognitive theory (SCT) in online communities.

  9. Parent-child mediated learning interactions as determinants of cognitive modifiability: recent research and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzuriel, D

    1999-05-01

    The main objectives of this article are to describe the effects of mediated learning experience (MLE) strategies in mother-child interactions on the child's cognitive modifiability, the effects of distal factors (e.g., socioeconomic status, mother's intelligence, child's personality) on MLE interactions, and the effects of situational variables on MLE processes. Methodological aspects of measurement of MLE interactions and of cognitive modifiability, using a dynamic assessment approach, are discussed. Studies with infants showed that the quality of mother-infant MLE interactions predict later cognitive functioning and that MLE patterns and children's cognitive performance change as a result of intervention programs. Studies with preschool and school-aged children showed that MLE interactions predict cognitive modifiability and that distal factors predict MLE interactions but not the child's cognitive modifiability. The child's cognitive modifiability was predicted by MLE interactions in a structured but not in a free-play situation. Mediation for transcendence (e.g., teaching rules and generalizations) appeared to be the strongest predictor of children's cognitive modifiability. Discussion of future research includes the consideration of a holistic transactional approach, which refers to MLE processes, personality, and motivational-affective factors, the cultural context of mediation, perception of the whole family as a mediational unit, and the "mediational normative scripts."

  10. Service Users' Views of Physical Restraint Procedures in Secure Settings for People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2007-01-01

    The appropriateness and justification of physical restraint procedures in secure learning disability settings is an emotive issue. This paper examines the views of service users (n = 10) from secure residential facilities who are restrained frequently. Using a semi-structured interview schedule, Service users were interviewed about their restraint…

  11. Procedural Learning and Memory Rehabilitation in Korsakoff’s Syndrome - a Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder caused by alcohol abuse and thiamine deficiency. Patients with KS show restricted autonomy due to their severe declarative amnesia and executive disorders. Recently, it has been suggested that procedural learning and memory are relativ

  12. The characteristics of a negotiated assessment procedure to promote teacher learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberg, Christina Petronella Maria

    2013-01-01

    The literature indicates that teacher professional development and learning may be improved by using formative assessment procedures. This thesis focuses on a specific form of formative assessment, negotiated assessment, which is characterised by the exchange of views between assessor and assessee

  13. Procedural Learning and Memory Rehabilitation in Korsakoff’s Syndrome - a Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Nijboer, Tanja C W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304832421; Postma, Albert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08621182X; Wijnia, Jan W.; Van der Stigchel, Stefan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/29880977X

    2015-01-01

    Korsakoff’s syndrome (KS) is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder caused by alcohol abuse and thiamine deficiency. Patients with KS show restricted autonomy due to their severe declarative amnesia and executive disorders. Recently, it has been suggested that procedural learning and memory are relativ

  14. Qualitative Parameters for Evaluation Procedures of Non-Formal and Informal Learning Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2009-01-01

    The article introduces evaluation principles of non-formal and informal learning that determine the quality of evaluation, describes stages of the evaluation procedure, differentiates their qualitative parameters and defines their criteria and indicators. It also brings in the discussion that consideration of qualitative parameters for the…

  15. Neurochemical Manipulation of Procedural Memory Sequential Stimuli Learning Under Influence of Phentermine and Pentobarbital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkerts, E; van Laar, M.W; Verbaten, M.N; Mulder, G.; Maes, R.A A

    1999-01-01

    Within the scope of implicit, procedural memory research a large number of empirical studies have been conducted to explore the conditions under which structured sequence learning will emerge in healthy volunteers. Up to now, a few studies have been carried out to determine the effects of scopolamin

  16. Neurochemical manipulation of procedural memory : Sequential stimuli learning under influence of phentermine and pentobarbital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkerts, ER; Verbaten, MN; Mulder, G; Maes, RAA

    1999-01-01

    Within the scope of implicit, procedural memory research a large number of empirical studies have been conducted to explore the conditions under which structured sequence learning will emerge in healthy volunteers. Up to now, a few studies have been carried out to determine the effects of scopolamin

  17. The quality of procedures to assess and credit prior learning: Implications for design.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Sluijsmans, Dominique; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Joosten-ten Brinke, D., Sluijsmans, D. M. A., Brand-Gruwel, S., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2008). The quality of procedures to assess and credit prior learning: Implications for design. Educational Research Review, 3, 51-65. doi:10.1016/j.edurev.2007.08.001.

