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Sample records for coffee grain processing

  1. Activity of some isoenzymatic systems in stored coffee grains

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    Reni Saath

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the worldwide consumption of coffee, it is natural that throughout the history many people have dedicated the research to markers that contribute somehow on gauging its quality. This research aimed to evaluate the biochemical performance of arabica coffee during storage. Coffee in beans (natural and in parchment (pulped dried in concrete terrace and in dryer with heated air were packed in jute bags and stored in not controlled environmental conditions. Enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase, esterase and lipoxygenase in coffee grains were evaluated at zero, three, six, nine and twelve months by means of electrophoresis. Independently of the drying method, the activity of isoenzymatic complexes highlighted deteriorative processes in stored grains of coffee. The treatments 60/40º C and 60º C used to reduce the water content imposed a greater stress condition, accelerated metabolism of natural coffee in the storage with decreased activity of defense mechanisms due to latent damage in these grains. Natural coffees are more sensible to high drying temperatures and its quality reduces faster than pulped coffee in the storage.

  2. Characterization of mutagenic activity in grain-based coffee-substitute blends and instant coffees

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    Johansson, M.A.E.; Knize, M.G.; Felton, J.S.; Jagerstad, M.

    1994-06-01

    Several grain-based coffee-substitute blends and instant coffees showed a mutagenic response in the Ames/Salmonella test using TA98, YG1024 and YG1O29 with metabolic activation. The beverage powders contained 150 to 500 TA98 and 1150 to 4050 YG1024 revertant colonies/gram, respectively. The mutagenic activity in the beverage powders was shown to be stable to heat and the products varied in resistance to acid nitrite treatment. Characterization of the mutagenic activity, using HPLC-and the Ames test of the collected fractions, showed the coffee-substitutes and instant coffees contain several mutagenic compounds, which are most likely aromatic amines.

  3. Heavy metals in wet method coffee processing wastewater in Soconusco, Chiapas, Mexico.

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    Siu, Y; Mejia, G; Mejia-Saavedra, J; Pohlan, J; Sokolov, M

    2007-05-01

    One of the driving forces of the economy in southeast Mexico is agriculture. In Soconusco, Chiapas, coffee is one of the main agricultural products and is traded on the international market. Coffee grown in this region is processed using the wet method in order to be commercialized as green coffee. In the beneficio (coffee processing plant) water is an essential resource which is required in great quantities (Matuk et al., 1997; Sokolov, 2002) as it is used to separate good coffee berries from defective ones, as a method of transporting the coffee berries to the processing machinery, in the elimination of the berry husk from the coffee grains (pulping) and finally in the post-fermentation washing process. This process gives rise to one of the smoothest, high-quality coffees available (Zuluaga, 1989; Herrera, 2002). Currently, many producers in Soconusco are opting for ecological coffee production, which has, among its many criteria, human health and environmental protection (Pohlan, 2005). Furthermore, increasing concern during the past few years regarding the production of food that is free from contaminants such as heavy metals, and recent environmental policies in relation to aquatic ecosystem protection, have given rise to questions concerning the quality of water used in coffee processing, as well as pollutants produced by this agroindustry. Water used in the coffee processing plants originates from the main regional rivers whose hydrological basins stretch from the Sierra Madre mountain range down to the coastal plain. As well as providing water, these rivers also receive the wastewater produced during coffee processing (Sokolov, 2002).

  4. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

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    Lepelley Maud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is

  5. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination.

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    Lepelley, Maud; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Martineau, Nelly; Cheminade, Gerald; Caillet, Victoria; McCarthy, James

    2012-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role in the programmed cell death

  6. Oleosin gene family of Coffea canephora: quantitative expression analysis of five oleosin genes in developing and germinating coffee grain.

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    Simkin, Andrew J; Qian, Tingzhi; Caillet, Victoria; Michoux, Franck; Ben Amor, Mohamed; Lin, Chenwei; Tanksley, Steve; McCarthy, James

    2006-05-01

    Coffee grains have an oil content between 10% and 16%, with these values associated with Coffea canephora (robusta) and C. arabica (arabica), respectively. As the majority of the oil stored in oil seeds is contained in specific structures called oil bodies, we were interested in determining whether there are any differences in the expression of the main oil body proteins, the oleosins, between the robusta and arabica varieties. Here, we present the isolation, characterization and quantitative expression analysis of six cDNAs representing five genes of the coffee oleosin family (CcOLE-1 to CcOLE-5) and one gene of the steroleosin family (CcSTO-1). Each coffee oleosin cDNA encodes for the signature structure for oleosins, a long hydrophobic central sequence containing a proline KNOT motif. Sequence analysis also indicates that the C-terminal domain of CcOLE-1, CcOLE-3 and CcOLE-5 contain an 18-residue sequence typical of H-form oleosins. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the transcripts of all five oleosins were predominantly expressed during grain maturation in robusta and arabica grain, with CcOLE-1 and CcOLE-2 being more highly expressed. While the relative expression levels of the five oleosins were similar for robusta and arabica, significant differences in the absolute levels of expression were found between the two species. Quantitative analysis of oleosin transcripts in germinating arabica grain generally showed that the levels of these transcripts were lower in the grain after drying, and then further decreased during germination, except for a small spike of expression for CcOLE-2 early in germination. In contrast, the levels of CcSTO-1 transcripts remained relatively constant during germination, in agreement with suggestions that this protein is actively involved in the process of oil body turnover. Finally, we discuss the implications of the coffee oleosin expression data presented relative to the predicted roles for the different coffee oleosins during

  7. Processing of a novel powdered herbal coffee (Pistacia Terebinthus L. Fruits Coffee) and its sensorial properties.

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    Secilmis, S S; Yanık, D Kocak; Gogus, F

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the effects of roasting method, grinding and reduction in oil content on the characteristics of Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee were investigated. Pistacia terebinthus fruit was roasted by microwave, pan and combined (microwave and convection) methods. The degree of roasting was determined by L*, a*, b* color values. The roasting times were 1,500, 1,900 and 1,620 s for microwave, pan and combined roasting methods, respectively. Cold press was used to reduce the oil content both prior to roasting and after the roasting. The oil content was reduced to around 21.5 % in all roasting methods to approach to that of coffee beans. Powdered Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee brews were compared with each other and Turkish coffee in terms of aroma, flavor, acidity aftertaste, and overall acceptability. Sensorial analysis results showed that coffee brews prepared by pressing after the roasting process were better than those pressing prior to roasting.

  8. An introduction to the square-necked grain beetle as a predator of coffee berry borer in Hawai'i

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    Biological control can be an important component of integrated pest management programs. Coffee berry borer is a new pest of Hawaii coffee that arrived with no apparent natural enemies. The square-necked grain beetle, Cathartus quadricollis, has been present in Hawaii for many years and has become o...

  9. Behavior of pesticides in coffee beans during the roasting process.

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    Sakamoto, Katsushi; Nishizawa, Hideo; Manabe, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, maximum residue limits for pesticides (MRL) in coffee are set on green coffee beans, but not roasted coffee beans, although roasted beans are actually used to prepare coffee for drinking. Little is known about the behavior of pesticides during the roasting process. In the present study, we examined the changes in the concentration of pesticide (organochlorine: γ-BHC, chlordane and heptachlor) residues in coffee beans during the roasting process. We prepared green coffee beans spiked with these pesticides (0.2 and 1.0 μg/g), and the residue levels in the beans were measured before and after the roasting process. We determined the residual rate after the roasting process. γ-BHC was not detectable at all, and more than 90% of chlordane was lost after the roasting (3.1 and 5.1% of chlordane remained in the beans spiked with 0.2 and 1.0 μg/g of chlordane, respectively). A low level of heptachlor (0.72%) was left in the coffee beans spiked with 1 μg/g of heptachlor. Disappearance of γ-BHC during the roasting process may be due to the high vapor pressure of γ-BHC, while chlordane has a lower vapor pressure. We also examined the behavior of piperonyl butoxide and atrazine during the roasting process. Piperonyl butoxide behaved similarly to chlordane, but atrazine disappeared after the roasting process, because it is unstable to heat.

  10. Challenges in Specialty Coffee Processing and Quality Assurance

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    Palmiro Poltronieri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is an important crop that assures a sustainable economy to farmers in tropical regions. A dramatic concern for coffee production is currently represented by climate change, which threatens the survival of Coffea arabica cultivation worldwide and imposes modifications of the agronomic practices to prevent this risk. The quality of coffee beans depends on optimized protocols of cultivation, ripe berries collection, and removal of the outer fruit layers by dry or wet processes and moisture reduction. Storage and shipment represent two steps where bean quality needs to be preserved by preventing fungal contamination that may impact the final product and form mycotoxins, mainly ochratoxin A. In this review, we describe the challenges faced by the coffee industry to guarantee quality from production to roasting and brewing. An overview of novel technologies, such as the application of starter cultures in fermentation and the exploitation of industrial enzymes in accelerating the process of flavour development in coffee beans, is given. Moreover, the results of studies on microbial populations on coffee and the differences found in fungi, yeasts and bacteria composition among the investigations, are summarized. In particular, this review describes new attempts to contain the development of mycotoxigenic fungi, through the application of antagonistic microorganisms such as S. cerevisiae. The new wave of specialty coffees, i.e., those with a cupping score higher than 85/100, is also presented. It is shown how, through careful coffee production methods and controlled fermentation processes, coffee producers may increase their income by assuring high standards of quality and high added value for the coffee experience sector.

  11. TRACKING THE PROCESSES OF MELANODIN FORMATION IN COFFEE

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    Snezhana Ivanova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Melanoidins are high molecular brown colored substances and products of sugar-amine reaction of Maillard. They are formed during roasting a green coffee beans under different thermal regimes of heat treatment. In the technological production of different types coffee beverages, the coffee powder is subjected to after-heat treatment. In these additional operations again become active processes of melanoidin formation and their changing their structures. This is changes of the Melanoidins have different effects on human health. It is therefore important to know their chemical structures and changes. Previous studies have shown that polysaccharides, proteins and chlorogenic acids are included in the formation of these melanoidins. However, the precise structures of coffee melanoidins and mechanisms involved in the formation are not yet clarified. This article systematize available information and provides an overview of research obtained so far on the structure of coffee melanoidins and mechanisms of their formation and potential health effects.

  12. Microbial ecology and starter culture technology in coffee processing.

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    Vinícius de Melo Pereira, Gilberto; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Neto, Ensei; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2017-09-02

    Coffee has been for decades the most commercialized food product and most widely consumed beverage in the world, with over 600 billion cups served per year. Before coffee cherries can be traded and processed into a final industrial product, they have to undergo postharvest processing on farms, which have a direct impact on the cost and quality of a coffee. Three different methods can be used for transforming the coffee cherries into beans, known as wet, dry, and semi-dry methods. In all these processing methods, a spontaneous fermentation is carried out in order to eliminate any mucilage still stuck to the beans and helps improve beverage flavor by microbial metabolites. The microorganisms responsible for the fermentation (e.g., yeasts and lactic acid bacteria) can play a number of roles, such as degradation of mucilage (pectinolytic activity), inhibition of mycotoxin-producing fungi growth, and production of flavor-active components. The use of starter cultures (mainly yeast strains) has emerged in recent years as a promising alternative to control the fermentation process and to promote quality development of coffee product. However, scarce information is still available about the effects of controlled starter cultures in coffee fermentation performance and bean quality, making it impossible to use this technology in actual field conditions. A broader knowledge about the ecology, biochemistry, and molecular biology could facilitate the understanding and application of starter cultures for coffee fermentation process. This review provides a comprehensive coverage of these issues, while pointing out new directions for exploiting starter cultures in coffee processing.

  13. Processed coffee alleviates DSS-induced colitis in mice

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    Bernd L. Fiebich

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and it has been demonstrated that it has important therapeutic activities not only because of its caffeine content but also owing to the presence of other biologically active small molecules such as chlorogenic acid, trigonelline and cyclopentadiones. However, chlorogenic acid is degraded into catechol, pyrogallol and hydroxyhydroquinone, which are thought to induce irritation of the gastric mucosa. To reduce the content of irritant compounds processing methods have been developed prior to roasting the coffee beans.Objectives: The aim of this study was to study the anti-inflammatory and gastro-protective effects of processed coffee (Idee-Kaffee on in LPS-treated human primary monocytes and in a murine model of colon inflammation (IBD model.Results: In this study we have analyzed the effects on inflammatory events in cultured cells and in mice drinking a commercially available processed coffee. The processed coffee inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, IL-6 and IL-8, and other inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin (PGE2 and 8-isoprostane in cultured human primary monocytes. Oral administration of dissolved processed coffee, i.e., in its usual beverage form, improved greatly the adverse macroscopic and histological features of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Processed coffee not only largely prevented DSS-induced colitis but also dramatically suppressed in vivo NF-B and STAT3 activities through inhibition of IB and STAT3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, this solubleFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2013; 3(5:133-145coffee bean extract reduced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-11, and IL-6 and the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in colonic tissues.Conclusions: This work identified

  14. Exergoeconomic evaluation of real processes for coffee roasting

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    Vučković Goran D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exergoeconomic methods provide an effective approach for identifying, evaluating and reducing thermodynamic inefficiencies and costs in an energy system. The aim of this paper is to show the potential for cost reduction on the demand side, using the exergoeconomic method in the example of real processes for coffee roasting. More than 6.5•109 kg of coffee beans is roasted worldwide annually, mostly in batch roasters. Near the end of the roast, roasting coffee emits volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide and other pollutants, which in many industrialized countries have to be oxidized in afterburners. Afterburners release exhaust gases with a temperature of 250-450°C, depending on the roasting process and the method of exhaust gas cleaning. The aim of this paper is to use exergy analysis and exergoeconomic performance evaluation to determine the energy use for coffee roasting and the afterburning process, and evaluate the way to utilize waste heat and reduce costs in the factory. For roasters with the capacity of up to 4 tons of green coffee beans per hour, the potential of heat recovery is 1.1 MW and the possibility to save money is around 60,000 € per year. This case study is similar to many others worldwide, and the results of this analysis could lead to more general conclusions.

  15. A NOVEL OPTIMIZED ENERGY-SAVING EXTRACTION PROCESS ON COFFEE

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    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Taguchi method is applied to optimize ultrasound thermal process for extracting caffeine and flavor from coffee. The use of ultrasound can abridge experiments in cost, energy loss and time; the different operating conditions for extraction experiments are executed and the results are also compared. The results show that the best design factors for caffeine are 95℃ of extraction temperature, 28 kHz of operating frequency and 30 s of extraction time. The proposed optimized extraction method is efficient and energy-saving compared with the general process for making coffee.

  16. Ochratoxin a contamination of cereal grains and coffee in Hungary in the year 2001.

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    Fazekas, B; Tar, A K; Zomborszky-Kovács, Melinda

    2002-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephrotoxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin, a secondary metabolite produced by mould fungi belonging to several Aspergillus and Penicillium species. It is formed during the storage of cereal grains and other plant-derived products. OTA ingested by humans and animals with the food or feed may exert deleterious effects on health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ochratoxin contamination of the most important potential sources of OTA. The OTA content of cereal samples for human consumption (36 baking wheat, 16 wheat flour and 6 maize coarse meal samples) and feed grain samples (30 feeding wheat, 32 feeding maize and 20 feeding barley samples) collected in the mid-phase or at the end of the storage period and of 50 commercial coffee samples was determined. The analyses were performed by immunoaffinity column--high-performance liquid chromatography (IAC-HPLC). The limit of detection of the method was 0.1 ng/g. Of the wheat samples intended for human consumption, 8.3% contained OTA at 0.29 ng/g on the average (OTA ranges: 0.12-0.5 ng/g; Table 2). The OTA contamination of wheat flour and maize meal samples for human consumption was similar to that of the baking wheat samples. OTA contamination was found in 26.7% of the feeding wheat, 15.6% of the feeding maize and 35% of the feeding barley samples. The average values and the ranges of OTA levels found in the above samples were 12.2 and 0.3-62.8 ng/g, 4.9 and 1.9-8.3 ng/g, and 72 and 0.14-212 ng/g, respectively (Table 3). Sixty-six percent of the coffee samples were contaminated with OA (average level: 0.57 ng/g, ranges: 0.17-1.3 ng/g; Table 4). OTA contamination of baking wheat samples was found to be relatively low, presumably as a result of the favourable weather at harvest and the optimal storage conditions. Calculations made on the basis of the obtained results show that the daily OTA intake of an adult human from edible cereals is only 6.7 ng, while the amount taken up with coffee

  17. [Biomonitoring of ochratoxin A in a small sample of cargo workers handling grains and raw coffee].

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    Degen, G H; Meifort, J; Blaszkewicz, M

    2005-09-01

    Handling cargo such as grains and raw coffee beans may result in an inhalation mycotoxin-containing dusts from these commodities. Ochratoxin A (OTA) was analyzed in blood samples obtained from nine cargo workers who handle these commodities at the Hamburg harbour. The OTA plasma levels ranged between 0.14 and 1.04 ng/ml. The mean (0.5±0.3) and median value (0.42 ng/ml) for this sample are slightly higher than those reported previously for the general population in Germany resulting from dietary OTA exposure alone. Our preliminary data point to a possible inhalation exposure, but further investigations are necessary for a definite proof of this exposure. This pilot study is an example of the usefulness of biomonitoring for OTA in occupational contexts.

  18. Thermal decomposition of torrefied and carbonized briquettes of residues from coffee grain processing Decomposição térmica de briquetes torrificados e carbonizados de resíduos do processamento dos grãos de café

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    Thiago de Paula Protásio

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomass has been recognized as a potential renewable energy and an alternative substitute that contributes to the decrease of fossil fuels consumption. Therefore, this research aimed to analyze the thermal behavior of briquettes made of residues from coffee grain processing in different conditions: in natura, torrefied and carbonized. Eucalyptus sawdust was used for comparison. The briquettes were carbonized considering final temperature of 450° C (kept for 30 min. The briquettes torrefaction was performed in an electric oven (muffle using two heating rates until 250° C (kept 60 min. The thermal-gravimetric analysis was made in nitrogen atmosphere until the temperature of 600° C. The contents of fixed carbon and volatile matter of the fuels were determined. The carbonized briquette of residues from coffee grain processing presented higher stability and low thermal decomposition. It was observed a low influence of torrefaction heating rate under thermal properties of briquettes, and fixed carbon and volatile matter content. Regarding the raw biomass, lower total mass loss was observed for the residues from coffee grain processing when compared to Eucalyptus sawdust. The carbonized and torrefied briquettes presented higher hydrophobicity than raw briquettes.O uso da biomassa tem sido reconhecido como uma energia potencial renovável e um substituto alternativo que contribua para a redução do consumo de combustíveis fósseis. Portanto, objetivou-se analisar o comportamento térmico de briquetes de resíduos do processamento dos grãos de café, em diferentes formas: in natura, torrificados e carbonizados. Utilizou-se a serragem de Eucalyptus como parâmetro de comparação. Os briquetes foram carbonizados considerando a temperatura final de 450° C (mantida por 30 min. A torrefação dos briquetes foi realizada em uma mufla em duas taxas de aquecimento até 250° C (mantida por 60 min. Realizou-se a análise termogravimétrica em

  19. How does roasting process influence the retention of coffee aroma compounds by lyophilized coffee extract?

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    López-Galilea, I; Andriot, I; de Peña, M P; Cid, C; Guichard, E

    2008-04-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to study the effect of lyophilized coffee extract on the retention of aroma compounds and (2) to study if aroma compounds selected are differently affected by the lyophilized coffee extracts obtained from conventional and Torrefacto coffee brews prepared by filter coffeemaker and by espresso coffee machine. Variable amounts of lyophilized coffee extracts, relative to coffee powder, containing different percentages of high molecular weight compounds, mainly melanoidins (value given in parentheses), were obtained: 20.9% (14.8) and 24.9% (23.3), respectively, for conventional and Torrefacto coffee brew prepared by filter coffeemaker and 18.1% (18.8) and 20.7% (57.5), respectively, for conventional and Torrefacto coffee brew prepared by espresso coffee machine. The retention of aroma compounds increased by increasing the lyophilized coffee extract concentration and was found to be dependent on the aroma compounds. The retention of aroma compounds was found to be slightly different depending on the brewing procedure employed, showing lyophilized coffee extracts obtained with espresso coffee machine had higher retention values that those extracted by filter coffeemaker. Retention capacity of lyophilized coffee extracts obtained from the conventional and the Torrefacto roasted coffee did not show differences except in the case of ethyl nonanoate.

  20. Effects of Processing Conditions During Manufacture on Retronasal-Aroma Compounds from a Milk Coffee Drink.

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    Ikeda, Michio; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hirano, Yuta; Miyazi, Kazuhiro; Kono, Masaya; Imayoshi, Yuriko; Iwabuchi, Hisakatsu; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2018-02-07

    To develop a ready-to-drink (RTD) milk coffee retaining the original coffee flavor, the effects of processing conditions during manufacture on retronasal-arma (RA) compounds from the milk coffee were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using an RA simulator (RAS). Thirteen of 46 detected compounds in the RAS effluent (RAS compounds) decreased significantly following pH adjustment of coffee (from pH 5.1 to 6.8) and 5 compounds increased. RAS compounds from coffee tended to decrease through the pH adjustment and subsequent sterilization. Significantly higher amounts of 13 RAS compounds were released from the milk coffee produced using a blending-after-sterilization (BAS) process without the pH adjustment than from that using a blending-before-sterilization (BBS) process with the pH adjustment. In BAS-processed milk coffee, significantly lower amounts of 8 high-volatility compounds and 1H-pyrrole were released from coffee containing infusion-sterilized (INF) milk than from coffee containing plate-sterilized (PLT) milk, whereas 3 low-volatility compounds were released significantly more from coffee using PLT milk. Principal component analysis revealed that the effect of the manufacturing process (BAS, BBS, or homemade (blending unsterilized coffee without pH adjustment with sterilized milk)) on milk coffee volatiles was larger than that of the sterilization method (INF or PLT) for milk, and that the sterilization method could result in different RAS volatile characteristics in BAS and homemade processes. In conclusion, a BAS process was found to be superior to a BBS process for the manufacture of an RTD milk coffee that retains volatile characteristics similar to that of a homemade milk coffee. Ready-to-drink (RTD) milk coffee manufactured using the conventional blending-before-sterilization process does not retain its original coffee flavor due to pH adjustment of the coffee during the process. The new blending-after-sterilization (BAS) process

  1. Effect of Household Coffee Processing on Pesticide Residues as a Means of Ensuring Consumers' Safety.

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    Mekonen, Seblework; Ambelu, Argaw; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2015-09-30

    Coffee is a highly consumed and popular beverage all over the world; however, coffee beans used for daily consumption may contain pesticide residues that may cause adverse health effects to consumers. In this monitoring study, the effect of household coffee processing on pesticide residues in coffee beans was investigated. Twelve pesticides, including metabolites and isomers (endosulfan α, endosulfan β, cypermethrin, permethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos ethyl, heptachlor epoxide, hexachlorobenzene, p'p-DDE, p'p-DDD, o'p-DDT, and p'p-DDT) were spiked in coffee beans collected from a local market in southwestern Ethiopia. The subsequent household coffee processing conditions (washing, roasting, and brewing) were established as closely as possible to the traditional household coffee processing in Ethiopia. Washing of coffee beans showed 14.63-57.69 percent reduction, while the roasting process reduced up to 99.8 percent. Chlorpyrifos ethyl, permethrin, cypermethrin, endosulfan α and β in roasting and all of the 12 pesticides in the coffee brewing processes were not detected. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the reduction of pesticide residues by washing is significantly different from roasting and brewing (P 0.05). The processing factor (PF) was less than one (PF < 1), which indicates reduction of pesticides under study during processing of the coffee beans. The cumulative effect of the three processing methods has a paramount importance in evaluating the risks associated with ingestion of pesticide residues, particularly in coffee beans.

  2. CARACTHERIZATION OF BIOMASS ENERGY AND CARBONIZATION OF COFFEE GRAINS (Coffea arabica, L) AND (Cedrelinga catenaeformis), DUKE WOOD RESIDUES

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    Ailton Teixeira do Vale; Luiz Vicente Gentil; Joaquim Carlos Gonçalez; Alexandre Florian da Costa

    2007-01-01

    Brazil produces annually two million tons of coffee s husks from farms or industrial processing units. This wastematerial can be used for energy production; currently it is mainly used in agricultural practices as field straw cover up. This paperdeals with coffee s (Coffea arabica, L) husks biomass energy characteristics, including wood carbonization. As a reference, the samestudy was performed with a wood species regularly used for building construction named Cedrorana (Cedrelinga catenaefor...

  3. Performance of a Big Scale Green House Type Dryer for Coffee Drying Process

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    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dying is one of important steps in coffee processing to produce good quality. Greenhouse is one of artificial drying alternatives that potential for coffee drying method cause of cleans environmental friendly, renewable energy sources and chippers. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has developed and testing a big scale greenhouse type dryer for fresh coffee cherries and wet parchment coffee drying process. Greenhouse has 24 m length, 18 m width, also 3 m high of the front side and 2 m high of the rear side. The maximum capacity of greenhouse is 40 tons fresh coffee cherries. Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP used as greenhouse roof that combined with I and C profile of steel. Fresh coffee cherries and wet parchment coffee from Robusta variety use as main materials in this research. The treatment of this research was 30 kg/m2, 60 kg/m2 and 90 kg/m2 for coffee density. String process has done by manual, two times a day in the morning and in the afternoon. As control, fresh coffee cherries and wet parchment coffee has dried by fully sun drying method. The result showed that a big scale greenhouse has heat drying efficiency between 29.9-58.2% depend on type and density of coffee treatments. On the full sunny day, greenhouse has produced maximum drying air temperature up to 52oC. In radiation cumulative level 4-5 kW-jam/m2 per day, 12.9-38.8 tons fresh coffee cherries or wet parchment coffee with 58-64% moisture content can be dried to 12% moisture content for 6 up to 14 days drying process. Slowly drying mechanism can be avoided negative effect to degradation of quality precursor compound. Capacity of the dryer can be raise and fungi can be reduce with application of controllable mechanical stirring in the greenhouse. Keywords: greenhouse, coffee, drying, quality

  4. Studies of acrylamide level in coffee and coffee substitutes: influence of raw material and manufacturing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojska, Hanna; Gielecińska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Many animal studies have shown that acrylamide is both neurotoxic and carcinogenic. The first reports of acrylamide actually having been found in foodstuffs were published in 2002 by the Swedish National Food Agency in conjunction with scientists from the University of Stockholm. It has since been demonstrated that acrylamide arises in foodstuffs by the Maillard reaction, ie. between free asparagine and reducing sugars at temperatures >120 degrees C. Coffee in fact, forms one of the principal dietary sources of acrylamide, where it is normally drunk in large quantities throughout many countries worldwide that includes Poland. Thus, it constitutes a major dietary component in a wide range of population groups, mainly ranging from late adolescents to the elderly. To determine the acrylamide level in commercial samples of roasted and instant coffee and in coffee substitutes by LC-MS/MS method. The influence of coffee species and colour intensity of coffee on acrylamide level was also detailed. A total of 42 samples of coffee were analysed which included 28 that were ground roasted coffee, 11 instant coffees and 3 coffee substitutes (grain coffee). Analytical separation of acrylamide from coffee was performed by liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To evaluate the colour intensity of ground roasted coffee and instant coffee we used method of arranging (sequence). The highest mean acrylamide concentrations were found in coffee substitutes (818 pg/kg) followed by instant coffee (358 microg/kg) and then roasted coffee (179 microg/kg). One single cup of coffee (160 ml) delivered on average from 0.45 microg acrylamide in roasted coffee to 3.21 microg in coffee substitutes. There were no significant differences in acrylamide level between the coffee species ie. Arabica vs Robusta or a mixture thereof. The various methods of coffee manufacture also showed no differences in acrylamide (ie. freeze-dried coffee vs agglomerated coffee). A

  5. Crushing of roasted Arabica coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with experimental research on the crushing of coffee beans of different kinds under quasi-static compression. The process of the crushing is described in details. It has been shown that there is variability in the crushing strength values. A relation between crushing strength and the coffee grain shape is also studied. Roasted Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica beans were used for analyses. Arabica coffees were produced in Colombia and Indonesia. Abbreviation in the square brackets indicates the coffee type and it is used in the text hereinafter. All Arabica samples were submitted to a light roast. The detail analysis of the experimental data shows that there is no significant relation between parameters describing the fracture behaviour of the grains and grain geometry. These parameters are also independent on the grain weight. Compression of the coffee grains leads to their crushing. The fracture force is different for the different kinds of the coffee. The same is fact valid also for the strain at the fracture and for the energy absorbed during the grain crushing. The obtained results suggest that the fracture parameters obtained at the compression loading are dependent only on the coffee brand and on the roasting conditions.

  6. REMPI-TOFMS for on-line monitoring and controlling the coffee roasting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfner, Ralph; Ferge, Thomas; Yeretzian, Chahan; Zimmermann, Ralf; Kettrup, Antonius

    2001-08-01

    REMPI@266nm-TOFMS is used for on-line analysis of the coffee roasting process. Volatile and flavor active compounds of coffee were ionized by REMPI@266nm and monitored on-line and in real-time by TOFMS during the coffee roasting process. The phenol and 4-vinylguaiacol time-intensity profiles, for example, show typical behavior for different roasting temperatures and provide an indicator to the achieved degree of roasting. The impact of the moisture level of the green coffee beans on the time shift of a typical (commercial) roasting time, correlates with REMPI-TOFMS measurements and literature data.

  7. Can volatile organic metabolites be used to simultaneously assess microbial and mite contamination level in cereal grains and coffee beans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Angelo C; Baptista, Inês; Barros, António S; Gomes, Newton C M; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide; Rocha, Silvia M

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToFMS) was developed for the simultaneous screening of microbial and mite contamination level in cereals and coffee beans. The proposed approach emerges as a powerful tool for the rapid assessment of the microbial contamination level (ca. 70 min versus ca. 72 to 120 h for bacteria and fungi, respectively, using conventional plate counts), and mite contamination (ca. 70 min versus ca. 24 h). A full-factorial design was performed for optimization of the SPME experimental parameters. The methodology was applied to three types of rice (rough, brown, and white rice), oat, wheat, and green and roasted coffee beans. Simultaneously, microbiological analysis of the samples (total aerobic microorganisms, moulds, and yeasts) was performed by conventional plate counts. A set of 54 volatile markers was selected among all the compounds detected by GC×GC-ToFMS. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied in order to establish a relationship between potential volatile markers and the level of microbial contamination. Methylbenzene, 3-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-methyl-3-pentanol, 1-octen-3-ol, and 2-hexanone were associated to samples with higher microbial contamination level, especially in rough rice. Moreover, oat exhibited a high GC peak area of 2-hydroxy-6-methylbenzaldehyde, a sexual and alarm pheromone for adult mites, which in the other matrices appeared as a trace component. The number of mites detected in oat grains was correlated to the GC peak area of the pheromone. The HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS methodology can be regarded as the basis for the development of a rapid and versatile method that can be applied in industry to the simultaneous assessment the level of microbiological contamination and for detection of mites in cereals grains and coffee beans.

  8. The roasting process does not influence the extent of conjugation of coffee chlorogenic and phenolic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Bridge, Belén; Renouf, Mathieu; Sauser, Julien; Beaumont, Maurice; Actis-Goretta, Lucas

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the bioavailability and metabolism of coffee compounds will contribute to identify the unknown biological mechanism(s) linked to their beneficial effects. The influence of the roasting process on the metabolism of coffee chlorogenic acids in humans was evaluated. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers consumed four instant coffees namely, high roasted coffee (HRC), low roasted coffee (LRC), unroasted coffee (URC), and in vitro hydrolyzed unroasted coffee (HURC). The sum of areas under the curve (AUC) ranged from 8.65-17.6 to 30.9-126 µM/h (P coffee drinks. Despite different absorption rates, the extent of conjugation was comparable between HRC, LRC, and URC coffees but different for HURC. The most abundant circulating metabolites during the first 5 H were dihydroferulic acid (DHFA), caffeic acid-3'-O-sulfate (CA3S) and isoferulic-3'-O-glucuronide (iFA3G). DHFA and 5-4-dihydro-m-coumaric acid (mDHCoA) were the main metabolites in the period of 5-24 H. The phenolic compounds after consumption of HURC were most rapidly absorbed (Tmax 1 H) compared with the other coffees (Tmax between 9 and 11 H). Using coffees with different degrees of roasting we highlighted that in spite of different absorption rates the extent of conjugation of phenolic acids was comparable. In addition, by using a hydrolyzed unroasted coffee we demonstrated an increased absorption of phenolic acids in the small intestine. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(3):259-267, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Optimization of coffee oil extraction from spent coffee grounds using four solvents and prototype-scale extraction using circulation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krit Somnuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of two parameters—espresso coffee oil extraction time and the ratio of dried spent coffee grounds (DSCG-to-solvent—were conducted on DSCG employing four solvents. Extracted yields were investigated using response surface methodology. The two independent variables—ratio of DSCG-to-solvent (5.1–24.9 g/g and extraction time (0.2–39.8 min—were optimized in the batch mode. The predicted model was verified using actual experiments. The experimental yields achieved were 14.7 percent by weight (wt%; using hexane, 13.1 wt% (using anhydrous ethanol, 11.8 wt% (using hydrous ethanol, and 7.5 wt% (using methanol. Prototype extraction was tested using a circulation process. Approximately 11.8 wt% oil yield of prototype extraction could be obtained from DSCG under the optimal conditions of 30.4 min extraction time and 22.5 g/g ratio of DSCG-to-hexane from the laboratory-scale results. In this study, the miscella (the solution of coffee oil dissolved in the solvent from up to six successive extractions was investigated to determine the optimal oil extraction process. The repeated miscella from each successive extraction showed high efficiency and stability of coffee oil yield similar to that obtained using fresh hexane.

  10. CARACTHERIZATION OF BIOMASS ENERGY AND CARBONIZATION OF COFFEE GRAINS (Coffea arabica, L AND (Cedrelinga catenaeformis, DUKE WOOD RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Teixeira do Vale

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazil produces annually two million tons of coffee s husks from farms or industrial processing units. This wastematerial can be used for energy production; currently it is mainly used in agricultural practices as field straw cover up. This paperdeals with coffee s (Coffea arabica, L husks biomass energy characteristics, including wood carbonization. As a reference, the samestudy was performed with a wood species regularly used for building construction named Cedrorana (Cedrelinga catenaeformis,Duke. Coffee s husks was obtained from a farm 150 km far from Brasilia city and cedrorana sawdust from a local saw mill. Thispaper presents results from energy and biomass variables like moisture content, bulk density, lower and superior heating power, ashcontent, fixed carbon, volatile matter and volumetric energy. It has also studied carbonization, charcoal, pyroligneous licqor and noncondensablegases. A comparison between Coffee s husk with 0% moisture content and Cedrorana sawdust portrays the followingresults: bulk density 144.41 kg/m3, fixed carbon 10.31%, superior heating power 4.57 kWh (or 16.46 MJ or 3.933 Mcal/kg, charcoalcontent 40,64% and heating value per cubic meter 2,179 MJ/m3

  11. Recognition of Roasted Coffee Bean Levels using Image Processing and Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, T. H.; Andayani, U.

    2017-03-01

    The coffee beans roast levels have some characteristics. However, some people cannot recognize the coffee beans roast level. In this research, we propose to design a method to recognize the coffee beans roast level of images digital by processing the image and classifying with backpropagation neural network. The steps consist of how to collect the images data with image acquisition, pre-processing, feature extraction using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) method and finally normalization of data extraction using decimal scaling features. The values of decimal scaling features become an input of classifying in backpropagation neural network. We use the method of backpropagation to recognize the coffee beans roast levels. The results showed that the proposed method is able to identify the coffee roasts beans level with an accuracy of 97.5%.

  12. Coffee consumption modulates inflammatory processes in an individual fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muqaku, Besnik; Tahir, Ammar; Klepeisz, Philip; Bileck, Andrea; Kreutz, Dominique; Mayer, Rupert L; Meier, Samuel M; Gerner, Marlene; Schmetterer, Klaus; Gerner, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of coffee consumption have been reported to be caused by caffeine and adenosine receptor signaling. However, contradictory effects have been observed. Many kinds of chronic diseases are linked to inflammation; therefore a profound understanding of potential effects of coffee consumption is desirable. We performed ex vivo experiments with eight individuals investigating peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood before and after coffee consumption, as well as in vitro experiments applying caffeine on isolated cells. After in vitro inflammatory stimulation of the cells, released cytokines, chemokines, and eicosanoids were determined and quantified using targeted mass spectrometric methods. Remarkably, the release of inflammation mediators IL6, IL8, GROA, CXCL2, CXCL5 as well as PGA2, PGD2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), LTC4, LTE4, and 15S-HETE was significantly affected after coffee consumption. While in several individuals coffee consumption or caffeine treatment caused significant downregulation of most inflammation mediators, in other healthy individuals exactly the opposite effects were observed. Ruling out age, sex, coffee consumption habits, the metabolic kinetics of caffeine in blood and the individual amount of regulatory T cells or CD39 expression as predictive parameters, we demonstrated here that coffee consumption may have significant pro- or anti-inflammatory effects in an individual fashion. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A process for reduction in viscosity of coffee extract by enzymatic hydrolysis of mannan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Prakram Singh; Sharma, Prince; Puri, Neena; Gupta, Naveen

    2014-07-01

    Mannan is the main polysaccharide component of coffee extract and is responsible for its high viscosity, which in turn negatively affects the technological processing involved in making instant coffee. In our study, we isolated mannan from coffee beans and extract of commercial coffee and it was enzymatically hydrolyzed using alkali-thermostable mannanase obtained from Bacillus nealsonii PN-11. As mannan is found to be more soluble under alkaline conditions, an alkali-thermostable mannanase is well suited for its hydrolysis. The process of enzymatic hydrolysis was optimized by response surface methodology. Under the following optimized conditions viz enzyme dose of 11.50 U mannanase g(-1) coffee extract, temperature of 44.50 °C and time of 35.80 min, significant twofold decrease in viscosity (50 mPas to 26.00 ± 1.56 mPas) was achieved. The application of this process in large-scale industrial production of coffee will help in reduction of energy consumption used during freeze-drying. It will also make technological processing involved in making coffee more economical.

  14. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS AS AN ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PROCESS COMPARED TO THERMAL HYDROLYSIS FOR INSTANT COFFEE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. Baraldi

    Full Text Available Abstract Conventional production of instant coffee is based on solubilisation of polysaccharides present in roasted coffee. Higher process temperatures increase the solubilisation yield, but also lead to carbohydrate degradation and formation of undesirable volatile compounds. Enzymatic hydrolysis of roasted coffee is an alternative to minimize carbohydrate degradation. In this work, products obtained from thermal and enzymatic processes were compared in terms of carbohydrates and volatiles composition. Roasted coffee was extracted with water at 125 °C, and spent coffee was processed by thermal (180 °C or enzymatic hydrolysis. Enzymatic hydrolysis experiments were carried out at 50 °C using the commercial enzyme preparations Powercell (Prozyn, Galactomannanase (HBI-Enzymes, and Ultraflo XL (Novozymes. These formulations were previously selected from eleven different commercial enzyme preparations, and their main enzymatic activities included cellulase, galactomannanase, galactanase, and β-glucanase. Enzymatic hydrolysis yield was 18% (dry basis, similar to the extraction yield at 125 °C (20%, but lower than the thermal hydrolysis yield at 180 °C (28%. Instant coffee produced by enzymatic hydrolysis had a low content of undesirable volatile compounds and 21% (w/w of total carbohydrates. These results point to the enzymatic process as a feasible alternative for instant coffee production, with benefits including improved quality as well as reduced energy consumption.

  15. N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) Part 2. Formation in roasted coffee and barley during thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermann, Silke; Theurillat, Viviane; Verzegnassi, Ludovica; Hofmann, Jocelyne; Kuchenbecker, Ralf; Constable, Anne; Delatour, Thierry; Stadler, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Previous work in model systems has demonstrated that mepiquat can be formed under typical roasting conditions from the amino acid lysine via the Maillard reaction and trigonelline, the latter alkaloid serving as a methyl donor. This study shows for the first time that mepiquat is formed in low mg kg(-1) amounts during the coffee roasting process and consequently can be detected in roast and ground as well as soluble coffee up to levels of 1.4 mg kg(-1). Darker roast coffees contain relatively higher amounts of mepiquat versus light roasted beans, with an excellent correlation of mepiquat formation to roast colour (r(2) = 0.99) in robusta beans. A survey of 20 of the major green coffee origins (robusta and arabica coffees) showed the absence of mepiquat (roasting (0.64 mg kg(-1)). Mepiquat can therefore be considered a process-induced compound formed from natural constituents during the roasting process. Even considering a high intake of seven cups per day of soluble coffee containing 1.4 mg kg(-1) mepiquat in the coffee powder (the highest amount measured in this study), the resulting intake would exhaust less than 0.2% of the ADI of mepiquat.

  16. Effect of coffee reduction on constituent concentration in an energy-efficient process of ultrasonic extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cheng-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the popular beverage; its constituents include caffeine, oxidation resistant aromatic constituents, protein, tannin, and fat. It is indicated in literatures that a proper amount of coffee stimulates the brain and enhances memory, but excessive coffee causes negative results, such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, heart disease and kidney disease. This study used high-performance ultrasonic process to discuss the effect of pulverized coffee reduction on the constituent concentration. It further compared the constituent concentrations obtained in different extraction periods. The experimental results show that the coffee aroma constituents can be extracted effectively by ultrasonic process without any organic solvent, and the constituent concentration does not decrease with the addition of pulverized coffee. Therefore, the consumption of pulverized coffee can be reduced greatly by using the proposed. The time of extraction process can be shortened, so as to save energy. The most important point is to reduce the enterprises manufacturing cost and to increase the profit.

  17. Administrative and operational strategies of the coffee processing industry department of Caldas (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Octavio Diaz Arango

    2016-07-01

    domestic and international markets. Furthermore, it was concluded that quality management depends on operating performance and productivity when it comes to increasing the competitiveness of the coffee processing industries in the Department of Caldas (Colombia.

  18. A further tool to monitor the coffee roasting process: aroma composition and chemical indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruosi, Manuela R; Cordero, Chiara; Cagliero, Cecilia; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo; Sgorbini, Barbara; Liberto, Erica

    2012-11-14

    Coffee quality is strictly related to its flavor and aroma developed during the roasting process, that, in their turn, depend on variety and origin, harvest and postharvest practices, and the time, temperature, and degree of roasting. This study investigates the possibility of combining chemical (aroma components) and physical (color) parameters through chemometric approaches to monitor the roasting process, degree of roasting, and aroma formation by analyzing a suitable number of coffee samples from different varieties and blends. In particular, a correlation between the aroma composition of roasted coffee obtained by HS-SPME-GC-MS and degree of roasting, defined by the color, has been researched. The results showed that aroma components are linearly correlated to coffee color with a correlation factor of 0.9387. The study continued looking for chemical indices: 11 indices were found to be linearly correlated to the color resulting from the roasting process, the most effective of them being the 5-methylfurfural/2-acetylfuran ratio (index).

  19. Processing of a novel powdered herbal coffee (Pistacia Terebinthus L. Fruits Coffee) and its sensorial properties

    OpenAIRE

    Secilmis, S. S.; Yanık, D. Kocak; Gogus, F

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of roasting method, grinding and reduction in oil content on the characteristics of Pistacia terebinthus fruit coffee were investigated. Pistacia terebinthus fruit was roasted by microwave, pan and combined (microwave and convection) methods. The degree of roasting was determined by L*, a*, b* color values. The roasting times were 1,500, 1,900 and 1,620 s for microwave, pan and combined roasting methods, respectively. Cold press was used to reduce the oil content bo...

  20. Strength of coffee beans under static and dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper deals with experimental research on the crushing of coffee beans of different kinds under quasi-static and dynamic compression. The process of the crushing is described in details. It has been shown that there is variability in the crushing strength values. A relation between crushing strength and the coffee grain shape is also studied. Roasted Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica beans were used for analyses. Arabica coffees were produced in different countries. All Arabica samples were submitted to a light roast. The detail analysis of the experimental data shows that there is no significant relation between parameters describing the fracture behaviour of the grains and grain geometry. These parameters are also independent on the grain weight. Compression of the coffee grains leads to their crushing. The fracture force is different for the different kinds of the coffee. The same is fact valid also for the strain at the fracture and for the energy absorbed during the grain crushing. Dynamic loading leads to the increase in the fracture force of coffee grains in comparison with the quasi static loading.

  1. Personal exposure to dust and endotoxin in Robusta and Arabica coffee processing factories in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Larsson, Lennart; Pehrson, Christina; Moen, Bente E

    2013-03-01

    Endotoxin exposure associated with organic dust exposure has been studied in several industries. Coffee cherries that are dried directly after harvest may differ in dust and endotoxin emissions to those that are peeled and washed before drying. The aim of this study was to measure personal total dust and endotoxin levels and to evaluate their determinants of exposure in coffee processing factories. Using Sidekick Casella pumps at a flow rate of 2l/min, total dust levels were measured in the workers' breathing zone throughout the shift. Endotoxin was analyzed using the kinetic chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Separate linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate exposure determinants for dust and endotoxin. Total dust and endotoxin exposure were significantly higher in Robusta than in Arabica coffee factories (geometric mean 3.41 mg/m(3) and 10 800 EU/m(3) versus 2.10 mg/m(3) and 1400 EU/m(3), respectively). Dry pre-processed coffee and differences in work tasks explained 30% of the total variance for total dust and 71% of the variance for endotoxin exposure. High exposure in Robusta processing is associated with the dry pre-processing method used after harvest. Dust and endotoxin exposure is high, in particular when processing dry pre-processed coffee. Minimization of dust emissions and use of efficient dust exhaust systems are important to prevent the development of respiratory system impairment in workers.

