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Sample records for cogema workers monitored

  1. Analysis of the mortality among Cogema workers monitored for external radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Hitz, M.; Samson, E.; Rogel, A.; Telle-Lamberton, M.; Tirmarche, M.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study follows 9287 Cogema workers exposed to low level of ionizing radiation from the beginning of employment to the end of 1994. This paper presents analyses of the mortality of Cogema workers monitored for external radiation exposure and the relation between their mortality and their cumulative external radiation dose. Workers were followed up for an average of 13 years. The percentage of subjects lost to follow up was less than 1%. during the follow-up period, 441 deaths occurred. The mean cumulative dose among the whole cohort was 19.4 mSv. As expected, the mortality of the cohort was lower than that of the French national population. The healthy worker effect is often observed in other nuclear workers studies. Part of the healthy worker effect is explained by a proportion of unemployed persons in general population, with a higher mortality rate. All causes S.M.R. increased with calendar period and duration of employment. this increase was not significant for all cancers S.M.R. by duration of employment. This could illustrate the decrease of the initial selection at employment with time. A significant increase in risk was observed for all cancers excluding leukemia mortality with increase of radiation dose in the 15-country study. Significant excess of leukemia by cumulative radiation exposure was observed in the 3-country study and was borderline significant in the 15-country study and in the UK National register for radiation workers study. A positive trend, not statistically significant, by level of external doses was observed in our study for all cancers and leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia mortality, but the analyses lack of statistical power. A significant trend was observed only for non-Hodgkin lymphoma death, but considering the large number of statistic tests computed, this result must be carefully interpreted. A borderline significant trend was observed for lung cancer death, a significant increase risk of lung cancer death

  2. Cancer mortality of nuclear workers of CEA and COGEMA from 1969 to 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirmarche, M.; Raphalen, A.; Allin, F.; Le Guen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Cancer mortality of the nuclear workers of CEA and COGEMA has been collected by the occupational health services of both firms from 1969 to 1986. The data are related only to the workers who died when in activity. Only very few workers left CEA and COGEMA before retirement so we consider this mortality survey as describing correctly the cancer mortality for the age groups less than 60-65 years old. Compared to the national mortality of same sex, age and calendar period, by the method of indirect standardization, the only excess observed was in the female population, linked to breast cancer mortality. The male population demonstrated a high healthy worker effect, even for cancer mortality. This study has now to be completed by an typical epidemiological cohort study in order to test cancer mortality after retirement and to discuss a possible relation with occupational exposure. (author)

  3. COGEMA in Niger. Inquiry report on the situation of workers of SOMAiR and COMINAK, Niger's subsidies of the AREVA-COGEMA group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    After having briefly recalled the activities of COGEMA's subsidies in Niger, presented the context of the inquiry, and made some remarks about COGEMA's attitude with respect to this inquiry, this report gives an extremely critical analysis of security measures and working conditions: non existent information about risks related to radioactivity, non existent or insufficient security equipment, exposure of workers to ionizing radiation by water, ignored security orders, random dosimetry controls. The second part recalls the radiological risks present in uranium mines, gives a critical analysis of the worker medical follow-up quality, considers as inexplicable the absence of professional diseases, and discusses the issue of work accidents. It finally outlines that control structures (Mine Direction, Work Inspection) are inadequate

  4. AREVA in Gabon. Inquiry report on the situation of workers of the COMUF, Gabonese subsidy of the AREVA-COGEMA group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    After a recall of the development of uranium mining activities by the COMUF Company which is now a subsidy company of the AREVA-COGEMA group, and a presentation of the inquiry, this document reports the inquiry performed in Gabon about the medical issue (with notably inadequate security measures) and about the environmental issue related to the site rehabilitation. It also reports the analysis of questionnaires sent to ex-workers in Gabon, as well as of testimonies obtained from expatriates who are suffering from health problems. The report discusses the possibilities to take legal actions for different reasons: unintentional injuries and homicide, endangering the life of others, or inexcusable error. In conclusion the report outlines that the risk was known, that there was no information about it, and that people were deliberately maintained in ignorance

  5. Cogema's transatlantic partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurphy, M.; Ihde, R.

    1991-01-01

    Cogema's transatlantic partnership, the B+W Fuel Company, is a natural evolution of Cogema's US fuel cycle activities. The partnership in which important elements of the French nuclear industry teamed with a long-established, well-respected US industrial partner to build a company for the future is explained. 1 fig

  6. Dosimetry optimization at COGEMA-La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalimbadjian, J.

    2000-01-01

    At the present time, the la Hague site strives to apply international recommendations together with national regulations concerning radiation protection, and especially the respect of limitation and optimization principles. The application of these principles is based on the implementation of a passive dosimetry and an active dosimetry. The monthly passive dosimetry is monitored by means of a photographic dosimetry film, completed with lithium fluorine thermoluminescent film badges. This personal dosimetry common to X, β, γ and neutron radiations is carried out in close relationship between the Radiation Protection Department, the Occupational Medical Department and the staff running the Plant. The application or ALARA's principle as well as that of radiation protection optimization implies to implement a complementary active dosimetry enabling to gain in real time, the personal dosimetry of each intervening person, either they be COGEMA's workers or external companies'. This active dosimetry provides with following information: This preventive dosimetry is based on the knowledge of doses integration in real time and is fitted with alarm thresholds according to the total amount of doses and dose rates. Thresholds on the dose rate are also set relatively to the radiological environment. This knowledge of doses and dose rates allows a stricter management of the works, while analyzing them according to the nature of the work, to the location and to the skills of the intervening people. This dosimetry allows to analyze and optimize doses integration according to the works nature for the whole intervening staff. The la Hague Site has developed an active personal dosimetry system, common to every intervening person, COGEMA or external companies. The DOSICARD was thus elaborated, shaped as an electronic dosimeter fitted with an alarm and a smart card. The access to controlled areas is conditioned to information given by the DOSICARD concerning medical aptitudes and

  7. A look inside Cogema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This article highlights four major acquisition by Cogema as it attempts to become the world's only fully integrated supplies of nuclear fuel. April 1992, Cogema buys 70% of German mining and trading company Urangesellschaft, significantly increasing its uranium reserves in the so-called open-quotes dollar-zoneclose quotes of the US, Canada, and Australia, as well as in Namibia and Niger. The UG deal solidifies Cogema's stature as a top-rank uranium producer and gives it a large presence in uranium trading. July 1992, As part of the consolidation of the French nuclear industry, Cogema buys the front-end fuel cycle and transportation businesses of Pechiney. February 1993, Cogema buys Cameco's 20% share of the Cluff Lake mine in Saskatchewan, giving it full ownership of one of the world's leading uranium deposits, with ore grades around 1% U3O8. May 1993, in its biggest deal yet, Cogema buys all the uranium assets of the French oil group Total. The deal leaves Cogema as France's only uranium producer

  8. COGEMA: yesterday, today, tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    CEA's 100%-owned subsidiary Cogema was set up in July 1966. 1979 was satisfactory and 1980 looks promising. Cogema is involved in all the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle except for the manufacture of the fuel itself, a gap that it is planning to fill. Cogema's discovery of the Coutras deposit in the Gironde is 'the good news' of the year. Work on the Eurodif uranium enrichment plant at Tricastin is almost finished and by the end of 1981 it will be operating at its full capacity of 10,8 million SWU. On the processing side, work on expanding existing facilities has begun (UP2 800 and UP3). In 1985 La Hague's foreign clients UP2 will process 1,200 tons and UP3 6000 tons [fr

  9. The Cogema Group and the sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the COGEMA Group commitment to sustainable development. Through this commitment, COGEMA is pursuing a policy of ''global performance'' allying economic progress, social progress and protection of the environment, in all its activities. This report points out the many contributions that COGEMA activities make to sustainable development: monitoring of the environment and of releases from its facilities; progress in Research and Development (treatment of liquid and gas effluents, optimized recycling of spent nuclear materials and reduction of their volume, etc.); certification; support for local economic development in the areas around the Group sites, not only in France, but also abroad, as at the mines in Canada and Niger; a strong policy of openness and transparency in its nuclear activities and ongoing dialogue with NGO. The document lays the bases for a number of indicators that can be used as of next year to measure the Group contribution to meeting the challenges of sustainable development. More-detailed statistical data are also presented in the annual environmental reports from the industrial sites in the COGEMA Group. (A.L.B.)

  10. The Cogema group in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The partnership between the Cogema group and Japan in the domain of fuel cycle started about 20 years ago and the 10 Japanese nuclear operators are all clients of the Cogema group. The 1997 turnover realized with Japan reached 3.6 billions of francs (11% of the total turnover of the group). This short paper presents briefly the nuclear program of Japan (nuclear park, spent fuels reprocessing-recycling strategy) and the contracts between Cogema and the Japanese nuclear operators (natural uranium, uranium conversion and enrichment, spent fuel reprocessing, plutonium recycle and MOX fuel production markets). (J.S.)

  11. The Cogema Group and the sustainable development; Le groupe Cogema et le developpement durable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents the COGEMA Group commitment to sustainable development. Through this commitment, COGEMA is pursuing a policy of ''global performance'' allying economic progress, social progress and protection of the environment, in all its activities. This report points out the many contributions that COGEMA activities make to sustainable development: monitoring of the environment and of releases from its facilities; progress in Research and Development (treatment of liquid and gas effluents, optimized recycling of spent nuclear materials and reduction of their volume, etc.); certification; support for local economic development in the areas around the Group sites, not only in France, but also abroad, as at the mines in Canada and Niger; a strong policy of openness and transparency in its nuclear activities and ongoing dialogue with NGO. The document lays the bases for a number of indicators that can be used as of next year to measure the Group contribution to meeting the challenges of sustainable development. More-detailed statistical data are also presented in the annual environmental reports from the industrial sites in the COGEMA Group. (A.L.B.)

  12. COGEMA's UMF [Uranium Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, G.; Bertrand, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The French government-owned corporation, COGEMA, is responsible for the nuclear fuel cycle. This paper describes the activities at COGEMA's Pierrelatte facility, especially its Uranium Management Facility. UF6 handling and storage is described for natural, enriched, depleted, and reprocessed uranium. UF6 quality control specifications, sampling, and analysis (halocarbon and volatile fluorides, isotopic analysis, uranium assay, and impurities) are described. In addition, the paper discusses the filling and cleaning of containers and security at UMF

  13. Cogema looks to wider markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruikshank, A.

    1984-01-01

    As the pace of the French nuclear programme slackens off, Cogema is planning to compete even more vigorously in world fuel cycle markets. The company believes the foundations for success lie in its comprehensive range of fuel cycle activities, its status as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, and its experience in fulfilling the bulk of French fuel cycle needs. To build on these foundations, Cogema is exploring for uranium, investing heavily in new plant, and strengthening its commercial management. (author)

  14. Radiation monitoring of uranium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    In order to manage radiological hazards in the workplace, it is necessary to have reliable measurements of workplace radiation levels and estimates of exposures and doses to workers. Over the past several years there have been many changes not only to the science of monitoring and dose assessment, but also to the regulatory framework. New International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations on dose in ICRP Publication 60 (1991) and the implications of the ICRP's new respiratory tract model in ICRP Publication 66 (1994) are of particular importance. In addition, triggered by the act establishing the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), which will replace the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), there is considerable activity in the review and development of regulatory guidance. Concurrent with these activities is the introduction of innovative mining procedures in Saskatchewan in order to extract uranium ore of particularly high grade. In view of these developments, the ACRP considered that a formal review of current monitoring practices would benefit both the CNSC and its licensees. In this report, 'uranium workers' refers to workers at uranium mines and mills, and workers at natural-uranium refineries, conversion, and fuel fabrication facilities; issues relating to long-term tailings management and to the handling of enriched materials are not addressed in this document. The report will have some relevance to workers in non-uranium mines and in industries handling naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) since, in some circumstances, these activities can present similar workplace radiation hazards. The report outlines the radiological hazards encountered in the Canadian uranium industry, and reviews current radiological monitoring practices and options; appendices include a glossary, a more technical discussion of monitoring methods, and an examination of errors and uncertainties in measurements of radon progeny and long

  15. COGEMA, fueling the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferre, Isabelle; Modigliani, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    On June 29, for the first time, Cogema's name has appeared on television screens as part of an advertising campaign which will also include the print media. The campaign is the culmination of a program requested by a vast majority of Cogema personnel. The kick-off of this campaign marks a new direction in communications for Cogema, one designed to widen the reach of its reputation and to build a positive image of the Group in the eyes of the public. The publics is not familiar with Cogema now. Our domestic and international achievements and our technical and human capabilities are rarely mentioned by the media. Cogema decided to take action and to make ourselves known, as would any other commercial company operating in a competitive environment, confident of our capabilities and in our future prospects for growth. We want the public to know about our company's strengths, so that they may contribute the building of Cogema's future

  16. COGEMA, fueling the nuclear power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferre, Isabelle; Modigliani, Sylvie [COGEMA, Communication Division (France); and others

    1993-07-01

    On June 29, for the first time, Cogema's name has appeared on television screens as part of an advertising campaign which will also include the print media. The campaign is the culmination of a program requested by a vast majority of Cogema personnel. The kick-off of this campaign marks a new direction in communications for Cogema, one designed to widen the reach of its reputation and to build a positive image of the Group in the eyes of the public. The publics is not familiar with Cogema now. Our domestic and international achievements and our technical and human capabilities are rarely mentioned by the media. Cogema decided to take action and to make ourselves known, as would any other commercial company operating in a competitive environment, confident of our capabilities and in our future prospects for growth. We want the public to know about our company's strengths, so that they may contribute the building of Cogema's future.

  17. Atom medicine. The history of health at work at the Cea and at the Cogema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, V.

    2005-01-01

    This work aims to inform any people interested in the origins and the development of the medical surveillance of workers exposed to ionizing radiations by relating the history and experience of medical services and biological and medical analysis laboratories of the Cea and Cogema. (N.C.)

  18. Mining activities of the Cogema group; Activite miniere du groupe Cogema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1996-12-31

    This brochure is a general presentation of the mining activities of the COGEMA group. COGEMA is specialized in the whole operations of the nuclear fuel cycle and is responsible for about 20% of the worldwide uranium production with the exploitation of French mines and its participation in the exploitation of mines abroad, mainly in Canada, USA, Niger and Gabon. This document is divided in seven chapters: the search for uranium ores and the mining prospecting, the uranium deposits and the worldwide market, the exploitation of uranium ores (techniques and mines exploited by the COGEMA group), the processing of ores, the radioactivity and the mining installations, the environmental protection and the rehabilitation of sites (environmental survey and management of mining sites), application of COGEMA`s know-how to other domains such as: gold ore processing, research and development studies, instrumentation and radioprotection, soils cleansing and sites rehabilitation. This brochure is illustrated with several photos and pictures. (J.S.).

  19. Cogema gives its communication a new impetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saulnier, J.-E.

    2001-01-01

    Starting 2 November 1999, COGEMA launched a mass public communication campaign and creating an Internet site, equipped with cameras (web-cams), to make everyone familiar with the COGEMA plant at La Hague. This system is designed to serve a communication policy that is resolutely open and attentive to French public concerns: - The COGEMA plant at La Hague is often perceived as a mystery, occult and dehumanized world. This communication campaign, entitled 'We have nothing to hide', illustrated COGEMA's determination to inform the citizens in the greatest possible transparence and its wish to bring the Group's industrial operations and the persons working there closer to the public. The campaign included TV commercials and press ads. The underlying principle is to work on issues that have made news. The televised system included two films, shot at La Hague. The first, lasting 90 seconds, consists of interviews and testimonies of employees who represent the professional and human diversity of the plant. The second, in 45-second format, presents the questions to which public opinion wants answers. These questions are also repeated in the press ads. - To ensure that everyone obtains all the answers to his questions, the TV spots and press ads refer to the website http://www.cogemalahague.fr and to a toll-free number 0 800-64-64-64 . This campaign was the first stage of a long-term approach. Its positive reception from the public strengthens COGEMA's resolution to anticipate the legitimate information's needs expressed by the public opinion. As a responsible firm, COGEMA means to adapt her communication policy in order to make the whole activities of the Group widely known. Beyond communication, COGEMA intends to carry on showing her attachment to nuclear industry and bolstering this sector's interests on the international scene. (authors)

  20. Year 2003. GRNC's appreciation of the dose estimates presented in the annual environmental monitoring report of Cogema-La-Hague facility. Detailed reports; Annee 2003. Appreciation par le GRNC de l'estimation des doses presentee dans le rapport annuel de surveillance de l'environnement de COGEMA-LA-HAGUE. Rapports detailles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-06-15

    The 'Groupe Radioecologie Nord Cotentin' (GRNC) has carried out a very thorough evaluation of the assessment of doses due to discharges from the Cap de la Hague nuclear site carried out by COGEMA, the site operators. The group has looked at all aspects of the assessment methods and data to ensure that they agree with the results presented in the 2003 annual environmental report of the operator. The computer tool, ACADIE, developed to assess the doses, has been used by the GRNC members to carry out their own calculations. This document comprises the detailed report of the GRNC and its synthesis. The detailed report includes: 1 - critical analysis of the 2003 source term, the data transmitted by Cogema (presentation of the July 6, 2005 meeting, status of atmospheric effluents, status of liquid effluents at sea, fuel data), the history of liquid and gaseous effluents between 1966 and 2003; 2 - detailed comparison between model and measurements; 3 - ACADIE users manual, doses calculated by the GRNC during its third mission (year 2003). (J.S.)

  1. A new organisation for the Cogema group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The Cogema group hopes to find a second business, being awaiting the nuclear area starts again. It needs eighteen months to find it. It must have an empathy with its first business and does not be in competition with its customers. (N.C.)

  2. COGEMA's national advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallot, Christine

    1999-01-01

    Goals of COGEMA's advertising campaign concerning nuclear fuel recycling are to: speak out in an area where COGEMA has legitimacy and is expected; and to take part in the discussion to support and defend an activity that is important for COGEMA. Targets are: back up opinion relays by reaching the general public; and back COGEMA personnel. The advertising strategy can be defined as follows: what is recommended for other industries (sorting and then recycling) is COGEMA's practice for spent fuel, with very significant advantages for the community in terms of economy and ecology

  3. Biological monitoring results for cadmium exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, M A; Freeman, C S; Grossman, E A; Martonik, J

    1996-11-01

    As part of a settlement agreement with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) involving exposure to cadmium (Cd), a battery production facility provided medical surveillance data to OSHA for review. Measurements of cadmium in blood, cadmium in urine, and beta 2-microglobulin in urine were obtained for more than 100 workers over an 18-month period. Some airborne Cd exposure data were also made available. Two subpopulations of this cohort were of primary interest in evaluating compliance with the medical surveillance provisions of the Cadmium Standard. These were a group of 16 workers medically removed from cadmium exposure due to elevations in some biological parameter, and a group of platemakers. Platemaking had presented a particularly high exposure opportunity and had recently undergone engineering interventions to minimize exposure. The effect on three biological monitoring parameters of medical removal protection in the first group and engineering controls in platemakers is reported. Results reveal that both medical removal from cadmium exposures and exposure abatement through the use of engineering and work practice controls generally result in declines in biological monitoring parameters of exposed workers. Implications for the success of interventions are discussed.

  4. On-site monitoring of plutonium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.; Richardson, C.K.; Paulka, S.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: As part of the Maralinga rehabilitation program it is necessary to implement a system of on-site monitoring for the workers in order to ensure that they do not exceed recommended dose limits. The main problem in the rehabilitation work is the inhalation of dusts which contain micron sized plutonium particles. Using the new ICRP lung model and available data derived from measurements on contaminated soils, the intake for a dose of 20 mSv was calculated to be 1200 Bq. Four methods are available for direct measurements on workers; nasal swabs, faecal analysis, urine analysis and lung monitoring. The first two techniques are sensitive but will give varying results depending of the time interval between exposure and sampling. They are also difficult to implement on a routine basis. For the second two techniques, the activity in the lungs and the activity excreted per day in the urine remain relatively constant for several years following an intake, making more accurate dose estimates possible. The ICRP lung model predicts deposition in the lung of the order of 5% of intake and urinary excretion models predict approximately 10 -5 of this will be excreted daily in the urine. Lung monitoring of workers will be performed routinely at Maralinga in a partly enclosed room constructed from 10cm of steel, using two 50 mm diameter germanium detectors shielded with lead collimators. The detectors will measure 241 Am, which has grown in following the decay of 241 Pu, and the minimum detectable activity will be 15 - 20 Bq depending on the chest thickness and chest wall thickness of the individual being measured. Urine will be collected routinely and selected samples will be measured. The minimum detectable activity will be 2001μBq of 239 Pu in a daily urine sample

  5. A new organisation for the Cogema group; Une nouvelle organisation pour le Groupe Cogema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2000-06-01

    The Cogema group hopes to find a second business, being awaiting the nuclear area starts again. It needs eighteen months to find it. It must have an empathy with its first business and does not be in competition with its customers. (N.C.)

  6. Transport of oxide spent fuel. Industrial experience of COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1985-01-01

    COGEMA, the world leading Company in the reprocessing industry who is also involved in the transport activity, is ruling all transports of spent fuel to La Hague reprocessing plant. The paper summarizes some aspects of the experience gained in this field (road, rail and sea transports) and describes the standards defined by COGEMA as regards transport casks. These standards are as follows: - casks of dry type, - casks of the maximum size compatible with rail transports, - capability to be unloaded with standardized equipment and following standard procedures. Considering: 1) the extremely large experience of COGEMA for all transport modes and, 2) the fact that all these transports are performed in full compliance with the IAEA recommendations, COGEMA is convinced that its experience could serve to help countries or utilities willing to undertake to establish a transport system within their own country COGEMA is prepared to contribute to this task on terms to be agreed [fr

  7. Cogema and the environment. Environmental policy. The Cogema group in the environment service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This document presents the organization of the environmental policy at Cogema facilities. The first part presents the environmental policy of the group: integration of environment management at all levels, reduction of effluents and control of their environmental impact, integrating environment protection at the design stage of facilities, quality and improvement policy, expenses devoted to environment protection (investments, R and D, funds), public information. The second part concerns the transfer of Cogema's know-how in environmental engineering towards other industrial sectors: radioactivity measurements, mine and quarry sites rehabilitation, industrial wastes and effluents processing, decontamination and rehabilitation of ancient polluted industrial sites, foreign activities (rehabilitation of US-DOE military sites, aid to Eastern countries. (J.S.)

  8. Transport of oxide spent fuel. Industrial experience of COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1983-01-01

    COGEMA is ruling all transports of spent fuel to La Hague reprocessing plant. The paper summarizes some aspects of the experience gained in this field (road, rail and sea transports) and describes the standards defined by COGEMA as regards transport casks. These standards are as follows: - casks of dry type, - casks of the maximum size compatible with rail transports, - capability to be unloaded with standardized equipment and following standard procedures

  9. Information centres: hyper-qualitative tool of Cogema's communication policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadeyron, P.

    1993-01-01

    The information centres are an indispensable link in the chain of Cogema's communication policy. They enable a complete adaptation to each visitor's different level of understanding and thus improve the quality of the transmission of information to a reduced, but totally sensitive, target. The information centres therefore represent ''quality'' tools which are complementary to other means of communication. Moreover, they emphasize Cogema's resolution to communicate and formalize its communication policy. (author)

  10. COGEMA's employment and training policy for its foreign subsidiaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamani, A.

    2002-01-01

    COGEMA has actively pursued a policy of employing country nationals for its foreign subsidiaries in Niger, Gabon, Canada and Kazakhstan. The process of replacing foreign staff by nationals in Niger is first described, detailing the personnel management objectives and procedures, the main difficulties encountered, the current situation and the lessons to take from this experience. COGEMA's policies and ways applied in other countries to increase the proportions of nationals are then presented. (author)

  11. Year 2004. GRNC's appreciation of the dose estimates presented in the annual environmental monitoring report of Cogema-La-Hague facility. Second GRNC viewpoint. Detailed report; Annee 2004. Appreciation par le GRNC de l'estimation des doses presentee dans le rapport annuel de surveillance de l'environnement de Cogema-La-Hague. Deuxieme avis du GRNC. Rapport detaille

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The 'Groupe Radioecologie Nord Cotentin' (GRNC) has carried out a very thorough evaluation of the assessment of doses due to discharges from the Cap de la Hague nuclear site carried out by COGEMA, the site operators. The group has looked at all aspects of the assessment methods and data to ensure that they agree with the results presented in the 2004 annual environmental report of the operator. The computer tool, ACADIE, developed to assess the doses, has been used by the GRNC members to carry out their own calculations. This document comprises the detailed report of the GRNC and its synthesis. The detailed report includes: 1 - critical analysis of the 2004 source term, the data transmitted by Cogema (status of atmospheric effluents, status of liquid effluents at sea, fuel data), the history of liquid and gaseous effluents between 1966 and 2004; 2 - detailed comparison between model and 2004 measurements; 3 - detail of the 2004 efficient dose calculations. (J.S.)

  12. Mobile health monitoring system for community health workers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sibiya, G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available of hypertension as it provides real time information and eliminates the need to visit a healthcare facility to take blood pressure readings. Our proposed mobile health monitoring system enables faster computerization of data that has been recorded... pressure, heart rate and glucose readings. These reading closely related to most common NCDs. D. Feedback to health worker and the subject of care Community health workers are often not professionally trained on health. As a result they are not expected...

  13. Monitoring intakes of radionuclides by nuclear power plants workers in France: materials, methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonin, M.; Le Guen, B.; Bailloeuil, C.; Gerondal, M. [Electricite De France (France)

    2000-05-01

    EDF (Electricite de France) owns 57 operating reactors distributed on 20 sites. Individual monitoring for intakes of radionuclides is done by whole body gamma countings and excretion bioassays. This monitoring concerns all EDF workers (about 20,000), and also subcontractor personnel (about 40,000 people per year). The aim of monitoring is to detect any intake above the recording level and to assess, as precisely as possible, internal doses. ICRP publications no.30 and 54 are used for internal dose calculations. Whole body countings (approximately 200,000 per year) are made by occupational health services on each nuclear site. The equipment consists of: 1. two whole body counters with two large NaI detectors, the approximate detection limit is 150 Bq in Co-60 for a 1-minute count. 2. one shielded chair with two smallers NaI detectors (one for thyroid and one for thoraco-abdominal region), specially designed for iodine contamination case, or casualties on stretchers. A special medical software program incorporates: 3. an operating system containing a module to ensure the quality control of measurements. 4. a measurement interpretation system with a screening histogram facility for activity alarm levels and spectrometry gamma analysis. 5. an administrative database for nationwide monitoring of all EDF and non-EDF workers. An EDF central radiotoxicology laboratory, located in the suburbs of Paris, analyses all the biological samples (about 8,000 per year, urines, faeces or nose blows) and centralises the results. At the occupational health service's request, the following analyses can be done: 1. tritium activity measurements (liquid scintillation) with a detection limit of 75 Bq per litre, 2. gamma spectrometry (HPGe detectors) on urines and faeces ash samples with a detection limit of 0.5 Bq per sample for one hours of counting. 3. alpha spectrometry (after chemical treatment) on urines and faeces ash samples with a lower detection limit of 0.2 mBq per sample

  14. Monitoring intakes of radionuclides by nuclear power plants workers in France: materials, methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonin, M.; Le Guen, B.; Bailloeuil, C.; Gerondal, M.

    2000-01-01

    EDF (Electricite de France) owns 57 operating reactors distributed on 20 sites. Individual monitoring for intakes of radionuclides is done by whole body gamma countings and excretion bioassays. This monitoring concerns all EDF workers (about 20,000), and also subcontractor personnel (about 40,000 people per year). The aim of monitoring is to detect any intake above the recording level and to assess, as precisely as possible, internal doses. ICRP publications no.30 and 54 are used for internal dose calculations. Whole body countings (approximately 200,000 per year) are made by occupational health services on each nuclear site. The equipment consists of: 1. two whole body counters with two large NaI detectors, the approximate detection limit is 150 Bq in Co-60 for a 1-minute count. 2. one shielded chair with two smallers NaI detectors (one for thyroid and one for thoraco-abdominal region), specially designed for iodine contamination case, or casualties on stretchers. A special medical software program incorporates: 3. an operating system containing a module to ensure the quality control of measurements. 4. a measurement interpretation system with a screening histogram facility for activity alarm levels and spectrometry gamma analysis. 5. an administrative database for nationwide monitoring of all EDF and non-EDF workers. An EDF central radiotoxicology laboratory, located in the suburbs of Paris, analyses all the biological samples (about 8,000 per year, urines, faeces or nose blows) and centralises the results. At the occupational health service's request, the following analyses can be done: 1. tritium activity measurements (liquid scintillation) with a detection limit of 75 Bq per litre, 2. gamma spectrometry (HPGe detectors) on urines and faeces ash samples with a detection limit of 0.5 Bq per sample for one hours of counting. 3. alpha spectrometry (after chemical treatment) on urines and faeces ash samples with a lower detection limit of 0.2 mBq per sample for 72

  15. COGEMA/TRANSNUCLEAIRE's experience with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanzy, Y.; Guillou, E.

    1998-01-01

    Facing a continuous increase in the fuel enrichments, COGEMA and TRANSNUCLEAIRE have implemented step by step a burnup credit programme to improve the capacity of their equipment without major physical modification. Many authorizations have been granted by the French competent authority in wet storage, reprocessing and transport since 1981. As concerns transport, numerous authorizations have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, those authorizations are restricted to PWR Fuel type assemblies made of enriched uranium. The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the systems are evaluated by calculations performed with well qualified French codes developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APPOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The authorizations are based on the assurance that the burnup considered is met on the least irradiated part of the fuel assemblies. Besides, the most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is restricted to major actinides only. This conservative approach allows not to take credit for any axial profile. On the operational side, the procedures have been reevaluated to avoid misloadings and a burnup verification is made before transport, storage and reprocessing. Depending on the level of burnup credit, it consists of a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice in France and Germany and new improvements are still in progress: extended qualifications of the codes are made to enable the use of six selected fission products in the criticality evaluations. (author)

  16. Personal monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1981-12-01

    The Personal Radiation Monitoring Service operated by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is outlined and the types of monitors used for assessment of doses received by radiation workers are described. The distribution of doses received by radiation workers in different occupational categories is determined. From these distributions, the average doses received have been assessed and the maximum likely additional increase in cancer deaths in Australia as a result of occupational exposure estimated. This increase is shown to be very small. There is, however, a considerable spread of doses received by individuals within occupational groups

  17. Power and openness of 'Cogema'. Management of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronova, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the 'Cogema' group activity in all stages of nuclear industrial cycle is covered. It is noticed, that 'Cogema' have joint ventures in the field of uranium wells development in the different countries of the world. In March of 1996 'Cogema' jointly with the National Atomic Company 'Kazatomprom' (Kazakhstan) the 'Katko' joint venture have implemented. J V 'Katko' posses with two licences on uranium ores mining for a 25 year term. Use of 'Muyunkum' uranium deposit (South Kazakhstan) carrying out by the mean of leaching technology with following ores reprocessing at the pilot plant. Capacity of the plant is 100 t of commercial uranium concentrate production per year. To middle of the summer of 2001 the plant was put into operation

  18. Cogema experience on retrieving and conditioning solid radwaste previously stored in pits. The La Hague north west pit case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodin, F.; Alexandre, D.; Fournier, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    Short lived, low and medium level waste called 'technological waste' produced by the La Hague Reprocessing Plant have been stored in the La Hague North-West concrete-lined pits until implementation at ANDRA's Centre de Stockage de la Manche (CSM). COGEMA decided to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of humid solid radwaste, stored in bulk in pits. This report describes the experience gained from February 1990 to December 1998, taking into account radwaste and integrated dose rate results conditioning such waste. The procedures and means used and improved by COGEMA to comply with ANDRA's storage standards and the ever-decreasing financial costs generated by the workers, allowed to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of old solid radwaste with competitive costs and in complete safety and protection of the environment. (authors)

  19. Personnel monitoring of DAE workers in Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma Savitri, P.; Bhattacharya, Madhumita; Reddy, K.S.; Chourasiya, G.

    2008-01-01

    Occupational exposure to radiation occurs in an organization, which involves work with radioactive sources directly or indirectly. It is recognized that radiation protection is only one component that must be addressed to protect the overall health and safety of the workers. Radiation monitoring is one of the key issues in radiological protection. TLD Unit, Hyderabad is part of the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, HS and E group, BARC and has been functioning at Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad since 1985. The unit monitors external dose to 1800 occupation workers from six Department of Atomic Energy units namely Nuclear Fuel Complex, Atomic Minerals Division, Electronic Corporation of India Limited, National Centre for Composition and Characterization of Materials, JONAKI, Hospital in Heavy Water Plant, Manuguru of Andhra Pradesh. This paper analyses dose distribution of radiation workers working in DAE facilities of Andhra Pradesh since the services started to the respective institutions. Excessive exposures of radiation cases are also presented in this paper. (author)

  20. Radioactivity in waste water samples from COGEMA supplied by Greenpeace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinen, H.A.J.M.; Kwakman, P.J.M.; Overwater, R.M.W.; Tax, R.B.; Nissan, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental organization Greenpeace sampled waste water from the reprocessing plant COGEMA in La Hague, France, in May 1999. On request of the Inspection Environmental Hygiene, The Dutch National Institute for Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM) determined the radioactivity of the waste water samples. 5 refs

  1. The activities of COGEMA in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaud, G.

    1981-02-01

    COGEMA (Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires) is a private company entirely owned by the C.E.A. Its activity covers the whole of the fuel cycle: uranium mining, production of concentrates from the extracted ore, conversion into hexafluoride, enrichment, fabrication of fuel assemblies, reprocessing of spent fuel, and packaging of waste. These different types of activity are reviewed [fr

  2. Biological monitoring of toxic metals - steel workers respiratory health survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Almeida, A. Bugalho de; Alves, L.; Freitas, M.C.; Moniz, D.; Alvarez, E.; Monteiro, P.; Reis, M.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work is to search for respiratory system aggressors to which workers are submitted in their labouring activity. Workers from one sector of a steel plant in Portugal, Siderurgia Nacional (SN), were selected according to the number of years of exposure and labouring characteristics. The work reports on blood elemental content alterations and lung function tests to determine an eventual bronchial hyper-reactivity. Aerosol samples collected permit an estimate of indoor air quality and airborne particulate matter characterisation to further check whether the elemental associations and alterations found in blood may derive from exposure. Blood and aerosol elemental composition was determined by PIXE and INAA. Respiratory affections were verified for 24% of the workers monitored. There are indications that the occurrence of affections can be associated with the total working years. The influence of long-term exposure, health status parameters, and lifestyle factors in blood elemental variations found was investigated

  3. COGEMA experience on retrieving and conditioning solid radwaste previously stored in pits. The La Hague North-West pit case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodin, F.; Alexandre, D.; Fournier, P.

    1999-01-01

    Short lived, low and medium level waste called 'technological waste' produced by the La Hague Reprocessing Plant have been stored in the La Hague North-West concrete-lined pits until implementation at ANDRA's Centre de Stockage de la Manche (CSM). COGEMA decided to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of humid solid radwaste, stored in bulk in pits. On account of the variety of radwaste kinds, retrieving and conditioning operations represented real challenge. One goal of these operations was to ensure that the work was performed in complete safety towards environment with optimum containment and with the best radiation protection for the personnel involved. COGEMA decided to split the work into two phases. The feedback from the first phase was very helpful to the second phase. This report describes the experience gained from February 1990 to December 1998, taking into account radwaste and integrated dose rate results conditioning such waste. The procedures and means used and improved by COGEMA to comply with ANDRA's storage standards and the ever-decreasing financial costs generated by the workers, allowed to retrieve and condition 11,000 m 3 of old solid radwaste with competitive costs and in complete safety and protection of the environment. (author)

  4. White paper on radiological monitoring of workers exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shettle, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This article comments the content of a white paper which aimed at proposing new regulatory bases to update the French Code of Labour and other legal texts related to the radiation protection of workers. The author briefly comments the objectives of this white paper (to put the initial regulatory basis into question again), briefly describes the adopted approach, the new definition of risk related to ionizing radiations within the frame of a global approach to the prevention of occupational risks. She notices and comments the removal of a reference to an exposure limit for the public as input criterion in the system of radiological monitoring of workers exposures. She also comments the introduction of some concepts: the concept of a worker submitted to a risk related to ionizing radiation, and the concept of exposure value entailing a strengthened preventive action. She indicates the different modalities adopted for exposure monitoring (radiological monitoring and dose follow-up), addresses the issue of communication of dosimetry data and the access to all dosimetry information for the person in charge of radiation protection, and finally briefly evokes the idea of publishing guides for each specific sectors

  5. Cogema and the recycling of nuclear military materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The signature of the Start 1 and Start 2 treaties in 1991 and 1993 has marked the start-up of nuclear disarmament. This process covers two aspects: the destruction of vectors (missiles, planes..) and the dismantling of warheads carrying weapon grade radioactive materials (uranium and plutonium). This dossier explains the political and technical choices made by Russia and the USA for the management of their weapon grade plutonium: fabrication of MOX fuels (cooperation between Minatom (Russia), Siemens and Cogema for the building of conversion and fabrication plants, collaboration between Cogema, Duke Engineering and Stone and Webster (DCS) for the building of a MOX fabrication plant and for the irradiation of MOX fuels in US reactors), disposal of hardly convertible plutonium. (J.S.)

  6. Cogema in 1996: increasing turnover and stable net results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This short article gives some financial informations about the Cogema group for 1996. The net result for 1996 reached 977 millions of French Francs (FF) with respect to 973 for the previous year. The turnover reached 34.427 billions of FF in 1996 and 30.611 in 1995, which represents a 12.5% growth. In the mining sector, the turnover has decreased to 2.853 billions of FF with respect to 3.238 in 1995. In the engineering and industry services sector the turnover of the overall companies, with the exception of Cogema, has considerably progressed (2.199 billions of FF in 1996, 1.738 in 1995). (J.S.)

  7. Engineering and service activities in the Cogema group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    This short document presents the engineering and service daughter companies of the Cogema group: SGN (nuclear engineering, fuel cycle, wastes and spent fuels management, decontamination and dismantling); Euriware group (advice, expertise and information systems in nuclear, pharmacy, petroleum, automotive and steel making industries); Game group (industrial maintenance in nuclear, chemistry, petroleum, automotive and steel making industries); Eurisys Mesures (nuclear measurements, instrumentation, radiation protection and nuclear imaging); SICN (mechanics); STMI and Socodei (nuclear cleansing and management of low level radioactive wastes); Krebs/Speichim (chemical engineering, divisions of SGN and Technip). (J.S.)

  8. Production from new uranium mines a Cogema resources Saskatchewan perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, B.

    2001-01-01

    The province of Saskatchewan is best known for the large flat tracts of land in the south that are primarily used for agricultural purposes. Less well known is the fact that the northern part of the province hosts the richest uranium mines in the world. In fact, to use a petroleum analogy, Saskatchewan has been referred to as the 'Saudi Arabia' of the uranium producing countries. The mining industry in Saskatchewan is a flourishing, high technology industry and supplies approximately one-third of the annual world primary production of uranium. The purpose of this paper is to examine the uranium mining industry in Saskatchewan and why this province stands alone as the dominant uranium producer in the world and will maintain that position into the foreseeable future. As well, an overview of the significant role played by COGEMA Resources in developing the Saskatchewan uranium industry will be undertaken. This company whose roots date back almost 40 years in the province, now holds significant interests in all four of the mines currently producing uranium. With investments of over one billion dollars (U.S.) in this province, COGEMA has established itself as a long-term player in the Saskatchewan Uranium Industry. (author)

  9. Assessment of knowledge and skills about growth monitoring amongst multipurpose workers in an ICDS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapil, U; Sood, A K; Gaur, D R; Bhasin, S

    1991-08-01

    Knowledge and skills amongst 34 multipurpose workers working in an ICDS project about growth monitoring was assessed using interview technique. All workers had correct knowledge about rationale of growth monitoring. A total of 73.5% and 94.1% had knowledge that flattened growth curve indicates no weight gain and descending growth indicates decrease in weight, respectively.

  10. Occupational radiation exposure monitoring among radiation workers in Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Chhavi Raj; Shrestha, Shanta Lall; Khanal, Tara; Ween, Borgny

    2008-01-01

    Nepal was accepted as a member of the IAEA in 2007. Nepal is one of the world's least developed countries and is defined in Health Level IV. The population counted 26.4 millions in 2007. The health care sector increases with new hospitals and clinics, however, Nepal has no radiation protection authority or radiation protection regulation in the country until now. The radiation producing equipment in the health sector includes conventional X-ray and dental X-ray equipment, fluoroscopes, mammography, CT, catheterization laboratory equipment, nuclear medicine facilities, a few linear accelerators, Co 60 teletherapy and High Dose Rate brachytherapy sources. The situation regarding dosimetry service for radiation workers is unclear. A survey has been carried out to give an overview of the situation. The data collection of the survey was performed by phone call interviews with responsible staff at the different hospitals and clinics. Data about different occupationally exposed staff, use of personal radiation monitoring and type of dosimetry system were collected. In addition, it was asked if dosimetry reports were compiled in files or databases for further follow-up of staff, if needed. The survey shows that less of 25% of the procedures performed on the surveyed hospitals and clinics are performed by staff with personnel radiation monitoring. Radiation monitoring service for exposed staff is not compulsory or standardized, since there is no radiation protection authority. Nepal has taken a step forward regarding radiation protection, with the IAEA membership, although there are still major problems that have to be solved. An evaluation of the existing practice of staff dosimetry can be the first helpful step for further work in building a national radiation protection authority. (author)

  11. A cytogenic monitoring approach of hospital workers occuptionally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 37 females) subjects of occupational workers who were indirectly exposed to radiation. ... Females are more vulnerable to ionizing radiation than males. ... Smoking and drinking habits do not have a significant effect in increasing the number ...

  12. First assessment of individual monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in Burkina Faso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakoro, A.; Nobila Ouédraogo, Salimata Traoré

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of monitoring of medical workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation as a consequence of exposure to X-rays, from 2007 to 2010, in Burkina Faso. The radiation exposure monitoring was made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) type 0110 and the reader used was Harshaw 4500. The medical establishments. subscribers were provided with personal dosimeters (measuring Hp (10) and Hp (0.07)) and dosimeters for background and workplace exposure (H*10) measurement. The dosimeters have been worn for periods of 2 months each. The number of establishments subscribed and workers monitored has gradually increased from 4 radiology establishments with 13 workers monitored at September 2007 to 23 subscribers with 121 workers monitored at the end of April 2010. 13 establishments were still working without monitoring. From September 2007 to April 2010, no individual annual dose limit has really been reached. 88.16% of the 2 months dose values of personal dosimeters were below 0.1mSv, the detection limit and 96.61% of Hp (10) bimonthly values were below 3.33mSv. The workplace exposure monitoring values were often low (varying from 0.00mSv to 40.45mSv). 87.08% of the values of H*(10) were below 3.33mSv, the upper limit of Hp (10) for a period of 2 months. Low values of individual dose have also been recorded despite of high values of workplace monitoring. This allowed to state that the workers monitored were not exposed to a major risk. Nevertheless, 13 TLD have been lost and 3 damaged by subscribers (out of 1504 TLD provided). 26 times (out of 240), background measurement and workplace exposure monitoring dosimeters have been placed at the improper location. Therefore, sensitization of the establishments using ionizing radiation should be reinforced and the national regulations should impose radiation monitoring (author)

  13. Worker-specific exposure monitor and method for surveillance of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovejoy, M.L.; Peeters, J.P.; Johnson, A.W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a person-specific monitor that provides sensor information regarding hazards to which the person is exposed and means to geolocate the person at the time of the exposure. The monitor also includes means to communicate with a remote base station. Information from the monitor can be downloaded at the base station for long term storage and analysis. The base station can also include means to recharge the monitor

  14. Contribution to the monitoring of workers exposed to non-transferable uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarasa, J.; Chalabreysse, J.

    1980-01-01

    After a short review of the present knowledge on uranium (metabolism, toxicity, principles of radiotoxicological monitoring), the authors' experience in the surveillance of workers exposed to natural non-transferable uranium compounds (oxides, tetrafluorides) is presented. When setting up urinary controls in a workers' population, a number of difficulties were met in the way of collecting urine samples, obtaining samples free of exogen contribution, interpreting results. The working environment was also studied: three types of pollution measurements were carried out: on the atmosphere at fixed places by measuring the radioactivity of air sample, on work-places and workers by chemical analysis and counting of uranium. Original graphs on work-place monitoring are up-dated regularly. Workers' surveillance by urinary and working condition controls are now well codified. However, further studies will be carried out on man, on working atmospheres, and on the substances handled. The surveillance will then cover working conditions from all points of view [fr

  15. COGEMA gives communication a new impetus: transparency to conduct a new dialog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graffin, K.

    2000-01-01

    COGEMA launched in November 1999 a mass public communication campaign and created an Internet site equipped with cameras (web-cams) to make everyone familiar with the COGEMA plant at La Hague. This system is designed to serve as a communication policy that is resolutely open and attentive to French public concerns. The campaign includes TV commercials and press ads. The underlying principle is to work on issues that have made the news. The televised system includes two films shot at La Hague. The first, lasting 90 seconds, consists of interviews and testimonies of employees who represent the professional and human diversity of the plant. The second, in 45-second format, presents the questions to which public opinion wants answers. To ensure that everyone obtains all the answers to their questions, the TV spots and press ads refer to the web-site: www.cogemalahague.fr. Cybemauts can witness live, by means of a dozen web-cams, what actually happens in different places at COGEMA La Hague: general view of the site, spent fuel unloading installations, storage ponds, Valognes rail terminal, etc. The gist of this first step in the new dialog that COGEMA wants to establish with public opinion is to get beyond irrational fears through transparency, and to show that COGEMA's men and women are fully responsible and determined to contribute actively to the information of the public at large. (authors)

  16. Annual dose distribution of Nuclear Malaysia radiation workers for monitoring period from year 2003 to 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairul Nizam Idris; Azimawati Ahmad; Norain Ab Rahman

    2008-08-01

    Estimation of radiation dose (external exposure) received by Nuklear Malaysia's radiation workers are measured by using personal dosimetry device which are provided by SSDL-Nuklear Malaysia. Dose assessment report for monitoring period from year 2003 - 2007 shows that almost all radiation workers received annual doses less than 20 mSv, only in very small percentage of radiation workers received annual doses between 20.1 to 50 mSv and none of the workers received doses higher than 50 mSv/year. Exposure dose below 20 mSv/year (the new annual dose limit to be used in Malaysia soon) could be fully achieved by improving the compliance with the safety regulations and enhancing the awareness about radiation safety among the workers. (Author)

  17. Low-Cost, Distributed Environmental Monitors for Factory Worker Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geb W. Thomas

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An integrated network of environmental monitors was developed to continuously measure several airborne hazards in a manufacturing facility. The monitors integrated low-cost sensors to measure particulate matter, carbon monoxide, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, noise, temperature and humidity. The monitors were developed and tested in situ for three months in several overlapping deployments, before a full cohort of 40 was deployed in a heavy vehicle manufacturing facility for a year of data collection. The monitors collect data from each sensor and report them to a central database every 5 min. The work includes an experimental validation of the particle, gas and noise monitors. The R2 for the particle sensor ranges between 0.98 and 0.99 for particle mass densities up to 300 μg/m3. The R2 for the carbon monoxide sensor is 0.99 for concentrations up to 15 ppm. The R2 for the oxidizing gas sensor is 0.98 over the sensitive range from 20 to 180 ppb. The noise monitor is precise within 1% between 65 and 95 dBA. This work demonstrates the capability of distributed monitoring as a means to examine exposure variability in both space and time, building an important preliminary step towards a new approach for workplace hazard monitoring.

  18. In vivo monitoring of nuclear research centre (NRC) workers. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A; Ali, E M; Taha, T M [Radiation Protection Departion, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Occupational workers of Nuclear research center (NRC) of atomic energy authority (AEA) working with radio-nuclides such as (Cs-137, I-131, and I-125) are monitored yearly. Individuals involved in routine work in hot laboratories are examined every three months. When an incident occurs, the workers involved are examined promptly. In order to measure internal contamination, the modified NRC-AEA whole body counter is used. More than hundred occupational workers had been examined in 1994. Results indicated that the annual limit of intake as recommended by ICRP was not exceeded. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Artificial stone dust-induced functional and inflammatory abnormalities in exposed workers monitored quantitatively by biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophir, Noa; Shai, Amir Bar; Alkalay, Yifat; Israeli, Shani; Korenstein, Rafi; Kramer, Mordechai R; Fireman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The manufacture of kitchen and bath countertops in Israel is based mainly on artificial stone that contains 93% silica as natural quartz, and ∼3500 workers are involved in cutting and processing it. Artificial stone produces high concentrations of silica dust. Exposure to crystalline silica may cause silicosis, an irreversible lung disease. Our aim was to screen exposed workers by quantitative biometric monitoring of functional and inflammatory parameters. 68 exposed artificial stone workers were compared to 48 nonexposed individuals (controls). Exposed workers filled in questionnaires, and all participants underwent pulmonary function tests and induced sputum analyses. Silica was quantitated by a Niton XL3 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Pulmonary function test results of exposed workers were significantly lower and induced sputa showed significantly higher neutrophilic inflammation compared to controls; both processes were slowed down by the use of protective measures in the workplace. Particle size distribution in induced sputum samples of exposed workers was similar to that of artificial stone dust, which contained aluminium, zirconium and titanium in addition to silica. In conclusion, the quantitation of biometric parameters is useful for monitoring workers exposed to artificial stone in order to avoid deterioration over time.

  20. Burn-up credit applications for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies in AREVA/COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubon, H.; Riffard, C.; Batifol, M.; Pelletier, S.