  18. Learning effects of repetitive administration of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure in novice prosthetic users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golea-Vasluian, Ecaterina; Bongers, Raoul M; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) evaluates the functionality of normal, injured or prosthetic hands. The aim was to evaluate the learning effects of SHAP tasks and the appropriateness of the time limits applied per task in novice prosthetic users. Methods: Right-handed uni

  19. User Acceptance of YouTube for Procedural Learning: An Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo Young; Lehto, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was framed using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to identify determinants affecting behavioral intention to use YouTube. Most importantly, this research emphasizes the motives for using YouTube, which is notable given its extrinsic task goal of being used for procedural learning tasks. Our conceptual framework included two…

  20. Robotic right hemicolectomy: Analysis of 108 consecutive procedures and multidimensional assessment of the learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Amilcare; Scrucca, Luca; Desiderio, Jacopo; Gemini, Alessandro; Guarino, Salvatore; Ricci, Francesco; Cirocchi, Roberto; Palazzini, Giorgio; D'Andrea, Vito; Minelli, Liliana; Trastulli, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Surgeons tend to view the robotic right colectomy (RRC) as an ideal beginning procedure to gain proficiency in robotic general and colorectal surgery. Nevertheless, oncological RRC, especially if performed with intracorporeal ileocolic anastomosis confectioning, cannot be considered a technically easier procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve of the RRC performed for oncological purposes and to evaluate its safety and efficacy investigating the perioperative and pathology outcomes in the different learning phases. Data on a consecutive series of 108 patients undergoing RRC with intracorporeal anastomosis between June 2011 and September 2015 at our institution were prospectively collected to evaluate surgical and short-term oncological outcomes. CUSUM (Cumulative Sum) and Risk-Adjusted (RA) CUSUM analysis were performed in order to perform a multidimensional assessment of the learning curve for the RRC surgical procedure. Intraoperative, postoperative and pathological outcomes were compared among the learning curve phases. Based on the CUSUM and RA-CUSUM analyses, the learning curve for RRC could be divided into 3 different phases: phase 1, the initial learning period (1st-44th case); phase 2, the consolidation period (45th-90th case); and phase 3, the mastery period (91th-108th case). Operation time, conversion to open surgery rate and the number of harvested lymph nodes significantly improve through the three learning phases. The learning curve for oncological RRC with intracorporeal anastomosis is composed of 3 phases. Our data indicate that the performance of RRC is safe from an oncological point of view in all of the three phases of the learning curve. However, the technical skills necessary to significantly reduce operative time, conversion to open surgery rate and to significantly improve the number of harvested lymph nodes were achieved after 44 procedures. These data suggest that it might be prudent to start the RRC learning curve

  1. The Impact of Learning Strategy and Cognitive Style on Learning Achievement of Nursing Process Application on Nursing Clinic Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atti Yudiernawati

    2015-03-01

    Key Words: learning  strategy,  problem based learning , direct instruction, cognitive style, learning achievement Abstrak: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh strategi pembelajaran (problem based learning vs direct instruction dan gaya kognitif terhadap prestasi belajar aplikasi proses keperawatan pada pembelajaran klinik. Dengan rancangan penelitian eksperimen semu pada subyek mahasiswa Jurusan  Keperawatan Malang, melalui teknik pengumpulan data berupa tes  untuk gaya kognitif dan performance assessment untuk prestasi belajar,  hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa: (1 terdapat perbedaan prestasi  belajar antara kelompok mahasiswa yang diajarkan dengan strategi PBL  dan pembelajaran langsung.  (2 terdapat perbedaan prestasi belajar pada mahasiswa dengan gaya kognitif yang berbeda, dan (3  tidak terdapat interaksi  penggunaan strategi pembelajaran dan gaya belajar mahasiswa terhadap prestasi  belajar pebelajaran. Kata kunci: strategi pembelajaran,  problem based learning (PBL,  direct instruction, gaya kognitif, prestasi belajar