  2. Modeling and validation of heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during the coffee roasting process using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Torres, Beatriz; Hernández-Pérez, José Alfredo; Sierra-Espinoza, Fernando; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2013-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during roasting were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Numerical equations for heat and mass transfer inside the coffee bean were solved using the finite volume technique in the commercial CFD code Fluent; the software was complemented with specific user-defined functions (UDFs). To experimentally validate the numerical model, a single coffee bean was placed in a cylindrical glass tube and roasted by a hot air flow, using the identical geometrical 3D configuration and hot air flow conditions as the ones used for numerical simulations. Temperature and humidity calculations obtained with the model were compared with experimental data. The model predicts the actual process quite accurately and represents a useful approach to monitor the coffee roasting process in real time. It provides valuable information on time-resolved process variables that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, but critical to a better understanding of the coffee roasting process at the individual bean level. This includes variables such as time-resolved 3D profiles of bean temperature and moisture content, and temperature profiles of the roasting air in the vicinity of the coffee bean.

  3. The effect of processing on chlorogenic acid content of commercially available coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charlotte E; Oruna-Concha, Maria Jose; Mottram, Donald S; Gibson, Glenn R; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2013-12-15

    Chlorogenic acids (CGA) are a class of polyphenols noted for their health benefits. These compounds were identified and quantified, using LC-MS and HPLC, in commercially available coffees which varied in processing conditions. Analysis of ground and instant coffees indicated the presence of caffeoylquinic acids (CQA), feruloylquinic acids (FQA) and dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQA) in all 18 samples tested. 5-CQA was present at the highest levels, between 25 and 30% of total CGA; subsequent relative quantities were: 4-CQA>3-CQA>5-FQA>4-FQA>diCQA (sum of 3,4, 3,5 and 4,5-diCQA). CGA content varied greatly (27.33-121.25mg/200 ml coffee brew), driven primarily by the degree of coffee bean roasting (a high amount of roasting had a detrimental effect on CGA content). These results highlight the broad range of CGA quantity in commercial coffee and demonstrate that coffee choice is important in delivering optimum CGA intake to consumers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Grain processing effects on starch utilization by ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurer, C B

    1986-11-01

    Starch utilization may be markedly enhanced by proper grain processing; however, extent of improvement is primarily dependent upon the ruminant species, grain source and method of processing. Grain processing has less impact on starch digestion by sheep than cattle. The magnitude of improvement is inverse to the starch digestion values for nonprocessed (or minimally processed) grains. Utilization of sorghum grain starch is improved most by extensive processing, and then corn, with little improvement in barley starch digestion. Studies comparing processing effects on barley or wheat starch utilization by cattle were not found. Steam-flaking consistently improves digestibility of starch by cattle fed corn- or sorghum grain-based diets over whole, ground or dry-rolled processes. Other extensive processing methods appear to enhance starch digestibility of corn and sorghum grain to a similar extent as steam-flaking, but comparative data are too limited to quantitate adequately effects of these methods. This improvement in starch utilization appears to be the primary reason for enhanced feed conversion of cattle fed diets high in these processed grains. The major site of cereal grain starch digestion is usually the rumen. Processing increases microbial degradation of starch in the rumen and decreases amounts of starch digested post-ruminally. Rates of in vitro amylolytic attack of starch in cereal grains by both ruminal microbial and pancreatic enzyme sources are improved by processing methods employing proper combinations of moisture, heat and pressure. In vitro and in situ studies suggest that much of the increase in ruminal starch fermentation with steam-flaking is due to changes in starch granular structure, which produces additive effects beyond those of decreasing particle size. Thus, efficiency of ruminal starch fermentation by cattle appears to be improved by proper processing of corn and sorghum grain. Processing and grain source studies both suggest that

  6. Coffee and Its Flavor

    OpenAIRE

    Handayani, Baiq Rien

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely served beverage. Flavor mainly the aroma is the most important attribute to specialty coffee. Coffee flavor consisted of volatile and non volatile compounds. The compounds were influenced by several factors i.e. growth environment, physiology, harvesting, post-harvest, roasting process and preparation. Keywords: coffee, flavor

  7. [Effect of processing on the antioxidant activity of amaranth grain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Yara Severino de; Manólio Soares, Rosana Aparecida; Capriles, Vanessa Dias; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva; Areas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2009-12-01

    Amaranth has attracted increasing interest over recent decades because of its nutritional, functional and agricultural characteristics. Amaranth grain can be cooked, popped, toasted, extruded or milled for consumption. This study investigated the effect of these processes on the antioxidant activity of amaranth grain. Total phenolic content and in vitro antioxidant activity were determined according to two methods: inhibition of lipid oxidation using the beta-carotene/linoleic acid system and the antioxidant activity index using the Rancimat apparatus. The processing reduced the mean total phenolics content in amaranth grain from 31.7 to 22.0 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g of dry residue. It was observed that the ethanol extract from toasted grain was the only one that presented a lower antioxidant activity index compared with the raw grain (1.3 versus 1.7). The extrusion, toasting and popping processes did not change the capacity to inhibit amaranth lipid oxidation (55%). However, cooking increased the inhibition of lipid oxidation (79%), perhaps because of the longer time at high temperatures in this process (100 degrees C/10 min). The most common methods for processing amaranth grain caused reductions in the total phenolics content, although the antioxidant activity of popped and extruded grain, evaluated by the two methods, was similar to that of the raw grain. Both raw and processed amaranth grain presents antioxidant potential. Polyphenols, anthocyanins, flavonoids, tocopherols, vitamin C levels and Maillard reaction products may be related to the antioxidant activity of this grain.

  8. New Process for Grain Refinement of Aluminum. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Joseph A. Megy

    2000-09-22

    A new method of grain refining aluminum involving in-situ formation of boride nuclei in molten aluminum just prior to casting has been developed in the subject DOE program over the last thirty months by a team consisting of JDC, Inc., Alcoa Technical Center, GRAS, Inc., Touchstone Labs, and GKS Engineering Services. The Manufacturing process to make boron trichloride for grain refining is much simpler than preparing conventional grain refiners, with attendant environmental, capital, and energy savings. The manufacture of boride grain refining nuclei using the fy-Gem process avoids clusters, salt and oxide inclusions that cause quality problems in aluminum today.

  9. Smashing CoffeeScript

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Brew the perfect code with CoffeeScript If you're familiar with JavaScript and the often-frustrating process of creating complex applications, a nice cup of CoffeeScript can help. CoffeeScript is a programming language that compiles into JavaScript and simplifies the entire development process. Now you can tap the full power of CoffeeScript with Smashing CoffeeScript. This full-color, practical book explains CoffeeScript language, syntax, and processes, and will soon have you producing concise and quality code. Ultimately, you'll create RIAs and mobile apps faster, with less

  10. Design Of A Small-Scale Hulling Machine For Improved Wet-Processed Coffee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleke

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The method of primary processing of coffee is a vital determinant of quality and price. Wet processing method produces higher quality beans but is very labourious. This work outlines the design of a small scale cost-effective ergonomic and easily maintained and operated coffee hulling machine that can improve quality and productivity of green coffee beans. The machine can be constructed from locally available materials at a relatively low cost of about NGN 140000.00 with cheap running cost. The beaters are made from rubber strip which can deflect when in contact with any obstruction causing little or no stresses on drum members and reducing the risk of damage to both the beans and machine. The machine is portable and detachable which make it fit to be owned by a group of farmers who can move it from one farm to the other making affordability and running cost easier. The easily affordable and relatively low running cost may be further reduced by the fact that the machine is powered by 3.0 Hp petrol engine which is suitable for other purposes among the rural dwellers. The eventual construction of the machine will encourage more farmers to go into wet processing of coffee and reduce the foreign exchange hitherto lost to this purpose.

  11. Investigation of the change in the flavor of a coffee drink during heat processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Kenji; Masuda, Hideki

    2003-04-23

    Heat processing is responsible for the change in the flavor of a coffee drink. In this study, the application of gas chromatography-olfactometry of headspace samples (GCO-H) using the vapor fraction before and after heat processing of the coffee samples resulted in the detection of 12 odor-active peaks for which the flavor dilution (FD) factors changed. Eight potent odorants were identified from these peaks by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among these components, methanethiol (putrid), acetic acid (sour), 3-methylbutanoic acid (sour), 2-furfuryl methyl disulfide (meaty), and 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (caramel-like) increased after heating of the coffee sample, whereas 2-furfurylthiol (roasty), methional (potato-like), and 3-mercapto-3-methylbutyl formate (roasty) decreased compared with the coffee sample before heat treatment. In addition, extensive studies have been carried out on the pH effects on the change in the concentration of 2-furfurylthiol during heat processing and in the pH range of 5-7; it was found that the concentration of this compound in the model solutions had significantly changed.

  12. Laser mass spectrometry as on-line sensor for industrial process analysis: process control of coffee roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfner, Ralph; Ferge, Thomas; Yeretzian, Chahan; Kettrup, Antonius; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2004-03-01

    The objective of the project is to develop on-line, real-time, and noninvasive process control tools of coffee roasting that help deliver a consistent and high-quality coffee aroma. The coffee roasting process was analyzed by direct injection of the roaster gas into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and ionized either by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) at 266 and 248 nm or vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization (VUV-SPI) at 118 nm. The VUV ionization scheme allows detecting mainly the most volatile and abundant compounds of molecular mass below 100 m/z, while REMPI ionizes mainly aromatic compounds of molecular mass larger than 100 m/z. Combining the compounds ionized by resonant and single-photon ionization, approximately 30 volatile organic compounds are monitored in real time. Time-intensity profiles of 10 important volatile coffee compounds were discussed in connection with their formation chemistry during roasting. Applying multivariate statistics (principle component analysis) on time-intensity traces of nine volatile coffee compounds, the roasting degree could be traced as a consistent path in the score plot of the two most significant principle components (including 68% of the total variance), for a range of roasting temperatures (200-250 degrees C).

  13. Roasting process of coffee beans as studied by nuclear magnetic resonance: time course of changes in composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Koda, Masanori; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we report a (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based comprehensive analysis of coffee bean extracts of different degrees of roast. The roasting process of coffee bean extracts was chemically characterized using detailed signal assignment information coupled with multivariate data analysis. A total of 30 NMR-visible components of coffee bean extracts were monitored simultaneously as a function of the roasting duration. During roasting, components such as sucrose and chlorogenic acids were degraded and components such as quinic acids, N-methylpyridinium, and water-soluble polysaccharides were formed. Caffeine and myo-inositol were relatively thermally stable. Multivariate data analysis indicated that some components such as sucrose, chlorogenic acids, quinic acids, and polysaccharides could serve as chemical markers during coffee bean roasting. The present composition-based quality analysis provides an excellent holistic method and suggests useful chemical markers to control and characterize the coffee-roasting process.

  14. Thrips (Thysanoptera) of coffee flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of thrips (Thysanoptera) associated with coffee flowers was conducted in coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico. The main objectives were to identify them and to determine whether they were carrying coffee pollen grains. A total of 40 thrips species in 22 genera were identified. The most com...

  15. Mathematic simulation of high-efficiency process of grain cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyautdinova, Y. V.; Gaysin, I. A.; Samigullin, A. D.; Samigullina, A. R.; Galyautdinov, R. R.

    2017-09-01

    The article presents the results of field experiment and the results of computer simulation of the grain cleaning process pneumosorting machine PSM-0,5. The results of the comparison of two methods of research are presented.

  16. Coffee husk composting: an investigation of the process using molecular and non-molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemekite, Fekadu; Gómez-Brandón, María; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Praehauser, Barbara; Insam, Heribert; Assefa, Fassil

    2014-03-01

    Various parameters were measured during a 90-day composting process of coffee husk with cow dung (Pile 1), with fruit/vegetable wastes (Pile 2) and coffee husk alone (Pile 3). Samples were collected on days 0, 32 and 90 for chemical and microbiological analyses. C/N ratios of Piles 1 and 2 decreased significantly over the 90 days. The highest bacterial counts at the start of the process and highest actinobacterial counts at the end of the process (Piles 1 and 2) indicated microbial succession with concomitant production of compost relevant enzymes. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of rDNA and COMPOCHIP microarray analysis indicated distinctive community shifts during the composting process, with day 0 samples clustering separately from the 32 and 90-day samples. This study, using a multi-parameter approach, has revealed differences in quality and species diversity of the three composts. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Inoculation of starter cultures in a semi-dry coffee (Coffea arabica) fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Suzana Reis; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Cordeiro, Cecília de Souza; Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of yeasts as starter cultures in coffee semi-dry processing. Arabica coffee was inoculated with one of the following starter cultures: Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA YCN727, S. cerevisiae UFLA YCN724, Candida parapsilosis UFLA YCN448 and Pichia guilliermondii UFLA YCN731. The control was not inoculated with a starter culture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assess the microbial population, and organic acids and volatile compounds were quantified by HPLC and HS-SPME/GC, respectively. Sensory analyses were evaluated using the Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS). DGGE analysis showed that the inoculated yeasts were present throughout the fermentation. Other yeast species were also detected, including Debaryomyces hansenii, Cystofilobasidium ferigula and Trichosporon cavernicola. The bacterial population was diverse and was composed of the following genera: Weissella, Leuconostoc, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Erwinia and Klebsiella. Butyric and propionic acids, were not detected in any treatment A total of 47 different volatiles compounds have been identified. The coffee inoculated with yeast had a caramel flavor that was not detected in the control, as assessed by TDS. The use of starter cultures during coffee fermentation is an interesting alternative for obtaining a beverage quality with distinctive flavor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling the process of compaction of plastic grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patejuk

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Thc aniclc prcscnts an experimental analysis of thc cffcct or plastic grain size on the deformation of the presscd moulding during thepmcess of punch thrust in a closcd containcr. Thc cffcct of configuration and grain diameter on !he flow of rorccs in rhc process ofmolding format ion in the scmi-liquid statc. Test werc performod by using specially prepared plasticine-based mdcl marcrial. Thc obtain4test resuIts arc technological guidelines Tor manufacturing products Tmm powdcrs of the requircd grain sizc

  19. INFLUENCE OF GRAIN DEBRIS ON THE MICRONIZATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Kochanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Effect of weed, mineral and metallomagnetic impurities in the grain feedstock to micronization process was investigated. In laboratory and production conditions conducted a study on the influence of the impurity content in the treated grain, different size, density and metallomagnetic properties on the process of micronization. Trash content in feed grains of barley, wheat and corn according to current standards for grain must match the basic approach, and do not exceed 5 % , including mineral impurities - 1.0%. No restrictions on metallomagnetic and organic impurities. Dependence of the clearing of mineral impurities in various capacities device for separating stones was installed. Most effectively, 95-98 % grain (especially barley where these studies were carried out allocated pebbles, i.e. mineral impurity density which is almost twice the density of barley. Lumps of earth, the density of which is virtually identical to the density of barley allocated a maximum of 70%. Setting in the shop micronization grain separator and magnetic separator device for separating stones led to increase the reliability of the process equipment and process stability micronization. Year and a half after the reconstruction of the workshop there were no failure nodes of device for flattening. A particularly important consideration is to increase the duration of exploitation of the working surfaces of the rolls crusher to guaranteed by period (not less than 1 year.

  20. In-line monitoring of the coffee roasting process with near infrared spectroscopy: Measurement of sucrose and colour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, João Rodrigo; Viegas, Olga; Páscoa, Ricardo N M J; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Rangel, António O S S; Lopes, João Almeida

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a real-time and in-situ analytical tool based on near infrared spectroscopy is proposed to predict two of the most relevant coffee parameters during the roasting process, sucrose and colour. The methodology was developed taking in consideration different coffee varieties (Arabica and Robusta), coffee origins (Brazil, East-Timor, India and Uganda) and roasting process procedures (slow and fast). All near infrared spectroscopy-based calibrations were developed resorting to partial least squares regression. The results proved the suitability of this methodology as demonstrated by range-error-ratio and coefficient of determination higher than 10 and 0.85 respectively, for all modelled parameters. The relationship between sucrose and colour development during the roasting process is further discussed, in light of designing in real-time coffee products with similar visual appearance and distinct organoleptic profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Grain size of fine-grained windblown sediment: a powerful proxy for process identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenberghe, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dust transport by the wind is not a uniform process but may occur in different modes according to source area conditions and transport height and distance. Subsequently, these differences are expressed in terms of grain-size and fluxes of the aeolian deposits. Transport distances may vary from

  2. Effect of sugar addition (torrefacto) during roasting process on antioxidant capacity and phenolics of coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, I.A. (Iziar A.); Bravo, J.; Peña, M.P. (María Paz) de; Cid, C.

    2013-01-01

    The addition of sugar during roasting (torrefacto) has been proposed as a technique to increase the antioxidant capacity. However, other factors such as roasting degree and coffee origin also play a key role. Two batches of Colombian green coffee were roasted adding increased amounts of sucrose (0-15 g per 100 g of coffee) to reach the same roasting degree than a commercial Colombian coffee. Moreover, seven conventional roasted coffees from different origins (Colombia, Brazil, Kenya, Guatemal...

  3. The impact of traditional coffee processing on river water quality in Ethiopia and the urgency of adopting sound environmental practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Abebe; Kassahun, Yared; Addis, Taffere; Assefa, Fassil; Amsalu, Aklilu; Legesse, Worku; Kloos, Helmut; Triest, Ludwig

    2012-11-01

    Although waste from coffee processing is a valuable resource to make biogas, compost, and nutrient-rich animal food, it is usually dumped into nearby water courses. We carried out water quality assessment at 44 sampling sites along 18 rivers that receive untreated waste from 23 coffee pulping and processing plants in Jimma Zone, Ethiopia. Twenty upstream sampling sites free from coffee waste impact served as control, and 24 downstream sampling sites affected by coffee waste were selected for comparison. Physicochemical and biological results revealed a significant river water quality deterioration as a result of disposing untreated coffee waste into running water courses. During coffee-processing (wet) season, the highest organic load (1,900 mg/l), measured as biochemical oxygen demand, depleted dissolved oxygen (DO) to a level less than 0.01 mg/l, and thus curtailed nitrification. During off season, oxygen started to recuperate and augmented nitrification. The shift from significantly elevated organic load and reduced DO in the wet season to increased nitrate in the off season was found to be the determining factor for the difference in macroinvertebrate community structure as verified by ordination analysis. Macroinvertebrate diversity was significantly reduced in impacted sites during the wet season contrary to the off season. However, there was a significant difference in the ratio of sensitive to pollution-tolerant taxa in the off season, which remained depreciated in the longer term. This study highlights the urgency of research exploring on the feasibility of adopting appropriate pollution abatement technologies to implement ecologically sound coffee-processing systems in coffee-growing regions of Ethiopia.

  4. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    OpenAIRE

    Yusianto; Widyotomo, Sukrisno

    2013-01-01

    Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast), “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor ma...

  5. Effect of heat processing on selected grain amaranth physicochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyonga, John H; Andabati, Brian; Ssepuuya, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Grain amaranth is a pseudocereal with unique agricultural, nutritional, and functional properties. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of different heat-processing methods on physicochemical and nutraceutical properties in two main grain amaranth species, of Amaranthus hypochondriacus L. and Amaranthus cruentus L. Grains were prepared by roasting and popping, milled and analyzed for changes in in vitro protein digestibility, gruel viscosity, pasting characteristics, antioxidant activity, flavonoids, and total phenolics. In vitro protein digestibility was determined using the pepsin-pancreatin enzyme system. Viscosity and pasting characteristics of samples were determined using a Brookfield Viscometer and a Rapid Visco Analyzer, respectively. The grain methanol extracts were analysed for phenolics using spectrophotometry while antioxidant activity was determined using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) method. Heat treatment led to a reduction in protein digestibility, the effect being higher in popped than in roasted samples. Viscosities for roasted grain amaranth gruels were significantly higher than those obtained from raw and popped grain amaranth gruels. The results for pasting properties were consistent with the results for viscosity. In both A. hypochondriacus L. and A. cruentus L., the order of the viscosity values was roasted>raw>popped. The viscosities were also generally lower for A. cruentus L. compared to A. hypochondriacus L. Raw samples for both A. hypochondriacus L. and A. cruentus L. did not significantly differ in total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and total antioxidant activity values. Thermal processing led to an increase in TFC and antioxidant activity. However, TPC of heat-processed samples remained unchanged. From the results, it can be concluded that heat treatment enhances antioxidant activity of grain amaranth and causes rheological changes dependent on the nature of heat treatment. PMID

  6. AUTOMATION OF TRACEABILITY PROCESS AT GRAIN TERMINAL LLC “ UKRTRANSAGRO"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. TRISHYN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A positive trend of growth in both grain production and export is indicated. In the current marketing year the export potential of the Ukrainian grain market is close to the record level. However, the high positions in the rating of world exporters are achieved not only due to the high export potential, but also because of higher quality and logistics. These factors depend directly on the quality of enterprise management and all processes occurring at it. One of the perspective ways of enterprise development is the implementation of the traceability system and further automation of the traceability process. European integration laws are obliging Ukrainian enterprises to have a traceability system. Traceability is an ability to follow the movement of a feed or food through specified stages of production, processing and distribution. The process of traceability is managing by people, which implies a human factor. Automation will allow, in a greater extent, to exclude the human factor that will mean decreasing of errors in documentation and will speed up the process of grain transshipment. Research work on the process was carried out on the most modern grain terminal - LLC “UkrTransAgro”. The terminal is located in the Ukrainian water area of the Azov Sea (Mariupol, Ukraine. Characteristics of the terminal: capacity of a simultaneous storage - 48,120 thousand tons, acceptance of crops from transport - 4,500 tons / day; acceptance of crops from railway transport - 3000 tons / day, transshipment capacity - up to 1.2 million tons per year, shipment to the sea vessels - 7000 tons / day. The analysis of the automation level of the grain terminal is carried out. The company uses software from 1C - «1C: Enterprise 8. Accounting for grain elevator, mill, and feed mill for Ukraine». This software is used for quantitative and qualitative registration at the elevator in accordance with industry guidelines and standards. The software product has many

  7. Drinking Coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2015-01-01

    The chapter explores how coffee is an integral part of our daily life. Focusing on coffee drinking at home, at work, and on the go I show that coffee consumption is a social practice. The chapter illustrates through everyday examples that coffee is more than a caffeine drug. Coffee, with or without...... caffeine, is a social lubricant. We talk to each other and share emotions with one another as we share a cup of coffee. Coffee makes conversation and we embrace coffee, to stay or to go, in the daily rhythm of our busy and global social existence. The practice and sociality of coffee consumption provide...... the coffee industry with the opportunity to make money on our coffee preferences – indeed, also for those of us who actually dislike the taste of coffee. Would you prefer coffee mixed and stirred with non-coffee products such as salt, caramel and licorice? Then you are one of us in the modern age of coffee...

  8. Simulation of the internal environment of a post-harvest installation and a solar dryer of coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Osorio H.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to make a simulation of the internal environment of an installations for coffee post-harvest and a parabolic solar dryer, specifically analyzing the effect of natural ventilation on the temperature and relative humidity inside these buildings. The ventilated coffee-processing plant and the solar dryer with the largest natural ventilation area showed the best results to preserve the quality of coffee grain.

  9. Development of a Rapid Method for the Determination of Caffeine in Coffee Grains by GC-FID-A Fully Validated Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasias, Ioannis N; Kiriakou, I; Proestos, Charalampos

    2017-08-22

    A simple method for the determination of caffeine in coffee grains by GC-FID (Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionisation Detector) is presented in the current work. The method was fully validated according to ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 17025 requirements and European Commission regulations. The accuracy, as provided by recovery experiments, was higher than 93%, and the precision, as provided by the (%) relative standard deviation under reproducibility conditions, was lower than 5%. A vast number of independent parameters that lead in the increase of uncertainty of methods were investigated. The analysis was performed without use of an internal standard, which was proven to be reliable according to several validation methods. The method was applied in real samples, and possible health claims were investigated.

  10. Looking into individual coffee beans during the roasting process: direct micro-probe sampling on-line photo-ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of coffee roasting gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz-Schünemann, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Ehlert, Sven; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    A micro-probe (μ-probe) gas sampling device for on-line analysis of gases evolving in confined, small objects by single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) was developed. The technique is applied for the first time in a feasibility study to record the formation of volatile and flavour compounds during the roasting process within (inside) or in the direct vicinity (outside) of individual coffee beans. A real-time on-line analysis of evolving volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC) as they are formed under the mild pyrolytic conditions of the roasting process was performed. The soft-ionisation mass spectra depict a molecular ion signature, which is well corresponding with the existing knowledge of coffee roasting and evolving compounds. Additionally, thereby it is possible to discriminate between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta). The recognized differences in the roasting gas profiles reflect the differences in the precursor composition of the coffee cultivars very well. Furthermore, a well-known set of marker compounds for Arabica and Robusta, namely the lipids kahweol and cafestol (detected in their dehydrated form at m/z 296 and m/z 298, respectively) were observed. If the variation in time of different compounds is observed, distinctly different evolution behaviours were detected. Here, phenol (m/z 94) and caffeine (m/z 194) are exemplary chosen, whereas phenol shows very sharp emission peaks, caffeine do not have this highly transient behaviour. Finally, the changes of the chemical signature as a function of the roasting time, the influence of sampling position (inside, outside) and cultivar (Arabica, Robusta) is investigated by multivariate statistics (PCA). In summary, this pilot study demonstrates the high potential of the measurement technique to enhance the fundamental knowledge of the formation processes of volatile and semi-volatile flavour compounds inside the individual coffee bean.

  11. Processing properties of grains from some maize cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the dry milling, whole or pealed grains were simply processed in a hammer mill and the flour fractions separated as with wet milling. Results indicated some variation in the proximate composition with nine cultivars exhibiting protein contents above 8%. High protein cultivars were in order hybrids 88094X87036, ...

  12. Metadata for fine-grained processing at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cranshaw, Jack; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    High energy physics experiments are implementing highly parallel solutions for event processing on resources that support concurrency at multiple levels. These range from the inherent large-scale parallelism of HPC resources to the multiprocessing and multithreading needed for effective use of multi-core and GPU-augmented nodes. Such modes of processing, and the efficient opportunistic use of transiently-available resources, lead to finer-grained processing of event data. Previously metadata systems were tailored to jobs that were atomic and processed large, well-defined units of data. The new environment requires a more fine-grained approach to metadata handling, especially with regard to bookkeeping. For opportunistic resources metadata propagation needs to work even if individual jobs are not finalized. This contribution describes ATLAS solutions to this problem in the context of the multiprocessing framework currently in use for LHC Run 2, development underway for the ATLAS multithreaded framework (Athena...

  13. Effects of coffee processing residues on anaerobic microorganisms and corresponding digestion performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sossa, Juan Pablo; Murillo-Roos, Mariana; Uribe, Lidieth; Uribe-Lorio, Lorena; Marsh, Terence; Larsen, Niels; Chen, Rui; Miranda, Alberto; Solís, Kattia; Rodriguez, Werner; Kirk, Dana; Liao, Wei

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of different coffee processing residues on the anaerobic microbes and corresponding digestion performance. The results elucidated that mucilage-rich feed enhanced the accumulation of methanogens, which consequently led to better digestion performance of biogas production. Fifty percent more methane and up to 3 times more net energy (heat and electricity) output were achieved by the digestion of the mucilage-rich feed (M3). The microbial community and statistical analyses further elucidated that different residues in the feed had significant impact on microbial distribution and correspondingly influenced the digestion performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing of Arabica Coffee Bean Fermentation Process Using a Controlled Fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One  of  primary  coffee  processing  steps  which  affect  the  end  quality  isfermentation.  Fermentation  using  a  controlled  fermentor  might  be  usefulbecause  all  of  parameters  which  influence  coffee  quality  can  be  controlled.The  aim of this  research is to evaluate  performance  of  controlled fermentor forfermentation  process  of  Arabica  coffee  beans.  Main  material  of  this  researchwas ripe Arabica coffee cherries from Andungsari Research Station in Bondowoso district.  Research  parameters  were  temperature  with  four  levels  i.e.:  ambient temperature,  30o C,  35oC  and  40oC,  and  fermentation  time  with  three  levels  i.e.: 6  hours,  12  hours,  and  18  hours.  A  horizontal  type  of  modified  fermentor  has been  tested  with  20  kg/batch  or  50%  of  maximum  loading  capacity.  The  result showed  that  an  electric  heater  as  energy  source  can  raise  temperature  duringfermentation  process.  Fermentation  process  using  fermentor  at  30-40oC had  not  significant  effect  on  physical  properties  change  such  as  density,  beancount  per  100  g  and  distribution  of  beans.  Optimum  condition  for  Arabica fermentation  process  in  a  modified  fermentor  reactor  was  25oC  temperature, and  12  hours  fermentation  time.  By  this  condition,  green  beans  have  good organoleptic  score  than  other  fermentation  process  treatments. Key words: Fermentor, fermentation, coffee, quality, organoleptic, horizontal cylinder.

  15. Exploratory and discriminative studies of commercial processed Brazilian coffees with different degrees of roasting and decaffeinated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Souza Ribeiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The fingerprints of the volatile compounds of 21 commercial Brazilian coffee samples submitted to different industrial processing i.e. decaffeinated or different roasting degrees (traditional and dark were studied. The volatiles were collected by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The chromatographic data matrices (fingerprints obtained were explored by the principal component analysis (PCA and partial least squares - discriminative analysis (PLS-DA. Initially the chromatographic profiles were aligned by the algorithm correlation optimized warping (COW. The PCA showed the discrimination of the decaffeinated coffees from the others with both the SPME fibres used. This separation probably occurred due to the loss of some volatile precursors during the decaffeination process, such as sucrose. For both the fibres tested, PDMS/DVB and CX / PDMS SPME, the PLS-DA models correctly classified 100% of the samples according to their roasting degree: (medium and dark, the main differences being the concentrations of some of the volatile compounds such as 2-methyl furan, 2-methylbutanal, 2,3-pentanedione, pyrazine, 2-carboxyaldehyde pyrrole, furfural and 2-furanmethanol.

  16. Sustainable conversion of coffee and other crop wastes to biofuels and bioproducts using combined biochemical and thermochemical processes in a multi-stage biorefinery concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    The environmental impact of agricultural waste from processing of food and feed crops is an increasing concern worldwide. Concerted efforts are underway to develop sustainable practices for the disposal of residues from processing of such crops as coffee, sugarcane, or corn. Coffee is crucial to the...

  17. Quality and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee Processed by Some Fermentation Treatments: Temperature, Containers, and Fermentation Agents Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee fermentation is a step of wet processing. In fact, some microorganisms naturally exist on the surface of coffee cherry. Using a starter culture of microorganisms may change equilibrium of microorganism population. Among some safe fermentation agents are present in “ragi tape” (yeast, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk. A fermentor machine equipped with eating-control and stirrer had been designed, and tested before. Some treatments investigated were fermentation containers (fermentor machine and plastic sacks; fermentation agents (fresh cage-luwakcoffee, “ragi tape”, “ragi tempe”, and fermented milk; temperature of fermentation (room, 30 C, 35 C, and 40 C; and duration of fermentation (6, 12, and 18 hours. The experiment were replicated three times. Wet-coffee parchments were washed and sundried until moisture content reached 12%. The dried parchment was hulled and examined for the bean quality and flavors. The experiment indicated that 40 C fermentation in fermentor machine resulted in higher content of “full sour defect”. Fermentation agents significanly influenced bean size. Temperature treatment significanly influenced bulk density and bean size. The best flavor profile was obtained from fermentation in plastic sack at ambient temperature. Bacteria of fermented milk and “fresh luwak coffee” as fermentation agents resulted up to excellent flavor. Twelve hours fermentation produced best flavor of Arabica coffee compared to 6 and 18 hours. Key words: Arabica coffee, fermentation, flavour, fermentation agents

  18. Effect of processing on mycotoxin content in grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Geetanjali

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins that commonly occur in cereal grains and other products can contaminate finished processed foods on account of their high toxicity. The mycotoxins that are commonly associated with food grains include aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone. Various food-processing operations include sorting, trimming, cleaning, cooking, baking, frying, roasting, flaking, and extrusion that have variable effects on mycotoxins. The nature of the processing operation viz. physical, chemical, or thermal plays an important role in this; usually, the processes that utilize the higher temperatures have greater effects on mycotoxin dissipation. In general, the processes are known to reduce mycotoxin concentrations significantly, but do not eliminate them completely. However, roasting and extrusion processing result in lowest mycotoxin concentrations, since these involve higher temperatures. It is observed that very high temperatures are needed to bring about high reduction in mycotoxin concentrations, approaching acceptable background levels. The treatment with chemicals like ammonia, bicarbonate, citric acid, or sodium bisulfite is also effective in resulting in significant decline in mycotoxin concentrations.

  19. Grain- to multiple-grain-scale deformation processes during diffusion creep of forsterite + diopside aggregate: 1. Direct observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, G.; Hiraga, T.

    2017-08-01

    We uniaxially deformed fine-grained ( 1 μm) forsterite + diopside (5 and 20 vol %) aggregates in the diffusion creep regime. Prior to deformation, line markers were milled on a lateral surface of a cylindrical sample to detect single- to multiple-grain-scale deformation. We performed deformation experiments and observations of the marker-etched surface after sample cooling multiple times on the same specimens. The strain measured at the scale of several tens of grains from macroscopic shortening of the markers parallel to the compression axis is consistent with the total strain of the sample. However, microscopically, the markers are intensely segmented and rotated at the grain scale increasing with the sample strain. Meanwhile, essentially, no deformation is observed within the grains in most of the samples. The surface microstructures, including the deformation of the markers, reveal the serial operations of grain boundary migration, grain boundary sliding, rigid body grain rotation, and grain neighbor switching, which correspond well to processes expected in diffusion-controlled superplasticity. This sequence is commonly observed in both samples consisting of forsterite grains of tabular and equiaxed grain shapes, which have been shown to develop notable crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and random (or weak) CPO, respectively, during diffusion creep. Intragranular regions of relatively larger forsterite grains in the specimens deformed at stresses near the transition between deformation mechanisms from diffusion creep to dislocation creep reveal marker deformation and formation of surface creases and subgrain boundaries, which indicate intragranular dislocation processes. Overall, the surface microstructures reflect the deformation state of the materials well.

  20. [Coffee in Cancer Chemoprevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirthová, J; Gál, B; Smilek, P; Urbánková, P

    Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of several diseases including cancer. Its chemopreventive effect has been studied in vitro, in animal models, and more recently in humans. Several modes of action have been proposed, namely, inhibition of oxidative stress and damage, activation of metabolizing liver enzymes involved in carcinogen detoxification processes, and anti-inflammatory effects. The antioxidant activity of coffee relies partly on its chlorogenic acid content and is increased during the roasting process. Maximum antioxidant activity is observed for medium-roasted coffee. The roasting process leads to the formation of several components, e.g., melanoidins, which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Coffee also contains two specific diterpenes, cafestol and kahweol, which have anticarcinogenic properties. Roasted coffee is a complex mixture of various chemicals. Previous studies have reported that the chemopreventive components present in coffee induce apoptosis, inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells, and elicit antiangiogenic effects. A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies showed that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of developing various malignant tumors. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and the experimental and epidemiological evidence supporting the chemopreventive effect of coffee.Key words: coffee - chemoprevention - antioxidative enzyme - detoxification enzyme - anti-inflammatory effect The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 11. 9. 2016Accepted: 24. 11. 2016.

  1. Fine-Grained Turbidites: Facies, Attributes and Process Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stow, Dorrik; Omoniyi, Bayonle

    2016-04-01

    Within turbidite systems, fine-grained sediments are still the poor relation and sport several contrasting facies models linked to process of deposition. These are volumetrically the dominant facies in deepwater and, from a resource perspective, they form important marginal and tight reservoirs, and have great potential for unconventional shale gas, source rocks and seals. They are also significant hosts of metals and rare earth elements. Based on a large number of studies of modern, ancient and subsurface systems, including 1000s of metres of section logging, we define the principal genetic elements of fine-grained deepwater facies, present a new synthesis of facies models and their sedimentary attributes. The principal architectural elements include: non-channelised slope-aprons, channel-fill, channel levee and overbank, turbidite lobes, mass-transport deposits, contourite drifts, basin sheets and drapes. These comprise a variable intercalation of fine-grained facies - thin-bedded and very thin-bedded turbidites, contourites, hemipelagites and pelagites - and associated coarse-grained facies. Characteristic attributes used to discriminate between these different elements are: facies and facies associations; sand-shale ratio, sand and shale geometry and dimensions, sand connectivity; sediment texture and small-scale sedimentary structures; sediment fabric and microfabric; and small-scale vertical sequences of bed thickness. To some extent, we can relate facies and attribute characteristics to different depositional environments. We identify four distinct facies models: (a) silt-laminated mud turbidites, (b) siliciclastic mud turbidites, (c) carbonate mud turbidites, (d) disorganized silty-mud turbidites, and (e) hemiturbidites. Within the grainsize-velocity matrix turbidite plot, these all fall within the region of mean size < 0.063mm, maximum grainsize (one percentile) <0.2mm, and depositional velocity 0.1-0.5 m/s. Silt-laminated turbidites and many mud

  2. coffee growing areas in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enal eudiodiorg.uk -. Acknowledgements. The authors would like to thank Jennifer Leavy, Steve Wiggins, Colin Poulton and Kay Sharp for comments on various versions of this paper. ... coffee for a considerable share of their income, and provides jobs for many more people in coffee-related activities (e.g. coffee processing, ...

  3. Viability analysis of heat recovery solution for industrial process of roasting coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kljajić Miroslav V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Every industrial heat recovery solution is specific engineering challenge but not because predicted energy rationalization or achieved energy savings but potential unavoidable technological deviations and consequences on related processes and for sure, high investment because of delicate design and construction. Often, the energy savings in a particular segment of the industrial process is a main goal. However, in the food industry, especially roasting coffee, additional criteria has to be strictly observed and fulfilled. Such criteria may include prescribed and uniform product quality, compliance with food safety standards, stability of the processes etc., and all in the presence of key process parameters variability, inconsistency of raw material composition and quality, complexity of measurement and analytical methods etc. The paper respects all circumstances and checks viability of proposed recovery solution. The paper analyzes the possibility of using waste heat from the roasting process to ensure shortening of roasting cycle, reduction of fuel consumption and increasing capacity of roasting lines on daily basis. Analysis concludes that effects are valuable and substantial, although the complete solution is on the threshold of economic sustainability with numerous opportunities to improve of both technical and economic indicators. The analysis combines measuring and analytical methods with standard cost-benefit analysis. Conclusions are derived from measurements and calculations of key parameters in the operating conditions and checked by experimental methods. Test results deviate from 10 to 15%, in relation with parameters in main production line.

  4. Puffing, a novel coffee bean processing technique for the enhancement of extract yield and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooki; Kim, Sang-Youn; Kim, Dae-Ok; Kim, Byung-Yong; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2018-02-01

    Puffing of coffee beans, which induces heat- and pressure-derived physicochemical changes, was applied as an alternative to roasting. Roasted or puffed coffee beans with equivalent lightness values were compared. The moisture content was higher while the crude fat and protein compositions were lower in puffed beans than in roasted beans. The pH was lower and the acid content was higher in puffed beans than in roasted beans. The roasted beans exhibited greater specific volumes, while the puffed beans displayed greater extraction yields. The trigonelline and total phenolic contents were greater in puffed beans than in roasted beans resulting in an enhanced antioxidant capacity. Sensory evaluation of roasted and puffed coffee bean brews revealed that puffing did not affect the flavor or overall acceptance. The current study provides evidence that puffing is an alternative to roasting coffee beans with various benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrated electrocoagulation-electrooxidation process for the treatment of soluble coffee effluent: Optimization of COD degradation and operation time analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra-Taquez, Harold N; GilPavas, Edison; Blatchley, Ernest R; Gómez-García, Miguel-Ángel; Dobrosz-Gómez, Izabela

    2017-09-15

    Soluble coffee production generates wastewater containing complex mixtures of organic macromolecules. In this work, a sequential Electrocoagulation-Electrooxidation (EC-EO) process, using aluminum and graphite electrodes, was proposed as an alternative way for the treatment of soluble coffee effluent. Process operational parameters were optimized, achieving total decolorization, as well as 74% and 63.5% of COD and TOC removal, respectively. The integrated EC-EO process yielded a highly oxidized (AOS = 1.629) and biocompatible (BOD5/COD ≈ 0.6) effluent. The Molecular Weight Distribution (MWD) analysis showed that during the EC-EO process, EC effectively decomposed contaminants with molecular weight in the range of 10-30 kDa. In contrast, EO was quite efficient in mineralization of contaminants with molecular weight higher than 30 kDa. A kinetic analysis allowed determination of the time required to meet Colombian permissible discharge limits. Finally, a comprehensive operational cost analysis was performed. The integrated EC-EO process was demonstrated as an efficient alternative for the treatment of industrial effluents resulting from soluble coffee production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical characterization of coffee after roasting and grinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Henrique Horta de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Flowability is an important characteristic of handling process for efficiency and reliability purpose of post-harvest operations, which are governed by the physical properties of the product. Physical properties determination is an important factor for formulation of machinery projects and sizing of post-harvest operations, which may impact considerably on the products quality, influencing directly the operation cost and company profit. Thus, the objective of this work was to evaluate and determinate some physical properties (repose angle, unit and bulk density, porosity and color coordinates, particle size, moisture content, water activity, angle of internal friction and effective angle of internal friction of coffee, such as to evaluate the influence of different roast and grinding degrees over these properties. Crude grain coffee (Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, dehulled and dried were used. These were roasted at two levels: medium light and medium-dark brown, which Agtron numbers are, respectively, SCAA#65 and SCAA#45. After roasting process, grains were grinded at three particle sizes (thin, medium and thick. Both particle size and roast degree significantly affected physical properties of coffee. Coffee samples roasted at medium dark level obtained lower values of moisture content, water activity, repose angle, bulk and real density. Coffee samples grinded at level thin presented an increase of angle of internal friction and effective angle of internal friction, repose angle, bulk and real density, porosity and decrease of water activity values.

  7. The effect of dewaxing of green coffee on the coffee brew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, G.H.D. van der

    1979-01-01

    The two commercially most important mild treatments for green coffee are the steam treatment and the dewaxing process. In the former treatment the green coffee is just steamed. In the dewaxing process the waxy layer is extracted from the green coffee with an organic solvent, after which this coffee

  8. Process optimization of biogas energy production from cow dung with alkali pre-treated coffee pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvankumar, T; Sudhakar, C; Govindaraju, M; Selvam, K; Aroulmoji, V; Sivakumar, N; Govarthanan, M

    2017-08-01

    Biogas production from cow dung with co-substrate agricultural waste is one of the most demanding technologies for generating energy in a sustainable approach considering eco-friendly. In the present study, coffee pulp (CP) was pre-treated with 1% NaOH and combined with various proportions of cow dung (CD) to explore its biogas producing potentiality. The optimization of the process was studied using Response surface methodology. Statistics based on 3-D plots were generated to evaluate the changes in the response surface and to understand the relationship between the biogas yield and other parameters. The highest methane production (144 mL/kg) was achieved after 90 h of incubation with 1:3 of CP and CD at 40 °C. Gas chromatography analyzes the chemical compositions of the generated biogas and its post combustion emissions. The chemical composition of the substrates before digestion and after fermentation (biogas spent sludge) were measured in terms of fiber content and the values were noted as, total solids (0.53%), ash content (9.2%), volatile fatty acid (100 mg/L), organic carbon (46%) and a total carbohydrate (179 mg/g). The results of the optimization of biogas production presented in this work found to have significance with the process parameters. The outcome of the study has supported the fact of conventional combustion technology that has to be upgraded to prevent these hazardous emissions into the atmosphere.

  9. Covering the different steps of the coffee processing: Can headspace VOC emissions be exploited to successfully distinguish between Arabica and Robusta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzi, Ilaria; Taiti, Cosimo; Marone, Elettra; Magnelli, Susanna; Gonnelli, Cristina; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-12-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS technique in distinguishing between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora var. robusta (Robusta) commercial stocks in each step of the processing chain (green beans, roasted beans, ground coffee, brews). volatile organic compounds (VOC) spectra from coffee samples of 7 Arabica and 6 Robusta commercial stocks were recorded and submitted to multivariate statistical analysis. Results clearly showed that, in each stage of the coffee processing, the volatile composition of coffee is highly influenced by the species. Actually, with the exception of green beans, PTR-ToF-MS technique was able to correctly recognize Arabica and Robusta samples. Particularly, among 134 tentatively identified VOCs, some masses (16 for roasted coffee, 12 for ground coffee and 12 for brewed coffee) were found to significantly discriminate the two species. Therefore, headspace VOC analyses was showed to represent a valuable tool to distinguish between Arabica and Robusta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Coffee fermentation and flavor--An intricate and delicate relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2015-10-15

    The relationship between coffee fermentation and coffee aroma is intricate and delicate at which the coffee aroma profile is easily impacted by the fermentation process during coffee processing. However, as the fermentation process in coffee processing is conducted mainly for mucilage removal, its impacts on coffee aroma profile are usually neglected. Therefore, this review serves to summarize the available literature on the impacts of fermentation in coffee processing on coffee aroma as well as other unconventional avenues where fermentation is employed for coffee aroma modulation. Studies have noted that proper control over the fermentation process imparts desirable attributes and prevents undesirable fermentation which generates off-flavors. Other unconventional avenues in which fermentation is employed for aroma modulation include digestive bioprocessing and the fermentation of coffee extracts and green coffee beans. The latter is an area that should be explored further with appropriate microorganisms given its potential for coffee aroma modulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. research note disappearance of processed maize grain in the rumen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By comparison only 5 per cent of unpro- cessed maize grain disappeared within 24 hours and after six days about 80 per bent of the original DM of unpro- cessed maze were still left in the dacron bags. These results are in agreement with the results of Orskov er a/. (1978) who used barley as grain source. lo0. = h r'o. Eso.