    2003-01-01

    For the last seven years, AREVA/COGEMA has been implementing the second phase of its burn-up credit program (the incorporation of fission products). Since the early nineties, major actinides have been taken into account in criticality analyses first for reprocessing applications, then for transport and storage of fuel assemblies Next year (2004) COGEMA will take into account the six main fission products (Rh103, Cs133, Nd143, Sm149, Sm152 and Gd155) that make up 50% of the anti-reactivity of all fission products. The experimental program will soon be finished. The new burn-up credit methodology is in progress. After a brief overview of BUC R and D program and COGEMA's application of the BUC, this paper will focus on the new burn-up measurement for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies. It details the measurement instrumentation and the measurement experiments on MOX fuels performed at La Hague in January 2003. (author)

  1. Development of the national register of radiation workers: subsystem for individual monitoring of external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Haitao; Niu Haowei; Sun Quanfu; Fu Yinghua; Fan Yaohua; Yue Baorong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop a national registry and reporting system of individual monitoring for workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Methods: In accordance with the relevant law, regulations, standards and the current health supervision practice for radiation workers in China, to ensure more effective collection of information on individual monitoring from all levels of service providers across the country and an easy query and analysis of the collected information for both service providers and administrative institutions, the register consisted of an offline-system and a web-based information system. The off-line system consisted of 8 tables, which could easily make annual and period monitoring reports, and upload individual monitoring data in compressed and encrypted format. Web-based system consisted of 6 modules, could easily make S customized tabulations of monitoring data and show 2 trend figures. SSLVPN secure remote access was used in the system. Arranged by the Ministry of Health, training courses provided to all individual monitoring service providers and provincial administrative institutions. Results: A new and individual-based national register and reporting system of individual monitoring for workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation was successfully developed, and would be officially run soon. Conclusions: The establishment and running of the register would be great improvement on the national radiological health reports and produce a far-reaching impact on the individual monitoring in China. (authors)

  2. Cytogenetic monitoring of nuclear workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griciene, B.; Slapsyte, G.; Mierauskiene, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome aberration (CA) analysis using Giemsa techniques was performed in blood lymphocytes of 84 nuclear workers with cumulative doses of 1-632 mSv during employment periods of 1-25 y. The control group comprised 82 healthy male donors. An estimated CA frequency in the total radiation-exposed group was significantly higher when compared with the controls (2.27 vs. 1.76 CA/100 cells, p 0.05). However, significant increase in the total CA frequency was determined in workers with additional internal exposure (2.54 CA/100 cells, p < 0.05) and those with registered neutron doses (2.95 CA/100 cells, p < 0.01). No correlation was found between CA frequency and occupational exposure dose. Borderline significant correlation was found between duration of employment and total CA (r = 0.218, p = 0.046, Fig. 2) and chromosome-type aberration (r = 0.265, p = 0.015) frequency. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of sensitivity evaluation of a contamination monitor for use in monitoring of internal exposure of workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernando Maranhao; Assis, Janima Cruz de; Oliveira, Salomao Marques de; Dantas, Ana Leticia Almeida

    2014-01-01

    In practice of nuclear medicine, expert personnel routinely handle radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and radiotherapy. The control of intakes of radionuclides by workers can be performed through internal dosimetry techniques, as an integral part of the radiation protection program of the installation. The use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in vivo and in vitro in Brazil is regulated by CNEN-NE Standards and 3:05 CNEN-NN 3.01. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends the establishment of an internal monitoring program on workers, especially those subject to possible exposure to annual effective doses greater than 1 mSv. Note that, currently, in Brazil, are not available qualified laboratories to provide internal monitoring services in all regions in the country, if it were applied by CNEN, the requirement for internal monitoring of workers. This paper presents the development of a simple and low-cost methodology for in vivo monitoring of 131 I in the thyroid. The proposed methodology is the use of portable monitor of surface contamination, equipment available and routinely used in all nuclear medicine services in Brazil. The monitor is calibrated with neck-thyroid simulator developed at the Laboratory of In Vivo Monitoring of IRD/CNEN-RJ. The equipment tested is suitable for application in in vivo occupational monitoring thyroid. This conclusion is based on the fact that the detection system has sufficient sensitivity for monitoring up to seven days after the incorporation of the radionuclide and guarantees 131 I detection in values that result in effective doses below 1 mSv for the exposure scenarios adopted

  4. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1996-12-01

    Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Australian Radiation Laboratory have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 30,000 persons, which is roughly 90 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 75,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the five types of monitor issued by the Service: Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor), Finger TLD 3, Neutron Monitor, Special TLD and Environmental monitor. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs

  5. Radiation monitoring and dose distribution of medical workers in A.P. state 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.R.; Reddy, K.S.; Kamble, M.K.; Roy, Madhumita

    2001-01-01

    Individual monitoring for external ionizing radiation is being conducted for all radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State by TLD Unit located in Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad.The Unit comes under Personnel Monitoring Section of Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai. The aim of monitoring is to confirm that the radiation safety standards are strictly adhered in the institutions and also to investigate excessive exposures, if any. Personnel monitoring also provides data for epidemiological studies. In view of ICRP/AERB recommendations of 100 mSv dose limit for the five years block of 1994-98, the dose distribution among radiation workers in Andhra Pradesh State is analyzed for the period 1994-98. In continuation of above work, we have analyzed the data for the year 1999-2000 for various medical diagnostic procedures and these are presented

  6. Experiences in the monitoring of radiation workers in industry and hospitals in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, A.J.

    1976-08-01

    The task of monitoring of radiation doses among radiation workers employed either in industry and hospitals in the Philippines is presently being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. These radiation monitoring devices cover not only radioactive materials or sources but also x-ray machines. The most common dosimetry used is the film badge. This paper presents some of the experiences gained in the use of the film badge and other dosimeters

  7. Ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    Since July 2015 the study ''ionising radiation and risk of death from leukaemia and lymphoma in radiation-monitored workers (INWORKS) - an international cohort study'' is available. INWORKS comprised data from 300.000 occupational exposed and dosimetric monitored persons from France, USA and UK. The contribution is a critical discussion of this study with respect to the conclusion of a strong evidence of positive associations between protracted low-dose irradiation exposure and leukemia.

  8. Effect of daily noise exposure monitoring on annual rates of hearing loss in industrial workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Peter M; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R; Cullen, Mark R; Slade, Martin D; Dixon-Ernst, Christine

    2011-06-01

    Occupational noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is prevalent, yet evidence on the effectiveness of preventive interventions is lacking. The effectiveness of a new technology allowing workers to monitor daily at-ear noise exposure was analysed. Workers in the hearing conservation program of an aluminium smelter were recruited because of accelerated rates of hearing loss. The intervention consisted of daily monitoring of at-ear noise exposure and regular feedback on exposures from supervisors. The annual rate of change in high frequency hearing average at 2, 3 and 4 KHz before intervention (2000-2004) and 4 years after intervention (2006-2009) was determined. Annual rates of loss were compared between 78 intervention subjects and 234 controls in other company smelters matched for age, gender and high frequency hearing threshold level in 2005. Individuals monitoring daily noise exposure experienced on average no further worsening of high frequency hearing (average rate of hearing change at 2, 3 and 4 KHz = -0.5 dB/year). Matched controls also showed decelerating hearing loss, the difference in rates between the two groups being significant (p hearing loss showed a similar trend but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.06). Monitoring daily occupational noise exposure inside hearing protection with ongoing administrative feedback apparently reduces the risk of occupational NIHL in industrial workers. Longer follow-up of these workers will help determine the significance of the intervention effect. Intervention studies for the prevention of NIHL need to include appropriate control groups.

  9. Monitoring and radiation dose estimation for internal contamination of occupational workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kol, R; Laichter, Y [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev

    1996-12-01

    The assessment of interval radiation doses due to intake of radionuclides differs totally from external dosimetry. External dosimetry is relatively straight forward: Workers are equipped with appropriate dosimeters that give the dose upon direct reading. Internal dosimetry is actually an assessment of the dose based on results of personnel and environmental monitoring (authors).

  10. Human and technical factors in the doses reduction and optimization at Cogema/Marcoule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgogne, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    In the case of Cogema/Marcoule, the constant decrease of radiation doses is attributed to three factors: technical with a surveillance system and doses optimization, relational with the promotion of confidence in teams of radiation protection services as an acceptation factor of radiation protection techniques and psychological with an evolution of minds towards the ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  11. Uranium mining and milling by Cogema environmental impact compared to 1 mSv limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, S.; Daroussin, J.L.; Pfiffelmann, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    CEA then COGEMA have been operating mines and mills in France since 1948. Total production nears 70000 t of U in the concentrate which were contained in some 85 millions tons of ores (pulp and heap leaching). Many sites are now undergoing remediation and impact on the environment has always been a great concern. (author)

  12. Exposure assessment and heart rate variability monitoring in workers handling titanium dioxide particles: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichihara, Sahoko [Mie University, Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies (Japan); Li, Weihua [WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (China); Omura, Seiichi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji [National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Liu, Ying; Wang, Qiangyi [WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (China); Hiraku, Yusuke [Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine (Japan); Hisanaga, Naomi [Aichi Gakusen University, Faculty of Human Science and Design (Japan); Wakai, Kenji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine (Japan); Ding, Xuncheng [WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (China); Kobayashi, Takahiro, E-mail: takakoba@airies.or.jp [Association for International Research Initiatives for Environmental Studies (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku, E-mail: gak@rs.tus.ac.jp [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles are used for surface coating and in a variety of products such as inks, fibers, food, and cosmetics. The present study investigated possible respiratory and cardiovascular effects of TiO{sub 2} particles in workers exposed to this particle at high concentration in a factory in China. The diameter of particles collected on filters was measured by scanning electron microscopy. Real-time size-dependent particle number concentration was monitored in the nostrils of four workers using condensation particle counter and optical particle counter. Electrocardiogram was recorded using Holter monitors for the same four workers to record heart rate variability. Sixteen workers underwent assessment of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Mass-based individual exposure levels were also measured with personal cascade impactors. The primary particle diameter ranged from 46 to 562 nm. Analysis of covariance of the pooled data of the four workers showed that number of particles with a diameter <300 nm was associated positively with total number of N–N and negatively with total number of increase or decrease in successive RR intervals greater than 50 ms (RR50+/−) or percentage of RR 50+/− that were parameters of parasympathetic function. The total mass concentration was 9.58–30.8 mg/m{sup 3} during work, but significantly less before work (0.36 mg/m{sup 3}). The clear abnormality in respiratory function was not observed in sixteen workers who had worked for 10 months to 13 years in the factory. The study showed that exposure to particles with a diameter <300 nm might affect HRV in workers handling TiO{sub 2} particles. The results highlight the need to investigate the possible impact of exposure to nano-scaled particles on the autonomic nervous system.

  13. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: COGEMA expertise devoted to UP1 reprocessing plant dismantling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.

    2001-01-01

    Over the last past decades, the French nuclear industry has acquired a great experience and know-how in the field of dismantling. Today this experience amounts to more than 200,000 hours. The fundamental aims within dismantling strategy are the same as for all nuclear facilities: minimising doses received by workers, minimising waste volume and adapting waste management to radioactivity levels, minimising costs. French experience is based on technologies which are currently used in nuclear maintenance facilities. Dismantling is a dynamic process especially in the field of decontamination (chemical and mechanical), cleaning, robotics and remote control operations. The strategy for the dismantling of former UP1 reprocessing plant is based on the feedback of experience gained through the dismantling of other facilities such as the AT1 workshop at La Hague. This workshop, a pilot plant for reprocessing of fast-breeder reactor fuels (Rapsodie and Phenix) has to be dismantled to IAEA level 3 (unrestricted site use), excluding civil works structures. Currently conducted by trained shifts, this dismantling project should end in 1999. The experience already acquired proves that chemical rinsings with the use of specific reagents is sufficient to decontaminate the hot cells and that the use of remote operations or robotics is not as important as previously envisaged. The UP1 reprocessing plant of Marcoule operated from 1958 to 1997. End of the operation was pronounced on the 31st of December 1997. 20,000 tons of spent fuels were reprocessed at UP1. The cleaning and dismantling operations at the Marcoule site depend upon the CEA, EDF and COGEMA. The Defence and Industry Ministries asked for a specific structure to be set up. An economic interest group called CODEM was created in May 1996. CODEM decides, finances and supervises dismantling operations, while respecting the constraints of nuclear safety, environmental protection and cost-effectiveness. The cleaning operations of

  14. Development of quick scan whole body monitor for in-vivo monitoring of radiation workers and general public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankhla, Rajesh; Singh, I.S.; Rao, D.D.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Whole body monitoring of radiation workers at nuclear facilities is a regulatory requirement and is recommended for assessment of internal contamination due to gamma emitting radio nuclides. Additionally, nuclear accidents like Chernobyl, Fukushima and radiological accidents like Goiania have clearly highlighted the need for in-vivo monitoring of the members of the public during and/or after such accidents. To cater to these requirements, a high throughput, fast screening, standing linear geometry Quick Scan Whole Body Monitor (QS-WBM) is designed, fabricated and commissioned to measure internal contamination due to gamma emitting radio nuclides (E γ >200keV) incorporated in the human body. The system is designed to achieve sensitivity comparable with conventional WBM for 1 - 2 minutes counting time and to accommodate different body sizes of Indian occupational workers. It is calibrated using BARC reference Bottle Mannequin Absorption (BOMAB) type phantom and also using a family of BOMAB type phantoms representative of different age groups namely 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 20- years. The developed system will also be highly useful during emergency situations when large numbers of persons are to be monitored in short interval of time. (author)

  15. Professional exposure of medical workers: radiation levels, radiation risk and personal dose monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Guang

    2005-01-01

    The application of radiation in the field of medicine is the most active area. Due to the rapid and strong development of intervention radiology at present near 20 years, particularly, the medical workers become a popularize group which most rapid increasing and also receiving the must high of professional exposure dose. Because, inter alias, radiation protection management nag training have not fully follow up, the aware of radioactive protection and appropriate approach have tot fully meet the development and need, the professional exposure dose received by medical workers, especially those being engaged in intervention radiology, are more higher, as well as have not yet fully receiving the complete personal dose monitoring, the medical workers become the population group which should be paid the most attention to. The writer would advice in this paper that all medical workers who being received a professional radiation exposure should pay more attention to the safety and healthy they by is strengthening radiation protection and receiving complete personal dose monitoring. (authors)

  16. Development of database management system for monitoring of radiation workers for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyane, G.N.; Mishra, L.; Nadar, M.Y.; Singh, I.S.; Rao, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Annually around 500 radiation workers are monitored for estimation of lung activities and internal dose due to Pu/Am and U from various divisions of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (Trombay) and from PREFRE and A3F facilities (Tarapur) in lung counting laboratory located at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre hospital under Routine and Special monitoring program. A 20 cm diameter phoswich and an array of HPGe detector were used for this purpose. In case of positive contamination, workers are followed up and monitored using both the detection systems in different geometries. Management of this huge data becomes difficult and therefore an easily retrievable database system containing all the relevant data of the monitored radiation workers. Materials and methods: The database management system comprises of three main modules integrated together: 1) Apache server installed on a Windows (XP) platform (Apache version 2.2.17) 2) MySQL database management system (MySQL version 5.5.8) 3) PHP (Preformatted Hypertext) programming language (PHP version 5.3.5). All the 3 modules work together seamlessly as a single software program. The front end user interaction is through an user friendly and interactive local web page where internet connection is not required. This front page has hyperlinks to many other pages, which have different utilities for the user. The user has to log in using username and password. Results and Conclusions: Database management system is used for entering, updating and management of lung monitoring data of radiation workers, The program is having following utilities: bio-data entry of new subjects, editing of bio-data of old subjects (only one subject at a time), entry of counting data of that day's lung monitoring, retrieval of old records based on a number of parameters and filters like date of counting, employee number, division, counts fulfilling a given criterion, etc. and calculation of MEQ CWT (Muscle Equivalent Chest Wall Thickness), energy

  17. In-vitro monitoring of occupational workers from Technology Demonstration Plant, Mumbai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Kundan Kumar; Prabhu, Supreetha P.; Sawant, Pramilla D.; Rao, D.D.

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports the baseline monitoring data of these workers for U(nat.) using solid extraction chromatography technique. 232 U Working standard of 21.6 mBq/ml was prepared by diluting NPL standard (103.5± 1.0 Bq/g,) with 3M HNO 3 . 1 g UTEVA resin of 100-150 μm particle size was used for separation of U from urine. The urinary excretion rate observed for the individual in the present study can be treated as the existing level of U in urine for TDP workers. The values observed need to be subtracted from subsequent results obtained during future routine monitoring programmes in the facility to identify potential intakes, if any, before assignment of internal dose

  18. MTR spent fuel back-end - Cogema's long-term commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.

    1998-01-01

    MTR spent fuel back end has been subject to many reversal and uncertainties in the past 10 years. Until the end of 1988, US obligated materials were subject to the Off site Fuels Policy (OFP). Under this policy, spent fuels were returned to USA, and were reprocessed there. This OFP took end the 31th of December 1988, and Research Reactor's operators had to implement others solutions: On site storage or Reprocessing in Europe. Meanwhile the RERTR Program was leading to a new LEU fuel to replace HEU aluminide. This new silicide fuel has one main drawback: it cannot be reprocessed in working plants without some process main line modifications. Fortunately, a new Research Reactors spent fuels return policy has been set up by the US in the early 1996. This new policy applies to all reactors converted or that have agreed to convert to LEU, and reactors operating with HEU for which no suitable LEU is available. It covers all the spent fuels discharged until 2006/05/12. But after that period of time, each reactor will be fully responsible for its spent fuels. Since the end of 1996, COGEMA is proposing reprocessing services for Aluminides spent fuels, based on the La Hague capability. This COGEMA answer is for the long term, as the La Hague plant has a good load for the coming years, including the first decade of the next century. Further, this activity benefits from a strong R and D support, that allowed fulfilling the evolutive needs of our customers, and gives us the ability to adapt the plant to the future market. Taking advantage of this flexibility, COGEMA offers Research Reactors' operators a long-term commitment. Already two reactors' operators have chosen to contract with COGEMA for the whole life of their reactors. The contracts execution is under progress and the first transportation will take place soon. Beside today's services, COGEMA is involved in R and D activities to support new fuels development enhancing present LEU performances and having the ability to

  19. Individual internal monitoring of workers of Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear - FCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Marcelo X.

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, workers are exposed to different compounds of enriched uranium. Due to the high cost of the individual monitoring programme for internal dose assessment in the routine monitoring programmes, usually only one type of measurement is assigned. In complex situations like the one described in this paper, where several parameters can compromise the accuracy of the bioassay interpretation it is need to have a combination of techniques to evaluate the internal dose. According to ICRP 78 (1997), the general order of preference in terms of accuracy of interpretation is: body activity measurement, excreta analysis and personal air sampling. A group of fifteen workers from controlled area of the fuel fabrication facility was selected to evaluate the internal dose using all different available techniques during a certain period. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the daily urinary excretion, faecal excretion, chest counting and personal air sampling (PAS). The results have shown that at least two types of sensitivity techniques must be used, since there are some sources of uncertainties on the bioassay interpretation, like mixture of uranium compounds intake and different routes of intake. The combination of urine and faeces analysis has shown be the more appropriate methodology for assessing internal dose in this situation. (author)

  20. The regulatory system of monitoring workers in Germany for intakes of radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalheimer, A.; Henrichs, K.

    1996-01-01

    In Germany, the working group 'Incorporation Monitoring' of the German-Swiss Radiation Protection Association defined a new standard for the monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to radioactive material. During the last two years this draft has been accepted by the German government in the form of three guidelines. The purpose of the approach was the installation of a consistent state-of-the-art system: defining clear criteria for the necessity of routine and special monitoring programs, giving guidelines for monitoring programs ensuring that dose assessments are as reliable as necessary with the lowest possible expenses, standardizing as far as possible the procedures of dose assessments, and guaranteeing the necessary quality standards. The scientific basis of this regulatory system are the publications 30 and 54 of lCRP. (author)

  1. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1992-06-01

    The Australian Radiation Laboratory has operated a Personal Radiation Monitoring Service since the early 1930's so that people working with radiation can determine the radiation doses that they receive due to their occupation. Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Service have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. Ultimately, this data base will become a National Register of the doses received within Australia. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 20,000 persons, which is roughly 70 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 35,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the four types of monitor issued by the Service: 1. Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor) 2. Finger TLD 3. Neutron Monitor 4. Special TLD. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 4 figs

  2. 10 years of transport of vitrified High Level Waste (HLW) from COGEMA La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancelot, J.; Martinotti, B.; Tourneux, F.

    2004-01-01

    COGEMA has been using, for decades, its large experience of Reprocessing in both Gas Cooled reactors (GCR) and LWR fuels with the following facilities: Marcoule UP1 plant started up in late 50's: La Hague UP2 plant started up in 1966 first with GCR fuels and from 1976 with LWR Fuel (including foreign fuels): La Hague UP3 plant started up in 1990 Foreign Utilities signed Reprocessing Contracts with COGEMA from 1970's, providing returns of residues to the country of origin where they will be managed in a safe storage facility. Therefore, for nearly 30 years Spent Fuel coming from Japan, Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and the Netherlands are processed on La Hague site

  3. Cogema's world-wide experience in prospecting and surveying uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berville, M.; Faure, D.

    1985-01-01

    Having briefly outlined the history of uranium prospection in France, the authors describe COGEMA's prospection operations at home and abroad and analyse the methods applied according to different contexts (granitic and metamorphic rocks, ''sub-discordant'' deposits, sedimentary deposits, prospection in detail of a qualified zone); at the same time they show how technology has developed, particularly in the fields of geophysics and radiometry [fr

  4. Environment supervision in a nuclear industry plant: Cogema example in Pierrelatte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, M.L.

    1993-07-01

    Every nuclear industrial facility must achieve radioactivity measurements of its environment: COGEMA is therefore very careful of its environmental quality and guarantees the supervision of it with a programme corresponding to the activities and to the environment characteristics. We shall study- the atmospheric control- the waters control- the plants control and we shall end on results synthesis, which must be analysed according to the natural omnipresent radioactivity. 6 Annexes

  5. Film badge personnel monitoring and dose distribution of industrial and medical workers in the country (1994-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Hariom; Pandey, R.L.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-03-01

    Personnel Monitoring Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, is entrusted with the responsibility of providing a countrywide personnel monitoring to radiation workers using extemal radiation like X, beta, gamma and neutron. As per Radiation Protection Rules (RPR) of 1971 promulgated by the competent authority the personnel monitoring service is mandatory for all the workers working with radiation. The radiation exposures received by them should be within the limits stipulated by AERB. Nearly 43,000 radiation workers in about 3000 DAE and non DAE institutions using radiation and radioisotopes are monitored, using both the Film Badges and the Thermoluminescent dosimeters. This report presents various aspects of film dosimetry which was introduced more than four decades ago in the country and also analysis of doses received by the radiation workers in the five year block 1994-1998 covered by film badge service. (author)

  6. Facility - transportation system interface at COGEMA (experience in taking delivery of spent fuel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1983-01-01

    COGEMA has long experience in taking delivery of spent fuel from LWR's. This activity is now fully industrialized. Great care is taken by COGEMA and their affiliates in this business, generally beyond the normal regulatory limits, and this is quite normal, COGEMA wanting to prevent, by all possible means, causes of incidents or accidents which could destroy the position it has established and the confidence placed in it by many customers. It is clear that the situation is quite different at reactors and at reprocessing plants; the limited number of flasks handled at reactors (in general five per year) is generally not enough to lead reactor operators to invest in sophisticated equipment and to adopt procedures allowing extremely small exposures of their personnel, while the great number of flasks received each year in a plant like La Hague (not fewer than 200 per year) justifies the investment in more specialized equipment (automation, remote operation, more sophisticated tools, etc.) and allows the personnel to be very well trained to that particular type of work. These are factors leading to very limited exposures of the personnel although the work performed in a repocessing plant is generally more complex (deeper decontamination, closer work, maintenance, etc.) than in a reactor

  7. CLOUD TECHNOLOGIES OF MONITORING OF THE QUALITY OF TRAINING OF WORKERS OF RAILWAY PROFILE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetyana Bondarenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of creating the system of monitoring of the quality of professional training of future workers of railway profile, the author puts forward a technology of using cloud services of the search system of Google. The article proves that the system provides a complex support of monitoring, from creating appropriate forms and storing of the results in cloud storage to the\\processing of results of the monitoring and management of the system of testing on the basis of using the service of Google-Calendar. In the article there has been considered the usage of the concept of BYOD for testing of students’ achievement. The article demonstrates the advantages of  the proposed approach to monitoring the quality of training of future workers of railway profile highlighting  the usage of the cloud services of the search system of Google as a means of  expanding the boundaries of research in space and time and making the procedure more flexible and systematic.

  8. Evolution of the Regular monitoring of workers using ionizing radiations in medical field in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biau, A.; Valero, M.; Dubuquoy, E.; Crescini, D.

    2002-01-01

    Among the 260000 workers surveyed by individual monitoring dosimetry in France, about 140000 work in medical field, in Radiodiagnostic. Radiotherapy or Nuclear Medicine. For the twenty last years the global exposure of these workers has decreased continuously like the number of doses over the regular limits of 50 millisieverts per year or even 20 millisieverts which will be included in the new regulations according to the European Directive 96/29 of 13 may 1996. To reinforce this evolution to lower exposures (ALARA) the french regulations have been completed in 1998 and 1999. These new regular prescriptions consist essentially in. - possibility of using another system of passive dosimetry than firm dosimeter (TLD, OSL, RPL...) - obligation of active dosimeter (real time reading) associated with the passive dosimeter for the workers affected in controlled area. - gathering of all the dosimetric results on a data base called SISERI accessible by computer only to the health physicians and the competent person specially authorized. This work is showing from statistical data on the levels of exposure in medical field: - which are the working conditions for which the two system of dosimetry are really necessary - how to delimit the controlled area on realistic basic rather than theoretical assumptions - how the data base SISERI is actually functioning and how it will evaluate from now to 2003. Finally, we propose a schedule to define the different forms of survey for internal and external risks of exposure and to select the best type of monitoring according to the working conditions. (Author)

  9. Individual monitoring for internal exposure of workers - regulation and practice in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerekes, A.; Kocsy, G.; Pellet, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Decree of Ministry of Health for the enforcement of the Act on Atomic Energy has put special emphasis on the regulation of monitoring for internal exposure in Hungary. The necessarily general prescription of the Decree 'In case of the possibility or suspicion of incorporating open radioactive substances the affected employee shall be subjected to internal contamination monitoring. The obligation of the internal monitoring shall be determined by the Radiation Hygiene Centre of the National Public Health and Medical Officer's Service' called for a guidance to assist the work of the competent authority. The guide was elaborated on the basis of the IAEA Safety Guide No. RS-G-1.2. According to the Safety Guide the decision factor shall first be determined for the potential radionuclides and practice applied. For routine monitoring the required frequency, method and MDA values, moreover for special monitoring the method and MDA values were derived for over 40 radionuclides considering the following two basic assumptions: the activity remaining in or excreted from the body could be determined by the given measurement method, the possible underestimation of intake shall be less than a factor of three within the monitoring interval. The following prescription of the Decree 'The laboratory performing the monitoring of internal exposure shall be accredited' has raised a conflict in practice. To solve the problem the Guide suggests a two-step monitoring process: a screening measurement for the possible internal contamination performed by the Radiation Protection Service of the workplace by any equipment used in daily practice for investigation of patients, radiation protection purposes, etc., if the result of screening indicates an internal contamination the radiation worker shall be monitored by an accredited laboratory. As an ISO Standard in process has several assumptions differing from the IAEA Safety Guide, e.g. the limitation of 'maximum potential

  10. Research at COGEMA: benefits and a future outlook of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, Francois; Masson, Herve

    2004-01-01

    COGEMA research expenses represent about Euro 100 million per year. They include the expenses for internal and external research programs and research management as well as the expenses for pre-engineering studies leading to cost evaluation. They are divided between front-end, back-end and nuclear services. Front-end expenses fell sharply when research on the SILVA enrichment process was dropped. The main objectives of the research are to maintain the ability of the industrial tool to satisfy COGEMA's clients and to increase operational safety while reducing the impact on the environment. It is also to eliminate the legacy of previous operations and to prepare for future evolutions. As far as the back-end is concerned, a large part of expenses is devoted to the 'Program of Common Interest' (PIC) with the CEA. Thanks to this fruitful collaboration, outstanding results have been obtained in the building, start-up and operation of the two modern reprocessing plants in La Hague. A new agreement is about to be signed with the CEA to follow on from the first one signed in 1978. According to this agreement, COGEMA will be financing as a lump sum a part of the expenses of ATALANTE, which is considered a very valuable research tool. Today, the main program in the PIC is still support to the La Hague reprocessing plant. More specifically, some work is still needed in the Puretex program to further improve the present performance of the plants and adapt them to the burn-up increase. There are significant programs on innovative waste vitrification, historical waste retrieval and conditioning and waste characterization including long-term behavior. Concerning Partition and Transmutation, COGEMA support is limited to the former. There is a strong incentive to understand and prepare evolutions to come that can contribute to sustainable development. Such advanced programs are also under consideration in other countries, which were not up to now willing to reprocess, such as the US

  11. Interpretation of the results from individual monitoring of workers at the Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Marcelo Xavier de

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, workers are exposed to different compounds of enriched uranium. Although in this kind of facility the main route of intake is inhalation, ingestion may occur in some situations, and also a mixture of both. The interpretation of the bioassay data is very complex, since it is necessary taking into account all the different parameters, which is a big challenge. Due to the high cost of the individual monitoring programme for internal dose assessment in the routine monitoring programmes, usually only one type of measurement is assigned. In complex situations like the one described in this study, where several parameters can compromise the accuracy of the bioassay interpretation it is need to have a combination of techniques to evaluate the internal dose. According to ICRP 78 (1997), the general order of preference of measurement methodologies in terms of accuracy of interpretation is: body activity measurement, excreta analysis and personal air sampling. Results of monitoring of working environment may provide information that assists in the interpretation on particle size, chemical form, solubility and date of intake. A group of fifteen workers from controlled area of the studied nuclear fuel fabrication facility was selected to evaluate the internal dose using all different available techniques during a certain period. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the daily urinary and faecal excretion (collected over a period of 3 consecutive days), chest counting and personal air sampling. The results have shown that at least two types of sensitivity techniques must be used, since there are some sources of uncertainties on the bioassay interpretation, like mixture of uranium compounds intake and different routes of intake. The combination of urine and faeces analysis has shown to be the more appropriate methodology for assessing internal dose in this situation. The chest counting methodology has not shown

  12. Investigating real-time monitoring of fatigue indicators of New Zealand forestry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Judy; Hinze, Annika; Griffiths, Christopher

    2017-12-27

    The New Zealand forestry industry has one of the highest fatality and injury rates of any industrial sector in the country. Worker fatigue has been identified as one of the main contributing factors. Currently no independent and objective large data source is available that might support an analysis of this, or provide the basis for ongoing monitoring to further investigate. In order to successfully manage fatigue in the forestry workplace, we must identify suitable ways of detecting it. Industry partners are increasingly looking at monitoring solutions (particularly lightweight, wearable technology) that aim to measure worker activities and physiological metrics in order to determine if they are fatigued. In this article we present the results of studies which investigate whether or not such technology can capture meaningful data in a reliable way that is both practical and usable within the forestry domain. Two series of studies were undertaken with in-situ forestry workers using reaction and decision-making times as a measure of potential impairment, while considering activity levels (via step count and heart rate) and job-roles. We present the results of these studies and further provide a comparison of results across different ambient temperatures (winter vs. summer periods). The results of our studies suggest that it may not be possible to identify correlations between workloads (based on both physical and cognitive stresses) and fatigue measures using in-situ measurements as results are highly personalised to individual workers and can be misleading if the wider context is not also taken into consideration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of skeletal muscle fatigue of road maintenance workers based on heart rate monitoring and myotonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalkis Henrijs

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This research work is dedicated to occupational health problems caused by ergonomic risks. The research object was road building industry, where workers have to work very intensively, have long work hours, are working in forced/constrained work postures and overstrain during the work specific parts of their bodies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the work heaviness degree and to estimate the muscle fatigue of workers after one week work cycle. The study group consisted of 10 road construction and maintenance workers and 10 pavers aged between 20 and 60 years. Methods Physical load were analyzed by measuring heart rate (HR, work postures (OWAS and perceived exertion (RPE. Assessments of the muscles strain and functional state (tone were carried out using myotonometric (MYO measurements. The reliability of the statistical processing of heart rate monitoring and myotonometry data was determined using correlating analysis. Results This study showed that that road construction and repairing works should be considered as a hard work according to average metabolic energy consumption 8.1 ± 1.5 kcal/min; paving, in its turn, was a moderately hard work according to 7.2 ± 1.1 kcal/min. Several muscle tone levels were identified allowing subdivision of workers into three conditional categories basing on muscle tone and fatigue: I – absolute muscle relaxation and ability to relax; II – a state of equilibrium, when muscles are able to adapt to the work load and are partly able to relax; and III – muscle fatigue and increased tone. It was also found out that the increase of muscle tone and fatigue mainly depend on workers physical preparedness and length of service, and less – on their age. Conclusion We have concluded that a complex ergonomic analysis consisting of heart rate monitoring, assessment of compulsive working postures and myotonometry is appropriate to assess the work heaviness degree and can provide prognosis of

  14. Radiological monitoring of workers exposure - White book. A multidisciplinary collective approach for a shared vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbey, Pierre; Gauron, Christine; LAHAYE, Thierry; Le-Sourd-Thebaud, Viviane; Godet, Jean-Luc; Bardelay, Chantal; PETIT, Sylvain; Vial, Eric; Vallet, Jeremie; Michel Dit Laboelle, Nicolas; Samain, Jean-Paul; Roy, Catherine; Gonin, Michele; Lallier, Michel

    2015-06-01

    Prior to regulatory changes aiming to transpose the 2013/59/EURATOM Directive, the objective of this White Paper is to rethink the bases of the radiological surveillance of workers and to redefine the organization by proposing new approaches. The Group notes heterogeneity in the implementation of prevention across sectors and companies, leading to inequality in the protection of workers against the risk of ionizing radiation (IR). This heterogeneity derives in part of the regulatory structure based on the historical specificity given to ionizing radiation following a European treaty separate from that carrying the common law relating to occupational risk prevention. Sharing guidelines brought by the recital 8 of that previous Directive, calling for a transposition in accordance with the general principles of prevention, the Group emphasizes the need for better coordination of regulations relating to radiation protection with those for other risks. This is the foundation of the Group's recommendations for a more harmonized and fair protection of workers, regardless of the risk. On the basis of a common regulatory base for the protection of workers, the Group recommends a variation by business sector to allow a gradual adjustment of the means of prevention, with the nature and scale of the risk. In this approach that puts more emphasis on the goals than on the means, the Group underlines the increasing role of social dialogue and inspection bodies to ensure the implementation of the regulations. In this context of global risk management, the Group recommends: - the evolution of the current overly restrictive concept of 'exposed' worker in favor of 'worker subject to an IR risk' in order not to exclude certain workers of the gradual radiation protection system; the introduction of exposition Values Triggering enhanced prevention Action (VTA) is a key element of this graduated approach. - The enlargement of the personal dosimetry information

  15. Radiation protection - Monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to a risk of internal contamination with radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In the course of employment, individuals might work with radioactive materials that, under certain circumstances, could be taken into the body. Protecting workers against risks of incorporated radionuclides requires the monitoring of potential intakes and/or the quantification of actual intakes and exposures. The selection of measures and programmes for this purpose requires decisions concerning methods, techniques, frequencies etc. for measurements and dose assessment. The criteria permitting the evaluation of the necessity of such a monitoring programme or for the selection of methods and frequencies of monitoring usually depend upon the legislation, the purpose of the radiation protection programme, the probabilities of potential radionuclide intakes, and the characteristics of the materials handled. This International Standard offers guidance for the decision whether a monitoring programme is required and how it should be designed. Its intention is to optimise the efforts for such a monitoring programme consistent with legal requirements and with the purpose of the radiation protection programme. Recommendations of international expert bodies and international experience with the practical application of these recommendations in radiation protection programmes have been considered in the development of this International Standard. Its application facilitates the exchanges of information between authorities, supervisory institutions and employers. The International Standard is not a substitute for legal requirements. In the International Standard, the word 'shall' is used to denote a requirement and no deviation is allowed. The word 'should' is used to denote a recommendation from which justified deviations are allowed. The word 'may' is used to denote permission

  16. Biological monitoring as a useful tool for the detection of a coal-tar contamination in bitumen-exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raulf-Heimsoth, M.; Angerer, J.; Pesch, B.; Marczynski, B.; Hahn, J.U.; Spickenheuer, A.; Preuss, R.; Ruhl, R.; Rode, P.; Bruning, T. [Institute at the Ruhr University of Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In our research project entitled 'Chemical irritative and/or genotoxic effect of fumes of bitumen under high processing temperatures on the airways,' 73 mastic asphalt workers exposed to fumes of bitumen and 49 construction nonexposed workers were analyzed and compared with respect to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposure and exposure-related health effects. In order to assess the internal exposure the monohydroxylated metabolites of pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), and phenanthrene, 1-, 2- and 9-, and 3- and 4-hydroxyphenanthrene (OHPH) were determined in pre- and post-shift urinary samples. Significantly higher concentrations 1-OHP and OHPH were detected in the post-shift urine samples of 7 mastic asphalt workers working on the same construction site compared to the reference workers and all other 66 mastic asphalt workers. The adjusted mean OHPH in the reference, 66 mastic worker, and 7 worker subgroups was 1022, 1544, and 12919 ng/g creatinine (crn) respectively, indicating a marked rise in the 7 worker subgroup. In addition, there was a more than 12-fold increase of PAH metabolites from pre- to post-shift in these 7 workers, whereas in the other mastic asphalt workers there was only a twofold rise in PAH-metabolite concentration between pre- and post-shift values. The analysis of a drilling core from the construction site of the seven workers led to the detection of the source for this marked PAH exposure during the working shift as being coal tar plates, which were, without knowledge of the workers and coordinators, the underground material of the mastic asphalt layer. The evaluation of the stationary workplace concentration showed enhanced levels of phenanthrene, pyrene, fluorene, anthracene, and acenaphthene during working shifts at the construction site of these seven workers. Our study shows that biological monitoring is also a useful tool for the detection of unrecognized sources with high PAH concentrations.

  17. Biological monitoring of organic substances in workers of a hazardous waste incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agramunt, C.; Domingo, J.L.; Bocio, A.; Nadal, M. [Lab. of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Reus (Spain); Muller, L. [SGS GmbH, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    In recent years, incineration has been one of the most frequently used technologies for hazardous waste treatment. However, health risks and the potential environmental impact of hazardous waste incinerators (HWI) are still issues of major concern. The reason is the association of stack emissions of semivolatile and volatile compounds from HWI with their potential adverse health effects. Some compounds of special interest are polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). In relation to this, HWI workers can be potentially exposed to PCDD/Fs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other pollutants with a well-known toxicity. Since 1999, the only HWI in Spain has been operating in Constanti (Tarragona, Catalonia). It has a burning furnace that operates at a temperature of 1100 C and can burn 30,000 tons of hazardous waste per year. The purpose of the present survey was to determine after four years of regular operations in the facility, the concentrations in blood and urine of the HWI workers of a number of organic substances directly related with HWI and to which workers could be exposed. Human biological monitoring evaluates the degree of internal exposure to a defined environmental or occupational pollutant of individuals or population groups. The results of the current study have been compared with the baseline levels.

  18. Use of air monitoring and experimental aerosol data for intake assessment for Mayak plutonium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaytseva, Yekaterina V.; Tretyakov, Fyodor D.; Romanov, Sergey A.; Miller, Guthrie; Bertelli, Luiz; Guilmette, Raymond A.

    2007-01-01

    One of the major uncertainties in reconstructing doses to Mayak Plutonium (Pu) workers is the unknown exposure patterns experienced by individuals. These uncertainties include the amounts of Pu inhaled, the temporal exposure pattern of Pu air concentration, the particle-size distribution and solubility of the inhaled aerosols. To date, little individual and workplace-specific information has been used to assess these parameters for the Mayak workforce. However, extensive workplace-specific alpha activity air monitoring data set has been collated, which, if coupled with individual occupational histories, can potentially provide customized intake scenarios for individual Mayak workers. The most available Pu air concentration data are annual averages, which exist for over 100 defined work stations at radiochemical and chemical-metallurgical manufacturing facilities and basically for the whole period of Mayak production operations. Much sparser but more accurate data on Pu concentrations in workers' breathing zone are available for some major workplaces and occupations. The latter demonstrate that within a working shift, Pu concentrations varied over a range of several orders of magnitude depending on the nature of the operations performed. An approach to use the collated data set for individual intake reconstruction is formulated and its practical application is demonstrated. Initial results of ongoing experimental study on historic particle size at Mayak PA and their implications for intake estimation are presented. (authors)

  19. Actinides exposure: review of Ca-DTPA injections inside Cea-Cogema plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grappin, L.; Berard, P.; Beau, P.; Carbone, L.; Castagnet, X.; Courtay, C.; Le Goff, J.P.; Menetrier, F.; Neron, M.; Piechowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    Ca-DTPA has been used for medical treatment of plutonium and americium contaminations in the CEA and COGEMA plants from 1970 to 2003. This report is a survey of the injections administered of Ca-DTPA as a chelating molecule. This report will be a part of the AMM process for Ca-DTPA by intravenous administration submitted by the Central Pharmacy of the french Army. Out of 1158 injections administered to 469 persons, 548 events of possible or confirmed contaminations were reported. These employees were followed by occupational physicians according to the current regulations. The first part of the report is a synthesis of the most recent findings. Due to its short biological period and its limited action in the blood, Ca-DTPA does not chelate with plutonium and americium as soon as these elements are deposited in the target organs. It justifies an early treatment, even in cases of suspected contamination followed by additional injections if necessary. The second part presents data concerning these 1158 injections (way of contamination, posology, adverse effects...). These incidents took place at work, were most often minor, not requiring follow-up treatment. A study concerning the effectiveness of the product was done on a group of people having received 5 or more injections. These results were compared with effectiveness estimated from theoretical basis. Posologies and therapeutic schemes were proposed based on these observations. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings. This document is the first synthesis in this field. It is the result of a collective work having mobilized the occupational medicine departments, the laboratories of CEA and COGEMA and a working group CEA-COGEMA-SPRA. (authors)

  20. ALPHA WASTE MINIMIZATION IN TERMS OF VOLUME AND RADIOACTIVITY AT COGEMA'S MELOX AND LA HAGUE PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ARSLAN, M.; DUMONT, J.C.; LONDRES, V.; PONCELET, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the management of alpha waste that cannot be stored in surface repositories under current French regulations. The aim of the paper is to provide an overview of COGEMA's Integrated Waste Management Strategy. The topics discussed include primary waste minimization, from facility design to operating feedback; primary waste management by the plant operator, including waste characterization; waste treatment options that led to building waste treatment industrial facilities for plutonium decontamination, compaction and cement solidification; and optimization of industrial tools, which is strongly influenced by safety and financial considerations

  1. Polyvalent intermediate storage: first step in the cleaning of the Cogema Marcoule site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabe, J.M. [Cogema, 30 - Marcoule (France); Seurat, Ph. [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles, SGN, 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    1998-07-01

    Cleaning operations of Marcoule site consist, beside the permanent stop and the dismantling of the Cogema 's nuclear fuel reprocessing plant U.P.1., in assuring waste retaking and conditioning not dispatched to C.S.M., for the moment stored on production or pretreatment facilities, under a stabilized form. The Polyvalent Intermediate Storage (E.I.P.) receives preconditioned waste before treatment and reconditioning, receives storing over about 50 years conditioned waste before a permanent repository. Its main function is to wait for the construction of long term repository. (N.C.)

  2. Polyvalent intermediate storage: first step in the cleaning of the Cogema Marcoule site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabe, J.M.; Seurat, Ph.

    1998-01-01

    Cleaning operations of Marcoule site consist, beside the permanent stop and the dismantling of the Cogema 's nuclear fuel reprocessing plant U.P.1., in assuring waste retaking and conditioning not dispatched to C.S.M., for the moment stored on production or pretreatment facilities, under a stabilized form. The Polyvalent Intermediate Storage (E.I.P.) receives preconditioned waste before treatment and reconditioning, receives storing over about 50 years conditioned waste before a permanent repository. Its main function is to wait for the construction of long term repository. (N.C.)

  3. Biological monitoring of blood toluene in exposed printing shop workers; Biologisches Monitoring von Toluol am Beispiel belasteter Druckereiarbeiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, K.D. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Ordinariat fuer Hygiene; Pietsch, S. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Ordinariat fuer Hygiene; Pfeiffer, E.H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Ordinariat fuer Hygiene

    1993-11-01

    42 toluene exposed printing workers were monitored and the results compared with those of a control group of 45 blood donors. Monitoring was done by means of blood toluene and hippuric acid excretion measurements. The mean indoor air concentration of toluene amounted to 230 mg/m{sup 3}. The blood toluene averaged up to 830 {mu}g/l. The median of hippuric acid excretion was in the range of 0,405 mg/mg creatinine for the control group and 1,938 mg/mg creatinine for the exposed group respectively. Hippuric acid showed a positive correlation toward ORSA-tube toluene measurements with good significance (p=0,000). Considerable high individual deviations in toluene metabolism occurred, and were discussed as a result of smoking and drinking behavior. (orig.) [Deutsch] 42 Druckereiarbeiter, die einer Raumluft mit einer mittleren Toluolkonzentration von 230 {mu}g/m{sup 3} exponiert waren, wurden untersucht und die Ergebnisse einer unbelasteten Kontrollgruppe bestehend aus 45 Blutspendern gegenuebergestellt. Als Parameter fuer ein biologisches Monitoring wurde die Blut-Toluolkonzentration und die Exkretion von Hippursaeure verwendet. Die Blut-Toluolkonzentration lag im Mittel bei 830 {mu}g/l. Der Mittelwert der Hippursaeure im Urin der unbelasteten Gruppe lag bei 0,405 mg/mg Kreatinin und der belasteten Gruppe bei 1,938 mg/mg Kreatinin. Die Hippursaeureausscheidung war hoch signifikant mit den Werten der ORSA-Roehrchen fuer die Luft-Toluolkonzentration korreliert (p=0,000). Erhebliche individuelle Abweichungen im Toluol-Metabolismus wurden deutlich und anhand von Rauch- und Trinkgewohnheiten diskutiert. (orig.)

  4. Treatment of actinide exposures: a review of Ca-DTPA injections inside CEA-COGEMA plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grappin, Louise; Berard, Philippe; Carbone, Lise; Le Goff, Jean-Pierre; Neron, Marie-Odile; Menetrier, Florence; Courtay, Catherine; Castagnet, Xavier; Piechowski, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Calcium diethylenetriamine pent-acetate (Ca-DTPA) has been used for medical treatment of plutonium and americium contaminations in the CEA and COGEMA plants from 1970 to 2003. This paper is a survey of the injections Ca-DTPA administered as a chelating molecule and it will be a part of the authorization process for Ca-DTPA by intravenous administration. Out of 1158 injections administered to 469 persons, 548 events of possible or confirmed contamination were reported. These employees were followed by occupational physicians according to the current French regulations. These incidents took place at work, were most often minor, not requiring follow-up treatment. The authors present (1) a synthesis of the most recent findings. Due to its short biological half-time and its limited action in the blood, Ca-DTPA does not chelate with plutonium and americium as soon as these elements are deposited in the target organs. It justifies an early treatment, even in cases of suspected contamination followed by additional injections if necessary (2) data concerning these 1158 injections (route of contamination, dosage, adverse effects, etc.) The authors also investigated a study on the efficacy of the product on a group of persons having received five or more injections. These results were compared with the efficacy estimated theoretically. Dosages and therapeutic schemes were proposed based on these observations. This synthesis is the result of a collective work having mobilized the occupational medicine departments, the medical laboratories inside a working group CEA-COGEMA-SPRA. (authors)

  5. Application of the ICRP recommendations in medical radiation practice and in medical monitoring of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafontaine, A.

    1979-01-01

    Medical exposure in connection with an existing or suspected illness may be made subject to the ICRP principles, but it must be realized that the dose limitation system cannot necessarily be applied when the individual at risk is the one benefiting from examination or treatment. Justification is the responsibility of the doctor prescribing the examination or treatment and/or of the person carrying it out. Optimization will be achieved by virtue of the rules imposed on doctors and by the requirements applicable to equipment and techniques. The same rules and requirements apply mutatis mutandis to check-ups, routine medical examinations, examinations for professional purposes, medico-legal examinations and medical research. In the last case ethical rules and criteria for the validity of the proposed research also need to be applied. Medical monitoring of workers must take the ICRP principles into account, but a qualified doctor should nevertheless be able to form his own judgement on the basis of his knowledge of different types of exposure (both to radiation and to other agents), to intervene in cases of accidental or planned exposure, and to gather data in order to evaluate the long-term effects and the consequences of occupational exposure in terms of doses to the public. Moreover, the doctor should inform the worker of his conclusions and recommendations. (author)

  6. The problems of individual monitoring for internal exposure of monazite storage facility workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekidin, A.; Kirdin, I.; Yarmoshenko, I.; Zhukovsky, M.

    2006-01-01

    traditionally two situations of internal inhalation exposure by alpha emitting nuclides are considered in radiological protection: occupational exposure due to inhalation of plutonium aerosols; inhalation exposure by 222 Rn daughters in working places and in home. for these situations the problems of radioactive aerosols intake, nuclide dynamics in human body, internal dosimetry, nuclide excretion, monitoring of internal exposure have been investigated in details especially for plutonium inhalation exposure. The results of these studies are presented in details in ICRP Publications and UNSCEAR reports. However there is very specific case in which the special analysis of internal inhalation exposure is need. it is the working places with anomalous, extremely high concentration of thoron ( 220 Rn) daughters. The problems of internal radiation exposure of workers in such working place are the main topic of this publication. (authors)

  7. Radioecological surveillance 2001-2003 of marine environment of the dismantling workings of the old pipe of releases in sea Cogema la Hague (Anse des Moulinets)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-02-01

    In order to watch the environment of the construction site of dismantling of the former pipe of releases in sea of Cogema-La Hague, the special and permanent commission of Information near the establishment Cogema of La Hague (C.S.P.I.) asked the association for the radiation monitoring in the West (A.C.R.O.) to realize a specific campaign of measures, on the basis of a protocol accepted by the C.S.P.I.. During the three years of the building work, two significant increases of the concentration in 137 Cs in the marine flora with at most, 9.3 Bq/kg dry, are noticed so be it ten times the concentration that could be measured before the building work begins. We note a net improvement of the situation after the works. The 137 Cs tends finally to disappear. For the sedimentary masses and the sands of beaches, it is outlined no increase of the contamination in 137 Cs (during the works and in posteriori) which translates in a irrefutable way contributions of the construction site. Let us remind this subject that the level of contamination of sands of the Moulinets cove by the named radionuclides is the most important of the coasts of La Hague and that a such report supposes that local events are behind. In conclusion, the campaign of measures of the ambient gamma radiation realized in August, 2004, that is three months after works, consolidates the hypothesis that the works did not generate particular radiological situation susceptible to increase the external risk of irradiation in the Moulinets cove. (N.C.)

  8. Individual monitoring of internal exposure of 131I of workers from the nuclear medicine service FUESMEN, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenas, G.; Acosta, N.; Venier, V.; Bedoya Toboo, C.