  2. Effect of Cognitive Style on Learning and Retrieval of Navigational Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Boccia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Field independence (FI has been found to correlate with a wide range of cognitive processes requiring cognitive restructuring. Cognitive restructuring, that is going beyond the information given by the setting, is pivotal in creating stable mental representations of the environment, the so-called “cognitive maps,” and it affects visuo-spatial abilities underpinning environmental navigation. Here we evaluated whether FI, by fostering cognitive restructuring of environmental cues on the basis of an internal frame of reference, affects the learning and retrieval of a novel environment. Fifty-four participants were submitted to the Embedded Figure Test (EFT for assessing their Cognitive Style (CS and to the Perspective Taking/Spatial Orientation Test (PTSOT and the Santa Barbara Sense of Direction Scale (SBSOD for assessing their spatial perspective taking and orientation skills. They were also required to learn a path in a novel, real environment (route learning, RL, to recognize landmarks of this path among distracters (landmark recognition, LR, to order them (landmark ordering, LO and to draw the learned path on a map (map drawing, MD. Retrieval tasks were performed both immediately after learning (immediate-retrieval and the day after (24 h-retrieval. Performances on EFT significantly correlated with the time needed to learn the path, with MD (both in the immediate- and in the 24 h- retrievals, results on LR (in 24-retrieval and performances on PTSOT. Interestingly, we found that gender interacted with CS on RL (time of learning and MD. Females performed significantly worse than males only if they were classified as FD, but did not differ from males if they were classified as FI. These results suggest that CS affects learning and retrieval of navigational environment, especially when a map-like representation is required. We propose that CS may be pivotal in forming the cognitive map of the environment, likely due to the higher ability of FI

  3. A Listening Laboratory Designed from Cognitive Learning Principles at Evergreen Valley College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tanya

    A listening laboratory was developed at Evergreen Valley College (EVC) in accordance with procedures used at the college's individualized instruction laboratory. Steps taken in developing the laboratory included: (1) the director of the Learning Center Instructional Laboratory was interviewed to determine the procedure for establishing the…

  4. Cognitive agents - a procedural perspective relying on the predictability of Object-Action-Complexes (OACs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wörgötter, Florentin; Agostino, A.; Krüger, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Embodied cognition suggests that complex cognitive traits can only arise when agents have a body situated in the world. The aspects of embodiment and situatedness are being discussed here from the perspective of linear systems theory. This perspective treats bodies as dynamic, temporally variable...... entities, which can be extended (or curtailed) at their boundaries. We show how acting agents can, for example, actively extend their body for some time by incorporating predictably behaving parts of the world and how this affects the transfer functions. We suggest that primates have mastered...... and behaviour. Hence, in this article we have tried to show how predictability can be used to augment the agent's body and to acquire knowledge about the external world, possibly leading to more advanced cognitive traits....

  5. An incremental procedure model for e-learning projects at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahlke, Friedrich

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available E-learning projects at universities are produced under different conditions than in industry. The main characteristic of many university projects is that these are realized quasi in a solo effort. In contrast, in private industry the different, interdisciplinary skills that are necessary for the development of e-learning are typically supplied by a multimedia agency.A specific procedure tailored for the use at universities is therefore required to facilitate mastering the amount and complexity of the tasks.In this paper an incremental procedure model is presented, which describes the proceeding in every phase of the project. It allows a high degree of flexibility and emphasizes the didactical concept – instead of the technical implementation. In the second part, we illustrate the practical use of the theoretical procedure model based on the project “Online training in Genetic Epidemiology”.

  6. Multiagent -Learning for Aloha-Like Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Husheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An Aloha-like spectrum access scheme without negotiation is considered for multiuser and multichannel cognitive radio systems. To avoid collisions incurred by the lack of coordination, each secondary user learns how to select channels according to its experience. Multiagent reinforcement leaning (MARL is applied for the secondary users to learn good strategies of channel selection. Specifically, the framework of -learning is extended from single user case to multiagent case by considering other secondary users as a part of the environment. The dynamics of the -learning are illustrated using a Metrick-Polak plot, which shows the traces of -values in the two-user case. For both complete and partial observation cases, rigorous proofs of the convergence of multiagent -learning without communications, under certain conditions, are provided using the Robins-Monro algorithm and contraction mapping, respectively. The learning performance (speed and gain in utility is evaluated by numerical simulations.

  7. Preexposure effects in spatial learning: From gestaltic to associative and attentional cognitive maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward S. Redhead

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a series of studies and theoretical proposals about how preexposure to environmental cues affects subsequent spatial learning are reviewed. Traditionally, spatial learning had been thought to depend on gestaltic non-associative processes, and well established phenomena such as latent learning or instantaneous transfer have been taken to provide evidence for this sort of cognitive mapping. However, reviewing the literature examining these effects reveals that there is no need to advocate for gestaltic processes since standard associative learning theory provides an adequate framework for accounting for navigation skills. Recent studies reveal that attentional processes play a role in spatial learning. The need for an integrated attentional and associative approach to explain spatial learning is discussed.