  12. Kinetic parameters of biomass growth in a UASB reactor treating wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Milton Montenegro Campos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the treatment of wastewater from coffee wet processing (WCWP in an anaerobic treatment system at a laboratory scale. The system included an acidification/equalization tank (AET, a heat exchanger, an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor (UASB, a gas equalization device and a gas meter. The minimum and maximum flow rates and volumetric organic loadings rate (VOLR were 0.004 to 0.037 m 3 d -1 and 0.14 to 20.29 kgCOD m -3 d -1 , respectively. The kinetic parameters measured during the anaerobic biodegradation of the WCWP, with a minimal concentration of phenolic compounds of 50 mg L - ¹, were: Y = 0.37 mgTVS (mgCODremoved -1 , Kd = 0.0075 d-1 , Ks = 1.504mg L -1 , μmax = 0.2 d -1 . The profile of sludge in the reactor showed total solids (TS values from 22,296 to 55,895 mg L -1 and TVS 11,853 to 41,509 mg L -1 , demonstrating a gradual increase of biomass in the reactor during the treatment, even in the presence of phenolic compounds in the concentration already mentioned.

  13. Effect of influent aeration on removal of organic matter from coffee processing wastewater in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Maike; Matos, Antonio Teixeira; Abreu, Edgar Carneiro; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Borges, Alisson Carraro

    2013-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of aeration and vegetation on the removal of organic matter in coffee processing wastewater (CPW) treated in 4 constructed wetlands (CWs), characterized as follows: (i) ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) cultivated system operating with an aerated influent; (ii) non-cultivated system operating with an aerated influent, (iii) ryegrass cultivated system operating with a non-aerated influent; and (iv) non-cultivated system operating with a non-aerated influent. The lowest average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) removal efficiencies of 87, 84 and 73%, respectively, were obtained in the ryegrass cultivated system operating with a non-aerated influent. However, ryegrass cultivation did not influence the removal efficiency of organic matter. Artificial aeration of the CPW, prior to its injection in the CW, did not improve the removal efficiencies of organic matter. On other hand it did contribute to increase the instantaneous rate at which the maximum COD removal efficiency was reached. Although aeration did not result in greater organic matter removal efficiencies, it is important to consider the benefits of aeration on the removal of the other compounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of roasting and different brewing processes on the ochratoxin A content in coffee determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Pera, L; Avellone, G; Lo Turco, V; Di Bella, G; Agozzino, P; Dugo, G

    2008-10-01

    A rapid and reliable procedure has been developed for the determination of ochratoxin A (OTA) in green and roasted coffee. The method consists of extraction of the sample with methanol-5% aqueous sodium hydrogen carbonate/1% PEG8000 (20:80), followed by immunoaffinity column (IAC) clean-up and, finally, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) determination with fluorimetric detection. Mean recoveries for green and roasted coffee spiked at different levels ranging from 94 and 105% were obtained. The limit of determination (S/N = 3) was 0.032 ng g(-1) and the precision (within-laboratory relative standard deviation) was 6%. The method described has been used to assess the influence of roasting and different brewing processes on OTA content in commercial lots of green and roasted coffee. The results provided evidence that roasting led to a significant drop on OTA levels (65-100%). Also, the way coffee is prepared affects the OTA content: brewing using a Moka Express (Italian coffee) led to a significant reduction of OTA concentration (50-75%) since hot water stays in contact with coffee for a short time. On the contrary, Turkish coffee-making (infusion for about 10 min) cause poor reduction in OTA.

  15. Ochratoxin A contamination of coffee batches from Kenya in relation to cultivation methods and post-harvest processing treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Daniel; Mburu, Joseph K; Durand, Noël; Clarke, Renata; Frank, John M; Guyot, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    This study set out to assess the relative importance of sound and unsound beans in a batch of coffee with regard to ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination. Initially, unsound beans were found to account for 95% of contamination in a batch of coffee, whatever the methods used for post-harvest processing. It was also found that beans displaying traces of attacks by Colletotrichum kahawae were the greatest contributors to OTA contamination. In a second stage, the study compared the contamination of sound beans with that of beans attacked by Colletotrichum kahawae. On average, beans attacked by Colletotrichum kahawae had a statistically higher OTA content than sound beans (18.0 microg kg(-1) as opposed to 1.2 microg kg(-1)). In addition, the average OTA content in unsound beans varied depending on growing conditions.

  16. Microscopia eletrônica de varredura do endosperma de café (Coffea arabica L. durante o processo de secagem Scanning electron microscopy of the endosperm of coffee (Coffea arabica L. during the drying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Saath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A manutenção da integridade das membranas celulares, entre outros eventos, é um forte indicativo de que a qualidade do café foi preservada na pós-colheita. Objetivou-se neste trabalho, analisar o efeito de diferentes métodos de secagem na manutenção da integridade da parede celular e da membrana plasmática de café natural e café despolpado, buscando determinar as condições e o momento em que ocorrem as rupturas microscópicas. Os cafés foram submetidos a um período de pré-secagem em terreiro. Após este, uma parcela de cada tipo de café foi desidratada no terreiro e, outra, à temperatura de 40ºC e 60ºC em secadores de camada fixa, monitorando-se a temperatura e o teor de água até 11% (bu. Nesse período, grãos foram aleatoriamente amostrados e fragmentos do endosperma preparados para a microscopia eletrônica de varredura, registrando-se diversas eletromicrografias, avaliando-se as alterações na membrana plasmática da célula do endosperma dos grãos de cafés em função do teor de água e tempo de secagem. O citoplasma das células a 11% (bu de teor de água não foi comprometido na secagem em terreiro e a 40°C; na secagem a 60°C, observou-se comprometimento nas estruturas celulares nos cafés com teor de água de 20% (bu.The maintenance of the integrity of cellular membranes, among other events, is a strong indicator that the quality of the coffee was preserved in the post-harvesting process. Therefore, this work aimed to analyze the effect of different drying methods on the maintenance of the integrity of cell walls and plasma membrane of natural and de-pulped coffee in order to determine the conditions and the moment that microscopic ruptures take place. The coffee was submitted to a pre-drying period on a concrete patio. After this, a sample of each type of coffee was dehydrated outdoors and another, with heated air at 40ºC and 60ºC in fixed-layer dryers, controlling the grain temperature and the moisture

  17. Coffee and liver health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisco, Filomena; Lembo, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Giovanna; Camera, Silvia; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely used beverages in the world. It includes a wide array of components that can have potential implications for health. Several epidemiological studies associate coffee consumption with a reduced incidence of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past 20 years, an increasing number of epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the positive effects of coffee on chronic liver diseases. Coffee consumption has been inversely associated with the activity of liver enzymes in subjects at risk, including heavy drinkers. Coffee favours an improvement in hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, and a reduction in cirrhosis and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanisms of action through which it exerts its beneficial effects are not fully understood. Experimental studies show that coffee consumption reduces fat accumulation and collagen deposition in the liver and promotes antioxidant capacity through an increase in glutathione as well as modulation of the gene and protein expression of several inflammatory mediators. Animal and in vitro studies indicate that cafestol and kahweol, 2 diterpens, can operate by modulating multiple enzymes involved in the detoxification process of carcinogens causing hepatocellular carcinoma. It is unclear whether the benefits are significant enough to "treat" patients with chronic liver disease. While we await clarification, moderate daily unsweetened coffee use is a reasonable adjuvant to therapy for these patients.

  18. Classification of rice grain varieties arranged in scattered and heap fashion using image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sudhanva; Panat, Sreedath; N, Arunachalam

    2017-03-01

    Inspection and classification of food grains is a manual process in many of the food grain processing industries. Automation of such a process is going to be beneficial for industries facing shortage of skilled workforce. Machine Vision techniques are some of the popular approaches for developing such automations. Most of the existing works on the topic deal with identification of the rice variety by analyzing images of well separated and isolated rice grains from which a lot of geometrical features can be extracted. This paper proposes techniques to estimate geometrical parameters from the images of scattered as well as heaped rice grains where the grain boundaries are not clearly identifiable. A methodology based on convexity is proposed to separate touching rice grains in the scattered rice grain images and get their geometrical parameters. And in case of heaped arrangement a Pixel-Distance Contribution Function is defined and is used to get points inside rice grains and then to find the boundary points of rice grains. These points are fit with the equation of an ellipse to estimate their lengths and breadths. The proposed techniques are applied on images of scattered and heaped rice grains of different varieties. It is shown that each variety gives a unique set of results.

  19. Processing characteristics, grain quality and end-use quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total milling recovery (TMR) was lower in hybrid than CIR and there was significantly (p < 0.05) outstanding performance in terms of milling recovery of FARO 52 and FARO 60 over the hybrids. There was no significant difference (p < 0.05) between the hybrid and CIR in terms of grain elongation ratio, but there was marginal ...

  20. The water kefir grain inoculum determines the characteristics of the resulting water kefir fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, D; De Vuyst, L

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the influence of the water kefir grain inoculum on the characteristics of the water kefir fermentation process. Three water kefir fermentation processes were started with different water kefir grain inocula and followed as a function of time regarding microbial species diversity, community dynamics, substrate consumption profile and metabolite production course. The inoculum determined the water kefir grain growth, the viable counts on the grains, the time until total carbohydrate exhaustion, the final metabolite concentrations and the microbial species diversity. There were always 2-10 lactic acid bacterial cells for every yeast cell and the majority of these micro-organisms was always present on the grains. Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus hilgardii, Lactobacillus nagelii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were always present and may be the key micro-organisms during water kefir fermentation. Low water kefir grain growth was associated with small grains with high viable counts of micro-organisms, fast fermentation and low pH values, and was not caused by the absence of exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria. The water kefir grain inoculum influences the microbial species diversity and characteristics of the fermentation process. A select group of key micro-organisms was always present during fermentation. This study allows a rational selection of a water kefir grain inoculum. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Real-time monitoring of a coffee roasting process with near infrared spectroscopy using multivariate statistical analysis: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelani, Tiago A; Santos, João Rodrigo; Páscoa, Ricardo N M J; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena R; Lopes, João A

    2018-03-01

    This work proposes the use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance mode and multivariate statistical process control (MSPC) based on principal component analysis (PCA) for real-time monitoring of the coffee roasting process. The main objective was the development of a MSPC methodology able to early detect disturbances to the roasting process resourcing to real-time acquisition of NIR spectra. A total of fifteen roasting batches were defined according to an experimental design to develop the MSPC models. This methodology was tested on a set of five batches where disturbances of different nature were imposed to simulate real faulty situations. Some of these batches were used to optimize the model while the remaining was used to test the methodology. A modelling strategy based on a time sliding window provided the best results in terms of distinguishing batches with and without disturbances, resourcing to typical MSPC charts: Hotelling's T 2 and squared predicted error statistics. A PCA model encompassing a time window of four minutes with three principal components was able to efficiently detect all disturbances assayed. NIR spectroscopy combined with the MSPC approach proved to be an adequate auxiliary tool for coffee roasters to detect faults in a conventional roasting process in real-time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  3. Grain morphology of YBCO coated superconductors prepared by spin process on Ni substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.F.; Du, S.J.; Yan, G.; Xi, W.; Wu, X.; Pang, Y.; Wang, F.Y.; Liu, X.H.; Feng, Y.; Zhang, P.X.; Wu, X.Z.; Zhou, L

    2003-04-15

    The YBCO thick films with c-axis preferred orientation were prepared by spin and printing processes on Ni substrates (including cold rolling Ni, cube textured Ni, and cube textured Ni+self-oxided NiO). The results show that the chrysanthemum (or spherulite) and polygon morphology grains dominate the microstructure of YBCO films. The chrysanthemum size is about 0.2-0.5 mm range, some reaches 1 mm, and polygon grains normally are placed in the center of the chrysanthemum grains. No chrysanthemum grains appear in the thick films prepared on the substrate with Ag or YBCO intermediate layers.

  4. Mechanisms of dust grain charging in plasma with allowance for electron emission processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol’kov, S. I.; Savin, V. N., E-mail: moped@onego.ru [Petrozavodsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The process of dust grain charging is described with allowance for secondary, ion-induced, photoelectric, and thermal electron emission from the grain surface. The roughness of the grain surface is taken into account. An intermediate charging regime involving ion–atom collisions and electron ionization in the perturbed plasma region is analyzed using the moment equations and Poisson’s equation. A calculation method is proposed that allows one to take into account the influence of all the above effects and determine the radius of the plasma region perturbed by the dust grain.

  5. Mechanisms of dust grain charging in plasma with allowance for electron emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol'kov, S. I.; Savin, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    The process of dust grain charging is described with allowance for secondary, ion-induced, photoelectric, and thermal electron emission from the grain surface. The roughness of the grain surface is taken into account. An intermediate charging regime involving ion-atom collisions and electron ionization in the perturbed plasma region is analyzed using the moment equations and Poisson's equation. A calculation method is proposed that allows one to take into account the influence of all the above effects and determine the radius of the plasma region perturbed by the dust grain.

  6. Parâmetro bromatológicos de grãos crus e torrados de cultivares de café(Coffea arabica L. Bromatological parameters in raw and toasted grains of cultivars of coffee (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Maria Vieira Lopes Mendonça

    2005-06-01

    de São Sebastião do Paraíso da Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária de Minas Gerais. The fruits were dry with all the parts creating the known coffee as natural. The toasted grains were obtained by clear roasted, determined visually. The analysis of the results allowed to observe differences in the levels of soluble solids and pH for all the variable studied, in raw and toasted grains. Both cultivars Icatu Amarelo (H 2944 and Acaiá Cerrado presented larger values of the pH in the raw grains and the smallest ones in the toasted grains. The levels of soluble solids were larger in the toasted grains of the cultivars Mundo Novo and Rubi, the smallest values observed for the raw grain were in cultivars Topázio and Rubi. The total acidity showed differences only in toasted grains. There was an increase in the total acidity with the roasting, and reduction in pH values and soluble solids, which showed variation among all cultivars. It was observed that cultivars presented differences in chemical composition, and variations different from this composition with the toasted process.

  7. Effect of different rates of spent coffee grounds (SCG) on composting process, gaseous emissions and quality of end-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cátia; Fonseca, João; Aires, Alfredo; Coutinho, João; Trindade, Henrique

    2017-01-01

    The use of spent coffee grounds (SCG) in composting for organic farming is a viable way of valorising these agro-industrial residues. In the present study, four treatments with different amounts of spent coffee grounds (SCG) were established, namely, C0 (Control), C10, C20 and C40, containing 0, 10, 20 and 40% of SCG (DM), respectively; and their effects on the composting process and the end-product quality characteristics were evaluated. The mixtures were completed with Acacia dealbata L. shoots and wheat straw. At different time intervals during composting, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were measured and selected physicochemical characteristics of the composts were evaluated. During the composting process, all treatments showed a substantial decrease in total phenolics and total tannins, and an important increase in gallic acid. Emissions of greenhouse gases were very low and no significant difference between the treatments was registered. The results indicated that SCG may be successfully composted in all proportions. However C40, was the treatment which combined better conditions of composting, lower GHG emissions and better quality of end product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetization reversal processes of isotropic permanent magnets with various inter-grain exchange interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tsukahara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We performed a large-scale micromagnetics simulation on a supercomputing system to investigate the properties of isotropic nanocrystalline permanent magnets consisting of cubic grains. In the simulation, we solved the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation under a periodic boundary condition for accurate calculation of the magnetization dynamics inside the nanocrystalline isotropic magnet. We reduced the inter-grain exchange interaction perpendicular and parallel to the external field independently. Propagation of the magnetization reversal process is inhibited by reducing the inter-grain exchange interaction perpendicular to the external field, and the coercivity is enhanced by this restraint. In contrast, when we reduce the inter-grain exchange interaction parallel to the external field, the coercivity decreases because the magnetization reversal process propagates owing to dipole interaction. These behaviors show that the coercivity of an isotropic permanent magnet depends on the direction of the inter-grain exchange interaction.

  9. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  10. The clinical significance of immunological contact urticaria to processed grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact urticaria, is characterized by an urticarial wheal-and-flare reaction at the site of contact by an allergen. Immunological contact urticaria, while less common than non-immunological contact urticaria, has more potentially serious consequences, and therefore, its recognition and treatment is important. Immunological contact urticaria is a type I hypersensitivity reaction. Potential complications include organ system involvement other than skin and even anaphylaxis and death. A vast majority of immunological contact urticaria is work-related. We will discuss the definition of immunological contact urticaria, the mechanism of the contact urticarial reaction, contact urticaria in the occupational setting, and the role of grains in contact urticaria. Testing and treatment are also briefly discussed.

  11. Russian Kefir Grains Microbial Composition and Its Changes during Production Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, I B; Cherdyntseva, T A; Netrusov, A I

    2016-01-01

    By combining DGGE-PCR method, classical microbiological analysis and light- and electron microscopic observations, it was found that the composition of microbial communities of central Russia regions kefir grains, starter and kefir drink include bacteria of the genera Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and Lactococcus, and yeast anamorphs of the genera Saccharomyces, Kazachstania and Gibellulopsis. Fifteen prokaryotic and four eukaryotic pure cultures of microorganisms were isolated and identified from kefir grains. It has been shown that members of the genus Lactobacillus prevailed in kefir grains, whereas strains Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides and Lactococcus lactis dominated in the final product - kefir drink. Yeasts contained in kefir grains in small amounts have reached a significant number of cells in the process of development of this dairy product. The possibility of reverse cell aggregation has been attempted in a mixed cultivation of all isolated pure cultures, but full formation kefir grains is not yet observed after 1.5 years of observation and reinoculations.

  12. lon beam analysis of Brazilian coffee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debastiani, R.; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Ramos, M.M.; Souza, V.S.; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande so Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Coffee is one of the most popular and consumed beverages worldwide. Consumers can make the beverage from different types of coffee such as ground coffee, instant coffee or grinding roasted coffee beans. Each type of coffee leads to different characteristics in flavor and scent. The aim of this work is to perform an elemental analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. To that end, eight popular Brazilian ground coffee brands have been chosen to make a comparative study among brands. One of these brands was selected for a complete study of the beverage preparation process. This same brand offers packages of roasted coffee beans, which allowed the elemental comparison between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. Roasted coffee beans were ground with a pestle and mortar. The beverage was prepared using a typical coffee pot. The spent and liquid coffees were submitted to a heat treatment and subsequently homogenized and pressed into pellets. The filters used in the coffee pot were analyzed as well. For micro-PIXE studies, coffee beans were cut in different parts for analysis. Samples of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans (grind) were analyzed by PIXE, while light elements like C, O and N were analyzed by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry). The roasted coffee beans were analyzed by micro-PIXE to check the elemental distribution in the beans. The elements found in powder coffee were Mg, AI, Si, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb. Potassium is the element with higher concentration, while Ti and Zn are trace elements. AI, Si and Ti showed the same concentration for all brands. Potassium and chlorine have high solubility, and about 80% of their concentration is transferred from the powder to the beverage during the infusion. Mg, P, CI, K, Mn, Fe, Zn and Rb showed significant variation between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. The elemental maps show that potassium and phosphorus are correlated, and iron appears in particular

  13. Physical quality of grains subjected to moistening and drying processes for marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Coradi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim was to evaluate the physical quality of conventional and transgenic corn grains, through drying and wetting processes for marketing. The experimental design was completely randomized in a factorial scheme (7 x 3 x 2, corresponding to seven drying times (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 min, three temperatures of the drying air (80, 100 and 120 °C and two hybrids of corn (conventional AG 1051 and transgenic Herculex@ 30S31H. Grain drying was held in convection oven with forced air ventilation while the wetting was done in a B.O.D chamber. The water movement in the grain, the volume and the electrical conductivity were evaluated periodically. The results showed that the transgenic corn grain reduced the negative effects of drying and moistening on the physical quality. The increase in drying air temperature accelerated the physical deterioration of conventional and transgenic corn grains. The increase in water content by the moistening process caused losses in grain physical quality, similar to the drying process, for both the conventional and transgenic corn grains.

  14. Changes in headspace volatile concentrations of coffee brews caused by the roasting process and the brewing procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Galilea, Isabel; Fournier, Nicole; Cid, Concepción; Guichard, Elisabeth

    2006-11-01

    Headspace-solid-phase microextraction technique (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) were used to characterize the aroma compounds of coffee brews from commercial conventional and torrefacto roasted coffee prepared by filter coffeemaker and espresso machine. A total of 47 volatile compounds were identified and quantified. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to differentiate coffee brew samples by volatile compounds. Conventional and torrefacto roasted coffee brews were separated successfully by principal component 1 (68.5% of variance), and filter and espresso ones were separated by principal component 2 (19.5% of variance). By GC olfactometry, a total of 34 aroma compounds have been perceived at least in half of the coffee extracts and among them 28 were identified, among which octanal was identified for the first time as a contributor to coffee brew aroma.

  15. Parameters Online Detection and Model Predictive Control during the Grain Drying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the grain drying quality and automation level, combined with the structural characteristics of the cross-flow circulation grain dryer designed and developed by us, the temperature, moisture, and other parameters measuring sensors were placed on the dryer, to achieve online automatic detection of process parameters during the grain drying process. A drying model predictive control system was set up. A grain dry predictive control model at constant velocity and variable temperature was established, in which the entire process was dried at constant velocity (i.e., precipitation rate per hour is a constant and variable temperature. Combining PC with PLC, and based on LabVIEW, a system control platform was designed.

  16. Hints for Neutrino-process Boron in Presolar Silicon Carbide Grains from Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter; Ott, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We have studied more than 1000 presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains from the Murchison CM2 chondrite for C- and Si-isotopic compositions. Twelve SiC X grains, characterized by strong enrichments in 28Si and believed to originate from Type II Supernovae (SNeII), were also measured for Li- and B-isotopic compositions. None of these grains show resolvable isotope anomalies in Li or B. For the seven X grains without Li and B contributions from nearby or attached SiC grains of distinct origins we find on average 7Li/6Li = 11.83 ± 0.29 (solar system: 12.06) and 11B/10B = 4.68 ± 0.31 (solar system: 4.03). The average 7Li/6Li is compatible with the solar system ratio and the lithium in the X grains is likely largely dominated by contaminating Li of laboratory or meteoritic origin. Also, most of the boron in X grains appears to be contamination but the small 11B excess of ~16%, significant at the 2σ level, can be considered a hint for the presence of boron produced by the neutrino process in the parent SNeII. Despite this finding, a quantitative comparison of the B isotope and abundance data of X grains with model predictions reveals deficiencies in our current understanding of the details of B production in SNeII as well as on B chemistry and condensation in SNII ejecta.

  17. Grain boundary traction signatures: Quantifying the asymmetrical dislocation emission processes under tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhi; Chew, Huck Beng

    2017-06-01

    The disruption in crystallographic arrangement of atoms across a grain boundary interface generates local stress fields in the vicinity. Here, we reconstruct the continuum-equivalent grain boundary tractions from local atomic stresses near symmetrical-tilt Ni grain boundaries. We show that the resolved shear stress contribution from the grain boundary tractions, τGB, along active slip-systems either assists or prevents the emission of dislocations, depending on its direction with respect to the resolved shear stress contribution from external loading, τext. When τGB acts in the same direction as τext, Shockley partial dislocations are readily emitted from the boundary once | τGB +τext | exceeds the critical barrier stress for shear-slip. When τGB opposes τext, the higher sustainable stresses in the grain boundary structure instead triggers: (a) emission of dislocations from the bulk, or (b) reconfiguration of the grain boundary atomic structure and subsequent emission of non-Schmid dislocations or formation of extrinsic stacking faults. Our results quantitatively explain the asymmetrical grain boundary dislocation emission processes observed in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations under applied tensile and compressive loads. The relationship between the traction signatures and periodic structural units along the grain boundary is discussed.

  18. MODEL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES OF THE GRAIN PROCESSING AND MILL ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Blagoveshchenskaia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In the work the model of quality management of technological processes of the grain processing and mill enterprises is presented. It is shown that flour-grinding production is an important part of agro-industrial complex because it provides production of the main food product of people – flour. The analytical indicators of quality of technological process are presented. The matrix of expert estimates of i-th level of quality for the set combinations of parameters values according to the scheme of complete factorial experiment is made. Considered a model for the calculation of the raw material preparation for milling, which characterizes the main qualities of the processed raw materials. For the purpose of management of quality of technological processes of flour mill the mathematical model which includes calculation of two groups of indicators of an assessment is developed: qualities of preparation of raw materials for a grinding and qualities of conducting technological process. The algorithm of an analytical assessment of indicators of quality of technological process of the flour-grinding enterprises, including the selection of waste, selection of bran, a compliance rate of output of flour-grinding products, compliance rate of moisture products, is offered. The assessment of quality management of technological process of a high-quality grinding on the example of several leading flour-grinding enterprises of Central Federal District is carried out. The two-dimensional model of quality management of technological process based on an analytical indicators of an assessment of quality, an assessment of quality of preparation the raw materials for a grinding and an optimum effective condition of technological process is constructed. It is shown that quality management at the enterprise provides collecting, processing and the analysis of information on a condition of material streams and productions on all of their stages.

  19. Solar Ion Processing of Itokawa Grains: Reconciling Model Predictions with Sample Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Roy; Keller, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Analytical TEM observations of Itokawa grains reported to date show complex solar wind ion processing effects in the outer 30-100 nm of pyroxene and olivine grains. The effects include loss of long-range structural order, formation of isolated interval cavities or "bubbles", and other nanoscale compositional/microstructural variations. None of the effects so far described have, however, included complete ion-induced amorphization. To link the array of observed relationships to grain surface exposure times, we have adapted our previous numerical model for progressive solar ion processing effects in lunar regolith grains to the Itokawa samples. The model uses SRIM ion collision damage and implantation calculations within a framework of a constant-deposited-energy model for amorphization. Inputs include experimentally-measured amorphization fluences, a Pi steradian variable ion incidence geometry required for a rotating asteroid, and a numerical flux-versus-velocity solar wind spectrum.

  20. Metrological changes in the surface morphology of cereal grains in the mixing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królczyk, Jolanta B.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a new idea of approach to the analysis of surface morphology of cereal grains. In this paper, the surfaces of maize were analyzed using an optical 3D measurement system to determine the surface morphology and parameters of surface topography. It was established how changes in the moisture influence on the surface characteristics. Comprehensive parametric analysis was conducted for maize grains with different moisture contents. The objective of this study was to comprehensively characterize the surface morphology of maize in contact area using standardized 3D roughness parameters as well as other characteristics such as structure direction and isotropy. This is the first study that has presented, elucidated, and discussed the relationships between some morphological parameters of cereal grains. This research contributes to better understanding of the mixing process. The main findings are: the values of roughness parameters kurtosis and skewness are characterized by higher values for maize grains with lower moisture, compared with maize grains with higher moisture content; there is a close relationship between the maize grain moisture content and the surface roughness parameters of kurtosis and skewness; maize grains have an anisotropic structure.

  1. Processed grains as a supplement to lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tothi, R.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: heat treatment, maize, barley, starch, protein, in sacco, in vivo, dairy, perennial ryegrass, grazing, supplementation, ruminal fermentation, VFA, rumen, degradability, synchrony.In this thesis the effect of different ways of thermal processing (pelleting, expanding, toasting) of barley

  2. The Value Chain for Indonesian Coffee in a Green Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Neilson, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The global value chain for Indonesian coffee is currently undergoing significant structural changes, which offer both opportunities and policy challenges for the Government of Indonesia in its attempt to develop a national green economy. These changes include: the declining importance of coffee farming as a reliable livelihood strategy for many rural households; growth of the domestic coffee processing sector; and the increasing influence of coffee trading companies in coffee farm systems ass...

  3. Annealing Characteristics of Ultrafine Grained Low-Carbon Steel Processed by Differential Speed Rolling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-05-01

    The annealing behavior of ultrafine grained ferrite in low-carbon steel (0.18 wt pct C) fabricated using a differential speed rolling (DSR) process was examined by observing the microstructural changes by electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. For this purpose, the samples processed by 4-pass DSR at a roll speed ratio of 1:4 for the lower and upper rolls, respectively, were annealed isochronally at temperatures ranging from 698 K to 898 K (425 °C to 625 °C) for 1 hour. The deformed samples exhibited a complex microstructure in the ferrite phase consisting of an equiaxed structure with a mean grain size of ~0.4 µm and a lamellar structure with a mean lamellar width of ~0.35 µm. The texture evolved during deformation was characterized by the rolling and shear components with specific orientations. After annealing at temperatures lower than 798 K (525 °C), the aspect ratio of the deformed grains tended to shift toward a unit corresponding to the equiaxed shape, whereas the grain size remained unchanged as the annealing temperature increased. At temperatures above 798 K (525 °C), however, some grains with a low dislocation density began to appear, suggesting that the starting temperature of static recrystallization in the severely deformed ferrite grains was 798 K (525 °C). The annealing texture of the present sample after heat treatment showed a uniform fiber texture consisting of α- and γ-components.

  4. Inferring Fine-Grained Data Provenance in Stream Data Processing: Reduced Storage Cost, High Accuracy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Wombacher, Andreas; Apers, Peter M.G.; Hameurlain, Abdelkader; Liddle, Stephen W.; Schewe, Klaus-Dieter; Zhou, Xiaofang

    Fine-grained data provenance ensures reproducibility of results in decision making, process control and e-science applications. However, maintaining this provenance is challenging in stream data processing because of its massive storage consumption, especially with large overlapping sliding windows.

  5. Hydrolysis of isolated coffee mannan and coffee extract by mannanases of Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachslehner, A; Foidl, G; Foidl, N; Gübitz, G; Haltrich, D

    2000-06-23

    Different mannanase preparations obtained from the filamentous fungus Sclerotium rolfsii were used for the hydrolysis of coffee mannan, thus reducing significantly the viscosity of coffee extracts. Mannan is the main polysaccharide component of these extracts and is responsible for their high viscosity, which negatively affects the technological processing of instant coffee. Coffee mannan was isolated from green defatted Arabica beans by delignification, acid wash and subsequent alkali extraction with a yield of 12.8%. Additionally, coffee extract polysaccharides were separated by alcohol precipitation and were found to form nearly half of the coffee extract dry weight. These isolated mannans as well as the mannan in the coffee extract were efficiently hydrolysed by the S. rolfsii mannanase, which resulted in significant viscosity reductions. Concurrently, the reducing sugar content increased continuously due to the release of various mannooligosaccharides including mannotetraose, mannotriose, and mannobiose. Both a partially purified, immobilised and a soluble, crude mannanase preparation were successfully employed for the degradation of coffee mannan.

  6. Ultrafine grained Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rodak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is a study of Cu microstructure after severe plastic deformation process by usingcompression with oscillatory torsion test.Design/methodology/approach: Cu samples were deformed at torsion frequency (f) changed from 0 Hz(compression) to 1.8 Hz under a constant torsion angle (α) ≈8° and compression speed (v)=0.1mm/s. Structuralinvestigations were conducted by using light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Findings: The structural analysis ma...

  7. Physico-chemical composition and sensory quality of conilon coffee produced in Espírito Santo State and submitted to different processing formsComposição físico-química e qualidade sensorial de café conilon produzido no Estado do Espírito Santo e submetido a diferentes formas de processamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcísio Lima Filho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Espirito Santo State is the largest producer of conilon coffee in Brazil. However, there is a lack of information about physico-chemical composition and sensory characteristics of this coffee submitted to different processing forms. Therefore, the objective of this work was to investigate physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of the Espirito Santo conilon coffee submitted to three forms of processing. The harvest was performed selecting only cherry grains, which were submitted to three forms of processing (dry process, semi dry process or wet process. Sensory analysis was performed by two professional classifiers. Analysis of moisture, pH and titratable acidity were determined in samples of raw and roasted coffee and aqueous extract were determined in samples of roasted coffee. The processing forms and types of grains did not differ in terms of pH and acidity. Natural and peeled coffee showed higher levels of aqueous extract. In sensory classification, all samples showed good overall evaluation. The use of raw material within the quality standards, grains of cherry type and the proper conduction of post-harvest stages allow the obtainment of a beverage with good sensory ratings and without changes in pH and acidity regardless the processing form used. Therefore, it is possible to obtain good quality beverages using dry processing, which is less expensive than the other types of coffee processing Apesar de o estado do Espírito Santo ser o maior produtor de café conilon brasileiro, pouco se sabe sobre a composição físico-química e características sensoriais desse café submetido a diferentes formas de processamento. Sendo assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi realizar a caracterização físico-química e sensorial do café conilon capixaba submetido a três formas de processamento. A colheita foi realizada selecionando-se apenas grãos cereja, que foram submetidos a três formas de processamento (via seca, via úmida sem fermenta

  8. Application of binomial and multinomial probability statistics to the sampling design process of a global grain tracing and recall system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, coded, pill-sized tracers embedded in grain are proposed as a method for grain traceability. A sampling process for a grain traceability system was designed and investigated by applying probability statistics using a science-based sampling approach to collect an adequate number of tracers fo...

  9. Role of cereal type and processing in whole grain in vivo protection from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Andrea; Danesi, Francesca; Verardo, Vito; Serrazanetti, Diana Isabella; Valli, Veronica; Russo, Alessandra; Riciputi, Ylenia; Tossani, Nadia; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Bordoni, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The reduced risk of chronic diseases related to whole grain consumption is in part attributed to their high antioxidant content. Many studies have been performed on the in vitro antioxidant capacity of cereals, but in vivo studies are necessary. We have evaluated and compared the effect of whole grain durum wheat bread and whole grain Kamut khorasan bread on the oxidative status in rats. Two different bread-making processes were used for whole grain Kamut khorasan, sourdough and baker's yeast. After 7 weeks on the experimental diets rats were divided into two subgroups, one receiving an oxidative stress by doxorubicin injection. Our results evidenced both wheat durum and Kamut khorasan as good sources of antioxidants, and a lower oxidative state in rats fed the cereal-based diets. Furthermore, Kamut khorasan bread fed animals had a better response to stress than wheat durum fed, especially when a sourdough bread was supplied. Although further studies are needed, data herein reported suggest whole grains, particularly whole ancient grains, as a safe and convenient way of increasing antioxidant protection.

  10. Evolution of hardness in ultrafine-grained metals processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kawasaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The processing of metals through the application of high-pressure torsion (HPT provides the potential for achieving exceptional grain refinement in bulk metals. Numerous reports are now available demonstrating the application of HPT to a range of pure metals and simple alloys. In practice, excellent grain refinement is achieved using this processing technique with the average grain size often reduced to the true nano-scale range. Contrary to the significant grain refinement achieved in metals during HPT, the models of the hardness evolution are very different depending upon the material properties. For a better understanding of the material characteristics after conventional HPT processing, this report demonstrates the hardness evolutions in simple metals including high-purity Al, commercial purity aluminum Al-1050, ZK60A magnesium alloy and Zn-22% Al eutectoid alloy after processing by HPT. Separate models of hardness evolution are described with increasing equivalent strain by HPT. Moreover, a new approach for the use of HPT is demonstrated by synthesizing an Al–Mg metal system by processing two separate commercial metals of Al-1050 and ZK60A through conventional HPT processing at room temperature.

  11. TABLE COFFEE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dextroamphetamine with amphetamine and dextroamphetamine are the best known drug treatment for ADHD. 1 However, these drugs are not available in our environment. Caffeine is a psychoactive substance available in table coffee. When consumed in a low to moderate doses, it leads to increased alertness, energy and.

  12. Green Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs)Caffeine in green coffee might increase blood sugar. Diabetes medications are used to lower blood sugar. By ... the effectiveness of diabetes medications. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed. Some medications ...

  13. Role of Sand Grains in Sorption Processes by Surface Layers of Components of Sand Moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of researches of sorption processes of surface layers of components of sand moulds covered by protective coatings are presented in the hereby paper. Investigations comprised various types of sand grains of moulding sands with furan resin: silica sand, reclaimed sand and calcined in temperature of 700°C silica sand. Two kinds of alcoholic protective coatings were used - zirconium and zirconium - graphite. Tests were performed under condition of a constant temperature within the range 30 - 35°C and high relative air humidity 75 - 80%. To analyze the role of sand grains in sorption processes quantitavie moisture sorption with use of gravimetric method and ultrasonic method were used in measurements. The tendency to moisture sorption of surface layers of sand moulds according to the different kinds of sand grains was specified. The effectiveness of protective action of coatings from moisture sorption was analyzed as well.

  14. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione in breathing zone and area air during large-scale commercial coffee roasting, blending and grinding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. McCoy

    Full Text Available Recently described scientific literature has identified the airborne presence of 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione at concentrations approaching or potentially exceeding the current American Conference of Industrial Hygienists’ (ACGIH Threshold Limit Values (TLVs at commercial coffee roasting and production facilities. Newly established National Institutes of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limits for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione are even more conservative. Chronic exposure to these alpha-diketones at elevated airborne concentrations has been associated with lung damage, specifically bronchiolitis obliterans, most notably in industrial food processing facilities.Workers at a large commercial coffee roaster were monitored for both eight-hour and task-based, short-term, 15-min sample durations for airborne concentrations of these alpha-diketones during specific work processes, including the coffee bean roasting, blending and grinding processes, during two separate 8-h work periods. Additionally, the authors performed real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the workers’ breathing zone as well as the area workplace air for the presence of organic compounds to determine the sources, as well as quantitate and identify various organic compounds proximal to the roasting and grinding processes. Real-time FTIR measurements provided both the identification and quantitation of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, as well as other organic compounds generated during coffee bean roasting and grinding operations.Airborne concentrations of diacetyl in the workers’ breathing zone, as eight-hour time-weighted averages were less than the ACGIH TLVs for diacetyl, while concentrations of 2,3-pentanedione were below the limit of detection in all samples. Short-term breathing zone samples revealed airborne concentrations for diacetyl that exceeded the ACGIH short-term exposure limit of 0

  15. On-line process monitoring of coffee roasting by resonant laser ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry: bridging the gap from industrial batch roasting to flavour formation inside an individual coffee bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz-Schünemann, R; Dorfner, R; Yeretzian, C; Streibel, T; Zimmermann, R

    2013-12-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) enables the fast and sensitive on-line monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC) formed during coffee roasting. On the one hand, REMPI-TOFMS was applied to monitor roasting gases of an industrial roaster (1500 kg/h capacity), with the aim of determining the roast degree in real-time from the transient chemical signature of VOCs. On the other hand, a previously developed μ-probe sampling device was used to analyse roasting gases from individual coffee beans. The aim was to explore fundamental processes at the individual bean level and link these to phenomena at the batch level. The pioneering single-bean experiments were conducted in two configurations: (1) VOCs formed inside a bean were sampled in situ, i.e. via a drilled μ-hole, from the interior, using a μ-probe (inside). (2) VOCs were sampled on-line in close vicinity of a single coffee bean's surface (outside). The focus was on VOCs originating from hydrolysis and pyrolytic degradation of chlorogenic acids, like feruloyl quinic acid and caffeoyl quinic acid. The single bean experiments revealed interesting phenomena. First, differences in time-intensity profiles between inside versus outside (time shift of maximum) were observed and tentatively linked to the permeability of the bean's cell walls material. Second, sharp bursts of some VOCs were observed, while others did exhibit smooth release curves. It is believed that these reflect a direct observation of bean popping during roasting. Finally, discrimination between Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora was demonstrated based on high-mass volatile markers, exclusively present in spectra of Coffea arabica. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. GRAPH MODELING OF THE GRAIN PROCESSING ENTERPRISE FOR SECONDARY EXPLOSION ESTIMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Popov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical model for the possible development of the primary explosion at the grain processing enterprise is created. It is proved that only instability is possible for the combustion process. This model enables to estimate possibility of the secondary explosion at any object of the enterprise and forms the base for mathematical support of the decision support system for explosion-proof. Such decision support system can be included in the control system of the processing enterprise.

  17. The Coffee and Cream Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Brandon; Feldman, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    Many coffee drinkers take cream with their coffee and often wonder whether to add the cream earlier or later. With the objective of keeping their coffee as hot as possible over a moderate time period (10-15 minutes), this is a question that most of them can never answer definitively. We investigated this problem empirically using hot and cold water, with special emphasis on the calorimetry of the mixture. Assuming a coffee:cream (hot:cold) ratio of 3:1, we began with two identical styrofoam coffee cups containing hot water and then added cold water at t = 200 s in one cup and t = 700 s in the other cup. Using two Vernier temperature probes to simultaneously track the temperature change during the cool-down period of the water in both cups over δt = 1000 s, we obtained a real-time graphical account of which process achieved the higher temperature over this time period. In addition, the effect of evaporation was explored by comparing trials with and without a lid on the coffee cup. The application of Newton's Law of Cooling, as compared to the graphical temperature data acquired, will leave no doubt as to the best strategy for adding cool cream to hot coffee.

  18. Torrefação e carbonização de briquetes de resíduos do processamento dos grãos de café Torrefaction and carbonization of briquettes made with residues from coffee grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de P. Protásio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, nesse trabalho, avaliar os briquetes dos resíduos do processamento dos grãos de café submetidos aos processos de carbonização e torrefação. Os briquetes foram carbonizados utilizando-se taxa de aquecimento de 1,67 ºC min-1 com temperatura inicial de 50 ºC e final de 450 ºC, por 30 min. A torrefação dos briquetes foi realizada em uma mufla em duas taxas de aquecimento: 1,5 e 3,0 ºC min-1 até 250 ºC, temperatura mantida durante 60 min. Foram determinados os rendimentos em briquetes torrificados e carbonizados, em líquido pirolenhoso, em gases não condensáveis e em carbono fixo. Para todos os briquetes foram quantificados os teores de carbono fixo, cinzas, voláteis, dos componentes elementares (C, H, N, S, O, o poder calorífico superior, a densidade aparente e energética e a resistência à compressão diametral. Os briquetes carbonizados apresentaram maior potencial energético devido aos elevados teores de carbono fixo e elementar e poder calorífico, porém baixa resistência mecânica. Os briquetes torrificados nas duas taxas de aquecimento consideradas apresentaram características e propriedades energéticas semelhantes mas densidade energética inferior em relação aos briquetes carbonizados e in natura.This research aimed to evaluate the briquettes made with residues from processing of coffee grain submitted to carbonization and torrefaction. The briquettes were carbonized at a heating rate of 1.67 ºC min-1 with initial temperature of 50 ºC and final of 450 ºC, which was kept during 30 min. The torrefaction of the briquettes was made in a muffle furnace at two heating rates: 1.5 and 3.0 ºC min-1 until 250 ºC, temperature kept during 60 min. The yields in torrefied and carbonized briquettes, pyroligneous liquor, non-condensable gases and fixed carbon were determined. For all briquettes the fixed carbon, ash, volatile and elemental components (C, H, N, S, O contents and higher heating value, apparent

  19. Overview on the mechanisms of coffee germination and fermentation and their significance for coffee and coffee beverage quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Deborah M; Arendt, Elke K; Moroni, Alice V

    2017-01-22

    Quality of coffee is a complex trait and is influenced by physical and sensory parameters. A complex succession of transformations during the processing of seeds to roasted coffee will inevitably influence the in-cup attributes of coffee. Germination and fermentation of the beans are two bioprocesses that take place during post-harvest treatment, and may lead to significant modifications of coffee attributes. The aim of this review is to address the current knowledge of dynamics of these two processes and their significance for bean modifications and coffee quality. The first part of this review gives an overview of coffee germination and its influence on coffee chemistry and quality. The germination process initiates while these non-orthodox seeds are still inside the cherry. This process is asynchronous and the evolution of germination depends on how the beans are processed. A range of metabolic reactions takes place during germination and can influence the carbohydrate, protein, and lipid composition of the beans. The second part of this review focuses on the microbiota associated with the beans during post-harvesting, exploring its effects on coffee quality and safety. The microbiota associated with the coffee cherries and beans comprise several bacterial, yeast, and fungal species and affects the processing from cherries to coffee beans. Indigenous bacteria and yeasts play a role in the degradation of pulp/mucilage, and their metabolism can affect the sensory attributes of coffee. On the other hand, the fungal population occurring during post-harvest and storage negatively affects coffee quality, especially regarding spoilage, off-tastes, and mycotoxin production.

  20. Free area estimation in a dynamic germ-grain model with renewal dropping process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A partially observed dynamic germ-grain model with renewal dropping process is considered. The expected fraction of free area function is estimated by a product integral-type estimator. Uniform consistency and asymptotic Gaussianity of the estimator are proved. Confidence bands and simulation results are also provided.

  1. Free area estimation in a dynamic germ-grain model with renewal dropping process

    OpenAIRE

    Marcello De Giosa

    2006-01-01

    A partially observed dynamic germ-grain model with renewal dropping process is considered. The expected fraction of free area function is estimated by a product integral-type estimator. Uniform consistency and asymptotic Gaussianity of the estimator are proved. Confidence bands and simulation results are also provided.

  2. The effect of grain type and processing on chewing activity in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøkner, Christine; Nørgaard, Peder; Eriksen, Lis

    2005-01-01

    The aims of the present experiment were to study the effect of grain type and processing on chewing activity in horses. Three adult trotters (Exp.I) and 3 adult Icelandic horses (Exp.II) were fed 3 daily meals during 3 consecutive days in two 3 x 3 completely randomized block design experiments...

  3. Assessment of alteration processes on circumstellar and interstellar grains in Queen Alexandra Range 97416

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Maitrayee; Zega, Thomas J.; Williams, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Insight into the presolar and interstellar grain inventory of the CO3 chondrite Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 97416 is gained through correlated secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES). Only one presolar silicate grain [O17/O16=(9.96±0.75)×10-4; O18/O16=(19.49±0.96)×10-4] that may have formed in a low-mass Red Giant or Asymptotic Giant Branch star occurs in the coarse-grained matrix of QUE 97416. No other presolar grains were identified. Although presolar grains are rare in QUE 97416, numerous (898±259 ppm) 15N-rich domains (δN15∼+1447‰ to +3069‰) occur in the thin section. Based on TEM of an extracted section, two 15N-rich domains are amorphous, C-bearing, and texturally uniform, and they are embedded in a ferromagnesian silicate matrix with varied grain sizes. The individual 15N-rich organic regions with high δN15 (+2942±107‰ and +2341±140‰) exhibit diverse carbon functional groups, such as aromatic, vinyl-keto, amidyl, and carboxylic functionality, while the nitrogen XANES reveals traces of nitrile functionality. QUE 97416 appears to have escaped aqueous alteration based on the absence of hydrated minerals but is thermally altered, which could have resulted in the destruction of presolar grains. However, this process at >400 °C metamorphic temperatures was inefficient in destroying the carriers of N isotope anomalies, which may indicate the resistant nature of the organic carriers and/or the limited extent of thermal metamorphism on the QUE 97416 parent body.