    2013-01-01

    It is presented the FUESMEN experience in routine monitoring of thyroid internal doses due to inhalation of 131 I in workers of the Nuclear Medicine Service in normal operation or accidental exposure. It is used a surface contamination monitor, type Geiger Mueller, calibrated with a acrylic phantom based on specifications of the simulator of thyroid of ICRU 48 with 131 I reference activity. Through the obtained measurements is achieved to validate the use of Portable Monitor to carry out preliminary exploration on the monitoring scenarios of incidental situations

  9. Nuclear propaganda war in Normandie. Cogema and Greenpeace fighting over nuclear waste disposal at Cap La Hague, France; Nucleaire propagandaoorlog in Normandie. Cogema en Greenpeace ruzien over lozingen van Cap La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passchier, W.F. [ed.

    1997-10-01

    Some background information is given with respect to the controversy between the environmental organization Greenpeace and nuclear fuel reprocessing plant of Cogema in Cap La Hague, France. On the basis of radioactivity measurements in the vicinity of the plant it is concluded that there is no radiation risk. 1 fig., 3 refs.

  10. Human and technical factors in the doses reduction and optimization at Cogema/Marcoule; Facteurs techniques et humains dans la reduction et l'optimisation des doses a Cogema/Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgogne, J.L. [Cogema, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    1998-07-01

    In the case of Cogema/Marcoule, the constant decrease of radiation doses is attributed to three factors: technical with a surveillance system and doses optimization, relational with the promotion of confidence in teams of radiation protection services as an acceptation factor of radiation protection techniques and psychological with an evolution of minds towards the ALARA approach. (N.C.)

  11. Proposal and application of methodology for monitoring workers occupationally exposed to Thorium-232 and its decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao

    1993-08-01

    Thorium-232 is the parent of one of the naturally occurring decay series and is widely spread on the earth's crust, being also present in higher concentrations at some deposits located mainly in Brazil and India. The occupational exposure to this radionuclide may occur in several steps of the thorium cycle. In Brazil, there is a large number of workers that should be monitored because they manipulate directly or indirectly different kinds of ores, raw materials and products containing significant amounts of thorium in its composition. In this study, the techniques developed specifically for the in vivo and in vitro monitoring of these workers are presented together with the application of these techniques to a group of selected workers classified as occupationally exposed. It is also presented the methodology by which the results obtained with these measurements are interpreted with the objective of identifying the main pathways of incorporation and reducing the internal doses to values as low as reasonably achievable. (author)

  12. Bio-monitoring for the genotoxic assessment in road construction workers as determined by the buccal micronucleus cytome assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Ayla; Yildirim, Seda; Ekinci, Seda Yaprak; Taşdelen, Bahar

    2013-06-01

    Buccal micronucleus cytome (BMCyt) assay monitors genetic damage, cell proliferation and cell death in humans exposed to occupational and environmental agents. BMCyt is used as an indicator of genotoxic exposure, since it is associated with chromosomal instability. There is little research on the occupational exposure among road construction workers for genotoxicity testing. In the present study, we evaluated MN frequencies and other nuclear changes, karyorrhexis (KR), karyolysis (KL), broken egg (BE), binucleate (BN), condensed chromatin cell (CCC), and picnotic cell (PC) in buccal mucosa cells of 40 road construction workers (twenty smokers and twenty non-smokers) and 40 control groups consisting of healthy persons (twenty smokers and twenty non-smokers). Microscopic observation was performed of 2000 cells per individual in both road construction workers and control group. In control and worker groups, for each person repair index (RI) was calculated via formula KR+L/BE+MN. The results showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of MN in buccal epithelial cells of exposed group compared with control group (proad construction workers, RI is lower than the control group. There is a significant difference between workers and control group (proad paving operations are absorbed by workers and that asphalt fume exposure is able to significantly induce cytogenetic damage in buccal mucosa cells of workers after controlling some possible confounding factors, such as age, sex and smoking habits. In addition to determination of nuclear changes and the micronucleus, the determination of RI value presents a new approach to genotoxic bio-monitoring assessment studies of occupationally exposed population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear propaganda war in Normandie. Cogema and Greenpeace fighting over nuclear waste disposal at Cap La Hague, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passchier, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    Some background information is given with respect to the controversy between the environmental organization Greenpeace and nuclear fuel reprocessing plant of Cogema in Cap La Hague, France. On the basis of radioactivity measurements in the vicinity of the plant it is concluded that there is no radiation risk. 1 fig., 3 refs

  14. Biological monitoring to determine worker dose in a butadiene processing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtold, W.E.; Hayes, R.B. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Butadiene (BD) is a reactive gas used extensively in the rubber industry and is also found in combustion products. Although BD is genotoxic and acts as an animal carcinogen, the evidence for carcinogenicity in humans is limited. Extrapolation from animal studies on BD carcinogenicity to risk in humans has been controversial because of uncertainties regarding relative biologic exposure and related effects in humans vs. experimental animals. To reduce this uncertainty, a study was designed to characterize exposure to BD at a polymer production facility and to relate this exposure to mutational and cytogenetic effects. Biological monitoring was used to better assess the internal dose of BD received by the workers. Measurement of 1,2-dihydroxy-4-(N-acetylcysteinyl) butane (M1) in urine served as the biomarker in this study. M1 has been shown to correlate with area monitoring in previous studies. Most studies that relate exposure to a toxic chemical with its biological effects rely on exposure concentration as the dose metric; however, exposure concentration may or may not reflect the actual internal dose of the chemical.

  15. Vitrification of HLW produced by uranium/molybdenum fuel reprocessing in cogema's cold crucible melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quang, R. Do; Petitjean, V.; Hollebeque, F.; Pinet, O.; Flament, T.; Prodhomme, A.; Dalcorso, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel COGEMA (industrial Operator), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and SGN (respectively COGEMA's R and D provider and Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities : the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12% in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also being qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed

  16. Vitrification of HLW Produced by Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel Reprocessing in COGEMA's Cold Crucible Melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Quang, R.; Petitjean, V.; Hollebecque, F.; Pinet, O.; Flament, T.; Prod'homme, A.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel COGEMA (industrial Operator), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and SGN (respectively COGEMA's R and D provider and Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities : the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also being qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed

  17. Individual monitoring of internal exposure for nuclear medicine workers in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baechler, S.; Stritt, N.; Bochud, F. O.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of internal exposure for nuclear medicine workers requires frequent measurements due to the short physical half lives of most radionuclides used in this field. The aim of this study was to develop screening measurements performed at the workplace by local staff using standard laboratory instrumentation, to detect whether potential intake has occurred. Such measurements do not enable to determine the committed effective dose, but are adequate to verify that a given threshold is not exceeded. For radioiodine, i.e. 123 I, 124 I, 125 I and 131 I, a calibrated surface contamination monitor is placed in front of the thyroid to detect whether the activity threshold has been exceeded. For radionuclides with very short physical half-lives (≤6 h), such as 99m Tc) and those used in positron emission tomography imaging, i.e. 11 C, 15 O, 18 F and 68 Ga, screening procedures consist in performing daily measurements of the ambient dose rate in front of the abdomen. Other gamma emitters used for imaging, i.e. 67 Ga, 111 In and 201 Tl, are measured with a scintillation detector located in front of the thorax. For pure beta emitters, i.e. 90 Y and 169 Er, as well as beta emitters with low-intensity gamma rays, i.e. 153 Sm, 177 Lu, 186 Re and 188 Re, the procedure consists in measuring hand contamination immediately after use. In Switzerland, screening procedures have been adopted by most nuclear medicine services since such measurements enable an acceptable monitoring while taking into account practical and economic considerations. (authors)

  18. Impact of uranium exploitation by Cogema-Areva subsidiaries in Niger. Assessment of analyses performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory in 2004 and at the beginning of 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    After a description of the uranium exploitation context (involved companies, production) in Arlit, Niger, by Cogema-Areva subsidiary companies, this report describes the context of controls performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory. Then, it reports and comments the contamination of underground so-called drinkable waters (contamination risks, Cogema statement, detection of a rather high concentration of alpha emitters, measurements performed in 2004 and 2005). The authors notice that water contamination is known by Cogema. Then, the report analyzes the issue of contaminated scrap metal dispersal, comments and criticizes the attitude of Cogema with respect to the associated risks. It comments the uranate transport accident which occurred in February 2004, the subsequent contamination, actions performed by Cogema, the associated health risks, and the statements made by Areva and Cogema. It also comments and analyzes the risks related to radioactive radon dusts inhalation around different sites and because of some technical practices, and Cogema statements about this issue. In conclusion, the authors outline the need of reinforced controls and of an epidemiological study, and outlines how Areva propagates wrong ideas

  19. New high density MTR fuel. The CEA-CERCA-COGEMA development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Languille, A.; Durand, J.P.; Gay, A.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a new generation of LEU, high in density and with reprocessing capacities MTR fuel, is a key issue to provide reactor operators with a smooth operation which is necessary for a long term development of Nuclear Energy. In the RRFM'98 meeting, a joint contribution of CEA, CERCA and COGEMA presented a technical classification of the potential candidates uranium alloys. In this paper this MTR working group presents the development program of a new high density fuel. This program is composed of three main steps: Basic Data analysis and collection, Plate Tests (Irradiation and Post Irradiation Examinations) and Lead Test Assemblies (Irradiation and Post Irradiation Examinations). The goal to be reached is to make this new fuel available before the end of the present US return policy. (author)

  20. COGEMA: Geological exploitation and supervision concerning the open pits of the Herault Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, D.

    1989-01-01

    Cogema mines since 1974 near Lodeve (Herault) the uranium deposits located in the eastern part of the Permian basin of Lodeve. These mining operations are carried out open cast and underground by the Herault Mining Division. The methods used for mining the deposit underground at Mas Lavayre in the most important uranium mine of Western Europe were previously described. The object of the present article is to describe the methods applied to mine the deposits by open cast working, for which it is essential in view of the complex geometry of the mineralizations to have a high-quality geological supervision to ensure a good selective recovery of the ore. 9 figs., 9 refs [fr

  1. Multipurpose interim storage facility: first step in cleanup of the Cogema Marcoule site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabe, J.M.; Themines, R.; Pasquale, B. [Cogema, 30 - Marcoule (France); Misraki, J. [CIE CODEM Paniscoule, 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Seurat, Ph. [SGN 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2000-07-01

    The COGEMA's graphite-gas fuel reprocessing plant UP1, located in Marcoule (Gard department in France) as been started up in the late fifties. UP1 has been in the final shutdown process since 1998. The function of the Multi-purpose Interim Storage (EIP) is to receive waste - before treatment and reconditioning, - already treated, waiting for a decision on the final disposal according to the law of december 30. 1991. For the purpose, the design was based on a system of modular storage compartments by kinds of waste and a variety of multi-purpose handling means consistent with the reception of different types of packages. The installation has been designed for a lifetime of 50 years as from the basic design phase. (authors)

  2. Multipurpose interim storage facility: first step in cleanup of the Cogema Marcoule site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabe, J.M.; Themines, R.; Pasquale, B.; Misraki, J.; Seurat, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    The COGEMA's graphite-gas fuel reprocessing plant UP1, located in Marcoule (Gard department in France) as been started up in the late fifties. UP1 has been in the final shutdown process since 1998. The function of the Multi-purpose Interim Storage (EIP) is to receive waste - before treatment and reconditioning, - already treated, waiting for a decision on the final disposal according to the law of december 30. 1991. For the purpose, the design was based on a system of modular storage compartments by kinds of waste and a variety of multi-purpose handling means consistent with the reception of different types of packages. The installation has been designed for a lifetime of 50 years as from the basic design phase. (authors)

  3. Development of CaSO4:Dy based ring dosemeter for extremity monitoring of radiation workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Kshama; Meenal, P.; Bhagat, R.V.; Singh, R.; Kolambe, D.H.; Chougaonkar, M.P.; Sapra, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    Extremity dosemeters are required to be worn in cases where the dose to extremities is expected to be significantly greater than the dose to the whole body. In India, CaSO 4 :Dy based three element personnel monitoring TLD badge worn at chest and wrist level are used for whole body and extremity monitoring, respectively. Presently no official/legal finger dosemeter is available for extremity monitoring for radiation workers in the country. To cater to the long standing requirement of finger dosimeter, a new compact three-element Extremity Ring Badge Dosemeter (ERBD) has been developed for measurement of the equivalent doses received by the extremities of radiation workers in terms of operational quantity Hp(0.07). It was aimed to meet the performance requirement of IEC/ISO standards. This paper gives the design detail and result of experimental studies of ERB dosemeter

  4. Monitoring of exposure to selected metals in workers of a ferroalloy production plant using NAA and PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Havranek, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Bencko, V.; Fabianova, E.; Sysalova, J.

    1998-01-01

    Advantages and pitfalls of direct and biological monitoring of occupational exposure are briefly mentioned and a project aimed at evaluating exposure to chromium (and possibly manganese) in workers of a ferro-alloy production plant using both the above approaches is outlined. Facilities for NAA and PIXE at the Nuclear Physics Institute at Rez to be used in the project are described. Results of quality assurance of INAA method for analysis of workplace air born particulate matter and blood sampling are presented. Results from previous work relating to this Co-ordinated Research Programme - studying exposure of workers of a vanadium pentoxide production plant are also briefly reviewed. (author)

  5. Effectiveness of an electronic hand hygiene monitoring system on healthcare workers' compliance to guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Salman, J M; Hani, S; de Marcellis-Warin, N; Isa, Sister Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene is a growing concern among populations and is a crucial element in ensuring patient safety in a healthcare environment. Numerous management efforts have been conducted in that regard, including education, awareness and observations. To better evaluate the possible impact of technology on a healthcare setting, we observed the impact of a particular niche technology developed as an answer to the growing hand hygiene concerns. A study was conducted at Salmaniya Medical Complex (SMC) in Bahrain on a total of 16 Coronary Care Unit (CCU) beds where the system was installed, and the hand hygiene activity of healthcare workers (HCWs) in this area was monitored for a total period of 28 days. Comments, remarks and suggestions were noted, and improvements were made to the technology during the course of the trial. While resistance to change was significant, overall results were satisfactory. Compliance with hand hygiene techniques went from 38-42% to 60% at the beginning of the trial and then increased to an average of 75% at the end of the 28-day trial. In some cases, compliance peaked at 85% or even at 100%. Our case study demonstrates that technology can be used effectively in promoting and improving hand hygiene compliance in hospitals, which is one way to prevent cross-infections, especially in critical care areas. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cytogenetic Monitoring By Use Of The Micronucleus Assay Among Nuclear Malaysia Radiation Workers-A Preliminary Result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimah Abdul Rahim; Mohd Rodzi Ali; Noraisyah Mohd Yusof; Juliana Mahamad Napiah; Yahaya Talib; Rehir Dahalan

    2014-01-01

    Biological dosimetry based on the analysis of micronuclei in the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay can be used as an alternative method for scoring dicentric chromosomes in the field of radiation protection. Bio dosimetry is mainly performed, in addition to physical dosimetry, with the aim of individual dose assessment. Aim of this study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in radiation workers exposed to ionizing radiation. The CBMN assay was used in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 50 exposed workers. Number of bi-nucleated cell and micronuclei were scored and statistical analysis was done to see the effect and correlation of micronuclei with gender, age and time of worked. In conclusion, scoring of micronuclei is a useful cytogenetic monitoring for radiation workers. (author)

  7. Decree No. 81-300 of 31 March 1981 authorising the Atomic Energy Commission and COGEMA to intervene in the field of ores and fossile substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Decree was made to enable COGEMA to diversify its activities in the mining sector. It was therefore necessary to amend both the Decree of 26 December 1975 authorizing the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to set up the COGEMA and the Decree of 29 September 1970 relating to the CEA, in view of the specific nature of the duties entrusted to this body by the latter Decree. (NEA) [fr

  8. Taking worker productivity to a new level? Electronic Monitoring in homecare - the (re)production of unpaid labour

    OpenAIRE

    Sian, Moore; Hayes, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    The editors of this journal have outlined the capacity of digital technology to restructure the temporal dimensions of work and called for further focused empirical study (Howcroft and Taylor, 2014). This article explores the impact of the Electronic Monitoring (EM) of homecare work on working time in the context of severe financial pressures on public sector provision of social care in the UK. Homecare workers are overwhelmingly women and provide personal care to older and disabled people in...

  9. Monitoring and evaluation of the health status of workers from the Kozloduy NPP for the period 2011-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negoycheva, Krasimira; Chobanova, Nina; Peyankov, Her; Miltchev, Audrey; Djounova, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the impact of occupational exposure on workers in the Kozloduy NPP through monitoring and evaluation of their health status. The study involved 302 persons from the NPP for the period 2011-2013. Based on the protocol for individual monitoring, cumulative doses of the respondents are in the range of 0.1 to 588 mSv. The probability of the occupational exposure to be a reason for the diagnosed malignant diseases has been determined (Probability of Causation is henceforth denoted as PC)

  10. Implementation of internal monitoring programs for workers occupationally exposed by 131I in nuclear medicine services in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.M.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Dantas, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    In nuclear medicine services (NMS), workers routinely handle radionuclides for diagnostic and therapy. This practice represents a risk of incorporation by these radionuclides. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends the implementation of an internal monitoring program on workers exposed to annual effective doses greater than 1 mSv, as for example, those who handle 131 I for therapy in NMS. Currently, in Brazil, there are not enough available laboratories qualified to provide internal monitoring services to attend all possible demand of internal monitoring if it such regulation were applied by the Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Board (CNEN). The objective of this work is to disseminate simple and inexpensive methods for in vivo routine thyroid monitoring of 131 I using equipment available in the NMS. Devices available in two public hospitals located in the city of Rio de Janeiro were calibrated for use in occupational internal monitoring. The equipment evaluated in this work presented enough sensitivity for such application, being suitable to access intakes of 131 I in the thyroid and able to estimate doses below 1 mSv. (author)

  11. Implementation of internal monitoring programs for workers occupationally exposed by {sup 131}I in nuclear medicine services in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, S.M.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Dantas, B.M., E-mail: salomao.marques@ymail.com [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Dosimetria

    2017-07-01

    In nuclear medicine services (NMS), workers routinely handle radionuclides for diagnostic and therapy. This practice represents a risk of incorporation by these radionuclides. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommends the implementation of an internal monitoring program on workers exposed to annual effective doses greater than 1 mSv, as for example, those who handle {sup 131}I for therapy in NMS. Currently, in Brazil, there are not enough available laboratories qualified to provide internal monitoring services to attend all possible demand of internal monitoring if it such regulation were applied by the Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Board (CNEN). The objective of this work is to disseminate simple and inexpensive methods for in vivo routine thyroid monitoring of {sup 131}I using equipment available in the NMS. Devices available in two public hospitals located in the city of Rio de Janeiro were calibrated for use in occupational internal monitoring. The equipment evaluated in this work presented enough sensitivity for such application, being suitable to access intakes of {sup 131}I in the thyroid and able to estimate doses below 1 mSv. (author)

  12. The new German regulatory system of monitoring workers for intakes of radioactivity with special reference to thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrichs, K.

    1995-01-01

    In Germany, the Association for Radiation Protection (member of IRPA) defined a new standard for the monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to radioactive material. During the last two years this draft has been accepted by the German government in the form of three directives. The purpose of our approach was the installation of a system defining clear criteria for the necessity of regular and special monitoring programs, giving directives for monitoring programs ensuring that dose assessments are as reliable as necessary with the lowest possible expenses, standardizing as far as possible the procedures of dose assessments, and guaranteeing the necessary quality standards. The most important features of these regulations will be discussed in this contribution and their application will be exemplified for the specially difficult monitoring of thorium intakes. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Monitoring OH-PCBs in PCB transport worker's urine as a non-invasive exposure assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yuki; Suzuki, Motoharu; Matsumura, Chisato; Okuno, Toshihiro; Tsurukawa, Masahiro; Fujimori, Kazuo; Kannan, Narayanan; Weber, Roland; Nakano, Takeshi

    2018-04-14

    In this study, we analyzed hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) in urine of both PCB transport workers and PCB researchers. A method to monitor OH-PCB in urine was developed. Urine was solid-phase extracted with 0.1% ammonia/ methanol (v/v) and glucuronic acid/sulfate conjugates and then decomposed using β-glucuronidase/arylsulfatase. After alkaline digestion/derivatization, the concentration of OH-PCBs was determined by HRGC/HRMS-SIM. In the first sampling campaign, the worker's OH-PCB levels increased several fold after the PCB waste transportation work, indicating exposure to PCBs. The concentration of OH-PCBs in PCB transport workers' urine (0.55~11 μg/g creatinine (Cre)) was higher than in PCB researchers' urine (PCB storage area. In the second sampling, after recommended PCB exposure reduction measures had been enacted, the worker's PCB levels did not increase during handling of PCB equipment. This suggests that applied safety measures improved the situation. Hydroxylated trichlorobiphenyls (OH-TrCBs) were identified as a major homolog of OH-PCBs in urine. Also, hydroxylated tetrachlorobiphenyls (OH-TeCBs) to hydroxylated hexachlorobiphenyls (OH-HxCBs) were detected. For the sum of ten selected major indicators, a strong correlation to total OH-PCBs were found and these can possibly be used as non-invasive biomarkers of PCB exposure in workers managing PCB capacitors and transformer oils. We suggest that monitoring of OH-PCBs in PCB management projects could be considered a non-invasive way to detect exposure. It could also be used as a tool to assess and improve PCB management. This is highly relevant considering the fact that in the next 10 years, approx. 14 million tons of PCB waste need to be managed. Also, the selected populations could be screened to assess whether exposure at work, school, or home has taken place.

  14. Air Monitoring to Control the Intake of Airborne Radioiodine-131 Contaminants by Nuclear Medicine Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiemwutthisak, P.; Sritongkul, N.; Chaudakshetrin, P.; Kanchanaphiboon, P.; Tuntawiroon, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation of radioiodine-131 is the largest cause of internal dose to nuclear medicine workers. The concentration of radioiodine-131 in air is limited by the Derived Air Concentration (DAC) of 416.67 Bq/m3. In this study air monitoring shall be performed to measure the radioiodine-131 contaminant in air by sample collection and analysis. Air samples were drawn from areas where there is a potential for I-131 airborne radioactivity e.g. in the hot laboratory, radioiodine treatment rooms, radioactive waste collection areas and waste water treatment plant. A portable battery-operated air sampler, Gilian BDX II with carbon- impregnated cellulose filters was used for air sampling. The flow rate was adjusted to 3 liters per minute and the sampler run for 180 minutes. Iodine-131 radioactivity on filter was measured for 10 minutes by 2 NaI(Tl) gamma counters, Perkin Elmer Wallac Wizard 1480 (3''x3'') and Atomlab 950 PC (2''x2'') with and objective for inter comparison. Counting efficiency of the counters are 57 and 39 percent respectively. Agreeable results of I-131 radioactivity were obtained from both gamma counters. The mean I-131 concentrations measured by Wallac(Atomlab) were 31.59±16.31 (29.84±14.74) Bq/m 3 in radioiodine fume hood for treatment dose dispensing, 8.98±4.33 (7.58±5.10) Bq/m 3 in fume hood accommodated with a dose calibrator, 7.80±5.39 (7.54±5.04) Bq/m 3 in radioactive waste storage area, 0.03±0.54 (0.03±0.57) Bq/m 3 in patient waiting area, 2.94±3.60 (2.55±2.98) Bq/m 3 in hospital ward waste collection area and 0.03±0.01 (0.03±0.01) Bq/m 3 in the water treatment plant area. Radioiodine concentrations in patient's room increases linearly as the administered dose was increasing. Mean±SD of the measured concentrations were 11.63±9.30 (9.86±8.98) Bq/m 3 , 18.57±13.24 (17.35±12.33) Bq/m 3 and 31.90±22.32 (30.90±22.49) Bq/m 3 for the administered doses of 3.7, 5.55 and 7.4 Bq respectively. Radioiodine concentrations in all specified areas

  15. Anticipation of the needs linked with new generation reactors: COGEMA Logistics casks developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issard, H.; Grygiel, J.M. [COGEMA LOGISTICS SA, 1 rue des Herons BP 302, Montigny-le-Bretonneux, 78054 Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2006-07-01

    assigning the level of performance of the cask to be used. To accompany the 'nuclear renaissance' and the related fuel design and fuel management evolution, it is crucial to anticipate the associated needs in terms of cask development notably for the spent fuel management. It is the reason why an ambitious R and D program has been set up at COGEMA Logistics. It aims at proposing innovative solutions oriented by the trends guiding this 'renaissance': the proposed systems have indeed to accommodate Spent Fuel Assemblies (SFAs) characterized by ever increasing burn-ups, fissile isotopes contents, and total inventory. Flexibility may potentially mean quick evacuation of UO{sub 2} or MOX spent fuel with high thermal power to be dealt with. As described in the present paper, these evolutions directly guide the R and D actions on thermal and structural analysis, criticality and containment. The approach shall also include predictable licensing processes in an ever-demanding regulatory environment. The paper has the following structure: I. Evolutionary casks for evolving needs; II COGEMA Logistics R and D on evolutionary packagings; 1- The objectives of COGEMA Logistics R and D on evolutionary packagings; 2- Which R and D actions are currently implemented to anticipate evolving needs?; 2-1 Building an R and D program; 2-2 High performance design solutions for subcriticality; 2-3 Solutions for thermal and structural management; 2-4 Solution for enhanced shielding design; 2-5 Solutions for double containment systems; 2-6 Solutions for shock absorbers; 3- Examples of packaging developments; III Conclusion. To summarize, COGEMA Logistics is actively involved in Research and Development to accompany the improvement brought by Areva in fuel design and management linked either to extensive programs of nuclear plant life extension or to new constructions, such as Areva's European Pressurized Reactor. These evolutions coupled with needs for ever higher flexibility

  16. Anticipation of the needs linked with new generation reactors: COGEMA Logistics casks developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issard, H.; Grygiel, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    to be used. To accompany the 'nuclear renaissance' and the related fuel design and fuel management evolution, it is crucial to anticipate the associated needs in terms of cask development notably for the spent fuel management. It is the reason why an ambitious R and D program has been set up at COGEMA Logistics. It aims at proposing innovative solutions oriented by the trends guiding this 'renaissance': the proposed systems have indeed to accommodate Spent Fuel Assemblies (SFAs) characterized by ever increasing burn-ups, fissile isotopes contents, and total inventory. Flexibility may potentially mean quick evacuation of UO 2 or MOX spent fuel with high thermal power to be dealt with. As described in the present paper, these evolutions directly guide the R and D actions on thermal and structural analysis, criticality and containment. The approach shall also include predictable licensing processes in an ever-demanding regulatory environment. The paper has the following structure: I. Evolutionary casks for evolving needs; II COGEMA Logistics R and D on evolutionary packagings; 1- The objectives of COGEMA Logistics R and D on evolutionary packagings; 2- Which R and D actions are currently implemented to anticipate evolving needs?; 2-1 Building an R and D program; 2-2 High performance design solutions for subcriticality; 2-3 Solutions for thermal and structural management; 2-4 Solution for enhanced shielding design; 2-5 Solutions for double containment systems; 2-6 Solutions for shock absorbers; 3- Examples of packaging developments; III Conclusion. To summarize, COGEMA Logistics is actively involved in Research and Development to accompany the improvement brought by Areva in fuel design and management linked either to extensive programs of nuclear plant life extension or to new constructions, such as Areva's European Pressurized Reactor. These evolutions coupled with needs for ever higher flexibility in terms of spent fuel management clearly guide the packaging

  17. One year's experience by COGEMA logistics of application of the new modal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malesys, P.

    2002-01-01

    International transport of radioactive materials is regulated by international and regional modal regulations that apply to all dangerous goods. The requirements for radioactive materials in the modal regulations are based on those of the 'Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material' set forth by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The last edition of the IAEA regulations was published in 1996 (TS-R-1 (ST-1, Revised)), then incorporated in the modal regulations, and finally implemented, with various transitional periods throughout 2001. As a final result, since 1 January 2002 it has been mandatory, for all modes, to perform transports in accordance with the 1996 edition of the IAEA transport regulations. In the mean time, all the international and regional regulations have also been reformatted, and each of them has now adopted the unified format of the United Nations 'Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Model Regulations', often referred to as the Orange Book. This paper presents the experience of COGEMA Logistics with the application of this new set of regulations to design of packages, transport operations, and administrative matters. Both the advantages provided by these new regulations and the difficulties which were (and are still being) met are presented. (author)

  18. Elimination of quarterly urinalysis of radiation workers based on detection capability of portal monitors for internal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanuja, Jayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Covidien is a radiopharmaceutical manufacturing company in Missouri, USA. The facility produces radionuclides for diagnostic and therapeutic use. The radionuclides of interest, 123 I, 67 Ga, 99 Mo, 99m Tc, 201 Tl, 111 In, and 131 I are fairly short lived with the exception of 51 Cr. The operating license document for the company mandated quarterly urinalysis (bioassay) of all radiation workers in the facility. This was labor intensive and did not enhance the quality of radiation protection program. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) required a technical basis to prove that there was no compromise in the radiological safety and accurate dose assessment in the event of internal contamination of radiation workers if quarterly urinalysis was discontinued. Measurements in a phantom, gamma spectroscopy analysis, as well as calculations showed that there was no need to perform quarterly urinalysis and that portal monitors and other radiological controls were sufficient to detect any chronic or acute intake of radioactivity by radiation workers. Technical evaluation showed Portal monitors can detect an Effective Dose Equivalent of 0.1 mSv (10 mrem) in a year. NRC allowed revision of operating license document and operating procedures to discontinue quarterly urinalysis. (author)

  19. Monitoring acetylcholinesterase levels in migrant agricultural workers and their children using a portable test kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, G M; Muñiz, J F; McCauley, L A

    2001-02-01

    The EQM Research, Inc., portable test kit was evaluated as a surveillance tool for blood cholinesterase levels among migrant workers and their children. Laboratory validation demonstrated a linear relationship between the reference Ellman and kit methods (Ellman = 0.95 x kit result + 0.82, r2 = 0.98). Pre- and post-season cholinesterase levels measured in 70 farm workers were within normal ranges, but significantly different at 28.5 and 29.7 U/g Hb, respectively (paired t-test, p = 0.014). Results from 98 migrant farm worker children and a comparison group of 53 age-matched non-agricultural children showed that cholinesterase levels were not significantly different between the agricultural and non-agricultural children (ANOVA, p = 0.69). These data demonstrate that a portable test kit can provide useful data pesticide exposures when measurements are made in a temperature-controlled setting.

  20. Cytogenetic monitoring of hospital workers exposed to low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigatti, P.; Lamberti, L.; Ardito, G.; Armellino, F.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study the cytogenetic effects in hospital workers exposed to low-level radiation were evaluated. Samples of peripheral blood were collected from 63 subjects working in radiodiagnostics and from 30 subjects, working in the same hospitals, who were used as controls. A higher number of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (CA) was observed in the exposed workers vs. the controls and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). No correlation was, on the contrary, found between CA and years of exposure. A significant difference was observed in the incidence of cells with CA between smokers and non-smokers, but in the control group only. In contrast, in the workers exposed to ionizing radiation, the frequency of cells with CA was very similar in smokers and non-smokers. 13 refs.; 4 tabs

  1. Actinides exposure: review of Ca-DTPA injections inside Cea-Cogema plants; Exposition aux actinides: bilan des injections de Ca-DTPA dans les centres CEA-Cogema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grappin, L.; Berard, P.; Beau, P.; Carbone, L.; Castagnet, X.; Courtay, C.; Le Goff, J.P.; Menetrier, F.; Neron, M.; Piechowski, J. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, Dept. de Soutien en surete et securite, Sev. de Sante au Travail, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2006-07-01

    Ca-DTPA has been used for medical treatment of plutonium and americium contaminations in the CEA and COGEMA plants from 1970 to 2003. This report is a survey of the injections administered of Ca-DTPA as a chelating molecule. This report will be a part of the AMM process for Ca-DTPA by intravenous administration submitted by the Central Pharmacy of the french Army. Out of 1158 injections administered to 469 persons, 548 events of possible or confirmed contaminations were reported. These employees were followed by occupational physicians according to the current regulations. The first part of the report is a synthesis of the most recent findings. Due to its short biological period and its limited action in the blood, Ca-DTPA does not chelate with plutonium and americium as soon as these elements are deposited in the target organs. It justifies an early treatment, even in cases of suspected contamination followed by additional injections if necessary. The second part presents data concerning these 1158 injections (way of contamination, posology, adverse effects...). These incidents took place at work, were most often minor, not requiring follow-up treatment. A study concerning the effectiveness of the product was done on a group of people having received 5 or more injections. These results were compared with effectiveness estimated from theoretical basis. Posologies and therapeutic schemes were proposed based on these observations. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings. This document is the first synthesis in this field. It is the result of a collective work having mobilized the occupational medicine departments, the laboratories of CEA and COGEMA and a working group CEA-COGEMA-SPRA. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of the long duration efficiency of the ECC storage facility of Cogema La Hague plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baganz, C.; Bouland, P.; Breton, E.

    2004-01-01

    The ECC facility of Cogema La Hague has been designed in view of the storage of 24000 CSD-C type containers produced by the ACC facility. It comprises a reception and unloading unit, and a modular storage unit (alveoles). The safety of the facility is based on: a controlled ventilation (low pressurization rooms, controlled atmosphere, heat and toxic gases evacuation), a construction ensuring the static confinement, the sub-criticality and the radiological protection, and the possibility of natural ventilation of the alveoles (earthquake-dimensioned equipments). On the basis of these safety functions, the conformability of the facility with respect to long duration has been analyzed considering three aspects of the facility: the infrastructure, the waste packages and the ventilation system. In normal operation, a foreseeable service life of at least 100 years is established: simpleness and accessibility of ventilation systems, no significant corrosion of packages, durability of the reinforced concrete structure. The demonstration of a service life greater than 100 years would require the improvement of our knowledge about concretes in terms of experience feedback. The behaviour of the facility in terms of loss of technical mastery has been considered too. The scenario retained for this situation is the prolonged stoppage (several months or years) of the nuclear ventilation after a 100 years of disposal. After this period of time, both the thermal power and the hydrogen generation from waste packages will have significantly diminished, allowing a loss of technical mastery era of several years with no impact on concretes integrity. However, during long situations of non-controlled atmosphere, the corrosion behaviour of stainless steels is not predictable. (J.S.)

  3. Monitoring of the sleep patterns of shift workers in the automotive industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Takako; Kuratomi, Yushiro; Suto, Sachiko; Kanai, Tomoe; Nishime, Akemi; Nakano, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    The effect of shift schedules on the amount of sleep that workers receive is an important factor in workplace health and safety as well as the employees' overall quality of life. The objective of this study is to compare sleep period among workers engaging in each of the three-shift work. The amount of sleep (sleep period) that male workers with rotating shift schedules received was measured using accelerometers. The mean age of the 16 male workers enrolled in this study was 54.3 years (one standard deviation, 6.7 years). Thirteen participants ranged in age from 51 to 60 years of age, and the other three participants were 32, 48, and 50 years old. Work shifts were rotated on a weekly basis and were categorized into three periods: shift-1 (8:00 to 17:00), shift-2 (15:00 to 23:50), and shift-3 (23:30 to 8:15). Each work week consisted of 5 days. No significant differences were observed in the mean sleep period for each of the three shifts. However, the sleep periods during shift-1 or shift-2 tended to be longer than that obtained during shift-3. No effect of age on the length of the sleep period was observed. Rotating shift-work did not affect the amount of sleep that workers obtained. However, a comparison with previous study results suggests that morning shifts (starting at 6 AM) and day shifts (starting at 8 AM) may have different effects on sleep time.

  4. Computerized Analytical Data Management System and Automated Analytical Sample Transfer System at the COGEMA Reprocessing Plants in La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.; Goasmat, F.; Poilane, F.

    2002-01-01

    Managing the operation of large commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, such as UP3 and UP2-800 in La Hague, France, requires an extensive analytical program and the shortest possible analysis response times. COGEMA, together with its engineering subsidiary SGN, decided to build high-performance laboratories to support operations in its plants. These laboratories feature automated equipment, safe environments for operators, and short response times, all in centralized installations. Implementation of a computerized analytical data management system and a fully automated pneumatic system for the transfer of radioactive samples was a key factor contributing to the successful operation of the laboratories and plants

  5. Correlation analysis of first phase monitoring results for uranium mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report describes the determination of the existence and extent of correlations in data obtained during the first phase study of urinalysis, personal air sampling and lung burden measurements of uranium mill workers. It was shown that uranium excretions in urine as determined from spot urine samples at the end of the shift were correlated with intakes calculated from personal air sampling data at the 90 percent confidence level. When there are large variations in the rate of urine production, the time rate or uranium elimination was shown to be a more reliable indicator of uranium excretion than the uranium concentration in urine. Based on correlations between phantom and subject lung burden measurements in the presence of changing background radiation levels, a comparative lung burden measurement technique was developed. The sensitivity and accuracy of the method represent a significant improvement and the method is as applicable to females as to males

  6. Biological monitoring of arsenic exposure of gallium arsenide- and inorganic arsenic-exposed workers by determination of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in urine and hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Mashiko, M.; Yamamura, Y. (St. Marianna Univ. School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan))

    1989-11-01

    In an attempt to establish a method for biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure, the chemical species of arsenic were measured in the urine and hair of gallium arsenide (GaAs) plant and copper smelter workers. Determination of urinary inorganic arsenic concentration proved sensitive enough to monitor the low-level inorganic arsenic exposure of the GaAs plant workers. The urinary inorganic arsenic concentration in the copper smelter workers was far higher than that of a control group and was associated with high urinary concentrations of the inorganic arsenic metabolites, methylarsonic acid (MAA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA). The results established a method for exposure level-dependent biological monitoring of inorganic arsenic exposure. Low-level exposures could be monitored only by determining urinary inorganic arsenic concentration. High-level exposures clearly produced an increased urinary inorganic arsenic concentration, with an increased sum of urinary concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites (inorganic arsenic + MAA + DMAA). The determination of urinary arsenobetaine proved to determine specifically the seafood-derived arsenic, allowing this arsenic to be distinguished clearly from the arsenic from occupational exposure. Monitoring arsenic exposure by determining the arsenic in the hair appeared to be of value only when used for environmental monitoring of arsenic contamination rather than for biological monitoring.

  7. Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to dust among aluminium foundry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Choupani

    2018-05-01

    Conclusion ― Determination of AL concentration in urine is not enough to serve as a biomarker. Estimation of AL nanoparticles in the air and biomarkers that determine the actual absorption rate seems to be an adequate method for occupational exposure monitoring of AL.

  8. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to intake of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, O. A.

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring and estimation of individual intakes of radionuclides can be complex. Doses of intakes cannot be measured directly, however must be assessed from the monitoring data of the individual. The individual monitoring data includes whole body counting, excretion analysis (urine or faecal). In the estimation of these data requires that the assessor makes assumptions about the exposure scenario, including the pattern and mode of radionuclide intake. Also physicochemical characteristics of the material involved and the period of time between exposure and measurement. This project report seeks to provide some underlying guidance on monitoring programmes and data interpretation using case study. In this present study the committed effective dose (CED) 1.20mSv exceeded the recording level (i.e. 1mSv) however it was below the investigation level (i.e. 2mSv). The present study recommends that as an essential part in internal dosimetry, specialists be capable of recognizing conditions warranting follow-up bioassay and dose evaluation. Personnel should be familiar with the relevant internal dosimetry literature and the recommendations of national and international scientific organizations with regard to internal dose. (au)

  9. Monitoring Processes in Visual Search Enhanced by Professional Experience: The Case of Orange Quality-Control Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visalli, Antonino; Vallesi, Antonino

    2018-01-01

    Visual search tasks have often been used to investigate how cognitive processes change with expertise. Several studies have shown visual experts' advantages in detecting objects related to their expertise. Here, we tried to extend these findings by investigating whether professional search experience could boost top-down monitoring processes involved in visual search, independently of advantages specific to objects of expertise. To this aim, we recruited a group of quality-control workers employed in citrus farms. Given the specific features of this type of job, we expected that the extensive employment of monitoring mechanisms during orange selection could enhance these mechanisms even in search situations in which orange-related expertise is not suitable. To test this hypothesis, we compared performance of our experimental group and of a well-matched control group on a computerized visual search task. In one block the target was an orange (expertise target) while in the other block the target was a Smurfette doll (neutral target). The a priori hypothesis was to find an advantage for quality-controllers in those situations in which monitoring was especially involved, that is, when deciding the presence/absence of the target required a more extensive inspection of the search array. Results were consistent with our hypothesis. Quality-controllers were faster in those conditions that extensively required monitoring processes, specifically, the Smurfette-present and both target-absent conditions. No differences emerged in the orange-present condition, which resulted to mainly rely on bottom-up processes. These results suggest that top-down processes in visual search can be enhanced through immersive real-life experience beyond visual expertise advantages.

  10. Monitoring Processes in Visual Search Enhanced by Professional Experience: The Case of Orange Quality-Control Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Visalli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual search tasks have often been used to investigate how cognitive processes change with expertise. Several studies have shown visual experts' advantages in detecting objects related to their expertise. Here, we tried to extend these findings by investigating whether professional search experience could boost top-down monitoring processes involved in visual search, independently of advantages specific to objects of expertise. To this aim, we recruited a group of quality-control workers employed in citrus farms. Given the specific features of this type of job, we expected that the extensive employment of monitoring mechanisms during orange selection could enhance these mechanisms even in search situations in which orange-related expertise is not suitable. To test this hypothesis, we compared performance of our experimental group and of a well-matched control group on a computerized visual search task. In one block the target was an orange (expertise target while in the other block the target was a Smurfette doll (neutral target. The a priori hypothesis was to find an advantage for quality-controllers in those situations in which monitoring was especially involved, that is, when deciding the presence/absence of the target required a more extensive inspection of the search array. Results were consistent with our hypothesis. Quality-controllers were faster in those conditions that extensively required monitoring processes, specifically, the Smurfette-present and both target-absent conditions. No differences emerged in the orange-present condition, which resulted to mainly rely on bottom-up processes. These results suggest that top-down processes in visual search can be enhanced through immersive real-life experience beyond visual expertise advantages.

  11. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaw, S. T.

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to external radiation occurs in many occupations. Any exposure to ionizing radiation has the tendency to change the biochemical make-up of the human body which may result in biological health effects of ionizing radiation. This study reviews the monitoring and assessment of external radiation doses in industrial radiography using thermoluminescence and direct reading dosimeters. Poor handling procedures such as inadequate engineering control of equipment, safety culture, management, and inadequate assessment and monitoring of doses are the causes of most of the reported cases of exposure to external radiation in industrial radiography. Occupational exposure data in industrial radiography from UNSCEAR report 2008 was discussed and recommendations were made to regulatory authorities, operating organizations and radiographers. (au)

  12. [Analytical quality in biological monitoring of workers exposed to chemicals: experience of the Prevention and Safety at the Workplace Service in Modena].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaca, R I Paredes; Migliore, A; Di Rico, R; Canali, Claudia; Rota, Cristina; Trenti, T; Cariani, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    The quality of laboratory data is one of the main factors in guaranteeing efficacy of biological monitoring. To analyze the quality of laboratory data used for biological monitoring of exposed workers. A survey involving 18 companies employing 945 workers in the area of Modena, Italy, was carried out in 2008. Most of the 9 private laboratories receiving biological samples did not perform directly part or all of the laboratory assessments requested, but this was not indicated in the final report. Major problems were observed in the application of internal quality control, and only one laboratory participated in external quality assessment for blood lead measurements. Our results raise major concerns on the traceability and reliability of laboratory assessments performed for biomonitoring of exposed workers. Systematic evaluation of the quality of analytical data would be highly recommendable.

  13. Enhancement of hand hygiene compliance among health care workers from a hemodialysis unit using video-monitoring feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Carrillo, Laura Arelí; Rodríguez-López, Juan Manuel; Galarza-Delgado, Dionisio Ángel; Baena-Trejo, Laura; Padilla-Orozco, Magaly; Mendoza-Flores, Lidia; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián

    2016-08-01

    The importance of hand hygiene in the prevention of health care-associated infection is well known. Experience with hand hygiene compliance (HHC) evaluation in hemodialysis units is scarce. This study was a 3-phase, prospective longitudinal intervention study during a 5-month period in a 13-bed hemodialysis unit at a university hospital in Northern Mexico. The unit performs an average of 1,150 hemodialysis procedures per month. Compliance was evaluated by a direct observer and a video assisted observer. Feedback was given to health care workers in the form of educational sessions and confidential reports and video analysis of compliance and noncompliance. A total of 5,402 hand hygiene opportunities were registered; 5,201 during 7,820 minutes of video footage and 201 by direct observation during 1,180 minutes. Lower compliance during the baseline evaluation was observed by video monitoring compared with direct observation (P hand hygiene compliance. Video-assisted monitoring of hand hygiene is an excellent method for the evaluation of HHC in a hemodialysis unit; enhanced HHC can be achieved through a feedback program to the hemodialysis staff that includes video examples and confidential reports. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reliability of the spent fuel identification for flask loading procedure used by COGEMA for fuel transport to La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, M.; Zachar, M.; Pretesacque, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Identification for Flask Loading (SFIFL) procedure designed by COGEMA is analysed and its reliability calculated. The reliability of the procedure is defined as the probability of transporting only approved fuel elements for a given number of shipments. The procedure describes a non-coherent system. A non-coherent system is the one in which two successive failures could result in a success, from the system mission point of view. A technique that describes the system with the help of its maximal cuts (states) is used for calculations. A maximal cut contains more than one failure which can split into two cuts (sub-states). Cuts splitting will enable us to analyse, in a systematic way, non-coherent systems with independent basic components. (author)

  15. Reliability of the spent fuel identification for flask loading procedure used by COGEMA for fuel transport to La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eid, M.; Zachar, M.; Pretesacque, P.

    1990-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Identification for Flask Loading, SFIFL, procedure designed by COGEMA is analysed and its reliability is calculated. The reliability of the procedure is defined as the probability of transporting only approved fuel elements for a given number of shipments. The procedure describes a non-coherent system. A non-coherent system is the one in which two successive failures could result in a success, from the system mission point of view. A technique that describes the system with the help of its maximal cuts (states), is used for calculations. A maximal cut contains more than one failure can split into two cuts, (sub-states). Cuts splitting will enable us to analyse, in a systematic way, non-coherent systems with independent basic components. (author)

  16. Establishment of a reference value for chromium in the blood for biological monitoring among occupational chromium workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ji; Yu, Shan-Fa; Wang, Zhi-Liang; Jia, Guang

    2016-10-01

    The concentration of chromium in the blood (CrB) has been confirmed as a biomarker for occupational chromium exposure, but its biological exposure indices (BEIs) are still unclear, so we collected data from the years 2006 and 2008 (Shandong Province, China) to analyze the relationship between the concentration of chromium in the air (CrA) of the workplaces and CrB to establish a reference value of CrB for biological monitoring of occupational workers. The levels of the indicators for nasal injury, kidney (β2 microglobulin (β2-MG)), and genetic damages (8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and micronucleus (MN)) were measured in all subjects of the year 2011 (Henan Province, China) to verify the protective effect in this reference value of CrB. Compared with the control groups, the concentrations of CrA and CrB in chromium exposed groups were significantly higher (P value of CrB was recommended to 20 μg/L. The levels of nasal injury, β2-MG, 8-OhdG, and MN were not significantly different between the low chromium exposed group (CrB ≤ 20 μg/L) and the control group, while the levels of β2-MG, 8-OHdG, and MN were statistically different in the high chromium exposed group than that in the control group. This research proved that only in occupational workers, CrB could be used as a biomarker to show chromium exposure in the environment. The recommended reference value of CrB was 20 μg/L. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Use of dual-head gamma camera in radionuclide internal contamination monitoring on radiation workers from a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Brandan, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    As a part of an internal dosimetry program that is performed at the Mexican National Institute of Cancerology - Nuclear Medicine Department, in the present work we suggest a procedure for the routinely monitoring of internal contamination on radiation workers and nuclear medicine staff. The procedure is based on the identification and quantification of contaminating radionuclides in human body by using a dual-head whole-body gamma camera. The results have shown that the procedures described in this study can be used to implement a method to quantify minimal accumulated activity in the main human organs to evaluate internal contamination with radionuclides. The high sensitivity of the uncollimated gamma camera is advantageous for the routinely detection and identification of small activities of internal contamination. But, the null spatial resolution makes impossible the definition of contaminated region of interest. Then, the use of collimators is necessary to the quantification of incorporated radionuclides activities in the main human organs and for the internal doses assessment. (author)

  18. Monitoring the hand hygiene compliance of health care workers in a general intensive care unit: Use of continuous closed circle television versus overt observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Livshiz-Riven, Ilana; Gushansky, Alexander; Erblat, Alexander; Koyfman, Leonid; Ziv, Tomer; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Klein, Moti; Borer, Abraham

    2017-08-01

    A variety of hand hygiene monitoring programs (HHMPs) have come into use in hospitals throughout the world. In the present study, we compare continuous closed circle television (CCTV) with overt observation for monitoring the hand hygiene compliance of health care workers (HCWs) in a general intensive care unit (GICU). This is a cross-sectional and comparative study. In this study, we use a novel hand hygiene CCTV monitoring system for hand hygiene performance monitoring. The study population incorporated all the GICU HCWs, including registered nurses, staff physicians, and auxiliary workers. All HCWs of our GICU were observed, including ICU registered nurses, ICU staff physicians, and auxiliary workers participated in the present study. Overall, each observer team did 50 sessions in each arm of the study. Total number of hand hygiene opportunities was approaching 500 opportunities. The compliance rates when only overt observations were performed was higher than when only covert observations were performed with a delta of approximately 10% (209 out of 590 [35.43%] vs 130 out of 533 [24.39%]; P hand hygiene. However, there is no clear basis for incorporating a CCTV observation modality into a health care system that already operates an overt observation program. We have shown that CCTV methodology records a different distribution of opportunities for performing hand hygiene and of actual performances of hand hygiene compared with overt observation. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of personnel radiation monitoring program for occupationally exposed workers in Malawian Hospitals : A case study of Kamuzu Central, Bwaila and Mtengo Wa Nthenga Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinangwa, Getrude

    2016-07-01

    Malawi became an IAEA member state in 2006 and developed the Atomic Energy Act and Regulations in 2011 and 2012 respectively. However, regulatory authority and personnel monitoring services have not yet been established. As such, hospitals operating radiological services in Malawi do not have personnel monitoring programme. This study aimed at developing the personnel radiation monitoring program for three hospitals in Malawi namely; Kamuzu Central Hospital, Bwaila Hospital, and Mtengo wa Nthenga Hospital. A radiation protection questionnaire was administered to the X-ray Departments involved in the study to investigate radiation protection practices in the hospitals. Dose rate measurements in the facilities were taken using survey meters and doses to individuals were recorded using personal dosimeters. The results showed that the hospitals lack radiation protection program which covers the critical issues of quality assurance and control as well as the personnel dose monitoring. Average ambient dose rate values were 0.39 μSv/hr for Mtengo wa Nthenga Hospital, 5.03 μSv/hr for Bwaila Hospital and 4μSv/hr for Kamuzu Central Hospital. Average monthly dose for workers was 0.247 mSv. The study recommends the establishment of a regulatory authority, consistent dose assessment, quality control tests and structural shielding assessment in these and probably all the diagnostic facilities in Malawi. The personnel monitoring programme developed from this study is intended to guide diagnostic facilities and personnel monitoring service providers in Malawi in tracking and reporting exposure record for their occupationally exposed workers. (au)

  20. Using Health Extension Workers for Monitoring Child Mortality in Real-Time: Validation against Household Survey Data in Rural Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbessi Amouzou

    Full Text Available Ethiopia has scaled up its community-based programs over the past decade by training and deploying health extension workers (HEWs in rural communities throughout the country. Consequently, child mortality has declined substantially, placing Ethiopia among the few countries that have achieved the United Nations' fourth Millennium Development Goal. As Ethiopia continues its efforts, results must be assessed regularly to provide timely feedback for improvement and to generate further support for programs. More specifically the expansion of HEWs at the community level provides a unique opportunity to build a system for real-time monitoring of births and deaths, linked to a civil registration and vital statistics system that Ethiopia is also developing. We tested the accuracy and completeness of births and deaths reported by trained HEWs for monitoring child mortality over 15 -month periods.HEWs were trained in 93 randomly selected rural kebeles in Jimma and West Hararghe zones of the Oromia region to report births and deaths over a 15-month period from January, 2012 to March, 2013. Completeness of number of births and deaths, age distribution of deaths, and accuracy of resulting under-five, infant, and neonatal mortality rates were assessed against data from a large household survey with full birth history from women aged 15-49. Although, in general HEWs, were able to accurately report events that they identified, the completeness of number of births and deaths reported over twelve-month periods was very low and variable across the two zones. Compared to household survey estimates, HEWs reported only about 30% of births and 21% of under-five deaths occurring in their communities over a twelve-month period. The under-five mortality rate was under-estimated by around 30%, infant mortality rate by 23% and neonatal mortality by 17%. HEWs reported disproportionately higher number of deaths among the very young infants than among the older children

  1. A Review of Electronic Hand Hygiene Monitoring: Considerations for Hospital Management in Data Collection, Healthcare Worker Supervision, and Patient Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Maryanne; Govednik, John

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in U.S. acute care hospitals lead to a burden of $96-$147 billion annually on the U.S. health system and affect 1 in 20 hospital patients (Marchetti & Rossiter, 2013). Hospital managers are charged with reducing and eliminating HAIs to cut costs and improve patient outcomes. Healthcare worker (HCW) hand hygiene (HH) practice is the most effective means of preventing the spread of HAIs, but compliance is at or below 50% (McGuckin, Waterman, & Govednik, 2009). For managers to increase the frequency of HCW HH occurrences and improve the quality of HH performance, companies have introduced electronic technologies to assist managers in training, supervising, and gathering data in the patient care setting. Although these technologies offer valuable feedback regarding compliance, little is known in terms of capabilities in the clinical setting. Less is known about HCW or patient attitudes if the system allows feedback to be shared. Early-adopting managers have begun to examine their experiences with HH technologies and publish their findings. We review peer-reviewed research on infection prevention that focused on the capabilities of these electronic systems, as well as the related research on HCW and patient interactions with electronic HH systems. Research suggests that these systems are capable of collecting data, but the results are mixed regarding their impact on HH compliance, reducing HAIs, or both and their costs. Research also indicates that HCWs and patients may not regard the technology as positively as industry or healthcare managers may have intended. When considering the adoption of electronic HH monitoring systems, hospital administrators should proceed with caution.