  8. Three Facets of Visual and Verbal Learners: Cognitive Ability, Cognitive Style, and Learning Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E.; Massa, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the hypothesis that some people are verbal learners and some people are visual learners. Presented a battery of 14 cognitive measures related to the visualizer-verbalizer dimension to 95 college students and then conducted correlational and factor analyses. Results have implications for how to conceptualize and measure individual…

  9. Cognitive Attainment in Online Learning Environments: Matching Cognitive and Technological Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Elena; Torras, Eulalia; Guasch, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    To know whether students' achievements are the result of online interaction and not just a consequence of individual differences themselves, it seems essential to link the cognitive results to the students' online behavior (technological presence). In technological presence, interaction is based on the degree in which the online student senses the…

  10. Cognitive Design for Learning: Cognition and Emotion in the Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebrook, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We are so used to accept new technologies being the driver of change and innovation in human computer interfaces (HCI). In our research we focus on the development of innovations as a design process--or design, for short. We also refer to the entire process of creating innovations and putting them to use as "cognitive processes"--or…

  11. The effect of cognitive aging on implicit sequence learning and dual tasking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eVandenbossche

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influence of attentional demands on sequence-specific learning by means of the serial reaction time (SRT task (Nissen & Bullemer, 1987 in young (age 18-25 and aged (age 55-75 adults. Participants had to respond as fast as possible to a stimulus presented in one of four horizontal locations by pressing a key corresponding to the spatial position of the stimulus. During the training phase sequential blocks were accompanied by (1 no secondary task (single, (2 a secondary tone counting task (dual tone, or (3 a secondary shape counting task (dual shape. Both secondary tasks were administered to investigate whether low and high interference tasks interact with implicit learning and age. The testing phase, under baseline single condition, was implemented to assess differences in sequence-specific learning between young and aged adults. Results indicate that (1 aged subjects show less sequence learning compared to young adults, (2 young participants show similar implicit learning effects under both single and dual task conditions when we account for explicit awareness, and (3 aged adults demonstrate reduced learning when the primary task is accompanied with a secondary task, even when explicit awareness is included as a covariate in the analysis. These findings point to implicit learning deficits under dual task conditions that can be related to cognitive aging, demonstrating the need for sufficient cognitive resources while performing a sequence learning task.

  12. Collaborative Anti-jamming in Cognitive Radio Networks Using Minimax-Q Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is an efficient technique for realization of dynamic spectrum access. Since in the cognitive radio network (CRN environment, the secondary users (SUs are susceptible to the random jammers, the security issue of the SU’s channel access becomes crucial for the CRN framework. The rapidly varying spectrum dynamics of CRN along with the jammer’s actions leads to challenging scenario. Stochastic zero-sum game and Markov decision process (MDP are generally used to model the scenario concerned. To learn the channel dynamics and the jammer’s strategy the SUs use reinforcement learning (RL algorithms, like Minimax-Q learning. In this paper, we have proposed the multi-agent multi-band collaborative anti-jamming among the SUs to combat single jammer using the Minimax-Q learning algorithm. The SUs collaborate via sharing the policies or episodes. Here, we have shown that the sharing of the learned policies or episodes enhances the learning probability of SUs about the jammer’s strategies but reward reduces as the cost of communication increases. Simulation results show improvement in learning probability of SU by using collaborative anti-jamming using Minimax-Q learning over single SU fighting the jammer scenario.

  13. A Framework for Interaction and Cognitive Engagement in Connectivist Learning Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction has always been highly valued in education, especially in distance education (Moore, 1989; Anderson, 2003; Chen, 2004a; Woo & Reeves, 2007; Wang, 2013; Conrad, in press. It has been associated with motivation (Mahle, 2011; Wen-chi, et al., 2011, persistence (Tello, 2007; Joo, Lim, & Kim, 2011, deep learning (Offir, et al., 2008 and other components of effective learning. With the development of interactive technologies, and related connectivism learning theories (Siemens, 2005a; Downes, 2005, interaction theory has expanded to include interactions not only with human actors, but also with machines and digital artifacts. This paper explores the characteristics and principles of connectivist learning in an increasingly open and connected age. A theory building methodology is used to create a new theoretical model which we hope can be used by researchers and practitioners to examine and support multiple types of effective educational interactions. Inspired by the hierarchical model for instructional interaction (HMII (Chen, 2004b in distance learning, a framework for interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning contexts has been constructed. Based on cognitive engagement theories, the interaction of connectivist learning is divided into four levels: operation interaction, wayfinding interaction, sensemaking interaction, and innovation interaction. Connectivist learning is thus a networking and recursive process of these four levels of interaction.