  4. Effect of Supplemental Dietary Fat and Processed Barley Grain on Performance of Lactating Dairy Cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.A Alijoo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of barley grain processing and source of supplemental fat on performance of lactating dairy cows were studied in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods and a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Eight Holstein cows with mean body weight (BW of 572 ± 71 kg and 45 ± 10 days in milk were allocated to 4 dietary treatments including 1 ground barley with cottonseed 2 pelleted barley with cottonseed 3 ground barley with canola seed 4 pelleted barley with canola seed. The nitrogen intake and fecal N were higher in cows fed ground barley in comparison with those fed pelleted barley. Source of supplemental fat or barley processing had no effect on milk fat and milk protein contents. Milk SNF yield was higher in cows fed canola as supplemental fat source and ground barley (P < 0.05. Milk yield was affected by method of barley grain processing and was 0.64 to 1.9 kg/d higher in cows fed ground barley compared with those fed pelleted barley (P = 0.04. Plasma concentrations of glucose, NEFA, BHBA, cholesterol, triglycerides and blood urea nitrogen were similar in all treatments. Dry matter intake was affected by barley grain processing. The cows fed ground barley consuming 1.15 to 2.18 kg/d more DM compared with those fed pelleted barley (P = 0.04.Total tract digestibilities of DM, crude fat, ADF, NDF and OM were not affected by the barley grain processing as well as source of oilseed. The results indicated that interactions between barley grain processing and source of supplemental dietary fat can improve the performance of lactating dairy cows, However, more detailed studies are required

  5. Comparison Between Different Processing Schedules for the Development of Ultrafine-Grained Dual-Phase Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Anish; Sivaprasad, S.; Nath, S. K.; Misra, R. D. K.; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2014-05-01

    A comparative study was carried out on the development of ultrafine-grained dual-phase (DP) (ferrite-martensite) structures in a low-carbon microalloyed steel processed using two thermomechanical processing routes, (i) intercritical deformation and (ii) warm-deformation and intercritical annealing. The samples were deformed using Gleeble3500® simulator, maintaining a constant total strain ( ɛ = 1) and strain rate ( = 1/s). Evolution of microstructure and micro-texture was investigated by SEM, TEM, and EBSD. Ultrafine-grained DP structures could be formed by careful selection of deformation temperature, T def (for intercritical deformation) or annealing temperature, T anneal (for warm-deformation and annealing). Overall, the ferrite grain sizes ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 μm, and the sizes and fractions of the uniformly distributed fine-martensitic islands ranged from 1.5 to 3.0 μm and 15 to 45 pct, respectively. Dynamic strain-induced austenite-to-ferrite transformation followed by continuous (dynamic) recrystallization of the ferrite dictated the grain refinement during intercritical deformation, while, continuous (static) recrystallization by pronounced recovery dictated the grain refinement during the warm-deformation and the annealing. Regarding intercritical deformation, the samples cooled to T def indicated finer grain size compared with the samples heated to T def, which are explained in terms of the effects of strain partitioning on the ferrite and the heating during deformation. Alpha-fiber components dominated the texture in all the samples, and the fraction of high-angle boundaries (with >15 deg misorientation) increased with the increasing T def or T anneal, depending on the processing schedule. Fine carbide particles, microalloyed precipitates and austenitic islands played important roles in defining the mechanism of grain refinement that involved retarding conventional ferrite recrystallization and ferrite grain growth. With regard to the intercritical

  6. Contribuição do porta-enxerto, no teor de cafeína em grãos de café Contribution of the root-stock on the caffeine content of the coffee grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Melo

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available A contribuição do porta-enxerto no teor de cafeína dos grãos de café foi investigada nos cultivares mundo novo e laurina de Coffea arabica e no robusta de C. canephora, os quais diferem marcadamente no teor desse alcalóide. Os resultados obtidos indicam que o porta-enxerto, independentemente de seu genótipo, não exerce efeito mensurável sobre o teor de cafeína nos grãos. Variações individuais foram verificadas no teor de cafeína no robusta, devido à sua variabilidade genética, indicando a possibilidade de seleção para essa característica dentro desse material. Do ponto de vista agrícola o robusta poderia ser usado como porta-enxerto para as seleções de C. arabica, sem qualquer efeito no produto final.The contribution of the root-stock on the caffeine content of the coffee grains was studied in the Mundo Novo and Laurina cultivais of Coffea arabica and in the Rubosta cultivar of C. canephora which markedly differ in the alkaloid content. The results indicate that the root-stock, independently of its genotype, does not influence the caffeine content of the grains. Individual variation in caffeine content was found in the Robusta due to its genetic variability, pointing out to the possibility of selection for this characteristics in this material. It was also concluded that Robusta cultivars can be used as root-stock for Arabica selections without affecting the final product.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF PROCESSED PRODUCTS OF WHEAT GERM ON GRAIN BREAD QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Ponomareva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development and introduction of new types of bakery products with increased nutritional value is one of the basic and urgent problems in the bakery industry. The solution of it is the use of whole grains, as well as secondary products of their processing. The use of by-products of wheat germ (oil, oilcake, oilcake flour, which are rich in proteins and enhances the nutritional value of products is considered to be a promising area in the bakery industry. At the same time the program objectives products, developed in the framework of the "Strategy of development of the food processing industry of the Russian Federation for the period up to 2020"products, are expanding the production of cereal-based foods , and involving of secondary resources in the economy. These technologies are re-source efficient. They allow efficient use of by-products raw materials of the milling industry. The process for the preparation of grain bread on the basis of a thick sourdough from bioactivated wheat grain is known. However, despite all the advantages of grain breads with high amounts of dietary fiber, minerals and vitamins, they exhibit low levels of protein and lysine deficiency. At present larger preference is given to the raw materials of natural origin (millet, buckwheat and oatmeal flours, fruit puree, whole grains, oil, flour and wheat germ flakes, and etc. for foods enrichment in modern food science. Products of processing of wheat germ: oil, flakes, oilcake and oil-cake flour are widely used in bakery technology. To improve the nutritional value flour from wheat germ oilcake was used in the work. In the course of the research its positive effect on the quality of semi-finished and finished products was found. They differed from the control sample in a high content of antioxidants and better digestibility of proteins bread crumb.

  8. Quantification and antibacterial activity of flavonoids in coffee samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Flavonoids are the phenolic substances widely found in fruits, vegetables, grains, bark, roots, stems, flowers, tea and coffee. Methodology: In the current study quantity of flavonoids and antibacterial activities were determined in different coffee samples namely Nescafe classic, Nescafe gold, Nescafe martina, ...

  9. Grain- to multiple-grain-scale deformation processes during diffusion creep of forsterite + diopside aggregate: 2. Grain boundary sliding-induced grain rotation and its role in crystallographic preferred orientation in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, G.; Hiraga, T.

    2017-08-01

    Polycrystalline samples composed of either tabular or equiaxed forsterite grains +diopside (5 and 20 vol %) were deformed with a grid etched onto the lateral surface. In Part 1 of this study, we identified grain boundary sliding (GBS) and rigid body-like grain rotation during deformation by diffusion creep where samples with tabular forsterite grains were shown to develop low-index plane grain boundaries that result in crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Here we examine how grain rotation depends on the sample strain, grain size, phases, grain shapes, and orientations relative to the compression axis and long axes of tabular forsterite grains. Based on these results, we model grain rotation due to GBS that occurs preferentially along low-index plane boundaries. The model reproduces all of the characteristics of grain rotation and together with the observed grain rotation rates in tabular and equiaxed grain samples, we estimate that low-index plane boundaries have a lower viscosity by a factor of 3 relative to general grain boundaries, which results in the development of CPO during diffusion creep. The observed constant rotation rate of 0.4 (radian/strain) in equiaxed-grain samples and in tabular-grain samples deformed to a strain of >0.5 is considered to be a minimum and further, a material-independent rotation rate during diffusion creep, indicating grain rotation as a primary microprocess during diffusion creep. We discuss the possible consequences of GBS-induced grain rotation and CPO development in rock microstructure and the seismic properties of the Earth's mantle.

  10. SPITZER survey of dust grain processing in stable discs around binary post-AGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, C.; van Winckel, H.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Lloyd Evans, T.

    2008-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the mineralogy and dust processing in the circumbinary discs of binary post-AGB stars using high-resolution TIMMI2 and SPITZER infrared spectra. Methods: We perform a full spectral fitting to the infrared spectra using the most recent opacities of amorphous and crystalline dust species. This allows for the identification of the carriers of the different emission bands. Our fits also constrain the physical properties of different dust species and grain sizes responsible for the observed emission features. Results: In all stars the dust is oxygen-rich: amorphous and crystalline silicate dust species prevail and no features of a carbon-rich component can be found, the exception being EP Lyr, where a mixed chemistry of both oxygen- and carbon-rich species is found. Our full spectral fitting indicates a high degree of dust grain processing. The mineralogy of our sample stars shows that the dust is constituted of irregularly shaped and relatively large grains, with typical grain sizes larger than 2 μm. The spectra of nearly all stars show a high degree of crystallinity, where magnesium-rich end members of olivine and pyroxene silicates dominate. Other dust features of e.g. silica or alumina are not present at detectable levels. Temperature estimates from our fitting routine show that a significant fraction of grains must be cool, significantly cooler than the glass temperature. This shows that radial mixing is very efficient is these discs and/or indicates different thermal conditions at grain formation. Our results show that strong grain processing is not limited to young stellar objects and that the physical processes occurring in the discs are very similar to those in protoplanetary discs. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, observing program 072.D-0263, on observations made with the 1.2 m Flemish Mercator telescope at Roque de los Muchachos, Spain, the 1.2 m Swiss Euler telescope at La Silla

  11. On the Spent Coffee Grounds Biogas Production

    OpenAIRE

    Tomáš Vítěz; Tomáš Koutný; Martin Šotnar; Jan Chovanec

    2016-01-01

    Due to the strict legislation currently in use for landfilling, anaerobic digestion has a strong potential as an alternative treatment for biodegradable waste. Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world and spent coffee grounds (SCG) are generated in a considerable amount as a processing waste during making the coffee beverage. Chemical composition of SCG, presence of polysaccharides, proteins, and minerals makes from the SCG substrates with high biotechnological value, which m...

  12. Coffee Berry Borer Resistance in Coffee Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Hiroshi Sera

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the coffee germplasm of the Paraná Agronomic Institute (IAPAR for resistance to the coffee-berry-borer. Preliminary field evaluation was performed in August 2004 and the fruits of less damaged genotypes in the field were evaluated under controlled condition with obligated and free choice experiments established in a randomized complete design with three replications. The genotypes were evaluated fifteen days after infestation with one borer per fruit in Petri dishes. The data were analyzed by the Scott-Knott means test at 1 % and by the χ2 test. Statistical analysis indicated that Coffea kapakata, Psilanthus bengalensis, C. eugenioides and genotypes with C. eugenioides genes were resistant. These genotypes presented low frequency of bored grains. C. eugenioides and C. kapakata could present resistance at epicarp level but not in the grain. P. bengalensis could present resistance also in the grains.O objetivo deste trabalho foi identificar fontes de resistência genética a H. hampei em diferentes espécies de café do banco de germoplasma do Instituto Agronômico do Paraná (IAPAR, Londrina, PR. Foram realizadas avaliações preliminares de campo, para posterior testes de confinamento e de livre escolha, em laboratório, instalados em delineamento inteiramente casualizado com três repetições. Os genótipos foram avaliados quinze dias após a infestação com uma broca por fruto em placas de petri. Os dados foram analisados pelo teste de médias Scott-Knott a 1 % e pelo teste de χ2. Foi observado que C. eugenioides, C. kapakata e P. bengalensis constituem importantes fontes de resistência à broca, pois apresentaram menor freqüência de grãos brocados. Os dois primeiros podem apresentar substâncias voláteis antagônicas à broca na casca e a resistência de P. bengalensis pode estar também no grão.

  13. What is under the hump? Mass spectrometry based analysis of complex mixtures in processed food--lessons from the characterisation of black tea thearubigins, coffee melanoidines and caramel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Nikolai; Dairpoosh, Farnoosh; Yassin, Ghada; Golon, Agnieszka; Jaiswal, Rakesh

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution we review our work on the characterisation of processed food. We review novel methods and analysis strategies developed to account for the composition of extraordinarily complex materials such as black tea thearubigins, coffee melanoidines and thermally treated carbohydrates. Our methods are mainly based on modern mass spectrometry and are introduced and critically discussed. A series of novel previously unpublished data interpretation strategies are presented as well. Finally an evaluation of the insight obtained in the composition of selected processed foods is given discussing potential consequences for assessing beneficial and adverse health effects of processed food.

  14. Carbonaceous material obtained from exhausted coffee by an aqueous solution combustion process and used for cobalt (II) and cadmium (II) sorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Gómez, J; López-González, H; Olguín, M T; Bulbulian, S

    2015-06-01

    New carbonaceous materials were obtained using a fast aqueous solution combustion process from mixtures of exhausted coffee, ammonium nitrate (oxidizer) and urea (fuel) heated at 600, 700, 800 or 900 °C. The resulting powders were effective adsorbents for removing Co(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Exhausted coffee was also calcined at different temperatures and compared. The products were characterized, and the obtained carbons had BET specific surface areas of 114.27-390.85 m(2)/g and pore diameters of 4.19 to 2.44 nm when the temperature was increased from 600 to 800 °C. Cobalt and cadmium adsorption by the carbonaceous materials was correlated with the maximum adsorption capacities and specific surface areas of the materials. The method reported here is advantageous because it only required 5 min of reaction to improve the textural properties of carbon obtained from exhausted coffee, which play an important role in the material's cobalt and cadmium adsorption capacities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PAH in tea and coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duedahl-Olesen, Lene; Navarantem, Marin; Adamska, Joanna

    For food regulation in the European Union maximum limits on other foods than tea and coffee includes benzo[a]pyrene and the sum of PAH4 (sum of benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, benz[a]anthracene and benzo[b]fluoranthene). This study includes analysis of the above mentioned PAH in both, tea leaves, coffee...... for accumulation of PAH in tea leaves. Different varieties of tea leaves were analyzed and highest concentrations were found in leaves from mate and black tea with maximum concentrations of 32 μg/kg for benzo[a]pyrene and 115 μg/kg for the sum of PAH4. Also, coffee beans are roasted during processing. However......, both benzo[a]pyrene and PAH4 concentrations were more than ten times lower for coffee beans than for tea leaves. Highest levels were found for PAH4 of solid instant coffee (5.1 μg/kg). Data were used to calculate the exposure of benzo[a]pyrene (15%) and sum of PAH4 (10%) from tea and coffee...

  16. Coffee and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hoon Bae

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Most people start their day with a cup of coffee. Many people would also finish their daily work with coffee. As such, coffee drinking is an important part of modern daily life. It has been told that coffee is a driving force for humans to develop science, because it has an alerting effect on the human brain. However, some people report experiencing irregular heartbeat or headaches and are thus reluctant to drink coffee, which suggests individual variation to coffee intolerance. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the effects of coffee on human health.

  17. Diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione in breathing zone and area air during large-scale commercial coffee roasting, blending and grinding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Michael J; Hoppe Parr, Kimberly A; Anderson, Kim E; Cornish, Jim; Haapala, Matti; Greivell, John

    2017-01-01

    Recently described scientific literature has identified the airborne presence of 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl) and 2,3-pentanedione at concentrations approaching or potentially exceeding the current American Conference of Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) at commercial coffee roasting and production facilities. Newly established National Institutes of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommended Exposure Limits for diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione are even more conservative. Chronic exposure to these alpha-diketones at elevated airborne concentrations has been associated with lung damage, specifically bronchiolitis obliterans, most notably in industrial food processing facilities. Workers at a large commercial coffee roaster were monitored for both eight-hour and task-based, short-term, 15-min sample durations for airborne concentrations of these alpha-diketones during specific work processes, including the coffee bean roasting, blending and grinding processes, during two separate 8-h work periods. Additionally, the authors performed real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the workers' breathing zone as well as the area workplace air for the presence of organic compounds to determine the sources, as well as quantitate and identify various organic compounds proximal to the roasting and grinding processes. Real-time FTIR measurements provided both the identification and quantitation of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, as well as other organic compounds generated during coffee bean roasting and grinding operations. Airborne concentrations of diacetyl in the workers' breathing zone, as eight-hour time-weighted averages were less than the ACGIH TLVs for diacetyl, while concentrations of 2,3-pentanedione were below the limit of detection in all samples. Short-term breathing zone samples revealed airborne concentrations for diacetyl that exceeded the ACGIH short-term exposure limit of 0.02 parts per million (ppm) in

  18. Systematic identification of factors involved in post-transcriptional processes in wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopato, Sergiy; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Milligan, Andrew S; Shirley, Neil; Bazanova, Natalia; Parsley, Kate; Langridge, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Post-transcriptional processing of primary transcripts can significantly affect both the quantity and the structure of mature mRNAs and the corresponding protein products. It is an important mechanism of gene regulation in animals, yeast and plants. Here we have investigated the interactive networks of pre-mRNA processing factors in the developing grain of wheat (Triticum aestivum), one of the world's major food staples. As a first step we isolated a homologue of the plant specific AtRSZ33 splicing factor, which has been shown to be involved in the early stages of embryo development in Arabidopsis. Real-time PCR showed that the wheat gene, designated TaRSZ38, is expressed mainly in young, developing organs (flowers, root, stem), and expression peaks in immature grain. In situ hybridization and immunodetection revealed preferential abundance of TaRSZ38 in mitotically active tissues of the major storage organ of the grain, the endosperm. The protein encoded by TaRSZ38 was subsequently used as a starting bait in a two-hybrid screen to identify additional factors in grain that are involved in pre-mRNA processing. Most of the identified proteins showed high homology to known splicing factors and splicing related proteins, supporting a role for TaRSZ38 in spliceosome formation and 5' site selection. Several clones were selected as baits in further yeast two-hybrid screens. In total, cDNAs for 16 proteins were isolated. Among these proteins, TaRSZ22, TaSRp30, TaU1-70K, and the large and small subunits of TaU2AF, are wheat homologues of known plant splicing factors. Several, additional proteins are novel for plants and show homology to known pre-mRNA splicing, splicing related and mRNA export factors from yeast and mammals.

  19. Compositional Analysis of Whole Grains, Processed Grains, Grain Co-Products, and Other Carbohydrate Sources with Applicability to Pet Animal Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beloshapka, Alison N; Buff, Preston R; Fahey, George C; Swanson, Kelly S

    2016-03-25

    Our objective was to measure the proximate, starch, amino acid, and mineral compositions of grains, grain co-products, and other carbohydrate sources with potential use in pet foods. Thirty-two samples from barley (barley flake, cut barley, ground pearled barley, malted barley, whole pearled barley, pearled barley flakes, and steamed rolled barley); oats (groats, ground oatmeal, ground steamed groats, instant oats, oat bran, oat fiber, oat flour, quick oats, regular rolled oats, steamed rolled oat groats, and steel cut groats); rice (brown rice, polished rice, defatted rice bran, and rice flour); and miscellaneous carbohydrate sources (canary grass seed, hulled millet, whole millet, quinoa, organic spelt hull pellets, potato flake, sorghum, whole wheat, and whole yellow corn) were analyzed. Crude protein, amino acid, fat, dietary fiber, resistant starch, and mineral concentrations were highly variable among the respective fractions (i.e., barley flake vs. malted barley vs. steamed rolled barley) as well as among the various grains (i.e., barley flake vs. brown rice vs. canary grass seed). These ingredients not only provide a readily available energy source, but also a source of dietary fiber, resistant starch, essential amino acids, and macrominerals for pet diets.

  20. Energetic feedback in galaxies: Processing of interstellar silicate grains by cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G W M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J P; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2006-05-10

    The formation and evolution of stars and galaxies is a complex process that involves the cooling and collapse of dense interstellar clouds as well as energetic feedback on these clouds. Interstellar dust grains are central to the radiative transfer, thermal balance, and molecular processes in these clouds and can provide an important diagnostic. Hence, the effects of energetic processing of interstellar dust may have significant consequences. r This may be studied in our own Galaxy, where observations have shown that an appreciable fraction of silicates formed in the outflows from red giants and supergiants have a crystalline structure. Yet, the fraction of crystalline silicates in the interstellar medium is very small, pointing towards an efficient crystalline crystalline-to to-amorphous conversion process. Here we report experimental and modeling results that show that relatively ''low'' energy (0.1 - 5.0 GeV) heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium. The implications of this are briefly discussed. We also examine the effects of cosmic ray processing of silicates in the solar system and in stellar debris disks. In the latter systems, cosmic ray processing may play a role for grains trapped in resonance with planetary companions. We speculate that energetic processing of interstellar dust is likely to be even more important in s star forming galaxies, which have higher cosmic ray fluxes due to tar their much larger star formation rates and their emerging active black holes with associated jets.

  1. Coffee husks: - A possible wood substitute in the particleboard industry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee husks, a waste by-product from coffee processing has been used as particles with hydrolysed tannin and urea formaldehyde as binders to make homogenous coffee husks particleboards. The resulting particleboards were subjected to physical and mechanical tests and a comparison made with the existing ...

  2. Coffee Production in Kigoma Region, Tanzania: Profitability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers processed at CPU gained about TZS 1350/kg as coffee improvement gain. Coffee production contributed about 39% of the total household income in the region. Input prices, taxes, research contribution and Central Pulpery Unit tax, shortage of extension services, unreliable markets and low coffee price, low quality ...

  3. Adaptive Measures for the Factors Affecting Marketing of Coffee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adaptive Measures for the Factors Affecting Marketing of Coffee ( Coffea robusta Rio Nunes) in Kogi State, Nigeria. ... of coffee in the study area was poor pricing and marketing systems; this is as a result of inappropriate processing method, lack of quality control and relevant information on improved coffee technologies.

  4. Counting pollen grains using readily available, free image processing and analysis software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Clayton M; Yang, Suann

    2009-10-01

    Although many methods exist for quantifying the number of pollen grains in a sample, there are few standard methods that are user-friendly, inexpensive and reliable. The present contribution describes a new method of counting pollen using readily available, free image processing and analysis software. Pollen was collected from anthers of two species, Carduus acanthoides and C. nutans (Asteraceae), then illuminated on slides and digitally photographed through a stereomicroscope. Using ImageJ (NIH), these digital images were processed to remove noise and sharpen individual pollen grains, then analysed to obtain a reliable total count of the number of grains present in the image. A macro was developed to analyse multiple images together. To assess the accuracy and consistency of pollen counting by ImageJ analysis, counts were compared with those made by the human eye. Image analysis produced pollen counts in 60 s or less per image, considerably faster than counting with the human eye (5-68 min). In addition, counts produced with the ImageJ procedure were similar to those obtained by eye. Because count parameters are adjustable, this image analysis protocol may be used for many other plant species. Thus, the method provides a quick, inexpensive and reliable solution to counting pollen from digital images, not only reducing the chance of error but also substantially lowering labour requirements.

  5. The influence of sorghum grain decortication on bioethanol production and quality of the distillers' dried grains with solubles using cold and conventional warm starch processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomba, Edouard Y; van Rensburg, Eugéne; Chimphango, Annie F A; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-03-01

    Very high gravity hydrolysis-fermentation of whole and decorticated sorghum grains were compared using conventional and cold hydrolysis methods to assess the extent by which decortication could minimize enzymes dosages and affect the quality of the distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS). All processing configurations achieved ethanol concentrations between 126 and 132 g/L (16.0-16.7%v/v), although decortication resulted in a decreased ethanol yield. Decortication resulted in a decreased volumetric productivity during warm processing from 1.55 to 1.25 g L(-1)h(-1), whereas the required enzyme dosage for cold processing was decreased from 250 to 221 μl/100 gstarch. Cold processing decreased the average acid detergent fibre (ADF) from 35.59% to 29.32% and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) from 44.04% to 32.28% in the DDGS compared to the conventional (warm) processing. Due to lower enzyme requirements, the use of decorticated grains combined with cold processing presents a favourable process configuration and source of DDGS for non-ruminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analisis Customer Segment, Channels, Dan Customer Relationship Dalam Pembentukan Value Proposition Di Starbucks Coffee (Studi Kasus Pada Starbucks Coffee Indonesia)

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmanisa, Aisy; Wilopo,; Sanawiri, Brillyanes

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to understand and explain; How to Starbucks Coffee create value proposition for their customer? How to Starbucks Coffee segmented the customer, to create the value proposition? How to Starbucks Coffee build and choose the channels to grab the customer and create value proposition? How to Starbucks Coffee build a customer relationship and create value proposition from the process? .This reaserch uses primery data descriptive analysis method with fenomelogy kualitative o...

  7. Sensory properties of under-roasted coffee beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Camilla; Dinnella, Caterina; Barnabà, Massimo; Navarini, Luciano; Monteleone, Erminio

    2013-08-01

    Conditions milder than standard roasting (under-roasting: 140 to 170 °C for 20 to 12 min) have been proposed to reduce the formation of potentially harmful compounds developing during standard coffee roasting. In the present study, sensory properties of brews prepared with under-roasted coffees (140 to 165 °C for 20 min) were described by descriptive analysis. Two meta-attributes were defined: "coffee" consisting of attributes positively related to the increasing of process temperature and "no-coffee" consisting of those negatively related to temperature. The progressive lowering of "no-coffee" and the corresponding increasing of "coffee" mean values were induced by temperature increasing in under-roasting conditions. The processing temperature of 150 °C seems to represent the changing point between the 2 meta-attributes with "no-coffee" prevailing at lower and "coffee" at higher temperatures. Consumer responses indicate the positive effect of both product processing temperature and "coffee" attribute intensity on liking. Brews from coffee treated at temperature lower than 150 °C showed a sensory profile characterized by "no-coffee" attributes and resulted the less preferred by regular coffee consumers. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Fine grained event processing on HPCs with the ATLAS Yoda system

    CERN Document Server

    Calafiura, Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration; Guan, Wen; Maeno, Tadashi; Nilsson, Paul; Oleynik, Danila; Panitkin, Sergey; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; van Gemmeren, Peter; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01

    High performance computing facilities present unique challenges and opportunities for HENP event processing. The massive scale of many HPC systems means that fractionally small utilizations can yield large returns in processing throughput. Parallel applications which can dynamically and efficiently fill any scheduling opportunities the resource presents benefit both the facility (maximal utilization) and the (compute-limited) science. The ATLAS Yoda system provides this capability to HENP-like event processing applications by implementing event-level processing in an MPI-based master-client model that integrates seamlessly with the more broadly scoped ATLAS Event Service. Fine grained, event level work assignments are intelligently dispatched to parallel workers to sustain full utilization on all cores, with outputs streamed off to destination object stores in near real time with similarly fine granularity, such that processing can proceed until termination with full utilization. The system offers the efficie...

  9. Stored energy in ultrafine-grained 316L stainless steel processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa El-Tahawy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy stored in severely deformed ultrafine-grained (UFG 316L stainless steel was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. A sample was processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT for N = 10 turns. In the DSC thermogram, two peaks were observed. The first peak was exothermic and related to the annihilation of vacancies and dislocations. During this recovery, the phase composition and the average grain size were practically unchanged. The energy stored in dislocations was calculated and compared with the heat released in the exothermic DSC peak. The difference was related to the annihilation of vacancy-like defects with a concentration of ∼5.2 × 10−4. The second DSC peak was endothermic which was caused by a reversion of α′-martensite into γ-austenite, however in this temperature range dislocation annihilation and a moderate grain growth also occurred. The specific energy of the reverse martensitic phase transformation was determined as about −11.7 J/g. Keywords: High-pressure torsion, Stored energy, Stainless steel, Phase transformation, Thermal stability

  10. Fatigue Behavior of Ultrafine-Grained 5052 Al Alloy Processed Through Different Rolling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogesha, K. K.; Joshi, Amit; Jayaganthan, R.

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, 5052 Al alloy was processed through different rolling methods to obtain ultrafine grains and its high-cycle fatigue behavior were investigated. The solution-treated Al-Mg alloys (AA 5052) were deformed through different methods such as cryorolling (CR), cryo groove rolling (CGR) and cryo groove rolling followed by warm rolling (CGW), up to 75% thickness reduction. The deformed samples were subjected to mechanical testing such as hardness, tensile and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) test at stress control mode. The CGW samples exhibit better HCF strength when compared to other conditions. The microstructure of the tested samples was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM fractography and TEM to understand the deformation behavior of deformed Al alloy. The improvement in fatigue life of CR and CGR samples is due to effective grain refinement, subgrain formations, and high dislocation density observed in the heavily deformed samples at cryogenic condition as observed from SEM and TEM analysis. However, in case of CGW samples, formation of nanoshear bands accommodates the applied strain during cyclic loading, thereby facilitating dislocation accumulation along with subgrain formations, leading to the high fatigue life. The deformed or broken impurity phase particles found in the deformed samples along with the precipitates that were formed during warm rolling also play a prominent role in enhancing the fatigue strength. These tiny particles hindered the dislocation movement by effectively pinning it at grain boundaries, thereby improving the resistance of crack propagation under cyclic load.

  11. 3D reconstruction of prior β grains in friction stir-processed Ti-6Al-4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, J S; Shiveley, A R; Pilchak, A L; Shade, P A; Groeber, M A

    2014-08-01

    The prior β grain structure and orientations in the central stir zone of friction stir-processed Ti-6Al-4V were reconstructed from measured α phase orientations obtained by three-dimensional serial sectioning in a dual-beam focused ion beam scanning electron microscope. The data were processed to obtain the α colony and β grain size distributions in the volume. Several β grains were individually analysed to determine the total number of unique α variants and the respective volume fractions of each. The analysis revealed that some grains experienced overwhelming variant selection (i.e. one variant dominated) whereas other β grains contained a more evenly distributed mixture of all 12 variants. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Processing Conditions Affecting Grain Size and Mechanical Properties in Nanocomposites Produced via Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2014-10-01

    Cold spray is a coating technology based on aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. In this process, spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to a high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (pre-heated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval-type nozzle. A coating is formed through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on a substrate at a temperature below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper the main processing parameters affecting the microstructural and mechanical behavior of metal-metal cold spray deposits are described. The effect of process parameters on grain refinement and mechanical properties were analyzed for composite particles of Al-Al2O3, Ni-BN, Cu-Al2O3, and Co-SiC. The properties of the formed nanocomposites were compared with those of the parent materials sprayed under the same conditions. The process conditions, leading to a strong grain refinement with an acceptable level of the deposit mechanical properties such as porosity and adhesion strength, are discussed.

  13. The Role of Bee Pollinators in Improving Berry Weight and Coffee Cup Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Rebecca H.N. Karanja; Grace N. Njoroge; John M. Kihoro; Mary W. Gikungu; L.E. Newton

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted at Kiambu County in Kenya. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pollination improves the coffee yield and quality of processed coffee in terms of taste and aroma. Among the parameters evaluated when grading coffee for sale in world market are berry weight and cup quality. No previous work in Kenya describes the role of bee pollinators in enhancement of coffee yields and quality. Data on berry weights and the resulting processed coffee quality from different...

  14. Coffee roasting acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Preston S

    2014-06-01

    Cracking sounds emitted by coffee beans during the roasting process were recorded and analyzed to investigate the potential of using the sounds as the basis for an automated roast monitoring technique. Three parameters were found that could be exploited. Near the end of the roasting process, sounds known as "first crack" exhibit a higher acoustic amplitude than sounds emitted later, known as "second crack." First crack emits more low frequency energy than second crack. Finally, the rate of cracks appearing in the second crack chorus is higher than the rate in the first crack chorus.

  15. Condutividade elétrica e lixiviação de potássio do exsudato de grãos de café: alguns fatores que podem influenciar essas avaliações Potassium leaching and eletric conductivity of grain coffee (Coffea arabica L. exsudate: some factors that may affect these evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ribeiro Malta

    2005-10-01

    arabica L. quality evaluation procedures are based on subjective parameters, once depend on personal abilities and sensitivity, acquired after many years of experience. So in order to complement these analysis physical and chemical methods are also used to support the results. Firstly an experiment was installed to evaluate some factors that may influence in grain coffee exsudates, potassium leaching and electric conductivity determination. Grain coffee size and defects affect potassium leaching and electric conductivity in coffee cultivar, Acaia Cerrado MG 1474. A coffee grain sample, with no defective grain removal showed at the lower sieves, higher eletric conductivity and potassium leaching values. However, pulling back defective grains those values were not observed. There was a gradative increase in electric conductivity in grain coffee as follow: normal, greens and bored grains and also fermented as black grains. In relation to potassium leaching there were no differences, excepted to green and bored grains that had similar values. These results suggest that defective coffee grain might affect in significant way the electric conductivity and potassium leaching of esxudate of grains, and could cause inadequate interpretations related to quality of the analyzed coffee.

  16. What is this link doing here? Beginning a fine-grained process of identifying reasons for academic hyperlink creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelwall Mike

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to begin a [fine-grained] process of differentiating between creation motivations for links in academic Web sites and citations in journals on the basis that they are very different phenomena.

  17. The Climate Change and Rwandan Coffee Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidele Hakorimana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed overview of the current situation of the coffee sector in the Rwandan economy and identifies the possible challenges that the sector is currently facing. The study has identified the economic and the livelihood indicators for farmers who are engaged in coffee production and also gives the Rwandan coffee sector’ situation and its position in the global coffee market. Also, the research has found out that in Rwanda, nearly 500,000 farmers produce coffee along with other crops, notably beans, savory banana and corn and found out that in 2012, coffee accounted for almost 30 percent of Rwanda’s total export revenue. On the other hand, the study revealed that the sector throughout all the coffee production process, has undergone different challenges especially climate change as it is reported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Animal resources. A low yield was reported in 2007 and climate variability was quoted among the causes. Insufficient rainfall in the last three months of 2006 (the period of coffee flowering proceeding the short dry season in the first two months of 2007 was recorded. The reduced rainfall was also poorly distributed across coffee growing regions in Rwanda. In addition, the research revealed that even though the area under coffee production is increasing, the coffee production is decreasing due to unexpected climate change and variability in current years and also the improper use of chemical fertilizers by coffee farmers is very critical. The study concluded that adding value to the coffee supply chain of Rwanda is adding direct economic benefits and important indirect social benefits to the lives of individuals and to the health of communities in Rwanda. Moreover, more effort should continue to raise the profile of the Rwandan coffee sector suggesting that proper use of chemical fertilizers, solid marketing channels and climate change adaptations measures would be the fair ways of making the

  18. The superiority of silver nanoellipsoids synthesized via a new approach in suppressing the coffee-ring effect during drying and film formation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao; He, Wei; Wang, Shouxu; Tao, Zhihua; Cheng, Lijuan

    2014-03-01

    Silver nanoellipsoids (Ag NEs) with about 40 nm diameter minor axis and 100 nm major axis were prepared by a typical polyol process in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone), using Cl- as etching agent at the early stage of synthesis and poly(ethylene glycol) at the later stage to control the size. A suspension of these kinds of Ag NEs can resist the coffee-ring effect and deposit uniform films after drying. By contrast, suspensions of spherical silver nanoparticles suffer the coffee-ring effect badly, always leaving a ring on the edge of patterns after evaporation is complete. The reasons behind these phenomena can be mainly attributed to the long-ranged interparticle attraction between Ag NEs that preserves them from being transported by Marangoni flows during the drying process. These Ag NEs will be very useful in the preparation of conductive inks. They can perform well in the solidification process of printed patterns, forming uniform and smooth films, greatly enhancing the printing efficiency.

  19. Investigation of the instability and low water kefir grain growth during an industrial water kefir fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureys, David; Van Jean, Amandine; Dumont, Jean; De Vuyst, Luc

    2017-04-01

    A poorly performing industrial water kefir production process consisting of a first fermentation process, a rest period at low temperature, and a second fermentation process was characterized to elucidate the causes of its low water kefir grain growth and instability. The frozen-stored water kefir grain inoculum was thawed and reactivated during three consecutive prefermentations before the water kefir production process was started. Freezing and thawing damaged the water kefir grains irreversibly, as their structure did not restore during the prefermentations nor the production process. The viable counts of the lactic acid bacteria and yeasts on the water kefir grains and in the liquors were as expected, whereas those of the acetic acid bacteria were high, due to the aerobic fermentation conditions. Nevertheless, the fermentations progressed slowly, which was caused by excessive substrate concentrations resulting in a high osmotic stress. Lactobacillus nagelii, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus hilgardii, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Bifidobacterium aquikefiri, Gluconobacter roseus/oxydans, Gluconobacter cerinus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Zygotorulaspora florentina were the most prevalent microorganisms. Lb. hilgardii, the microorganism thought to be responsible for water kefir grain growth, was not found culture-dependently, which could explain the low water kefir grain growth of this industrial process.

  20. Coffee seed physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eira, M.T.S.; Silva, da E.A.A.; Castro, de R.D.; Dussert, S.; Walters, C.; Bewley, J.D.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Coffee is a member of the Rubiaceae family and the genus Coffea. There are more than 70 species of coffee but only two are economically important: Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre; 70 % of the coffee traded in the world is arabica and 30 % is robusta (C. canephora). Other species such

  1. Application of products of coffee silverskin in anti-ageing cosmetics and functional food

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, M. Dolores del; Ibáñez, Elena; Amigo-Benavent, Miryam; Herrero, Miguel; Plaza, Merichel; Ullate, Mónica

    2011-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a product obtained from coffee silverskin, characterised in that it is (a) powdered coffee silverskin or b) coffee silverskin extract. The invention also relates to a method for extracting coffee silverskin, comprising a step of extraction with water, preferably with subcritical water. The invention further relates to the use of the product obtained from coffee silverskin in cosmetics or functional food, especially for preventing physiological ageing processes, a...

  2. Climate change impacts on coffee rust disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, W. M. V.; Koga-Vicente, A.; Pinto, H. S.; Alfonsi, E. L., Sr.; Coltri, P. P.; Zullo, J., Jr.; Patricio, F. R.; Avila, A. M. H. D.; Gonçalves, R. R. D. V.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in climate conditions and in extreme weather events may affect the food security due to impacts in agricultural production. Despite several researches have been assessed the impacts of extremes in yield crops in climate change scenarios, there is the need to consider the effects in pests and diseases which increase losses in the sector. Coffee Arabica is an important commodity in world and plays a key role in Brazilian agricultural exports. Although the coffee crop has a world highlight, its yield is affected by several factors abiotic or biotic. The weather as well pests and diseases directly influence the development and coffee crop yield. These problems may cause serious damage with significant economic impacts. The coffee rust, caused by the fungus Hemileia vastarix,is among the diseases of greatest impact for the crop. The disease emerged in Brazil in the 70s and is widely spread in all producing regions of coffee in Brazil, and in the world. Regions with favorable weather conditions for the pathogen may exhibit losses ranging from 30% to 50% of the total grain production. The evaluation of extreme weather events of coffee rust disease in futures scenarios was carried out using the climatic data from CMIP5 models, data field of coffee rust disease incidence and, incubation period simulation data for Brazilian municipalities. Two Regional Climate Models were selected, Eta-HadGEM2-ES and Eta-MIROC5, and the Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 w/m2 was adopted. The outcomes pointed out that in these scenarios the period of incubation tends to decrease affecting the coffee rust disease incidence, which tends to increase. Nevertheless, the changing in average trends tends to benefit the reproduction of the pathogen. Once the temperature threshold for the disease reaches the adverse conditions it may be unfavorable for the incidence.

  3. On the Spent Coffee Grounds Biogas Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vítěz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the strict legislation currently in use for landfilling, anaerobic digestion has a strong potential as an alternative treatment for biodegradable waste. Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world and spent coffee grounds (SCG are generated in a considerable amount as a processing waste during making the coffee beverage. Chemical composition of SCG, presence of polysaccharides, proteins, and minerals makes from the SCG substrates with high biotechnological value, which might be used as valuable input material in fermentation process. The methane production ranged from 0.271–0.325 m3/kg dry organic matter.

  4. Multipass comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-05-27

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction one or more times through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel.

  5. The effect of coarse second-phase particles on the rate of grain refinement during severe deformation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apps, P.J.; Bowen, Jacob R.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of second-phase particles on the rate of grain refinement during severe deformation processing has been investigated, by comparing the microstructure evolution in an AA8079 aluminium alloy, containing 2.5 vol.% of ~2 μm particles, with that in a high purity, single-phase, Al-0.13% Mg...... alloy, deformed identically by ECAE to an effective strain of ten. The materials were analysed by high-resolution EBSD orientation mapping, which revealed that grain refinement occurred at a dramatically higher rate in the particle-containing alloy. A submicron grain structure could be achieved...... by an effective strain of only five in the particle-containing alloy, compared to ten in the single-phase material. The mechanisms that contribute to this acceleration of the grain refinement process are discussed....

  6. Morphological changes of olivine grains reacted with amino acid solutions by impact process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Yuhei; Takase, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Nao; Sekine, Toshimori; Kobayashi, Takamichi; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Early oceans on Earth might have contained certain amounts of biomolecules such as amino acids, and they were subjected to meteorite impacts, especially during the late heavy bombardment. We performed shock recovery experiments by using a propellant gun in order to simulate shock reactions among olivine as a representative meteorite component, water and biomolecules in oceans in the process of marine meteorite impacts. In the present study, recovered solid samples were analyzed by using X-ray powder diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The analytical results on shocked products in the recovered sample showed (1) morphological changes of olivine to fiber- and bamboo shoot-like crystals, and to pulverized grains; and features of lumpy surfaces affected by hot water, (2) the formation of carbon-rich substances derived from amino acids, and (3) the incorporation of metals from container into samples. According to the present results, fine-grained olivine in meteorites might have morphologically changed and shock-induced chemical reactions might have been enhanced so that amino acids related to the origin of life may have transformed to carbon-rich substances by impacts.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic properties of soybean grains during the drying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Emanuel Cabral de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work were to adjust different mathematical models to experimental data describing the drying of the Valiosa cultivar soybean grain, to determine and to evaluate the effective diffusion coefficient and to obtain the activation energy and the thermodynamic properties of the drying process under different air conditions. The experiments were conducted at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Goiás (Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Goiano – Câmpus Rio Verde. The Valiosa cultivar soybean grains, with an initial moisture content on a dry basis of 0.56 (d.b., decimal, were dried in an oven with forced air ventilation at five different temperatures (40, 55, 70, 85 and 100°C until reaching a moisture content of 0.133±0.019 (d.b.. Of the models analyzed, Page’s model was selected to best represent the drying phenomenon. The effective diffusion coefficient of soybeans increased with the air temperature and was described by the Arrhenius equation; an activation energy of 22.77 kJ mol–1 was reported for liquid diffusion in the drying of the soybeans. The enthalpy and entropy decreased with increasing temperature, while the Gibbs free energy increased with increasing drying temperature.

  8. Cellulase and xylanase production at pilot scale by solid-state fermentation from coffee husk using specialized consortia: The consistency of the process and the microbial communities involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Alejandra; Mejías, Laura; Gea, Teresa; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-11-01

    Solid state fermentation is a promising technology however rising concerns related to scale up and reproducibility in a productive process. Coffee husk and a specialized inoculum were used in a 4.5L and then in 50L reactors to assess the reproducibility of a cellulase and hemicellulase production system. Fermentations were consistent in terms of cellulase production and microbial communities. The higher temperatures achieved when operating at 50L generated a shift on the microbial communities and a reduction of nearly 50% on cellulase production at pilot scale. In spite, an overall enzymatic production of 3.1±0.5FPUg-1DM and 48±4Ug-1DM for FPase and Xyl activities was obtained, respectively, with low deviation coefficients of 16 and 19% for FPase and Xyl production. Gaseous emissions assessment revealed an emission factor of 2.6·10-3kg volatile organic compounds per Mg of coffee husk and negligible NH3, CH4 and N2O emissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Field Evaluation of Cereal Combine Harvesters Processing Losses on JD-955 and JD-1165 Combines Equipped with Grain Loss Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R Mostofi Sarkari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Grain loss monitors are installed on combine harvester and make it possible to measure grain loss on different parts of the combine. The instrument permits the operator to adjust a proper ground speed to keep grain loss within an acceptable range. In this study a loss monitoring system was implemented to measure grain losses continuously on straw walker and sieves. Two grain loss monitors (KEE and TeeJet were installed behind the straw walker and the sieves of JD-955 and JD-1165 combine harvesters. Harvesting performance parameters such as combine total and processing losses were then measured. To evaluate the precision and accuracy of the instruments, the measured and monitored losses were compared and investigated. The results of a two-year research showed that the average processing loss of the combine harvesters with 10-12% grain moisture content and 750 rpm drum speed was 0.82% which is whitin the acceptable range recommended by ASAE Standard No. S343.3. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the measured and monitored values of processing loss.

  10. Qualidade de grãos de café beneficiados em resposta à adubação potássica Potassium fertilization and the quality of processed coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enilson de Barros Silva

    2002-03-01

    í Vermelho (3.5 x 0.7 m; one plant per hole, on the enzyme activity of poliphenyloxidase, coloration index and total sugars of processed coffee beans. The quality of beans grown under K2SO4 and KNO3 fertilization was better than that of beans grown under KCl fertilization; results of K2SO4 and KNO3 fertilizations were significantly better for the Rhodic Acrudox. Best grain quality was observed for the application of 200 kg K ha-1 as KCl and K2SO4 and 100 kg K ha-1 as KNO3.