  2. Reliability of the fuel identification procedure used by COGEMA during cask loading for shipment to LA HAGUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretesacque, P.; Eid, M.; Zachar, M.

    1993-01-01

    This study has been carried out to demonstrate the reliability of the system of the spent fuel identification used by COGEMA and NTL prior to shipment to the reprocessing plant of La Hague. This was a prerequisite for the French competent authority to accept the 'burnup credit' assumption in the criticality assessment of spent fuel packages. The probability to load a non-irradiated and non-specified fuel assembly was considered as acceptable if our identification and irradiation status measurement procedures were used. Furthermore, the task analysis enabled us to improve the working conditions at reactor sites, the quality of the working documentation, and consequently to improve the reliability of the system. The NTL experience of transporting to La Hague, as consignor, more than 10,000 fuel assemblies since the date of implementation of our system in 1984 without any non-conformance on fuel identification, validated the formalism of this study as well as our assumptions on basic events probabilities. (J.P.N.)

  3. Simulation of the atmospheric dispersion at local scale in the area of Cogema (la Hague) using PERLE system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandu, Irina; Lac, Christine

    2003-01-01

    METEO-FRANCE is presently developing a new system named PERLE which permits real time evaluation of atmospheric dispersion at local scale. This system consists in a non-hydrostatic meteorological model at mezo-scale (Meso-NH) and a particular code for the dispersion of the chemically passive pollutants. As a result of several studies performed by DP/SERV/ENV at Meteo-France, two particular codes have been retained for the dispersion module of PERLE: DIFPAR (EDF) and SPRAY (Aria Technologies). In this study, the dispersion at local scale of Kr 85 in the area of the nuclear-wastes reprocessing plant COGEMA (La Hague) has been simulated with the two dispersion models, initialised with the meteorological fields provided by Meso-NH. The simulations concern the most complete sampling campaign of Kr 85 performed in this area on 18th and 19th september 2001. The evaluation the two models performances and of the PERLE system's results for this campaign has been done by using the CTA (Atmospherical Transfer Coefficient) measured values. (authors)

  4. Real world implementation lessons and outcomes from the Worker Interactive Networking (WIN) project: workplace-based online caregiver support and remote monitoring of elders at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Diane M F; Mutschler, Phyllis H; Tarlow, Barbara; Liss, Ellen

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of and receptivity to the first computerized workplace-based direct caregiver intervention and to assess the effects on businesses, working family caregivers, and their elderly relatives. Working family caregivers, with at least one health and/or safety concern related to an elder residing alone at home during the workday, were recruited from five companies (n = 27). Caregivers received free computer access to the Worker Interactive Networking (WIN) Internet online caregiver support group and a remote elder monitoring system at home for 6 months. The remote monitoring system provided Web-based status reports and e-mail/pager alerts when individualized parameters were exceeded. Motion sensor signals were transmitted to a transponder that uploaded via wireless cellular communications to the project server, thereby not interfering with elders' telephone use. Formative qualitative analyses clarified acceptance and implementation issues. Summative quantitative evaluation determined pilot intervention effects and was conducted by external evaluators. Despite interoperability and cellular reception issues, the system was successfully deployed across four states to a variety of businesses and housing types. Positive results occurred on worker morale, productivity, and reduction of caregiver stress. Participants found it easy to learn and use. Elders did not find the technology "intrusive" or "isolating." Contrary to their expectations, managers reported no abuse of Internet access. Workers expressed a willingness to pay for a similar system in the future ranging from $10 to $130, depending on the features. They would pay the most for the option involving a geriatric nurse coach. The WIN system innovatively tailored to users' wants, and provided users customized control and personalized support. Use of the system was associated with positive outcomes. Enrollment response suggests a specific niche market for

  5. MONITORING OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES FOR MEDICAL WORKERS OF DENTAL POLYCLINIC’S X-RAY ROOMS IN DUSHANBE, THE REPUBLIC OF TADJIKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. U. Hakimova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data and analyses of personnel’s average annual external exposure doses monitoring via the thermoluminescent dosimetry method used for X-ray radiological personnel in dental polyclinics of Dushanbe, Tadjikistan Republic over a 5-year period ( 2010–2014 . Out of 42 registered medical institutions dental polyclinics amounted up to only just 14%. For this work thermoluminescent dosimeters were used ( with LiF: Mg, Ti with the thermoluminescent dosimetric installation “ Harshaw – 4500” as the reader device. Monitoring results comparison of individual dose equivalent Hp ( 10 values was conducted for two groups of medical workers: medical doctors and X-ray lab technicians. It is demonstrated that radiological technicians’ professional exposure doses are on the average by 23% higher than those for medical doctors.The average individual exposure doses over the above indicated period amount to 0,93 mSv and 1,3 mSv for doctors and X-ray lab technicians, respectively, and are in the range from 0,45 mSv to 2,39 mSv. The doses include contribution from the natural background. The values of doses recorded for the personnel in dental polyclinic correspond to those recorded for the workers in the routine X-ray rooms.

  6. Association between Traffic Air Pollution and Reduced Forced Vital Capacity: A Study Using Personal Monitors for Outdoor Workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubiratan Paula Santos

    Full Text Available The effects of outdoor air pollution on lung function in adults are still controversial.Evaluate the effects of exposure to different levels of traffic-generated PM2.5 on workers' lung functions in São Paulo, Brazil.To cover a wide range of exposures, 101 non-smoking workers from three occupations (taxi drivers, traffic controllers, and forest rangers were selected for the study. After clinical evaluation, the participants were scheduled to attend four consecutive weekly visits in which they received a 24-hour personal PM2.5 sampler and had lung function tests measured on the following day. The association between the spirometric variables and the averaged PM2.5 levels was assessed using robust regression models adjusted for age, waist circumference, time at the job, daily work hours, diabetes or hypertension and former smoking habits.Relative to workers in the lowest exposed group (all measures 39.6 μg/m3 showed a reduction of predicted FVC (-12.2%; CI 95%: [-20.0% to -4.4%], a marginal reduction of predicted FEV1 (-9.1%; CI 95%: [-19.1% to 0.9%] and an increase of predicted FEF25-75%/FVC (14.9%; CI 95%: [2.9% to 26.8%] without changes of FEV1/FVC.Exposure to vehicular traffic air pollution is associated with a small but significant reduction of FVC without a reduction of FEV1/FVC.

  7. Current applications of actinide-only burn-up credit within the Cogema group and R and D programme to take fission products into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toubon, H.; Guillou, E.; Cousinou, P.; Barbry, F.; Grouiller, J.P.; Bignan, G.

    2001-01-01

    Burn-up credit can be defined as making allowance for absorbent radioactive isotopes in criticality studies, in order to optimise safety margins and avoid over-engineering of nuclear facilities. As far as the COGEMA Group is concerned, the three fields in which burn-up credit proves to be an advantage are the transport of spent fuel assemblies, their interim storage in spent fuel pools and reprocessing. In the case of transport, burn-up credit means that cask size do not need to be altered, despite an increase in the initial enrichment of the fuel assemblies. Burn-up credit also makes it possible to offer new cask designs with higher capacity. Burn-up credit means that fuel assemblies with a higher initial enrichment can be put into interim storage in existing facilities and opens the way to the possibility of more compact ones. As far as reprocessing is concerned, burn-up credit makes it possible to keep up current production rates, despite an increase in the initial enrichment of the fuel assemblies being reprocessed. In collaboration with the French Atomic Energy Commission and the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection, the COGEMA Group is participating in an extensive experimental programme and working to qualify criticality and fuel depletion computer codes. The research programme currently underway should mean that by 2003, allowance will be made for fission products in criticality safety analysis

  8. Current applications of actinide-only burn-up credit within the Cogema group and R and D programme to take fission products into account

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toubon, H. [Cogema, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France); Guillou, E. [Cogema Etablissement de la Hague, D/SQ/SMT, 50 - Beaumont Hague (France); Cousinou, P. [CEA Fontenay aux Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Barbry, F. [CEA Valduc, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, 21 - Is sur Tille (France); Grouiller, J.P.; Bignan, G. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Burn-up credit can be defined as making allowance for absorbent radioactive isotopes in criticality studies, in order to optimise safety margins and avoid over-engineering of nuclear facilities. As far as the COGEMA Group is concerned, the three fields in which burn-up credit proves to be an advantage are the transport of spent fuel assemblies, their interim storage in spent fuel pools and reprocessing. In the case of transport, burn-up credit means that cask size do not need to be altered, despite an increase in the initial enrichment of the fuel assemblies. Burn-up credit also makes it possible to offer new cask designs with higher capacity. Burn-up credit means that fuel assemblies with a higher initial enrichment can be put into interim storage in existing facilities and opens the way to the possibility of more compact ones. As far as reprocessing is concerned, burn-up credit makes it possible to keep up current production rates, despite an increase in the initial enrichment of the fuel assemblies being reprocessed. In collaboration with the French Atomic Energy Commission and the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection, the COGEMA Group is participating in an extensive experimental programme and working to qualify criticality and fuel depletion computer codes. The research programme currently underway should mean that by 2003, allowance will be made for fission products in criticality safety analysis.

  9. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  10. Monitoring of Frequency and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Pathogens on the Hands of Healthcare Workers in a Tertiary Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tselebonis Athanasios

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To monitor microbes, focusing on drug resistance, on the hands of the personnel of four departments of a tertiary hospital (ICU, neonatal unit, internal medicine ward and surgical ward and explore differences between departments, professions and genders.

  11. Individual monitoring of internal exposure of {sup 131}I of workers from the nuclear medicine service FUESMEN, Argentina; Monitoraje individual debido a exposicion interna por {sup 131I} de los trabajadores del servicio de medicina nuclear de FUESMEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, G.; Acosta, N.; Venier, V.; Bedoya Toboo, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (FUESMEN/CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Fundacion Escuela de Medicina Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    It is presented the FUESMEN experience in routine monitoring of thyroid internal doses due to inhalation of {sup 131}I in workers of the Nuclear Medicine Service in normal operation or accidental exposure. It is used a surface contamination monitor, type Geiger Mueller, calibrated with a acrylic phantom based on specifications of the simulator of thyroid of ICRU 48 with {sup 131}I reference activity. Through the obtained measurements is achieved to validate the use of Portable Monitor to carry out preliminary exploration on the monitoring scenarios of incidental situations.

  12. Worker Entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucouliagos, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Evaluates the experience of worker entrepreneurship, highlighting successes and failures in Europe, and analyzes the relative importance of factors to worker entrepreneurship such as access to finance, education and training, organizational culture, and worker risk taking. (JOW)

  13. Age correction in monitoring audiometry: method to update OSHA age-correction tables to include older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Robert A; Wojcik, Nancy C

    2015-07-13

    The US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Noise Standard provides the option for employers to apply age corrections to employee audiograms to consider the contribution of ageing when determining whether a standard threshold shift has occurred. Current OSHA age-correction tables are based on 40-year-old data, with small samples and an upper age limit of 60 years. By comparison, recent data (1999-2006) show that hearing thresholds in the US population have improved. Because hearing thresholds have improved, and because older people are increasingly represented in noisy occupations, the OSHA tables no longer represent the current US workforce. This paper presents 2 options for updating the age-correction tables and extending values to age 75 years using recent population-based hearing survey data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Both options provide scientifically derived age-correction values that can be easily adopted by OSHA to expand their regulatory guidance to include older workers. Regression analysis was used to derive new age-correction values using audiometric data from the 1999-2006 US NHANES. Using the NHANES median, better-ear thresholds fit to simple polynomial equations, new age-correction values were generated for both men and women for ages 20-75 years. The new age-correction values are presented as 2 options. The preferred option is to replace the current OSHA tables with the values derived from the NHANES median better-ear thresholds for ages 20-75 years. The alternative option is to retain the current OSHA age-correction values up to age 60 years and use the NHANES-based values for ages 61-75 years. Recent NHANES data offer a simple solution to the need for updated, population-based, age-correction tables for OSHA. The options presented here provide scientifically valid and relevant age-correction values which can be easily adopted by OSHA to expand their regulatory guidance to

  14. Monitoring of people and workers exposure to the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields in an Italian national cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomba Raffaele

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The paper reports the electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields (emf measurements carried out in the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute (NCI. Several devices, used in diagnostics and in medical cures, can represent sources of emf for the workers and for the public subjected to the treatments. The aim is to evaluate their exposition, in order to assess the compliance with the law. Methods The investigations have been carried out in the departments of: intensive care, physiotherapy, MR presstherapy and in the surgical rooms. The measurements have been performed using broad band probes in the frequency ranges 5 Hz÷30 kHz and 100 kHz-3 GHz. Results The variability of the magnetic induction (B(μT levels is between 0,05 μT and 80 μT. The statistical distribution shows that most of the measurements are in the range 0,05 Conclusion The measurement of the emf levels in the NCI is recommended because of the presence of the oncological patients; their long stay near the equipments and their day-long exposure represent additional risk factors for which a prudent avoidance strategy have to de adopted.

  15. Biological monitoring the exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of coke oven workers in relation to smoking and genetic polymorphisms for GSTM1 and GSTT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joost H.M. van Delft; Marie-Jose S.T. Steenwinkel; Jeff G. van Asten; Nico de Vogel; Truus C.D.M. Bruijntjes-Rozier; Ton Schouten; Patricia Cramers; Lou Maas; Marcel H. van Herwijnen; Frederik-Jan van Schooten; Piet M.J. Hopmans [TNO Nutrition and Food Research Institute (Netherlands). Toxicology Division

    2001-07-01

    Occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Human exposure is often demonstrated by increased internal levels of PAH metabolites and of markers for early biological effects, like DNA adducts and cytogenetic aberrations. This study aimed to assess whether the current exposure to PAH of coke oven workers in a Dutch plant induced biological effects, and to determine if these effects are influenced by tobacco smoking and by genetic polymorphisms for the glutathione S-transferase genes GSTM1 and GSTT1. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHpyr) levels were used to monitor the internal dose, while the internal effective dose was assessed by monitoring PAH-DNA adducts, DNA strand breaks (Comet assay), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE) and cells with a high frequency of SCE (HFC) in lymphocytes together with micronuclei (MN) in exfoliated urothelial cells. Occupational exposure to PAH resulted in statistically significant increased 1-OHpyr levels, but it did not cause a significant induction of SCE, HFC, MN, DNA strand breaks or DNA adducts. Smoking caused a significant increase of 1-OHpyr, SCE, HFC and DNA adducts, but not of MN or DNA strand breaks. Following correction for the smoking-related effects, no occupational induction of the effect biomarkers could be discerned. Multi-variate analysis did not show a significant influence of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms on any biomarker. Also no significant interactions were observed between the various biomarkers.

  16. About the interest of an agreement for a european passport for workers in european regulated nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorin, M.; Bailloeuil, C.; Petrequin, A.

    2002-01-01

    The European directive 96/29 applicable to EU member states is, or will be transposed in each country according to national conditions which could prove to be more restrictive than the demands of the directive. Additionally, specific organisations in each country, reinforce the disparities where radioprotection, and medical and dosimetric follow-up are concerned. In April 2001, on the initiative of a group of French company medical officers (EDF CEA COGEMA), a meeting with company medical officers from various member states of the EEC: Great Britain, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Germany, was organised in order to bring to attention the issue of the movement of contract workers in European regulated nuclear installations

  17. About the contribution of occupational health's services for risk factors evaluation, medical and dosimetric follow-up in the workers monitoring exposed to ionising radiations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailloeuil, C.; Gonin, M.; Gerondal, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: French national regulation (31/03/2003) indicates principles of a global approach about the medical and dosimetric follow-up in the workers monitoring. Legislator insists on risks and expositions trace ability along all professional career and after. The aim of this French specific system is to institute medical clinic aspects in accordance with dosimetry and professional risks. The occupational practitioners are approved practitioners who have followed a specific training. The organisation guarantees that a worker will be followed by one specific practitioner in order to reinforce the quality and the traceability of follow up. Medical supervision is done at taking on and at least once a year. It means to identify and take care of risks and expositions at work stations. If necessary, biological measurements and recommendations about collective and individual protection equipments complete the estimation of risks. On the subject of emergency, first aid is delivered on sites by occupational health personnel, either for classic medical problem or for radiological accident. Furthermore, occupational health personnel assist outside emergency services with whom we have specific conventions. External dosimetric follow-up is done with radiation protection qualified expert of the company. The internal contamination supervision and internal dose evaluation are done by the occupational health services. Measurements either whole body counts or radio-toxicologic analysis are submitted to technical quality process. Beyond the respect of regulatory dose limits, the aim of the dosimetric follow-up is the contribution to the preparation of work places with strong dosimetric focus. Informations at workers are dispensed about every risks and every kinds of risks: ionising radiation health effects, ionising radiation and pregnancy, high exposition, chemical risks, work at heat, asbestos. All data are conserved 50 years after the exposure These data

  18. Monitoring of workers and members of the general public for the incorporation of thorium and uranium in the EU and selected countries outside the EU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, E.; Oeh, U.; Hoellriegl, V.; Roth, P.; Regulla, D.

    2003-01-01

    Among the 92 natural elements, thorium and uranium are elements with only radioactive isotopes. Due to their long half-lives, 232 Th, 235 U and 238 U are the parent nuclides of decay chains, each comprising about 12 daughter isotopes. The daughter isotopes always include several α-emitters and β-emitters. Therefore, incorporation of thorium and uranium may result in significant internal radiation exposure. Indeed, isotopes of these two elements are among those with the highest effective dose following intake by inhalation or ingestion[1]. Thorium and uranium are ubiquitously abundant in the human environment in varying concentrations and therefore may enter also the biosphere. Consequently, these elements are present in food and drinking water and also in the human body. Differences in the environ-mental concentrations, but also dietary habits will influence the internal radiation dose of members of the public. Moreover, human activities may lead to accumulation of thorium and uranium in particular areas. Both the elements have numerous applications even in the non-nuclear industry. Increased concentrations require adequate monitoring of workers. Besides the selection of a method suitable to assess intake or body content of thorium and uranium with the necessary sensitivity and accuracy, the interpretation of measured data with regard to occupational exposure requires the differentiation between incorporation of thorium and uranium at work place and uptake from natural sources respectively. In order to keep the internal exposure due to thorium and uranium for workers as well as for members of the public within acceptable limits and to differentiate between occupational and natural sources of exposure, adequate knowledge is required on: sources of natural Th und U uptake, use of Th und U in industry, procedures to assess individual internal exposure, methods to determine committed effective doses for intakes of Th and U. In the reporting period, studies were

  19. Analysis of personnel monitoring results of external radiation doses received by occupationally exposed workers obtained using CaSO4: Dy TLD personnel monitoring badges at RAPS (2000-2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chourasiya, G.; Kher, R.K.; Rao, B.S.; Pradhan, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Personnel monitoring is a key step in radiation protection programme. It helps in keeping a check on radiation hazards and safety aspects of the operating unit. Moreover, analysis of the temporal trends in exposure histories of the individuals/groups play an important role in assessing the need of improved standards of protection and the impact of implementation of such measures. The paper presents the analysis of annual effective dose and collective dose to the radiation workers, which are indicators of individual risk and the impact of the practice. The present study also gives the analysis of the effective dose, cumulative dose and various dose distribution ratios (SR E and NR E ) for the block of 5 years (2000-2004) of RAPS 1 and 2 the oldest PHWR in the country and RAPS 3 and 4 the latest in the series incorporating many improvements in design and operation. It is seen that occupational exposures at NPPs have been showing a steadily decreasing trend, which is a result of a number of design improvements, operation and protection measures. However, to achieve world standards, we have to go a long way by further carrying out identification of areas of improvement, good operating practices along with the desired modifications in design. (author)

  20. The radiological impact of 50 years of uranium mining in France. The necessity of a site satisfying restructuring by Cogema-Areva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In a first text, the author briefly describes the radioprotection risks related to uranium mining, gives an overview of the characteristics of extraction residues in uranium extraction factories. Then, after having presented the case of the Limousin region in France, he outlines the high level of contamination of the environment of the mining sites, recalls the extraction process and discusses the careless use of the extracted radioactive rocks and materials. He outlines the insufficient management and processing of liquid effluents, the risk associated with the dispersal of contaminated scrap metals and of radioactive ores. He also discusses air contamination due to dusts and radioactive gases. He comments the issue of long term storage of uranium mining residues. He outlines the responsibility of the Administration and comments the trial against Cogema which took place in 2005. He outlines how restructuring of all the concerned sites is a challenging issue for our future. A second text in English describes radiological hazards from uranium mining (uranium by-products, radiological situation before and during extraction, long term contamination after mines closure, problems posed by tailing disposal)

  1. TN trademark FLEX: a new generation of fluorocarbon o-rings developed by COGEMA logistics with enhanced characteristics at low temperature (-40 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issard, H.; Andre, R.

    2004-01-01

    Three main types of elastomers are used for the sealing of radioactive material transport casks with elastomeric gaskets: EPDM, fluorocarbons type Viton registered (standard designation: FKM) and silicon rubbers. Each rubber has specific characteristics in terms of temperature range, permeability, coefficient of expansion.. For the casks where high temperatures can be reached (200 C in continuous using), FKM gaskets are generally used. The problem is that this type of gasket does not guarantee the leaktightness at -40 C, which is a regulatory requirement. Two solutions are generally used: to specify a minimum heat load or a minimum ambient temperature. The direct consequence is that it is impossible to get B(U) approvals on the new concepts when FKM gaskets are used but only B(M) approvals, which generate significant additional justification costs (multiple submittals of Safety Analysis Reports, calculation of the minimum heat load or of the minimum ambient temperature..). Thus, it is important to develop gaskets with the same performance as FKM gaskets at high temperature but with enhanced performance at low temperature (and mainly, which guarantee the leaktightness at -40 C). COGEMA LOGISTICS has qualified a new generation of fluorocarbon O-rings (TN trademark FLEX gaskets) which can be used in continuous service on a -47 C/+200 C temperature range. TN trademark FLEX gaskets will be implemented on new casks designs

  2. Interpretation of the results from individual monitoring of workers at the Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility, Brazil; Interpretacao de resultados de monitoracao individual interna da Fabrica de Combustivel Nuclear - FCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Marcelo Xavier de

    2005-07-01

    In nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, workers are exposed to different compounds of enriched uranium. Although in this kind of facility the main route of intake is inhalation, ingestion may occur in some situations, and also a mixture of both. The interpretation of the bioassay data is very complex, since it is necessary taking into account all the different parameters, which is a big challenge. Due to the high cost of the individual monitoring programme for internal dose assessment in the routine monitoring programmes, usually only one type of measurement is assigned. In complex situations like the one described in this study, where several parameters can compromise the accuracy of the bioassay interpretation it is need to have a combination of techniques to evaluate the internal dose. According to ICRP 78 (1997), the general order of preference of measurement methodologies in terms of accuracy of interpretation is: body activity measurement, excreta analysis and personal air sampling. Results of monitoring of working environment may provide information that assists in the interpretation on particle size, chemical form, solubility and date of intake. A group of fifteen workers from controlled area of the studied nuclear fuel fabrication facility was selected to evaluate the internal dose using all different available techniques during a certain period. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the daily urinary and faecal excretion (collected over a period of 3 consecutive days), chest counting and personal air sampling. The results have shown that at least two types of sensitivity techniques must be used, since there are some sources of uncertainties on the bioassay interpretation, like mixture of uranium compounds intake and different routes of intake. The combination of urine and faeces analysis has shown to be the more appropriate methodology for assessing internal dose in this situation. The chest counting methodology has not shown

  3. Radiation exposure of workers in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujnova, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an interdisciplinary department that deals with diagnosis and therapy using open sources. Therefore workers in nuclear medicine are in daily contact with ionizing radiation and thus it is essential to monitor a radiation load. Each work must therefore carry out monitoring of workers. It monitors compliance with the radiation limits set by law, allows an early detection of deviations from normal operation and to demonstrate whether the radiation protection at the workplace is optimized. This work describes the principles of monitoring of workers in nuclear medicine and monitoring methods for personal dosimetry. In the next section the author specifically deals with personal dosimetry at the Department of Nuclear Medicine St. Elizabeth Cancer Institute, Bratislava (KNM-Ba-OUSA). The main part of the work is to evaluate the results of a one-year monitoring of radiation workers KNM-Ba-OUSA. (author)

  4. Gender, airborne chemical monitoring, and physical work environment are related to indoor air symptoms among nonindustrial workers in the Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syazwan, Aizat Ismail; Hafizan, Juahir; Baharudin, Mohd Rafee; Azman, Ahmad Zaid Fattah; Izwyn, Zulkapri; Zulfadhli, Ismail; Syahidatussyakirah, Katis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship of airborne chemicals and the physical work environment risk element on the indoor air symptoms of nonindustrial workers. A cross-sectional study consisting of 200 office workers. A random selection of 200 buildings was analyzed for exposure and indoor air symptoms based on a pilot study in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. A set of modified published questionnaires by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH), Malaysia and a previous study (MM040NA questionnaire) pertaining to indoor air symptoms was used in the evaluation process of the indoor air symptoms. Statistical analyses involving logistic regression and linear regression were used to determine the relationship between exposure and indoor air symptoms for use in the development of an indoor risk matrix. The results indicate that some indoor air pollutants (carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, total volatile organic compound, and dust) are related to indoor air symptoms of men and women. Temperature and relative humidity showed a positive association with complaints related to the perceived indoor environmental condition (drafts and inconsistency of temperature). Men predominantly reported general symptoms when stratification of gender involved exposure to formaldehyde. Women reported high levels of complaints related to mucosal and general symptoms from exposure to the dust level indoors. Exposure to pollutants (total volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde) and physical stressors (air temperature and relative humidity) influence reported symptoms of office workers. These parameters should be focused upon and graded as one of the important elements in the grading procedure when qualitatively evaluating the indoor environment.

  5. Older workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ybema,J.F.; Giesen, F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to an ageing population and global economic competition, there is a societal need for people to extend their working lives while maintaining high work productivity. This article presents an overview of the labour participation, job performance, and job characteristics of older workers in the

  6. Migrating Worker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    This is the preliminary report on the results obtained in the Migrating Worker-project. This project was initiated by the Danish Ministry of Finance with the aim of illustrating the effects of the 1408/71 agreement and the bilateral double taxation agreements Denmark has with the countries included...

  7. Report from the production and exchanges commission about the resolution proposal (no 2937) of Mr Noel Mamere which aims at creating an inquiry commission relative to the existence and storage of ultimate nuclear wastes at the Hague plant, in violation of the law from December 30, 1991, and under the liabilities of Cogema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bono, M.

    2001-04-01

    This document presents the motives of the French production and exchanges commission for the rejection of the proposal from the French 'green' deputy Noel Mamere about the creation of an inquiry commission which would aim at verifying the illegal storage of irradiated MOX fuels from German nuclear facilities at the Cogema La Hague plant. (J.S.)

  8. Monitoring in radiological protection scheme; Pemonitoran dalam skim perlindungan radiologi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: function and responsibility of the monitoring, planning of monitoring programme i.e working area for external radiation, monitoring of workers for external radiation, monitoring of working area for surface contamination, monitoring of working area for air contamination, monitoring of workers for internal contamination, and the evaluation of monitoring results.

  9. Optimal Design of Air Quality Monitoring Network and its Application in an Oil Refinery Plant: An Approach to Keep Health Satus of Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled ZoroufchiBenis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Industrial air pollution is a growing challenge to humane health, especially in developing countries, where there is no systematic monitoring of air pollution. Given the importance of the availabil­ity of valid information on population exposure to air pollutants, it is important to design an optimal Air Quality Monitoring Network (AQMN for assessing population exposure to air pollution and predicting the magnitude of the health risks to the population. Methods: A multi-pollutant method (implemented as a MATLAB program was explored for configur­ing an AQMN to detect the highest level of pollution around an oil refinery plant. The method ranks potential monitoring sites (grids according to their ability to represent the ambient concentra­tion. The term of cluster of contiguous grids that exceed a threshold value was used to calculate the Station Dosage. Selection of the best configuration of AQMN was done based on the ratio of a sta­tion’s dosage to the total dosage in the network. Results: Six monitoring stations were needed to detect the pollutants concentrations around the study area for estimating the level and distribution of exposure in the population with total network effi­ciency of about 99%. An analysis of the design procedure showed that wind regimes have greatest effect on the location of monitoring stations. Conclusion: The optimal AQMN enables authorities to implement an effective program of air quality management for protecting human health.

  10. Incidence and mortality by cancer among French nuclear workers of contracting companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, S.; Haddy, N.; Giardini, M.; Paoletti, C.; De Vathaire, F.

    2006-01-01

    nuclear industry workers of contracting companies are known to be more exposed to radiation than permanent workers (EDF, Cea/Cogema). A longer follow-up of these specific workers should be necessary. (authors)

  11. Gender, airborne chemical monitoring, and physical work environment are related to indoor air symptoms among nonindustrial workers in the Klang Valley, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan AI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aizat Ismail Syazwan,1 Juahir Hafizan,2 Mohd Rafee Baharudin,1 Ahmad Zaid Fattah Azman,1 Zulkapri Izwyn,3 Ismail Zulfadhli,4 Katis Syahidatussyakirah11Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia; 2Department of Environmental Science/Environmental Forensics Research Center (ENFORCE, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 3Department of Biosciences and Health Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia; 4Faculty of Built Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor, MalaysiaObjectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship of airborne chemicals and the physical work environment risk element on the indoor air symptoms of nonindustrial workers.Design: A cross-sectional study consisting of 200 office workers. A random selection of 200 buildings was analyzed for exposure and indoor air symptoms based on a pilot study in the Klang Valley, Malaysia.Methods: A set of modified published questionnaires by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH, Malaysia and a previous study (MM040NA questionnaire pertaining to indoor air symptoms was used in the evaluation process of the indoor air symptoms. Statistical analyses involving logistic regression and linear regression were used to determine the relationship between exposure and indoor air symptoms for use in the development of an indoor risk matrix.Results: The results indicate that some indoor air pollutants (carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, total volatile organic compound, and dust are related to indoor air symptoms of men and women. Temperature and relative humidity showed a positive association with complaints related to the perceived indoor environmental condition (drafts and inconsistency of temperature. Men predominantly reported general symptoms when stratification of gender involved exposure to formaldehyde. Women reported high levels of complaints related to mucosal and general symptoms from exposure to the dust

  12. Monitoring and dose recording for the individual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document specifies the conditions under which monitoring of individuals is required. For workers identified as Atomic Radiation Workers, determination of dose or exposure must be made. In circumstances where personal monitoring techniques are impractical, doses and exposures may be estimated by non-personal monitoring techniques. For workers not identified as Atomic Radiation Workers, licensees must be able to demonstrate that there is no reasonable potential for accumulating radiation doses or exposures in excess of regulatory limits. (L.L.)

  13. Remarks on the Cogema-Areva project of storage of contaminated sludge and sediments on the Bellezane site (Haute-Vienne). Investigation performed by the CRIIRAD laboratory on its own funds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    As sediments of several lakes are contaminated by uranium mines which are located upstream, and which have been exploited in the past by the Cogema (now Areva NC), this company asked for an authorization to use an old pit in Bellezane to deposit clearing sludge from water processing plants and from the clearing of ponds. This document describes the different problems raised by this project. It outlines that the site is not waterproof and that its legal status is not correct. It also reports and comments the radiological contamination of waters and soils due to site effluents, the chemical contamination of waters, and the existence of solid radioactive wastes at the vicinity of this site

  14. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Takaro

    2009-05-29

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997

  15. [The significance of enviromental and biological monitoring in workers employed in service stations after the elimitation of tetraethyl lead from gasoline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghittori, S; Ferrari, M; Maestri, L; Negri, S; Zadra, P; Gremita, C; Imbriani, M

    2005-01-01

    The chemical risk in service stations may be due to toxic compounds present in fuel (particularly benzene and additives) and to the emission of exhausts and fine particulate from vehicles. Owing to the elimination of lead (Pb) from fuel and to the necessity of lowering CO emission, several oxygenated additives have been added to fuel, in particular methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), whose toxic properties are at present under investigation. The introduction of reformulated gasoline (RFG) and the use of catalytic converters (with possible release of platinum (Pt) in the environment) may have modified the risks for workers employed in service stations. The paper shows data collected from 26 subjects (divided into three specific tasks, namely: fuel dispenser, "self-service" attendant and controller, and cashier) to estimate the actual chemical risk and to compare it with the previous data taken from literature. For this purpose, besides performing the usual medical surveillance, we measured the environmental concentrations of benzene, MTBE and formaldehyde, the urinary levels of benzene metabolites S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and t,t-muconic acid (MA) and of unmodified MTBE, and the blood concentrations of Pb and Pt for each subject. Mean values of these compounds were, respectively: 38.81 microg/m3; 174.04 microg/m3; 10.38 microg/m3; 2.36 microg/g creatinine; 96.57 microg/g creatinine; 1.41 microg/L; 7.00 microg/100 mL; 0.0738 ng/ml. The above values were much lower than the corresponding limit values reported by ACGIH and DFG. In particular, after the introduction of vapour recycle systems and the widespread use of "self-service" systems, airborne benzene concentration dropped from 300/400 microg/m3 to lower than 100 microg/m3, without noticeable increasing of exposure to formaldehyde. The disappearing of Pb from gasoline leads to a progressive lowering of its blood levels, while the possible risks due to the very low amounts of Pt released from catalytic

  16. Bias analysis to improve monitoring an HIV epidemic and its response: approach and application to a survey of female sex workers in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Ali; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Navadeh, Soodabeh; McFarland, Willi; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Mohammad, Kazem

    2013-10-01

    We present probabilistic and Bayesian techniques to correct for bias in categorical and numerical measures and empirically apply them to a recent survey of female sex workers (FSW) conducted in Iran. We used bias parameters from a previous validation study to correct estimates of behaviours reported by FSW. Monte-Carlo Sensitivity Analysis and Bayesian bias analysis produced point and simulation intervals (SI). The apparent and corrected prevalence differed by a minimum of 1% for the number of 'non-condom use sexual acts' (36.8% vs 35.8%) to a maximum of 33% for 'ever associated with a venue to sell sex' (35.5% vs 68.0%). The negative predictive value of the questionnaire for 'history of STI' and 'ever associated with a venue to sell sex' was 36.3% (95% SI 4.2% to 69.1%) and 46.9% (95% SI 6.3% to 79.1%), respectively. Bias-adjusted numerical measures of behaviours increased by 0.1 year for 'age at first sex act for money' to 1.5 for 'number of sexual contacts in last 7 days'. The 'true' estimates of most behaviours are considerably higher than those reported and the related SIs are wider than conventional CIs. Our analysis indicates the need for and applicability of bias analysis in surveys, particularly in stigmatised settings.

  17. School Social Workers as Partners in the School Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finigan-Carr, Nadine M.; Shaia, Wendy E.

    2018-01-01

    Social workers in schools provide benefits not just for struggling students, but for the entire school community. But, the authors argue, school social workers are often relegated to monitoring IEPs and doing basic casework. By using skills and values that have long been fundamental to social work practice, school social workers can advocate for,…

  18. Haiti. Educating factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, H

    1990-04-01

    There are approximately 50,000 workers employed in the light assembly industry in Haiti. About 70% are women, the majority of whom are aged between 25 and 34 years, and are either single or in a nonpermanent relationship with the father of their children. Many live and work in appalling conditions, surviving on very low wages to support several children and an extended family. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is now a visible problem in many factories. In October 1988, the Center for the Promotion of Women Workers (Centre de Promotion des Femmes Ouvriers/CPFO) launched a pilot AIDS education program for factory women. The Center, based in a large industrial zone near the airport, runs a health clinic and courses in literacy, communications skills, health promotion and family planning. The new AIDS program allowed CPFO staff to gain entry into factories for the 1st time. Other courses were held outside working hours and outside factory premises. Staff contacted manages by telephone to arrange a meeting to discuss AIDS and to ask permission to hold educational "round tables" with workers. Of 18 managers in the factories approached over a 12-month period, only 2 refused entry to CPFO staff. Almost all managers reported they had registered between 2 and 5 deaths from AIDS among their employees over the past couple of years. A total of 85 educational sessions, each lasting about 2 hours, were held within 28 different factories, community or labor organizations reaching 3063 workers (male and female). In each session, the presentation was carried out by 2 CPFO trained monitors and included a slide show, flip charts, and the video "Met ko," originally produced for Haitian immigrants in New York. The most important aspect of the program was the training of 38 volunteer factory-based health promoters. These promoters attended the round table sessions, where they facilitated discussion and distributed condoms and were subsequently available for counseling co-workers

  19. Thyroid measurements of Iodine-125 workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.A.; Peggie, J.R.

    1979-02-01

    The accumulation of 125 I in the thyroid presents real hazards to workers who use this radionuclide. Recent assessments of the maximum permissible thyroid burden for 125 I have tended to be lower than those previously adopted. Workers using 125 I may receive small doses to a film badge monitor from external radiation while accumulating significant doses to the thyroid from internal contamination. It is therefore necessary to perform some form of thyroid monitoring on such workers. In the past two years the Australian Radiation Laboratory has monitored 125 I workers from six different institutations in the Melbourne area to determine the activity of 125 I in their thyroids. Most of the levels monitored were less than one tenth of the most recently recommended thyroid burden of 400 nanocurie. The highest levels were measured in workers who actually perform iodinations. Workers who handle the iodinate generally had lower levels than those performing the iodinations. Only a very small number of the workers measured were below the detectable limit of the system indicating that even when low activities of 125 I are handled in relatively stable forms it is still possible to accumulate 125 I in the thyroid

  20. Testing of CaSO-4:Dy in teflon discs as a thermoluminescent dosimetry material for personal monitoring of uranium mine and mill workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Murray, A.; Young, J.G.; Johnston, P.N.

    1981-05-01

    Some studies of the spectroscopic and thermoluminescent properties of CaSO 4 :Dy are discussed. Measurements were also made in the field. Exposures measured using TLD, film and spot monitoring were in agreement, and these observations, together with measurements made at various heights above the ore stockpile have shown that CaSO 4 :Dy in teflon discs, shielded by 2mm of copper, give a reliable measure of the exposure at the appropriate position on the wearer's body. This exposure may then be converted into the dose equivalent for the whole body

  1. Biological monitoring and the influence of genetic polymorphism of As3MT and GSTs on distribution of urinary arsenic species in occupational exposure workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janasik, Beata; Reszka, Edyta; Stanislawska, Magdalena; Wieczorek, Edyta; Fendler, Wojciech; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2015-08-01

    To examine the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns in men affected by occupational exposure, we performed a study on 149 participants—workers of a copper mill and 52 healthy controls without occupational exposure. To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic (As) metabolism, we studied the associations of six polymorphisms: As3MT Met287Thr (T>C) in exon 9; As3MT A>G in 5'UTR; As3MT C>G in intron 6; As3MT T>G in intron 1; GSTP1 Ile105Val and GSTO2 T>C. Air samples were collected using individual samplers during work shift. Urine samples were analyzed for total arsenic and arsenic chemical forms (As(III); As(V), MMA, DMA, AsB) using HPLC-ICP-MS. A specific polymerase chain reaction was done for the amplification of exons and flanking regions of As3MT and GSTs. The geometric mean arsenic concentrations in the air were 27.6 ± 4.9 µg/m(3). A significant correlation (p iAs +MMA and iAs. As3MT (rs3740400) GG homozygotes showed significantly (p iAs (21.8 ± 2.0) in urine than GC+CC heterozygotes (16.0 ± 2.1). A strong association between the gene variants and As species in urine was observed for GSTO2 (rs156697) polymorphism. The findings of the study point out that the concentration of iAs or the sum of iAs + MMA in urine can be a reliable biological indicator of occupational exposure to arsenic. This study demonstrates that As3MT and/or GSTs genotype may influence As metabolism. Nevertheless, further studies investigating genetic polymorphism in occupational conditions are required.

  2. Personal monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Sources of ionizing radiation have innumerable applications in the workplace. The potential exposures of the individual workers involved may need to be routinely monitored and records kept of their cumulative radiation doses. There are also occasions when it is necessary to retrospectively determine a dose which may have been received by a worker. This Module explains the basic terminology associated with personal monitoring and describes the principal types of dosimeters and other related techniques and their application in the workplace. The Manual will be of most benefit if it forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a qualified expert in radiation protection. Most of the dosimeters and techniques described in this Module can only be provided by qualified experts

  3. New limits to the remote monitoring of workers' activities at the intersection between the rules of the Statute and the privacy Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilario Alvino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the provisions contained in the new article 4 of the Worker’s Statute that limit the employer’s monitoring powers.After more 40 years, this article is being changed by article 23 of d.lgs. 151/2015 with the purpose to revise the legislation in connection with development of modern technologies.In particular, emphasis is given to the difficult to implement and interpret the law in relation to the scope for employers to control how employees use the internet and emails at work.The new article is analysed in accordance with the rules of Italian Data Protection Code (d.lgs. 196/2003 and the norms laid down by the Italian Data Protection Authority.

  4. To monitor or not to monitor?: editorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    After a brief discussion about results for occupational exposure in New Zealand and the UK, a short editorial raises a number of questions about personal dosimetry practice. These questions include whether the right people are being monitored and whether less attention should be paid to the monitoring of certain groups of workers who are occupationally exposed to external beta/gamma radiation, and more to the monitoring of workers or members of the general public who are exposed to higher doses from radon daughters, so as to focus attention on the areas where the largest savings in collective dose could be achieved. (U.K.)

  5. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  6. Wage discrimination against foreign workers in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Vakulenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We try to determine with the help of the Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition technique whether foreign workers are discriminated against in Russia. We use the Russian Ministry of Labor (Rostrud data on migrants’ applications and the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS, provided by the Higher School of Economics for the period 2009–2013. We show that there is significant discrimination against foreign workers. The average salary of Russian workers with the same level of productivity as migrants exceeds migrants’ average salary by 40%. The industries in which the workers are employed have made most substantial contribution to the discrimination gap. Moreover, there is evidence that the lower salaries of foreign workers do not reduce the salaries of Russians employed in similar positions.

  7. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation by the worker. Indirect participation involves employee representation, while direct participation relates to individual involvement in management’s decision-making processes. In the Framework Dir...

  8. Individual monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Practical Radiation Technical Manual is one of a series which has been designed to provide guidance on radiological protection for employers, Radiation Protection Officers, managers and other technically competent persons who have a responsibility to ensure the safety of employees working with ionizing radiation. The Manual may be used together with the appropriate IAEA Practical Radiation Safety Manual to provide adequate training, instruction or information on individual monitoring for all employees engaged in work with ionizing radiations. Sources of ionizing radiation have a large number of applications in the workplace. The exposures of the individual workers involved may need to be routinely monitored and records kept of their cumulative radiation doses. There are also occasions when it is necessary to retrospectively determine a dose which may have been received by a worker. This Manual explains the basic terminology associated with individual monitoring and describes the principal types of dosimeters and other related techniques and their application in the workplace. The Manual will be of most benefit if it forms part of more comprehensive training or is supplemented by the advice of a qualified expert in radiation protection. Most of the dosimeters and techniques described in this Manual can only be provided by qualified experts

  9. Updated mortality follow-up among French AREVA NC workers: 1977-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Rogel, A.; Samson, E.; Laurier, D.; Tirmarche, M.; Caer, S.; Quesne, B.; Acker, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: This study has been established in order to evaluate the mortality of nuclear workers employed at the French company specialized in nuclear fuel cycle (AREVA NC ex COGEMA) and exposed to low level of ionizing radiation. The follow-up of the cohort has been extended recently. We present here a new analysis of the mortality based on an extended follow-up of the cohort by 10 years. Methods: Administrative data, vital status and causes of death were reconstructed for each worker. Standardized Mortality ratios (SMR) were computed using national mortality rates as external reference adjusted for sex, age and calendar year. Trend tests were computed to assess the association between different causes of death and radiation exposure considering adjustment on socioeconomic status (SES). Results: 93% of the 9,285 workers were male workers. They were followed for an average of 22 years, with a total number of person-years of 206,603. The % of subjects lost to follow-up was less than 1%. 1,052 deaths occurred during the total follow-up period. 98% of the causes of death were identified. Mean age at end of follow-up was 56 years. As excepted, a strong deficit was observed for all causes of death (SMR=0.64; 90% confidence interval CI : 0.60-0.67) and all cancer mortality (SMR=0.77; 90% confidence interval CI : 0.71-0.83). No significant excess was found for any of the considered causes of death. The all-causes and all cancers SMRs increased significantly with cumulative dose, but after adjusting on SES, these positive trends were no longer statistically significant. Among the 30 causes of deaths studied, significant trends were observed for colon, liver cancer and for non-cancer respiratory diseases. Conclusion: AREVA NC workers exposed to ionizing radiation have a lower mortality than the French national population, partly due to the Healthy Worker Effect. It is important to adjust on SES in the dose-effect relationship analysis. Although follow-up has

  10. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000130.htm Coal worker's pneumoconiosis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) is a lung disease that ...

  11. Contamination monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamares, A L [Philippine Nuclear Research Inst., Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    1997-06-01

    By virture of Republic Act 2067, as amended the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), now renamed Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) is the government agency charged with the regulations and control of radioactive materials in the Philippines. The protection against the hazards of non-ionizing radiation is being monitored by the Radiological Health Service (RHS) of the Department of Health pursuant to the provision of Presidental Decree 480. The RHS issues licenses for possession, handling, and use of x-ray machines and equipment, both industrial and medical, and provide radiation protection training to x-ray technologists and technicians. As part of its regulatory function, the PNRI is charged with the responsibility of assuring that the radiation workers and the public are protected from the hazards associated with the possession, handling, production, manufacturing, and the use of radioactive materials and atomic energy facilities in the Philippines. The protection of radiation workers from the hazards of ionizing radiation has always been a primary concern of PNRI and by limiting the exposure of radiation workers, the risk to population is kept to within acceptable level. In this paper, the following items are described: radiation protection program, radiation protection services, radiation control, and problems encountered/recommendation. (G.K.)

  12. Cell Phones in support of Community Health Workers | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cell Phones in support of Community Health Workers ... the diagnosis and treatment of childhood pneumonia at a level 4 health centre (county level). Oximetry is a non-invasive method of monitoring the amount of oxygen in the patient's blood.

  13. Analysis of occupational doses of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Joshi, V.D.; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Raman, N.V.; Kher, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Routine monitoring of occupational radiation workers is done for controlling the doses to the individuals and to demonstrate the compliance with occupational dose limits. One of the objective of personnel monitoring program is the assessment of the radiation safety of working area and trends of exposure histories of individuals or group of workers. Computerised dose registry of all monitored radiation workers along with their personnel data helps in analyzing these trends. This in turn helps the institutions in management of their radiation safety programs. In India, annual and life time occupational dose records are maintained as National Dose Registry in the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. This paper presents analysis of occupational dose data of monitored radiation workers in medical institutions in India during last five years (i.e. 2002-2006)

  14. Posting of workers : Enforcement problems and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Expert contribution to a final conference. According to the author, monitoring the process of posting and controlling the regular character of the cross-border provision of services with posted workers has proven to be a problematic area. Recent joint activities of the labour inspectorate have

  15. SME Worker Affective (SWA) index based on environmental ergonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushada, M.; Kusuma Aji, G.; Okayama, T.; Khidir, M.