  14. A consideration of cognitive factors in the learning and education of older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Prem S.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider the unique cognitive and intellectual factors that influence the learning and education of older adults. With this objective in mind, the paper reviews the empirical literature on patterns of intellectual and cognitive aging, and ends by discussing the implications and applications of these patterns for the practical and effective education of our elderly citizenry. When we consider the aging of intellectual abilities we are concerned with studying the development of fluid, crystallized and practical intelligence and variations in these abilities from adulthood into advanced old age. We are also concerned with looking at changes in cognitive functions such as attention, memory, information retrieval and tolerance for interference in learning capacity. Much recent work has been successful in showing that intellectual and cognitive decline in old age is not necessarily irreversible. While many elderly persons are very able learners, are highly self-directed, and have ample educational and intellectual resources available, others may benefit from assistance or suggestions about how to compensate for some of the cognitive declines in old age. With this objective the implications are discussed for educators and practitioners who must formulate cognitive training programs for older adults.

  15. An integrated theory of prospective time interval estimation : The role of cognition, attention, and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, Niels A.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John

    2007-01-01

    A theory of prospective time perception is introduced and incorporated as a module in an integrated theory of cognition, thereby extending existing theories and allowing predictions about attention and learning. First, a time perception module is established by fitting existing datasets (interval es

  16. A Cognitive Tutor for Genetics Problem Solving: Learning Gains and Student Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Albert; Kauffman, Linda; Maclaren, Ben; Wagner, Angela; Jones, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Genetics is a unifying theme of biology that poses a major challenge for students across a wide range of post-secondary institutions, because it entails complex problem solving. This article reports a new intelligent learning environment called the Genetics Cognitive Tutor, which supports genetics problem solving. The tutor presents complex,…

  17. The Effect of Learning Background and Imagery Cognitive Development on Visual Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shyh-Bao; Sun, Chun-Wang

    2013-01-01

    This research looked into the effect of how cognitive development toward imagery is formed through visual perception by means of a quantitative questionnaire. The main variable was the difference between the learning backgrounds of the interviewees. A two-way ANOVA mixed design was the statistical method used for the analysis of the 2 × 4 (2 by 4)…

  18. The Effect of Learning Background and Imagery Cognitive Development on Visual Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Shyh-Bao; Sun, Chun-Wang

    2013-01-01

    This research looked into the effect of how cognitive development toward imagery is formed through visual perception by means of a quantitative questionnaire. The main variable was the difference between the learning backgrounds of the interviewees. A two-way ANOVA mixed design was the statistical method used for the analysis of the 2 × 4 (2 by 4)…

  19. Using Cognitive Conflict to Promote the Use of Dialectical Learning for Strategic Decision-Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jeffrey G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that uses dialectical inquiry (DI) to create cognitive conflict in strategic decision-makers for the purpose of improving strategic decisions. Activation of the dialectical learning process using DI requires strategic decision-makers to integrate conflicting information causing…

  20. Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning: Introduction to Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tamer G.; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Haglund, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of "International Journal of Science Education" is based on the theme "Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning." The idea for this issue grew out of a symposium organized on this topic at the conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) in September 2013.…

  1. Cognitive Factors That Influence Children's Learning from a Multimedia Science Lesson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggoro, Florencia K.; Stein, Nancy L.; Jee, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the cognitive factors that influence children's physical science learning from a multimedia instruction. Using a causally coherent text and visual models, we taught 4th- and 7th-grade children about the observable and molecular properties of the three states of water. We manipulated whether the text was read by a tutor…

  2. Effects of Prior Knowledge and Concept-Map Structure on Disorientation, Cognitive Load, and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadieu, Franck; van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred; Tricot, Andre; Marine, Claudette

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the effects of prior knowledge (high vs. low; HPK and LPK) and concept-map structure (hierarchical vs. network; HS and NS) on disorientation, cognitive load, and learning from non-linear documents on "the infection process of a retrograde virus (HIV)". Participants in the study were 24 adults. Overall subjective ratings of…

  3. Math Learning Model That Accommodates Cognitive Style to Build Problem-Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warli; Fadiana, Mu'jizatin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop mathematical learning models that accommodate the cognitive styles reflective vs. impulsive students to build problem-solving skills, quality (valid, practical, and effective). To achieve the target would do research development (development research) and method development that consists of five stages,…

  4. An integrated theory of prospective time interval estimation : The role of cognition, attention, and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, Niels A.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John