  11. Recycling of multi-grain, melt processed bulk (RE)BCO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S. K.; Babu, N. H.; Dennis, A. R.; Iida, K.; Strasik, M.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2010-06-01

    Recycling is fundamental to the sustainable and economic use of natural resources. Bulk RE-Ba-Cu-O ((RE)BCO, where RE is a rare earth element or Y) can be used for variety of sustainable engineering and power sector applications. However, current costs of production and relatively high process failure rates of up to 30% severely limit the manufacture of these materials for industrial use. It is necessary, therefore, to develop an effective way of recycling failed (RE)BCO bulk samples to reduce both production costs and the consumption of the constituent rare earth elements. Failed, melt processed samples have a different chemical composition to that used initially in the precursor powder and, as a result, are generally scrapped, rather than re-processed. We report a novel method for re-processing failed (RE)BCO samples to restore their chemical composition. Failed bulk samples recycled using this process exhibit superconducting properties that are comparable to those of single-grain samples fabricated by conventional top seeded melt growth.

  12. ECONOMIC ESSENCE OF MODERN INVESTMENT PROCESSES IN THE GRAIN PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Kanashkina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research is theoretical and methodological bases of formation of effective investment in priorities feed processing industry in Ukraine. The object of research is the investment process in feed processing Ukrainian industry, the main direction and the way to increase the efficiency of the investment process in the industry. The aim is to develop an integrated approach to the study of the economic substance of investments to improve the methods to determine their effectiveness, the study of factors of investment environment, study methodology for determining business risk, development of proposals of the priority areas of investing in feed processing industry, the formation of effective investment strategies for its development in the conditions of market transformation. Methods. We used the following methods: dialectical, abstract logic, Economics and Statistics and the systemic-functional methods of knowledge of economic processes. The dialectical method has allowed the author to analyze the development of research in the last five years, identified reserves and propose ways for its further development. Abstract-logical method of waste classification of the factors influencing the efficiency of the investment process in the industry, the methodological approaches to the formation of the components of the conceptual apparatus studied category. Economic-statistical method used in the study and synthesis of trends and patterns of the dynamics of the industry at the present stage. Systemic-functional method allowed to generalize the theoretical and methodological foundations of development effectiveness feed processing industry. The study also used methods: a comparative analysis – for comparing actual data reporting and previous years; model approach – to determine the entrepreneurial risk in the enterprises of the industry; expert assessments and cost approaches to identify key trends and ways to improve the country

  13. Investigation of fatigue crack growth rate of Al 5484 ultrafine grained alloy after ECAP process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynk, Tomasz; Rasinski, Marcin; Pakiela, Zbigniew; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof J. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland); Olejnik, Lech [Faculty of Production Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    During the last decade equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) has emerged as a widely used fabrication route of ultrafine-grained (UFG) metals and alloys. Enhanced mechanical properties of UFG materials produced by severe plastic deformation, with a grain size smaller than 1 {mu}m, have been reported in a large number of publications. However, the higher strength does not imply higher resistance to fatigue both high- and low-cyclic. In fact, due to reduced plasticity, higher fatigue crack propagation rates are reported for UFG materials, particularly in low-amplitude range. The aim of this work was to investigate fatigue crack propagation in samples of Al 5483 alloy subjected to ECAP treatment. Because of small dimensions of the coupons processed by ECAP, non-standard, mini-samples were used in a crack propagation tests. Two test procedures were used to estimate stress intensity factor (K). The first was based on optical measurements of crack length from images recorded during the test. The second method was based on digital image correlation (DIC), which was used to determine K value directly from displacement field near the crack tip. Comparison of these two methods is made and the relationship between the intensity of ECAP process (measured in terms of the number of ECAP passes) and fatigue crack propagation rates proposed. In addition to fatigue resistance, the results of tensile tests carried out with mini-samples are presented. Applicability of such samples in the investigations of the mechanical properties of UFG materials is discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Effects of storage time and temperature on the characteristics of vegetable-type soybean grain minimally processed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Czaikoski

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of storage time and temperature on the characteristics of vegetable-type soybean grain (cultivar BRS 267 minimally processed and to define the best conditions for its storage. The evaluation was performed by measurement of vitamin C levels, weight loss and color parameters (L*, a*, and b*. The time of storage of vegetable-type soybean grains minimally processed and storage in Styrofoam trays and wrapped with PVC film, caused a decreased in vitamin C levels and color parameters and increased weight loss. This process was intensified with higher temperature at 25 °C than 5°C. To maintain appropriate levels of vitamin C, weight and color of vegetable-type soybean grains minimally processed and storage in trays wrapped in plastic wrap, recommended storage for 3 days at 5°C.

  15. Decline in lung function related to exposure and selection processes among workers in the grain processing and animal feed industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, W.; Heederik, D.; Houba, R.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To follow up workers in the grain processing and animal feed industry five years after an initial survey, and to monitor exposures to organic dust and endotoxin and changes in prevalence of respiratory symptoms and lung function. METHODS: Outcome measures in the present survey were decline in lung function over five years, rapid annual decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) above 90 ml.s-1, and loss to follow up. RESULTS: Among 140 workers included in the longitudinal analysis, annual decline in FEV1 and maximal mid- expiratory flow (MMEF) were significantly related to occupational exposure to dust and endotoxin in the grain processing and animal feed industry. Assuming a cumulative exposure over a working life of 40 years with an exposure of 5 mg.m-3, the estimated effect on the FEV1 would be a decline of 157 ml.s-1 (95% CI 13 to 300)--that is, about 4% of the group mean FEV1 and 473 ml.s-1 (95% CI 127 to 800) of the MMEF (about 12%). Workers with a dust exposure > 4 mg.m-3 or endotoxin concentrations > 20 ng.m-3 at the 1986-8 survey had significantly higher risk of rapid decline in FEV1 (odds ratio (OR) 3.3, 95% CI 1.02 to 10.3). The relations between occupational exposure and decline in lung function in this study occurred, despite the selection through the healthy worker effect that occurred as well. Increasing working years was related to decreasing annual decline in FEV1 and fewer people with rapid decline in FEV1 (OR 0.04, 95% CI 0 to 0.61 for over 20 v animal feed industry). The presence of respiratory symptoms at baseline was a strong predictor of subsequent loss to follow up. Baseline lung function was not found to be predictive of subsequent loss to follow up. However, among workers lost to follow up the number of working years was more strongly negatively related to baseline lung function than among the workers who were studied longitudinally. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of the healthy worker effect implies that an exposure

  16. Effect of zinc and its form of supply on production and quality of coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, Yonara; Martinez, Herminia E P; Cecon, Paulo R

    2011-10-01

    In Brazil, the usual forms of zinc (Zn) supply to coffee plants have limitations that compromise the element availability to the plant. This study proposes to test an alternative approach to supplying the nutrient to Coffea arabica L. using trunk implanted zinc tablets. Additionally, the effect of Zn on the production and quality of coffee beans was also evaluated. The highest total coffee bean production was recorded in plants implanted with Zn tablets (TA), while the lowest was recorded in the control treatment, without zinc supply (WZn), reaching a bianual production of 188.2 and 130.1 60-kg bags of processed beans per hectare, respectively. In the treatments where Zn were applied as tablet implantation or as foliage spraying (SZn); the bean size was larger, while the grain electrical conductivity and potassium leaching were lower compared with WZn. Zn supply via tablet implantation into tree trunks provides yield and quality similar to those obtained by foliage spraying. Independent of the form of supply, Zn positively influences the production and quality of coffee beans. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Resíduo de beneficiamento do granito como fertilizante alternativo na cultura do café Granite processing waste as an alternative fertilizer for the coffee crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Guarçoni M.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O resíduo de beneficiamento do granito é considerado um contaminante do ambiente. Sua utilização na agricultura como fertilizante tem sido testada e os resultados satisfatórios definidos mais por questões ideológicas do que por real eficácia. Tendo por objetivo avaliar o efeito do resíduo de beneficiamento do granito na adubação de plantas de café da espécie conilon, foi instalado um experimento em casa de vegetação, utilizando duas amostras de um mesmo solo (superficial e subsuperficial, seis doses de resíduo de beneficiamento do granito (0,0; 1,5; 3,0; 6,0; 9,0 e 15,0 g dm-3, equivalentes a 0; 3; 6; 12; 18 e 30 t ha-1 e duas doses de calcário (0,4 e 1,2 vezes a necessidade de calagem. Após incubação das amostras, plantio, crescimento e colheita das plantas de café conilon, foram determinados teores de elementos químicos e características de planta e solo, podendo-se concluir que: a aplicação de doses crescentes do resíduo de beneficiamento do granito elevou o pH do solo e reduziu o teor de Al3+, de forma linear, mas em pequena magnitude; a utilização do resíduo de beneficiamento do granito foi mais eficiente em amostra de solo com maior capacidade tampão; para o crescimento inicial do café, o resíduo deve ser utilizado, exclusivamente, como fonte de K e Ca, sendo necessário, para isso, que o pH do solo esteja em torno de 5,0; doses próximas a 20 t ha-1 de resíduo de beneficiamento do granito geraram crescimento inicial adequado para o café.The granite processing waste is considered an environmental contaminant. Its agricultural use has been investigated and satisfactory results have been defined basically considering ideological questions instead of its real effectiveness. Aiming to evaluate the effect of the granite processing waste on conilon coffee fertilizing, an experiment was installed under greenhouse conditions. Two samples of only one soil (superficial and subsuperficial, six granite processing

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Damage Processes in Aluminum Alloys: Grain-Scale Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhalter, J. D.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bozek, J. E.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    framework. At the microscale, the nanoscale mechanics are represented within cohesive zones where appropriate, i.e. where the mechanics observed at the nanoscale can be represented as occurring on a plane such as at grain boundaries or slip planes at a crack front. Important advancements that are yet to be made include: 1. an increased fidelity in cohesive zone modeling; 2. a means to understand how atomistic simulation scales with time; 3. a new experimental methodology for generating empirical models for CZMs and emerging materials; and 4. a validation of simulations of the damage processes at the nano-micro scale. With ever-increasing computer power, the long-term ability to employ atomistic simulation for the prognosis of structural components will not be limited by computation power, but by our lack of knowledge in incorporating atomistic models into simulations of MSFC into a multiscale framework.

  19. Large-scale grain growth in the solid-state process: From "Abnormal" to "Normal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Minhong; Han, Shengnan; Zhang, Jingwei; Song, Jiageng; Hao, Chongyan; Deng, Manjiao; Ge, Lingjing; Gu, Zhengfei; Liu, Xinyu

    2018-02-01

    Abnormal grain growth (AGG) has been a common phenomenon during the ceramic or metallurgy processing since prehistoric times. However, usually it had been very difficult to grow big single crystal (centimeter scale over) by using the AGG method due to its so-called occasionality. Based on the AGG, a solid-state crystal growth (SSCG) method was developed. The greatest advantages of the SSCG technology are the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of the technique. But the traditional SSCG technology is still uncontrollable. This article first summarizes the history and current status of AGG, and then reports recent technical developments from AGG to SSCG, and further introduces a new seed-free, solid-state crystal growth (SFSSCG) technology. This SFSSCG method allows us to repeatedly and controllably fabricate large-scale single crystals with appreciable high quality and relatively stable chemical composition at a relatively low temperature, at least in (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3(KNN) and Cu-Al-Mn systems. In this sense, the exaggerated grain growth is no longer 'Abnormal' but 'Normal' since it is able to be artificially controllable and repeated now. This article also provides a crystal growth model to qualitatively explain the mechanism of SFSSCG for KNN system. Compared with the traditional melt and high temperature solution growth methods, the SFSSCG method has the advantages of low energy consumption, low investment, simple technique, composition homogeneity overcoming the issues with incongruent melting and high volatility. This SFSSCG could be helpful for improving the mechanical and physical properties of single crystals, which should be promising for industrial applications.

  20. Income Content of the World Coffee Exports Income Content of the World Coffee Exports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Monteiro da Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is the most widely commercialized tropical product on the international market. The 2009/10 crop had an estimated value of $15.4 billion, with 93.4 million bags exported. According to the International Coffee Organization (ICO, 2011, the coffee sector employed  around 26 million people in 56 producing countries and over 100 exporting countries. But how would coffee products rank, in terms of income content, in relation to other commercialized products, and how have they evolved? To answer this question, the annual income content of 5,111 products exported by 167 countries from the period between 2000 and 2009, was calculated. Data from the UNCOMTRADE (2011, and “sophistication” indicators proposed by Hausmann and Rodrik (2003 who classify different products according to their productivity, were used. An emphasis was put on five coffee products (whole grain, roasted, decaffeinated, caffeinated, and soluble, showing the evolution of the number of exporting countries and of the “sophistication” index (income content, whose temporal variation was decomposed by the effects of competitiveness and income per capita changes. The results showed that non-roasted, non-decaffeinated, whole grain coffee is still the most commercialized product, but with the lowest income content of all coffee products, occupying the twenty-fourth worst position in terms of income content in 2009. The roasted, decaffeinated coffee presented the greatest income growth in the period, placing itself in the 3,309th position in 2009. The decomposition of the index showed that for coffee products with the most processing, the greatest cause of export sophistication growth was the Revealed Comparative Advantage effect. Products with the least amount of processing presented a loss in relative market share, with the addition of values to the production chain occurring outside those countries producing the raw materials.El café es el producto tropical m

  1. 3D primary grain shapes resulting from semi-solid metal processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, Ulyate A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available simultaneously being cooled. Primary aluminium grains are extracted by an etch technique from a sample volume of the casting. The grain size distribution and shapes are analysed. The 3D particles are pictured with scanning electron microscopy. Various interesting...

  2. Hardware-based image processing for high-speed inspection of grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    A high-speed, low-cost, image-based sorting device was developed to detect and separate grains with slight color differences and small defects on grains The device directly combines a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) color image sensor with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) which...

  3. Fatigue Behavior of an Ultrafine-Grained Al-Mg-Si Alloy Processed by High-Pressure Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Murashkin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the evaluation of the mechanical and fatigue properties of an ultrafine-grained (UFG Al 6061 alloy processed by high-pressure torsion (HPT at room temperature (RT. A comparison is made between the UFG state and the coarse-grained (CG one subjected to the conventional aging treatment Т6. It is shown that HPT processing leads to the formation of the UFG microstructure with an average grain size of 170 nm. It is found that yield strength (σ0.2, ultimate tensile strength (σUTS and the endurance limit (σf in the UFG Al 6061 alloy are higher by a factor of 2.2, 1.8 and 2.0 compared to the CG counterpart subjected to the conventional aging treatment Т6. Fatigue fracture surfaces are analyzed, and the fatigue behavior of the material in the high cycle and low cycle regimes is discussed.

  4. Too much coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    coffee can be motivated to drink less coffee. The ethnomethodological perspective reveals how the participants’ different common-sense and hierarchical perceptions of a normative theory and its meaning in practice appears to guide the talk about how to motivate the patient to drink less coffee....... The negotiation between the researchers’ and practitioners’ approach to the coffee drinking patient facilitate a more profound understanding of how different knowledge forms can be at play in other ways than expected. In conclusion the findings show that dialogue and interplay between different knowledge forms...

  5. Physical and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee as Affected by Cherry Storage Before Pulping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting and pulping process of coffee cherry in the same day is inaccesible. Storage of coffee cherry before pulping was carried out incorrectly. Some storage treatments before pulping of Arabica coffee cherry had been examined at Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute using Arabica coffee cherries from Andungsari Experimental Garden, Bondowoso, East Java. Treatments of the experiment were method and period of cherry storage. Methods of coffee cherry storage were put in plastic sacks; immerse in water, without water replacement; and immerse in water with daily water replacement. Period of coffee cherry storage were 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days. After storage treatments, the coffee cherries were pulped, fermented, washed, sundried, and dehulled. The experiment were carried out using randomized block design with three replications. Observation of coffee cherry during storage periods was done on the physical and temperature. Observation of the green coffee were done on the color dan bulk density. The green coffee were roasted at medium roast level for sensory analysis. Observation of roasting profile were out-turn, bulk density and pH of roasted coffee. Sensory analysis used Specialty Coffee Association of America method. Methods and period of cherry storage before pulping significanly influence on the cherry color, parchment color, green coffee color, and the flavor profile of Arabica coffee. Color of dry parchment changed to be red-brown becouse of cherry immersed in water for two days or more. In plastic sacks, Arabica coffee cherry may be stored only for two days, but underwater with or without water replacement, should be not more than five days. Green and sensory quality of Arabica coffee will be deteriorated after five days storage underwater. Coffee cherry storage immerse in water with daily replacing water may improve sensory quality of Arabica coffee.Key word: Arabica coffe, storage, pulping, flavor, physical

  6. INTRODUCTION TO THE ANALYSIS OF THE MECHANICS OF THE DIAMOND GRINDING PROCESS WITH THE ACCOUNT OF WEAR OF WHEEL GRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feodor NOVIKOV

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the theoretical analysis of the mechanics of the diamond grinding process, taking into account the wear of the wheel grains for scientifically based choice of optimal processing conditions. A multiplicative probabilistic approach to the generalization of the cutting profile of a diamond grinding wheel in its consideration in a state of some steady wear during processing is considered. This is achieved by working the wheel in a mode of properly established self-sharpening or with the use of effective dressing methods. In this case, the linear wear of individual grains of diamond abrasive located on the working surface of the grinding wheel and opened to mechanical contact with the material being processed is assumed to proportionally to the depth of the introduction of grain into it. The analytical dependence of the maximum thickness of the cut is presented, and the relationship between the maximum grain wear and the accepted universal relative characteristic of the steady wear with the operational parameters of the tool and the grinding mode is shown. The obtained results can be used in the development of analytical models of processing productivity and microgeometric engineering of the treated surface, new approaches to increasing the efficiency of diamond grinding. The research is based on modern technical possibilities of controlling the state of the cutting relief of diamond-abrasive tools, especially in electro-physical-mechanical grinding technologies, for example, using the diamond-spark method developed at the Kharkov Polytechnic Institute.

  7. What's Inside That Seed We Brew? A New Approach To Mining the Coffee Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Michael Joe; Mitchell, Thomas; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B

    2015-10-01

    Coffee is a critically important agricultural commodity for many tropical states and is a beverage enjoyed by millions of people worldwide. Recent concerns over the sustainability of coffee production have prompted investigations of the coffee microbiome as a tool to improve crop health and bean quality. This review synthesizes literature informing our knowledge of the coffee microbiome, with an emphasis on applications of fruit- and seed-associated microbes in coffee production and processing. A comprehensive inventory of microbial species cited in association with coffee fruits and seeds is presented as reference tool for researchers investigating coffee-microbe associations. It concludes with a discussion of the approaches and techniques that provide a path forward to improve our understanding of the coffee microbiome and its utility, as a whole and as individual components, to help ensure the future sustainability of coffee production. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. What's Inside That Seed We Brew? A New Approach To Mining the Coffee Microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Thomas; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is a critically important agricultural commodity for many tropical states and is a beverage enjoyed by millions of people worldwide. Recent concerns over the sustainability of coffee production have prompted investigations of the coffee microbiome as a tool to improve crop health and bean quality. This review synthesizes literature informing our knowledge of the coffee microbiome, with an emphasis on applications of fruit- and seed-associated microbes in coffee production and processing. A comprehensive inventory of microbial species cited in association with coffee fruits and seeds is presented as reference tool for researchers investigating coffee-microbe associations. It concludes with a discussion of the approaches and techniques that provide a path forward to improve our understanding of the coffee microbiome and its utility, as a whole and as individual components, to help ensure the future sustainability of coffee production. PMID:26162877

  9. Free choice profiling sensory analysis to discriminate coffees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Sorane Good Kitzberger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensory attributes were evaluated from Arabica coffee genotypes growing in two places in Brazil, Mandaguari and Londrina. Post-harvest and roasted process was standardized. Free choice profiling sensory analysis was apply to investigate the influence of genetic variability and local cultivation (Londrina and Mandaguari, Brazil on the sensory characteristics of coffee genotypes. A sensory panel evaluated coffees from Mandaguari in two groups: one (Sarchimor derived, IPR100, IPR102, IPR105, IPR106 characterized by transparency, coffee colour, green aroma, taste (green, bitter, fermented, astringent and a watery texture, another group (Catuaí, Sarchimor derived, IPR101, IPR103 was characterized by coffee colour, brightness, aroma (coffee, acid, sweet, chocolate, acidity, bitterness, burnt aroma, sweetness and full-bodied. Coffees from Londrina presented brightness, coffee colour, sweet, green, burnt aroma, astringent, bitter, fermented, green taste; and watery texture (Catuaí, IPR97, IPR98, IPR100. Another group (Sarchimor derived, IPR101, IPR102, IPR103, IPR105, IPR106 were associated with turbidity, aroma (green, coffee, sweet, acidity, astringency, bitterness, sweetness and full-bodied. Catuaí, Iapar59, IPR99, IPR101, IPR103 and IPR108 exhibited positive attributes when grown in either locale. Edaphoclimatic conditions play a major role in the sensory profiles of coffee.

  10. Modeling of the inhomogeneity of grain refinement during combined metal forming process by finite element and cellular automata methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majta, Janusz; Madej, Łukasz; Svyetlichnyy, Dmytro S.; Perzyński, Konrad; Kwiecień, Marcin, E-mail: mkwiecie@agh.edu.pl; Muszka, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    The potential of discrete cellular automata technique to predict the grain refinement in wires produced using combined metal forming process is presented and discussed within the paper. The developed combined metal forming process can be treated as one of the Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) techniques that consists of three different modes of deformation: asymmetric drawing with bending, namely accumulated angular drawing (AAD), wire drawing (WD) and wire flattening (WF). To accurately replicate complex stress state both at macro and micro scales during subsequent deformations two stage modeling approach was used. First, the Finite Element Method (FEM), implemented in commercial ABAQUS software, was applied to simulate entire combined forming process at the macro scale level. Then, based on FEM results, the Cellular Automata (CA) method was applied for simulation of grain refinement at the microstructure level. Data transferred between FEM and CA methods included set of files with strain tensor components obtained from selected integration points in the macro scale model. As a result of CA simulation, detailed information on microstructure evolution during severe plastic deformation conditions was obtained, namely: changes of shape and sizes of modeled representative volume with imposed microstructure, changes of the number of grains, subgrains and dislocation cells, development of grain boundaries angle distribution as well as changes in the pole figures. To evaluate CA model predictive capabilities, results of computer simulation were compared with scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction images (SEM/EBSD) studies of samples after AAD+WD+WF process.

  11. Processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of large-grained zirconium diboride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuman, Eric W.; Hilmas, Gregory E., E-mail: ghilmas@mst.edu; Fahrenholtz, William G.

    2016-07-18

    Zirconium diboride ceramics produced using commercial ZrB{sub 2} powders, and milled with zirconium diboride grinding media, were fabricated by hot-pressing at temperatures of 2100–2200 °C with hold times of 30–120 min. This ZrB{sub 2} exhibits no additional impurities typically introduced by milling with grinding media of differing composition. Microstructure analysis revealed grain sizes ranging from ~25 to ~50 µm along with ~3 vol% porosity. Flexure strength ranged from 335 to 400 MPa, elastic modulus from 490 to 510 GPa, fracture toughness from 2.7 to 3.2 MPa m{sup ½}, and hardness from 13.0 to 14.4 GPa. Strength limiting flaws were identified as surface grain pullout induced by machining. Elastic modulus and hardness were found to increase with decreasing porosity. Compared to the fine grained ceramics typically reported, large grain zirconium diboride ceramics exhibit higher than expected room temperature strengths.

  12. Bifunctional composite from spent "Cyprus coffee" for tetracycline removal and phenol degradation: Solar-Fenton process and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladipo, Akeem Adeyemi; Abureesh, Mosab Ali; Gazi, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    Removals of tetracycline and photocatalytic degradation of phenol by Fe3O4/coffee residue (MCC) were investigated. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Boehm titration were employed to characterize MCC. Artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the tetracycline (TC) concentration in the column effluent. Maximum tetracycline adsorption capacity of 285.6mg/g was observed in a batch system. High removal efficiency (87%) was obtained at 3.3mL/min flow rate, 8.0cm bed height and 50mg/L influent TC concentration in a column system. Complete degradation of phenol by solar-Fenton was attained at 60min irradiation time. Total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased to 63.3% in the presence of 1.0g/L MCC, 1.2g/L H2O2 and solar irradiation. MCC showed remarkable potential to remove antibiotics from wastewater even in the presence of heavy metal (Ni(2+)) via magnetic separation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Start-up of an anaerobic hybrid (UASB/filter) reactor treating wastewater from a coffee processing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Mendoza, R; Castillo-Rivera, M F

    1998-10-01

    The ability of an anaerobic hybrid reactor, treating coffee wastewater, to achieve a quick start-up was tested at pilot scale. The unacclimatized seed sludge used showed a low specific methanogenic activity of 26.47 g CH4 as chemical oxygen demand (COD)/kg volatile suspended solids (VSS) x day. This strongly limited the reactor performance. After a few days of operation, a COD removal of 77.2% was obtained at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.89 kg COD/m3 x day and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 22 h. However, suddenly increasing OLR above 2.4 kg COD/m3 x day resulted in a deterioration in treatment efficiency. The reactor recovered from shock loads after shutdowns of 1 week. The hybrid design of the anaerobic reactor prevented the biomass from washing-out but gas clogging in the packing material was also observed. Wide variations in wastewater strength and flow rates prevented stable reactor operation in the short period of the study.

  14. Electrical characterization of CdTe grain-boundary properties from as processed CdTe/CdS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, L.M.; Robinson, G.Y. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Levi, D.H.; Ahrenkiel, R.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Kaydanov, V. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    An ability to liftoff or separate the thin-film polycrystalline CdTe from the CdS, without the use of chemical etches, has enabled direct electrical characterization of the as-processed CdTe near the CdTe/CdS heterointerface. The authors use this ability to understand how a back-contact, nitric-phosphoric (NP) etch affects the grain boundaries throughout the film. Quantitative determination of the grain-boundary barrier potentials and estimates of doping density near the grain perimeter are determined from theoretical fits to measurements of the current vs. temperature. Estimates of the bulk doping are determined from high-frequency resistivity measurements. The light and dark barrier potentials change after the NP etch, and the origin of this change is postulated. Also, a variable doping density within the grains of non-etched material has been determined. These results allow a semi-quantitative grain-boundary band diagram to be drawn that should aid in determining more accurate two-dimensional models for polycrystalline CdTe solar cells.

  15. Authentication of bee pollen grains in bright-field microscopy by combining one-class classification techniques and image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chica, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    A novel method for authenticating pollen grains in bright-field microscopic images is presented in this work. The usage of this new method is clear in many application fields such as bee-keeping sector, where laboratory experts need to identify fraudulent bee pollen samples against local known pollen types. Our system is based on image processing and one-class classification to reject unknown pollen grain objects. The latter classification technique allows us to tackle the major difficulty of the problem, the existence of many possible fraudulent pollen types, and the impossibility of modeling all of them. Different one-class classification paradigms are compared to study the most suitable technique for solving the problem. In addition, feature selection algorithms are applied to reduce the complexity and increase the accuracy of the models. For each local pollen type, a one-class classifier is trained and aggregated into a multiclassifier model. This multiclassification scheme combines the output of all the one-class classifiers in a unique final response. The proposed method is validated by authenticating pollen grains belonging to different Spanish bee pollen types. The overall accuracy of the system on classifying fraudulent microscopic pollen grain objects is 92.3%. The system is able to rapidly reject pollen grains, which belong to nonlocal pollen types, reducing the laboratory work and effort. The number of possible applications of this authentication method in the microscopy research field is unlimited. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comminution process to produce engineered wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30

    Comminution process of wood veneer to produce wood particles, by feeding wood veneer in a direction of travel substantially normal to grain through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of veneer travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (Td), to produce wood particles characterized by a length dimension (L) substantially equal to the Td and aligned substantially parallel to grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) substantially equal to the veneer thickness (Tv) and aligned normal to W and L, wherein the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces with end checking between crosscut fibers.

  17. Comminution process to produce wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from veneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2017-03-28

    Comminution process of wood veneer to produce wood particles, by feeding wood veneer in a direction of travel substantially normal to grain through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood veneer travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (Td), to produce wood particles characterized by a length dimension (L) substantially equal to the Td and aligned substantially parallel to grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) aligned normal to W and L, wherein the W.times.H dimensions define a pair of substantially parallel end surfaces with end checking between crosscut fibers.

  18. Coffee Leaf Rust Epidemics ( Hemileia vastatrix ) in Montane Coffee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) is native to southwestern Ethiopia growing as understory of the rainforests that harbor huge floral and faunal diversities. Besides drastic reduction in the forest cover and low average yield, the crop is attacked by several diseases among which coffee berry disease, coffee wilt disease and coffee ...

  19. Nutritional, functional and rheological properties of processed sorghum and ragi grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Mahajan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to determine the effect of different treatments such as roasting, puffing and germination of white sorghum, red sorghum and ragi grains on physicochemical, antioxidant, protein, amylose, bulk density, colour index and rheological properties of respective flour. In case of ragi, after roasting treatment, total phenolic content (TPC content for flour was increased from 0.331 ± 0.001 to 0.373 ± 0.004 mg of gallic acid equivalents per gram of dry sample. However, total flavonoids content was also increased slightly after different processing treatments. The rheological properties of respective flour were studied using Chopin Mixolab, where wheat flour dough profile acts as a reference to study the effect of different treatments. Dough elasticity which is expressed by the values of amplitude (Nm was found to be low in case of untreated flour as compared to wheat flour dough. Elasticity values of untreated flour such as white sorghum, red sorghum and ragi were 0.02, 0.00 and 0.06 Nm, respectively. Whereas, after processing treatments, values of elasticity for roasted flour dough of white sorghum, puffed flour dough of red sorghum and roasted flour dough of ragi increased to 0.36, 0.11 and 0.15 Nm, respectively, as compared to wheat flour dough of 0.10 Nm. The results found that roasted ragi flour had higher rate of starch gelatinization, lower starch retrogradation, high antioxidant and amylose contents which were found to be prospective ingredients in whole wheat flour in various baked and fermented food applications.

  20. Mainstreaming sustainable coffee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2013-01-01

    This overview article examines the various dimensions of sustainable coffee as well as the actors involved and their perceptions of how to advance the market from niche to mainstream. The issues at hand are very complex, with different types of coffee producers, manufacturing/roasting companies and

  1. Coffee grounds. I. Effects of coffee grounds on ration digestibility and diuresis in cattle, on in vitro rumen fermentation, and on rat growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T W; Bartley, E E; Bechtle, R M; Dayton, A D

    1976-08-01

    Holstein steers were used to compare rations in which coffee grounds replaced grain at rates of 0, 5, 10, or 20%. The coffee grounds analyzed (%) dry matter 91.1, protein 11.8, fat 23.1, fiber 42.5, ash .7, and caffeine .13. Digestibility coefficients for dry matter, crude protein, and energy decreased, and ether extract increased progressively as concentrations of coffee grounds in the ration were increased. There was a significant decrease in nitrogen retention and utilization when the rations contained 10 or 20% coffee grounds. Coffee grounds depressed feed intake, increased urinary output, and increased water intake (based on dry matter intake). Coffee grounds caused diuresis and renal, urethral, and bladder irritation. Adding coffee grounds up to 35% of the substrate did not depress rumen microbial fermentation, as measured by in vitro gas production. Weight gain of rats fed rations containing 22.5% untreated coffee grounds was reduced significantly. Water extraction removed some undersirable factors in coffee grounds for rats, and ether extraction removed most of them. Incremental additions of coffee oil (1, 3, or 5%) to the basal diet resulted in incremental decreases in rat weight gain.

  2. Can good coffee prices increase smallholder revenue?

    OpenAIRE

    Pinard, Fabrice; Aithal, Anand

    2011-01-01

    The global coffee market is currently plagued by 2 paradoxes, a coffee boom in consuming countries, and a coffee crisis in producing countries (over supply of low quality coffee and shortage of high quality coffee) which is actually driving the coffee market (Daviron and Ponte, 2005). After the termination of the International Coffee Agreement between producing and consuming countries in 1989, the coffee market has been in a flux, with market forces and over supply bringing down the coffee pr...

  3. Coffee and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Bodil Hammer

    Background: Coffee consumption in Denmark is high also among pregnant women and it is presumably their main source of caffeine intake. Coffee or caffeine intake during pregnancy has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and reduced fetal growth. However...... a review of the literature indicates that further studies are needed to test the hypothesis of an effect of coffee or caffeine on the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.The aim of the thesis was to study the relation between coffee and the risk of fetal death and the relation between caffeine intake...... and mean birth weight. Based on data from the Danish National Birth Cohort we evaluated the association between coffee intake and fetal death in 88,482 pregnant women who participated in a comprehensive interview during second trimester. Information about fetal death was obtained from registries...

  4. Physical and Flavor Quality of Some Potential Varieties of Arabica Coffee in Several Interval Storage Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee storage was an active process, where the quality and flavor was depend on the origin, humidity, temperature, period, and ware house condition. The objective of this research was to know quality and flavor of some Arabica coffee varieties in interval of storage periods. The examined coffee varieties were BP 416 A, BP 430 A, BP 432 A, BP 509 A, BP 542 A, P 88, AS 1, S 795, and USDA-762. The treatments were recent harvest, one and two years stored green coffee. The green coffee were wet processed, sun dried, packed in polyethylene bags, one kg/pack and placed in some covered plastic boxes. The boxes were stored in ware house covered with wavy asbes roof and flat asbes ceiling. The green coffee was examined for its moisture content, color, and bulk density. The green coffee was roasted at medium level, and then examined for its the bulk density, yield, volume of swelling, and color of the roasted and powdered. The flavors examination was blind test method. The research showed that storage period significantly influenced the moisture content, color, and bulk density of green coffee, yield, volume of swelling, color of roasted coffee, color, and flavor profile of coffee powder. Those varieties tested showed significantly different on the moisture content, green coffee color, roasted coffee color, coffee powder color, and the profile flavor. The storage period influenced the green coffee color from greenish-gray to yellowish-red. The bulk density of green coffee decreased. The varieties that showed a little color changeduring storage, were BP 430 A,BP 416 A, AS 1, and S 795. One year of storage periode, the green coffee was still had the original color, but after two years, the original color had changed totally. The powder of recent harvest coffee was darker than that of one and two years storage. One year stored coffee had higher quality of aroma, intensity of aroma, quality of flavor, intensity of flavor, acidity, quality of after taste

  5. Evaluation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of the ultrafine grained thin-walled tubes processed by severe plastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolvand, H.; Faraji, G.; Givi, M. K. Besharati; Hashemi, R.; Riazat, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, ultrafine-grained (UFG) Cu-Zn tubes were processed via multi-pass parallel tubular channel angular pressing (PTCAP) process, and microstructure, mechanical properties along the axial and peripheral directions were evaluated. Mechanical characterizations were done using uniaxial tension test along both the axial and peripheral directions and biaxial bulging tests. The hydro-bulging test was used to measure the bursting pressure of UFG tubes. The results present that the UFG and nanostructured tubes achieved form PTCAP process exhibit excellent pressure bearing capacity in comparison with the coarse-grained (CG) counterparts. Also, the bursting pressure of the UFG tube was remarkably increased to 93 MPa just after the first pass of PTCAP process from 43.3 MPa for the CG one. It was 88 MPa and 81.3 MPa for second and third passes PTCAP processed tube. Important reasons for this behavior were both significant grain refinement and severe mechanical anisotropy results from texture evolution after PTCAP processing.

  6. Determination of acrylamide during roasting of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdonaite, Kristina; Derler, Karin; Murkovic, Michael

    2008-08-13

    In this study different Arabica and Robusta coffee beans from different regions of the world were analyzed for acrylamide after roasting in a laboratory roaster. Due to the complex matrix and the comparably low selectivity of the LC-MS at m/ z 72, acrylamide was analyzed after derivatization with 2-mercaptobenzoic acid at m/ z 226. Additionally, the potential precursors of acrylamide (3-aminopropionamide, carbohydrates, and amino acids) were studied. The highest amounts of acrylamide formed in coffee were found during the first minutes of the roasting process [3800 ng/g in Robusta ( Coffea canephora robusta) and 500 ng/g in Arabica ( Coffea arabica)]. When the roasting time was increased, the concentration of acrylamide decreased. It was shown that especially the roasting time and temperature, species of coffee, and amount of precursors in raw material had an influence on acrylamide formation. Robusta coffee contained significantly larger amounts of acrylamide (mean = 708 ng/g) than Arabica coffee (mean = 374 ng/g). Asparagine is the limiting factor for acrylamide formation in coffee. 3-Aminopropionamide formation was observed in a dry model system with mixtures of asparagine with sugars (sucrose, glucose). Thermal decarboxylation and elimination of the alpha-amino group of asparagine at high temperatures (>220 degrees C) led to a measurable but low formation of acrylamide.

  7. Attracting Students to Fluid Mechanics with Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    We describe a new class developed at U.C. Davis titled "The Design of Coffee," which serves as a nonmathematical introduction to chemical engineering as illustrated by the process of roasting and brewing coffee. Hands-on coffee experiments demonstrate key engineering principles, including material balances, chemical kinetics, mass transfer, conservation of energy, and fluid mechanics. The experiments lead to an engineering design competition where students strive to make the best tasting coffee using the least amount of energy - a classic engineering optimization problem, but one that is both fun and tasty. "The Design of Coffee" started as a freshmen seminar in 2013, and it has exploded in popularity: it now serves 1,533 students per year, and is the largest and most popular elective course at U.C. Davis. In this talk we focus on the class pedagogy as applied to fluid mechanics, with an emphasis on how coffee serves as an engaging and exciting topic for teaching students about fluid mechanics in an approachable, hands-on manner.

  8. Effect of processing and roasting on the antioxidant activity of coffee brews Efeito do processamento e da torração sobre a atividade antioxidante da bebida de café

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris da Silveira Duarte

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of processing and roasting on the antioxidant activity of coffee brews. Brews prepared with light, medium and dark roasted coffees were analyzed. The pH, total solids content, polyphenols content, reducing substances and chlorogenic acids content were determined. The antioxidant activity of aqueous extracts, the guaicol decolorizing and the capacity to inhibit lipid peroxidation were also analyzed. The antioxidant activity of coffee brews were concentration-dependent. A progressive antioxidant activity and polyphenols content was observed decreasing with roasting. The light roasted coffee showed the highest antioxidant activity and dark roasted coffee showed the lowest antioxidant activity. The results indicate that the ingestion of coffee brews prepared with light and medium roasted coffees might protect cells from oxidative stress damages.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do processamento e grau de torração sobre a atividade antioxidante da bebida de café. Foram analisadas bebidas preparadas com café nos graus de torração claro, médio e escuro. Foram determinados o pH, o conteúdo de sólidos totais, o conteúdo de polifenóis, o conteúdo de substâncias redutoras e o conteúdo de ácidos clorogênicos. Além disto, foram analisadas a atividade antioxidante dos extratos aquosos, a descoloração do guaiacol e a capacidade de inibição da formação de peróxidos lipídicos. A atividade antioxidante mostrou ser dependente da concentração da bebida de café. Foi observada redução progressiva da atividade antioxidante e de compostos fenólicos com o grau de torração. O café submetido à torra clara apresentou atividade antioxidante máxima e o café com maior grau de torra apresentou a menor atividade antioxidante. Os resultados indicam que a ingestão de bebidas preparadas com cafés de torras clara e média pode proteger a célula contra os efeitos do estresse

  9. Decomposition of Fertilizer Use Intensity and Its Environmental Risk in China’s Grain Production Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Cai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully explore the fertilizer use intensity and its potential threats to the ecological environment, this paper has studied the decomposition of fertilizer use intensity and its environmental risk in China’s grain production. Based on the statistical data collected from 10 provinces during 2004–2015 in China’s grain producing areas, this paper has analyzed the effect of fertilizer use intensity from a regional perspective. The environmental risk assessment model considers some factors such as the fertilizer application safety thresholds use efficiency, multiple cropping index, and environmental impact weight. The fertilizer application safety thresholds are calculated on the target output of local food crops. The results show that: (1 during 2004–2015, the fertilizer use intensity shows an increasing trend in China’s grain producing areas, and the intensity is significantly higher than the upper limit of the international safety fertilization; (2 the cumulative contribution rate of the increase of fertilizer use intensity caused by regional fertilizer use efficiency and grain planting structure adjustment are 57.03% and 1.81% respectively; (3 in 2015, China’s grain producing areas’ environmental risk index of phosphorus and potash was low, with the values in these two provinces being quite different and indicating the characteristics of aggregation and distribution. Therefore, the Chinese government should unswervingly encourage the application of some technology that could save fertilizer and increase efficiency, establish environmental risk monitoring and control systems, and improve relevant policies and regulations.

  10. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James H.; Lanning, David N.

    2015-06-23

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, wherein W.sub.C>L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is less than T.sub.D.

  11. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-08-13

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is greater than T.sub.D.

  12. Effect of roasting conditions on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content in ground Arabica coffee and coffee brew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houessou, Justin Koffi; Maloug, Saber; Leveque, Anne-Sophie; Delteil, Corine; Heyd, Bertrand; Camel, Valérie

    2007-11-14

    Roasting is a critical process in coffee production as it enables the development of flavor and aroma. At the same time, roasting may lead to the formation of nondesirable compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, Arabica green coffee beans from Cuba were roasted under controlled conditions to monitor PAH formation during the roasting process. Roasting was performed in a pilot spouted bed roaster, with the inlet air temperature varying from 180 to 260 degrees C, using both dark (20 min) and light (5 min) roasting conditions. Several PAHs were determined in both roasted coffee samples and green coffee samples. Also, coffee brews, obtained using an electric coffee maker, were analyzed for final estimation of PAH transfer coefficients to the infusion. Formation of phenanthrene, anthracene, and benzo[a]anthracene in coffee beans was observed at temperatures above 220 degrees C, whereas formation of pyrene and chrysene required 260 degrees C. Low levels of benzo[g,h,i]perylene were also noted for dark roasting under 260 degrees C, with simultaneous partial degradation of three-cycle PAHs, suggesting that transformation of low molecular PAHs to high molecular PAHs occurs as the roasting degree is increased. The PAH transfer to the infusion was quite moderate (roasted coffee as compared to light-roasted coffee.

  13. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Potential of Coffee Husk and Pulp as an Alternative Source of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Ethiopia enormous amounts of coffee husk and pulp are generated anually from coffee processing industries. However, they have been poorly utilized or left to decompose or otherwise dumped in the environment. Therefore, this research was conducted at Teppi and Limu coffee farms in Ethiopia to produce briquettes ...

  15. Role of 3D force networks in linking grain scale to macroscale processes in sheared granular debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, K.; Jettestuen, E.; Abe, S.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults, landslides and subglacial tills contain accumulations of granular debris that evolve during sliding. The macroscopic motion in these environments is at least to some extent determined by processes operating in this sheared granular material. A valid question is how the local behavior at the individual granular contacts actually sums up to influence macroscopic sliding. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling can potentially help elucidate this. Observations of jamming (stick) and unjamming (flow) as well as concentrated shear bands on the scale of 5-10 grains suggest that a simple continuum description may be insufficient to capture important elements of the behavior. We therefore seek a measure of the organization of the granular fabric and the 3D structure of the load bearing skeleton that effectively demonstrates how the individual grain interactions are manifested in the macroscopic sliding behavior we observe. Contact force networks are an expression of this. Here we investigate the structure and variability of the most connected system spanning force networks produced in 3D discrete element models of granular layers under shear. We use percolation measures to identify, characterize, compare and track the evolution of these strongly connected contact force networks. We show that specific topological measures used in describing the networks, such as number of contacts and coordination number, are sensitive to grain size distribution (and likely the grain shape) of the material as well as loading conditions. Hence, faults of different maturity would be expected to accommodate shear in different ways. Distinct changes in the topological characteristics i.e. the geometry of strong force networks with accumulated strain are directly correlated to fluctuations in macroscopic shearing resistance. This suggests that 3D force networks play an important bridging role between individual grain scale processes and macroscopic sliding behavior.

  16. Online monitoring of coffee roasting by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS): towards a real-time process control for a consistent roast profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Flurin; Gloess, Alexia N; Keller, Marco; Wetzel, Andreas; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2012-03-01

    A real-time automated process control tool for coffee roasting is presented to consistently and accurately achieve a targeted roast degree. It is based on the online monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the off-gas of a drum roaster by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry at a high time (1 Hz) and mass resolution (5,500 m/Δm at full width at half-maximum) and high sensitivity (better than parts per billion by volume). Forty-two roasting experiments were performed with the drum roaster being operated either on a low, medium or high hot-air inlet temperature (= energy input) and the coffee (Arabica from Antigua, Guatemala) being roasted to low, medium or dark roast degrees. A principal component analysis (PCA) discriminated, for each one of the three hot-air inlet temperatures, the roast degree with a resolution of better than ±1 Colorette. The 3D space of the three first principal components was defined based on 23 mass spectral profiles of VOCs and their roast degree at the end point of roasting. This provided a very detailed picture of the evolution of the roasting process and allowed establishment of a predictive model that projects the online-monitored VOC profile of the roaster off-gas in real time onto the PCA space defined by the calibration process and, ultimately, to control the coffee roasting process so as to achieve a target roast degree and a consistent roasting.