    2018-04-01

    Small-Medium sized (SME) is a focal type of Indonesian industry which contributes to national emerging economies. Indonesian goverment has developed employee social security system (BPJS Ketenagakerjaan) to support worker quality of life. However, there were limited research which could assist BPJS Ketenagakerjaan in evaluating worker quality of life. Worker quality of life could be categorized as the highest worker needs or affective states. SME Worker Affective (SWA) index is being concerned as a basic tool to make balance between worker performance and quality of life in workstation of SMEs. The research objectives are: 1) To optimize the environmental ergonomics in SMEs; 2) To quantify SME Worker Affective (SWA) index based on optimized environmental ergonomics. The research advantage is to support Indonesian goverment in monitoring SMEs good practices to its worker quality of life. Simulated annealing optimized the heart rate and environmental ergonomics parameters. SWA index was determined based on comparison between optimized heart rate and environmental ergonomics parameters. SWA index were quantified for 380 data of worker. The evaluation indicated 51.3% worker in affective and 48.7% in non-affective condition. Research results indicated that stakeholders of SMEs should put more attention on environmental ergonomics and worker affective.

  16. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  17. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service

  18. A need for national registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marathe, P.K.; Krishnan, D.; Massand, O.P.; Dhond, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    In India about 33000 radiation workers are monitored regularly from a centralised Personnel Monitoring Service conducted by the Division of Radiological Protection, B.A.R.C. In view of the large dose data accumulated over the past thirty years it is only logical to investigate for biological effects if any. The need to initiate National Registry of Radiation Workers (NRRW) is pointed out. Such a registry is in force in U.K., Canada, France and Japan etc. Even in case of negative findings, such an exercise would help in allaying fears among radiation workers in particular and the public in general. (author)

  19. Worker Alienation and Compensation at the Savannah River Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, Loka; Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Corporations operating U.S. nuclear weapons plants for the federal government began tracking occupational exposures to ionizing radiation in 1943. However, workers, scholars, and policy makers have questioned the accuracy and completeness of radiation monitoring and its capacity to provide a basis for workers' compensation. We use interviews to explore the limitations of broad-scale, corporate epidemiological surveillance through worker accounts from the Savannah River Site nuclear weapons plant. Interviewees report inadequate monitoring, overbearing surveillance, limited venues to access medical support and exposure records, and administrative failure to report radiation and other exposures at the plant. The alienation of workers from their records and toil is relevant to worker compensation programs and the accuracy of radiation dose measurements used in epidemiologic studies of occupational radiation exposures at the Savannah River Site and other weapons plants. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Occupational health care of radiation exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahim Rahman Hamzah

    1995-01-01

    The medical problems encountered by the earlier pioneer workers in radiation at the turn of the century are well known. In the 1928, the ICRP (International Committee for Radiological Protection) was instituted and the ALARA principle of radiation protection was evolved. Occupational health care is about maintaining the health and safety of workers in their workplaces. This involves using medical, nursing and engineering practices to achieve its objectives. In certain occupations, including those where workers are exposed to ionising radiation, some of these principles are enshrined in the legislation and would require statutory compliance. Occupational health care of radiation workers seek to prevent ill health arising from exposure to radiation by consolidating the benefits of exposures control and dosimetry. This is via health surveillance for spillages, contamination and exposures to unsealed sources of radiation. It is unlikely that can plan and hope to cater for a Chernobyl type of disaster. However, for the multitude of workers in industry exposed to radiation, control models are available. These are from the more in industrialize countries with a nuclear based energy industry, and where radioactive gadgetry are used in places ranging from factories and farms to construction sites. These models involve statutory requirements on the standard of work practices, assessment of fitness to work and the monitoring of both the worker and the workplace. A similar framework of activity is present in Malaysia. This will be further enhanced with the development of her general health and safety at work legislation. (author)

  1. The Greek outside workers radiation passbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamenopoulou, V.

    1997-01-01

    Following the European Council Directive 90/641/EURATOM of the 4 December 1990, on the operational protection of outside workers exposed to the risk of ionising radiation during their activities in controlled areas, the Greek Government has adopted the Ministerial Order, published in the Official Gazette (No 9087(FOR) 1004 of 1996). The Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the competent governmental authority for radiation protection matters. Therefore it is the GAEC's responsibility of monitoring the implementation of this Order. The Order consists of 6 parts, where among others are described the obligations of outside undertakings and operators and the obligations of outside workers. One of the major elements of this Ministerial Order is the radiation passbook.The Greek Radiation Passbook is written in two languages, Greek and English. It contains worker's personal data (identity, medical examinations, training in radiation protection, etc), information concerning his employee (name, address, etc) and worker's dosimetry information such as operational and the official dosimetry (external and internal) data. The radiation passbook is provided only to category A outside workers, working in Greece or abroad. The GAEC distributed the Ministerial Order with application forms to the possible outside undertakings for their information. Until August 1997, 41 radiation passbooks have been attributed to outride workers. All of them are technicians dealing with medical equipment using ionizing radiation. (author)

  2. Epidemiological studies on radiation workers in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo Yong Choi; Hai Won Chung

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objectives: The aim of this study is to analyze the occupational exposure for external radiation and to evaluate radiation effects on Korean radiation workers. Methods: The National Dose Registry contains radiation exposure records for all monitored radiation workers since its creation in 1983. We are carrying out epidemiological survey for radiation workers. The items of information included personal identification, employment and dose data. The frequencies of various types of chromosome aberrations in radiation workers were compared with controls. The data were analyzed according to year, sex, age, duration of occupation, exposure dose, etc. using SPSS statistical package(version 15.0). The goodness-of-fit test for Poisson assumption and dispersion test for detecting heterogeneity for Poisson distribution were done with chromosomal aberrations among study subjects. Results: The total number of workers registered from 1983 to 2005 was 61,610. The number of workers steadily increased and the accumulated dose somewhat increased. The collective annual dose of radiation workers was 345.823 man Sv and the mean annual dose was 1.34mSv. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations in 102 workers were compared with those in 42 controls. The frequencies of all types of chromosome aberrations in the exposed subjects were higher than those in the control group. Poisson regression analysis showed that there was significant association of chromosome aberrations with radiation dose, duration of work, age and alcohol intake. We started to survey radiation workers in order to evaluate radiation effects, collected epidemiological data for 9,157 workers at present and analyzed their lifetime radiation exposure doses. Follow-up is carrying out using the Korean Mortality Data, Cancer Registry and individual investigation. Among study patients, 11 of 38 deaths were identified with cancer. Conclusions: The data on occupational doses shows that

  3. Identification of occupational mortality risks for Hanford workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneale, G.W.; Mancuso, T.F.; Stewart, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Though most of the production work at Hanford is done by manual workers, 46% of the most dangerous jobs are performed by people who have professional or technical qualifications. For these privileged workers occupational mortality risks are positively correlated with radiation doses but for manual workers, who have relatively high death rates, there is an inverse relation with dose. The high ratio of professional to manual workers is clearly the reason for the industry having fewer observed than expected deaths and the inverse relation with dose for less privileged workers is probably a sign that there has been selective recruitment of the most highly paid manual workers-that is, skilled craftsmen into the more dangerous occupations. Evidence of this selective recruitment was obtained by equating danger levels with levels of monitoring for internal radiation. Therefore, there should be some control for these levels in any analysis of cancer effects of the measured dose of radiation. (author)

  4. Advanced worker protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D ampersand D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D ampersand D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration

  5. Advanced worker protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.

  6. Community-based blood pressure measurement by non-health workers using electronic devices: a validation study

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel D. Reidpath; Mei Lee Ling; Shajahan Yasin; Kanason Rajagobal; Pascale Allotey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Population monitoring and screening of blood pressure is an important part of any population health strategy. Qualified health workers are expensive and often unavailable for screening. Non-health workers with electronic blood pressure monitors are increasingly used in community-based research. This approach is unvalidated. In a poor, urban community we compared blood pressure measurements taken by non-health workers using electronic devices against qualified health workers usin...

  7. Electronic Performance Monitoring: An Organizational Justice and Concertive Control Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, G. Stoney; Tompkins, Phillip K.

    1997-01-01

    Applies theories of organizational justice/concertive control to account for contradictions inherent in electronic monitoring of workers by organizations. Argues that results are usually positive when workers are involved in the design and implementation of monitoring systems, and monitoring is restricted to performance-related activities with…

  8. Basic principles for occupational radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This Safety Guide sets forth the objectives of an adequate strategy for monitoring internal and external radiation exposures of workers. It covers individual monitoring, and workplace monitoring to the extent required for assessment and control of individual radiation doses. The responsibilities of authorities for organizing the monitoring of radiation workers are discussed, and brief descriptions are given of the rules governing the implementation of monitoring methods. The general principles to be considered in selecting instrumentation and appropriate monitoring techniques are described, as well as calibrating techniques, methods of record keeping and related aspects

  9. Modifiers of the healthy worker effect and expression of the internal healthy worker effect in a female nuclear worker cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillargeon, Jacques Guy

    Though well-documented among numerous cohorts of male workers, little is known about how the healthy worker effect (HWE) and the internal HWE is expressed among cohorts of female workers. This investigation examines characteristics of the HWE and the internal HWE in a cohort of 12,668 female nuclear workers. The HWE, which was estimated by assessing SMRs for all causes of death combined, was found to be modified by race, occupational class and length of follow-up. Smaller variations in the HWE were observed for age at hire, occupational class, length of employment, monitored status, and interruption of monitoring. Examination of SMRs for all cancers combined revealed that the HWE was modified by race, occupational class, monitored status, interruption of monitoring, and length of follow-up. Smaller variations were observed for age at hire and length of employment. Investigators often try to circumvent the HWE by employing internal comparisons; that is, by directly comparing the mortality of subgroups within a defined occupational cohort with one another. However, internal comparisons are not necessarily free from certain biases related to the HWE. If employees are selected on the basis of health into subgroups which serve as the basis for internal comparisons, then a form of internal comparison bias, called the internal healthy worker effect (Stewart et al, 1991; Wilkinson, 1992) may occur. In this investigation, the expression of the internal HWE was examined by estimating the extent to which survival time was modified by the variables under study. Using the Cox PH model, time to death from all causes was found to be modified by occupational class and length of employment but not by race, age at hire, monitored status, or interruption of monitoring. Time to death from all cancers was found to be modified by race and interruption of monitoring but not by age at hire, occupational class, length of employment, or monitored status. These results are important because

  10. Occupational radiation doses among diagnostic radiation workers in South Korea, 1996-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. J.; Cha, E. S.; Ha, M.; Jin, Y. W.; Hwang, S. S.; Kong, K. A.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses of occupational radiation among diagnostic radiation workers by using the national dose registry between 1996 and 2006 by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Dose measurements were collected quarterly by the use of thermoluminescent dosemeter personal monitors. A total of 61 732 workers were monitored, including 18 376 radiologic technologists (30%), 13 762 physicians (22%), 9858 dentists (16%) and 6114 dental hygienists (9.9%). The average annual effective doses of all monitored workers decreased from 1.75 to 0.80 mSv over the study period. Among all diagnostic radiation workers, radiologic technologists received both the highest effective and collective doses. Male radiologic technologists aged 30-49 y composed the majority of workers receiving more than 5 mSv in a quarter. More intensive monitoring of occupational radiation exposure and investigation into its health effects on diagnostic radiation workers are required in South Korea. (authors)

  11. Workers' Education in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elayassa, Wajih

    2013-01-01

    Due to the political context and the restrictions placed on general freedoms and trade union activities, workers' education in Palestine remained informal and largely reliant on oral memory until the early 1990s. For decades, it was an integral part of political education. Workers' education only became a stand-alone field after the establishment…

  12. What makes workers happy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.; Wielers, R.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    This article answers the question what makes workers happy? It does so by combining insights from micro-economics, sociology and psychology. Basis is the standard utility function of a worker that includes income and hours of work and is elaborated with job characteristics. In this way it is

  13. Conservatism amongst Nigerian workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Waterman (Peter)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractIn a recent paper (Waterman 1974) I discussed the debate that has been taking place, largely amongst socialists, over the role of workers and unions in Africa. I identified three major positions that have emerged. One was the traditional Communist position that the workers and unions are

  14. Analysis of causes of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.

    2001-01-01

    About 5500 radiation workers are monitored from industrial institutions in our country out of which 3600 radiation workers are working in industrial radiography institutions. These workers have a higher potential of receiving overexposure (equivalent dose 3 10 mSv) due to their nature of work. This paper presents analysis of overexposures and their causes for radiation workers working in industrial radiography institutions during the last seven years. (author)

  15. Organization of the individual monitoring in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, P.

    1991-01-01

    There are about 35,000 workers monitored in Brazil. Most of them are employed onhealth and non-nuclear industrial areas. The external individual monitoring is done by 10 laboratories accredited by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, applying specific regulation. The personal date and doses of the monitored workers are stored in a data bank. In this paper, future improvements are also discussed. (orig.)

  16. COGEMA Experience in Uranous Nitrate Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tison, E.; Bretault, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    Separation and purification of plutonium by PUREX process is based on a sequence of extraction and back extraction which requires reducing plutonium Pu IV (extractable form) into Pu III (inextractable form) Different reducers can be used to reduce Pu IV into Pu III. Early plants such as that for Magnox fuel at Sellafield used ferrous sulfamate while UP 1 at Marcoule used uranous sulfamate. These reducers are efficient and easy to prepare but generates ferric and/or sulphate ions and so complicates management of the wastes from the plutonium purification cycle. Recent plants such as UP3 and UP2 800 at La Hague, THORP at Sellafield, and RRP at Rokkasho Mura (currently under tests) use uranous nitrate (U IV) stabilized by hydrazinium nitrate (N 2 H 5 NO 3 ) and hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN). In the French plants, uranous nitrate is used in U-Pu separation and alpha barrier and HAN is used in Pu purification. Compared to sulfamate, U IV does not generate extraneous chemical species and uranyl nitrate (U VI) generated by reducing Pu IV follows the main uranium stream. More over uranous nitrate is prepared from reprocessed purified uranyl nitrate taken at the outlet of the reprocessing plant. Hydrazine and HAN offer the advantage to be salt-free reagents. Uranous nitrate can be generated either by electrolysis or by catalytic hydrogenation process. Electrolytic process has been implemented in early plant UP 1 at Marcoule (when changing reducer from uranous sulfamate to uranous nitrate) and was used again in UP2 plant at La Hague. However, the electrolytic process presented several disadvantages such as a low conversion rate and problems associated with the use of mercury. Electrolysis cells with no mercury were developed for the Eurochemic plant in Belgium and then implemented in the first Japanese reprocessing plant in Tokai-Mura. But finally, in 1975, the electrolytic process was abandoned in favor of the catalytic hydrogenation process developed at La Hague. The yield of the operation and its simplicity were the main reasons for this choice. Nowadays, our catalytic hydrogenation process is used in all the commercial reprocessing plants worldwide: THORP at Sellafield, UP3 and UP2 800 at La Hague, and RRP at Rokkasho-Mura. In this process, uranyl nitrate is reduced to uranous nitrate by hydrogen in presence of a platinum based catalyst. Most of the plants implement the reaction in the same kind of reactor: 'co-current, up-flow and fixed-bed reactor'. For UP2 800 at La Hague, started in 1994, a new kind of reactor allowing a higher capacity has been developed. In this reactor, the catalyst bed is not fixed but circulating (fluidized bed). The aim of the paper is to describe both reactor technology implemented in La Hague (fixed bed and fluidized bed), to show their performance in terms of capacity and yield and to compare their operating and maintenance principles. (authors)

  17. Radiation protection medical care of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walt, H.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection medical care for radiation workers is part of the extensive programme protecting people against dangers emanating from the peaceful application of ionizing radiation. Thus it is a special field of occupational health care and emergency medicine in case of radiation accidents. It has proved helpful in preventing radiation damage as well as in early detection, treatment, after-care, and expert assessment. The medical checks include pre-employment and follow-up examinations, continued long-range medical care as well as specific monitoring of individuals and defined groups of workers. Three levels of action are involved: works medical officers specialized in radiation protection, the Institute of Medicine at the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection, and a network of clinical departments specialized in handling cases of acute radiation damage. An account is given of categories, types, and methods of examinations for radiation workers and operators. (author)

  18. [Indian workers in Oman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longuenesse, E

    1985-01-01

    Until recently Oman was a country of emigration, but by 1980 an estimated 200,000 foreign workers were in the country due to the petroleum boom. Almost 1/3 of the estimated 300,000 Indian workers in the Gulf states were in Oman, a country whose colonial heritage was closely tied to that of India and many of whose inhabitants still speak Urdu. The number of work permits granted to Indians working in the private sector in Oman increased from 47,928 in 1976 to 80,787 in 1980. An estimated 110,000 Indians were working in Oman in 1982, the great majority in the construction and public works sector. A few hundred Indian women were employed by the government of Oman, as domestics, or in other capacities. No accurate data is available on the qualifications of Indian workers in Oman, but a 1979 survey suggested a relatively low illiteracy rate among them. 60-75% of Indians in Oman are from the state of Kerala, followed by workers from the Punjab and the southern states of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh and Bombay. Indian workers are recruited by specialized agencies or by friends or relatives already employed in Oman. Employers in Oman prefer to recruit through agencies because the preselection process minimizes hiring of workers unqualified for their posts. Officially, expenses of transportation, visas, and other needs are shared by the worker and the employer, but the demand for jobs is so strong that the workers are obliged to pay commissions which amount to considerable sums for stable and well paying jobs. Wages in Oman are however 2 to 5 times the level in India. Numerous abuses have been reported in recruitment practices and in failure of employers in Oman to pay the promised wages, but Indian workers have little recourse. At the same level of qualifications, Indians are paid less then non-Omani Arabs, who in turn receive less than Oman nationals. Indians who remain in Oman long enough nevertheless are able to support families at home and to accumulate considerable

  19. Stress in Humanitarian Workers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    recognized as one of the most serious occupational health hazards reducing workers' satisfaction and productivity,. 1-3 ... Using a self- ... Kan D, Yu X. Occupational Stress, Work-Family. Conflict and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese.

  20. Risks for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotblat, J.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection; methods for determining dose limits to workers; use of data from survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki for estimating risk factors; use of data from survivors of nuclear explosions in Marshall Islands, uranium miners, and patients exposed to diagnostic and therapeutic radiation; risk factors for radioinduced malignancies; evidence that risk factors for persons exposed to partial-body radiation and Japanese survivors are too low; greater resistance of A-bomb survivors to radiation; and radiation doses received by U.K. medical workers and by U.K. fuel reprocessing workers. It is suggested that the dose limit for radiation workers should be reduced by a factor of 5

  1. Telecommuting: The Wired Worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilles, Jack M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the use of home computers and how they allow the worker to work at home rather than commuting. Discusses the growing trend of telecommuting, cost of operation, how it will affect company structure, and productivity. (CT)

  2. Social Workers Versus Bureaucracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Wilbur A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The literature on the conflict between professional autonomy and bureaucratic controls is extensive. The author examines this literature in detail and concludes that the trend is toward further intrusions on worker autonomy.

  3. Health of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1979-11-01

    Radiation workers are healthier than the average person in the general population and appear to be as healthy as workers in other ΣsafeΣ industries. It is, however, assumed that there is no safe dose of radiation and that any exposure to radiation will cause a small increase in the incidence of cancer, this increase being directly proportional to the total radiation dose. On the basis of the risk estimates given by ICRP, radiation exposures up to 1 rem per year for 47 years are predicted to cause fewer work-related deaths than expected for the average worker in Canadian industry. Radiation exposures of 5 rem per year from age 18 to 65 would result in predicted risk which is about four times higher than that for most workers in Canada and might increase the chances of death before age 75 to nearly the same level as for the average member of the general public. (auth)

  4. Workers Compensation Claim Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains DOT employee workers compensation claim data for current and past DOT employees. Types of data include claim data consisting of PII data (SSN,...

  5. Worker in nuclear activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes Fischer, M.D. de; Associacao Brasileira de Direito Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro)

    1984-01-01

    Juridical aspects with respect to the workers in nuclear activity are presented. Special emphasis is given to the clauses of the statute of workers (Consolidacao das Leis do Trabalho) the rules of the Ministerio do Trabalho and the rules of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear. The performance of the international authorities is also emphasized such as the International Labour Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the International Radiological Protection Commission. (Author) [pt

  6. Advanced worker protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J. [Oceaneering Space Systems, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project describes the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) which will include a life-support backpack with liquid air for cooling and as a supply of breathing gas, protective clothing, respirators, communications, and support equipment.

  7. Radiation haunts shipyard workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrey, L.

    1978-01-01

    The apparent link recently found by Dr. Najarian between cancer among workers at a US Naval dockyard where up to 5000 civilian employees have been exposed to low dose irradiation while servicing nuclear ships and their radiation exposure is discussed. The study has revealed that 38.4% of the deaths of nuclear workers at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in New Hampshire were caused by cancer while the comparable rate for non-nuclear shipyard workers was 21.7% and the national average in the United States is 18%. The Portsmouth study, launched in October 1977, was based on a survey of 1722 death certificates of shipyard employees and interviews with 592 next-of-kin. In addition the results show that the rate of leukaemia of the shipyard workers was 450% higher than that of the general population, and the incidence of lymph gland cancers was 125% higher than the national rate. The most startling statistics compared mortality among workers aged 60 to 69. In this age group nearly 60% of the nuclear employees had died of cancer, while the cancer death rate among non-nuclear workers was only 26%. If these results are confirmed present ideas concerning the effects of low doses of radiation must be challenged. (U.K.)

  8. Advanced worker protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D ampersand D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D ampersand D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project describes the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) which will include a life-support backpack with liquid air for cooling and as a supply of breathing gas, protective clothing, respirators, communications, and support equipment

  9. Analysis of overexposure cases for female radiation workers in medical and research institutions in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation Protection Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for 40,000 radiation workers, of which about 22,000 radiation workers are from industrial, medical and research institutions. The number of female radiation workers constitute about 5% of the total radiation workers monitored. Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that for men except for pregnant women (foetus). Equivalent dose above 10 mSv in a service period is investigated as to the causes of exposure whether the exposure was really received by the worker (genuine) or only the monitoring badge received the exposure due to other reasons (non-genuine) and necessary remedial actions are taken. Analysis of overexposure cases in female radiation workers as a group has been done for the period of four years (1990-1993) and the conclusions are presented. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  10. Probabilistic induction of delayed health hazards in occupational radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad, M.H.M.; Abdel-Ghani, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Occupational radiation workers are periodically monitored for their personal occupational dose. Various types of radiation measurement devices are used, mostly film badges and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Several thousand occupational radiation workers were monitored over a period of seven years (jan. 1995- Dec. 2001). These included atomic energy personnel, nuclear materials personnel, staff of mediology departments (diagnostic, therapeutic and nuclear medicine) and industrial occupational workers handling industrial radiography equipment besides other applications of radiation sources in industry. The probably of induction of health hazards in these radiation workers was assessed using the nominal probability coefficient adopted by the ICRP (1991) for both hereditary effects and cancer induction. In this treatise, data procured are presented and discussed inthe light of basic postulations of probabilistic occurrence of radiation induced delayed health effects

  11. Assessment of PAH-exposure among coke oven workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahakangas, K. [and others] [Oulu University, Oulu (Finland)

    1992-12-31

    Levels of BaP diol epoxide - DNA adducts in urine and blood were monitored for workers at the Raahe coking plant, Finland, and other relevant information was collected. All adduct values were low, but oven battery workers had slightly higher values than matched controls. Antibodies to these adducts increased somewhat after work at the plant started, no differences between smokers and non-smokers were found.

  12. Analysis of radiation overexposures for radiation workers in industrial institutions during 1991-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Raman, N.V.; Massand, O.P.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation Standards and Instrumentation Division (RS and ID) conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for external exposures of a total of about 41,000 radiation workers. Out of these, there are about 5300 radiation workers in industrial institutions alone. The analysis of overexposure cases (more than 10 mSv during a monitoring period) of these radiation workers has been presented for the period 1991-1995. The paper describes how the reporting, investigations and follow-up of these cases helps in obtaining effective control of doses to the radiation workers in the country keeping in view the dose limits stipulated by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. (author)

  13. Worker exposures: How much in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Basically, four categories of workers are involved with transport operations: handlers, drivers, health physics monitoring staff, and supervisory staff. In 1984, the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) published results of a study covering all four of these worker categories, all types of radioactive material, and all modes of transport used in the United Kingdom. The study covered occupationally related exposure during all normal transport operations of radioactive materials, but did not cover potential consequences of accidents. Although mainly concerned with exposure of workers, the study included the exposure of the public from the transport of irradiated Magnox fuel from the first generation of nuclear power stations. The current evaluation - based on measurements as distinct from earlier assessments which were theoretical estimates - shows that the public exposure is much lower than the calculated maximum based on pessimistic assumptions. For workers, the study concluded that the annual collective dose from the transport of all radioactive materials in the UK is approximately 1 man-sievert. This compares with an annual collective dose estimated at 500 man-sievert from all occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in the UK

  14. Dislocated Worker Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988

    Due to the severe economic decline in the automobile manufacturing industry in southeastern Michigan, a Dislocated Workers Program has been developed through the partnership of the Flint Area Chamber of Commerce, three community colleges, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, the Michigan State Department of Education, the…

  15. Rescue workers and trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romano, Eugenia; Elklit, Ask

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigates which factors had the biggest impact on developing distress in rescue workers who were involved in a firework factory explosion. Method: Four hundred sixty-five rescuers were assessed using items investigating demographic factors, organizational variables, so...

  16. Women Workers' History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Gary; Gilmore, Peter

    This document consists of one page chapters each documenting women's roles in changing the conditions for U.S. workers during and after the industrial revolution. Each chapter is a series of period style drawings with captions detailing the story of that particular incident and cartoon balloons offering humorous comments from the participants. The…

  17. Globalization and workers' health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Ichiro

    2008-10-01

    The global integration of economies worldwide has led to increased pressure for "labor flexibility". A notable aspect of this trend has been the rise in non-standard work arrangements, which include part-time work, temporary agency-based work, fixed-term contingent work, and independent contracting. Although non-standard work arrangements are convenient for employers, they are often associated with poor pay, absence of pension and health benefits, as well as lack of protection from unions and labor laws. Studies have begun to address the question of whether these "precarious" jobs pose a health hazard for workers. The challenge for causal inference is that precarious workers are likely to differ from non-precarious workers in a variety of characteristics that also influence health outcomes, i.e. there is confounding and selection bias. However, even after taking account of these biases--through propensity score-matched analysis--there is evidence to suggest that non-standard work may be damaging to workers' health. Policies modeled after the European Union's Directive on Part-Time Work may help to mitigate some of the health hazards associated with precarious work.

  18. Innovative Older-Worker Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Denise; Greenberg, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    Describes program innovations to keep older workers employed: retraining, job sharing, flexible working hours, job redesign, and phased retirement. Addresses costs and savings, disincentives for workers and employers, and future trends. (SK)

  19. Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... for More Information Resources for Those Vaccinating HCWs Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk for exposure to ...

  20. Workers' marginal costs of commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ommeren, Jos; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper applies a dynamic search model to estimate workers' marginal costs of commuting, including monetary and time costs. Using data on workers' job search activity as well as moving behaviour, for the Netherlands, we provide evidence that, on average, workers' marginal costs of one hour...

  1. Workers Education Programme in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansarkar, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    The philosophy of Workers Education in India is that strong and enlightened trade unions could be of great value in the rapid industrialization of the country. The Central Board for Workers Education has devised a number of training programs, the most important of which are training of education officers, worker-teachers training, and training…

  2. Dermatologic Diseases in Silk Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Pasricha

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 112 workers of a silk facory near Bangalore, for dermatologic diseases revealed (1 a characteristic wearing off of the medial halves of the distal free edges of the finger nail plates in 10 of the 15 cocoonsorters, (2 maceration of the palms in 58 workers of the boiling and reeling section, and (3 pitted keratolysis of the palms, in 42 workers, also from the boiling and reeling section. There was no clinical evidence of contact dermatitis, and patch tests with the silk thread from the cocoons in 25 workers showed a very mild reaction in 2 workers and a doubtful reaction in another two. In addition, one worker from the skeining section had crisscross superficial fissures on the finger tips caused by friction, two workers had paronychia ′of the fingers and four workers had dermatophytFNx01t fingers webs. As in the previous survey, these workers also had a high incidence of ichthyosis (92 workers and hyperketatosis of the palms (62 workers and soles (110 workers.

  3. Occupational Radiation Dose for Medical Workers at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Nassef

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational radiation doses for medical workers from the departments of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy at the university hospital of King Abdul-Aziz University (KAU were measured and analysed. A total of 100 medical radiation workers were monitored to determine the status of their average annual effective dose. The analysis and the calibration procedures of this study were carried out at the Center for Radiation Protection and Training-KAU. The monitored workers were classified into subgroups, namely, medical staff/supervisors, technicians, and nurses, according to their responsibilities and specialties. The doses were measured using thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti placed over the lead apron at the chest level in all types of workers except for those in the cath lab, for whom the TLD was placed at the thyroid protective collar. For nuclear medicine, a hand dosimeter was used to measure the hand dose distribution. The annual average effective doses for diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy workers were found to be 0.66, 1.56, and 0.28 mSv, respectively. The results of the measured annual dose were well below the international recommended dose limit of 20 mSv. Keywords: Occupational radiation dose, radiation workers, TLD, radiation protection

  4. Occupational health programme for lead workers in battery plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Kook

    The realization of problems resulting from the exposure to undue high lead levels of workers in lead-using industries, particularly in storage battery plants, has given rise to a new occupational health service, the so-called type specific (harmful agent specific) group occupational health. In 1988, the Korean Ministry of Labor designated the Institute of Industrial Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, as an authorized organization to take care of lead workers in lead industries. The following occupational health services are provided by the Institute: (i) physical health examination; (ii) biological monitoring with zinc protoporphyrin, urine δ-aminolevulinic acid and blood lead; (iii) respiratory protection with maintenance-free respirators; (iv) measurement of the environmental condition of workplaces; (v) health education. A three-year occupational health programme for lead workers has contributed to improvements in the working conditions of lead industries, particularly in large-scale battery plants, and has decreased the unnecessary high lead burden of workers through on-going medical surveillance with biological monitoring and health education schemes. The strong commitment of both employers and the government to improve the working conditions of lead industries, together with the full cooperation of lead workers, has served to reduce the high lead burdens of lead workers. This decreases the number of lead-poisoning cases and provides more comfortable workplaces, particularly in battery plants.

  5. Spatial fidelity of workers predicts collective response to disturbance in a social insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crall, James D; Gravish, Nick; Mountcastle, Andrew M; Kocher, Sarah D; Oppenheimer, Robert L; Pierce, Naomi E; Combes, Stacey A

    2018-04-03

    Individuals in social insect colonies cooperate to perform collective work. While colonies often respond to changing environmental conditions by flexibly reallocating workers to different tasks, the factors determining which workers switch and why are not well understood. Here, we use an automated tracking system to continuously monitor nest behavior and foraging activity of uniquely identified workers from entire bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) colonies foraging in a natural outdoor environment. We show that most foraging is performed by a small number of workers and that the intensity and distribution of foraging is actively regulated at the colony level in response to forager removal. By analyzing worker nest behavior before and after forager removal, we show that spatial fidelity of workers within the nest generates uneven interaction with relevant localized information sources, and predicts which workers initiate foraging after disturbance. Our results highlight the importance of spatial fidelity for structuring information flow and regulating collective behavior in social insect colonies.

  6. Development of radiation alarm monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung Jae Song; Myung Chan Lee; Jung Kwan Son

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Alarm Monitor is developed domestically in order to protect radiation workers from over exposure. The Radiation Alarm Monitor with microprocessor installed can record the information of radiation field before and after accidents. It can also provide the data to analyze the accident and to set a counterplan. It features a wide detection range of radiation (I OmR/h - I OOR/h), radiation work and data storage, portability, high precision (5%) due to calibration, and adaptation of a powerful alarm system. In order to protect workers from over exposure, light and sound alarm had been designed to initiate when accident occurs such as an unexpected change of radiation field such as radiation rate and accumulated dosed between 90 min. before the alarm and 30 min. after the alarm. In addition, the Radiation Alarm Monitor interfaces with computer so that the accident can be analyzed. After the testing conditions in other countries for the Radiation Alarm Monitor were compared, the most stringent test, ANSI N42. 17-A, was selected. The performance testing was car-ried out under various conditions of temperature, humidity, vibration and electromagnetic wave hindrance by Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). As a result, the Radiation Alan-n Monitor passed all test. Also, for the Radiation Alarm Monitor, environmental adaptability tests under the environmental conditions of NPP sites had been performed. The Radiation Alan-n Monitor had been reviewed by radiation workers at NPPs and their opinions had been collected. Operating procedure will be written and distributed to every NPP sites. Radiation Alarm Monitor will be modified for use under the specific environmental conditions of each site. It will be distributed to NPP sites and will be used by radiation workers

  7. Primary DNA damage in chrome-plating workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambelunghe, A; Piccinini, R; Ambrogi, M; Villarini, M; Moretti, M; Marchetti, C; Abbritti, G; Muzi, G

    2003-06-30

    In order to evaluate the primary DNA damage due to occupational exposure to chromium (VI), DNA strand-breaks and apoptosis in peripheral lymphocytes were measured in a group of 19 chrome-plating workers. DNA strand-breaks was assessed by alkaline (pH>13) single-cell microgel electrophoresis ('comet') assay, while apoptosis was measured by flow-cytometry after propidium iodide staining of the cells. Concentrations of chromium in urine, erythrocytes and lymphocytes were investigated as biological indicators of exposure. A group of 18 hospital workers (control group I) and another 20 university personnel (control group II) without exposure to chromium were also studied as controls. The results of the study show that chrome-plating workers have higher levels of chromium in urine, erythrocytes and lymphocytes than unexposed workers. Comet tail moment values, assumed as index of DNA damage, are increased in chromium-exposed workers and results are significantly correlated to chromium lymphocyte concentrations. No difference emerged in the percentage of apoptotic nuclei in exposed and unexposed workers. The study confirms that measurements of chromium in erythrocytes and lymphocytes may provide useful information about recent and past exposure to hexavalent chromium at the workplace. The increase in DNA strand-breaks measured by comet assay suggests this test is valid for the biological monitoring of workers exposed to genotoxic compounds such as chromium (VI).

  8. Oenorm S 5220-1: monitoring of persons with regard to incorporated radioactive materials. Part 1: General necessity and frequency, a regulation in Austria to protect workers from occupational internal exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, F.; Brandl, A.

    2002-01-01

    Intake of non-sealed radioactive material (incorporation) results in people's internal exposure to radioactivity. The basic requirements for incorporation monitoring provided by Part 1 of OENORM S 5220 are intended to contain internal exposures within the limits set forth in EC-Regulation 96/29/Euratom. In particular, it enables the user to determine the internal exposure contribution to the effective dose and to prove at any time that dose limits for equivalent and effective dose have not been exceeded and conditions at the work place have not changed unexpectedly. The OENORM discussed in this paper can be used by the competent authorities as a basis for their determination of the permissibility of the work with non-sealed radioactive material in a certain work place. Based on the OENORM, they can ensure standardized physical radiation protection after incorporation of radionuclides and the calculation of the resulting equivalent and effective doses according to consistent criteria. In the case where the work with non-sealed radioactive material has previously been permitted, the competent authorities can re-evaluate the necessity, the frequency, and the optimal method for incorporation monitoring. Two different kinds of laboratories are envisioned in this standards series to perform the necessary measurements

  9. Immigrants and Native Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non......-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find...... that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability...

  10. Advanced Worker Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs

  11. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, S; Yamada, N; Sakurai, K [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed.

  12. The occupational exposure of radiation workers, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamada, Norimasa; Sakurai, Koh

    1975-01-01

    Because the medical use of x-rays and radioisotopes is gradually increasing for diagnosis and therapy, radiation workers, special doctors, nurses and radiological technicians have occupational exposure. Procedures for monitoring external exposure of personnel include the wearing of a filmbadge or a pocket chamber. The results of filmbadge monitoring in Yamaguchi University Hospital for the last 10 years were described. In 1964, the total number of filmbadges that radiation workers used during a 2 week period of radiological examination and therapy was 610. This has been increasing yearly, and in 1972 it was 1999. Radiological technicians generally had low occupational exposure, and about 90 per cent of their filmbadges were exposed to less than 10 mR. Approximately 65 per cent of the filmbadges that nurses used were less than 10 mR, but some nurses who worked in radium therapy at the isotope ward suffered large doses. Some nurses had occasionally exposure higher than 100 mR in radiological examination. Some doctors sustained an occupational exposure of more than 150 mR. From these data, some problems on radiation monitoring using a filmbadge were discussed. (author)

  13. Workers in transition

    OpenAIRE

    Rutkowski, Michael

    1995-01-01

    After Central and Eastern European and Central Asian economies abandoned central planning, nearly 195 million workers had to adjust to new rules of work and life. Most transition economies have not yet fully committed themselves to the rules of the market place. A few that have are already enjoying growth in wages and employment; in other countries, labor income growth is still to come. Reform has not been so well accepted in countries that were forced to enter the transition. Transition brou...

  14. Delivering migrant workers' remittances

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Roger

    2004-01-01

    As globalization has led to ever higher levels of labour mobility, so the volume of funds remitted to their families by workers employed in countries far distant from their homes has increased by leaps and bounds. The total volume of such transfers currently amounts to over $100 billion per annum, the greater part of which flows from economically advanced regions in the West and North to developing countries in the East and South. Delivering those funds swiftly, reliably and cheaply to relati...

  15. Worker and public safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, P.E.

    1984-09-01

    Nuclear regulatory controls have been in place for many years in Canada to ensure that the risk for the safety of workers and members of the public is as low as reasonably possible. The Atomic Energy Control Board implements these controls by virtue of a broadly based Act of Parliament, rigorous regulations and compliance procedures. The Canadian experience with nuclear practices involves about 1 million person-years at risk without a fatality due to acute exposure to radiation

  16. Auditory and Respiratory Health Disorders Among Workers in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For early detection of respiratory and auditory disorders, spirometry and audiometry should be included in the periodic medical examination. Accurate health records of workers, so, those at risk can be monitored, and/or pre-placed. Using personal protective equipments especially masks and ear muffles as well as prohibit ...

  17. The workers and public radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.; Roupioz, A.; Rabu, B.

    2003-01-01

    Six texts develop the question of the radiation protection of workers and public. Monitoring of the exposure risk to alpha emitters during the unit outage of nuclear power plant of Cattenom is the first one, the second article concerns the ALARA approach applied to the yard that controls the welding of vapor generators of the Phenix reactor. The third one treats the evaluation of impact in environment of tritium releases associated to a fusion reactor accident. Some systems of radiological detection are studied, the notion of dose constraint is discussed, and what about the cooperation around nuclear and non nuclear installations. (N.C.)

  18. Comparison of systemic burdens at autopsy to estimates based on health physics data for selected plutonium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heid, K.R.

    1981-09-01

    Monitoring the intake of plutonium by workers is a vital but difficult function that must be performed by a health physicist or someone responsible for the radiation protection of the worker. This is normally accomplished in part by monitoring the work environment (especialy the airborne concentration) to which a worker is or may be exposed. Because there is no assurance that the air sampled is the same as that inhaled by the worker, supplemental monitoring such as contamination surveys of the work area surfaces and of the worker himself are routinely performed. Surveys of the worker may include contamination surveys of skin and protective clothing, especially the gloves worn; nasal smears at the completion of the work; hand and shoe surveys when leaving the work area; and routine surveillance in the form of in vivo measurements of the chest burden and/or the collection of excreta samples which are processed for plutonium content

  19. Community-based blood pressure measurement by non-health workers using electronic devices: a validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Reidpath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Population monitoring and screening of blood pressure is an important part of any population health strategy. Qualified health workers are expensive and often unavailable for screening. Non-health workers with electronic blood pressure monitors are increasingly used in community-based research. This approach is unvalidated. In a poor, urban community we compared blood pressure measurements taken by non-health workers using electronic devices against qualified health workers using mercury sphygmomanometers. Method: Fifty-six adult volunteers participated in the research. Data were collected by five qualified health workers, and six non-health workers. Participants were randomly allocated to have their blood pressure measured on four consecutive occasions by alternating a qualified health worker with a non-health worker. Descriptive statistics and graphs, and mixed effects linear models to account for the repeated measurement were used in the analysis. Results: Blood pressure readings by non-health workers were more reliable than those taken by qualified health workers. There was no significant difference between the readings taken by qualified health workers and those taken by non-health workers for systolic blood pressure. Non-health workers were, on average, 5–7 mmHg lower in their measures of blood pressure than the qualified health workers (95%HPD: −2.9 to −10.0 for diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion: The results provide empirical evidence that supports the practice of non-health workers using electronic devices for BP measurement in community-based research and screening. Non-health workers recorded blood pressures that differed from qualified health workers by no more than 10 mmHg. The approach is promising, but more research is needed to establish the generalisability of the results.

  20. Perceived heat stress and health effects on construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Priya; Rajiva, Ajit; Andhare, Dileep; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Tiwari, Abhiyant; Sheffield, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Increasing heat waves-particularly in urban areas where construction is most prevalent, highlight a need for heat exposure assessment of construction workers. This study aims to characterize the effects of heat on construction workers from a site in Gandhinagar. This study involved a mixed methods approach consisting of a cross sectional survey with anthropometric measurements (n = 219) and four focus groups with construction workers, as well as environmental measurements of heat stress exposure at a construction site. Survey data was collected in two seasons i.e., summer and winter months, and heat illness and symptoms were compared between the two time periods. Thematic coding of focus group data was used to identify vulnerability factors and coping mechanisms of the workers. Heat stress, recorded using a wet bulb globe temperature monitor, was compared to international safety standards. The survey findings suggest that heat-related symptoms increased in summer; 59% of all reports in summer were positive for symptoms (from Mild to Severe) as compared to 41% in winter. Focus groups revealed four dominant themes: (1) Non-occupational stressors compound work stressors; (2) workers were particularly attuned to the impact of heat on their health; (3) workers were aware of heat-related preventive measures; and (4) few resources were currently available to protect workers from heat stress. Working conditions often exceed international heat stress safety thresholds. Female workers and new employees might be at increased risk of illness or injury. This study suggests significant health impacts on construction workers from heat stress exposure in the workplace, showed that heat stress levels were higher than those prescribed by international standards and highlights the need for revision of work practices, increased protective measures, and possible development of indigenous work safety standards for heat exposure.

  1. Heat stress management program improving worker health and operational effectiveness: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Rosalyn G; Skelton, Scott B; Alvis, Kimberly L; Shane, Leigh A

    2013-03-01

    Heat stress monitoring is a vital component of an effective health and safety program when employees work in exceptionally warm environments. Workers at hazardous waste sites often wear personal protective equipment (PPE), which increases the body heat stress load. No specific Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations address heat stress; however, OSHA does provide several guidance documents to assist employers in addressing this serious workplace health hazard. This article describes a heat stress and surveillance plan implemented at a hazardous waste site as part of the overall health and safety program. The PPE requirement for work at this site, coupled with extreme environmental temperatures, made heat stress a significant concern. Occupational health nurses and industrial hygienists developed a monitoring program for heat stress designed to prevent the occurrence of significant heat-related illness in site workers. The program included worker education on the signs of heat-related illness and continuous physiologic monitoring to detect early signs of heat-related health problems. Biological monitoring data were collected before workers entered the exclusion zone and on exiting the zone following decontamination. Sixty-six site workers were monitored throughout site remediation. More than 1,700 biological monitoring data points were recorded. Outcomes included improved worker health and safety, and increased operational effectiveness. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Proposal for intake model for workers at IPEN-CNEN/SP who handle 131 I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, A.S.; Potiens Junior, A.J.; Gaburo, J.C.; Sanches, M.P.; Oliveira, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    The intake model for the two groups of workers at IPEN-CNEN/SP is presented. They handle iodine compounds during the processing of irradiated targets and at labeling of radiopharmaceutical compounds. The intake model for the workers are proposed from the knowledge of the activities carried out in the plant and the internal monitoring program of the workers. In this study, the intake is considered to be taken uniformly during the days of major activities carried out by the workers. In practice, the application of this model has be shown suitable, for the studied groups

  3. Radiological worker training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  4. Radiological worker training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance

  5. A prototype wearable tritium monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, R. A.; Dubeau, J.

    2008-01-01

    Sudden unexpected changes in tritium-in-air concentrations in workplace air can result in significant unplanned exposures. Although fixed area monitors are used to monitor areas where there is a potential for elevated tritium in air concentrations, they do not monitor personnel air space and may require some time for acute tritium releases to be detected. There is a need for a small instrument that will quickly alert staff of changing tritium hazards. A moderately sensitive tritium instrument that workers could wear would bring attention to any rise in tritium levels that were above predetermined limits and help in assessing the potential hazard therefore minimizing absorbed dose. Hand-held instruments currently available can be used but require the assistance of a fellow worker or restrict the user to using only one hand to perform some duties. (authors)

  6. Are transition economy workers underpaid?

    OpenAIRE

    Adamchik, Vera A.; Brada, Josef C.; King, Arthur E.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the extent to which workers in transition and developed market economies are able to obtain wages that fully reflect their skills and labor force characteristics. We find that workers in two transition economies, the Czech Republic and Poland, are able to better attain the maximum wage available than are workers in a sample of developed market economies. This greater wage-setting efficiency in the transition economies ap-pears to be more the result of social and demographic charact...

  7. Radiological impact of diagnostic nuclear medicine technology on the Quebec population (patients and workers) in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, L.; Blanchette, J.

    1992-01-01

    Using the results of a six month survey on the doses received by non-monitored hospital workers from diagnostic nuclear medicine patients (DNMP) in three hospitals and published statistics on Quebec's workers and hospitals, an evaluation of the radiological impact of DNMP has been calculated on the Quebec's population. In 1989, diagnostic nuclear medicine gave an average of 6.4 mSv/act or a total of 2,800 sv-man. The diagnostic nuclear medicine technologists' community received 0.4 Sv-man and the non-monitored hospital workers 1.7 Sv-man from the DNMP in the same year. (author)

  8. The Assessment of I-131 Internal Doses of Nuclear Medicine Workers in Korea Using Thyroid uptake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Young Kag; Oh, Gi Back; Lee, Chang Ho; Lee, Jong Doo; Yeom, Yu Sun; Hwang, Young Muk

    2012-01-01

    There are possibilities the radiation workers could intake the radiation when workers deal with radiation-materials. Therefore, internal radiation doses of radiation workers need to be assessed. Although an application of the nuclear medicine is continuously increased in Korea, there is not a proper tool and form to monitor the internal doses of nuclear medicine workers. However, it is possible to attain the internal doses of I-131 to evaluate using thyroid uptake and well count system. In this study, we measured and evaluated the I-131 internal doses of nuclear medicine workers in Korea using thyroid uptake and well count system and performed an air sampling

  9. A primer for workers' compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Spengler, Dan M; Mir, Hassan R

    2014-07-01

    A physician's role within a workers' compensation injury extends far beyond just evaluation and treatment with several socioeconomic and psychological factors at play compared with similar injuries occurring outside of the workplace. Although workers' compensation statutes vary among states, all have several basic features with the overall goal of returning the injured worker to maximal function in the shortest time period, with the least residual disability and shortest time away from work. To help physicians unfamiliar with the workers' compensation process accomplish these goals. Review. Educational review. The streamlined review addresses the topics of why is workers' compensation necessary; what does workers' compensation cover; progression after work injury; impairment and maximum medical improvement, including how to use the sixth edition of American Medical Association's (AMA) Guides to the evaluation of permanent impairment (Guides); completion of work injury claim after impairment rating; independent medical evaluation; and causation. In the "no-fault" workers' compensation system, physicians play a key role in progressing the claim along and, more importantly, getting the injured worker back to work as soon as safely possible. Physicians should remain familiar with the workers' compensation process, along with how to properly use the AMA Guides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Value Preferences of Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Walsh, Sophie D

    2018-04-01

    The current study examines value preferences of social workers in Israel. Using a theoretical framework of person-environment fit paradigm and theory of values, the study compared social workers (N = 641, mean age = 37.7 years, 91 percent female) with a representative sample of Israeli Jews (N = 1,600, mean age = 44.2, 52 percent female). Questionnaires included personal value preferences and sociodemographic variables (gender, age, education, religiosity, and immigrant status). Multivariate analysis of covariance showed that value preferences of social workers differed significantly from those of the general population. Analyses of covariance showed that social workers reported a higher preference for self-transcendence and a lower preference for conservation and self-enhancement values. Results have significance for the selection, training, and supervision of social workers. They suggest that it is important to assess to what extent selection processes for social workers are primarily recruiting social workers with shared values, thus creating an overly homogenous population of social workers. An understanding of personal value motivations can help social workers in their own process of self-development and growth, and to understand how the profession can fulfill their basic motivations.

  11. Basic requirements for personnel monitoring. 1980 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Code of Practice sets forth the objectives of an adequate system of personnel monitoring for radiation workers. It covers individual dosimetry, including internal radiation monitoring, and area monitoring to the extent required for the assessment of individual radiation doses. The responsibilities of authorities for organizing monitoring of radiation workers are discussed, together with brief descriptions of monitoring methods and the rules governing their application. The general principles to be considered in selecting instrumentation and the appropriate monitoring techniques are described, as well as calibration techniques, methods of data handling and record keeping. Current concepts and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, as presented in ICRP Publication No.26, have been incorporated. New developments in techniques and instruments have been reflected, and several sections such as calibration and record keeping have been elaborated. The bibliography has been updated and new annexes added.

  12. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-03-16

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify

  13. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-01-01

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify

  14. Malignant pleural mesothelioma risk among nuclear workers: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Guseva Canu, I; Laurier, D

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation has been suggested as a causal risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Studies of patients treated by radiotherapy for primary cancers have suggested that radiation contributes to the development of secondary MPM. Here we examined the risk to nuclear workers of MPM related to exposure to low doses of occupational radiation at low dose rates. All results concerning MPM risk in published studies of nuclear workers were examined for their association with radiation exposure and potential confounders. We found 19 relevant studies. Elevated risks of pleural cancer were reported in most (15/17) of these studies. Eight reported risks higher for radiation monitored workers than for other workers. However, of 12 studies that looked at associations with ionising radiation, only one reported a significant dose-risk association. Asbestos was an important confounder in most studies. We conclude that studies of nuclear workers have not detected an association between ionising radiation exposure and MPM. Further investigations should improve the consideration of asbestos exposure at the same time as they address the risk of MPM related to occupational exposure of nuclear workers to low doses of ionising radiation at low dose rates. (review)

  15. [A survey of occupational health among polyether-exposed workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xu-ying; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Chun-ping; Zheng, Guan-hua; Bai, Lan; Zhang, Pan-pan

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the occupational health of the workers simultaneously exposed to acrylonitrile, epoxyethane, epoxypropane, and styrene. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 70 front-line workers simultaneously exposed to acrylonitrile, epoxyethane, epoxypropane, and styrene (exposure group) and 50 managers (control group) in a polyether manufacturer; in addition, air monitoring at workplace and occupational health examination were also performed. The obtained data were analyzed. The female workers in exposure group and the spouses of male workers in exposure group had significantly higher spontaneous abortion rates than their counterparts in control group (P polyether-exposed working years had significantly higher mean levels of DNA damage than the control group (P polyether-exposed working years and those with not less than 20 polyether-exposed working years had significantly higher mean micronucleus rates than the control group (P polyether-exposed working years (P > 0.05); the workers with not less than 5 and less than 20 polyether-exposed working years and workers with not less than 20 polyether-exposed working years had significantly higher mean micronucleus rates than those with less than 5 polyether-exposed working years (P polyether manufacturer.