    A theory of prospective time perception is introduced and incorporated as a module in an integrated theory of cognition, thereby extending existing theories and allowing predictions about attention and learning. First, a time perception module is established by fitting existing datasets (interval

  5. Brain Substrates of Learning and Retention in Mild Cognitive Impairment Diagnosis and Progression to Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ling; Bondi, Mark W.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; McEvoy, Linda K.; Hagler, Donald J., Jr.; Jacobson, Mark W.; Dale, Anders M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the underlying qualitative features of memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can provide critical information for early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study sought to investigate the utility of both learning and retention measures in (a) the diagnosis of MCI, (b) predicting progression to AD, and (c)…

  6. A neural-symbolic cognitive agent for online learning and reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, H.L.H. de; Avila Garcez, A.S. d; Lamb, L.C.; Meyer, J.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In real-world applications, the effective integration of learning and reasoning in a cognitive agent model is a difficult task. However, such integration may lead to a better understanding, use and con-struction of more realistic models. Unfortunately, existing models are either oversimplified or re

  7. Mining Students' Learning Patterns and Performance in Web-Based Instruction: A Cognitive Style Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sherry Y.; Liu, Xiaohui

    2011-01-01

    Personalization has been widely used in Web-based instruction (WBI). To deliver effective personalization, there is a need to understand different preferences of each student. Cognitive style has been identified as one of the most pertinent factors that affect students' learning preferences. Therefore, it is essential to investigate how learners…

  8. Cognitive Neuroscience and Mathematics Learning: How Far Have We Come? Where Do We Need to Go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Lyons, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary on the ZDM special issue: "Cognitive neuroscience and mathematics learning--revisited after 5 years," we explore the progress that has been made since ZDM published a similar special issue in 2010. We consider the extent to which future frontiers and methodological concerns raised in the commentary on the 2010 issue by…

  9. The Potential Relevance of Cognitive Neuroscience for the Development and Use of Technology-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Jones, Paul; Ott, Michela; van Leeuwen, Theo; De Smedt, Bert

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the application of cognitive neuroscience in educational thinking and practice, and here we review findings from neuroscience that demonstrate its potential relevance to technology-enhanced learning (TEL). First, we identify some of the issues in integrating neuroscientific concepts into TEL research. We caution…

  10. Cognitive Learning Strategy as a Partial Effect on Major Field Test in Business Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth David

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was developed to determine if cognitive learning strategies improved standardized university business exam results. Previous studies revealed that factors such as prior ability, age, gender, and culture predicted a student's Major Field Test in Business (MFTB) score better than course content. The experiment control consisted of…

  11. The Impact of Affective and Cognitive Trust on Knowledge Sharing and Organizational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Peter E.; Hwang, Alvin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to add to the research on the role of cognitive and affective trust in promoting knowledge sharing between executives and consequently establishing an organizational learning environment. Design/methodology/approach: This paper examines the influence of one conceptualization of trust, one that has two…

  12. Effects of Peer-Tutor Competences on Learner Cognitive Load and Learning Performance during Knowledge Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Ping; Brouns, Francis; van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    In Learning Networks, learners need to share knowledge with others to build knowledge. In particular, when working on complex tasks, they often need to acquire extra cognitive resources from others to process a high task load. However, without support high task load and organizing knowledge sharing themselves might easily overload learners'…

  13. A Comparison of Approaches to Learning Task Selection in the Training of Complex Cognitive Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salden, Ron; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Salden, R.J.C.M., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J.J.G. (2006). A comparison of approaches to learning task selection in the training of complex cognitive skills. Computers in Human Behavior, 22 , 321-333

  14. Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 7 November). Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners. Paper presentation at the ICO [Interuniversity Center for Educational Research] National Fall School,

  15. Phylogenetic Origins of Biological Cognition : Convergent Patterns in the Early Evolution of Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijn, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Various forms of elementary learning have recently been discovered in organisms lacking a nervous system, such as protists, fungi and plants. This finding has fundamental implications for how we view the role of convergent evolution in biological cognition. In this article, I first review the

  16. Applying Cognitive Linguistics to Instructed L2 Learning: The English Modals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea; Mueller, Charles M.; Ho, Vu

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a quasi-experimental effects-of-instruction study examining the efficacy of applying a Cognitive Linguistic (CL) approach to L2 learning of the semantics of English modals. In spite of their frequency in typical input, modal verbs present L2 learners with difficulties, party due to their inherent…