  17. Effect of different types of processing on the total phenolic compound content, antioxidant capacity, and saponin content of Chenopodium quinoa Willd grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Júlia; Spanier, Luciana Pio; Botelho, Fabiana Torma; Gularte, Márcia Arocha; Helbig, Elizabete

    2016-10-15

    The effects of five processing forms on the content of phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity, and saponin content in quinoa grains were evaluated. The processes included washing, washing followed by hydration, cooking (with or without pressure), and toasting. The highest content of phenolic compounds was obtained after cooking under pressure; however, these compounds also increased with grain washing. The toasting process caused the greatest loss. The antioxidant capacity of the grains was similarly affected by the processing techniques. According to the amount of saponins, the grains were classified as bitter. Washing caused a reduction in these compounds, but the levels remained unchanged after cooking (with and without) pressure and toasting; however, they significantly increased after hydration. Cooking, especially with pressure, had greater effects than the other processes, and potentiated the functional properties of quinoa grains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chemical, functional, and structural properties of spent coffee grounds and coffee silverskin

    OpenAIRE

    Ballesteros, Lina F.; J. A. Teixeira; Mussatto, Solange I.

    2014-01-01

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) and coffee silverskin (CS) represent a great pollution hazard if discharged into the environment. Taking this fact into account, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition, functional properties, and structural characteristics of these agro-industrial residues in order to identify the characteristics that allow their reutilization in industrial processes. According to the results, SCG and CS are both of lignocellulosic nature. Sugars polymeri...

  19. Performance of process-based models for simulation of grain N in crop rotations across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Xiaogang; Kersebaum, KC; Kollas, C

    2017-01-01

    calibration. The models performed better in predicting the grain N of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) compared to spring oat (Avena sativa L.), winter rye (Secale cereale L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.) and winter oilseed rape...

  20. Effects of process parameters on the properties of barley containing snacks enriched with brewer's spent grain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirjoranta, Satu; Tenkanen, Maija; Jouppila, Kirsi

    2016-01-01

    Brewer's spent grain (BSG), a by-product of malting of barley in the production of malt extract, was used as an ingredient in extruded barley-based snacks in order to improve the nutritional value of the snacks and widen...

  1. Grain Size Control in AA5083: Thermomechanical Processing and Particle Stimulated Nucelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    of the grain structure. Overlaid on top of the image quality map are lines that represent different misorientations. The black lines indicate ...User’s Manual. TexSEM Laboratories, Draper, UT, 2001. [32] Aitchison , J. and Brown, J.A.C., The Lognormal Distribtuion (with special reference to

  2. Lessons Learned from Designing the Montium a Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Processing Tile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria; Heysters, P.M.; Rosien, M.A.J.; Molenkamp, Egbert

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe in retrospective the main results of a four year project, called Chameleon. As part of this project we developed a coarse-grained reconfigurable core for DSP algorithms in wirelessdevices denoted MONTIUM. After presenting the main achievements within this project we present

  3. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debastiani, R.; dos Santos, C. E. I.; Yoneama, M. L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans.

  4. Too much coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    and ethnomethodology we – researchers - decided to study the interplay between practitioners and researchers negotiating on how a psychiatric patient who drinks too much coffee can be motivated to drink less coffee. The ethnomethodological perspective reveals how the interlocutors’ different common......-sense and hierarchical perceptions of a normative theory and its meaning in practice appears to guide the talk about how to motivate the patient to drink less coffee. Moreover, the examination of the dialogue between these show how important it is to respect multivocality in order to be sensitive to how different...

  5. A review of coffee wilt disease, Gibberella xylarioides (Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee is vital to the economy of East and Central Africa, providing a major source of foreign exchange earnings and as a cash crop, supporting the livelihood of millions of people who are involved in cultivation, processing, marketing, and export. Coffee is attacked by various disease-causing organisms such as fungi, ...

  6. Multiscale Crystal Plasticity Modeling Considering Nucleation of Dislocations Based on Thermal Activation Process on Ultrafine-grained Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Y.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a crystal plasticity model expressing the behavior of the dislocation source and the mobile dislocations is proposed by considering a thermal activation process of dislocations. In order to predict the variation of critical resolved shear stress due to grain boundaries, mobile dislocations, or dislocation sources, information on these crystal defects is introduced into a hardening law of crystal plasticity. The crystal orientation and shape of ultrafine-grained (UFG) aluminum produced by accumulative roll bonding processes are measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Mechanical properties of the UFG aluminum are estimated using tensile test and indentation test. Results obtained by EBSD are introduced into a computational model. Finite element simulation for polycrystal of aluminum investigates the effect of microstructure on mechanical properties of UFG aluminum.

  7. Statistical processing the interlaboratory testing results of grain-size distribution of stone coal from the Coal Mine Avramica

    OpenAIRE

    Urošević, Daniela; Jovanović, Ivana; Bartulović, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the results of interlaboratory testing the grain-size distribution of stone coal from the Coal Mine Avramica. Tests were carried out on representative samples of coal. The results were processed by two ways: numerical method - Cochran's test of accuracy and graphic interpretation - Calculating the z value in accordance with the Standard SRPS ISO 5725-2 [1]. The followings were calculated: variance of repeatability variance Sr2; interlaboratory variance SL 2 and reproducibil...

  8. Tem Study of Recrystallization in Ultra-Fine Grain AA3104 Alloy Processed by High-Pressure Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of annealing on the microstructure and the texture development was investigated in a particle containing AA3104 aluminium alloy. The samples were processed at room temperature by high-pressure torsion (HPT up to ten turns. The nucleation of new grains was analyzed by a transmission electron microscope equipped with a system for local orientation measurements and a heating holder.

  9. Enhanced Mechanical Properties and Electrical Conductivity in Ultrafine-Grained Al 6101 Alloy Processed via ECAP-Conform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Murashkin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the effect of equal channel angular pressing-Conform (ECAP-C and further artificial aging (AA on microstructure, mechanical, and electrical properties of Al 6101 alloy. As is shown, ECAP-C at 130 °C with six cycles resulted in the formation of an ultrafine-grained (UFG structure with a grain size of 400–600 nm containing nanoscale spherical metastable β′ and stable β second-phase precipitates. As a result, processed wire rods demonstrated the ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 308 MPa and electrical conductivity of 53.1% IACS. Electrical conductivity can be increased without any notable degradation in mechanical strength of the UFG alloy by further AA at 170 °C and considerably enhanced by additional decomposition of solid solution accompanied by the formation of rod-shaped metastable β′ precipitates mainly in the ultrafine grain interior and by the decrease of the alloying element content in the Al matrix. It is demonstrated that ECAP-C can be used to process Al-Mg-Si wire rods with the specified UFG microstructure. The mechanical strength and electrical conductivity in this case are shown to be much higher than those in the industrial semi-finished products made of similar material processed by the conventional T6 or T81 treatment.

  10. Biological systems coupled for treating wastewater from processing coffee cherries: I – Removal of organic matter - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i2.13627

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Fia

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three treatment systems consisting of upflow anaerobic filters followed by constructed wetlands (CW were evaluated in the treatment of wastewater from processing coffee cherries (WCP. The filters (F were made up of PVC (1.5 m high and 0.35 m diameter filled with gravel # 2 and SACs were made of wood boxes (1.5 m long, 0.4 m high and 0.5 m wide sealed with HDPE geomembranes and filled with gravel ‘zero’. WCP had the pH adjusted with lime to values close to 7.0 and the nutrient concentration changed to obtain a BOD/N/P ratio equal to 100/5/1. As a result, the values of influent and effluent pH remained within the range appropriate to the biological degradation of organic material. The system could not bear the shock of the organic load, which reduced the organic matter removal efficiency. Based on the analysis of performance and operating conditions employed, only the system that received the lowest organic load (F1+CW1 on the third phase, was effective in removing organic matter.  

  11. Export and Competitiveness of Indonesian Coffee Bean in International Market: Strategic Implication for the Development of Organic Coffee Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Drajat

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of Indonesian coffee bean export from 1995 to 2004was not satisfactory. This implied that there were problems of the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. This study was expected to come up withsome views related with the problem. This study was aimed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export in international markets. Somepolicy implication would be derived following the conclusions. In addition,this study was aimed to deliver some arguments referring to organic coffee development as an alternative export development. Data used in this study wastime series data ranging from 1995 to 2004 supported with some primary data.The export data were analyzed descriptively and the Revealed ComparativeAdvantage (RCA Index employed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. The results of the analysis gave some conclusions, asfollows : (1 The export of Indonesian coffee bean was product oriented notmarket oriented. (2 The Indonesian coffee bean export was characterized withlow quality with no premium price, different from that of Vietnam coffee export. (3 Besides quality, the uncompetitive Indonesian coffee export was related to market hegemony by buyers, emerging issue of Ochratoxin A. contamination and high cost economy in export. (4 The competitiveness of Indonesian coffee export was lower than those other countries, such as Columbia,Honduras, Peru, Brazil, and Vietnam. (5 Indonesia still held opportunity todevelop organic coffee for export. Some policy implications emerged from thediscussion were as follows : (1 The Government should facilitate market development through the provisions of market information and export incentives.(2 The Government should develop and applied national standard of coffeebean referring to that of international, as well as, improve processing technology equipments in the farm level for both wet and dry process. (3 Besides improving quality, the improvement

  12. Regarding the perturbed operating process of DB propellant rocket motor at extreme initial grain temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan ION

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite many decades of study, the combustion instability of several DB propellants is still of particular concern, especially at extreme grain temperature conditions of rocket motor operating. The purpose of the first part of the paper is to give an overview of our main experimental results on combustion instabilities and pressure oscillations in DB propellant segmented grain rocket motors (SPRM-01, large L/D ratio, working at extreme initial grain temperatures. Thus, we recorded some particular pressure-time traces with significant perturbed pressure signal that was FFT analysed. An updated mathematical model incorporating transient frequency-dependent combustion response, in conjunction with pressure-dependent burning, is applied to investigate and predict the DB propellant combustion instability phenomenon. The susceptibility of the tested motor SPRM-01 with DB propellant to get a perturbed working and to go unstable with pressure was evidenced and this risk has to be evaluated. In the last part of our paper we evaluated the influence of recorded perturbed thrust on the rocket behaviour on the trajectory. The study revealed that at firing-table initial conditions, this kind of perturbed motor operating may not lead to an unstable rocket flight, but the ballistic parameters would be influenced in an unacceptable manner.

  13. Spent coffee grounds as a versatile source of green energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondamudi, Narasimharao; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Misra, Mano

    2008-12-24

    The production of energy from renewable and waste materials is an attractive alternative to the conventional agricultural feed stocks such as corn and soybean. This paper describes an approach to extract oil from spent coffee grounds and to further transesterify the processed oil to convert it into biodiesel. This process yields 10-15% oil depending on the coffee species (Arabica or Robusta). The biodiesel derived from the coffee grounds (100% conversion of oil to biodiesel) was found to be stable for more than 1 month under ambient conditions. It is projected that 340 million gallons of biodiesel can be produced from the waste coffee grounds around the world. The coffee grounds after oil extraction are ideal materials for garden fertilizer, feedstock for ethanol, and as fuel pellets.

  14. Use of Coffee Pulp and Minerals for Natural Soil Ameliorant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujiyanto Pujiyanto

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In coffee plantation, solid waste of coffee pulp is usually collected as heap nearby processing facilities for several months prior being used as compost. The practice is leading to the formation of odor and liquid which contaminate the environment. Experiments to evaluate the effect of natural soil ameliorant derived from coffee pulp and minerals were conducted at The Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute in Jember, East Java. The experiments were intended to optimize the use of coffee pulp to support farming sustainability and minimize negative impacts of solid waste disposal originated from coffee cherry processing. Prior to applications, coffee pulp was hulled to organic paste. The paste was then mixed with 10% minerals (b/b. Composition of the minerals was 50% zeolite and 50% rock phosphate powder. The ameliorant was characterized for their physical and chemical properties. Agronomic tests were conducted on coffee and cocoa seedling. The experiments were arranged according to Randomized Completely Design with 2 factors, consisted of natural ameliorant and inorganic fertilizer respectively. Natural ameliorant derived from coffee pulp was applied at 6 levels: 0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 g dry ameliorant/seedling of 3 kg soil, equivalent to 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5% (b/b of ameliorant respectively. Inorganic fertilizer was applied at 2 levels: 0 and 2 g fertilizer/application of N-P-K compound fertilizer of 15-15-15 respectively. The inorganic fertilizer was applied 4 times during nursery of coffee and cocoa. The result of the experiment indicated that coffee pulp may be used as natural soil ameliorant. Composition of ameliorant of 90% coffee pulp and 10% of minerals has good physical and chemical characteristics for soil amelioration. The composition has high water holding capacity; cations exchange capacity, organic carbon and phosphorus contents which are favorable to increase soil capacity to support plant growth. Application of

  15. Influence of Grain Coarsening on the Creep Parameters During the Superplastic Deformation of a Severely Friction Stir Processed Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Caballero, Alberto; Ruano, Oscar A.; Carreño, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    During grain boundary sliding in ultrafine-grain materials at intermediate temperatures and high strain rates ( 10-2 s-1), apparent creep parameters usually deviate from the theoretical values, due to microstructural coarsening. An analysis has been carried out in a severely friction stir processed (FSP) 7075 alloy with three different ultra-fine grain sizes ( L), obtaining explicit grain size dependence of the creep parameters n ap = n ap( L) and Q ap = Q ap( L), confirming the validity of the theoretical values of these parameters in the constitutive equation.

  16. Pesticide residues in raw and processed maize grains and flour from selected areas in Dar es Salaam and Ruvuma, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahugija, John Andrew Marco; Kayombo, Auguster; Peter, Regina

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the levels of pesticide residues in maize grains and flour and the effects of processing methods on their levels in maize products in samples collected in Dar es Salaam and Ruvuma regions. Analysis of cleaned-up extracts was done using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Twelve pesticides were detected in maize grains and their highest concentrations were up to 676.1, 11200 and 14 μg/kg for organochlorines, organophosphorous and pyrethroid pesticides, respectively. In maize flour, eight pesticides were detected and the concentrations for organochlorines, organophosphorous and pyrethroid pesticides were up to 333.3, 2220 and 2 μg/kg, respectively. Only dieldrin was detected in cooked samples at a concentration of 2 μg/kg. The concentrations of p,p'-DDD, aldrin, dieldrin, chlorpyrifos and pirimiphos methyl in some grains and flour samples exceeded the maximum residue limit (MRLs). The findings indicate risks and concerns for public health. Processing methods were found to cause transformation and reduction of the pesticides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Concentrações de metais pesados em grãos de café produzidos em lavouras sobre solos originados do basalto e do arenito Caiuá Heavy metals concentration in coffee grains produced in farming under basalt and Caiuá sandstone soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Adriana Pizarro Schmidt

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Tendo em vista que o Brasil é um grande produtor e consumidor de café, fica evidente a importância de sua caracterização em diferentes locais de cultivo. O objetivo do presente estudo foi quantificar os teores de metais pesados em amostras de grãos de café, provenientes de lavouras implantadas em solos oriundos do basalto e do arenito Caiuá do Estado do Paraná. Foram examinadas 30 amostras de grãos de café, sendo 15 cultivados em solos predominantemente arenosos e 15 em solos argilosos. A determinação de Cromo (Cr, Cobalto (Co, Níquel (Ni, Chumbo (Pb, Cádmio (Cd, Cobre (Cu, Zinco (Zn e Manganês (Mn foi feita por espectrometria de emissão atômica com fonte de plasma induzido com Thermo Jarrel-ash ICAP 612 E (ICP-EAS. Os níveis foram variáveis entre as amostras.Considering that Brazil is a big producer and coffee consumer its evident the importance of its characterization in the different places of cultivation. The purpose of the present study was quantify the levels of high metals in coffee grains samples 'IAPAR 59' derived from farming introduced in basalt and Caiuá sandstone soils in Paraná, Brazil . Thirty ground samples were examined, being 15 of predominantly arenaceous ground and 15 of argillaceous ground. The determination of Chrome (Cr, Cobalt (Co, Nickel (Ni, Lead (Pb, Cadmium (Cd, Copper (Cu, Zinc (Zn and Manganese (Mn, was made through atomic emission spectrometry with induced plasma source with Thermo 612 Jarrel-ash ICAP E (ICP-EAS. The levels changed among the samples.

  18. Beneficiamento de sementes de café e efeitos na qualidade fisiológica Coffee seed processing and effects on physiological seed quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Silva Giomo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerando-se a escassez de informações sobre o beneficiamento mecanizado de sementes de café, realizou-se este trabalho para estudar seus efeitos na qualidade fisiológica das sementes de café arábica. Um lote de sementes de 'Catuaí Amarelo IAC 62' foi submetido à ação de máquina de pré-limpeza, máquina de ventiladores e peneiras e mesa densimétrica, em diversas combinações, e as sementes foram avaliadas quanto à germinação e ao vigor (envelhecimento acelerado, emergência de plântulas, altura e massa de matéria seca de plântulas e mudas. O teor de água das sementes também foi determinado. Utilizou-se o delineamento estatístico de blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições, e o teste de Tukey a 5% para comparação de médias. Concluiu-se que: a a qualidade fisiológica das sementes foi aprimorada à medida que o lote passou por equipamentos específicos no beneficiamento, culminando com a melhor qualidade na seqüência operacional em que o lote foi submetido à ação da máquina de ventiladores e peneiras e mesa densimétrica; b a mesa densimétrica, associada à máquina de ventiladores e peneiras, foi o equipamento que proporcionou a melhor separação de materiais que interferem negativamente na qualidade fisiológica das sementes; c as sementes maiores e/ou mais pesadas tiveram qualidade fisiológica superior, e as sementes mocas graúdas, qualidade fisiológica similar à das sementes chatas graúdas; d o descarte das frações do lote constituídas por sementes pequenas ou de menor densidade possibilitou a obtenção de lotes homogêneos e com alta qualidade fisiológica, favorecendo a obtenção de mudas mais vigorosas.The objective of this research was to obtain more suitable information concerning coffee seed processing in the air-screen machines and gravity table, studying their effects on the physiological seed quality. One coffee seed lot of the Yellow Catuaí IAC 62 cultivar was processed in a precleaner

  19. Current knowledge of coffee wilt disease, a major constraint to coffee production in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Mike A

    2006-06-01

    ABSTRACT Coffee is vital to the economy of East and Central Africa, providing a major source of foreign exchange earnings and, as a cash crop, supporting the livelihoods of millions involved in cultivation, processing, marketing, and export. Coffee wilt disease (CWD), attributed to Gibberella xylarioides (Fusarium xylarioides), has caused losses to coffee production in Africa since 1927 but has been largely contained through the use of host resistance and in some instances wide-scale sanitation practices. A reemergence of CWD on Coffea canephora (Robusta coffee) in Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Tanzania has already led to heavy losses and threatens future production in these countries and elsewhere in the region. The relevance of CWD is all the more pertinent given the impact of a considerable fall in world coffee prices over the last decade. Recent research has clarified the extent of the problem in the region and revealed a low level of diversity within the pathogen, suggesting that two genetically and biologically distinct forms are responsible for current problems. These findings and related research and development initiatives undertaken under the auspices of the Regional Coffee Wilt Programme are of fundamental importance in providing an urgently needed solution to this devastating disease.

  20. Coffee production crisis and migration, in a context of poverty and marginalization. The case of indigenous producers in Huehuetla, Puebla

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alejandro Ortega Hernández; Benito Ramírez Valverde

    2013-01-01

    Because of coffee prices crisis in Mexico, mainly for indigenous producers, a labor expulsion process between their family members, like the case of indigenous coffee growers in Huehuetla municipality, Puebla...

  1. Using geographical information techniques to quantify the spatial structure of endolithic boring processes within sediment grains of marine stromatolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrisor, Alexandru I; Decho, Alan W

    2004-02-01

    Marine stromatolites are generated through the interactions of environmental parameters and specific microbial processes. The activities of endolithic bacteria, that bore canals through calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) sand grains (ooids) and reprecipitate the CaCO(3) as a single layer (i.e. micritic laminae) are especially important in the longer term stability of the stromatolite macrostructure. Image analysis and classification approaches have been used previously, but only seldom as a quantitative microscopic tool. Here, we develop a new approach that enables the quantification of microscale (i.e. micrometers to millimeters) spatial structure within marine stromatolites. To demonstrate our approach, images were acquired from two different layers of a stromatolite: "orange layers", where microboring of canals within ooids was relatively abundant, and "white layers" where microboring was greatly reduced or lacking. Images were then transformed into spatial maps. Computation of canal and ooid grain areas within each image was conducted and statistically compared between replicate samples from the two stromatolite layers. This allowed quantification of the areas of ooid grains that were microbored. Based on our results, we suggest that our method could be widely applicable to sedimentary environments, and other areas of fundamental research.

  2. Detection of genetically modified maize in processed products, dry grains, and corn ears intended for fresh consumption in South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C A M; Kommers, C M; Lehmann, F K M; Fonseca, A S K; Ikuta, N; Lunge, V R

    2016-10-17

    Conventional and genetically modified (GM) maize cultivars have been widely planted in Brazil to produce grains for processed food, feed, or to be consumed fresh as corn ears. This study used real-time PCR to detect GM maize in processed products and fresh commercial corn ears produced in the last two years in South Brazil. Eighteen conventional and GM maize cultivars were obtained from seed production companies and 50 commercial samples (including canned corn, corn flour, dry grains, and fresh corn ears) were purchased in small local stores and supermarkets. All samples were analyzed by real time TaqMan PCR to detect one constitutive maize gene (hmg) and three genetic regions present in GM plants (p-35S promoter, major gene cry 1A.105, and t-Nos terminator). Each commercial sample was classified as conventional or GM based on the PCR results. PCR targeting the hmg gene generated positive results from all DNA samples, which were further tested with the GM targets. These targets were not detected in the five conventional maize cultivars, but were detected in the GM seeds hosting these fragments. Analysis of processed foods identified four cultivars as conventional and six as GM, which were mostly correctly labeled. Seven (53.8%) dry grain samples were classified as conventional, while six (46.2%) were classified as GM. Three (11.1%) corn ear samples were identified as conventional, and the remaining 24 (88.9%) were GM maize. These results demonstrate the high frequency of GM maize in processed products, including fresh corn ears intended for consumption in South Brazil.

  3. Dual mechanisms of grain refinement in a FeCoCrNi high-entropy alloy processed by high-pressure torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenqian; Song, Min; Ni, Song; Wang, Jingshi; Liu, Yong; Liu, Bin; Liao, Xiaozhou

    2017-04-01

    An equiatomic FeCoCrNi high-entropy alloy with a face-centered cubic structure was fabricated by a powder metallurgy route, and then processed by high-pressure torsion. Detailed microscopy investigations revealed that grain refinement from coarse grains to nanocrystalline grains occurred mainly via concurrent nanoband (NB) subdivision and deformation twinning. NB-NB, twin-NB and twin-twin interactions contributed to the deformation process. The twin-twin interactions resulted in severe lattice distortion and accumulation of high densities of dislocations in the interaction areas. With increasing strain, NB subdivision and interactions between primary twins and inclined secondary stacking faults (SFs)/nanotwins occurred. Secondary nanotwins divided the primary twins into many equiaxed parts, leading to further grain refinement. The interactions between secondary SFs/nanotwins associated with the presence of Shockley partials and primary twins also transformed the primary twin boundaries into incoherent high-angle grain boundaries.

  4. Desempenho de bomba centrífuga operando com água residuária do processamento do café Centrifugal pump performance using coffee process wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinto A. Carvalho

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho de bomba centrífuga no recalque de águas residuárias provenientes do processamento do café, especificamente do descascamento e da demucilagem. Montou-se uma bancada, composta por caixas d'água, tubulações, válvulas, medidores de vazão e de pressão, e uma motobomba para a realização dos ensaios. Esses consistiram em aberturas parciais do registro, na saída da bomba, e medições da vazão e da pressão desenvolvida, e da energia consumida. Tais procedimentos foram realizados, primeiro, utilizando água pura, e depois com águas residuárias, em suas concentrações originais e com diversos graus de diluições. Os ensaios mostraram quedas acentuadas de altura manométrica e de rendimento, e aumento da potência demandada com a vazão recalcada de água residuária em comparação ao desempenho da mesma bomba operando com água limpa; a diluição das águas residuárias promoveu melhor desempenho da bomba em relação àquela com concentração original.This work was carried out to evaluate the performance of a centrifugal pump operating with wastewater from coffee process. Under laboratory conditions, it was determined the hydraulic characteristics (manometric height, engine power and efficiency for a centrifugal pump, operating with clear water and coffee process wastewater. The results have show that manometric height and efficiency was smaller and the engine power was higher when the coffee process wastewater was used in comparison with results obtained for clean water. The smaller the concentration of that coffee wastewater produced the better the performance of the pump in comparison with the performance obtained with original concentration of the coffee wastewater.

  5. The role of dissolved cations in coffee extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendon, Christopher H; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell

    2014-05-28

    The flavorsome compounds in coffee beans exist in the form of aprotic charge neutral species, as well as a collection of acids and conjugate salts. The dissolution and extraction of these organic molecules is a process dependent on the dissolved mineral content of the water. It is known that different rates and compositions of coffee extraction are achieved through the control of the water "impurities", Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), which coordinate to nucleophilic motifs in coffee. Using density functional theory, we quantify the thermodynamic binding energies of five familiar coffee-contained acids, caffeine, and a representative flavor component, eugenol. From this, we provide insight into the mechanism and ideal mineral composition of water for extraction of flavorsome compounds in coffee.

  6. Changes of physical properties of coffee beans during roasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokanović Marija R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of heating time on physical changes (weight, volume, texture and colour of coffee beans (Outspan and Guaxupe coffee were investigated. The roasting temperature of both samples was 170°C and samples for analysis were taken at the intervals of 7 minutes during 40 minutes of roasting. Total weight loss at the end of the roasting process was 14.43 % (light roasted and 17.15 % (medium to dark roasted for Outspan and Guaxupe coffee beans, respectively. Significant (P < 0.05 changes in the coffee bean breaking force values were noted between the 7th and 14th minutes, and statistically not significant (P > 0.05 between the 35th and 40th minutes of the roasting. According to the L* colour parameter as a criterion for the classification of roasted coffee colour (light, medium, dark, the Outspan sample was medium and Guaxupe sample was dark roasted.

  7. Precipitation Processes during Non-Isothermal Ageing of Fine-Grained 2024 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozieł J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical alloying and powder metallurgy procedures were used to manufacture very fine-grained bulk material made from chips of the 2024 aluminum alloy. Studies of solution treatment and precipitation hardening of as-received material were based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC tests and TEM/STEM/EDX structural observations. Structural observations complemented by literature data lead to the conclusion that in the case of highly refined structure of commercial 2024 alloys prepared by severe plastic deformation, typical multi-step G-P-B →θ” →θ’ →θ precipitation mechanism accompanied with G-P-B →S” →S’ →S precipitation sequences result in skipping the formation of metastable phases and direct growth of the stable phases. Exothermic effects on DSC characteristics, which are reported for precipitation sequences in commercial materials, were found to be reduced with increased milling time. Moreover, prolonged milling of 2024 chips was found to shift the exothermic peak to lower temperature with respect to the material produced by means of common metallurgy methods. This effect was concluded to result from preferred heterogeneous nucleation of particles at subboundaries and grain boundaries, enhanced by the boundary diffusion in highly refined structures.

  8. Coffee melanoidins: structures, mechanisms of formation and potential health impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Ana S P; Nunes, Fernando M; Domingues, M Rosário; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2012-09-01

    During the roasting process, coffee bean components undergo structural changes leading to the formation of melanoidins, which are defined as high molecular weight nitrogenous and brown-colored compounds. As coffee brew is one of the main sources of melanoidins in the human diet, their health implications are of great interest. In fact, several biological activities, such as antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticariogenic, anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, and antiglycative activities, have been attributed to coffee melanoidins. To understand the potential of coffee melanoidin health benefits, it is essential to know their chemical structures. The studies undertaken to date dealing with the structural characterization of coffee melanoidins have shown that polysaccharides, proteins, and chlorogenic acids are involved in coffee melanoidin formation. However, exact structures of coffee melanoidins and mechanisms involved in their formation are far to be elucidated. This paper systematizes the available information and provides a critical overview of the knowledge obtained so far about the structure of coffee melanoidins, mechanisms of their formation, and their potential health implications.

  9. Growing Coffee in the Shade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thapa, Sushil; Lantinga, Egbert A.

    2017-01-01

    Coffee white stem borer, Xylotrechus quadripes Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a major coffee pest in parts of Asia and Africa. In recent years, the pest has also been found in American countries. This study in Gulmi District, Nepal, aimed to determine the infestation by coffee white stem

  10. Influence of fibre distribution and grain size on the mechanical behaviour of friction stir processed Mg–C composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, A., E-mail: anne.mertens@ulg.ac.be [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium); Simar, A. [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (Belgium); Adrien, J.; Maire, E. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA Lyon), MATEIS Laboratory (France); Montrieux, H.-M. [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium); Delannay, F. [Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering (Belgium); Lecomte-Beckers, J. [Université de Liège, Faculty of Applied Science, A& M Department, Metallic Materials Science Unit (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Short C fibres–Mg matrix composites have been produced by friction stir processing sandwiches made of a layer of C fabric stacked between two sheets of Mg alloy AZ31B or AZ91D. This novel processing technique can allow the easy production of large-scale metal matrix composites. The paper investigates the microstructure of FSPed C fibre–Mg composites in relation with the fragmentation of the C fibres during FSP and their influence on the tensile properties. 3D X-ray tomography reveals that the fibres orient like onion rings and are more or less fragmented depending on the local shear stress during the process. The fibre volume fraction can be increased from 2.3% to 7.1% by reducing the nugget volume, i.e. by using a higher advancing speed in AZ31B alloy or a stronger matrix alloy, like AZ91D alloy. A higher fibre volume fraction leads to a smaller grain size which brings about an increase of the composite yield strength by 15 to 25%. However, a higher fibre volume fraction also leads to a lower fracture strain. Fracture surface observations reveal that damage occurs by fibre/matrix decohesion along fibres oriented perpendicularly to the loading direction. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • C–Mg MMCs were produced by FSP sandwiches made of a C fabric between Mg sheets. • Fibre fragmentation and erosion is larger when the temperature reached during FSP is lower. • A lower advancing speed brings a lower fibre volume fraction and a lower grain size. • X-ray tomography reveals that fibres orient along the FSP material flow. • The fibres and grain size reduction increase the yield strength by 15 to 25%.

  11. Formability of an ultra-fine grained Cu-Cr-Zr alloy processed via severe plastic deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Asenjo Varela, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-fine grained (UFG) metallic materials have been a hot topic in materials science for more than 25 years. There is a significant body of research showing that the UFG materials have very high mechanical strength, but their commercialization is limited due to their low uni-axial tensile ductility. The main objective of this thesis is to study the bi-axial stretching formability of the UFG Cu-Cr-Zr alloy material after equal channel angular pressing with two different processing routes. It...

  12. Orthographic transparency modulates the grain size of orthographic processing: behavioral and ERP evidence from bilingualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallier, Marie; Carreiras, Manuel; Tainturier, Marie-Josèphe; Savill, Nicola; Thierry, Guillaume

    2013-04-10

    Grapheme-to-phoneme mapping regularity is thought to determine the grain size of orthographic information extracted whilst encoding letter strings. Here we tested whether learning to read in two languages differing in their orthographic transparency yields different strategies used for encoding letter-strings as compared to learning to read in one (opaque) language only. Sixteen English monolingual and 16 early Welsh-English bilingual readers undergoing event-related brain potentials (ERPs) recordings were asked to report whether or not a target letter displayed at fixation was present in either a nonword (consonant string) or an English word presented immediately before. Bilinguals and monolinguals showed similar behavioural performance on target detection presented in words and nonwords, suggesting similar orthographic encoding in the two groups. By contrast, the amplitude of ERPs locked to the target letters (P3b, 340-570 ms post target onset, and a late frontal positive component 600-1,000 ms post target onset) were differently modulated by the position of the target letter in words and nonwords between bilinguals and monolinguals. P3b results show that bilinguals who learnt to read simultaneously in an opaque and a transparent orthographies encoded orthographic information presented to the right of fixation more poorly than monolinguals. On the opposite, only monolinguals exhibited a position effect on the late positive component for both words and nonwords, interpreted as a sign of better re-evaluation of their responses. The present study shed light on how orthographic transparency constrains grain size and visual strategies underlying letter-string encoding, and how those constraints are influenced by bilingualism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of process parameters on the properties of barley containing snacks enriched with brewer's spent grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirjoranta, Satu; Tenkanen, Maija; Jouppila, Kirsi

    2016-01-01

    Brewer's spent grain (BSG), a by-product of malting of barley in the production of malt extract, was used as an ingredient in extruded barley-based snacks in order to improve the nutritional value of the snacks and widen the applications of this by-product in food sector. The effects of the extrusion parameters on the selected properties of the snacks were studied. Snacks with different ingredients including whole grain barley flour, BSG, whey protein isolate (WPI), barley starch and waxy corn starch were produced in 5 separate trials using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Extrusion parameters were water content of the mass (17-23 %), screw speed (200-500 rpm) and temperature of the last section and die (110-150 °C). Expansion, hardness and water content of the snacks were determined. Snacks containing barley flour and BSG (10 % of solids) had small expansion and high hardness. Addition of WPI (20 % of solids) increased expansion only slightly. Snacks with high expansion and small hardness were obtained when part of the barley flour was replaced with starch (barley or waxy corn). Yet, the highest expansion and the smallest hardness were achieved when barley flour was used with barley starch and WPI without BSG. Furthermore, expansion increased by increasing screw speed and decreasing water content of the mass in most of the trials. This study showed that BSG is a suitable material for extruded snacks rich in dietary fiber. Physical properties of the snacks could be improved by using barley or waxy corn starch and WPI.

  14. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  15. Aroma recovery from roasted coffee by wet grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggenstoss, J; Thomann, D; Perren, R; Escher, F

    2010-01-01

    Aroma recovery as determined by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was compared in coffees resulting from conventional grinding processes, and from wet grinding with cold and hot water. Freshly roasted coffee as well as old, completely degassed coffee was ground in order to estimate the relationship of internal carbon dioxide pressure in freshly roasted coffee with the aroma loss during grinding. The release of volatile aroma substances during grinding was found to be related to the internal carbon dioxide pressure, and wet grinding with cold water was shown to minimize losses of aroma compounds by trapping them in water. Due to the high solubility of roasted coffee in water, the use of wet-grinding equipment is limited to processes where grinding is followed by an extraction step. Combining grinding and extraction by the use of hot water for wet grinding resulted in considerable losses of aroma compounds because of the prolonged heat impact. Therefore, a more promising two-step process involving cold wet grinding and subsequent hot extraction in a closed system was introduced. The yield of aroma compounds in the resulting coffee was substantially higher compared to conventionally ground coffee. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Fine-Grained Provenance Inference for a Large Processing Chain with Non-materialized Intermediate Views

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huq, M.R.; Apers, Peter M.G.; Wombacher, Andreas; Ailamaki, Anastasia; Bowers, Shawn

    Many applications facilitate a data processing chain, i.e. a workflow, to process data. Results of intermediate processing steps may not be persistent since reproducing these results are not costly and these are hardly re-usable. However, in stream data processing where data arrives continuously,

  17. Avaliação do teor de cafeína em folhas e grãos de acessos de café arábica Evaluation of the caffeine content in leaves and grains of arabica coffee accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Lara Teixeira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo identificar, dentro do banco de germoplasma do estado de Minas Gerais, acessos de Coffea arabica L. com baixos teores de cafeína e verificar a existência de correlação entre o teor de cafeína dos grãos e de folhas ainda no estádio de mudas, viabilizando a prática da seleção precoce. Foram utilizados 75 acessos de café (cultivares, híbridos e alguns genótipos selvagens oriundos do banco de germoplasma de café do Estado de Minas Gerais. Para estudo da correlação foram utilizados oito cultivares no delineamento de blocos casualizados com três repetições. Avaliaram-se os teores de cafeína presentes nos grãos e no terceiro e quarto par de folhas verdadeiras. Seis acessos apresentaram teores de cafeína nos grãos menores que 0,88%. Correlações significativas para teor de cafeína foram observadas entre o terceiro (0,69 e quarto par de folhas (0,92 e os grãos. Foram identificados acessos com teores reduzidos de cafeína e boa produtividade de grãos, podendo ser utilizados como genitores em programas de melhoramento. Verificou-se que é possível realizar a seleção precoce para teor de cafeína, em plantas de cafeeiro ainda no estádio de mudas, por meio da avaliação do quarto par de folhas.The aim of this study was to identify, within the germplasm bank of the Minas Gerais state, Coffea arabica L. accessions with low levels of caffeine and check the correlation between grain and leaves in seedling stage, making possible the practice of early selection. Seventy-five coffe accessions (cultivars, hybrids and several wild genotypes were evaluated from the coffee germplasm bank of the Minas Gerais state. In the correlation study, eight cultivars were used on randomized complete block design with three replications. Were evaluated the caffeine levels in the grains and the third and fourth pair of true leaves. Six accessions had caffeine levels in grains smaller than 0.88%. Was also detected

  18. Influência da colheita e preparo do café sôbre a qualidade da bebida The influence of harvesting and processing coffee on the quality of the beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth dos Santos Garruti

    1961-01-01

    Full Text Available Em 1958 e 1959 foram estudados no Vale do Paraíba, região normalmente produtora de café de bebida rio ou riada, processos de colheita e preparo a fim de observar a influência dessas operações sôbre a qualidade da bebida. Dois processos de colheita foram comparados: o da derriça e o da colheita apenas dos frutos maduros ou cerejas. Estas foram sêcas com e sem prévio despolpamento, retirando-se a mucilagem pela fermentação natural ou com solução de NaOH a 0,5%, sendo, neste último caso, maceradas, ou não, em água, durante 12 horas. Em todos os casos a secagem foi feita em terreiro. Para comparação, incluiram-se na experiência quatro lotes de café das bebidas-padrão: mole, apenas mole, dura e riada. O café derriçado alcançou as piores médias, classificando-se em ambos os anos, entre os padrões de bebida dura e riada. As cerejas despolpadas não diferiram estatisticamente entre si e tampouco do padrão mole. As cerejas não despolpadas se mostraram equivalentes ao padrão mole, em 1958, mas foram inferiores a êle em 1959.The influence of harvesting and processing the coffee fruits on the qualities of the beverage was studied on material obtained from the Paraiba Valley. This region is known to produce low quality coffee, commonly designated as having the Rio flavor. Two haver sting procedures were compared: (I the usual stripping method and (2 the hand picking of ripe berries. The coffee fruits picked according to the second method were further thus treated: (a dried as such; (b pulped and then dried. The mucillage of the pulped coffee was removed by natural fermentation or by treatment in a 0.5% sodium hydroxide solution. After washing the pulped coffee seeds that underwent this last treatment were immediately put to dry in one case and macerated during 12 hours before being dried in the other. All samples in the experiment were sun dried. For statistical analysis, the samples obtained in the experiment were compared in

  19. Performance of a table vibration type coffee grading machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available One of important coffee beans quality is the size uniformity. To confirm with the standart requirement, coffee beans have to be graded before being traded. Until now, grading process is still carried out fully manual, so that the grading cost is very expensive about 40% of total processing cost. Meanwhile, shortage of skill workers is as a limiting factor of the process. Therefore, machine for grading coffee beans is good alternative for grading cost. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed a table vibration type coffee grading machine for grouping of coffee beans in order to consistent quality and reduce grading cost. The machine has dimension of 272 cm length, 126 cm height, and 144 cm width. The machine has three primary components, i.e. grader table, combustion engine, and beam. The machine has three kinds of grader table that each grader table has different holes size, i.e. 7 mm x 7 mm for top grader table, 5 mm x 5 mm for axle grader table, and 4 mm x 4 mm for bottom grader table. Each grader table has dimension of 206 cm length, 105.5 cm height, and 14 cm width. The grading mechanism is by vibration grader table with the power source 5.5 HP combustion engine. The results shown that the outlet are in farms of three grades of coffee beans with connected to each compartement. Assessment of the grading machine reveals that the optimum capacity of 1,406 kg/hour reached when the speed 2,600 rpm and the angle 10O. Economic analysis showed that operational cost for grading one kilogram Robusta coffee beans with moisture content 13—14% wet basis is Rp 7.17.Key words : grading, coffee, quality, vibration table.

  20. Sediment transport processes in the Pearl River Estuary as revealed by grain-size end-member modeling and sediment trend analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Tuan-Jie

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of grain-size distribution enables us to decipher sediment transport processes and understand the causal relations between dynamic processes and grain-size distributions. In the present study, grain sizes were measured from surface sediments collected in the Pearl River Estuary and its adjacent coastal areas. End-member modeling analysis attempts to unmix the grain sizes into geologically meaningful populations. Six grain-size end-members were identified. Their dominant modes are 0 Φ, 1.5 Φ, 2.75 Φ, 4.5 Φ, 7 Φ, and 8 Φ, corresponding to coarse sand, medium sand, fine sand, very coarse silt, silt, and clay, respectively. The spatial distributions of the six end-members are influenced by sediment transport and depositional processes. The two coarsest end-members (coarse sand and medium sand) may reflect relict sediments deposited during the last glacial period. The fine sand end-member would be difficult to transport under fair weather conditions, and likely indicates storm deposits. The three remaining fine-grained end-members (very coarse silt, silt, and clay) are recognized as suspended particles transported by saltwater intrusion via the flood tidal current, the Guangdong Coastal Current, and riverine outflow. The grain-size trend analysis shows distinct transport patterns for the three fine-grained end-members. The landward transport of the very coarse silt end-member occurs in the eastern part of the estuary, the seaward transport of the silt end-member occurs in the western part, and the east-west transport of the clay end-member occurs in the coastal areas. The results show that grain-size end-member modeling analysis in combination with sediment trend analysis help to better understand sediment transport patterns and the associated transport mechanisms.

  1. The influence of peeling and type of drying on chemical and sensorial analysis of organic coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Caixeta Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic coffee is characterized by being produced without the use of chemical products and by having a similar or superior quality in comparison to that of coffee produced by traditional methods. The production of organic coffee does not include the use of highly soluble nutrients, which makes consumers concerned with environmental issues and healthy eating habits realize its true value. This paper aims to analyze the influence of harvesting, peeling and drying on the quality of organic coffee, in order to present the best way of producing high quality coffee. Samples of organic coffee were harvested by both conventional and selective ways, and some were peeled. They were then dried on concrete patio and on suspended terraces. The beans were analyzed for potassium leaching, electrical conductivity, titratable acidity, and submitted to coffee cupping-test. The results obtained indicated that the selective harvesting of the peeled or unpeeled cherry coffee dried on concrete terrace is feasible for production of fine coffees. This type of processing effectively influenced the final quality of the organic coffee, thus being an alternative to improve the quality and market value of the product, especially for small producers, cooperatives, and associations of coffee producers.

  2. Performance of a Horizontal Double Cylinder Type of Fresh Coffee Cherries Pulping Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulping is one important step in wet coffee processing method. Usually, pulping process uses a machine which constructed using wood or metal materials. A horizontal single cylinder type coffee pulping machine is the most popular machine in coffee processor and market. One of the weakness of a horizontal single cylinder type coffee pulping machine is high of broken beans. Broken beans is one of major aspect in defect system that result in low quality. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed and tested a horizontal double cylinder type coffee pulping machine. Material tested is Robusta cherry, mature, 60—65% (wet basis moisture content, which size compostition of coffee cherries was 50.8% more than 15 mm diameter, 32% more than 10 mm diameter, and 16.6% to get through 10 mm hole diameter; 690—695 kg/m3 bulk density, and clean from methal and foreign materials. The result showed that this machine has 420 kg/h optimal capacity in operational conditions, 1400 rpm rotor rotation speed for unsorted coffee cherries with composition 53.08% whole parchment coffee, 16.92% broken beans, and 30% beans in the wet skin. For small size coffee cherries, 603 kg/h optimal capacity in operational conditions, 1600 rpm rotor rotation speed with composition 51.30% whole parchment coffee, 12.59% broken beans, and 36.1% beans in the wet skin. Finally, for medium size coffee cherries, 564 kg/h optimal capacity in operational conditions, 1800 rpm rotor rotation speed with composition 48.64% whole parchment coffee, 18.5% broken beans, and 32.86% beans in the wet skin.Key words : coffee, pulp, pulper, cylinder, quality.

  3. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR SPECIALTY COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vharessa Aknesia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialty coffee is a coffee of premium quality that has been made through various stages of post-harvest processing and strictly controlled to produce distinctive taste of origins. PT Sinar Mayang Lestari is one of the companies that currently produce and develop specialty coffee type, Arabica Java Preanger. The objectives of the study are to examine competitive advantages and develop an alternative strategy that need to be done by PT Sinar Mayang Lestari for their business development. The research methods used are value chain analysis and VRIO framework to explore competitive advantage owned by the company. The result shows the company currently has a temporary competitive advantage of the technological resources and reputation. By using SWOT-AHP technique, the alternative strategies that can be done by company are as follows: 1 increasing the production of natural and honey coffee  type; 2 building coffee center in plantation site for sharing knowledge and innovation media to the farmers; 3 improving the competency of human resource in plantation, post harvest, and promoting area; 4 building management system gradually 5 forwarding integration by building roast and ground coffee business; and 6 maximizing the ability of the land and human resources through research and development.Keywords: competitive advantage, specialty coffee, SWOT-AHP, value chain, VRIOABSTRAKKopi special merupakan kopi dengan kualitas premium yang sudah melalui berbagai tahapan pengolahan pascapanen yang diawasi dengan ketat sehingga menghasilkan cita rasa yang khas sesuai dengan daerah asalnya. PT Sinar Mayang Lestari adalah salah satu perusahaan yang saatini memproduksi dan mengembangkan kopi spesial jenis Arabika Java Preanger. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah menganalisis keunggulan bersaing yang dimiliki dan mengembangkan alternative strategi yang perlu dilakukanoleh PT Sinar Mayang Lestari untuk pengembangan usahanya. Penelitian ini menggunakan analisis rantai

  4. The mathematical description of the process of drying the grain of millet in the device with active hydromechanical mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Antipov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The basis for the creation of new designs dryers laid the mathematical description of the test process, taking into account the method of loading and handling of the product in the machine, how to supply coolant or other type of energy supply, the theoretical performance, and structural (geometric component of the apparatus. To simulate the process of our work was considered of cylindrical dryers with active hydrodynamic regime and microwave energy supply, one feature of which is the loading of the product in a stream tangential coolant flow. The object of the study was chosen millet grain, because of the high biological value and high prevalence in the southern regions of the Russian Federation. On the basis of theoretical analysis, it was decided to divide the mathematical model into two conditional components: the study of heat and mass transfer study of aerodynamic component of the drying process. In this paper, we have been disclosed in detail is the second part of the process. The basis of this model were the equations of motion of millet grains by Newton's second law. The coolant in the framework of the proposed model is considered to be a continuous medium, highly compressible and has an internal viscosity, described by the Navier-Stokes equations. The initial conditions of the mathematical model were the following assumptions: the speed of the mechanical motion elements are equal to zero, the initial density of the air environment in all nodes is the equilibrium density of the air, the initial velocity of the air quality in all nodes is zero. The boundary conditions can be described as the constancy of the flow temperature and humidity, and its displacement is directly design constraints of the drying chamber. This model will be useful for professionals engaged in the problems of calculation and design of drying equipment.