  16. Malignant pleural mesothelioma risk among nuclear workers: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Guseva Canu, I; Laurier, D, E-mail: camille.metz@irsn.fr [Laboratory of Epidemiology, Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to ionising radiation has been suggested as a causal risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Studies of patients treated by radiotherapy for primary cancers have suggested that radiation contributes to the development of secondary MPM. Here we examined the risk to nuclear workers of MPM related to exposure to low doses of occupational radiation at low dose rates. All results concerning MPM risk in published studies of nuclear workers were examined for their association with radiation exposure and potential confounders. We found 19 relevant studies. Elevated risks of pleural cancer were reported in most (15/17) of these studies. Eight reported risks higher for radiation monitored workers than for other workers. However, of 12 studies that looked at associations with ionising radiation, only one reported a significant dose-risk association. Asbestos was an important confounder in most studies. We conclude that studies of nuclear workers have not detected an association between ionising radiation exposure and MPM. Further investigations should improve the consideration of asbestos exposure at the same time as they address the risk of MPM related to occupational exposure of nuclear workers to low doses of ionising radiation at low dose rates. (review)

  17. Mobile Applications for Knowledge Workers and Field Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stieglitz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the diffusion of mobile applications (mobile apps has risen significantly. Nowadays, mobile business apps are strongly emerging in business, enhancing productivity and employees’ satisfaction, whilst the usage of customized individual enterprise apps is still an exception. Standardized business apps enable basic functionalities, for example, mobile data storage and exchange (e.g., Dropbox, communication (e.g., Skype, and other routine processes, which support mobile workers. In addition, mobile apps can, for example, increase the flexibility of mobile workers by easing the access to firm’s information from outside the enterprise and by enabling ubiquitous collaboration. Hence, mobile apps can generate competitive advantages and can increase work efficiency on a broad scale. But mobile workers form no coherent group. Our research reveals, based on two case studies, that they can be clustered into two groups: knowledge workers and field workers. Knowledge workers and field workers fulfill different tasks and work in different environments. Hence, they have different requirements for mobile support. In this paper we conclude that standardized mobile business apps cannot meet the different requirements of various groups of mobile workers. Task- and firm-specific (individualized requirements determine the specification, implementation, and application of mobile apps.

  18. Towards improving workers' health by matching work and workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoer, I.

    2014-01-01

    From an occupational health perspective, the match between work and workers was the central topic in this thesis. The term ‘work’ was used to encompass a combination of physical, mental and psychosocial work demands. The term ‘workers’ represents the resources of workers, in terms of physical,

  19. Excessive exposures of diagnostic X-ray workers in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambiger, T.Y.; Shenoy, K.S.; Patel, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    The excessive exposures (i.e. exceeding 400 mrems per fortnight) of diagnostic X-ray workers revealed under the countrywide personnel monitoring programme in India have been analysed. The analysis covers the data collected over a period of ten years during 1965-1974. The radiation workers in medical X-ray diagnostic group receiving an excess dose are found to be less than 1%. Each case of the excess dose is throughly investigated and nongenuine cases are separated and causes for genuine excessive exposures are traced. The causes and the corrective measures are enumerated. (M.G.B.)

  20. Part I. Emergency workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This monograph deals with assessment of radiological health effects of the Chernobyl accident for emergency workers (part 1) and the population of the contaminated areas in Russia (part 2). The Chernobyl emergency workers and people living in the contaminated areas of Russia received much lower doses than the population of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and it was unclear whether risks of radiation-induced cancers derived with the Japanese data could be extrapolated to the low dose range However, it was predicted as early as in 1990 that the thyroid cancer incidence might be increasing due to incorporated 131 irradiation. What conclusions can be drawn from regarding cancer incidence among emergency workers and residents of the contaminated areas in Russia and the role of the radiation factor on the basis of the registry data? Leukemia incidence. Leukemia incidence is known to be one of principal indications of radiation effects. The radiation risk for leukemias is 3-4 times higher that for solid cancers and its latent period is estimated to be 2-3 years after exposure. Results of the radiation epidemiological studies discussed in this book show that in the worst contaminated Bryansk region the leukemia incidence rate is not higher than in the country in general. Even though some evidence exists for the dose response relationship, the radiation risks appear to be not statistically significant. Since risks of leukemia are known to be higher for those who were children at exposure, long-term epidemiological studies need to be continued. The study of leukemias among emergency workers strongly suggest the existence of dose response relationship. In those who received external doses more than 0.15 Gy the leukemia incidence rate is two time higher and these emergency workers should be referred to as a group of increased radiation risk. Solid cancers. The obtained results provide no evidence to a radiation-induced increase in solid cancers among residents of the contaminated areas

  1. Respiratory health and lung function in Chinese restaurant kitchen workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H S; Lee, Frank S C; Qiu, Hong

    2011-10-01

    To measure air pollutant concentrations in Chinese restaurant kitchens using different stove types and assess their influence on workers' respiratory health. 393 kitchen workers from 53 Chinese restaurants were surveyed over 16 months: 115 workers from 21 restaurants using only electric stoves and 278 workers from 32 restaurants using only gas stoves. Workers were interviewed about their respiratory symptoms and had their lung function tested. Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) and fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) were measured using portable monitors and air-bag sampling. Temperature and noise levels were assessed. Median concentrations of NO, NO(2) and CO were 7.4, 1.5 and 1.6 times higher in gas-fuelled kitchens than in electric ones and average concentrations of PM(2.5) and TVOC were 81% and 78% higher, respectively. Differences were smaller for CH(4) and NMHC. Electricity-run kitchens were 4.5°C cooler and 9 dBA less noisy than gas-fuelled ones. Workers using electric cookers had significantly better lung function than their gas-using counterparts and their mean FEV(1) and FVC values were 5.4% and 3.8% higher, respectively, after adjustment for confounders. Wheeze, phlegm, cough and sore throat were more prevalent in workers using gas. The adjusted OR for having phlegm regularly was significantly higher. The poorer lung function and higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms among workers in gas-fuelled kitchens compared to those in electricity-powered kitchens may be associated with exposure to higher concentrations of toxic air pollutants generated during gas cooking.

  2. Radiation monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.Eh.; B'yuli, D.K.; Karmikel, Dzh.Kh.E.

    1985-01-01

    Recommendations on radiation monitoring of personnel, used medical ionizing radiation source, are given. The necessity to carry out radiation monitoring of situation at medical personnel's positions and personnel dosimetry is marked. It is convenient to subdivide radiation monitoring into 3 types: usual, surgical and special. Usual monitoring is connected with current work; surgical monitoring is carried out to receive information during a concrete operation; special monitoring is used to detect possible deviation from standard conditions of work or when suspecting them

  3. Economic Globalization and Workers: introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E-J. Visser (Evert-Jan); M.P. van Dijk (Meine Pieter)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis dossier deals with the impact of economic globalisation on workers, especially in developing nations: their employment opportunities, wage income, job security and other aspects of decent work (ILO 1999, 2002). This is a highly relevant theme. Not only do workers in the EU, the

  4. A Profile of Contingent Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polivka, Anne E.

    1996-01-01

    Based on data from the supplement to the February 1995 Current Population Survey, contingent workers were more likely to be female, black, young, enrolled in school, and employed in services and construction industries than were noncontingent workers. More than 10% were teachers. (Author)

  5. Meet the local policy workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Camilla L.; Vallgårda, Signild; Jensen, Anja MB

    2018-01-01

    Reporting on an interview and observation based study in Danish municipalities, this article deals with local policy workers, and takes departure in the great variation we observed in implementation of centrally issued health promotion guidelines. We present five types of local policy workers, ea...

  6. Medical supervision of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santani, S.B.; Nandakumar, A.N.; Subramanian, G.

    1982-01-01

    The basic elements of an occupational medical supervision programme for radiation workers are very much the same as those relevant to other professions with some additional special features. This paper cites examples from literature and recommends measures such as spot checks and continuance of medical supervision even after a radiation worker leaves this profession. (author)

  7. Mortality studies of Hanford workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1986-04-01

    Radiation exposures at Hanford have been deliberately limited as a protection to the worker. This means that if current estimates of radiation risks, which have been determined by national and international groups, are correct, it's highly unlikely that noticeable radiation-induced health effects will be identified among Hanford workers. 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Radium dial workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, R.E.; Lucas, H.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The population of radium dial workers who were exposed to radium 30 to 50 years ago are currently being followed by the Center for Human Radiobiology at the Argonne National Laboratory. It is not clear that radium has induced additional malignancies in this population, other than the well-known bone sarcomas and head carcinomas, but elevated incidence rates for multiple myeloma and cancers of the colon, rectum, stomach, and breast suggest that radium might be involved. Continued follow-up of this population may resolve these questions. Finally, the question of the effect of fetal irradiation on the offspring of these women remains to be resolved. No evidence exists to suggest that any effects have occurred, but there is no question that a chronic irradiation of the developing fetus did take place. No formal follow-up of these children has yet been initiated

  9. Workers' Education Methods and Techniques for Rural Workers and Their Organisations: Summary of Views Expressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labour Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Several issues concerning rural workers' organizations and workers' education are discussed: motivation for self-organization, workers' education needs of rural workers, workers' education methods and techniques, training institutions and training personnel, financial resources, and the role of the International Labor Organization workers'…

  10. Wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS). Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Science Application International Corporation (SAIC) RadStar trademark wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS) is designed to provide real-time monitoring of the radiation dose to workers as they perform work in radiologically contaminated areas. WRRMS can also monitor dose rates in a room or area. The system uses radio-frequency communications to transmit dose readings from the wireless dosimeters worn by workers to a remote monitoring station that can be located out of the contaminated area. Each base station can monitor up to 16 workers simultaneously. The WRRMS can be preset to trigger both audible and visual alarms at certain dose rates. The alarms are provided to the worker as well as the base station operator. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their self-reading dosimeters (SRDs), which are typically used to monitor workers, more difficult. The base station is an IBM-compatible personal computer that updates and records information on individual workers every ten seconds. Although the equipment costs for this improved technology are higher than the SRDs (amortized at $2.54/hr versus $1.02/hr), total operational costs are actually less ($639/day versus $851/day). This is because the WRRMS requires fewer workers to be in the contaminated zone than the traditional (baseline) technology. There are also intangible benefits associated with improved worker safety and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principles, making the WRRMS an attractive alternative to the baseline technology. The baseline technology measures only integrated dose and requires workers to check their own dosimeters manually during the task

  11. Heat stress monitoring system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program involves the need to decontaminate and decommission buildings expeditiously and cost-effectively. Simultaneously, the health and safety of personnel involved in the D and D activities is of primary concern. Often, D and D workers must perform duties in inclement weather, and because they also frequently work in contaminated areas, they must wear personal protective clothing and/or respirators. Monitoring the health status of workers under these conditions is an important component of ensuring their safety. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System's heat stress monitoring system (HSMS) is designed to monitor the vital signs of individual workers as they perform work in conditions that might be conducive to heat exhaustion or heat stress. The HSMS provides real-time data on the physiological condition of workers which can be monitored to prevent heat stress or other adverse health situations. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their condition more difficult. The MiniMitter VitalSense Telemetry System can monitor up to four channels (e.g., heart rate, body activity, ear canal, and skin temperature) and ten workers from a single supervisory station. The monitors are interfaced with a portable computer that updates and records information on individual workers. This innovative technology, even though it costs more, is an attractive alternative to the traditional (baseline) technology, which measures environmental statistics and predicts the average worker's reaction to those environmental conditions without taking the physical condition of the individual worker into consideration. Although use of the improved technology might be justified purely on the basis of improved safety, it has the potential to pay for itself by reducing worker time lost caused by heat

  12. Wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS). Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-01

    The Science Application International Corporation (SAIC) RadStar{trademark} wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS) is designed to provide real-time monitoring of the radiation dose to workers as they perform work in radiologically contaminated areas. WRRMS can also monitor dose rates in a room or area. The system uses radio-frequency communications to transmit dose readings from the wireless dosimeters worn by workers to a remote monitoring station that can be located out of the contaminated area. Each base station can monitor up to 16 workers simultaneously. The WRRMS can be preset to trigger both audible and visual alarms at certain dose rates. The alarms are provided to the worker as well as the base station operator. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their self-reading dosimeters (SRDs), which are typically used to monitor workers, more difficult. The base station is an IBM-compatible personal computer that updates and records information on individual workers every ten seconds. Although the equipment costs for this improved technology are higher than the SRDs (amortized at $2.54/hr versus $1.02/hr), total operational costs are actually less ($639/day versus $851/day). This is because the WRRMS requires fewer workers to be in the contaminated zone than the traditional (baseline) technology. There are also intangible benefits associated with improved worker safety and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principles, making the WRRMS an attractive alternative to the baseline technology. The baseline technology measures only integrated dose and requires workers to check their own dosimeters manually during the task.

  13. Radiological Worker Training: Radiological Worker 2 study guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    Upon completion of this training course, the participant will have the knowledge to work safely in areas controlled for radiological purposes using proper radiological practices. Radiological Worker H Training, for the worker whose job assignment involves entry into Radiological Buffer Areas and all types of Radiation Contamination and Airborne Radioactivity Areas. This course is designed to prepare the worker to work safely in and around radiological areas and present methods to use to ensure individual radiation exposure is maintained As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  14. Automatic personnel contamination monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattin, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    United Nuclear Industries, Inc. (UNI) has developed an automatic personnel contamination monitor (APCM), which uniquely combines the design features of both portal and hand and shoe monitors. In addition, this prototype system also has a number of new features, including: micro computer control and readout, nineteen large area gas flow detectors, real-time background compensation, self-checking for system failures, and card reader identification and control. UNI's experience in operating the Hanford N Reactor, located in Richland, Washington, has shown the necessity of automatically monitoring plant personnel for contamination after they have passed through the procedurally controlled radiation zones. This final check ensures that each radiation zone worker has been properly checked before leaving company controlled boundaries. Investigation of the commercially available portal and hand and shoe monitors indicated that they did not have the sensitivity or sophistication required for UNI's application, therefore, a development program was initiated, resulting in the subject monitor. Field testing shows good sensitivity to personnel contamination with the majority of alarms showing contaminants on clothing, face and head areas. In general, the APCM has sensitivity comparable to portal survey instrumentation. The inherit stand-in, walk-on feature of the APCM not only makes it easy to use, but makes it difficult to bypass. (author)

  15. Indirect monitoring of internal exposure for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro G, C.J.; Barreto F, J.; Todo A, A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Av. Professor Lineu Prestes No. 2242, Zip code 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The procedure used to the assessment of internal exposure of workers involved with dismantling lightning rods and radioactive smoke detectors is described. Due to the presence of the sources of {sup 241} Am in these devices, a monitoring program to the workers have been implemented. This paper presents an analytical method for the separation and analysis of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) in urine samples using solid-phase extraction chromatography and alpha spectrometry. The mean recovery obtained with this technique is about 80% and the detection limit for 24 h urine sample range between 0.6 mBqL{sup -1} and 1.0 mBqL{sup -1}. The assessment of intakes and internal doses are performed following ICRP Publication 78 recommendations and appropriated biokinetic models (ICRP, 1997). Assumptions have been made for routine monitoring of these workers and it is also discussed the establishment of the internal monitoring program using the results of alpha measurements. (Author)

  16. Indirect monitoring of internal exposure for actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carneiro G, C.J.; Barreto F, J.; Todo A, A.

    2006-01-01

    The procedure used to the assessment of internal exposure of workers involved with dismantling lightning rods and radioactive smoke detectors is described. Due to the presence of the sources of 241 Am in these devices, a monitoring program to the workers have been implemented. This paper presents an analytical method for the separation and analysis of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) in urine samples using solid-phase extraction chromatography and alpha spectrometry. The mean recovery obtained with this technique is about 80% and the detection limit for 24 h urine sample range between 0.6 mBqL -1 and 1.0 mBqL -1 . The assessment of intakes and internal doses are performed following ICRP Publication 78 recommendations and appropriated biokinetic models (ICRP, 1997). Assumptions have been made for routine monitoring of these workers and it is also discussed the establishment of the internal monitoring program using the results of alpha measurements. (Author)

  17. The Danish law on the posting of workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Martin Gräs

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the background to the Law on the posting of workers and its development in the 10 years it has been in force. The interaction with EU law and the consequences of the Laval decision are also described. Finally there is a focus on selected problems that have been identified as ...... as theoretical and practical problem areas for the rules on the posting of workers. The question of the general right of trade unions to monitor compliance with collective bargains has not previously been dealt with more systematically in the Danish legal literature......This article reviews the background to the Law on the posting of workers and its development in the 10 years it has been in force. The interaction with EU law and the consequences of the Laval decision are also described. Finally there is a focus on selected problems that have been identified...

  18. Assessment of internal dose caused by uranium isotopes for workers in the phosphatic industry using alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Sakhita, Kh.; Al-Dallal, Z.

    2007-04-01

    There is probability of exposure to uranium for workers in the phosphate industry (Internal exposure) by inhalation, and the deposition of this uranium in organs and tissues, and the consequence excretion out of the body by perspiration or urine. This study focuses on the determination of uranium in urine samples of workers .some results seem to be higher than the detection limit of the method, therefore routine monitoring is required for those workers.(Author)

  19. Remote monitoring demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, Susan; Olsen, John

    2006-01-01

    The recently upgraded remote monitoring system at the Joyo Experimental Reactor uses a DCM-14 camera module and GEMINI software. The final data is compatible both with the IAEA-approved GARS review software and the ALIS software that was used for this demonstration. Features of the remote monitoring upgrade emphasized compatibility with IAEA practice. This presentation gives particular attention to the selection process for meeting network security considerations at the O'arai site. The Joyo system is different from the NNCA's ACPF system, in that it emphasizes use of IAEA standard camera technology and data acquisition and transmission software. In the demonstration itself, a temporary virtual private network (VPN) between the meeting room and the server at Sandia in Albuquerque allowed attendees to observe data stored from routine transmissions from the Joyo Fresh Fuel Storage to Sandia. Image files from a fuel movement earlier in the month showed Joyo workers and IAEA inspectors carrying out a transfer. (author)

  20. Common understanding of Emergency Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-11-01

    While the protection of Emergency Workers is regulated in most countries, national definitions, respectively interpretations differ. The prevailing regulatory frameworks are: - Basic Safety Standards (2013/59/EURATOM) The Basis Safety Standards (BSS) are binding for members of the EU. The BSS give a definition of Emergency Workers. - IAEA General Safety Requirements Part 7 (Draft). The Agency's definition is consistent with the BSS-definition. In addition, the Helper is defined. - The Nordic Flag-book. The Nordic Flag-book's Emergency Worker is consistent with the BSS-definition. In addition, workers are defined. Flag-book-Workers (FBW) are neither coterminous with GSR-P-7-helpers nor with BSS-workers. The possible need for harmonization was assessed by the means of a questionnaire, asking members of the Working Group Emergencies to attribute regulatory categories to different roles that might arise in an emergency. While showing a rich variation in interpretations, there is general agreement for the most important roles. Wherever differences are found, the bilateral impact is deemed to be marginal at worst. Therefore, no need for harmonisation with respect to the concept of Emergency Workers is seen

  1. Monitoring of occupational exposure at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The regulations concerning the monitoring of radiation doses of nuclear power plant workers and the reporting of radiation doses to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are specified in the guide. (10 refs.)

  2. Radiation protection of workers in mining and processing of uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Sahoo, S.K; Puranik, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    Low grade of uranium ore mined from three underground mines is processed in a mill at Jaduguda in eastern India to recover uranium concentrate in the form of yellow cake. Radiation protection of workers is given due importance at all stages of these operations. Dedicated Health Physics Units and Environmental Survey Laboratories established at the site regularly carry out in-plant and environmental surveillance to keep radiation exposure of workers and the members of public within the limits prescribed by the regulatory body. The limits set by the national regulatory body based on the international standards recommended by the ICRP and the IAEA are followed. In the uranium mines, external gamma radiation, radon and airborne activity due to radioactive dust are monitored. Similarly, in the uranium ore processing mill, gamma radiation and airborne radioactivity due to long-lived α-emitters are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the area and personal monitoring data. It has been observed that the average radiation dose to workers has been below 10 mSvy -1 and all exposures are well below 20 mSvy -1 at all stages of operations. Adequate ventilation is provided during mining and ore processing operations to keep the concentrations of airborne radioactivity well below the derived limits. Workers use personal protective appliances, where necessary, as a supplementary means of control. The monitoring methodologies, results and control measures are presented in the paper. (author)

  3. Tuberculosis in Healthcare Workers and Infection Control Measures at Primary Healthcare Facilities in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassens, Mareli M.; van Schalkwyk, Cari; du Toit, Elizabeth; Roest, Eline; Lombard, Carl J.; Enarson, Donald A.; Beyers, Nulda; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. Methods One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. Results The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02) as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08). In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08). Conclusion The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB. PMID:24098461

  4. Tuberculosis in healthcare workers and infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassens, Mareli M; van Schalkwyk, Cari; du Toit, Elizabeth; Roest, Eline; Lombard, Carl J; Enarson, Donald A; Beyers, Nulda; Borgdorff, Martien W

    2013-01-01

    Challenges exist regarding TB infection control and TB in hospital-based healthcare workers in South Africa. However, few studies report on TB in non-hospital based healthcare workers such as primary or community healthcare workers. Our objectives were to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures at primary healthcare facilities, the smear positive TB incidence rate amongst primary healthcare workers and the association between TB infection control measures and all types of TB in healthcare workers. One hundred and thirty three primary healthcare facilities were visited in five provinces of South Africa in 2009. At each facility, a TB infection control audit and facility questionnaire were completed. The number of healthcare workers who had had TB during the past three years was obtained. The standardised incidence ratio of smear positive TB in primary healthcare workers indicated an incidence rate of more than double that of the general population. In a univariable logistic regression, the infection control audit score was significantly associated with reported cases of TB in healthcare workers (OR=1.04, 95%CI 1.01-1.08, p=0.02) as was the number of staff (OR=3.78, 95%CI 1.77-8.08). In the multivariable analysis, the number of staff remained significantly associated with TB in healthcare workers (OR=3.33, 95%CI 1.37-8.08). The high rate of TB in healthcare workers suggests a substantial nosocomial transmission risk, but the infection control audit tool which was used did not perform adequately as a measure of this risk. Infection control measures should be monitored by validated tools developed and tested locally. Different strategies, such as routine surveillance systems, could be used to evaluate the burden of TB in healthcare workers in order to calculate TB incidence, monitor trends and implement interventions to decrease occupational TB.

  5. Burnout and young workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Batista Chaves Azevedo de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article intends to conduct an analysis of the dimensions of the a model about the burnout syndrome, from the reality of young workers who are doing some vocational courses in the city of Recife/PE. Objective: Description of characteristics of a predetermined population. Still, the research is in a field of research and using content analysis method to discuss the data obtained through interviews that had their questions based on the original questionnaire that were validity (Maslach Burnout Inventory. Method: The study is characterized as exploratory and descriptive, given the need to provide greater familiarity with the relationship between the phenomenon to be studied and the target audience that was wanted to interview. Results: The results indicated that the size of the professional fulfillment is committed to moderate level, the size of depersonalization is not compromised and emotional exhaustion is present in youth work routine. Thus, although not found the burnout itself, there are remarkable risk behaviors that could be generate the syndrome on the future. Conclusion: The results may indicate the need for intervention in the company, in order to allow greater enrichment activities developed by young learners, as well as prevent the emergence of situations that may lead to suffering at work .

  6. Interviewing media workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the use of Niklas Luhmann’s systems theoretical approach in order to analyse interviews conducted with media workers concerning their experiences of ethnic diversity in newsrooms. Applying systems theory means constructing the interview as a social system and seeing the “data” as observations produced by the observer and not as representations of a reality. The first part of the article describes the interview methodology and the second part provides examples, from the current study, of how systems theory can be applied in order to analyse interviews. Using a difference-theoretical approach means looking at the distinctions the informants make when talking about their experiences. These main guiding distinctions can be summarised as immigrant background/competence as well as advantage/competence. Using the guiding distinction of inclusion/exclusion when interpreting the interviewees’ statements, the interdependencies of mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in newsrooms related to ethnic background can be examined.

  7. The worker profile autocontrolled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Omar Delgado Mora

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This document is part of two deliveries. In this first paper is to make an approach to the concept of self-control from the very beginning with Sakichi Toyoda, founder of what the industry Toyota Motor Company, additionally taking some excerpts of the concept issued by teachers and the psychologist Henry Murray, a professor at the university Harvard precursor test TAT personality test creator, pen applied world wide by psychologists David McCllelan, also a psychologist and a pioneer in the study of human needs and the concept of competence; Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer of Stanford University organizational behavior and theory, Frederick Hertzberg, Psychologist and strong influential in business management, Kronfly Cruz, lawyer and investigator of social and administrative sciences, Charles Perrow, a sociologist at Yale University and Stanford , who studies the impact of large organizations in society, among others. The study reflects the need to meet organizational objectives related to the physicochemical characteristics of the finished product in a plant of the company’s main beers in the country. In this paper, we intend to make an approximation of worker self -controlled, which when compared with the powers, generic, specific and technical area established by the brewery, will allow generating a methodology to adjust these competencies and to obtain the target profile drawn. This comparison and development of the methodology proposed is the subject of the second work planned.

  8. Sensitisation to Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium notatum in laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscolo, P; Piccolomini, R; Benvenuti, F; Catamo, G; Di Gioacchino, M

    1999-01-01

    Four workers in medical research laboratories, located in a basement level of a University facility equipped with a humidified air conditioning system, complained of cough and/or asthma and/or rhinitis during their normal working activities. Since exposure to toxic compounds was very low (similar to that of the outdoor environment) only microbiological monitoring was performed. Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium notatum were found in some laboratories. Eight laboratory workers (including the 4 symptomatic subjects) out of 26 investigated were found to be atopic. Specific IgE sensitisation to Aspergillus fumigatus was found in the 8 atopic and in the 6 non-atopic workers, while Penicililum notatum was found in 7 atopic and 4 non-atopic subjects. History, physical examination and laboratory data excluded the presence of aspergillosis or allergic bronchial aspergillosis in the sensitised subjects. Our results suggest that evaluation of immune parameters, along with monitoring of the working environment, may reduce the risk of sensitisation and/or allergic symptoms in atopic laboratory workers.

  9. Experience with a routine fecal sampling program for plutonium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bihl, D.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Sula, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A quarterly fecal sampling program was conducted at the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford site for congruent to 100 workers at risk for an intake of plutonium oxide and other forms of plutonium. To our surprise, we discovered that essentially all of the workers were excreting detectable activities of plutonium. Further investigation showed that the source was frequent, intermittent intakes at levels below detectability by normal workplace monitoring, indicating the extraordinary sensitivity of fecal sampling. However, the experience of this study also indicated that the increased sensitivity of routine fecal sampling relative to more common bioassay methods is offset by many problems. These include poor worker cooperation; difficulty in distinguishing low-level chronic intakes from a more significant, acute intake; difficulty in eliminating interference from ingested plutonium; and difficulty in interpreting what a single void means in terms of 24-h excretion. Recommendations for a routine fecal program include providing good communication to workers and management about reasons and logistics of fecal sampling prior to starting, using annual (instead of quarterly) fecal sampling for class Y plutonium, collecting samples after workers have been away from plutonium exposure for a least 3 d, and giving serious consideration to improving urinalysis sensitivity rather than going to routine fecal sampling

  10. Preparing the radiation protection worker to meet multiple needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abercrombie, J.S.; Thorpe, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the radiation protection worker aids in protecting personnel and their surrounding environment from the hazards of radiation. These individuals use their technical knowledge, skills, and abilities to survey and monitor various project-related activities. They must also provide guidance in project design, development, and implementation. These combined efforts assure that protective measures are taken in accordance with applicable standards. The ORNL performance-based training program enhances the skills of the worker. The program incorporates job specific information on the diverse facilities and activities monitored with basic fundamentals of radiation protection. Successful completion of this program includes passing both a qualification exam and an on-the-job skills review. This paper details the structure of such a program and explains the strategies taken to reach the program's goals. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Occupational exposure to xenon-133 among hospital workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, M.

    1984-11-01

    During procedures for pulmonary ventilation studies on patients in hospitals, xenon-133 may escape into ambient air. Measurements of air concentrations were required to permit an evaluation of the exposure to which hospital workers are subjected. Two complementary methods of in situ measurements of air concentrations were employed: a commercial air monitor and evacuated blood sampling tubes. Personal dosimeters (TLDs) were exposed simultaneously with the commercial air monitor, and the results were compared. This report presents the results of the measurements of air concentrations during studies on patients. Substantial leakage of xenon-133 was noted, but workers received less than the maximum permissible dose. Personal dosimeters do not permit accurate evaluation of the skin doses resulting from exposure to xenon-133; measurements of air concentrations are required for such evaluation. A number of procedures are recommended to minimize leakage and personnel exposure

  12. Trends in doses to some UK radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Best, R.J.; Kendall, G.M.; Pook, E.A.; Saunders, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    The NRPB runs a Personal Monitoring Service which issues dosemeters and keeps radiation dose records for over 10 000 workers. This database is a valuable source of information on occupational exposure to radiation though it is likely that in future the Central Index of Dose Information (CIDI) will provide more comprehensive statistics, albeit restricted to radiation workers in the sense of Ionising Radiation Regulations. This note describes doses incurred to the end of 1987 with some preliminary figures for 1988. It does not cover the same ground as earlier reports but gives more details of the structure of the monitored population by age and sex and examines evidence that mean radiation doses are decreasing with time. (author)

  13. Pesticide Worker Safety Cooperative Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    The worker safety program cooperative agreements fund projects to educate pesticide applicators, handlers, and farmworkers on working safely with, and around, pesticides. Read about pesticide related grant opportunities and reports from previous grants.

  14. Mental health workers. Graduation daze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Carol

    2003-09-11

    PCTs are likely to miss the national target on employment of graduate mental health workers. Pilots are showing success in reducing referrals. Managers must address career progression problems and define roles more clearly.

  15. Radiation protection optimization of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lochard, J.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents the contribution of CEPN (study center on protection evaluation in nuclear area) to the Days of the French Radiation Protection Society (SFRP) on optimization of workers radiation protection in electronuclear, industrial and medical areas

  16. Work values among Lebanese workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidani, Y M; Gardner, W L

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of a review of the existing literature, the authors tested 4 hypotheses to determine the applicability of work values in Arab societies to employees in Lebanese organizations. Only 1 hypothesis was supported: Organizational policies that ran counter to the worker's religious values had an adverse effect on job satisfaction. There was no support for the hypotheses (a) that workers' religiosity in inversely related to positive attitudes toward women's involvement at work, (b) that employee satisfaction is related to a mechanistic organizational design, or (c) that workers with an internal locus of control experience higher job satisfaction. The Lebanese workers, thus, did not appear to share some of the attributes claimed to exist in Arab societies.

  17. Mortality studies of Hanford workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1986-03-01

    The relationships of cancer mortality with radiation exposure as influenced by age, sex, follow-up time length of employment, and job category are discussed in relation to workers at the Hanford facilities

  18. Facts about Hospital Worker Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... statistics show that hospitals are still relatively hazardous workplaces, and they have much room to improve. OSHA has developed this factbook to help hospital safety managers and other stakeholders understand the challenges of worker ...

  19. NGO field workers in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Haroon SIDDIQUE

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available NGOs came into the society in their present form after World War II and more precisely in 1960s. Before that also different forms of philanthropy existed. Like elsewhere in the world, in Pakistan also state and the market were the two sectors catering for different needs of the people. When foreign funding started coming into the poor countries, the channel of NGOs was considered more appropriate including the fact they had roots in the society and the benefit could reach the far flung areas. NGO field workers are the real actors in the NGOs’ activities but sadly the NGOs those raise the slogans of working for the destitute do not bother to facilitate the NGO field workers. Eventually the NGO field workers are facing problems of job insecurity, poor salary structure, unhealthy working environment and even harassment especially in case of women NGO field workers in Pakistan

  20. Decompression sickness in caisson workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghawabi, Samir H. El; Mansour, Mohamed B.; Youssef, Fatma L.; Ghawabi, Mohamed H. El; Latif, Mohamed M. Abd El

    1971-01-01

    El Ghawabi, S. H., Mansour, M. B., Youssef, F. L., El Ghawabi, M. H., and Abd El Latif, M. M. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 323-329. Decompression sickness in caisson workers. An investigation of 55 bridge construction workers is reported. The overall bends rate was 0·97%. (The term `bends' as used in this study is defined in the paper.) Chokes were encountered in 67·27% of workers. A clinical, haematological, and radiological study was performed. Definite bony changes were found in 43·6% of all workers; 91·6% of these had lesions around the elbow. The presence of dense areas in the neck of the scapula is reported in two cases for the first time. The relatively high haematocrit value is thought to play a part in the pathogenesis of bone infarction through its relation with blood viscosity. Images PMID:5124832

  1. Risk factors for non-fatal occupational injuries among construction workers: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashaba, E; El-Helaly, M; El-Gilany, A H; Motawei, S M; Foda, S

    2018-02-01

    Substance abuse is a serious problem, because it affects both workers and young people. Prevalence and consequences of cannabis abuse among construction workers in particular are not well studied in Egypt. To determine the association between non-fatal occupational injuries among construction workers and their demographic and occupational factors and to assess the frequency of cannabis abuse and its relationship to injury severity and workdays lost. A case-control study was conducted at Mansoura Emergency Hospital. Cases were 100 acutely injured male workers. A control group of 90 healthy age-matched workers was selected from 8 construction sites. Workers were interviewed, and a questionnaire was completed that included socio-demographic data, full occupational history, and causes and type of injury. Injury outcome measures included lost workdays and the injury severity score (ISS). Cannabis abuse in injured workers was monitored by preliminary testing of urine and confirmatory testing of blood. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent predictors of occupational injuries were rural residence, being a carpenter or painter and past history of injuries. The most common accidents were slipping falls (62%). Confirmed cannabis test was positive in 51.1% of the injured workers. Median days away from work were greater among cannabis users than non-users. The ISS was significantly higher among users compared to non-users ( p construction workers with inadequate safety measures.

  2. Product Quality and Worker Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Abowd, John M; Kramarz, Francis

    1995-01-01

    We study the relation between product quality and worker quality using an economic model that, under certain conditions, provides a direct link between product price, product quality and work-force quality. Our measures of product quality are the evolution in the detailed product price relative to its product group, and the level of the product price relative to this group. Our worker quality measures are the firm's average person effect and personal characteristics effect from individual wag...

  3. Product Quality and Worker Quality

    OpenAIRE

    John M. ABOWD; Françis KRAMARZ; Antoine MOREAU

    1996-01-01

    We study the relation between product quality and worker quality using an economic model that, under certain conditions, provides a direct link between product price, product quality and work force quality. Our measures of product quality are the evolution in the detailed product price relative to its product group and the level of the product price relative to this group. Our worker quality measures are the firm's average person effect and personal characteristics effect from individual wage...

  4. Bioassay criteria for environmental restoration workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) work at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site posed questions concerning when to perform bioassay monitoring of workers for potential intakes of radioactivity. Application of criteria originally developed for use inside radionuclide processing facilities to ER work resulted in overly restrictive bioassay requirements. ER work typically involves site characterization or, excavating large quantities of potentially contaminated soil, rather than working with concentrated quantities of radioactivity as in a processing facility. An improved approach, tailored to ER work, provided soil contamination concentrations above which worker bioassay would be required. Soil concentrations were derived assuming acute or chronic intakes of 2% of an Annual Limit on Intake (ALI), or a potential committed effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem, and conservative dust loading of air from the work. When planning ER work, the anticipated soil concentration and corresponding need for bioassay could be estimated from work-site historical records. Once site work commenced, soil sampling and work-place surveys could be used to determine bioassay needs. This approach substantially reduced the required number of bioassay samples with corresponding reductions in analytical costs, schedules, and more flexible work-force management. (Work supported by the US Department of Energy under contract DOE-AC06-76RLO 1830.)

  5. The battle over workers' compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, J N

    2000-01-01

    Faced with lower profits and rapidly increasing premium costs in the 1980s, insurers and employer organizations cleverly parlayed the public perception of worker fraud and abuse in the workers' compensation system (that they helped to create) into massive legislative changes. Over the last decade, state legislators and governors, Republican and Democrat alike, have jumped on this bandwagon, one that workers and their allies have dubbed the workers' compensation "deform" movement. Alleging a "game plan" and a calculated campaign on the part of insurers and employers, the author looks at the major components of changes that were made, examines the elements of workers' compensation over which employers and insurers have gained control, and discusses Newt Gingrich's efforts to capitalize on employer and insurer fervor over the system. This campaign whistled through the country until it goaded the labor movement, injured workers, the trial bar, and others in Ohio in 1997 to organize themselves to stand up to employers by defeating the deform law through a ballot initiative. The article details that battle and suggests that similar voices can be achieved through a return to grassroots organizing and mobilization.

  6. Laundry monitor for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Mitsuo (Toshiba Corp., Fuchu (Japan). Fuchu Works)

    1984-06-01

    A laundry monitor has been developed for the detection and cleansification of radiation contamination on the clothes, headgear, footgear, etc. of workers in nuclear facilities. With this monitor, measurement is made irrespective of the size and shape of the objects; a large-area plastic scintillation detector is incorporated; it has stable and highly sensitive characteristics, with the merits of swift measurement, economical operation and easy maintenance. Connected with a folding machine, automatic carrying and storing compartment through a conveyor, it is capable of saving energy and man power, contributing to scheduled operation, and improving the efficiency of the facilities.

  7. Laundry monitor for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Mitsuo

    1984-01-01

    A laundry monitor has been developed for the detection and cleansification of radiation contamination on the clothes, headgear, footgear, etc. of workers in nuclear facilities. With this monitor, measurement is made irrespective of the size and shape of the objects ; a large-area plastic scintillation detector is incorporated ; it has stable and highly sensitive characteristics, with the merits of swift measurement, economical operation and easy maintenance. Connected with a folding machine, automatic carrying and storing compartment through a conveyor, it is capable of saving energy and man power, contributing to scheduled operation, and improving the efficiency of the facilities. (author)

  8. Treatment of operational monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo P, D. de; Marcondes T, J.

    1996-01-01

    From effective doses calculation models, published in norms and regulatory guides, the specific dose conversion factors for different installations are used on monitoring data. The monitoring data are achieved from many individual parameters and, in case there is no individual parameters, area monitoring data are used. With the objective of reducing occupational exposures, the results are evaluated in function of the pertinent norms. The measurements are analyzed also in function of the consistency of the data obtained from former similar operations. The results are saved as individual historical dose, in each worker annual dose of every work year. The other files are formed by determined operation individual doses, calculated per capita; dose rates are achieved from individual monitoring data and the averages of each operational function are calculated; dose rates are also obtained by area monitoring, and each workplace mean is calculated. These averages are compared with the correspondent annual dose equivalent limit fraction. The analysis of variance is applied to individuals dose rates and to workplace dose rates in order to verify statistical differences, the largest mean is compared to the remaining. The individual working time in a programmed operation is limited in order to avoid that the predicted dose equivalent of twelve months exceed the established annual limit. When this limit is predicted to be exceeded, the working time is re-programmed, with worker removing at the beginning of the operation or before the end of operation, keeping prevision below the limit. (authors). 7 refs

  9. Monitoring of surface and airborne contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradeep Kumar, K S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)

    1997-06-01

    Indian nuclear energy programme aims at total safety in all activities involved in the entire fuel cycle for the occupational workers, members of the public and the environment as a whole. Routine radiation monitoring with clearly laid out procedures are followed for ensuring the safety of workers and public. Radiation monitoring carried out for the nuclear installations comprises of process monitoring, monitoring of effluent releases and also of the radiation protection monitoring of the individuals, work place and environment. Regulations like banning of smoking and consumption of food and drink etc. reduces the risk of direct ingestion even if inadvertent spread of contamination takes place. Though limit of transportable surface contamination is prescribed, the health physicists always follow a ``clean on swipe`` philosophy which compensates any error in the measurement of surface contamination. In this paper, the following items are contained: Necessity of contamination monitoring, accuracy required in the calibration of surface contamination monitors, methodology for contamination monitoring, air monitoring, guidelines for unrestricted release of scrap materials, and problems in contamination monitoring. (G.K.)

  10. Radiation monitoring at Pakistan research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.

    1984-05-01

    Area radiation monitoring is accomplished by using Tracer Lab. radiation monitor. Personnel monitoring is carried out using film badges, TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) and pocket dosimeters. For the evaluation of monthly accumulated doses of radiation workers film badges/TLDs and for instantaneous/short term dose measurement in higher radiation zones pocket dosimeters are used in addition to film badge/TLD. Environmental monitoring is necessary to check the PARR operation effect on background radiation level in the vicinity of PINSTECH. (A.B.). 4 refs

  11. A Review of Measures against Increasing Temperature and Climate Change for the Safeguard of Workers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit Kumar Dehury

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe heat causes various health related problems among the workers in India. Working under hot and humid environment damages health of workers especially the agriculture labourers, construction workers, rickshaw pullers, venders, brick kiln workers and daily wage labourers. High humidity and high temperature can leads to heat stress even in 38°C temperature. The damage might be temporary, like heat related injuries to permanent like, critical heat stroke. Sometimes, it leads to occupational hazards which is irreversible in nature. Despite these serious issues, there is minimal preparation which exposes the workers to serious conditions. This paper evaluates various consequences of climate change and increasing temperature on the workers. Various databases like PubMed, Scopus and Google Scholar have been enquired to bring evidences across industry and places. The effects of heat and temperature were thematically arranged to understand the seriousness of the issues. Suggestions and way forwards are also discussed for the solution for workers and sustainability of various sectors depending on labourers working under the heat of sun. The paper suggests the requirement of creating a heat combating environment by coordinating among various government departments and agencies for the welfare of the workers. The industrial workers have to be provided with sufficient measures by various industries as per the governing laws. The agriculture and brick kiln workers have to work in mild heat and with sufficient protection to avoid consequences. The government need to monitor the unorganised sectors for protection of workers by law enforcing organs.

  12. Internal dose evaluation of workers involved in radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals handling for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, R.B.P.; Mesquita, C.H. de

    1987-01-01

    The internal dose levels of IPEN workers, involved in the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for medical use are surveyed. In this production, the workers were splited in six group: research and development, routine production, quality control, packaging, radiological protection and maintenance. The internal dose was evaluated according to the models described by ICRP-30, from the results obtained in the whole body counters monitoring. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Grand Rounds: An Outbreak of Toxic Hepatitis among Industrial Waste Disposal Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Choi, Jung-Keun; Choi, Sung-Bong; Suh, Jeong-Ill; Choi, Dae Seob; Kim, Jung Ran

    2006-01-01

    Context Industrial waste (which is composed of various toxic chemicals), changes to the disposal process, and addition of chemicals should all be monitored and controlled carefully in the industrial waste industry to reduce the health hazard to workers. Case presentation Five workers in an industrial waste plant developed acute toxic hepatitis, one of whom died after 3 months due to fulminant hepatitis. In the plant, we detected several chemicals with hepatotoxic potential, including pyridine...

  14. Estimating the whole-body exposure annual dose of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Yizong; Gao Jianzheng; Liu Wenhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: By imitating experiment of radioactive sources being installed, to estimate the annual whole-body exposure dose of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear determining wells; Methods: To compre the values of the theory, imitating experiment and γ individual dose monitor calculations. Results: The three values measured above tally with one anather. Conclusion: The annual whole-body exposure doses of radiation workers of petroleum nuclear determining wells are no more than 5 mSv. (authors)

  15. Determination of uranium in urine samples for workers in the phosphoric acid purification using fluorimetry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Sakhita, Kh.; Aldalal, Z.

    2003-10-01

    There is probability of exposure to uranium for workers in the phosphoric acid purification (internal exposure) by inhalation, and the deposition of this uranium in organs and tissues, and the consequence excreation out of the body by perspiration or urine. This study focuses on the determination of uranium in urine samples of workers. All results seem to be under the detection limit of the method, therefore no routine monitoring is required. (author)

  16. Considerations of selection suggested for internal contamination monitoring in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz S, R.; Lopez B, G.; Placeres V, C.; Arado L, J.; Jova S, L.

    1996-01-01

    A method for calculating effective risk of radionuclide intake and hypothetical annual dose that will receive a person who works with unsealed sources is proposed. Calculated committed dose equivalent and metabolic characteristic of radionuclides permit to select the type of monitoring 'in vivo' and/or 'in vitro'. The method was applied to 396 workers from 28 institutions, where 20 radionuclides in 124 different products for 266 applications are used. From this study 62% of the workers had to be monitored for internal contamination, meanly by 'in vitro' monitoring. In practices of Nuclear Medicine and other medical uses 75% of the workers had to be monitored. These results permitted to corroborate the criteria for internal contamination monitoring program carried out by Center for Hygiene and Radiation Protection and permitted to identify needs for control of radionuclides intakes. (authors).5 refs., 3 figs

  17. Workers and the ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbib, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    In both the preparation and the application of the recommendations presented by the ICRP one important voice has been absent: that of the workers in the nuclear industry. A large number of specialists are studying their situation from all points of view, in their different capacities as workers, consumers and male or female members of the public, but this extensive study is being done without consulting them, without their opinion even being asked for. The paper discusses such deficiencies, in particular all those aspects which distinguish these recommendations from a legal text. The lack of conciseness in the definition of the limit which the average annual dose to a large group of workers must not exceed (500 mrad) is considered. The possibility of a large number of workers being exposed for a long period is not acceptable if the decision is left to the manager of a nuclear facility alone. Cost-benefit analysis, as it is described in the ICRP text, cannot be considered to provide credible protection from the point of view of workers. Moreover, the various ICRP recommendations fail to mention such important matters as allowance for low-dose effects, disparities in the social security coverage offered to various categories of workers in the event of occupational illness, and the increasing use of migrant workers for difficult decontamination and maitenance tasks. At a time when it is thought that nuclear technology can be standardized, the French Democratic Labour Confederation (CFDT) expresses its fears concerning the practical application of the ICRP recommendations; for example, the text of ICRP Publication 26 has not yet been translated into French, but Euratom has already proposed directives for its application in Member States

  18. Application of GPRS in the remote X γ radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanliang; Su Xiaohui; Jin Yu; Li Zhengcai; Wang Yuhong; Zhang Wentao

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a system sending radiation monitoring data wirelessly by GPRS network. Monitor terminal in this system can send the measured data to the monitor computer wirelessly by GPRS, then managing program of the monitor computer can process the data. When data is abnormal, there is an alarm, workers can deal with it on time. (authors)

  19. Advances in radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The requirement to keep radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, linked with the growing number of workers whose exposure to radiation must be strictly controlled, requires intensified efforts directed towards the provision of adequate radiation monitoring programmes. This symposium was intended to review the advances that have been made in methods, techniques and instrumentation for radiation protection monitoring. Thus the symposium complemented the detailed consideration that had already been given to two closely related topics, that of environmental monitoring and of monitoring radioactive airborne and liquid discharges from nuclear facilities. The first topic had been dealt with in detail in an Agency symposium held in November 1973 in Warsaw and the second was treated in an Agency symposium held in September 1977 in Portoroz. The present symposium covered a broad range of topics under the following main headings: Monitoring of external exposure (three sessions),Contamination monitoring (three sessions), Radiation monitoring programmes (one session), Calibration, and use of computers (two sessions). An introductory paper described the purpose of radiation protection monitoring and its historical development. It drew attention to the gradual change from the threshold dose hypothesis to the hypothesis of direct proportionality between dose and effect and discussed practical implications of the recommendations recently issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It became apparent that guidance on the application of these recommendations is urgently needed. This guidance is presently being prepared by ICRP

  20. A biomonitoring study of genotoxic risk to workers of transformers and distribution line stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikler, Serap; Aydemir, Nilufer; Vatan, Ozgur; Kurtuldu, Sevim; Bilaloglu, Rahmi

    2009-12-01

    A cytogenetic monitoring study was carried out on a group of workers from transformer and distribution line stations in the Bursa province of Turkey, to investigate the genotoxic risk of occupational exposure to extremely low frequency electric (ELF) and magnetic fields (EMF). Cytogenetic analysis, namely chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and micronucleus (MN) tests were performed on a strictly selected group of 55 workers and compared to 17 controls. CA and MN frequencies in electrical workers appeared significantly higher than in controls (p electric transformer and distribution stations.

  1. Management and processing of dosimetric data of workers exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasoarimalala, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Madagascar - INSTN Radiation protection and Dosimetry Department use the reader HARSHAW TLD 6600 for workers doses reading. Although the performance of this device, manual works is required to store and to maintain the dosimetric data after reading and to note the TLDs sent to the establishments. To avoid these manual works, this present work proposes computer programs written in Python and using SQLite software. One of the programs in python retrieves dose values after reading and transfers directly these doses in the workers database. The use of SQLite software provides a way for the dosimetric data management and the TLDs movement monitoring. The other program assesses estimation of the dose received by worker through a trend curve for workers dosimetric monitoring. The calculated differences of this curve over the curve connecting all points are less than 20%, acceptable limit in radiation protection for TLDs. This present work presents then significances for the personnel occupying individual monitoring of ionizing radiation workers and for these workers too. [fr

  2. The development of wireless radiation dose monitoring using smart phone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Jeong, Gyo Seong; Lee, Yun Jong [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Yeal [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chai Wan [REMTECH, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Radiation workers at a nuclear facility or radiation working area should hold personal dosimeters. some types of dosimeters have functions to generate audible or visible alarms to radiation workers. However, such devices used in radiation fields these days have no functions to communicate with other equipment or the responsible personnel. our project aims at the development of a remote wireless radiation dose monitoring system that can be utilized to monitor the radiation dose for radiation workers and to notify the radiation protection manager of the dose information in real time. We use a commercial survey meter for personal radiation measurement and a smart phone for a mobile wireless communication tool and a Beacon for position detection of radiation workers using Blue tooth communication. In this report, the developed wireless dose monitoring of cellular phone is introduced.