  17. Transforming Principles into Practice: Using Cognitive Active Learning Strategies in the High School Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderski, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    High school teachers who engage students through active learning in their classrooms can more fully understand this instructional practice by examining the theories and strategies underlying the cognitive perspective of educational psychology, which addresses the development of knowledge in the individual mind. Two theoretical explanations,…

  18. An integrated theory of prospective time interval estimation : The role of cognition, attention, and learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, Niels A.; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John

    2007-01-01

    A theory of prospective time perception is introduced and incorporated as a module in an integrated theory of cognition, thereby extending existing theories and allowing predictions about attention and learning. First, a time perception module is established by fitting existing datasets (interval es

  19. Perceived Social Status and Learning Experiences in Social Cognitive Career Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mindi N.; Dahling, Jason J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a model based on Social Cognitive Career Theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) that placed perceived social status as an antecedent of career-related learning experiences, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations. Gender was included in the present model and results indicated that gender related as expected to…

  20. A Robot-Partner for Preschool Children Learning English Using Socio-Cognitive Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Elvis; Benvenuti, Martina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study in which a humanoid robot (MecWilly) acted as a partner to preschool children, helping them to learn English words. In order to use the Socio-Cognitive Conflict paradigm to induce the knowledge acquisition process, we designed a playful activity in which children worked in pairs with another child or with…

  1. Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning: Introduction to Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tamer G.; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Haglund, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This special issue of "International Journal of Science Education" is based on the theme "Conceptual Metaphor and Embodied Cognition in Science Learning." The idea for this issue grew out of a symposium organized on this topic at the conference of the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA) in September 2013.…

  2. Expectancy-Value and Cognitive Process Outcomes in Mathematics Learning: A Structural Equation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Huy P.

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has yielded evidence to indicate that the expectancy-value theoretical model predicts students' learning in various achievement contexts. Achievement values and self-efficacy expectations, for example, have been found to exert positive effects on cognitive process and academic achievement outcomes. We tested a conceptual model…

  3. Exploring the Link between Cognitive Processes and Learning from Refutational Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the cognitive processes used by individuals who read a refutational text about physics and demonstrated conceptual change learning. Four high school readers whose initial conceptions differed from the scientific conception of Newton's first law thought aloud while reading a refutational…

  4. Assessing Cognitive Load Theory to Improve Student Learning for Mechanical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impelluso, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer programming class for students of mechanical engineering was redesigned and assessed: Cognitive Load Theory was used to redesign the content; online technologies were used to redesign the delivery. Student learning improved and the dropout rate was reduced. This article reports on both attitudinal and objective assessment: comparing…

  5. The Effects of Gender Variety and Power Disparity on Group Cognitive Complexity in Collaborative Learning Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curseu, Petru Lucian; Sari, Kimzana

    2015-01-01

    This study sets up to test the extent to which gender variety moderates the impact of power disparity on group cognitive complexity (GCC) and satisfaction with the group in a collaborative learning setting. Using insights from gender differences in perceptions, orientations and conflict handling behavior in negotiation, as well as gender…

  6. A Robot-Partner for Preschool Children Learning English Using Socio-Cognitive Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Elvis; Benvenuti, Martina

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory study in which a humanoid robot (MecWilly) acted as a partner to preschool children, helping them to learn English words. In order to use the Socio-Cognitive Conflict paradigm to induce the knowledge acquisition process, we designed a playful activity in which children worked in pairs with another child or with…

  7. Exploring the Link between Cognitive Processes and Learning from Refutational Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the cognitive processes used by individuals who read a refutational text about physics and demonstrated conceptual change learning. Four high school readers whose initial conceptions differed from the scientific conception of Newton's first law thought aloud while reading a refutational…

  8. Understanding the Cognitive Processes and Metacognitive Strategies That Work with Mathematical Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The reality is that approximately 5-8% of school-age students have memory or other cognitive deficits that interfere with their ability to acquire, master, and apply mathematical concepts and skills (Geary, 2004). These students with Mathematical Learning Disabilities (MLD) are at risk for failure in middle school mathematics because they…

  9. SAT Performance: Understanding the Contributions of Cognitive/Learning and Social/Personality Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda; McNaughton-Cassill, Mary

    2011-07-01

    This study identifies a number of sources of individual differences in SAT performance by examining the simultaneous contributions of factors from two otherwise disparate research areas, namely cognition/learning and social/personality. Preliminary analysis revealed that just the cognitive/learning measures accounted for 37.8, 41.4 and 21.9% of the variance in SAT, V-SAT and Q-SAT performance, respectively while just the social/personality measures accounted for 21.4, 18.2 and 17.3% of the variance. When combined, cognitive/learning and social/personality factors accounted for even larger amounts of variance in performance; specifically 43.4, 44.6 and 28% for the SAT, V-SAT and Q-SAT, respectively. Finally, the results revealed that three measures consistently predicted performance on the SAT, V-SAT and Q-SAT; two measures were the learning/cognitive factors of working memory and integration of new text-based information with information from long-term memory and one measure was the social/personality factor, test anxiety.