  5. Coffee and Cigarettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Kristian

    , I analyze how the informal and supposedly non-therapeutic interactions (e.g. coffee breaks, lunch or fieldtrips) between clients and social workers are scenes of subtle acts of governing and resistance. I employ Susie Scott’s (2010) notions of performative regulation and reinventive institutions...

  6. Grain alignment and critical current densities of (Bi,Pb)-2223 phase in the partial-melting and sintering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X.Y.; Nagata, A.; Sugawara, K.; Kamada, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Akita 010-8502 (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The grain alignment of the partially melted samples exists only in their surface layers. The Bi-2201 phase with the c-axis alignment, (Sr,Ca)CuO{sub 2} and (Sr,Ca){sub 2}CuO{sub 3} coexist in the surface layers of the air-cooled sample, whereas in the surface layers of the sample sintered at 840 deg. C for 18 h after being partially melted, the Bi-2212 phase with the c-axis alignment exists as a major phase. After prolonged sintering to 240 h, the c-axis-aligned Bi-2212 phase transforms to the c-axis-aligned Bi-2223 phase. The Bi-2201 phase in the air-cooled sample shows the sharpest and narrowest grain alignment, whereas the Bi-2223 phase in the sample sintered at 840 deg. C for 240 h exhibits the bluntest and widest alignment. J{sub c} values of tapes which were heat treated by partial melting before wrapping with Ag sheets are larger than those of tapes without partial melting, and the tape which was sintered at 840 deg. C for 240 h after being partially melted at 875 deg. C prior to wrapping exhibits the highest J{sub c} value. These results indicate that the partial-melting process is of real importance to the improvement of J{sub c} in the (Bi,Pb)-2223 oxide superconductor. (author)

  7. Grain size associations of branched tetraether lipids in soils and riverbank sediments: influence of hydrodynamic sorting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterse, Francien; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2017-06-01

    We analyzed the abundance and distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) in grain size fractions of 7 globally distributed river flank sediments and catchment soils in order to determine if and how the initial soil-brGDGT signature is influenced by hydrodynamic sorting upon entering a river and during subsequent transport from land to sea. BrGDGTs are hypothesized to form associations with high-surface-area fine-grained minerals in soils. Such associations, if maintained during transport, may impart resistance to degradation and promote downstream transport, reducing potential interferences by aquatic brGDGTs. We find that brGDGTs are indeed primarily associated with organic carbon (OC) bound to the clay-silt fraction (soils and river sediments, and that these associations appear to be maintained during river transport. However, the relative distribution of individual brGDGTs among size fractions is relatively uniform, suggesting that brGDGTs are well mixed in river sediments and that OC-mineral associations are continuously renewed. Consequently, the brGDGT signature finally stored in continental margin sediments appears insensitive to differential particle transport processes. Nevertheless, the lower (upstream) temperature signal generally reflected by brGDGTs in river sediments may also be explained by a contribution of in situ produced brGDGTs leading to an underestimation of reconstructed air temperatures.

  8. Electronic Nose for Quality Control of Colombian Coffee Through the Detection of Defects in ``Cup Tests''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Juan C.; Duran, Cristhian M.; Reyes, Adriana X.

    2009-05-01

    This article presents a preliminary study on the analysis of samples of Colombian coffee for the detection and classification of defects (i.e. using "Cup Tests"), which was conducted in Almacafé quality control laboratory Almacafé in Cúcuta, Colombia). The results obtained show the application of an Electronic Nose (EN), called "A-NOSE," used in the coffee sector for the cupping tests. The results show that e-nose technology can be a useful tool as quality control of coffee grain.

  9. Coffee, hunger, and peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James A; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-06-01

    There is evidence from several empirical studies suggesting that coffee may help people control body weight. Our objective was to assess the effects of caffeine, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee, both alone and in combination with 75 g of glucose, on perceived hunger and satiety and related peptides. We conducted a placebo-controlled single-blinded randomized 4-way crossover trial. Eleven healthy male volunteers (mean age, 23.5 ± 5.7 years; mean BMI, 23.6 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) ingested 1 of 3 test beverages (caffeine in water, caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee) or placebo (water), and 60 minutes later they ingested the glucose. Eight times during each laboratory visit, hunger and satiety were assessed by visual analog scales, and blood samples were drawn to measure 3 endogenous peptides associated with hunger and satiety: ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and leptin. Compared to placebo, decaffeinated coffee yielded significantly lower hunger during the whole 180-minute study period and higher plasma PYY for the first 90 minutes (p hunger or PYY. Caffeinated coffee showed a pattern between that of decaffeinated coffee and caffeine in water. These findings suggest that one or more noncaffeine ingredients in coffee may have the potential to decrease body weight. Glucose ingestion did not change the effects of the beverages. Our randomized human trial showed that decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger and increase the satiety hormone PYY.

  10. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultra-fine-Grained Al-Mg-Si Tubes Produced by Parallel Tubular Channel Angular Pressing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, G.; Roostae, S.; Seyyed Nosrati, A.; Kang, J. Y.; Kim, H. S.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, commercial Al-6061 alloy tubes were processed via multi-pass parallel tubular channel angular pressing (PTCAP). The effects of the number of passes on grain refinement and mechanical properties were investigated. The microstructural evolution was characterized using electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated using tensile tests and hardness measurements. The EBSD analyses presented that the elongated subgrains or grains with ~800 nm in size and a high fraction of low-angle grain boundaries were formed after two PTCAP passes. After four passes, the elongated subgrains have transformed to almost equiaxed grains with ~400 nm in size and high-angle grain boundaries. Microhardness of the processed tube increased from 38.9 to 63.4 HV (~63 pct) after three PTCAP passes. An increase in the number of PTCAP passes after three passes has no more effect on the microhardness. Yield and ultimate tensile strength were increased by 2.1 and 1.6 times, respectively, after four PTCAP passes ( ɛ ~6.4) compared to the annealed sample. Ductile fracture with an extensive necking zone and many big dimples occur in the annealed sample, while fine dimples and limited ductile fracture features were observed in the ultra-fine grained PTCAP-processed samples.

  11. Grain size and microhardness evolution during annealing of a magnesium alloy processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Raquel C. Malheiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure torsion (HPT was used to impose severe plastic deformation on a magnesium alloy AZ31. The material was processed for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 turns at room temperature under a pressure of 6.0 GPa. Samples were annealed for 1800 s at temperatures of 373 K, 423 K, 473 K, 573 K and 673 K. Microhardness tests and metallography were used to determine the evolution of strength and grain size as a function of the annealing temperature. The results show that recrystallization takes place at temperatures higher than 423 K. The annealing behavior is independent of the number of turns in HPT.

  12. ON THE ISSUE OF IMPORT SUBSTITUTION OF DEEP PROCESSING PRODUCTS FROM GRAIN AND POTATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Andreev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The analysis of structure of starch containing raw materials processing in Russia Federation is provided in the article. There was noted an increase in volumes of corn and wheat processing, however the share of processed potato is still low (below 4%. It was established that Russian starch products and starch sweeteners are on the same level on quality as best European samples and they are very competitive. Market demand in crystalline glucose for food and medical purposes (over 30 thous. tons is fully covered by import. The volume of import of modified starches exceeds 80 % of total consumption. The biggest volume of import among native starches belongs to potato starch – over 60 %. The article provides suggestions on import substitution of mentioned starch products. The growth of starch production in Russia was accompanied by concentration of production at large enterprises. So, in 2013 over 90 % of glucose syrup was produced at six enterprises, over 80 % of dry starch – at five enterprises. Efficiency of corn and wheat processing into starch and starch products is achieved by production and selling of co-products (dry gluten, gluten, corn germ or corn oil, corn extract, feed products.Development of starch sweeteners production from starch could be achieved by expanding the consumption areas of different kinds of glucose syrup and production of glucose-fructose syrups as full substitute of sugar, providing import substitution of sugar, crystalline glucose of food and medicine purpose, deep processing of glucose into polyols (sorbit, maltit, polylactites, aminoacids.

  13. Performance of Holstein-Zebu cows under partial replacement of corn by coffee hulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares Anamaria Almeida Costa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of corn by citrus pulp or coffee hulls explores the potential of dairy cows to digest fiber-rich feedstuffs. However, for the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, replacing citrus pulp by coffee hulls may reduce milk production costs, since citrus pulp needs to be imported from another state, while coffee hulls are highly available at essentially no cost. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the performance of crossbred cows fed concentrates containing 25% coffee hulls (Coffee or 25% citrus pulp (Pulp as a replacement for ground corn grain (Corn; 47.4% in the concentrate. Forty-two cows were blocked based on milk yield and allocated to one of the three treatments for 56 days, following a 14-day standardization period. Concentrates were fed twice a day during the milking routine, 1 kg to each 2.5 kg of the average milk yield for the block, determined at the end of the standardization period. The daily 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield was 7.5 kg for Corn, 7.9 kg for Pulp and 6.2 kg for Coffee (P 0.26. The Pulp concentrate provided the highest financial efficiency, while Coffee was the least efficient (P < 0.01. These data suggest that the potential of use of coffee hulls is low when added at rates equal to or greater than 25% of the concentrate offered during the milking routine.

  14. Optimation of a Table Conveyor Type Grading Machine to Increase the Performance of Green Coffee Manual Sortation

    OpenAIRE

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2006-01-01

    Coffee consumers request a good quality of green coffee to get a good coffee cup taste. Defective beans e.g. black bean, brown bean and broken bean are associated to low coffee quality which give negative effects to final taste. To meet the standard export requirement, coffee beans have to be graded before being traded. Until now, grading process is generally carried out manually. The method gives better product, so the grading cost is very expensive about 40% of total processing cost. Meanwh...

  15. Influence of processing conditions on apparent viscosity and system parameters during extrusion of distiller's dried grains-based snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Poonam; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan; Krishnan, Padmanaban

    2018-01-01

    A combination of different levels of distillers dried grains processed for food application (FDDG), garbanzo flour and corn grits were chosen as a source of high-protein and high-fiber extruded snacks. A four-factor central composite rotatable design was adopted to study the effect of FDDG level, moisture content of blends, extrusion temperature, and screw speed on the apparent viscosity, mass flow rate or MFR, torque, and specific mechanical energy or SME during the extrusion process. With increase in the extrusion temperature from 100 to 140°C, apparent viscosity, specific mechanical energy, and torque value decreased. Increase in FDDG level resulted in increase in apparent viscosity, SME and torque. FDDG had no significant effect (p > .5) on mass flow rate. SME also increased with increase in the screw speed which could be due to the higher shear rates at higher screw speeds. Screw speed and moisture content had significant negative effect ( p  <   .05) on the torque. The apparent viscosity of dough inside the extruder and the system parameters were affected by the processing conditions. This study will be useful for control of extrusion process of blends containing these ingredients for the development of high-protein high-fiber extruded snacks.

  16. Ozônio e ultra-som: processos alternativos para o tratamento do café despolpado Ozone and ultrasound: alternative processes in the treatment of fermented coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos do Nascimento

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Há um crescente interesse em tecnologias que melhorem a qualidade dos alimentos, bem como o aspecto segurança alimentar. Após a água, o café é a bebida mais consumida no planeta, existindo uma demanda crescente por tipos especiais em alguns países importadores, como o café despolpado. Este tipo é obtido pela remoção da mucilagem, ao se submeter o café à fermentação, cujo processo varia com o clima e a microbiota associada, entre outros fatores, podendo levar ao detrimento da qualidade do produto e da saúde do consumidor. Assim, faz-se necessário investigar novas tecnologias que possam auxiliar na obtenção de produtos com melhor padronização, qualidade e que ofereçam maior segurança alimentar. O ozônio e o ultra-som são tecnologias usadas em diversas áreas, com grande flexibilidade e resultados promissores na obtenção e no tratamento de uma infinidade de alimentos. São conhecidas as potentes características oxidantes e microbicidas de ambos, mas seus mecanismos ainda não são bem esclarecidos quando utilizados em tecidos vivos. Seus efeitos sobre os vários parâmetros de qualidade devem ser estudados, compreendidos e ajustados, antes de serem utilizados em larga escala na indústria. No presente trabalho, foi aplicado o ozônio ou o ultra-som como tratamentos prévios à fermentação do café, demonstrando sua eficácia na melhoria da segurança alimentar do café despolpado, sem alteração perceptível da qualidade da bebida.There is a growing interest in technologies that improve food quality, as well as food safety aspects. After water, coffee is the most consumed beverage in the planet, with a rising demand for special types, such as fermented coffee, in some importing countries. This type of coffee is obtained by removing the mucilage, submitting the coffee to fermentation, a process that varies with the climate and the associated natural micro-organisms, among other factors, and that can lead to detrimental

  17. Características visuais da embalagem de café no processo de decisão de compra pelo consumidor Visual characteristics of coffee package on consumer's purchase decision process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Maria Della Lucia

    2009-01-01

    presented on coffee package during the purchase process were price, package color and brand. Many consumers were loyal to brand and others admitted to pay more for an organic product, depending on its price. It is suggested that on the organic coffee package labeling should be emphasized the product identification for those who don't know anything about organic production technique.

  18. Strengthening mechanisms in ultrafine grained Al-Mg-Si alloy processed by hydrostatic extrusion – Influence of ageing temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrominski, Witold, E-mail: wichr@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wenner, Sigurd [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Marioara, Calin D. [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, 7465 Trondheim (Norway); Holmestad, Randi [Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Lewandowska, Malgorzata [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-07-04

    Microstructure of hydrostatically extruded Al-Mg-Si alloy was studied by the combination of electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Three different grain types which feature various defects arrangements were detected. Post deformation ageing at two temperatures caused different precipitation phenomena which were strongly dependent on type of grain boundaries in the considered grain types. Thus, a combination of plastic deformation and ageing resulted in a material with complex microstructure. Based on transmission electron microscopy observations, contributions of different strengthening mechanisms were estimated and compared to experimental results. A good agreement between obtained data points confirmed that depending on grain type, different strengthening mechanisms are operative and the overall strength is a sum of hardening given by each of them. Ageing of ultrafine grain structure results in efficient precipitation strengthening. On the other hand ageing causes annihilation of low and high angle grains boundaries in which leads to softening of investigated material. This effect cannot be compensated by precipitation hardening.

  19. In vitro and in vivo studies of ultrafine-grain Ti as dental implant material processed by ECAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Baili; Li, Zhirui; Diao, Xiaoou [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Shannxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Xin, Haitao, E-mail: xhthmj@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Shannxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Xiaorui; Wu, Yulu; Li, Kai [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Shannxi Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Guo, Yazhou [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface characterization of ultrafine-grain pure titanium (UFG-Ti) after sandblasting and acid-etching (SLA) and to evaluate its biocompatibility as dental implant material in vitro and in vivo. UFG-Ti was produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). Microstructure and yield strength were investigated. The morphology, wettability and roughness of the specimens were analyzed after they were modified by SLA. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were seeded onto the specimens to evaluate its biocompatibility in vitro. For the in vivo study, UFG-Ti implants after SLA were embedded into the femurs of New Zealand rabbits. Osseointegration was investigated though micro-CT analysis, histological assessment and pull-out test. The control group was CP-Ti. UFG-Ti with enhanced mechanical properties was produced by four passes of ECAP in B{sub C} route at room temperature. After SLA modification, the hierarchical porous structure on its surface exhibited excellent wettability. The adhesion, proliferation and viability of cells cultured on the UFG-Ti were superior to that of CP-Ti. In the in vivo study, favorable osseointegration occurred between the implant and bone in CP and UFG-Ti groups. The combination intensity of UF- Ti with bone was higher according to the pull-out test. This study supports the claim that UFG-Ti has grain refinement with outstanding mechanical properties and, with its excellent biocompatibility, has potential for use as dental implant material. - Highlights: • Yield strength and Vickers hardness of Ti are improved significantly after it is grain-refined by ECAP process. • The hierarchical micro-porous structure with superior wettability could be formed on the surface of ECAP Ti after SLA. • The results in vitro exhibited excellent cell biocompatibility of UFG-Ti after sandblasting and acid-etching. • The osseointegration between UFG-Ti implant and surrounding bone could

  20. Shaded Coffee: A way to Increase Sustainability in Brazilian Organic Coffee plantations

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Cassio Franco; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.; Tagliaferro, Fábio Sileno

    2008-01-01

    Consumption of specialty coffee, mainly organic coffee, increases worldwide following the tendency of consuming social and ecological sustainable products. Brazil is the world largest coffee producer, with an average of 2,300,000 tons of green coffee in the last 5 years. Cultivation of organic coffee and shaded coffee are common in Central America, while in Brazil both conventional and organic coffee are cultivated in the full sun system. The full sun system is criticized due to the lack of b...

  1. Determination of Harvesting Time and Fermentation Conditions of Coffee (Coffee sp) Beans Based on the Fruit Pericarp Enzyme Activity)

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Said Didu

    2001-01-01

    Pectinase enzyme of coffee pericarp, containing pectinesterase and polymetilesterase, is potential to determine harvesting time or to classify coffee beans. The activity of the enzyme on the green fruit is higher than on the yellow one. When the fruit become light red, the activity increaed for the second time and then decrease when the fruit is overripe (dark colored)The optimum fermentation condition of the fruit is depending on the maturation degree. Study on the fermentation process at 25...

  2. Flint corn grain processing and citrus pulp level in finishing diets for feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvêa, V N; Batistel, F; Souza, J; Chagas, L J; Sitta, C; Campanili, P R B; Galvani, D B; Pires, A V; Owens, F N; Santos, F A P

    2016-02-01

    Four trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of flint corn processing and the replacement of corn with citrus pulp (CiP) in diets for Nellore feedlot cattle. In a 103-d finishing trial, 216 Nellore bulls (350 ± 24 kg initial BW) were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments. Factors included 2 processing methods, either ground corn (GC) or steam-flaked corn (FC), with CiP replacing each corn type at 4 levels (0, 25, 50, and 75% of DM). All diets contained 12% sugarcane bagasse and 88% concentrate (DM basis). Treatments were also evaluated in metabolism trials, in which 10 ruminally cannulated Nellore steers (389 ± 37 kg) were assigned to 2 independent but simultaneous 5 × 5 Latin squares, each using 1 method of corn processing (GC and FC). Interactions ( < 0.05) between corn processing and CiP inclusion level were observed for final BW, DMI, ADG, G:F, and HCW. With FC-based diets, added CiP linearly decreased final BW ( = 0.04), whereas with GC-based diets, added CiP quadratically increased final BW ( = 0.002). With FC-based diets, the inclusion of CiP linearly increased DMI ( = 0.03) and linearly decreased ADG ( = 0.03) and G:F ( = 0.001). Increasing CiP in GC-based diets quadratically increased DMI ( = 0.001), ADG ( = 0.005), and HCW ( = 0.003). In FC-based diets, CiP inclusion had no effect on HCW ( = 0.21). Dressing percent, LM area, and 12th-rib fat were not affected by diet ( ≥ 0.05). For steers fed GC diets, CiP inclusion in the diet quadratically decreased the molar proportion of isovalerate ( = 0.001) but linearly increased ruminal butyrate ( = 0.006). No differences ( ≥ 0.16) were observed for total VFA concentrations, acetate:propionate ratio, and ruminal NH-N as CiP replaced GC. For steers fed FC diets, the molar proportion of acetate linearly increased ( = 0.002) whereas the proportion of propionate was linearly decreased ( < 0.001), resulting in a linear increase ( = 0.001) in the

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine grained complex copper alloy fabricated by accumulative roll-bonding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Hee; Lim, Cha-Yong

    2014-10-01

    Accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) process using dissimilar copper alloys was performed up to six cycles (-an equivalent strain of 4.8) at ambient temperature without lubricant for fabrication of a new complex copper alloy. The dissimilar copper alloy sheets of oxygen free copper (OFC) and dioxide low-phosphorous copper (DLPC) with thickness of 1 mm were degreased and wire-brushed for the ARB process. The sheets were then stacked together and rolled by 50% reduction so that the thickness became 1 mm again. The sheet was then cut to the two pieces of same length and the same procedure was repeated up to six cycles. A new sound complex copper alloy sheet in which OFC and DLPC are combined each other was successfully fabricated by the ARB process. The tensile strength of the copper alloy increased with increasing the number of ARB cycles, reached 492 MPa after six cycles, which is about three times of the initial material. The average grain size was 12.6 μm after the 1st cycle, but it became 1.5 μm after six cycles. Microstructures and mechanical properties of the complex copper alloy fabricated by the ARB were investigated in detail.

  4. Coastal processes of Central Tamil Nadu, India: clues from grain size studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimalanathan Angusamy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The sediments of the beaches along the central coast of Tamil Nadu from Pondicherry to Vedaranyam were studied for their textural variation. 108 sediment samples collected from the low-, mid-, and high-tidal zones, as well as the berms and dunes of different beach morpho-units were analysed. The study area was divided into three sectors (northern, central and southern on the basis of prevailing energy conditions and oceanographic parameters. The poorly sorted, negatively skewed, coarser sediments of the northern sector are indicative of denudational processes taking place there. Medium-to-fine, moderately-to-well sorted, positive-symmetrically skewed sediments dominate the central sector, probably as a result of the influence of palaeo-sediments deposited by rivers from inland as well as by waves and currents from offshore. Fine, poorly sorted, positive-symmetrically skewed sediments dominate the southern sector, highlighting depositional processes. Linear Discriminant Function Analysis (LDF of the samples indicates a shallow marine environment origin for all the three sectors. These results show that reworked sediments, submerged during the Holocene marine transgression, are being deposited on present-day beaches by waves, currents and rivers in the study area.

  5. Effect of diastatic power and processing index on the feed value of barley grain for finishing feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, G O; Swift, M L; McAllister, T A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nutritional value of barley grain differing in diastatic power (DP; high vs. low; a malt trait) and processing index (PI; 75 vs. 85). One hundred sixty Angus × Hereford crossbred yearling steers (467 ± 38 kg; 144 intact and 16 rumen cannulated) were used in a complete randomized 2 × 2 factorial experiment. Steers were assigned to 16 pens, 8 of which were equipped with the GrowSafe system to measure individual feed intake. Cannulated steers (2 per pen) were randomly assigned to the 8 GrowSafe pens. Diets consisted of high- or low-DP barley grain (80.0% of diet DM) processed to an index of either 75 or 85% (PI-75 and PI-85, respectively). Ruminal pH in cannulated steers was measured over four 5-d periods using indwelling electrodes. Fecal samples were collected every 28 d from the rectum of each steer to assess digestibility using AIA as a marker. No differences ( > 0.10) in rumen pH were observed among cattle as measured by the indwelling pH meters. However, lower ( barley in rumen samples collected just prior to feeding and measured in the laboratory. Intake of DM and OM were not affected ( ≥ 0.24) by DP but were lower ( barley tended to exhibit higher ( = 0.09) total tract DM digestibility than high-DP barley. Steers fed PI-75 barley also had higher ( = 0.06) G:F and NEg. Digestibility of DM, OM, CP, NDF, and starch was higher ( barley than for PI-85 barley. Low-DP barley increased ( barley, with a lower PI tending to increase ( = 0.06) rib eye area. Compared with steers fed high-DP diets, steers fed low-DP diets had more ( = 0.01) total (41.7 vs. 19.4%) and severe liver abscesses (22.2 vs. 9.7%). Results suggest that although low-DP barley increased liver abscesses, differences in DP did not alter digestion or growth performance but low-DP barley did improve dressing percentage. Barley with different DP responded similarly to processing, with more intensive processing (PI-75) of barley improving starch digestion

  6. Coffee, its roasted form, and their residues cause birth failure and shorten lifespan in dengue vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, Hamady; Ellias, Salbiah Binti; Satho, Tomomitsu; Ahmad, Abu Hassan; Abang, Fatimah; Ghani, Idris Abd; Noor, Sabina; Ahmad, Hamdan; Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Morales, Noppawan P; Hipolito, Cirilo N; Attrapadung, Siriluck; Noweg, Gabriel Tonga

    2017-06-01

    In dengue mosquitoes, successful embryonic development and long lifespan are key determinants for the persistence of both virus and vector. Therefore, targeting the egg stage and vector lifespan would be expected to have greater impacts than larvicides or adulticides, both strategies that have lost effectiveness due to the development of resistance. Therefore, there is now a pressing need to find novel chemical means of vector control. Coffee contains many chemicals, and its waste, which has become a growing environmental concern, is as rich in toxicants as the green coffee beans; these chemicals do not have a history of resistance in insects, but some are lost in the roasting process. We examined whether exposure to coffee during embryonic development could alter larval eclosion and lifespan of dengue vectors. A series of bioassays with different coffee forms and their residues indicated that larval eclosion responses of Aedes albopictus and Ae. aegypti were appreciably lower when embryonic maturation occurred in environments containing coffee, especially roasted coffee crude extract (RCC). In addition, the lifespan of adults derived from eggs that hatched successfully in a coffee milieu was reduced, but this effect was less pronounced with roasted and green coffee extracts (RCU and GCU, respectively). Taken together, these findings suggested that coffee and its residues have embryocidal activities with impacts that are carried over onto the adult lifespan of dengue vectors. These effects may significantly reduce the vectorial capacity of these insects. Reutilizing coffee waste in vector control may also represent a realistic solution to the issues associated with its pollution.

  7. Coffee oil as a potential feedstock for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leandro S; Franca, Adriana S; Camargos, Rodrigo R S; Ferraz, Vany P

    2008-05-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of producing biodiesel using oil extracted from defective coffee beans was conducted as an alternative means of utilizing these beans instead of roasting for consumption of beverage with depreciated quality. Direct transesterifications of triglycerides from refined soybean oil (reference) and from oils extracted from healthy and defective coffee beans were performed. Type of alcohol employed and time were the reaction parameters studied. Sodium methoxide was used as alkaline catalyst. There was optimal phase separation after reactions using both soybean and healthy coffee beans oils when methanol was used. This was not observed when using the oil from defective beans which required further processing to obtain purified alkyl esters. Nevertheless, coffee oil was demonstrated to be a potential feedstock for biodiesel production, both from healthy and defective beans, since the corresponding oils were successfully converted to fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters.

  8. Polyphenolic chemistry of tea and coffee: a century of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2009-09-23

    Tea and coffee, the most popular beverages in the world, have been consumed for thousands of years for their alluring flavors and health benefits. Polyphenols, particularly flavonoids and phenolic acids, are of great abundance in tea and coffee and contribute a lot to their flavor and health properties. This paper reviews the polyphenol chemistry of tea and coffee, specifically their stability, and scavenging ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS). During the manufacturing and brewing process, green tea and black tea polyphenols undergo epimerization and oxidation, respectively. Meanwhile, the lactonization and the polymerization of chlorogenic acid are the major causes for the degradation of polyphenols in coffee. Tea catechins, besides having antioxidant properties, have the novel characteristic of trapping reactive carbonyl species. The A ring of the catechins is the binding site for RCS trapping, whereas the B ring is the preferred site for antioxidation.

  9. Texture analysis in ultrafine grained coppers processed by equal channel angular pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Fabián Higuera

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrolytic tough pitch (ETP and fire refined high conductivity (FRHC copper samples were severely deformed at room temperature by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP up to 16 passes (ε ~ 1 per pass, following route Bc. The effect of the initial texture on the evolution of texture after the ECAP process for both materials was analyzed. The annealed materials present a marked anisotropy, with a texture controlled by the fiber. According to the orientation distribution function (ODF, this initial behavior allows the presence of a strong C ({001} component after the first two ECAP passes in both coppers. However in the second pass the C component significantly increases in the FRHC copper, whereas the ETP copper presents a much more balanced behavior of the A1* (111[ 2]and A2* (111[11 ]components. The textures obtained for both coppers after each ECAP pass exhibit predominant orientations with continuous distributions along the orientation fiber with simple shear texture.

  10. Coffee Leaf Rust Epidemics ( Hemileia vastatrix ) in Montane Coffee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty coffee trees were selected from each forest (three sites within a forest) coffee population to record incidence (percent rusted leaves), severity (percent leaf area damaged) and sporulated lesion density (number of lesion per leaf, SLD) from selected six branches per tree. An average of 10-12 leaves per branch was ...

  11. Variação das dimensões características e da forma dos frutos de café durante o processo de secagem Variation of characteristic dimensions and forms of coffee fruits during drying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. Corrêa

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito da variação do teor de umidade nas dimensões e propriedades físicas-esfericidade e circularidade do fruto do café das espécies arabica e canephora, de diferentes variedades. Os resultados obtidos permitiram afirmar que a redução do teor de umidade afeta de forma acentuada as características físicas do fruto do cafeeiro das espécies e variedades estudadas, indicando que são importantes as variações das dimensões do fruto ao longo do processo de secagem e, ainda, que as expressões matemáticas ajustadas aos dados obtidos representaram de forma satisfatória os fenômenos estudados.The present work had as objective to evaluate the effect of moisture content variation on dimensions and physical properties (sphericity and roundness of coffee fruit of the arabica and canephora species, for different varieties. The obtained results show that the reduction of moisture content affects in an accentuated way the physical characteristics of coffee fruit of the studied species and varieties, indicating that the variations of dimensions of the fruit along the drying process are important. Further, the mathematical expressions adjusted to the data were satisfactory for the studied phenomena.

  12. Does coffee enriched with chlorogenic acids improve mood and cognition after acute administration in healthy elderly? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, Vanessa; Croft, Rodney; Silber, Beata; Neale, Chris; Scholey, Andrew; Stough, Con; Schmitt, Jeroen

    2012-02-01

    Caffeine exerts positive effects on cognitive and behavioral processes, especially in sub-optimal conditions when arousal is low. Apart from caffeine, coffee contains other compounds including the phenolic compounds ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and the chlorogenic acids, which have purported antioxidant properties. The chlorogenic acids are the most abundant family of compounds found in coffee, yet their effects on cognition and mood have not been investigated. This study aims to ascertain whether a coffee rich in chlorogenic acid modulates brain function. The present pilot study examined the acute effects of decaffeinated coffee with regular chlorogenic acid content and decaffeinated coffee with high chlorogenic acid content on mood and cognitive processes, as measured by behavioral tasks and event-related potentials (ERPs). Performance and ERP responses to a battery of cognitive tasks were recorded at baseline and following the equivalent of three cups of coffee in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study of 39 healthy older participants. Compared with the decaffeinated coffee with regular chlorogenic acid and placebo, caffeinated coffee showed a robust positive effect on higher-level mood and attention processes. To a lesser extent, the decaffeinated coffee high in chlorogenic acid also improved some mood and behavioral measures, relative to regular decaffeinated coffee. Our pilot results suggest that non-caffeine compounds in coffee such as the chlorogenic acids may be capable of exerting some acute behavioral effects, thus warranting further investigation.

  13. s-Processing from MHD-induced mixing and isotopic abundances in presolar SiC grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, S.; Trippella, O.; Busso, M.; Vescovi, D.; Petrelli, M.; Zucchini, A.; Frondini, F.

    2018-01-01

    In the past years the observational evidence that s-process elements from Sr to Pb are produced by stars ascending the so-called Asymptotic Giant Branch (or "AGB") could not be explained by self-consistent models, forcing researchers to extensive parameterizations. The crucial point is to understand how protons can be injected from the envelope into the He-rich layers, yielding the formation of 13C and then the activation of the 13C (α,n)16O reaction. Only recently, attempts to solve this problem started to consider quantitatively physically-based mixing mechanisms. Among them, MHD processes in the plasma were suggested to yield mass transport through magnetic buoyancy. In this framework, we compare results of nucleosynthesis models for Low Mass AGB Stars (M≲ 3M⊙), developed from the MHD scenario, with the record of isotopic abundance ratios of s-elements in presolar SiC grains, which were shown to offer precise constraints on the 13C reservoir. We find that n-captures driven by magnetically-induced mixing can indeed account for the SiC data quite well and that this is due to the fact that our 13C distribution fulfils the above constraints rather accurately. We suggest that similar tests should be now performed using different physical models for mixing. Such comparisons would indeed improve decisively our understanding of the formation of the neutron source.

  14. Ultrafine-grained magnesium–lithium alloy processed by high-pressure torsion: Low-temperature superplasticity and potential for hydroforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunoshita, Hirotaka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Edalati, Kaveh, E-mail: kaveh.edalati@zaiko6.zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); WPI, International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Furui, Mitsuaki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Horita, Zenji [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); WPI, International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-07-29

    A Mg–Li alloy with 8 wt% Li was processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) through the process of high-pressure torsion (HPT) to achieve ultrafine grains with an average grain size of ~500 nm. Tensile testing with an initial strain rate of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} showed that the alloy exhibited superplasticity at a temperature of 323 K or higher. Tensile testing in boiling water confirmed that the specimens were elongated to 350–480% at 373 K under the initial strain rates of 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} to {sup 1}0{sup −2} s{sup −1} with a strain rate sensitivity of ~0.3. The current study suggests that not only superplastic forming but also superplastic hydroforming should be feasible after the grain refinement using the HPT method.

  15. Reconstruction of sediment provenance and transport processes from the surface textures of quartz grains from Late Pleistocene sandurs and an ice-marginal valley in NW Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woronko Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Pomeranian phase of the Weichselian glaciation (~17-16 ka, the Toruń-Eberswalde ice-marginal valley (NW Poland and easternmost Germany drained water from the Pomeranian ice sheet, while intensive aeolian processes took place across Europe in the foreland of the Scandinavian ice sheet (‘European Sand Belt’. The micromorphology of the quartz grains in the Toruń-Eberswalde ice-marginal valley shows no traces of these aeolian processes, or only vague signs of aeolian abrasion. This is unique among the aeolian sediments in other Pleistocene ice-marginal valleys in this part of Europe. The study of the surfaces of the quartz grains shows that the supply of grains by streams from the south was minimal, which must be ascribed to the climate deterioration during the Last Glacial Maximum, which resulted in a decrease of the discharge of these extraglacial rivers to the ice-marginal valley.

  16. Nanofiltration for concentration of roasted coffee extract: From bench to pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, Lai Quoc; Quyen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc

    2017-09-01

    This paper focused on the application of nanofiltration (NF) for concentration of the roasted coffee extract in instant coffee processing. Three kinds of NF membranes were screened for separation capacity of total dry solid (TDS), polyphenols (PPs) and caffeine in roasted coffee extract and NF99 membrane showed the good performance for the NF of the extract. The crossflow NF with NF99 membrane at pilot scale was investigated for technical assessment of concentration of roasted coffee extract. Maximum theoretical concentration was estimated as 6.06. Recovery yields of TDS, PPs and caffeine were higher than 70% at 4.4 of concentration factor. The content of TDS in accumulative permeate was lower than 2.0 g/L. The fouling of NF was also solved by the suitable cleaning procedure with recovery index being 97.7%. Results of research indicate that it is feasible to apply NF for concentration of the roasted coffee extract in instant coffee production.

  17. Use of headspace gas chromatographic/FTIR for the monitoring of volatiles in commercial brand coffees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Senja V.; Compton, David A.

    1989-12-01

    Recently, the area of food analysis and product safety has become of major concern to consumers. Therefore, companies involved in the quality assurance of theirproducts have been encouraged to perform extensive analyses to guarantee safety and satisfaction. One of the largest consumer products in the beverage marketplace is coffee. Much emphasis has been placed upon the safety of the decaffeination processes used by various manufacturers; these involve extraction of the caffeine by a solvent system that may be aqueous or organic, and is sometimes,super-critical. Additionally, aroma (fragrance) of brewing coffee has been found to be of major concern to the individual by the marketing departments of the coffee companies. The heads ace analysis of coffees can be used to discover the species retained after the decaffeination of coffee, as well as to distinguish the volatile species released upon treatment of the coffee at boiling water temperatures.

  18. [Coffee enema induced acute colitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Jung; Song, Seung Kyun; Jeon, Jin Ho; Sung, Mi Kyung; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Kwang; Lee, Youn Soo

    2008-10-01

    Rectal enema used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes infrequently causes colitis. In medical practice, enemas are known to incidentally bring about colitis by mechanical, thermal, or direct chemical injuries. Coffee enema is told to ameliorate the constipation in alternative medicine. We hereby report a case of acute colitis resulting from coffee enema, which was presented with severe abdominal pain and hematochezia.

  19. Sensitivity to coffee and subjective health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Twisk, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The question was whether health complaints are associated with coffee consumption and self reported sensitivity to coffee. Participants were 89 men and 107 women, all coffee drinkers. Questionnaires were used at 2 points of time with an interval of 3.7 years. The correlations among coffee

  20. Evaluation of physiological changes in coffee seedlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were carried out at three locations with different vegetation in Nigeria between 1996 and 1998 to determine the physiological changes in coffee intercropped with maize, cassava and plantain. There were four intercropping treatments comprising coffee/maize, coffee/cassava, coffee/plantain and ...

  1. Fungal contamination in green coffee beans samples: A public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Pacífico, Cátia; Faria, Tiago; de Oliveira, Ana Cebola; Caetano, Liliana Aranha; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Anita Quintal; Viegas, Susana

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the microbiology of coffee cherries and beans have shown that the predominant toxigenic fungal genera (Aspergillus and Penicillium) are natural coffee contaminants. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of fungi in Coffea arabica L. (Arabica coffee) and Coffea canephora L. var. robusta (Robusta coffee) green coffee samples obtained from different sources at the pre-roasting stage. Twenty-eight green coffee samples from different countries of origin (Brazil, Timor, Honduras, Angola, Vietnam, Costa Rica, Colombia, Guatemala, Nicaragua, India, and Uganda) were evaluated. The fungal load in the contaminated samples ranged from 0 to 12330 colony forming units (CFU)/g, of which approximately 67% presented contamination levels below 1500 CFU/g, while 11% exhibited intermediate contamination levels between 1500 and 3000 CFU/g. Contamination levels higher than 3000 CFU/g were found in 22% of contaminated coffee samples. Fifteen different fungi were isolated by culture-based methods and Aspergillus species belonging to different sections (complexes). The predominant Aspergillus section detected was Nigri (39%), followed by Aspergillus section Circumdati (29%). Molecular analysis detected the presence of Aspergillus sections Fumigati and Circumdati. The% coffee samples where Aspergillus species were identified by culture-based methods were 96%. Data demonstrated that green coffee beans samples were contaminated with toxigenic fungal species. Since mycotoxins may be resistant to the roasting process, this suggests possible exposure to mycotoxins through consumption of coffee. Further studies need to be conducted to provide information on critical points of coffee processing, such that fungal contamination may be reduced or eliminated and thus exposure to fungi and mycotoxins through coffee handling and consumption be prevented.

  2. THE OCCURRENCE OF INSECTS, FUNGI AND ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS IN STORED COFFEE BEANS IN LAMPUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OKKY s. DHARMAPUTRA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey on postharvest handling and technology processing of coffee beans at farmer, trader and exporter levels was conducted in West Lampung a nd Tanggamus regencies of Lampung province during harvest time (July 1998. Interviews and sampling of coffee beans were carried out during the survey. The number of respondents at farmer, trader and exporter levels was 22, 20 and 4, respectively, while the number of samples collected from each level was 20. All samples were analyzed for moisture content, physical quality, insect and fungal infestation, reducing sugar content, and coffee cupping. The results of the interviews indicated that posth arvest handling and technol ogy processing became better from farmers to exporters. Moisture contents of coffee beans collected from farmers and traders were higher than the tolerable limit recommended by SNI (13%. Physical quality of coffee beans collected from exporters was higher than that collected from farmers and traders. Insects were found on coffee beans collected from farmers, traders and exporters, but the number of species and the percentage of samples infested by insects from each level were relatively low. The predominant species was Liposcelis entomophila. The number of fungal species on coffee beans collected from farmers was higher than that collected from traders and exporters. The predominant species at the three levels was Aspergillus niger, but the lowest percentage of beans infected by this fungus was found on coffee beans collected from expo rters. The lowest percentage of samples infected by all fungi was also found on coffee beans collected from exporters. Reducing sugar content of coffee beans collected from exporters was lower than that from farmers and traders. Aroma and flavor values tended to increase from farmers through traders to exporters, while the body decreased. Some off-flavors (i.e. earthy, mouldy, fermented and woody were encountered in a few coffee samples from farmers as

  3. Have coffee reforms and coffee supply chains affected farmers' income? The case of coffee growers in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Murekezi, Abdoul Karim; Loveridge, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Low prices in the international coffee markets have worsened the economic well-being among coffee farmers. In the face of this situation, the Government of Rwanda has introduced coffee sector reforms that aimed to transform the sector in a way that targets the high quality market and moves away from the bulk coffee market. The high quality coffee market has shown consistent growth over time and exhibits price premiums in international market. If these high prices are passed on to farmers who ...

  4. Why do interstellar grains exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seab, C. G.; Hollenbach, D. J.; Mckee, C. F.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1986-01-01

    There exists a discrepancy between calculated destruction rates of grains in the interstellar medium and postulated sources of new grains. This problem was examined by modelling the global life cycle of grains in the galaxy. The model includes: grain destruction due to supernovae shock waves; grain injection from cool stars, planetary nebulae, star formation, novae, and supernovae; grain growth by accretion in dark clouds; and a mixing scheme between phases of the interstellar medium. Grain growth in molecular clouds is considered as a mechanism or increasing the formation rate. To decrease the shock destruction rate, several new physical processes, such as partial vaporization effects in grain-grain collisions, breakdown of the small Larmor radius approximation for betatron acceleration, and relaxation of the steady-state shock assumption are included.

  5. [Negligible amounts of cholesterol-raising diterpenes in coffee made with coffee pads in comparison with unfiltered coffee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekschoten, M V; van Cruchten, S T J; Kosmeijer-Schuil, T G; Katan, M B

    2006-12-30

    To determine the amounts of the serum-cholesterol raising diterpenes cafestol and kahweol in coffee made with coffee pads and the Senseo coffee machine as opposed to filtered and unfiltered coffee. Observational. In five cities in the Netherlands coffee was purchased in three major supermarkets resulting in a total of 30 samples of coffee pads. The levels of cafestol and kahweol were determined by gas chromatography. As controls, the diterpene levels in filtered and unfiltered coffee were also measured. Coffee prepared using coffee pads contained on average 0.76 mg/l cafestol (95% CI: 0.69-0.82) and 0.85 mg/l kahweol (95% CI: 0.77-0.94). Filtered coffee contained 0.76 mg/l cafestol (95% CI: 0.63-0.88) and 0.81 mg/l kahweol (95% CI: 0.63-0.99). Unfiltered coffee contained 72.5 mg/l cafestol (95% CI: 48.5-96.4) and 71.5 mg/l kahweol (95% CI: 45.0-98.1). Coffee prepared using coffee pads and the Senseo coffee machine contained minute levels of diterpenes comparable to those of filtered coffee. Its effect on serum-cholesterol levels is therefore likely to be negligible.

  6. Dynamics of the international coffee market and instrumental in price formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Candéa Sá Barreto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study's main general objective of studying the behavior of coffee beans on the international market. Empirical analysis uses econometric tool as a model of simultaneous equations using least squares in a three-stage annual data base extending over the period 1964 / 65-2014 / 15. The results suggest that the factors that affect the production of coffee beans are the actual prices and the planted area. However, demand is affected by the growth of the world economy. The price simulations for the period 2014/15 - 2020/21 indicate that a yearly growth (GDP of 2.1% there is a tendency of small high price to 3.6% moderate rise in the price of coffee until 2018/19 and a stronger growth trend of prices from 2019/20 and a growth of 4.7% a high coffee prices trend in grain on the international market. Thus the tendency of the projections 3 and the key market factors continue to favor the maintenance of current high coffee prices. For the full period 1964/65 to 2014/15 there is a moderate relationship between coffee prices and the stock. It follows that the results obtained with the scenarios developed in this work can be useful to rethink measures to recover income from coffee producing countries

  7. Investigation of mechanical properties based on grain growth and microstructure evolution of alumina ceramics during two step sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, U. A.; Hussain, A.; Shah, M.; Shuaib, M.; Qayyum, F.

    2016-08-01

    Alumina ceramics having small grain size and high density yield good mechanical properties, which are required in most mechanical applications. Two Step Sintering (TSS) is used to develop dense alumina ceramics. In this research work the effect of sintering temperatures on microstructure and density of the alumina specimens developed by using TSS has been investigated. It has been observed that TSS is more efficient in controlling grain growth and increasing the density as compared to One Step Sintering (OSS) of alumina. Scanning electron micrographs of sintered alumina specimens have been compared. It has been observed that TSS proves to be a better technique for increasing density and controlling grain growth of alumina ceramics than OSS. More relative density, hardness, fracture toughness and small grain size was achieved by using TSS over OSS technique.