  3. Mortality study of lead workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W C; Gaffey, W R

    1975-01-01

    The mortality of 7,032 men employed for one or more years in lead production facilities or battery plants was followed over a 23-year period, 1947-70. Lead absorption in many of these men was greatly in excess of currently accepted standards based upon urinary and blood lead concentrations available for a portion of the group. There were 1,356 deaths reported. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes was 107 for smelter workers and 99 for battery plant workers. Death from neoplasms were in slight excess in smelters, but not significantly increased in battery plants. There were no excess deaths from kidney tumors. The SMR for cardiovascular-renal disease was 96 for smelter workers and 101 for battery plant workers. There was definitely no excess in deaths from either stroke or hypertensive heart disease; however, deaths classified as other hypertensive disease and unspecified nephritis or renal sclerosis were higher than expected. The life expectancy of lead workers was calculated to be approximately the same as that of all U.S. males.

  4. Health management of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugita, Naoki; Igari, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    People in Japan have expressed great anxiety about possible radiation and radioactivity after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO), due to the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan on 11 March 2011. A large number of workers were engaged in response and recovery operations, and they were possibly exposed to high doses of radiation as compared to the general population. In the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986, high doses of radiation to 134 plant staff and emergency personnel resulted in acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which proved fatal for 28 of them. In the Fukushima accident, six workers were exposed to more than 250 mSv of radiation during the initial response phase, but no one showed ARS. It is necessary to continue registration of radiation doses for all workers who were exposed to radiation to facilitate suitable healthcare management in the future. In addition to radiation exposure, a group of workers were also exposed to other health hazards. Frequent occurrence of heat disorders has been a concern for the workers wearing protective clothing with poor ventilation. A comprehensive program to prevent heat illness was implemented by TEPCO under the guidance of the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. It is important to provide effective systems not only for prevention of radiation exposure but also for general management of other health risks including heat disorders and infection. (author)

  5. Micronucleus assay for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasem, A.N.; Ali, A.S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Micronucleus assay was performed on 49 radiation workers and 22 healthy volunteers. Radiation workers were subdivided into two groups according to their employments durations in the radiation field. Group a consisted of 18 radiation workers who have been in this work between 5 and 22 years. Group b included 31 employees who have been classified as radiation workers for 1 to 4.5 years. Statistical analysis showed significant variations between the yields of micronuclei in groups A and B as well as between group A and a group of healthy controls. Meanwhile no significant difference was noticed between the yields of micronuclei in group B and the corresponding values in the healthy controls. The possible effect of age in the induction of micronuclei was discussed and a comparison with the yield of chromosomal aberrations was described. It seems that cytokinesis- blocking method may be used to detect the radiation-induced micronuclei in workers exposed occupationally to ionizing radiation in levels below the maximum permissible limit of 0.05 Sv per year

  6. Musculoskeletal diseases in forestry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Slađana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common hazards in the forestry that may induce disorders of the musculoskeletal system are vibrations, unfavorable microclimatic conditions, noise, over-time working hours, work load and long-term repeated movements. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases and its difference among workers engaged in various jobs in the forestry. Two groups of workers were selected: woodcutters operating with chain-saw (N=33 and other loggers (N=32. Selected workers were of the similar age and had similar total length of employment as well as the length of service in the forestry. Both groups of workers employed in the forestry had the high prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases (woodcutters 69.7% and other loggers 62.5%, respectively. Degenerative diseases of spinal column were very frequent, in dependently of the type of activity in the forestry. Non-significantly higher risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was found in woodcutters with chain-saw compared to workers having other jobs in the forestry (OR=3.09; 95%CI=0.64-19.72. The lateral epicondylitis was found only in woodcutters operating with chain-saw with the prevalence of 18.2%.

  7. Status on contamination monitoring in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quanlu, Gou [China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan (China)

    1997-06-01

    The air contaminated by radioactive materials in nuclear enterprises and radioactive workplaces and forming radioactive aerosol and the leakage of radioactive materials in operation cause internal exposure damage in workers. It is necessary and important to monitor air and surface contaminations for the health of public and workers, and for protecting environment. At present, many institutes engage in the studies on surface contamination monitoring in China, and the government has formulated the control limits of surface contamination in the Regulations of Radiation Protection. The monitors for surface contamination monitoring are almost home-made. The methods being used often are smear test and placing surface sample test. Scintillation counters, semiconductor detectors and G-M counters have been used for detecting alpha surface contamination. Plastic scintillator meters and thin wall/window G-M counters are used for beta surface contamination. Special detectors have been designed for monitoring low energy nuclides. The status of airborne contamination monitoring in China is reported. As the studies for future, the development of the surface contamination monitor for low energy beta nuclides, especially H-3, the monitoring methods for the special shapes of surfaces, the technology of decontamination and the calibration method and device for on-line radioactive aerosol continuous monitors are taken up. (K.I.)

  8. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    This textbook is addressed to all those concerned with the protection of radiation workers. It provides full coverage of the implications of radiation in exposed workers, and, after a chapter outlining, in simple terms, the basic facts about radiation, deals with measurement of ionising radiation; radiation dosimetry; effectiveness of absorbed dose; general biological effects of ionising radiation; somatic effects of radiation; the acute radiation syndrome; other somatic effects; hereditary effects; radiation protection standards and regulations; radiation protection; medical supervision of radiation workers; general methods of diagnosis and treatment; metabolism and health problems of some radioisotopes; plutonium and other transuranium elements; radiation accidents; emergency plans and medical care; atomic power plants; medico-legal problems

  9. Radiation worker: the ALARA key

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weedon, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    As low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) is a simple concept that has come to be a complicated and expensive regulatory goal. There are essentially three factors that can be manipulated to achieve ALARA: (1) radionuclide inventory (source), (2) physical arrangement (primarily distance and shielding); (3) radiation worker performance (radiation safety responsibilities and functions). Of these three elements, item 3 is utilized the least and yet has the greatest potential for reducing exposure per dollar expended. By establishing a relationship with radiation workers consisting of credible leadership and expecting the radiation workers to be responsible for specific elements of radiological safety. Health Physics can gain a degree of cooperation and performance that will provide significant ALARA gains at a very small expense

  10. Scientific literacy in hospital workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerci, Alba M.; Pinero, Adalberto; Zubiria, M. Guillermina; Sanz, Vanesa; Larragueta, Nicolas; Puntigliano, Diego

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Previous studies realized by our group have demonstrated radio-induction of genotoxic damage in peripheral blood of hospital workers exposed to chronic X-ray. The cytogenetic and cytomolecular damage was significant in the radiologists evaluated. Accordingly, we have researched the knowledge of risk radiation in 57 workers to different health centres, private and public, in La Plata city. Most of respondents (96.4%) answered to know the risk of working with radiation ionizing, but a large portion do not carry out with the appropriate safety rules. The workers have not interest in this rules, it is evidenced by negligence in the use of protective clothing and personal dosimeters. These results suggested that individuals could be sensitising to minimize their risk. For this purpose we are working in scientific literacy conferences which are organized by 'Asociacion de Tecnicos Radiologos y de Diagnostico por Imagenes de La Plata (ASTEDIRLP)'. (author)

  11. Nuclear: a world without worker?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Pierre; Maziere, M.

    2014-01-01

    After having recalled some characteristics of the electro-nuclear sector in terms of employment (direct and indirect jobs, average age, number of persons controlled on the radiological level, exposure with respect to work location), the author outlines that workers of this sector are seldom evoked whereas investments, incidents and accidents are generally the main evoked and commented topics. He proposes some explanations about this image of the nuclear sector. He reports an incident which occurred in Marcoule and outlines how a set of imperfectly managed events resulted in this incident. He also outlines the importance of the role of workers and the difficulty to make the right choice in such situations. As a conclusion, the author draws some lessons, and particularly outlines that the commitment of workers should be put forward

  12. Distribution of radium-226 body burden among workers in an underground uranium mine in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnaik, R.L.; Srivastava, V.S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Shukla, A.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2007-01-01

    Workers are exposed to ore dust containing uranium and its daughter products during mining and processing of uranium ore. These radio nuclides may be an inhalation hazard to the workers during the course of their occupation. The most significant among these radio nuclides is 226 Ra. Measurement of radium body burden of uranium mine and mill workers are important to control the exposure of workers within the prescribed limit. Radon-in-breath measurement technique is used for measurement of radium body burden. Workers associated with different category of underground mining operations were monitored. The measurement results indicate that workers associated with different category of underground mining operations are having 226 Ra body burden ranging from 0.15 - 2.85 kBq. It was also observed that workers involved in timbering operation are having maximum average 226 Ra body burden of 0.97 ± 0.54 kBq. Overall average radium body burden observed for 683 workers is 0.80 kBq. (author)

  13. Health protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norwood, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Essential information on the health protection of radiation workers which has accumulated since the advent of nuclear fission thirty years ago is presented in simple terms. Basic facts on ionizing radiation, its measurement, and dosimetry are presented. Acute and chronic somatic and genetic effects are discussed with emphasis on prevention. Radiation protection standards and regulations are outlined, and methods for maintaining these standards are described. Diagnosis and treatment of radiation injury from external radiation and/or internally deposited radionuclides is considered generally as well as specifically for each radioisotope. The medical supervision of radiation workers, radiation accidents, atomic power plants, and medicolegal problems is also covered. (853 references) (U.S.)

  14. CONTACT DERMATITIS AMONG CONSTRUCTION WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Diah Purnama Sari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Contact dermatitis is a form of skin inflammation with spongiosis or intercellular edema of the epidermis due to the interaction of irritants and allergens. While occupational contact dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin due to exposure to irritants or allergens in the workplace. One of the jobs that have a high risk of the disease are construction workers. Although the disease is rarely-threatening but can cause high morbidity and suffering for workers, so it can affect the economy and quality of life of patients.

  15. Standardization and workers' protection legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliesch, G.

    1979-01-01

    There are distinct laws guaranteeing the protection of workers in the social and medical field, but the protection of workers in the technical field is based on a simple, general clause relating to technical standards, i.e. to a confusing variety of regulations. The author therefore asks for DIN standards to be set up in order to achieve a consistent and uniform set of rules and regulations. He furthermore points out that it is up to the government to initiate appropriate procedures within the framework of constitutional law towards solving the essential problem, namely that of directly incorporating technical expert knowledge in legal provisions. (HSCH) [de

  16. Noise, Worker Perception, and Worker Concentration in Timber Harvesting Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efi Yuliati Yovi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timber harvesting activities are unquestionably related with high risk of work accidents and health disorders.Such activities were not only burdened the workers with heavy physical workloads due to uneasy workingenvironment, and massive work materials and tools, but also physiopsychologically burdened workers as theywere imposed with both mechanical and acoustic vibrations (noise produced by the chainsaw. However,  it is acommon practice that most of the workers still ignored the importance of the use of noise reduction devices suchas earmuff or ear plug.  This study was aimed to reveal the factual effects of noise on work concentration of theworkers to provide a scientific basis in supporting efforts in improving workers’ attitude.  The results confirmedthat chainsaw might produce noise during operation.  Noise intensities received by both right and left ears werenot significantly different, indicating that left-handed and normal workers received similar degree of noise inboth side of ears. Further, results also showed that there was a significant difference on the perception and workconcentration of chainsaw operators versus sedentary people to the noise.  These findings proved that hearingability of chainsaw operators had declined due to frequent noise exposure.Keywords: timber harvesting, physio-psychological disorder, noise, chainsaw

  17. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether...... the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. METHODS: We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector...

  18. A survey on human behavior towards energy efficiency for office worker in malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, N. H.; Husain, M. N.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Othman, M. A.; Malek, F.

    2014-04-01

    Green environment has become an important topic around the world. This campaign can be realized if everybody understands and shares similar objectives on managing energy in an efficient way. This paper will present and analyse the survey on energy usage by office workers in Malaysia. The survey will focus on the workers in government sector. In social science surveys, it is important to support the tested data for a project. For issues related to human behaviour we must compare with real situations to verify the tested data and the results in energy monitoring system. The energy monitoring system will improve energy usage efficiency for the basic human activities in different situations and environments.

  19. Elevated oxidative damage in kitchen workers in Chinese restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Luo, Xiaolin; Xu, Bin; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Huilian

    2011-01-01

    To investigate associations between occupational exposure to cooking oil fumes (COFs) and potential oxidative and genotoxic effects in kitchen workers. Sixty-seven male kitchen workers and 43 male controls from Chinese restaurants in Guangzhou were recruited. For all the participants, the levels of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in urine, binucleated micronucleus (BNMN) frequency, comet tail length and tail DNA% in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum were measured. The inhalable particulates (PM(10)) in their workplaces were also monitored. Our results showed that the exposed group had a significantly higher median level of urinary 1-OHP than that of the control group (pkitchen and cooking time per day. All these positive associations remained after adjusting for the four confounders in a subsequent multivariate linear regression analysis. Occupational exposure to COFs led to increased oxidative damage in Chinese kitchen workers. The health consequences of these oxidative changes need further investgation. Urinary 1-OHP and 8-oxodG are noninvasive and effective biomarkers for assessment of oxidative damage in restaurants workers.

  20. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results. 2016 Mission report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  1. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  2. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2016 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 372 262 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.8 % compared to 2015. The average individual dose in 2016 was very close to the value in 2015. Furthermore, 14 218 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 703 workers received more than 5 mSv. 1 worker received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 61.9 to 63.2 man.Sv (2 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 61.2 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.1 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.35 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.5 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.15 mSv and 1.36 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 659 individual examinations have been performed in 2016, 54 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 46 % are direct body counting. In 2016, 5 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 19.4 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air-crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2016, the average individual dose of 19 875

  3. Workers of Acromyrmex echinatior leafcutter ants police worker-laid eggs, but not reproductive workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijkstra, Michiel B.; van Zweden, Jelle Stijn; Dirchsen, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Nonreproductive workers of many eusocial Hymenoptera 'police' the colony, that is, they attack reproductive sister workers or destroy their eggs (unfertilized; developing into haploid males). Several ultimate causes of policing have been proposed, including (1) an increase in colony productivity,...... reproductive workers. We infer that relatedness incentives are the most likely ultimate cause of the evolutionary maintenance of worker-egg policing in A. echinatior. (C) 2010 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved...

  4. Application of ALARP to extremity doses for hospital workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C J; Whitby, M

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of ALARP for hospital workers is considered in relation to extremity doses. Criteria are proposed which could provide guidance in determining strategies for both implementing radiation protection measures and dose monitoring for the extremities. Two groups of hospital workers have been studied, namely interventional radiologists/cardiologists, and radionuclide staff preparing and administering radiopharmaceuticals. The radiology procedures can give high doses to both the hands and legs. Those to the legs can be reduced by the use of lead rubber shields. Study of the distribution of dose across radiologists' hands has identified the ring position on the little finger as the appropriate position for dose monitoring. The variations in dose across the hands of radionuclide workers are greater, with the tip likely to receive the highest dose. The protection strategy will need to be determined for each department, because of the wide range in techniques used in handling radiopharmaceuticals. It is hoped that the criteria could aid balanced decision-making about the appropriate protection strategy and ensure that protection measures are in place where they are required, but avoid their introduction where they are unnecessary

  5. Doses to road transport workers from radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, B.E.; van der Vooren, A.

    1988-12-01

    Each year approximately 750,000 packages of radioactive materials are shipped throughout Canada. Regulatory controls on these shipments are designed to keep radiation doses received by transport workers well within acceptable limits. Since many of these workers are not monitored for radiation exposure, however, little factual information has been available in Canada to support theoretical estimates. A study to document actual radiation doses received by a select group of transport workers that is actively involved in the shipment of radioactive materials, was carried out in 1987 and 1988. This study involved the monitoring of 31 candidates from nine transport companies from across the country that handle medical isotopes, industrial isotopes, uranium fuel cycle materials and associated radioactive wastes. Each of the candidates (consisting of driver, dock workers, sorters, and supervisors) was issued personal thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges that were worn each day during the six month monitoring period. Some of the candidates were also issued cab or area dosimeters that were left in the cabs of the vehicles or in work areas so that the dose received in these areas could be differentiated from total personal exposure. During the monitoring program, the candidates filled out reporting sheets at the end of each working day to document information such as the quantity of materials handled, handling times and vehicle size. This information and the dosimetry data were used in the development of correlations between materials handled and doses reported so that doses for other handling similar materials could be estimated. Based on the results of the study, it was learned that while most of the transport workers receive doses that are at or near background levels, other (particularly those handling medical isotopes) are exposed to levels of radiation that may result in their receiving doses above the 5 mSv per annum limit set for members of the general public. On

  6. [Burnout in volunteer health workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentero, P; Bonfiglio, N S; Pasero, R

    2006-01-01

    While diverse studies carried out in nursing and medical personnel have demonstrated that health workers can be subject to burnout, little effort has been focused on investigating burnout in volunteer hospital workers. The aim of the present study was to verify if burnout exists with volunteer auxiliary personnel and investigate what organizational conditions may favour it. The study was carried out on 80 volunteer workers of the Red Cross of Mortara (PV), subdivided into two categories: those performing emergency interventions and those performing routine services. For the evaluation of burnout, the Italian version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, together with a qualitative type of methodology. A 5-factor multivariate analysis (sex x shift x team x seniority x role), having as dependent variables the three scales of the MBI, showed that the highest values of depersonalization and fulfillment are found in the emergency team, and that subjects with least seniority are those who are least satisfied or fulfilled. The category of team-leader resulted as that with the highest values of emotional burnout, while sex- and shift-based differences were restricted to routine service workers. Despite these differences, findings showed that subjects are minimally affected by problems linked to burnout, although some relational and organizational difficulties emerged with the medical staff that underlie a certain degree of professional dissatisfaction.

  7. Productivity in Knowledge Worker Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Romero, Ana María; Mahou Fernández, Ángel; Varanki, H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of Information and Communication Technologies in work pro- cesses has not brought the expected productivity improvement. Some studies even suggest that the always-on model decreases productivity. This article proposes work teams as a new unit for knowledge worker productivity analysis in organizations. Organizations? ability to adopt new analysis measures is analyzed in three case studies.

  8. Active Strategies for Older Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans

    This report is also to be published by ETUI (Euruopean Trade Unions' Institute) in a book on Active Strategies for Older Workers. It is the National report for Denmark and contains a short section on characteristics of the Danish labour market, with a special focus on the situation of the elderly...

  9. Medical standards for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, S.

    1977-01-01

    The Council of the European Communities in its Directive of June 1, 1976 has laid down revised basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the danger of ionising radiation. The Directive requires each Member State of the Community 'for the guidance of medical practitioners.....to draw up a list, which need not be exhaustive, of the criteria which should be taken into account when judging a worker's fitness to be exposed to ionising radiation'. Medical officers with current responsibility for radiation workers in the U.K. therefore met recently for informal exploratory discussion at the National Radiological Protection Board's headquarters, and an account is given of the views expressed there about the composition of the required 'list', and the possibility of standardizing the procedure adopted. Consideration was given to the objectives of medical examinations, the form of examination, and specific conditions which may give rise to difficulty in making a fitness assessment. These conditions are skin abnormalities, blood abnormalities, cataract, pregnancy, and psychological and psychiatric conditions. It was concluded that the medical examination of radiation workers, including blood examinations, are of value to the extent that they form part of any good general occupational health practice. The promulgation of the Euratom Directive has provided an opportunity for reviewing and standardising procedures for medical surveillance in the light of current knowledge concerning average occupational radiation doses and dose-response relationships. (U.K.)

  10. Labor Rights of Health Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Bonilla-Medina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The claim of health workers to the way they are outraged in the exercise of their profession has become reiterative. Let's start with the inadequate input of supplies to care agencies. Because of the dreadful 100 law, the poor working conditions in the different hospitals, especially public hospitals, are well known.

  11. Healthcare Workers and Workplace Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Pinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is a threatening worldwide public health problem. Healthcare workers have under particular risk of workplace violence, and they are being exposed to violence 4-16 times more than other service workers. The frequency of violence in the health sector in the world has indicated in different range of results since there is no consistent definition of workplace violence and differences in research methodology (any type of violence: 22,0% - 60,0%; physical violence: 2,6% - 57,0%; verbal violence: 24,3% - 82,0%; sexual harassment: %1,9 - 10,5%. All healthcare workers have right to work in a safe working place. The safety of healthcare workers should deserve the same priority as patient safety. Various risk factors including social, cultural, environmental, organizational and personal elements play a role in the formation of workplace violence that is very important for our country. Considering all those factors, the workplace violence in health sector should be seriously handled and the strategies and policies must be developed for prevention. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(3.000: 315-326

  12. The Migration of Technical Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Sorenson, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Using panel data on the Danish population, we estimated the revealed preferences of scientists and engineers for the places in which they choose to work. Our results indicate that these technical workers exhibit substantial sensitivity to differences in wages but that they have even stronger...

  13. Workers' Objectives in Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossard, Michel

    1990-01-01

    A case study of quality circles in an appliance factory found that circle members and nonmembers obtained better working conditions by improving quality through the direct impact of their work on the company's market position. The study of the quality improvement process shows that workers seek more than psychological rewards for their…

  14. Personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This film stresses the need for personnel monitoring in work areas where there is a hazard of exposure to radiation. It illustrates the use of personnel monitoring devices (specially the film dosimeter), the assessment of exposure to radiation and the detailed recording of the results on personnel filing cards

  15. Mobility Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schæbel, Anne-Lise; Dybbro, Karina Løvendahl; Andersen, Lisbeth Støvring

    2015-01-01

    Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby......Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby...

  16. Personnel monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-12-31

    This film stresses the need for personnel monitoring in work areas where there is a hazard of exposure to radiation. It illustrates the use of personnel monitoring devices (specially the film dosimeter), the assessment of exposure to radiation and the detailed recording of the results on personnel filing cards

  17. Interpretation of bioassay data from nuclear fuel fabrication workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, D.; Xavier, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, workers are exposed to different compounds of enriched uranium. Although in this kind of facility the main route of intake is inhalation, ingestion may occur in some situations. The interpretation of the bioassay data is very complex, since it is necessary taking into account all the different parameters, which is a big challenge. Due to the high cost of the individual monitoring programme for internal dose assessment in the routine monitoring programmes, usually only one type of measurement is assigned. In complex situations like the one described in this paper, where several parameters can compromise the accuracy of the bioassay interpretation it is need to have a combination of techniques to evaluate the internal dose. According to ICRP 78 (1997), the general order of preference in terms of accuracy of interpretation is: body activity measurement, excreta analysis and personal air sampling. Results of monitoring of working environment may provide information that assists in interpretation on particle size, chemical form and solubility, time of intake. A group of seventeen workers from controlled area of the fuel fabrication facility was selected to evaluate the internal dose using all different available techniques during a certain period. The workers were monitored for determination of uranium content in the daily urinary and faecal excretion (collected over a period of 3 consecutive days), chest counting and personal air sampling. The results have shown that at least two types of sensitivity techniques must be used, since there are some sources of uncertainties on the bioassay interpretation, like mixture of uranium compounds intake and different routes of intake. The combination of urine and faeces analysis has shown to be the more appropriate methodology for assessing internal dose in this situation. (author)

  18. Respiratory Disorders Among Workers in Slaughterhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasali Kasaeinasab

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of respiratory disorders was significantly higher among workers in slaughterhouses. Thus, the significant reduction in the percentage predicted lung function among workers in slaughterhouses might be associated with exposure to bioaerosols in their work environment.

  19. The Politics of Workers' Education in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omole, M. A. Lanre

    1998-01-01

    Provides background on the concept and history of workers' education and opposition to it. States that workers' education should be targeted also to employers, government, media, and the general public. (SK)

  20. Process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Many of the measurements and observations made in a nuclear processing facility to monitor processes and product quality can also be used to monitor the location and movements of nuclear materials. In this session information is presented on how to use process monitoring data to enhance nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). It will be seen that SNM losses can generally be detected with greater sensitivity and timeliness and point of loss localized more closely than by conventional MC and A systems if process monitoring data are applied. The purpose of this session is to enable the participants to: (1) identify process unit operations that could improve control units for monitoring SNM losses; (2) choose key measurement points and formulate a loss indicator for each control unit; and (3) describe how the sensitivities and timeliness of loss detection could be determined for each loss indicator

  1. Brucella serology in abattoir workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhtar, F.; Kokab, F.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is an occupational hazard with those particularly at risk either living in close proximity with animals or handling them. It is a public health problem in developing countries with adverse health implications both for animals and human beings as well as economic implications for individuals and communities. The Objectives were to estimate the seroprevalence of brucellosis among abattoir workers of Lahore District and to determine the association of brucellosis with nature of job of the workers. Data was collected in April 2008. It was a cross-sectional study in which four main slaughterhouses in Lahore were included. The slaughterhouse workers were divided into seven strata based on their nature of job: meat sellers, slaughterers, animal keepers, drivers, cleaners, loaders and vets/paravets. A total of 360 such workers were selected using stratified random sampling technique. Sampling frames for different strata were prepared and from each frame, proportionate numbers, were selected through simple random method using random number tables. Data was obtained using a questionnaire. Additionally blood samples were collected and analyzed for anti-Brucella Immunoglobulin G (IgG) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. The seroprevalence of anti-Brucella IgG was found to be 21.7%. A statistically significant difference was observed between the immune status of the respondents and their nature of job (p=0.005), age groups (p=0.013), and duration of job (p=0.003). The disease is an important public health problem in Pakistan. The disease can be prevented in the slaughterhouse workers through the use of personal protective devices. Public health authorities should educate the general public regarding prevention of the disease with specific emphasis on people working in slaughterhouses. (author)

  2. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  3. Offsite emergency radiological monitoring system and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yongze

    1994-01-01

    The study and advance of the offsite radiological monitoring system and technology which is an important branch in the field of nuclear monitoring technology are described. The author suggests that the predicting and measuring system should be involved in the monitoring system. The measuring system can further be divided into four sub-systems, namely plume exposure pathway, emergency worker, ingestion exposure pathway and post accident recovery measuring sub-systems. The main facilities for the monitoring system are concluded as one station, one helicopter, one laboratory and two vehicles. The instrumentation for complement of the facilities and their good performance characteristics, up-to-date technology are also introduced in brief. The offsite emergency radiation monitoring system and technology are compared in detail with those recommended by FEMA U.S.A.. Finally the paper discusses some trends in development of emergency radiation monitoring system and technology in the developed countries

  4. Monitoring programmes for internal exposure: designing criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M.; Gomez Parada, Ines.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to offer guidance for the decision whether a monitoring programme is required and how it should be designed. It can be also used as a tool for making the standing programmes consistent with the most recent publications on internal dosimetry, such as ISO 20553 'Monitoring of workers occupationally exposed to a risk of internal contamination with radioactive material', specific publications of the IAEA and ICRP, and including the conclusions of the OMINEX Project ('Optimisation of Monitoring for Internal Exposures') and IDEAS Project. It is established that the general purpose of the monitoring is verify that each worker is protected adequately against risks from radionuclide intakes and document that the protection complies with legal requirements. The criteria for a particular monitoring programme designing is based on the magnitude of the probable intake and the possibility of detecting a significant event when it occurs. So, the risk assessment for each work process must be evaluated and each worker is classified accordingly. This classification implies the acceptance of reference effective dose values (1 y 6 mSv/y ). (author) [es

  5. Radiation protection of workers in uranium mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A. H.; Jha, G.; Jha, S.; Srivastava, G. K.; Sadasivan, S.; Raj, Venkat

    2002-01-01

    Low grade of uranium ore mined from three underground mines is processed in a mill at Jaduguda in eastern India to recover uranium concentrate in the form of yellow cake. This concentrate is further processed at the Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, in southern India, to produce fuel for use in nuclear power plants. Radiation protection of workers is given due importance at all stages of these operations. Dedicated Health Physics Units and Environmental Survey Laboratories established at each site regularly carry out in-plant and environmental surveillance to keep radiation exposure of workers and the members of public within the limits prescribed by the regulatory body. The limits set by the national regulatory body are based on the international standards suggested by the ICRP and the IAEA. In the uranium mines external gamma radiation, radon and airborne activity due to radioactive dust is monitored. Similarly, in the uranium mill and the fuel fabrication plant gamma radiation and airborne radioactivity due to long-lived α -emitters are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the personal monitoring and area monitoring data. It has been observed that the total radiation dose to workers has been well below 20 mSv.y 1 at all stages of operations. Adequate ventilation is provided during mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication operations to keep the concentrations of airborne radioactivity well below the derived limits. Workers use personal protective appliances, where necessary, as a supplementary means of control. The monitoring methodologies, results and control measures are presented in the paper

  6. Radiation protection of workers in uranium mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Jha, G.; Jha, S.; Srivastava, G.K.; Sadasivan, S.; Venkat Raj, V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Low grade of uranium ore mined from three underground mines is processed in a mill at Jaduguda in eastern India to recover uranium concentrate in the form of yellow cake. This concentrate is further processed at the Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad, in southern India, to produce fuel for use in nuclear power plants. Radiation protection of workers is given due importance at all stages of these operations. Dedicated Health Physics Units and Environmental Survey Laboratories established at each site regularly carry out in-plant and environmental surveillance to keep radiation exposure of workers and the members of public within the limits prescribed by the regulatory body. The limits set by the national regulatory body are based on the international standards suggested by the ICRP and the IAEA. In the uranium mines external gamma radiation, radon and airborne activity due to radioactive dust is monitored. Similarly, in the uranium mill and the fuel fabrication plant gamma radiation and airborne radioactivity due to long-lived a- emitters are monitored. Personal dosimeters are also issued to workers. The total radiation exposure of workers from external and internal sources is evaluated from the personal monitoring and area monitoring data. It has been observed that the total radiation dose to workers has been well below 20 mSvy -1 at all stages of operations. Adequate ventilation is provided during mining, ore processing and fuel fabrication operations to keep the concentrations of airborne radioactivity well below the derived limits. Workers use personal protective appliances, where necessary, as a supplementary means of control. The monitoring methodologies, results and control measures are presented in the paper

  7. Productivity Strategies Ranking of Knowledge Workers | Najafi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is commonly recognized that knowledge is the only source of core competence in the knowledge based companies, but the productivity rate of Knowledge Workers is always Low. Based on Knowledge Workers' characteristics, in this paper, we seek to identify factors influencing the Productivity of Knowledge Workers, and ...

  8. Signaling and Screening of Workers' Motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper develops a model in which workers to a certain extent like to exert effort at the workplace. We examine the implications of workers' motivation for optimal monetary incentive schemes. We show that in the optimum motivated workers work harder and are willing to work for a lower

  9. Child Welfare Worker Caseload: What's Just Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatani, Hide; Engel, Rafael; Spjeldnes, Solveig

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a caseload standard for child welfare workers. Understanding reasonable workload expectations for child welfare workers is a cornerstone of quality service provision and the recruitment and retention of qualified workers. Because of the analytic complexity of this question, qualitative and quantitative methods…

  10. Accident Prevention: A Workers' Education Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Devoted to providing industrial workers with a greater knowledge of precautionary measures undertaken and enforced by industries for the protection of workers, this safety education manual contains 14 lessons ranging from "The Problems of Accidents during Work" to "Trade Unions and Workers and Industrial Safety." Fire protection, safety equipment…

  11. Psychological attitudes of nuclear industry workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faes, M.; Stoppie, J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was carried out within the frame of occupational medicine on the psychological attitudes of workers in the nuclear industry towards ionizing radiations. Three aspects were considered: awareness of the danger; feeling of safety in the working environment; workers' feelings following incidents or accidents; satisfaction level felt by the workers in the plant [fr

  12. School Social Workers' Intent to Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselman, Tonia D.; Brandt, Mary D.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents findings from a survey that examined school social workers' intent to stay in the field of school social work. Forty-eight school social workers from a midwestern state participated in the study. Effect size estimates were used to examine the relationship between social workers' intent to stay and years of experience,…

  13. Medical examination of the workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    The hazardous effects of ionizing radiation to man are well recognized, and they are divided into two groups, the stochastic effects (hereditary and carcinogenic effect) and non-stochastic effects (somatic effects such as depression of hematopoiesis, chronic dermatitis and cataracta). The basic framework of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is intended to prevent the occurrence of non-stochastic effects, by keeping doses below the relevant thresholds, and to ensure that all reasonable aspects are taken to reduce the incidence of stochastic effects. In Japan, the regulatory provisions of radiological protection of the workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation are based on the recommendation of ICRP adopted in 1977. According to these regulations, the dose equivalent limits of occupational exposure of man has been decided at 50 mSv/year. The monitoring of exposure to the individual and the procedure of medical examination of the workers are briefly described and discussed. (author)

  14. Occupational Hazard Exposures and Depressive Symptoms of Pregnant Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sherri S; Lee, Chien-Nan; Wu, Ying-Hsuan; Tu, Nai-Chi; Guo, Yue-Leon; Chen, Pau-Chung; Chen, Chi-Hsien

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of exposure to occupational hazards and depressive mood with associated underlying risk factors among pregnant workers. Women at 12 weeks of gestation (n = 172) were recruited during regular prenatal screening. Data were obtained via questionnaires that explored job details and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. The most commonly encountered hazard was prolonged standing. The majority of women reported that the workplace provided no information on the safety or rights of pregnant women, but those exposed to at least four hazards had more access to such services (P workplace support were significantly associated with possible antenatal depressive symptoms. Pregnant workers are exposed to substantial levels of occupational hazards and may experience depressive symptoms; thus, their work conditions require monitoring and improvement.

  15. Health problems of nursing workers in a public educational institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Luiza Bernardes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the issues occurred with nursing workers through a Health Monitoring System for Nursing Workers (SIMOSTE and to describe the consequences of those problems. Method: This is a quantitative, exploratory and descriptive study realized in a teaching hospital in the west region of the city of São Paulo. Results: From the SIMOSTE, 1.847 occurrences were registered in a six month period. Within the main occurrences, medical licenses, work related accidents with and without removals; psychiatric consultations and psychotherapy were highlighted. Conclusion: The data points out to the need for the development of new health vigilance actions to notify accidents and illness related to work, besides the prevention of issues.

  16. Exposure potential to neutrons of the Brazilian workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Marcelo M.; Almeida, Carlos E. de

    1995-01-01

    Nowadays, there are 222 neutron radioactive sources registered in use in Brazil, in addition to several neutron fields, power and research reactors and neutron generators. Secondary neutron fields can also be generated in particle accelerators by nuclear reactions with its shielding, the experimental set up and the conversion target. These neutron fields are very different, not only in their spectra but also in their fluences. Around 200 radiation workers are monthly monitored since 1983 by an albedo system. Of the evaluated dosimeters 4% only have shown neutron doses, being 13 mSv the maximum measured value. Most of these doses were received by workers of the oil-well logging and research activities users of 241 Am-Be sources. (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs

  17. The Mental Vitality @ Work study: design of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of a workers' health surveillance mental module for nurses and allied health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Gärtner, Fania R; Ketelaar, Sarah M; Smeets, Odile; Bolier, Linda; Fischer, Eva; van Dijk, Frank JH; Nieuwenhuijsen, Karen; Sluiter, Judith K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Employees in health care service are at high risk for developing mental health complaints. The effects of mental health complaints on work can have serious consequences for the quality of care provided by these workers. To help health service workers remain healthy and productive, preventive actions are necessary. A Workers' Health Surveillance (WHS) mental module may be an effective strategy to monitor and promote good (mental) health and work performance. The objective o...

  18. Work reintegration after long-term sick leave: domains of influence on co-workers' ability to be supportive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Labriola, Merete; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Larsen, Eva Ladekjær

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify domains of influence on co-workers' ability to be supportive of returning worker during the work reintegration (WR) process. An ethnographic study design was chosen involving fieldwork at four different workplaces, at an emergency care service, a waste disposal company and at two nursing homes. Qualitative methods for inquiry were used including participant observation, individual- and group interviews of 30 participants. Data were coded and analysed according to a grounded theory approach. Four themes were identified related to domains of influence on co-workers' ability to be supportive of returning worker during the WR process: (1) organisation of work and level of interaction; (2) disruption of work routines, (3) relationship with returning worker and (4) attitudes towards sick leave. The WR process after long-term sick leave is not only influenced by the WR's arrangements made, but also by the co-workers' responses to the process. Work arrangements not only affect the returning worker's ability to return-to-work (RTW) successfully, but also the co-workers' ability to be supportive and their ability to take active part in the process. Implications for Rehabilitation The process of WR after long-term sick leave involves interaction with co-workers. Domains of influence is in the co-workers' perspective influencing their ability to be supportive during reintegration of a returning worker. Future WR management could benefit from integrating the conditions for co-worker support. We encourage co-workers to be involved in the RTW planning, monitoring and evaluation with particular focus on how the WR arrangements are influencing their work and their ability to be supportive.

  19. Uncertainty analysis in the task of individual monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokanov, A.; Badjin, V.; Gasteva, G.; Antipin, E.

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of internal doses is an essential component of individual monitoring programmes for workers and consists of two stages: individual monitoring measurements and interpretation of the monitoring data in terms of annual intake and/or annual internal dose. The overall uncertainty in assessed dose is a combination of the uncertainties in these stages. An algorithm and a computer code were developed for estimating the uncertainties in these stages. An algorithm and a computer code were developed for estimating the uncertainty in the assessment of internal dose in the task of individual monitoring data interpretation. Two main influencing factors are analysed in this paper: the unknown time of the exposure and variability of bioassay measurements. The aim of this analysis is to show that the algorithm is applicable in designing an individual monitoring programme for workers so as to guarantee that the individual dose calculated from individual monitoring measurements does not exceed a required limit with a certain confidence probability. (author)

  20. A Grid job monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitrescu, Catalin [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); Nowack, Andreas [RWTH Aachen (Germany); Padhi, Sanjay [University of California San Diego (United States); Sarkar, Subir, E-mail: subir.sarkar@cern.c [INFN, Sezione di Pisa and Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy)

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components : (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  1. A grid job monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumitrescu, Catalin; Nowack, Andreas; Padhi, Sanjay; Sarkar, Subir

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components: (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  2. Pulmonary function in automobile repair workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay O

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Automobile repair shop is a place where workers are exposed to harmful chemicals and toxic substances. Objective : To study the occurrence of obstructive and restrictive pulmonary impairment among automobile garage workers. Methods : A cross sectional study involving 151 automobile garage workers from 14 randomly selected garages of urban Kolkata. The study variables were Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV 1 , Forced Vital Capacity (FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PE FR, age, smoking habit, duration of work, type of work, and respiratory symptoms. The study was analysed using Regression equations, and Chi-square test. Results : All the workers were male. Obstructive impairment was seen in 25.83% of the workers whereas restrictive impairment was seen in 21.19% of the workers. Mixed obstructive and restrictive impairment was seen in 10.6% of the workers. The frequency of obstructive impairment was higher in older workers. In the age group of less than 20 years, 13.6% of the workers had obstructive impairment while 42.86% of workers above 40 years of age had obstructive impairment. Obstructive impairment was more frequently observed in battery repair workers (58.33% and spray painters (37.5% while 16.67% of the body repair workers and 30.19% of the engine mechanics had obstructive impairment. Obstructive impairment was more frequently observed in smokers (53.1 % as compared to ex-smokers (33.3% and non-smokers (6.4%. Obstructive impairment was more frequently observed in workers who had been working for a longer duration. Conclusion: Nearly 36.4% of the automobile garage workers had some form of pulmonary function impairment; obstructive and/or restrictive. The use of personal protective equipment, worker education, and discontinuation of the use of paints containing toxic pigments are recommended.

  3. Fluctuations of nickel concentrations in urine of electroplating workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernacki, E.J.; Zygowicz, E.; Sunderman, F.W. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel analyses were performed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry upon urine specimens obtained from electroplating workers at the beginning, middle and end of the work-shift. The means (+- S.D.) for nickel concentrations in urine specimens from seven electroplating workers on three regular workdays were: 34 +- 32 μg/L (pre-shift); 64 +- μg/L (mid-shift) and 46 +- μg/L (end-shift), compared to 2.7 +- 1.6 μg/L (pre-shift) in 19 controls (hospital workers). Nickel concentrations in urine specimens from six electroplating workers on the first workday after a two-week vacation averaged: 5 +- 3 μg/L (pre-shift); 9 +- 6 μg/L (mid-shift), and 12 +- 6 μg/L (end-shift). Nickel concentrations in personal air samples (seven hours) collected from the breathing zones of five electroplating workers on three regular workdays averaged 9.3 +- 4.4 μg/m 3 . Nickel concentrations in the air samples were correlated with nickel concentrations in end-shift urine specimens (corr. coef. = 0.70; P < 0.05), but were not correlated with nickel concentrations in pre-shift or mid-shift urine specimens. In view of the fluctuations of urine nickel concentrations that occur during the work-shift, the authors recommend that nickel analyses of eight hour urine specimens be used routinely to monitor occupational exposures to nickel. In situations where timed urine collections are impractical, analyses of end-shift urine specimens are the best alternative

  4. Epidemiology of Late Health Effects in Ukrainian Chornobyl Cleanup Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, Dimitry; Prysyazhnyuk, Anatoly; Gudzenko, Natalya; Dyagil, Iryna; Belyi, David; Chumak, Vadim; Buzunov, Volodymyr

    2018-07-01

    This article summarizes the results of 30 y of follow-up of cancer and noncancer effects in Ukrainian cleanup workers after the Chornobyl accident. The number of power plant employees and first responders with acute radiation syndrome under follow-up by the National Research Center for Radiation Medicine decreased from 179 in 1986-1991 to 105 in 2011-2015. Cancers and leukemia (19) and cardiovascular diseases (21) were the main causes of deaths among acute radiation syndrome survivors (54) during the postaccident period. Increased radiation risks of leukemia in the Ukrainian cohort of 110,645 cleanup workers exposed to low doses are comparable to those among survivors of the atomic bomb explosions in Japan in 1945. Additionally, an excess of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was demonstrated in the cleanup workers cohort for 26 y after the exposure. A significant excess of multiple myeloma incidence [standardized incidence rate (SIR) 1.61 %, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-2.21], thyroid cancer (SIR 4.18, 95% CI 3.76-4.59), female breast cancer (SIR 1.57 CI 1.40-1.73), and all cancers combined (SIR 1.07; 95% CI 1.05-1.09) was registered. High prevalence was demonstrated for cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases and mental health changes. However, the reasons for the increases require further investigation. To monitor other possible late effects of radiation exposure in Chornobyl cleanup workers, analytical cohort and case-control studies need to include cardiovascular pathology, specifically types of potentially radiogenic cancers using a molecular epidemiology approach. Possible effects for further study include increased rates of thyroid, breast, and lung cancers and multiple myeloma; reduction of radiation risks of leukemia to population levels; and increased morbidity and mortality of cleanup workers from cardio- and cerebrovascular pathology.

  5. THE KNOWLEDGE OF HEALTH CARE WORKERS AND DOCTORS REGARDING HAND SCRUB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sanjeev Chaudhary

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hand hygiene practices of health care workers has been shown to be an effective measure in preventing hospital acquired infections. This concept has been aptly used to improve understanding, training, monitoring, and reporting hand hygiene among healthcare workers. We conducted this study to assess the knowledge of doctors and health care workers regarding hand scrub. METHODS A study was conducted among doctors and health care workers in a tertiary care hospital. Knowledge was evaluated by using self-structured questionnaire based on the guidelines of hand hygiene prescribed by WHO. RESULTS The awareness and knowledge of preoperative surgical hand scrubbing was moderate in doctors, but unfortunately poor in HCWs. CONCLUSION Our study highlights the need for introducing measures in order to increase the knowledge of preoperative hand scrub in teaching hospital which may translate into good practices.

  6. Experiences and Management of Pregnant Radiation Workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, Mary; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Bryant, Janet L.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation workers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are divided into two classes based on whether or not they can encounter radioactive contamination in the normal course of their work. Level I workers primarily handle sealed radioactive materials such as those used to calibrate detectors. Level II workers perform benchtop chemistry. The U.S. Department of Energy has strict guidelines on the management of pregnant radiation workers. Staff members may voluntarily notify their line managers of a pregnancy and be subjected to stringent radiation exposure limits for the developing fetus. The staff member and manager develop a plan to limit and monitor radiation dose for the remainder of the pregnancy. Several examples of dose management plans and case examples of the impact of pregnancy on staff member's technical work and projects will be presented

  7. Genotoxic damage in mine workers exposed to diesel exhaust, and the effects of glutathione transferase genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Gaskell, M; Martin, E A

    2005-01-01

    in the environmental monitoring part of the study, showing a 7.5-fold higher exposure to particle-associated 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) in 50 underground workers compared with 42 surface workers [P.T.J. Scheepers, D. Coggon, L.E. Knudsen, R. Anzion, H. Autrup, S. Bogovski, R.P. Bos, D. Dahmann, P. Farmer, E.A. Martin, V...... higher levels (p=0.003) in underground workers (smokers) driving diesel-powered excavation machines (median 155 on a scale from 0 to 400, among 47 persons), compared with surface workers who smoked (median of 90, among 46 persons). The level of DNA damage in underground smokers was significantly higher...... (p=0.04) than in non-smokers. Samples from 2 of the 3 sampling weeks had significantly lower DNA damage compared with the third week, probably due to timely processing and freezing. These samples also showed significant differences (pworkers (median 145, among 41 persons...

  8. Mayak Film Dosimeter Response Studies Part III: Application to Worker Dose Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanin, Mikhail; Vasilenko, E. K.; Scherpelz, Robert I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to convert individual dosimeter readings for workers to obtain estimates of worker doses received in Mayak facilities. Film dosimeters were used at Mayak PA for worker monitoring from 1948 until 1992. The method requires a determination of the relationship between the absorbed dose in film emulsion and the dose in air under calibration conditions, then an extension of this relationship to exposures in the actual radiation fields of the workplace. Corrections needed to account for actual workplace exposure conditions were determined by modeling with the Monte-Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP. Correction factors were developed to convert from dosimeter reading to a realistic worker dose. The method was applied as a basis for individual dose reconstruction using film dosimeters in realistic photon spectra and geometries at Mayak PA work areas

  9. Monitoring Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2015-01-01

    This book is useful for Hadoop administrators who need to learn how to monitor and diagnose their clusters. Also, the book will prove useful for new users of the technology, as the language used is simple and easy to grasp.

  10. A knowledge and awareness level survey of radiation protection among the radiation workers in Henan Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiao-jun; Tian, Chong-bin; Zhang, Qin-fu; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Li

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To reveal the knowledge and awareness level of radiation protection among radiation workers in Henan province and to explore the methods to improve it. Methods: A questionnaire survey was carried out among 208 radiation workers. Results: The correct rate of the answer to radiation protection knowledge from radiation workers in Henan province is 53.78%. Most of them (88.9%) realized that it is important to protect patients and their companions. They adhere to the principles of justification of medial exposure and optimization of radiation protection and follow the management system of radiation protection. However, a few workers didn't follow the principles strictly. Sometime, during the radio diagnosis and radiotherapy services, the patients and their companions were not well protected from the radiation, and some patients were given unnecessary X-ray examine. Even worse, some workers did not attach importance to the regulations of radiation protection and disobey them frequently. Again, some hospital leaders disregard the regulation of radiation protection and didn't follow the regulation of health surveillance and radiation protection monitoring properly. And those behaviors and attitude, in fact, influence some workers' attitude to radiation protection. Conclusion: The level of radiation protection knowledge and awareness among the radiation workers in Henan province needs to be improved. It is necessary to strengthen radiation protection knowledge by strengthening training, and to improve safety awareness among the radiation staff, and, more important, the hospital leaders as well. (author)

  11. Exposure to trinitrotoluene and health effects among workers in an artillery and ammunition plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Preklang, Smart; Yoosook, Witaya; Chantanakul, Suttinun

    2012-06-01

    To determine urinary trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2-amino-4, 6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT) and 4-amino-2, 6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT) and health effects upon workers in an ammunition plant. The urine samples from forty munition workers and forty office workers were monitored for TNT and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The workers were interviewed with a questionnaire. The median levels of TNT and its metabolites were 112.84 and ranged from non-detectable (ND) to 1,833.81 mg/L. Median levels for 2ADNT were 11.66, ranging from ND to 360.89 mg/L. Median levels for 4ADNT were 19.95 and ranged from ND to 314.28 mg/L. There were significant correlations between TNT and 2ADNT in urine (r = 0. 700, p-value workers reported eye, nose and throat irritations, weakness and headaches with considerably higher frequency than non-exposed workers. TNT levels in urine were strongly associated with 4ADNT and 2ADNT levels. Workers exposed to TNT complained of nose, throat and eye irritation, along with overall weakness and headaches.

  12. Distribution of {sup 226}Ra body burden of workers in an underground uranium mine in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Kumar, R.; Srivastava, V.S.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Health Physics Unit, Jaduguda, Jharkhand (India)

    2014-11-15

    Uranium mine workers are exposed to ore dust containing uranium and its daughter products during different mining operations. These radionuclides may pose inhalation hazards to workers during the course of their occupation. The most significant among these radionuclides is {sup 226}Ra. The measurement of radium body burden of uranium mine workers is important to assess their internal exposure. For this purpose, the radon-in-breath measurement technique has been used in the present paper. Workers at the Jaduguda mine, India, associated with different categories of mining operations were monitored between 2001 and 2007. The measurement results indicate that workers - depending on mining operation category - show {sup 226}Ra body burdens ranging from 0.15 to 2.85 kBq. The maximum body burden was found for workers associated with timbering operations, with an average {sup 226}Ra body burden of 0.85 ± 0.54 kBq. Overall, the average value observed for 800 workers was 0.76 ± 0.51 kBq, which gives rise to an average effective dose of 1.67 mSv per year for inhalation and 0.21 mSv per year for ingestion. (orig.)

  13. Distribution of 226Ra body burden of workers in an underground uranium mine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, R L; Jha, V N; Kumar, R; Srivastava, V S; Ravi, P M; Tripathi, R M

    2014-11-01

    Uranium mine workers are exposed to ore dust containing uranium and its daughter products during different mining operations. These radionuclides may pose inhalation hazards to workers during the course of their occupation. The most significant among these radionuclides is (226)Ra. The measurement of radium body burden of uranium mine workers is important to assess their internal exposure. For this purpose, the radon-in-breath measurement technique has been used in the present paper. Workers at the Jaduguda mine, India, associated with different categories of mining operations were monitored between 2001 and 2007. The measurement results indicate that workers--depending on mining operation category--show (226)Ra body burdens ranging from 0.15 to 2.85 kBq. The maximum body burden was found for workers associated with timbering operations, with an average (226)Ra body burden of 0.85 ± 0.54 kBq. Overall, the average value observed for 800 workers was 0.76 ± 0.51 kBq, which gives rise to an average effective dose of 1.67 mSv per year for inhalation and 0.21 mSv per year for ingestion.