  10. Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Achievement Deficits in Children with Mathematical Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, David C.; Hoard, Mary K.; Byrd-Craven, Jennifer; Nugent, Lara; Numtee, Chattavee

    2007-01-01

    Using strict and lenient mathematics achievement cutoff scores to define a learning disability, respective groups of children who are math disabled (MLD, n = 15) and low achieving (LA, n = 44) were identified. These groups and a group of typically achieving (TA, n = 46) children were administered a battery of mathematical cognition, working…

  11. A Historical Writing Apprenticeship for Adolescents: Integrating Disciplinary Learning with Cognitive Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Paz, Susan; Monte-Sano, Chauncey; Felton, Mark; Croninger, Robert; Jackson, Cara; Piantedosi, Kelly Worland

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which an 18-day history and writing curriculum intervention, taught over the course of one year, helped culturally and academically diverse adolescents achieve important disciplinary literacy learning in history. Teachers used a cognitive apprenticeship form of instruction for the integration of historical reading…

  12. Prenatal Cigarette Exposure and Infant Learning Stimulation as Predictors of Cognitive Control in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Enrico; Buckner, John C.; Earls, Felton

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal exposures to neurotoxins and postnatal parenting practices have been shown to independently predict variations in the cognitive development and emotional-behavioral well-being of infants and children. We examined the independent contributions of prenatal cigarette exposure and infant learning stimulation, as well as their…

  13. Income Changes and Cognitive Stimulation in Young Children's Home Learning Environments. JCPR Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth.

    Early home learning environments are the result of interactions between the developing child and the opportunity structures provided by the family. Income is one of several resources that affect the cognitive stimulation that children experience. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this study examines the influence of…

  14. The price of learning good from bad: motivational costs and benefits in cognition and affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massar, S.A.A.

    2012-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis addressed the interactions between motivation, emotion, and cognition. The starting point for the research in this thesis was the question how inter-individual neurophysiological differences can be related to reward- and threat-related learning processes. Central

  15. Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 7 November). Physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with learning outcomes and cognition in adult distance learners. Paper presentation at the ICO [Interuniversity Center for Educational Research] National Fall School,

  16. Cognitive Neuroscience and Mathematics Learning: How Far Have We Come? Where Do We Need to Go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Lyons, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary on the ZDM special issue: "Cognitive neuroscience and mathematics learning--revisited after 5 years," we explore the progress that has been made since ZDM published a similar special issue in 2010. We consider the extent to which future frontiers and methodological concerns raised in the commentary on the 2010 issue by…

  17. The potential relevance of cognitive neuroscience for the development and use of technology-enhanced learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard-Jones, Paul; Ott, Michela; van Leeuwen, Theo; De Smedt, Bert

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the application of cognitive neuroscience in educational thinking and practice, and here we review findings from neuroscience that demonstrate its potential relevance to technology-enhanced learning (TEL). First, we identify some of the issues in integrating

  18. Assessing Cognitive Load Theory to Improve Student Learning for Mechanical Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impelluso, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A computer programming class for students of mechanical engineering was redesigned and assessed: Cognitive Load Theory was used to redesign the content; online technologies were used to redesign the delivery. Student learning improved and the dropout rate was reduced. This article reports on both attitudinal and objective assessment: comparing…

  19. An Intelligent Tutoring System for Learning Chinese with a Cognitive Model of the Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Michal; Lison, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present an intelligent tutoring system that lets students of Chinese learn words and grammatical constructions. It relies on a Bayesian, linguistically motivated cognitive model that represents the learner's knowledge. This model is dynamically updated given observations about the learner's behaviour in the exercises, and employed at runtime to…

  20. The Potential Relevance of Cognitive Neuroscience for the Development and Use of Technology-Enhanced Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Jones, Paul; Ott, Michela; van Leeuwen, Theo; De Smedt, Bert

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the application of cognitive neuroscience in educational thinking and practice, and here we review findings from neuroscience that demonstrate its potential relevance to technology-enhanced learning (TEL). First, we identify some of the issues in integrating neuroscientific concepts into TEL research. We caution…