  14. Ergonomic analysis of construction worker's body postures using wearable mobile sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nipun D; Akhavian, Reza; Behzadan, Amir H

    2017-07-01

    Construction jobs are more labor-intensive compared to other industries. As such, construction workers are often required to exceed their natural physical capability to cope with the increasing complexity and challenges in this industry. Over long periods of time, this sustained physical labor causes bodily injuries to the workers which in turn, conveys huge losses to the industry in terms of money, time, and productivity. Various safety and health organizations have established rules and regulations that limit the amount and intensity of workers' physical movements to mitigate work-related bodily injuries. A precursor to enforcing and implementing such regulations and improving the ergonomics conditions on the jobsite is to identify physical risks associated with a particular task. Manually assessing a field activity to identify the ergonomic risks is not trivial and often requires extra effort which may render it to be challenging if not impossible. In this paper, a low-cost ubiquitous approach is presented and validated which deploys built-in smartphone sensors to unobtrusively monitor workers' bodily postures and autonomously identify potential work-related ergonomic risks. Results indicates that measurements of trunk and shoulder flexions of a worker by smartphone sensory data are very close to corresponding measurements by observation. The proposed method is applicable for workers in various occupations who are exposed to WMSDs due to awkward postures. Examples include, but are not limited to industry laborers, carpenters, welders, farmers, health assistants, teachers, and office workers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Drifting behaviour as an alternative reproductive strategy for social insect workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacher, Pierre; Yagound, Boris; Lecoutey, Emmanuel; Devienne, Paul; Chameron, Stéphane; Châline, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Restricted reproduction is traditionally posited as the defining feature of eusocial insect workers. The discovery of worker reproduction in foreign colonies challenges this view and suggests that workers’ potential to pursue selfish interests may be higher than previously believed. However, whether such reproductive behaviour truly relies on a reproductive decision is still unknown. Workers’ reproductive decisions thus need to be investigated to assess the extent of workers’ reproductive options. Here, we show in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris that drifting is a distinct strategy by which fertile workers circumvent competition in their nest and reproduce in foreign colonies. By monitoring workers’ movements between colonies, we show that drifting is a remarkably dynamic behaviour, widely expressed by both fertile and infertile workers. We demonstrate that a high fertility is, however, central in determining the propensity of workers to enter foreign colonies as well as their subsequent reproduction in host colonies. Moreover, our study shows that the drifting of fertile workers reflects complex decision-making processes associated with in-nest reproductive competition. This novel finding therefore adds to our modern conception of cooperation by showing the previously overlooked importance of alternative strategies which enable workers to assert their reproductive interests. PMID:24068358

  16. Industrial radiography in the State of Bahia, Brazil: The health protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Ana Emilia Oliveira de

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the Regulatory and Inspection Authority for actions developed by industrial radiography enterprises in the State of Bahia, Brazil, concerning health protection of workers exposed to ionizing radiation in industry. Institutions which legislate about this matter at international, national and State level were identified. These legislations were analysed according to recommendations by the Basic Safety Standards from the Atomic Energy International Agency. Medical Supervision is proposed as a factor to warrant protection to worker's health. This is a service evaluation study, encompassing results, processes and structural components. Emphasis is given to the process component which investigated the adequacy of which is performed by employees and workers. Five enterprises which provide industrial radiography services in the State of Bahia were identified, employing forty workers on a temporary basis. This study also observed: intense workforce, a complete process of contracting out in the sector; inadequate conditions of work organization (long work journey, night work, lack of days-off schedule); inefficiency of medical services responsible by worker's protection concerning radiation specific risks as well as other occupational risks, unrelated to main activity. There is a legal basis for Authorities actions, although it has not been completely implemented. These findings embased the elaboration of a proposal of a Surveillance Program for the Worker Exposed to Industrial Radiation, which includes the setting of safety standards and monitoring of workers exposed to ionization radiation in the occupational environment, accident prevention in this activity and the specialized health care to those affected by radio accidents. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the demanded physical effort and posture of workers in forest nursery activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo da Silva Lopes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the physical effort demanded and the posture of the workers in forest nursery activities and to propose an ergonomic reorganization to improve the security and health levels of workers. The study was carried out with workers of a forestry company located in Parana State, Brazil. The physical effort demanded was evaluation with in a survery of the workers cardiac frequency in different stages of the work using a Polar monitor from Finlandia and work classified in categories as proposed by Apud (1997. To evaluation posture the workers were filmed during the performance of his activities and the data submitted to the software WinOwas of analysis of postures. The results indicated that the work stages considered of higher physical exigency were the substrate preparation and transport of seedlings in polythene bags to vegetation home with cardiac frequency of 120 and 115 bpm and cardiovascular load of 42% and 37%, respectively, with the activities classified as average heavy. The critical posture to workers was at removal substrate in concrete-mixer, due an overload of lumbar column. The seedling production activity showed the necessity of the correction at posture of the workers because in 97% of the total time they stand with the lumbar column curved. It is possible to conclude that the forestry company should take preventive measures to avoid backaches, using educational strategies or changing the operational system.

  18. Share capitalism and worker wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Alex; Clark, Andrew E; Freeman, Richard B; Green, Colin P

    2016-10-01

    We show that worker wellbeing is determined not only by the amount of compensation workers receive but also by how compensation is determined. While previous theoretical and empirical work has often been preoccupied with individual performance-related pay, we find that the receipt of a range of group-performance schemes (profit shares, group bonuses and share ownership) is associated with higher job satisfaction. This holds conditional on wage levels, so that pay methods are associated with greater job satisfaction in addition to that coming from higher wages. We use a variety of methods to control for unobserved individual and job-specific characteristics. We suggest that half of the share-capitalism effect is accounted for by employees reciprocating for the "gift"; we also show that share capitalism helps dampen the negative wellbeing effects of what we typically think of as "bad" aspects of job quality.

  19. Accommodation training in foreign workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masumi; Miyao, Masaru; Matsuura, Yasuyuki; Takada, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    By relaxing the contracted focus-adjustment muscles around the eyeball, known as the ciliary and extraocular muscles, the degree of pseudomyopia can be reduced. This understanding has led to accommodation training in which a visual target is presented in stereoscopic video clips. However, it has been pointed out that motion sickness can be induced by viewing stereoscopic video clips. In Measurement 1 of the present study, we verified whether the new 3D technology reduced the severity of motion sickness in accordance with stabilometry. We then evaluated the short-term effects of accommodation training using new stereoscopic video clips on foreign workers (11 females) suffering from eye fatigue in Measurement 2. The foreign workers were trained for three days. As a result, visual acuity was statistically improved by continuous accommodation training, which will help promote ciliary muscle stretching.

  20. Do working environment interventions reach shift workers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Garde, Anne Helene; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Shift workers are exposed to more physical and psychosocial stressors in the working environment as compared to day workers. Despite the need for targeted prevention, it is likely that workplace interventions less frequently reach shift workers. The aim was therefore to investigate whether the reach of workplace interventions varied between shift workers and day workers and whether such differences could be explained by the quality of leadership exhibited at different times of the day. We used questionnaire data from 5361 female care workers in the Danish eldercare sector. The questions concerned usual working hours, quality of leadership, and self-reported implementation of workplace activities aimed at stress reduction, reorganization of the working hours, and participation in improvements of working procedures or qualifications. Compared with day workers, shift workers were less likely to be reached by workplace interventions. For example, night workers less frequently reported that they had got more flexibility (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3-0.7) or that they had participated in improvements of the working procedures (OR 0.6; 95 % CI 0.5-0.8). Quality of leadership to some extent explained the lack of reach of interventions especially among fixed evening workers. In the light of the evidence of shift workers' stressful working conditions, we suggest that future studies focus on the generalizability of results of the present study and on how to reach this group and meet their needs when designing and implementing workplace interventions.

  1. Training for hazardous waste workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favel, K.

    1990-10-26

    This implementation plan describes the system and provides the information and schedules that are necessary to comply with the Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Memorandum, Reference EPD dated September 11, 1990, Training for Hazardous Waste Workers. The memo establishes the need for identifying employees requiring environmental training, ensuring that the training is received, and meeting documentation and recordkeeping requirements for the training.

  2. Medical supervision of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    The first part of this volume describes the effects of radiation on living organism, both at the overall and at the molecular level. Special attention is paid to the metabolism and toxicity of radioactivity substances. The second part deals with radiological exposure, natural, medical and occupational. The third part provides data on radiological protection standards, and the fourth part addresses the health supervision of workers exposed to ionizing radiation, covering both physical and medical control.

  3. World Council of Nuclear Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisseu, Andre

    2007-01-01

    WONUC is an association of Trade Unions, Scientific Societies and Social Organizations of the employees, workers and professionals of the nuclear energy related industries and technologies; integrated by 35 Countries and 1.8 millions members. This paper expose the products and services that WONUC provide for the promotion of peaceful uses of nuclear energy and the result of their work around all the world

  4. The comparison of health status between male and female medical radiation workers in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Guochao; Tian, Youjia; Zhang, Fengmei; Feng, Zhihui; Chen, Qianshu; Qu, Jianying; Lim, David

    2017-01-01

    To assess the health statue of chronically exposed Chinese medical radiation workers. A cross-sectional study of 530 medical radiation workers in a city of China was conducted to document the health status and the monitored annually absorbed doses. Long-term and low-dose radiation exposure can affect a number of health indicators in the individuals, which covered the cardiovascular system, hematologic system, ophthalmology, liver and kidney s functions, chromosome aberration and micronucleus. The differences in the health status between male and female individuals were associated with job types and exposed years of service. The monitored doses of individuals were lower than the limit value of the national standard. The health status in chronically exposed individuals demonstrated some gender difference associated with length of exposure and work type. This study provides some evidence to understand the health status of medical radiation workers in China and have the potentially to inform screening and clinical diagnosis. (authors)

  5. Social-demographic profile and dose evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical facility workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanches, Matias P.; Carneiro, Janete C. Gaburo; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The main aims of this work are to identify the social-demographic profile of the workers based on stratification variables such as gender, age, and tasks performed by the workers, and to evaluate the annual collective doses of workers with potential risk of ionizing radiation exposure at the workplace during the years 2004 to 2008. In this context, the knowledge of the workforce composition in the facility responsible for the radioisotope production and its distribution was used. The individual monitoring programme has been carried out by individual dosimeters, TLDs, and internal contamination monitoring (in vivo method). The reported doses, in the period studied, suggest that the external exposure was the main source of occupational exposure in radioisotope production and distribution areas. The internal exposure was not included in the doses estimated, because it was negligible. This study has an important exploratory character, in order to analyze possible correlations related to adverse health effects, aiming to provide directions for occupational epidemiology research. (author)

  6. Social-demographic profile and dose evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical facility workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanches, Matias P.; Carneiro, Janete C. Gaburo; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: msanches@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The main aims of this work are to identify the social-demographic profile of the workers based on stratification variables such as gender, age, and tasks performed by the workers, and to evaluate the annual collective doses of workers with potential risk of ionizing radiation exposure at the workplace during the years 2004 to 2008. In this context, the knowledge of the workforce composition in the facility responsible for the radioisotope production and its distribution was used. The individual monitoring programme has been carried out by individual dosimeters, TLDs, and internal contamination monitoring (in vivo method). The reported doses, in the period studied, suggest that the external exposure was the main source of occupational exposure in radioisotope production and distribution areas. The internal exposure was not included in the doses estimated, because it was negligible. This study has an important exploratory character, in order to analyze possible correlations related to adverse health effects, aiming to provide directions for occupational epidemiology research. (author)

  7. Duties of the radiologist for the radiation protection of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehel, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    After a risk analysis has been completed by the radiation safety officer, all entities where a source of ionizing radiation is present must established a monitored or controlled zone containing the source. When exposure exceeds the maximum regulatory dose, a dedicated color-coded controlled (yellow or orange) or restricted zone must be established. All assessments performed by the RSO should reflect normal working conditions. From these results, workers can be divided into two categories, A or B, based on their level of exposure. The workers should undergo medical and dosimetric follow-up with the use of passive dosimetry. The use of operational dosimetry should be added when working in a controlled zone. A radiation dosimetry report for each worker should be available to the occupational medicine provider to ensure appropriate dosimetric monitoring. (author)

  8. Foreign workers in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Lim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global age many people cross national borders in search of better work and more wages. According to IOM, more than 100 000 000 workers leave their homeland and migrate to another country for this reason. Europe and North America have already experienced increase in foreign labor for many decades but nowadays, it is very common to see foreign laborers in Asian countries. As the number of foreign laborers rapidly increased, however, so did many social problems in relation to these workers. No country is safe from or immune to such social problems in regards to the foreign workers especially with a much easier and more efficient transportation system. In case of South Korea, the history of foreign labor may not be as long as other nations but as of 2007, it boasts of more than 250 000 foreign laborers and is thus facing just as many social problems as well. In order to investigate such social issues, this article explores the history of foreign laborers and their current situation in South Korea. Furthermore, this artticle examines both internal and external factors which may have caused exponential growth of foreign labor market in South Korea in the past decade.

  9. Workers moving the industry forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Power Workers' Union represents workers at Ontario Hydro's nuclear stations and AECL operators at Chalk River. Although labour relations are far from perfect, the union does its best to protect the industry. Avoiding confrontation as much as possible, this union is happy to be regarded as a partner in the business. The union is impressed by the consultants' report on Ontario Hydro's nuclear operations. Whatever the future may bring, the present is not really pleasant for nuclear workers generally, in that the work itself is very demanding technically, and must be performed with great diligence because the responsibility for safety is enormous. Considering the actual safety record, some caricatures or ''cheap shots'' from antinuclear politicians and special interest groups seem quite offensive. As a partner in public relations, the union has produced draft fact sheets on topics such as: transporting radioactive material; the burning of plutonium from dismantled weaponry; deep geological storage of nuclear waste; the sale of Candu reactors to China. The author closes with some advice on how to improve industrial relations, based on the union's experience

  10. Quo vadis, personnel monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1975-01-01

    With the increasing use of nuclear power and radiation sources, the selection of optimum systems for personnel monitoring is becoming a matter of worldwide concern. The present status of personnel dosimetry, sometimes characterized by unstable and inaccurate detectors and oversimplified interpretation of the results, leaves much to be desired. In particular, photographic film, although having certain advantages with regard to economics and information content, undergoes rapid changes in warm and humid climates. Careful sealing reduces, but does not prevent, these problems. The replacement of film by solid-state dosimeters, primarily thermoluminescence dosimeters, is in progress or being considered by an increasing number of institutions and requires a number of decisions concerning the choice of the optimum detector(s), badge design, and evaluation system; organizational matters, such as the desirability of automation and computerized bookkeeping; etc. The change also implies the potential use of such advanced concepts as different detectors and monitoring periods for the large number of low-risk persons and the small number of high-risk radiation workers. (auth)

  11. The safety of the reprocessing plant of Cogema La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledermann, P.

    1997-01-01

    The risks associated to the operation of a reprocessing plant come from the important quantities of radioactive matter. To insure the reprocessing safety consists in keeping, in any circumstance, the containment of radioactive matter. That this objective that leads the safety at any step of the factory life. Three risks families are listed: the risks from nuclear origin, associated to the specific physico-chemical behaviours of radioactive matter (dispersion and criticality, thermal risks and risks bound to the hydrogen production); the second family is the group of internal risks resulting from the industrial activity (chemical risks, fire risks, dysfunctions of electric installations or falls of loads); the last family is the group of external risks resulting from the impact of events reaching the site where are established the installations (risks associated to climatic conditions, risks associated to surrounding activities such explosions, fires, impact resulting from the fall of a tourism plane or road transport of hazardous matter). (N.C.)

  12. Whole-body measurements of workers occupationally exposed to radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Joaquim Carlos S.; Xavier, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    The intake of radioactive material by workers can occur in the radiopharmaceuticals production, during the handling of these in the medical fields (nuclear medicine) and in biological and research laboratories. The workers who work in areas where exposures are significant are routinely monitored to demonstrate that the workers are receiving adequate protection from internal contamination. Direct measurements of whole-body and thyroid contents provide an estimate of the activity of these radionuclides in the potentially exposed workers. The whole-body measurements of the workers, trainees and visitors are routinely performed by the In Vivo Monitoring Laboratory (LMIV) of the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP). The frequency of measurements is defined by the Radioprotection Service (SRP) and the Dose Calculation Group of IPEN. For this purpose LMIV has two counters, whole body. NaITl (8 x 4”), and thyroid one, NaITl (3 x 3”). The system was calibrated in energy and efficiency, with calibration sources of Eu-152, Am-241 and Co-60 with gamma emissions between 59.54 and 1408.08 keV, positioned within Alderson Research Labs. anthropomorphic phantom. The background measures were obtained of worker's spectrum that was not exposed occupationally yet. The concepts adopted in the HPS N13.30 Standard and proposed in ISO documents for standardization were used for activity measurements. During the period January 2010 to December 2014, approximately 4500 measurements had been carried in workers who develop tasks related to the production and research. The activities of the radionuclides and the workers' tasks relationship had been evaluated. (author)

  13. Whole-body measurements of workers occupationally exposed to radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Joaquim Carlos S.; Xavier, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The intake of radioactive material by workers can occur in the radiopharmaceuticals production, during the handling of these in the medical fields (nuclear medicine) and in biological and research laboratories. The workers who work in areas where exposures are significant are routinely monitored to demonstrate that the workers are receiving adequate protection from internal contamination. Direct measurements of whole-body and thyroid contents provide an estimate of the activity of these radionuclides in the potentially exposed workers. The whole-body measurements of the workers, trainees and visitors are routinely performed by the In Vivo Monitoring Laboratory (LMIV) of the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP). The frequency of measurements is defined by the Radioprotection Service (SRP) and the Dose Calculation Group of IPEN. For this purpose LMIV has two counters, whole body. NaIT1 (8x4″), and thyroid one, NaIT1 (3x3″). The system was calibrated in energy and efficiency, with calibration sources of Eu-152, Am-241 and Co-60 with gamma emissions between 59.54 and 1408.08 keV, positioned within Alderson Research Labs. anthropomorphic phantom. The background measures were obtained of worker's spectrum that wasn't exposed occupationally yet. The concepts adopted in the HPS N13.30 Standard and proposed in ISO documents for standardization were used for activity measurements. During the period January 2007 to December 2012, approximately 6700 measurements had been carried in workers who develop tasks related to the production and research. The activities of the radionuclides and the workers' tasks relationship had been evaluated. (author)

  14. Personal dosimetric monitoring in Ukraine: current status and further development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumak, V. V.; Musijachenkom, A. V.; Boguslavskaya, A. I.

    2003-01-01

    Presently Ukraine has mixed system for dosimetric monitoring. Nuclear power plants and some major nuclear facilities have their own dosimetry services, which are responsible for regular dosimetric monitoring of workers. Rest of occupationally exposed persons is monitored by dosimetry laboratories affiliated to the territorial authorities for sanitary and epidemiology supervision. In 2002-2003 Ukrainian Ministry of Health performed survey of the status of dosimetric monitoring and inventory of critical groups requiring such monitoring. Dosimetry services in Ukraine cover about 38,000 occupationally exposed workers, including 9,100 medical professionals, 16,400 employees of 5 nuclear power plants and ca.12,400 workers dealing with other sources of occupational exposure (industry, research). Territorial dosimetry services operate in 13 of 24 regions of Ukraine, using DTU-01 manual TLD readers produced with one exception in 1988-1990. The coverage of critical groups by dosimetric monitoring is variable and ranges from 38% to 100% depending on the region. Personnel of nuclear power plants (about 16,400 workers) is monitored by their own dosimetry services achieving absolute coverage of the main staff and temporary workers. Current inadequate status of dosimetric monitoring infrastructure in Ukraine demands an urgent elaboration of the united state system for monitoring and recording of individual doses. The proposed plan would allows to bring dosimetry infrastructure in Ukraine to the modern state which would be compatible with existing and future European and international radiation protection networks. Unitary structure of Ukraine, strong administrative command and good communications between regions of the country are positive factors in favour of efficient implementation of the proposed plan. Deficiencies are associated with limited funding of this effort. (authors)

  15. The control and monitoring of exposures at AWRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.W.; Taylor, N.A.; Woodville, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    If attempts are to be made to learn about the health effects of low doses of radiation by epidemiological study of ''radiation workers'' it is desirable to understand something of such a population, the conditions under which occupational exposures occur, the statistical distribution of doses and the quality of the recorded dosimetric data. These points are illustrated by reference to the monitored workers at a large nuclear establishment with particular examples from plutonium work. (author)

  16. Adequacy of individual monitoring of external exposure at the workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, A.

    2006-01-01

    Individual monitoring of workers exposed to external radiations must fulfill technical, regulatory and organizational requirements. The external dosimetry should be adapted to the workplace. The relevant dosimetric techniques have to be chosen upon the workplace study that conditions both the categorization of exposed workers and classification of areas. Solutions exist which are satisfactory for the most situations. However, rational solutions still have to be found for a few specific situations. (author)

  17. Impact of Granite Quarrying on the Health of Workers and Nearby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of Granite Quarrying on the Health of Workers and Nearby Residents in Abeokuta Ogun State, Nigeria. ... Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) meter was employed to monitor the level of particulate matter (PM10) within and around five quarry sites selected for this study. The data collected from hospital records of ...

  18. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign...

  19. Radiation exposure of non-monitored hospital personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, L.; Blanchette, J.; Galand, C.

    1993-02-01

    This project investigated the radiological impact of nuclear medicine patients on non-monitored personnel in hospital environments. More than 800 workers and 135 specific areas in three Quebec hospitals were surveyed daily during a six-month period with Geiger counters, TLD badges, and TLD chips. Average dose rates of up to 2.2 μSv/h were measured in some waiting areas. The radiation level of a nursing unit is a direct function of the ambulatory radioactivity carried by nuclear medicine patients. Three percent of the workers surveyed had a work-related dose in excess of 0.3 mSv/6 months (maximum 1.4 mSv/6 months). Over 88 percent were in the range between local background and 0.3 mSv/6 months. Less than 4 percent belong to groups of workers who were exposed to a level indistinguishable from background. Thus many workers surveyed in this study receive a work-related dose similar to those of medical workers monitored by Health and Welfare Canada. The average annual dose for these workers was 104 person-millisieverts. The authors recommend: better management of radioactive patients; the provision of information and education for all hospital workers having regular contact with radioactive patients; and the facilitation of the identification of nuclear medicine patients within the hospital environment. (28 tabs., 23 figs.)

  20. [Work integration of impaired workers in a type-B social cooperative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taino, G; Gazzoldi, T; Marandola, P; Fabris, F; Ferrari, M; Imbriani, M

    2008-01-01

    form relationships, mainly within the work environment amongst colleagues and supervisors, but also in a social and family environment. A special mention is deserved in the case of the only worker hired in our research who left the cooperative after many years of work activity where, after having attended specific professional courses, steadily and successfully joined a company still in the social field but not exclusively dedicated to impaired workers. It may be observed that when one faces the work integration of impaired workers, the usual risk evaluation processes cannot be enough for the reason that these workers, due to their 'disability', find themselves in hypersusceptible conditions in respect to occupational risk factors which are generally acceptable for the other workers. In risk assessment it is therefore necessary to perform an accurate and all-round study in every aspect of the job duty, even around those considered irrelevant which, as a result, may show to be unsuitable to the worker's health status or might alter his/her often precarious psychological-physical condition. In conclusion, in the risk assessment process used prior to the work integration of impaired workers considered by our research, the organisational, relational and psycho-social aspects of work activity have often played a primary role in respect to traditional risk factors usually monitored and evaluated.

  1. The effects of monitoring environment on problem-solving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Brian K; Bailey, Charles D; Hester, Kim

    2018-01-01

    While effective and efficient solving of everyday problems is important in business domains, little is known about the effects of workplace monitoring on problem-solving performance. In a laboratory experiment, we explored the monitoring environment's effects on an individual's propensity to (1) establish pattern solutions to problems, (2) recognize when pattern solutions are no longer efficient, and (3) solve complex problems. Under three work monitoring regimes-no monitoring, human monitoring, and electronic monitoring-114 participants solved puzzles for monetary rewards. Based on research related to worker autonomy and theory of social facilitation, we hypothesized that monitored (versus non-monitored) participants would (1) have more difficulty finding a pattern solution, (2) more often fail to recognize when the pattern solution is no longer efficient, and (3) solve fewer complex problems. Our results support the first two hypotheses, but in complex problem solving, an interaction was found between self-assessed ability and the monitoring environment.

  2. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  3. Evaluation of acid leaching method for the determination of uranium in fecal samples from occupational workers at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveendran, Nanda; Dubla, Rupali; Yadav, J.R.; Rao, D.D.; Baburajan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of internal contamination due to inhalation, ingestion or injection of radionuclides to occupational workers is carried out by analysis of excreta samples and whole body counting. Routine monitoring of radiation workers for assessing actinides intake are done either by urine or fecal sample analysis. This paper deals with the evaluation of analytical method for the determination of isotopes of uranium in fecal samples submitted by occupational workers from operating plants at Tarapur. The method involves sample ashing, addition of 232 U tracer for radiochemical recovery and acid leaching preconcentration stage followed by anion exchange separation. Thirteen routine fecal samples submitted by radiation workers under their routine monitoring practices were collected and analyzed. Radiochemical tracer recovery was obtained in the range of 52% to 86.4 % with a mean and standard deviation of 64.7% and 12.3% respectively. (author)

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Illness, and Injury Surveillance Program, Worker Health At A Glance, 1995-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Illness and Injury Surveillance Program (IISP) has monitored the health of contractor workers at selected DOE sites since 1990. For the first time, the IISP has sufficient data to describe, in a collective manner, the health trends occurring among workers at a number of DOE sites during a 10-year period. This brief report and the more detailed Worker Health Summary assess illness and injury trends of DOE workers according to gender, age, occupational group, and program office over the 10-year period, 1995 through 2004. During this time, over 137,000 individual contractor workers were employed at the 15 DOE sites participating in the IISP.

  5. Community health workers and mobile technology: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Rebecca; Catalani, Caricia; Wimbush, Julian; Israelski, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services. Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring. Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to positive program outcomes through operational improvements and

  6. Community health workers and mobile technology: a systematic review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Braun

    Full Text Available In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings.We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services.Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring.Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to positive program outcomes through operational

  7. Exposure to Fluoride in Smelter Workers in a Primary Aluminum Industry in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AK Susheela

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluoride is used increasingly in a variety of industries in India. Emission of fluoride dust and fumes from the smelters of primary aluminum producing industries is dissipated in the work environment and poses occupational health hazards. Objective: To study the prevalence of health complaints and its association with fluoride level in body fluids of smelter workers in a primary aluminum producing industry. Methods: In an aluminum industry, health status of 462 smelter workers, 60 supervisors working in the smelter unit, 62 non-smelter workers (control group 1 and 30 administration staff (control group 2 were assessed between 2007 and 2009. Their health complaints were recorded and categorized into 4 groups: 1 gastro-intestinal complaints; 2 non-skeletal manifestations; 3 skeletal symptoms; and (4 respiratory problems. Fluoride level in body fluids, nails, and drinking water was tested by an ion selective electrode; hemoglobin level was tested using HemoCue. Results: The total complaints reported by study groups were significantly higher than the control groups. Smelter workers had a significantly (p<0.001 higher urinary and serum fluoride level than non-smelter workers; the nail fluoride content was also higher in smelter workers than non-smelter workers (p<0.001. The smelter workers with higher hemoglobin level had a significantly (p<0.001 lower urinary fluoride concentration and complained less frequently of health problems. Only 1.4% of the smelter workers were consuming water with high fluoride concentrations. A high percentage of participants was using substances with high fluoride contents. Conclusions: Industrial emission of fluoride is not the only important sources of fluoride exposure—consumption of substance with high levels of fluoride is another important route of entry of fluoride into the body. Measurement of hemoglobin provides a reliable indicator for monitoring the health status of employees at risk of fluorosis.

  8. Shutdown risk monitoring in TEPCO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroki; Masuda, Takahiro; Denda, Yasutaka; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Imai, Shun-ichi; Miyata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    At present, we are introducing risk monitors into our all three nuclear power stations; Fukushima Daiichi, Fukushima Daini and Kashiwazaki Kariwa, with technical support of TEPSYS. By monitoring shutdown risk of each unit, we are trying to optimize risks during outage inspection, and raising staff's awareness for reactor safety. This paper presents our recent shutdown risk monitoring activities in Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Shutdown risk monitoring has been carried out for the past five outages of Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Daily-changing shutdown risk is evaluated in the form of core damage frequency (CDF [/day/reactor]). We also examine high-risk point of outage plan if CDF is greater than the threshold at anytime of outage. The results are delivered to operational and maintenance staff before outage. The threshold value is set ten times as much as CDF of unit in operation. As CDF exceeds the threshold, we try to either change the system configuration, or let workers pay more attention to their works during the high-risk period. We already have some examples of outage plan modification to reduce CDF using the risk monitoring information. Greater number of station staff tends to pay more attention to shutdown risk thanks to these activities. (author)

  9. Monitoring your friends, not your foes: strategic ignorance and the delegation of real authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.; Sloof, R.; von Siemens, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment we study the use of strategic ignorance to delegate real authority within a firm. A worker can gather information on investment projects, while a manager makes the implementation decision. The manager can monitor the worker. This allows her to better exploit the

  10. Monitored by your friends, not your foes: Strategic ignorance and the delegation of real authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.; Sloof, R.; von Siemens, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment we study the use of strategic ignorance to delegate real authority within a firm. A worker can gather information on investment projects, while a manager makes the implementation decision. The manager can monitor the worker. This allows her to exploit any information

  11. Real-time personal exposure and health condition monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Isamu; Kanda, Hiroaki; Asai, Akio; Takeishi, Naoki; Ota, Yoshito [Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Tokyo (Japan); Hanawa, Nobuhiro; Ueda, Hisao; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) and HAM (Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd) have proposed novel monitoring system for workers of nuclear facility. In these facilities, exposure management for workers is mainly used access control and personal exposure recordings. This system is currently only for reports management but is not confirmative for surveillance when work in progress. Therefore, JAEA and HAM integrate access control and personal exposure recordings and two real-time monitoring systems which are position sensing and vital sign monitor. Furthermore change personal exposure management to real-time management, this system integration prevents workers from risk of accidents, and makes possible take appropriate action quickly. This novel system is going to start for tentative operation, using position sensing and real-time personal dosimeter with database in Apr. 2012. (author)

  12. Treaty Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canty, M.; Jasani, B.; Lingenfelder, I.

    2009-01-01

    of remote sensing technologies. The book therefore comprises management aspects (issues and priorities of security research, crisis response), applied methodologies and process chains (treaty monitoring, estimation of population densities and characteristics, border permeability models, damage assessment...... companies, national research institutions and international organizations, all of whom were brought together under the aegis of the European research project GMOSS (Global Monitoring for Security and Stability). This book is tailored for the scientific community that deals with the application of EO data...... of civil security. Written for: Scientists, researchers in spatial sciences as well as practitioners, politicians, decision makers at NGO's in the field of security, crisis management, risk assessment and vulnerability....

  13. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, N.D.

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs

  14. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N D

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Chromosome aberrations in workers of beach sand mineral industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakshi, C.; Mohankumar, Mary N.

    2013-01-01

    Beach Sand Mining (BSM) is a profitable industry earning a sizable income for the country by way of foreign exchange. The Indian coast is rich in rare earths such as ilmenite, rutile, leucoxene, zircon, garnet and sillimanite, and is invariably associated with radioactive monazite. Due to the nature of the separation processes involved and the manual handling, workers in these factories are continuously being exposed to suspended particles containing naturally occurring radioactive materials. An attempt was made to estimate DNA damage using a chromosome aberration assay to monitor radiation effects in workers of BSM industries in India. The study group comprised 27 BSM workers and 20 controls. Percentage yields of dicentrics, acentric fragments and chromatid breaks observed in the control group were 0.058 ± 0.017, 0.073 ± 0.03 and 0.22 ± 0.112, respectively. Percentage yields of dicentrics + centric rings, acentric fragments and chromatid breaks observed in the BSM group were 0.029 ± 0.01 (P value 0.19), 0.24 ± 0.06 (P value 0.006) and 0.455 ± 0.06 (P value 0.0004), respectively. Elevated levels of fragments and chromatid aberrations are suggestive of low-dose radiation effects and also chemically-induced DNA damage. (authors)

  16. Mortality among California highway workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlish, N; Beaumont, J; Singleton, J

    1988-01-01

    Standardized proportional mortality ratios (PMR) were computed for a population of highway workers. Hazards of highway maintenance work include exposure to solvents, herbicides, asphalt and welding fumes, diesel and auto exhaust, asbestos, abrasive dusts, hazardous material spills, and moving motor vehicles. Underlying cause of death was obtained for 1,570 workers who separated from the California Department of Transportation between 1970 and 1983, and who died in California between 1970 and 1983 (inclusive). Among 1,260 white males, the major findings were statistically significant excesses of cancers of digestive organs (PMR = 128), skin (PMR = 218), lymphopoietic cancer (PMR = 157), benign neoplasms (PMR = 343), motor vehicle accidents (PMR = 141), and suicide (PMR = 154). Black males (N = 66) experienced nonsignificant excesses of cancer of the digestive organs (PMR = 191) and arteriosclerotic heart disease (PMR = 143). Among 168 white females, deaths from lung cancer (PMR = 189) and suicide (PMR = 215) were elevated. White male retirees, a subgroup with 5 or more years of service, experienced excess mortality due to cancers of the colon (PMR = 245), skin (PMR = 738), brain (PMR = 556), and lymphosarcomas and reticulosarcomas (PMR = 514). Deaths from external causes (PMR = 135) and cirrhosis of the liver (PMR = 229) were elevated among white males with a last job in landscape maintenance. White males whose last job was highway maintenance experienced a deficit in mortality from circulatory diseases (PMR = 83) and excess mortality from emphysema (PMR = 250) and motor vehicle accidents (PMR = 196). Further epidemiologic and industrial hygiene studies are needed to confirm the apparent excess mortality and to quantify occupational and nonoccupational exposures. However, reduction of recognized hazards among highway maintenance workers is a prudent precautionary measure.

  17. Industrial screening programs for workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    Industrial screening efforts to identify classes of workers who are more susceptible to workplace hazards, by virtue of their fertility, genetic, or lifestyle characteristics, represent a relatively new approach to reducing workplace risks. Screening has already raised some important economic, legal, social, medical, and moral questions. Employers, employees, administrative agencies, and the courts are offering different, often conflicting answers. Ultimately the acceptability of various screening schemes rests upon judgments about how a society justifies the distribution of risk. The questions that industrial screening programs raise are only partially answered by empirical evidence; the rest is a matter of values

  18. Work ability assessment in a worker population: comparison and determinants of Work Ability Index and Work Ability score

    OpenAIRE

    El Fassi, Mehdi; Bocquet, Valery; Majery, Nicole; Lair, Marie Lise; Couffignal, Sophie; Mairiaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Public authorities in European countries are paying increasing attention to the promotion of work ability throughout working life and the best method to monitor work ability in populations of workers is becoming a significant question. The present study aims to compare the assessment of work ability based on the use of the Work Ability Index (WAI), a 7-item questionnaire, with another one based on the use of WAI?s first item, which consists in the worker?s self-assessment of his/he...

  19. The adaptive significance of inquiline parasite workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumner, Seirian; Nash, David R; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2003-01-01

    Social parasites exploit the socially managed resources of their host's society. Inquiline social parasites are dependent on their host throughout their life cycle, and so many of the traits inherited from their free-living ancestor are removed by natural selection. One trait that is commonly lost...... is the worker caste, the functions of which are adequately fulfilled by host workers. The few inquiline parasites that have retained a worker caste are thought to be at a transitional stage in the evolution of social parasitism, and their worker castes are considered vestigial and non-adaptive. However...... a vital role in ensuring the parasite's fitness. We show that the presence of these parasite workers has a positive effect on the production of parasite sexuals and a negative effect on the production of host sexuals. This suggests that inquiline workers play a vital role in suppressing host queen...

  20. Factors Affecting the Productivity of Government Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry P. Haenisch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While there have been a variety of studies concerning government worker motivation and productivity, few, if any, studies have focused specifically on state government workers’ perceptions about what factors affect their productivity. With more than 5 million workers employed by state governments in the United States, any improvement in state workplace productivity could have significant financial and service impact for society. In this study, state government workers identified those factors perceived as most affecting their workplace productivity. Data were collected through a survey offered to state government workers in the state of Wyoming. Factor analysis was used to derive key productivity factors from survey responses. The results indicate that state government workers appreciate having freedom and autonomy, like their jobs and the sense of achievement, and welcome teamwork, but feel limited by poor supervision and management, poor communications, and insufficient budgets and staffing. To improve productivity, the workers would eliminate bureaucracy, supervise better, and improve communication.

  1. Reexamining workers' compensation: a human rights perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Leslie I

    2012-06-01

    Injured workers, particularly those with more severe injuries, have long experienced workers' compensation systems as stressful and demeaning, have found it difficult to obtain benefits, and, when able to obtain benefits, have found them inadequate. Moreover, the last two decades have seen a substantial erosion of the protections offered by workers' compensation. State after state has erected additional barriers to benefit receipt, making the workers' compensation experience even more difficult and degrading. These changes have been facilitated by a framing of the political debate focused on the free market paradigm, employer costs, and worker fraud and malingering. The articles in this special issue propose an alternate framework and analysis, a human rights approach, that values the dignity and economic security of injured workers and their families. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Analysis of occupational doses of workers on the dose registry of the Federal Radiation Protection Service in 2000 and 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundare, F.O.; Balogun, F.A.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001 about 279 and 221 radiation workers, respectively, were monitored by the Federal Radiation Protection Service, University of Ibadan, in Nigeria. The distribution of the occupational doses shows that the majority of workers received doses below 4 mSv in each of the two years. The radiation workers in the two years are classified into two occupational categories: medicine and industry. The mean annual effective doses, collective doses and the collective dose distribution ratios for workers in each category and the entire monitored workers were calculated. The mean annual effective doses were compared with their corresponding worldwide values quoted by UNSCEAR. In each of the two years, a few workers in industry received doses higher than 50 mSv. The collective dose distribution ratio was found to be about 0.49, which is very close to the highest value of 0.5 in the range of values considered by UNSCEAR as normal for this parameter. This suggests that extra measures have to be taken, particularly in industry, to ensure that the proportion of workers at risk does not go outside this normal range. The occupational doses were also modelled by both the log-normal and Weibull distributions. Both distributions were found to describe the data in almost the same way. (author)

  3. Monitoring apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    An improved monitoring apparatus for use with process plants, such as nuclear reactors, is described. System failure in the acquisition of data from the plant, owing to stuck signals, is avoided by arranging input signals from transducers in the plant in a test pattern. (U.K.)

  4. Monitor 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility

  5. Monitoring programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution's 1992 report on its programme of monitoring radioactive substances is presented. Site operators' returns are verified and the report provides independent data on the environmental impact of authorized disposal of radioactive wastes. Radiation doses which may have been received by members of the public, fall well below the International Commission for Radiological Protection's (ICRP) recommended annual doses. (UK)

  6. Occupational exposure to diisocyanates in polyurethane foam factory workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Świerczyńska-Machura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate health effects of occupational exposure to diisocyanates (DIC among polyurethane foam products factory workers. Material and Methods: Thirty workers had a physical examination, skin prick tests with common allergens, allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE antibodies to diisocyanates and pulmonary function tests. Concentrations of selected isocyanates in the workplace air samples as well as concentration of their metabolites in the urine samples collected from the workers of the plant were determined. Results: The most frequent work-related symptoms reported by the examined subjects were rhinitis and skin symptoms. Sensitization to at least 1 common allergen was noted in 26.7% of the subjects. Spirometry changes of bronchial obstruction of a mild degree was observed in 5 workers. The specific IgE antibodies to toluene diisocyanate (TDI and 4,4’-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate (MDI were not detected in any of the patients’ serum. Cellular profiles of the collected induced sputum (ISP did not reveal any abnormalities. Air concentrations of TDI isomers ranged 0.2–58.9 μg/m3 and in 7 cases they exceeded the Combined Exposure Index (CEI value for those compounds. Concentrations of TDI metabolites in post-shift urine samples were significantly higher than in the case of pre-shift urine samples and in 6 cases they exceeded the British Biological Monitoring Guidance Value (BMGV – 1 μmol amine/mol creatinine. We didn’t find a correlation between urinary concentrations of TDI, concentrations in the air and concentrations of toluenediamine (TDA in the post shift urine samples. Lack of such a correlation may be an effect of the respiratory protective equipment use. Conclusions: Determination of specific IgE in serum is not sensitive enough to serve as a biomarker. Estimation of concentrations of diisocyanate metabolites in urine samples and the presence of work-related allergic symptoms seem to be

  7. Worker Sorting, Taxes and Health Insurance Coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Lang; Hong Kang

    2007-01-01

    We develop a model in which firms hire heterogeneous workers but must offer all workers insurance benefits under similar terms. In equilibrium, some firms offer free health insurance, some require an employee premium payment and some do not offer insurance. Making the employee contribution pre-tax lowers the cost to workers of a given employee premium and encourages more firms to charge. This increases the offer rate, lowers the take-up rate, increases (decreases) coverage among high (low) de...

  8. Importance of Ergonomics in Desk Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Gönültaş, Tülin; Aytaç, Necdet; Akbaba, Muhsin

    2018-01-01

    Therapid development of today's technology has led to an increase in office-styledesk workers, especially in the use of computers, in every sector andworkplace.At desk workers; the continuity of repetitive movements, the fixed orinappropriate position of the body, the loading of small parts of the body suchas hands and wrists, and the speed and continuity of movements threaten thehealth of workers in mid-long term. Especially problems related tomusculoskeletal diseases are seen. The prev...

  9. Sweat or no sweat: foreign workers in the garment industry in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crinis, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade factory owners, in response to brand-name Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) parameters, have joined associations that verify (through a monitoring and audit system) that management does not exploit labour. There have been no reports of violations of codes of conduct concerning Malaysian workers but for foreign workers on contract there are certain areas that have been reported. These areas, including trade union membership, the withholding of workers' passports and unsuitable accommodation, generally escape notice because auditors who monitor factory compliance do not question the terms of contracts as long as they comply with national labour standards. This paper is based on research with foreign workers in Malaysia and argues that despite the success of the anti-sweatshop movement in a global context, the neo-liberal state in Malaysia continues to place certain restrictions on transnational labour migrants which breach garment industry codes of conduct. Available evidence does not support the assumption that CSR practices provide sufficient protection for both citizen and foreign workers on contract in the garment industry.

  10. Analysis of questionnaires carried out on the annual education and training course for radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroi, Tomoko; Tatsunami, Shinobu; Kuwabara, Rie; Masuda, Youko; Kouyama, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hiroaki

    2005-01-01

    Questionnaires relating to the usage of hand-foot-clothes radiation monitor and the safety handling of wastes were carried out in the education and training course for radiation workers in 2003 and 2004, in the Institute of Radioisotope Research, Graduate School of Medicine, St. Marianna University. Responses from 77 workers were analyzed. The pattern of the frequency of questionnaire of the hand-foot-clothes radiation monitor usage was almost identical between men and women and between workers in two different radiation-controlled areas. However, there was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01, by the chi-square test) between the two groups of workers; that is, workers who either used radioisotopes or not. Similarly, different patterns in right/wrong responses for the handling of radioactive and non-radioactive wastes were observed between these two groups by the method of quantification 3. Therefore, it is suggested that there is a noticeable difference in the behavior between the two groups. We will take into consideration about these two groups in the future education and training courses. (author)

  11. Levels of doses to radiological workers in Ethiopia: 1977-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayou, Teshome.

    1991-01-01

    During the period 1977 to 1988, a total of 10,494 Eastman Kodak type 2 film badges and 19,236 Vinten lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDS) were delivered to medical workers in Ethiopia of which 5,135 (48.93%) film badges and 19,177 (99.69%) TLDS were evaluated. The annual average occupational doses to the workers were estimated to be of 1.44 and 4.51 man-Sv with corresponding collective dose equivalents to 0.29 and 4.51 man-Sv respectively. Comparisons of doses to similar workers in different countries were compiled from the literature. Based on the TLD results and the 1977 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) risk coefficients it is estimated that the occurrence of extra fatal and non-fatal cancer cases is in the order of 74 per million radiological workers per year. The hereditary defects expected are 18 and 36 cases in the next two and in all future generations respectively. During these periods, the number of institutions monitored rose from 35 to 88 while the workers monitored increased from 100 to 450

  12. Power Terminal Communication Access Network Monitoring System Scheme Based on Design Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shengchao; Wu, Desheng; Zhu, Jiang

    2018-01-01

    In order to realize patterns design for terminal communication monitoring system, this paper introduces manager-workers, tasks-workers design patterns, based on common design patterns such as factory method, chain of responsibility, facade. Using these patterns, the communication monitoring system which combines module-groups like networking communication, business data processing and the peripheral support has been designed successfully. Using these patterns makes this system have great flexibility and scalability and improves the degree of systematic pattern design structure.

  13. Dose Record Analysis of External Exposure of Workers in Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriambololona, R.; Ratovonjanahary, J. F.; Randriantsizafy, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    External personnel monitoring of workers in diagnostic radiology in Madagascar using thermoluminescence techniques has been studied in previous work for the period of 1990 to 2000. The study was based on the average of Hp(0.07) and Hp(10) and on the annual dose distribution. The results showed that mean doses are very low compared with the annual dose limits for workers of 20 mSv per year and are comparable with natural contribution of telluric X and gamma exposure which is evaluated as 3.21 mSv per year in Antananarivo. No trend in the average was observed, however, the last 4 years, the results showed a substantial decrease in the average from 2 mSv to 1 mSv. It was assumed that this was the impact of the implementation by radiation staff in their workplace of the in force regulation which is in compliance with the new basic safety standards. Indeed, since 1996, Madagascar-Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires (Madagascar-INSTN) and the Association Nationale de Radioprotection de Madagascar (ANARAPMAD), the Madagascar radiation protection society and associate member of IRPA, set up a national program for training of radiation workers. The number of workers trained during this period is evaluated as 50% of the total number of radiation workers in Madagascar. The present work is a continuation of the above mentioned survey during the period of 2001 to 2003. The training program was upgraded to involve personnel who will be in charge of radiation protection and safety in workplace and the training cycle lasts 2 years instead of 3 days in the previous program. The survey has been extended to include all radiation workers in Madagascar though the medical field is still the main application and represents more than 90 percent of the latter. The results shows that for this last 3 years, an other substantial decrease from 1 mSv to 0.5 mSv was observed in the average. In the dose distribution, more than 98 percent of the Hp(0.07) and more than 99

  14. Study of nominal daily output of urine from workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Marina F.; Carneiro, Janete C.G. Gaburo; Todo, Alberto S.

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective study of the 24-hour urine volumes from workers selected for the internal individual monitoring compares the average volume collected by sample and the average volume per individual with the nominal daily output of urine from 'Reference Man'. This work considers 134 registers of urine samples from 18 male workers, with semester routine sampling, between the years of 2000 and 2005. For this group, the average volume per collection was (971±371)mL and (962±376)mL per individual. In a cohort group of 9 male workers, which supplied at least 10 samples in this period, it was observed that the average volume per collection decreased to (955±308)mL and the average volume per individual increased to (1027±400)mL. For the female group, composed by 11 individuals, the 29 urine samples supplied between 1999 and 2005 were considered. The average volume per sampling and for worker was, respectively, (1122±337)mL and (1105±337)mL. Another cohort group of only 4 female workers with at least one annual collection during five years, of the seven years considered, the values decreased to (1112±336)mL per collection and the average volume per individual was maintained. The major variability of the volume among all the individuals was 927%, and for the same individual was 562%. This difference can be indicative of the individual differences of retention and excretion, alimentary diet interferences and for lack of awareness by the individual to collect urine during a period of 24-hour. The radionuclides clearance does not occur in constant rates and for the purpose of assessing intakes, in our routine analysis, the total volume of urine from worker is corrected for 1,4 L. Based in the results obtained over the years, and to minimize the errors of the nominal daily excretion rate in urine, actions about the aware of the individual in carrying out an accurately sampling and/or the implementation of the measurements of creatinine levels in urine are suggested

  15. Voices of Māori Sex Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Escaravage, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Aotearoa (New Zealand) is the only country in the world to have decriminalized sex work. The Prostitution Reform Act (PRA henceforth) was enacted in 2003 with the aim to safeguard the human rights of sex workers, and create a framework that is conducive to public health. Skeptics of this policy argue that the law reform was targeting indoor workers while the livelihood of street-based sex workers did not see significant improvements (Justice Acts, 2014). It is known that Māori sex workers are...

  16. Medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-05-01

    The guide covers medical surveillance of workers engaged in radiation work and their fitness for this work, protection of the foetus and infant during the worker's pregnancy or breastfeeding, and medical surveillance measures to be taken when the dose limit has been exceeded. The guide also covers recognition of practitioners responsible for medical surveillance of category A workers, medical certificates to be issued to workers, and preservation and transfer of medical records. The medical surveillance requirements specified in this Guide cover the use of radiation and nuclear energy. The guide also applies to exposure to natural radiation in accordance with section 28 of the Finnish Radiation Decree

  17. Privatizing community animal health worker based veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privatizing community animal health worker based veterinary services delivery system in West Kordofan, Southern Sudan; The needed roles of community animal health assistant (CAHA) and Pastoral unions.

  18. The Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jesús; Silva-Suarez, Georgina; Serna, Claudia A.; De La Rosa, Mario

    2017-01-01

    There is limited information on the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on Latino migrant workers (LMWs), although available data indicate that this community is being disproportionally affected. The need for prevention programs that address the specific needs of LMWs is becoming well recognized. HIV prevention interventions that train and employ community health workers are a culturally appropriate way to address the issues of community trust and capacity building in this community. This article describes the Latino Migrant Worker HIV Prevention Program and its efforts to train and engage community health workers in the prevention of HIV among LMWs in South Florida. PMID:22367261

  19. Medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-05-15

    The guide covers medical surveillance of workers engaged in radiation work and their fitness for this work, protection of the foetus and infant during the worker's pregnancy or breastfeeding, and medical surveillance measures to be taken when the dose limit has been exceeded. The guide also covers recognition of practitioners responsible for medical surveillance of category A workers, medical certificates to be issued to workers, and preservation and transfer of medical records. The medical surveillance requirements specified in this Guide cover the use of radiation and nuclear energy. The guide also applies to exposure to natural radiation in accordance with section 28 of the Finnish Radiation Decree

  20. Cyborgs and Knowledge Workers? Gendered Constructions of Workers in Vocational Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connole, Helen

    1996-01-01

    Discussions of knowledge workers are gender blind and ignore or devalue women's work. A more useful conception of the worker as cyborg illuminates questions of ownership of skills and knowledge and the blurring of boundaries between humans and technologies. (SK)