  8. Supercritical fluid extraction from spent coffee grounds and coffee husks: antioxidant activity and effect of operational variables on extract composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Kátia S; Gonçalvez, Ricardo T; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Martínez, Julian; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2012-01-15

    The present study describes the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of spent coffee grounds and coffee husks extracts, obtained by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO(2) and with CO(2) and co-solvent. In order to evaluate the high pressure method in terms of process yield, extract composition and antioxidant activity, low pressure methods, such as ultrasound (UE) and soxhlet (SOX) with different organic solvents, were also applied to obtain the extracts. The conditions for the SFE were: temperatures of 313.15K, 323.15K and 333.15K and pressures from 100 bar to 300 bar. The SFE kinetics and the mathematical modeling of the overall extraction curves (OEC) were also investigated. The extracts obtained by LPE (low pressure extraction) with ethanol showed the best results for the global extraction yield (X(0)) when compared to SFE results. The best extraction yield was 15±2% for spent coffee grounds with ethanol and 3.1±04% for coffee husks. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by DPPH method, ABTS method and Folin-Ciocalteau method. The best antioxidant activity was showed by coffee husk extracts obtained by LPE. The quantification and the identification of the extracts were accomplished using HPLC analysis. The main compounds identified were caffeine and chlorogenic acid for the supercritical extracts from coffee husks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of Texture and Grain Size on the Yield Strength of ZK61 Alloy Rods Processed by Cyclic Extrusion and Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Wencong; Cao, Biao; Chen, Wenzhen; Duan, Junpeng; Cui, Guorong

    2017-10-26

    The ZK61 alloy rods with different grain sizes and crystallographic texture were successfully fabricated by cyclic extrusion and compression (CEC). Their room-temperature tension & compression yield strength displayed a significant dependence on grain size and texture, essentially attributed to {10-12} twinning. The texture variations were characterized by the angle θ between the c-axis of the grain and the extrusion direction (ED) during the process. The contour map of room-temperature yield strength as a function of grain size and the angle θ was obtained. It showed that both the tension yield strength and the compression yield strength of ZK61 alloy were fully consistent with the Hall-Patch relationship at a certain texture, but the change trends of the tension yield strength and the compression yield strength were completely opposite at the same grain size while texture altered. The friction stresses of different deformation modes calculated based on the texture confirmed the tension yield strength of the CECed ZK61 alloy rods, which was determined by both the basal slip and the tension twinning slip during the tension deformation at room temperature, while the compression yield strength was mainly determined by the basal slip during the compression deformation.

  10. Effects of processing history on the evolution of surface damage layer and dislocation substructure in large grain niobium cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Large grain niobium (Nb is being investigated for fabricating superconducting radiofrequency cavities as an alternative to the traditional approach using fine grain polycrystalline Nb sheets. Past studies have identified a surface damage layer on fine grain cavities due to deep drawing and demonstrated the necessity for chemical etching on the surface. However, the origin of and depth of the damage layer are not well understood, and similar exploration on large grain cavities is lacking. In this work, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD was used to examine the cross sections at the equator and iris of a half cell deep drawn from a large grain Nb ingot slice. The results indicate that the damage (identified by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations depends on crystal orientations, is different at the equator and iris, and is present through the full thickness of a half cell in some places. After electron backscatter diffraction, the specimens were heat treated at 800 °C or 1000 °C for two hours, and the same areas were reexamined. A more dramatic decrease in dislocation content was observed at the iris than the equator, where some regions exhibited no change. The specimens were then etched and examined again, to determine if the subsurface region behaved differently than the surface. Little change in the dislocation substructure was observed, suggesting that the large grain microstructure is retained with a normal furnace anneal.

  11. Oxidation of organic compounds in wastewater from the humid processing of coffee berries; Materiais a base de oxido de ferro para oxidacao de compostos presentes no efluente da despolpa do cafe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Maraisa; Guerreiro, Mario Cesar; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Alves; Rocha, Cristian Luciana da [Universidade Federal de Lavras, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: guerrero@ufla.br

    2008-07-01

    Materials based on pure iron oxide and impregnated with niobia (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) were prepared. Their catalytic activities were tested on the oxidation of compounds present in the wastewater from the processing of coffee berries. Particularly caffeine and catechol were tested. The oxidation reactions were carried out with the following systems: UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}; photo-Fenton and heterogeneous Fenton. All materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy. Iron was mainly in the forms of goethite and maghemite. The oxidation kinetics were monitored by UV-vis and the oxidation products were monitored by mass spectrometry. The photo-Fenton reaction presented highest oxidation efficiency, removing 98% of all caffeine and catechol contents. (author)

  12. Materiais à base de óxido de ferro para oxidação de compostos presentes no efluente da despolpa do café Oxidation of organic compounds in wastewater from the humid processing of coffee berries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraísa Gonçalves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials based on pure iron oxide and impregnated with niobia (Nb2O5 were prepared. Their catalytic activities were tested on the oxidation of compounds present in the wastewater from the processing of coffee berries. Particularly caffeine and catechol were tested. The oxidation reactions were carried out with the following systems (i UV/H2O2, (ii photo-Fenton and (iii heterogeneous Fenton. All materials were characterized with X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy. Iron was mainly in the forms of goethite and maghemite. The oxidation kinetics were monitored by UV-vis and the oxidation products were monitored by mass spectrometry. The photo-Fenton reaction presented highest oxidation efficiency, removing 98% of all caffeine and catechol contents.

  13. Comparative study of polyphenols and caffeine in different coffee varieties affected by the degree of roasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hečimović, Ivana; Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Horžić, Dunja; Komes, Draženka

    2011-12-01

    The bioactive composition of coffee, as one of the most popular beverages in the world, has attracted interest as a potential source of beneficial bioactive compounds, especially polyphenols and caffeine. Since the content of these compounds is affected by the processing conditions, the objective of this study was to determine the content of polyphenolic compounds and caffeine in four different coffee varieties: Minas and Cioccolatato (Coffea arabica), and Cherry and Vietnam (Coffea canephora syn. Coffea robusta), roasted by three varying degrees (light, medium and dark). The content of the polyphenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity of coffees were determined using UV/Vis spectrophotometric methods, while the content of chlorogenic acid derivatives was determined using HPLC analysis. The caffeine content was determined by means of two spectrophotometric methods, as well as HPLC analysis. Additionally, raw caffeine was also obtained by an isolation procedure with chloroform. Cherry coffee, a variety of C. canephora exhibited the highest overall content of total phenols (42.37mg GAE/g), followed by Minas coffee, while Cioccolatato contained the lowest TPC (33.12mg GAE/g). Cherry coffee also exhibited the highest content of individual classes of polyphenols (flavan-3-ols, procyanidins and tannins), while the highest content of chlorogenic acid (CQA) derivatives was determined in Minas and Cioccolatato coffees (C. arabica). The highest content of total and individual polyphenolic compounds was determined in coffees roasted in both light and medium roasting conditions, which was also observed for the content of CQA derivatives and antioxidant capacity of roasted coffees. The highest caffeine content in the coffee samples was determined by employing the HPLC analysis (0.06-2.55%). Light roasted Cherry coffee contained the highest overall content of caffeine among all coffees, which exhibited a decrease with intensified roasting. Copyright © 2011. Published by

  14. Buying cannabis in 'coffee shops'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshouwer, Karin; Van Laar, Margriet; Vollebergh, Wilma A

    2011-03-01

    The key objective of Dutch cannabis policy is to prevent and limit the risks of cannabis consumption for users, their direct environment and society ('harm reduction'). This paper will focus on the tolerated sale of cannabis in 'coffee shops'. We give a brief overview of Dutch policy on coffee shops, its history and recent developments. Furthermore, we present epidemiological data that may be indicative of the effects of the coffee shop policy on cannabis and other drug use. Dutch coffee shop policy has become more restrictive in recent years and the number of coffee shops has decreased. Cannabis prevalence rates in the adult population are somewhat below the European average; the rate is relatively high among adolescents; and age of first use appears to be low. On a European level, the use of hard drugs in both the Dutch adult and adolescent population is average to low (except for ecstasy among adults). International comparisons do not suggest a strong, upward effect of the coffee shop system on levels of cannabis use, although prevalence rates among Dutch adolescents give rise to concern. Furthermore, the coffee shop system appears to be successful in separating the hard and soft drugs markets. Nevertheless, in recent years, issues concerning the involvement of organised crime and the public nuisance related to drug tourism have given rise to several restrictive measures on the local level and have sparked a political debate on the reform of Dutch drug policy. © 2011 Trimbos Institute.

  15. Extraction and characterization of polysaccharides and phenolic compounds from spent coffee grounds and their incorporation into edible films/coatings for food applications

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo, Lina Fernanda Ballesteros

    2016-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento dem Engenharia Química e Biológica. Coffee has been one of the most popular beverages around the world since ancient times. It is made from a mixture of hot water and coffee powder being consumed for its refreshing and stimulating properties. However, along its production process many wastes are generated. Spent coffee ground is the major waste produced during the soluble coffee preparation. This residue is rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols, making its use intere...

  16. Physical Land Suitability for Civet Arabica Coffee: Case Study of Bandung and West Bandung Regencies, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairani, E.; Supriatna, J.; Koestoer, R.; Moeliono, M.

    2017-12-01

    Indonesia has been widely known as the best Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) producer, in terms of both aspects, quality and number of product. Currently, its production, however, declines to the 3rd rank internationally. Issues emerged in the coffee cultivation are: land unsuitability, low quality of seeds, and poor management. Among Arabica coffee types, wild civet coffee is the most expensive one and harvested from the coffee beans which have been digested naturally. The study aims to determine the physical suitability of land as well as the constraints related to land for civet Arabica coffee in selected study cases, e.g., Bandung and Bandung Barat. The research methods employ multi-criteria analysis, and combined with weighted overlaying techniques for mapping. The criteria include temperature, rainfall, humidity, duration of dry season, slope, altitude, type of soil, soil texture, and erosion potential. Parameters of civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) are land use, altitude, and temperature. Local policy strongly supports the extensive management for land and the increase of coffee export. Processing data involved matching the comparison between guideline requirements for the land suitability classes, characteristics of Arabica coffee and civet habitat. The results covered the profile suitable land of the civet Arabica coffee in the study areas.

  17. Natural occurrence of ochratoxin A and antioxidant activities of green and roasted coffees and corresponding byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Aurora; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Tafuri, Alessio; Ritieni, Alberto

    2007-12-12

    Ochratoxin A is an important mycotoxin that can enter the human food chain in cereals, wine, coffee, spices, beer, cocoa, dried fruits, and pork meats. Coffee is one of the most common beverages and, consequently, it has a potential risk factor for human health related to ochratoxin A exposure. In this study, coffee and corresponding byproducts from seven different geographic regions were investigated for ochratoxin A natural occurrence by HPLC-FLD, nutritional characterization, and antioxidant activities by spectrophotometric assay. The research focused on composition changes in coffee during the processing step "from field to cup". Costa Rica and Indian green coffees were the most contaminated samples, with 13 and 11 microg/kg, respectively, while the Ethiopian coffee was the least contaminated, with 3.8 microg/kg of ochratoxin A. The reduction of ochratoxin A contamination during the roasting step was comparable for any samples that were considered under the recommended level of 4 microg/kg. Total dietary fibers ranged from 58.7% for Vietnam and 48.6% for Ivory Coast in green coffees and ranged from 58.6% for Costa Rica to 61.2% for India in roasted coffee. Coffee silverskin byproduct obtained from Ivory Coast was the highest, with 69.2 and 64.2% of insoluble dietary fibers, respectively.

  18. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee.

  19. Modelling the Cooling of Coffee: Insights from a Preliminary Study in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Wanty

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses an attempt to examine pre-service teachers' mathematical modelling skills. A modelling project investigating relationships between temperature and time in the process of cooling of coffee was chosen. The analysis was based on group written reports of the cooling of coffee project and observation of classroom discussion.…

  20. A field survey on coffee beans drying methods of Indonesian small holder farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, Parulian; Setyawan, Eko Y.; Gultom, Tumiur; Napitupulu, Farel H.; Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Drying agricultural product is a post-harvest process that consumes significant energy. It can affect the quality of the product. This paper deals with literature review and field survey of drying methods of coffee beans of Indonesia farmers. The objective is to supply the necessary information on developing continuous solar drier. The results show that intermittent characteristic of sun drying results in a better quality of coffee beans in comparison with constant convective drying. In order to use energy efficiently, the drying process should be divided into several stages. In the first stage when the moist content is high, higher drying air temperature is more effective. After this step, where the moist content is low, lower drying air temperature is better. The field survey of drying coffee beans in Sumatera Utara province reveals that the used drying process is very traditional. It can be divided into two modes and depend on the coffee beans type. The Arabica coffee is firstly fermented and dried to moisture content of 80% using sun drying method, then followed by Green House model of drying up to moisture content about 12%. The latter typically spends 3 days of drying time. On the other hand, The Robusta coffee is dried by exposing to the sun directly without any treatment. After the coffee beans dried follow by peeled process. These findings can be considered to develop a continuous solar drying that suitable for coffee beans drying.

  1. PRESENCE OF ASPERGILLUS AND OTHER FUNGAL SYMBIONTS IN COFFEE BEANS FROM COLOMBIA Presencia de Aspergillus y otros simbiontes fúngicos en granos de café procedentes de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL ÁNGEL GAMBOA-GAITÁN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are common inhabitants of plants and plant-derived products. Some of these fungal species are potentially dangerous to human health since they are able to produce chemical substances that alter normal physiological activity. There are no studies about natural mycoflora associated with coffee beans in Colombia, and nothing is known about the presence and abundance of toxigenic fungal species in Colombian coffee. In this study 5,000 coffee beans were studied by plating them on potato-based artificial culture medium and it was shown that potentially toxigenic fungal taxa (mostly from genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, are currently found in Colombian coffee beans. This is true for all steps of coffee processing, from berries in trees to toasted grains, including packed coffee ready for retail in supermarkets. Results show that the distribution of these fungi is not random among different steps of coffee processing, which means that some steps are more vulnerable to infection with some fungi that others. The convenience of establishing a program devoted to detect fungi and/or mycotoxins in Colombian commodities, specially coffee, is discussed hereLos hongos son comúnmente encontrados tanto en plantas como en sus productos, bien sea para uso humano o animal. Algunos de tales hongos son potencialmente peligrosos para la salud porque producen compuestos químicos fisiológicamente activos, como alcaloides y toxinas. En Colombia no hay estudios sobre la micoflora naturalmente asociada a granos de café, ni sobre la presencia de especies toxígenas en dicho producto. En este estudio se tomaron muestras de 5.000 granos de café en diferentes estadios de su procesamiento, encontrando que taxones fúngicos potencialmente toxígenos, tales como Aspergillus, Fusarium y Penicillium, son comúnmente encontrados en todos los estadios del procesamiento de café. El estudio incluyó muestras desde el fruto en el árbol hasta café tostado y empacado

  2. Development of mathematic model for coffee decaffeination with leaching method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple mathematic model for caffeine kinetic description during the extraction process (leaching of coffee bean was developed. A non­steady diffusion equation coupled with a macroscopic mass transfer equation for solvent was developed and them solved analytically. The kinetic of caffeine extraction from coffee bean is depend on initial caffeine content, final caffeine content, caffeine content at certain time, mass­transfer coefficient, solvent volume, surface area of coffee beans, process time, radius of coffee bean, leaching rate of caffeine, caffeine diffusivity and a are constan, solvent concentration, activation energy, temperature absolute and gas constant. Caffeine internal mass diffusivity was estimated by fitting the model to an experiment using acetic acid and liquid waste of cocoa beans fermentation. The prediction equation for leaching rate of caffeine in coffee beans has been found. It was found that Dk (m2/sec=1.345x10­7—4.1638x10­7, and kL (m/sec=2.445x10­5—5.551x10­5 by acetic acid as solvent depended on temperature and solvent concentration. The prediction equation for length of time to reduce initial caffeine content to certain concentration in coffee beans has been developed, Caffeine diffusivity (Dk and mass­transfer coefficient (kL was found respectively 1.591x 10­7—2.122x10­7 m2/sec and 4.897x10­5—6.529x10­5 m/sec using liquid waste of cocoa bean fermentation as solvent which depend on temperature and solvent concentration. Key words: Coffee, caffeine, decaffeination, leaching, mathematic model.

  3. Grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990--February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: Study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  4. Grain boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluffi, R. W.; Bristowe, P. D.

    The present document is a progress report describing the work accomplished to date during the second year of our four-year grant (February 15, 1990 to February 14, 1994) to study grain boundaries. The research was focused on the following three major efforts: study of the atomic structure of grain boundaries by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and computer modeling; study of short-circuit diffusion along grain boundaries; and development of a Thin-film Deposition/Bonding Apparatus for the manufacture of high purity bicrystals.

  5. The neutron capture process in the He shell in core-collapse supernovae: Presolar silicon carbide grains as a diagnostic tool for nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatari, Marco; Hoppe, Peter; Trappitsch, Reto; Fryer, Chris; Timmes, F. X.; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael

    2018-01-01

    Carbon-rich presolar grains are found in primitive meteorites, with isotopic measurements to date suggesting a core-collapse supernovae origin site for some of them. This holds for about 1-2% of presolar silicon carbide (SiC) grains, so-called Type X and C grains, and about 30% of presolar graphite grains. Presolar SiC grains of Type X show anomalous isotopic signatures for several elements heavier than iron compared to the solar abundances: most notably for strontium, zirconium, molybdenum, ruthenium and barium. We study the nucleosynthesis of zirconium and molybdenum isotopes in the He-shell of three core-collapse supernovae models of 15, 20 and 25 M⊙ with solar metallicity, and compare the results to measurements of presolar grains. We find the stellar models show a large scatter of isotopic abundances for zirconium and molybdenum, but the mass averaged abundances are qualitatively similar to the measurements. We find all models show an excess of 96Zr relative to the measurements, but the model abundances are affected by the fractionation between Sr and Zr since a large contribution to 90Zr is due to the radiogenic decay of 90Sr. Some supernova models show excesses of 95,97Mo and depletion of 96Mo relative to solar. The mass averaged distribution from these models shows an excess of 100Mo, but this may be alleviated by very recent neutron-capture cross section measurements. We encourage future explorations to assess the impact of the uncertainties in key neutron-capture reaction rates that lie along the n-process path.

  6. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activity of Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Yashin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes published information concerning the determination of antioxidant activity (AA in coffee samples by various methods (ORAC, FRAP, TRAP, TEAC, etc. in vitro and limited data of antiradical activity of coffee products in vitro and in vivo. Comparison is carried out of the AA of coffee Arabica and coffee Robusta roasted at different temperatures as well as by different roasting methods (microwave, convection, etc.. Data on the antiradical activity of coffee is provided. The antioxidant activity of coffee, tea, cocoa, and red wine is compared. At the end of this review, the total antioxidant content (TAC of coffee samples from 21 coffee-producing countries as measured by an amperometric method is provided. The TAC of green and roasted coffee beans is also compared.

  7. Antioxidant and Antiradical Activity of Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashin, Alexander; Yashin, Yakov; Wang, Jing Yuan; Nemzer, Boris

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes published information concerning the determination of antioxidant activity (AA) in coffee samples by various methods (ORAC, FRAP, TRAP, TEAC, etc.) in vitro and limited data of antiradical activity of coffee products in vitro and in vivo. Comparison is carried out of the AA of coffee Arabica and coffee Robusta roasted at different temperatures as well as by different roasting methods (microwave, convection, etc.). Data on the antiradical activity of coffee is provided. The antioxidant activity of coffee, tea, cocoa, and red wine is compared. At the end of this review, the total antioxidant content (TAC) of coffee samples from 21 coffee-producing countries as measured by an amperometric method is provided. The TAC of green and roasted coffee beans is also compared. PMID:26784461

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Fine-Grained AZ61 Magnesium Alloys Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyuan Xie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP on stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of a cast AZ61 Mg alloy was investigated in distilled water (DW using the slow strain rate tensile test (SSRT at a strain rate of 1 × 10−6 s−1. The fine-grained alloy after ECAP showed a greater SCC susceptibility but a higher ultimate tensile strength, compared with the as-cast counterpart. The results were attributed to refined grains, high-density dislocations and increased proportion of high-angle grain boundaries induced by severe plastic deformation, as well as isolated fine β-phase particles transiting from net-like β-phase.

  9. Wear properties of H13 with micron scale and nano scale grains bionic units processed by laser remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Cheng-tao; Liu, Yan; Ren, Lu-quan

    2013-12-01

    By simulating the cuticles of some soil animals, a combination of soft part (untreated substrate) and hard part (laser remelting area) structure was designed on metal surface to get an improved performance. Different specimens were prepared which contained units with micro and nano scale grains. The microstructures were observed by environmental field emission scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the phases. The results of these tests indicate that due to the rapid solidification condition in the water, nano scale grains have a high microhardness between 1300 and 1000 HV. Retained austenite was found in it. Some of them transform to martensite in block on ring wear test. Specimens with bionic unit have a better wear resistance. Especially, the units with nano grains bring a further enhancement. The alternate soft and hard in macroscopic (substrate and laser remelting area) and microscopic (austenite and martensite) structure played a key role in improving the H13 wear resistance.

  10. Briquetting of wastes from coffee plants conducted in zero harvest system

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    Oberdan Everton Zerbinatti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The briquetting process consists of lignocellulosic residues densification in solid biofuel with high calorific value denominated briquette. Coffee crop is one of the most important Brazilian commodities and according to the cultural practices produces plant residues in different amounts. The zero harvest system in coffee crop is based in pruning of plagiotropic branches in alternated years to make possible to concentrate the harvest and to avoid coffee biannual production. The aim of the present work was to verify the viability of briquette production using the biomass waste obtained by zero harvest system. The treatments were composed of briquetting process: 1 coffee rind; 2 mixture of branches and leaves; 3 25% of coffee rind + 75% of branches and leaves; 4 75% of coffee rind + 25% of branches and leaves; 5 50% of coffee rind + 50% of branches and leaves; 6 40% of coffee rind + 60% of branches and leaves. The mixtures were realized in v/v base, milled to produce 5-10 mm particles and were briqueted with 12% of humidity. The C-teor of briquettes produced ranged from 41.85 to 43. 84% and sulphur teor was below 0.1%. The calorific value of briquettes produced ranged from 3,359 to 4, 028 Kcal/ kg and the ashes were below 6%. The isolated use of coffee rind or branches and leaves, as well the mixtures of coffee rind with 50% or more of branches and leaves allow the production of briquettes with calorific value around 4,000 Kcal/ kg which is within the quality parameters. The briquetting of coffee crop wastes is viable and sustainable energetically.

  11. COFFEE TO FUEL LONDON BUSES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    .... A company called Bio-bean, in partnership with the oil giant Royal Dutch Shell, introduced relatively small amounts of oil produced from coffee grounds into the mix of diesel and biofuels mandated...

  12. Effects of process parameters on the properties of barley containing snacks enriched with brewer’s spent grain

    OpenAIRE

    Kirjoranta, Satu; Tenkanen, Maija; Jouppila, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    Brewer’s spent grain (BSG), a by-product of malting of barley in the production of malt extract, was used as an ingredient in extruded barley-based snacks in order to improve the nutritional value of the snacks and widen the applications of this by-product in food sector. The effects of the extrusion parameters on the selected properties of the snacks were studied. Snacks with different ingredients including whole grain barley flour, BSG, whey protein isolate (WPI), barley starch and waxy cor...

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Fine-Grained AZ61 Magnesium Alloys Processed by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    OpenAIRE

    Qiuyuan Xie; Aibin Ma; Jinghua Jiang; Zhaojun Cheng; Dan Song; Yuchun Yuan; Huan Liu

    2017-01-01

    The effect of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of a cast AZ61 Mg alloy was investigated in distilled water (DW) using the slow strain rate tensile test (SSRT) at a strain rate of 1 × 10−6 s−1. The fine-grained alloy after ECAP showed a greater SCC susceptibility but a higher ultimate tensile strength, compared with the as-cast counterpart. The results were attributed to refined grains, high-density dislocations and increased proportion of high-...

  14. Zapata Coffee Roasting Company

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata Pardo, Paula Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Zapata Coffee Roasting Company es un pequeño negocio de tostión y comercialización de café gourmet, ubicado en la ciudad de Bothell, Washington, al norte del área de Seattle, al noroeste de Estados Unidos. Fue fundada por María V. Zapata, quien proviene de cuatro generaciones de amor y pasión por el café, ya que su familia ha cosechado y tostado café por casi un siglo en el suroccidente de los Andes Colombianos. La compañía compite con otros pequeños tostadores y con grandes empresas con m...

  15. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily. PMID:27086837

  16. The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, Erol; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Perger, Matthew; Klatt, Christian; Leighton, Stephen; Miller, Brian; Butler, Keith T.; Melot, Brent C.; Speirs, Rory W.; Hendon, Christopher H.

    2016-04-01

    Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

  17. Coffee consumption and incident dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Saira Saeed; Tiemeier, Henning; de Bruijn, Renée F A G; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica; Koudstaal, Peter J; Ikram, M Arfan

    2014-10-01

    Coffee consumption has been frequently reported for its protective association with incident dementia. However, this association has mostly been reported in studies with short follow-up periods, and it remains unclear to what extent reverse causality influences this association. Studying the long-term effect of coffee consumption on dementia with stratified follow-up time may help resolve this issue. In the population-based Rotterdam Study, coffee consumption was assessed in 1989-1991 (N = 5,408), and reassessed in 1997-1999 (N = 4,368). Follow-up for dementia was complete until 2011. We investigated the association of coffee consumption and incident dementia for the two examination rounds separately using flexible parametric survival models. We studied the entire follow-up period as well as stratified follow-up time at 4 years. For both examination rounds, we did not find an association between coffee consumption and dementia over the entire follow-up. In contrast, for both examination rounds, a protective association was observed only in the follow-up stratum of 0-4 years. Our data suggest that coffee consumption is not associated with incident dementia during long-term. The protective association observed in the short-term might be driven by reverse causality.

  18. Is coffee a functional food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dórea, José G; da Costa, Teresa Helena M

    2005-06-01

    Definitions of functional food vary but are essentially based on foods' ability to enhance the quality of life, or physical and mental performance, of regular consumers. The worldwide use of coffee for social engagement, leisure, enhancement of work performance and well-being is widely recognised. Depending on the quantities consumed, it can affect the intake of some minerals (K, Mg, Mn, Cr), niacin and antioxidant substances. Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown positive effects of regular coffee-drinking on various aspects of health, such as psychoactive responses (alertness, mood change), neurological (infant hyperactivity, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) and metabolic disorders (diabetes, gallstones, liver cirrhosis), and gonad and liver function. Despite this, most reviews do not mention coffee as fulfilling the criteria for a functional food. Unlike other functional foods that act on a defined population with a special effect, the wide use of coffee-drinking impacts a broad demographic (from children to the elderly), with a wide spectrum of health benefits. The present paper discusses coffee-drinking and health benefits that support the concept of coffee as a functional food.

  19. EUROPIUM s-PROCESS SIGNATURE AT CLOSE-TO-SOLAR METALLICITY IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Cristallo, Sergio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, via Maggini snc, Teramo I-64100 (Italy); Rauscher, Thomas, E-mail: janaina.avila@anu.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics Research, School of Physics, Astronomy, and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01

    Individual mainstream stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains and a SiC-enriched bulk sample from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite have been analyzed by the Sensitive High Resolution Ion Microprobe-Reverse Geometry for Eu isotopes. The mainstream grains are believed to have condensed in the outflows of {approx}1.5-3 M{sub Sun} carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The {sup 151}Eu fractions [fr({sup 151}Eu) = {sup 151}Eu/({sup 151}Eu+{sup 153}Eu)] derived from our measurements are compared with previous astronomical observations of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars enriched in elements made by slow neutron captures (the s-process). Despite the difference in metallicity between the parent stars of the grains and the metal-poor stars, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements agree well with fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from astronomical observations. We have also compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of Eu isotopic ratios in the envelope of AGB stars. Because of the low Eu abundances in the SiC grains, the fr({sup 151}Eu) values derived from our measurements show large uncertainties, in most cases being larger than the difference between solar and predicted fr({sup 151}Eu) values. The SiC aggregate yields a fr({sup 151}Eu) value within the range observed in the single grains and provides a more precise result (fr({sup 151}Eu) = 0.54 {+-} 0.03, 95% conf.), but is approximately 12% higher than current s-process predictions. The AGB models can match the SiC data if we use an improved formalism to evaluate the contribution of excited nuclear states in the calculation of the {sup 151}Sm(n, {gamma}) stellar reaction rate.

  20. Multifeed biogas reactor for coffee waste water and biomass wastes : performance under highly fluctuating operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanakya, H.N.; Deepa, G.B.; Vinutha, D. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Centre for Sustainable Technologies; Modak, J.M. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This study compared different operating conditions used in anaerobic digestion processes that convert coffee effluents into biogas. The effluent from wet coffee processing is rich in saccharide. In India, coffee processing is carried out at small to medium sized plantations which do not have the adequate facilities to treat the effluent for biogas recovery. Rather, the wastewater is treated in anaerobic-aerobic lagoons, but this process releases large quantities of methane to the atmosphere. More efficient alternatives are needed to stabilize the operating conditions, concentrations of wastewater and ambient operating temperatures. This study tested a newly developed multi-feed anaerobic reactor that can covert herbaceous biomass and coffee effluent to biogas and compost. The reactor is fed herbaceous biomass feedstock during the 8 month period when there is no coffee processing. Coffee effluent is fed to the reactor during the 4 month coffee processing season. The effluent flows through partially decomposed biomass beds where methanogenic activities yield a biofilm to facilitate conversion to biogas. The seasonal operation can be transformed into a year round advantage. The method can be applied to similar agro-processing units. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  1. Effects of process parameters on the properties of barley containing snacks enriched with brewer’s spent grain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirjoranta, Satu; Tenkanen, Maija; Jouppila, Kirsi

    2016-01-01

    Brewer’s spent grain (BSG), a by-product of malting of barley in the production of malt extract, was used as an ingredient in extruded barley-based snacks in order to improve the nutritional value of the snacks and widen...

  2. Surface chemical treatment of ultrafine-grained Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy processed by severe plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, D.P., E-mail: dpedreira@ufscar.br [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luiz, km 235, São Carlos 13565-905, SP (Brazil); Prokofiev, E. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luiz, km 235, São Carlos 13565-905, SP (Brazil); Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12 K. Marx Str., Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Sanches, L.F.R. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luiz, km 235, São Carlos 13565-905, SP (Brazil); Polyakova, V. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12 K. Marx Str., Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Valiev, R.Z., E-mail: rzvaliev@mail.rb.ru [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, 12 K. Marx Str., Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Botta, W.J.; Junior, A.M.J.; Bolfarini, C. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luiz, km 235, São Carlos 13565-905, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrafine-grained titanium alloys is a good choice for biomedical applications. • Acid phosphoric treatment enhances bioactivity of Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy. • Apatite precipitation was increased in ultrafine-grained after surface modification. - Abstract: Ti–6Al–7Nb containing harmless for tissues niobium can be a good choice replacing Ti–6Al–4V for orthopedic implants application. Formation of ultrafine-grained (UFG) structure in metals and alloys by severe plastic deformation (SPD) techniques allows for achieving unique mechanical properties. Using equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) UFG structure in Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy with an average size of grains/subgrains of 200 nm was obtained. This UFG Ti–6Al–7Nb alloy has high mechanical (ultimate tensile strength 1470 MPa) and fatigue properties, suitable for practical application. Additionally, surface modifications of titanium alloys aim induce specific responses on osteoblastic cells after implantation. Chemical surface treatments are simple methods to obtain a bioactive for apatite precipitation surface. Phosphoric acid etching combined or not with alkaline treatment presented bioactivity after seven days soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution.

  3. Corn grain-processing method interacts with calcium salts of palm fatty acids supplementation on milk production and energy balance of early-lactation cows grazing tropical pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistel, Fernanda; de Souza, Jonas; Santos, Flávio Augusto Portela

    2017-07-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate the associative effects of feeding Ca salts of palm fatty acids (FA) and corn grain-processing method on production, nutrient digestibility, energy balance, and carryover effects of early-lactation dairy cows grazing a tropical pasture. Treatment diets were offered from 3 to 16 wk postpartum (treatment period), in which all cows grazed elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum L. Cameroon) and treatments were added to a concentrate supplement. Treatments were flint corn grain-processing method either as fine ground (FGC) or steam-flaked (SFC) associated with Ca salts of palm FA supplementation either not supplemented or supplemented (CSPO). From 17 to 40 wk postpartum (carryover period) all cows received a common diet fed as total mixed ration. During the treatment period, a tendency for an interaction between CSPO and corn grain-processing method were observed for milk yield, milk fat yield, and energy-corrected milk (ECM), as CSPO caused them to increased to a greater extent in the FGC diet compared with the SFC diet. Furthermore, a tendency for an interaction between CSPO and corn grain-processing method was observed for body weight change, because CSPO increased body weight loss in the FGC diet but not in the SFC diet. The CSPO increased milk yield, milk fat yield, 3.5% fat-corrected milk, ECM, and cumulative milk yield compared with not supplemented. Also, CSPO increased energy intake, milk energy output, and energy partitioning toward milk, whereas reduced energy was allocated to body reserves. The SFC increased milk yield, ECM, milk protein yield, milk casein yield, and cumulative milk yield, and decreased milk urea N compared with FGC. The SFC compared with FGC also increased body condition score and body weight change, and increased energy partitioning toward body reserves. During the carryover period, an interaction between CSPO and corn grain-processing method was observed for milk yield, which occurred because

  4. Statistical processing the results of interlaboratory testing the grain-size distribution of sand and gravel from the western part of the Kostolac basin

    OpenAIRE

    Urošević, Daniela; Vukićević, Mirjana; Davidović, Nebojša

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory testing the grain-size distribution of sand and gravel on representative samples from the site of the western part of the Kostolac Basin. The results were statistically processed by two ways: Numerical method: the Cochran test of accuracy and Graphic interpretation: the MANDEL technique of consistency in accordance with the Standard SRPS ISO 5725-2 [1,2]. The followings were calculated: repeatability variance Sr2; interlaboratory variance SL ...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF COFFEE MARKET AND CHANGES IN COFFEE CONSUMPTION AMONG POLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Chudy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a survey concerning coffee consumption together with results of visual and instrumental coffee analyses. The investigations focused on the type of additives used when preparing coffee. Based on the survey it was found that 58.3% respondents use sweeteners and 92.7% coffee whiteners (mainly milk with 3.2% fat content.

  6. Brazilian Coffee Production as Function of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, A. M. H. D.; Pinto, H. S.; Alfonsi, E. L., Sr.; Alfonsi, W. M. V.; Pereira, V. R.

    2016-12-01

    According to the Brazilian Government the actual area of coffee production in the country is close to 2.25 million hectares. The sector involves 290.000 of farmers with a production of 44 million of 60 Kg bags in 2015. The Arabica Coffee specie is cultivated in the country where the climate condition are characterized by a year mean temperatures between 18°C and 22°C. Temperatures higher than 33°C can cause abortion of flowers during the spring season and reduce the production while lower than 18°C can be affected by frost during winter when the minimum temperature can be lower than 2°C in the shelter. For a better quality of the final product the winter, between July and August, must be dry with rainfall lower than 50 mm/month. The Ministry of Agriculture defines those conditions for the Official Coffee Climatic Risk Zoning. In 2002, a partnership with the British Embassy and 2 Brazilian institutions, i. e. the State University of Campinas - UNICAMP and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa, published the study "Global Warming and the New Geography of Agricultural Production in Brazil" (Pinto and Assad, 2002). This study was based on the PRECIS/Hadley Centre Regional Climate Model future projections. The crop simulations indicated a decrease in the grain production due to temperature rise. Later in 2012, a new study was developed in cooperation with the World Bank to evaluate the future of nine main commodities in Brazil under climate change, including the Arabica coffee. The worst scenario considering any mitigation and adaptation action indicated that the two most affected crops would be the soybean and coffee, with a reduction of 22% and 6.7 % in the yield respectively. Field surveys to evaluate the historical spatial dynamic and migration of Arabica coffee cultivated areas confirmed the results of the previous studies and indicated a recent increase in the search for cooler altitude areas to plant coffee. Also the field observations

  7. Effect of Process Variables on the Grain Size and Crystallographic Texture of Hot-Dip Galvanized Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboli, Shirin; McDermid, Joseph R.

    2014-08-01

    A galvanizing simulator was used to determine the effect of galvanizing bath antimony (Sb) content, substrate surface roughness, and cooling rate on the microstructural development of metallic zinc coatings. Substrate surface roughness was varied through the use of relatively rough hot-rolled and relatively smooth bright-rolled steels, cooling rates were varied from 0.1 to 10 K/s, and bulk bath Sb levels were varied from 0 to 0.1 wt pct. In general, it was found that increasing bath Sb content resulted in coatings with a larger grain size and strongly promoted the development of coatings with the close-packed {0002} basal plane parallel to the substrate surface. Increasing substrate surface roughness tended to decrease the coating grain size and promoted a more random coating crystallographic texture, except in the case of the highest Sb content bath (0.1 wt pct Sb), where substrate roughness had no significant effect on grain size except at higher cooling rates (10 K/s). Increased cooling rates tended to decrease the coating grain size and promote the {0002} basal orientation. Calculations showed that increasing the bath Sb content from 0 to 0.1 wt pct Sb increased the dendrite tip growth velocity from 0.06 to 0.11 cm/s by decreasing the solid-liquid interface surface energy from 0.77 to 0.45 J/m2. Increased dendrite tip velocity only partially explains the formation of larger zinc grains at higher Sb levels. It was also found that the classic nucleation theory cannot completely explain the present experimental observations, particularly the effect of increasing the bath Sb, where the classical theory predicts increased nucleation and a finer grain size. In this case, the "poisoning" theory of nucleation sites by segregated Sb may provide a partial explanation. However, any analysis is greatly hampered by the lack of fundamental thermodynamic information such as partition coefficients and surface energies and by a lack of fundamental structural studies. Overall

  8. Transfer of Ochratoxin A into Tea and Coffee Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malir, Frantisek; Ostry, Vladimir; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Toman, Jakub; Bazin, Ingrid; Roubal, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, immunotoxic, neurotoxic, reprotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic (group 2B), being characterized by species and sex differences in sensitivity. Despite the fact that OTA is in some aspects a controversial topic, OTA is the most powerful renal carcinogen. The aim of this study was to make a small survey concerning OTA content in black tea, fruit tea, and ground roasted coffee, and to assess OTA transfer into beverages. OTA content was measured using a validated and accredited HPLC-FLD method with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 0.35 ng/g. The OTA amount ranged from LOQ up to 250 ng/g in black tea and up to 104 ng/g in fruit tea. Black tea and fruit tea, naturally contaminated, were used to prepare tea infusions. The transfer from black tea to the infusion was 34.8% ± 1.3% and from fruit tea 4.1% ± 0.2%. Ground roasted coffee naturally contaminated at 0.92 ng/g was used to prepare seven kinds of coffee beverages. Depending on the type of process used, OTA transfer into coffee ranged from 22.3% to 66.1%. OTA intakes from fruit and black tea or coffee represent a non-negligible human source. PMID:25525684

  9. Formation kinetics of furfuryl alcohol in a coffee model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouchi, Abdullatif; Murkovic, Michael

    2018-03-15

    The production of furfuryl alcohol from green coffee during roasting and the effect of multiple parameters on its formation were studied employing HPLC-DAD. Results show that coffee produces furfuryl alcohol in larger quantities (418µg/g) compared to other beans or seeds (up to 132µg/g) roasted under the same conditions. The kinetics of furfuryl alcohol production resemble those of other process contaminants (e.g., HMF, acrylamide) produced in coffee roasting, with temperature and time of roasting playing significant roles in quantities formed. Different coffee species yielded different amounts of furfuryl alcohol. The data point out that the amounts of furfuryl alcohol found in roasted coffee do not reflect the total amounts produced during roasting because great amounts of furfuryl alcohol (up to 57%) are evaporating and released to the atmosphere during roasting. Finally the effect of the moisture content on furfuryl alcohol formation was found to be of little impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of galactomannan derivatives in roasted coffee beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Fernando M; Reis, Ana; Domingues, M Rosário M; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2006-05-03

    In this work, the galactomannans from roasted coffee infusions were purified by 50% ethanol precipitation, anion exchange chromatography, and phenylboronic acid-immobilized Sepharose chromatography. Specific enzymatic hydrolysis of the beta-(1-->4)-D-mannan backbone allowed us to conclude that the galactomannans of roasted coffee infusions are high molecular weight supports of low molecular weight brown compounds. Also, the molecular weight of the brown compounds linked to the galactomannan increases with the increase of the coffee degree of roast. The reaction pathways of galactomannans during the coffee roasting process were inferred from the detection of specific chemical markers by gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry and/or electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Maillard reaction, caramelization, isomerization, oxidation, and decarboxylation pathways were identified by detection of Amadori compounds, 1,6-beta-anhydromannose, fructose, glucose, mannonic acid, 2-ketogluconic acid, and arabinonic acid in the reducing end of the obtained oligosaccharides. The implication of the several competitive reaction pathways is discussed and related to the structural changes of the galactomannans present in the roasted coffee infusions.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Rotating Cylinder Type Coffee Bean Roaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutarsi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available One strategy attempts to reduce dependence on primary commodity markets are overseas market expansion and development of secondary products. In the secondary product processing coffee beans is required of supporting equipment to facilitate these efforts. Research Center for Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa has developed coffee bean roaster. However, there are still many people who do not know about the technical aspects of roaster machine type of rotating cylinder so that more people use traditional ways to roast coffee beans. In order for the benefits of this machine is better known society it is necessary to study on the technical aspects. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the technical performance of the coffee beans roaster machine type of rotating cylinder. These include the technical aspects of work capacity of the machine, roasting technical efficiency, fuel requirements, and power requirements of using roaster machine. Research methods are including data collection, calculation and analysis. The results showed that the roaster machine type of a rotating cylinder has capacity of 12.3 kg/hour. Roasting efficiency is 80%. Fuel consumption is 0.6 kg. The calculated amount of the used power of current measurement is the average of 0.616 kW.

  12. Discrete Element Model for Suppression of Coffee-Ring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Lam, Miu Ling; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-02-01

    When a sessile droplet evaporates, coffee-ring effect drives the suspended particulate matters to the droplet edge, eventually forming a ring-shaped deposition. Because it causes a non-uniform distribution of solid contents, which is undesired in many applications, attempts have been made to eliminate the coffee-ring effect. Recent reports indicated that the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed by a mixture of spherical and non-spherical particles with enhanced particle-particle interaction at air-water interface. However, a model to comprehend the inter-particulate activities has been lacking. Here, we report a discrete element model (particle system) to investigate the phenomenon. The modeled dynamics included particle traveling following the capillary flow with Brownian motion, and its resultant 3D hexagonal close packing of particles along the contact line. For particles being adsorbed by air-water interface, we modeled cluster growth, cluster deformation, and cluster combination. We found that the suppression of coffee-ring effect does not require a circulatory flow driven by an inward Marangoni flow at air-water interface. Instead, the number of new cluster formation, which can be enhanced by increasing the ratio of non-spherical particles and the overall number of microspheres, is more dominant in the suppression process. Together, this model provides a useful platform elucidating insights for suppressing coffee-ring effect for practical applications in the future.

  13. Coffee production crisis and migration, in a context of poverty and marginalization. The case of indigenous producers in Huehuetla, Puebla

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Ortega Hernández; Benito Ramírez Valverde

    2013-01-01

    Because of coffee prices crisis in Mexico, mainly for indigenous producers, a labor expulsion process between their family members, like the case of indigenous coffee growers in Huehuetla municipality, Puebla. This population movement could be categorized as inner migration, but with a permanent character due to low prices and the lack of well remunerated jobs in coffee farms. Inner migration responds to poverty and marginalization conditions in which they are living; and m...

  14. Inflence of coffee and its components on breast cancer: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amongst females, breast cancer is one of the major culprits for cancer death. Consequently, many scientists have focused their researches to delineate the novel alternative strategies to cure or to reduce the outgrowth of this disease. Amongst the beverages, coffee is widely available and one of the most popular non-alcoholic drink worldwide. Due to the widespread usage of coffee in adults, scientists are trying to delineate its beneficial and harmful influences on human health and diseases. Evidences from an amount of researches have outlined the possible role of coffee and its components as chemoprotective agents against specific carcinogens as well as suppressors for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, some studies tried to elucidate the relationship amid coffee intake and suppression of carcinogenesis in breast tissues. The present review is an effort to highlight the consequence attributable to the intake of coffee and its key chemical components (caffeine, caffeic acid, kahweol and cafestol upon breast cancer developmental process.

  15. Integrated Pest Management of Coffee Berry Borer in Hawaii and Puerto Rico: Current Status and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Aristizábal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The coffee berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei, is the most significant insect pest of coffee worldwide. Since CBB was detected in Puerto Rico in 2007 and Hawaii in 2010, coffee growers from these islands are facing increased costs, reduced coffee quality, and increased pest management challenges. Here, we outline the CBB situation, and summarize the findings of growers, researchers, and extension professionals working with CBB in Hawaii. Recommendations for the Integrated Pest Management (IPM program for CBB in Hawaiian Islands and Puerto Rico include: (1 establish a CBB monitoring program, (2 synchronize applications of insecticides with peak flight activity of CBB especially during the early coffee season, (3 conduct efficient strip-picking as soon as possible after harvest and perform pre-harvest sanitation picks in CBB hotspots if needed, (4 establish protocols to prevent the escape of CBB from processing areas and when transporting berries during harvest, and (5 stump prune by blocks. Progress achieved includes the introduction of the mycoinsecticide Beauveria bassiana to coffee plantations, the coordination of area-wide CBB surveys, the establishment and augmentation of native beetle predators, and an observed reduction of CBB populations and increased coffee quality where IPM programs were established. However, CBB remains a challenge for coffee growers due to regional variability in CBB pressures, high costs, and labor issues, including a lack of training and awareness of CBB management practices among growers.

  16. Processo analítico hierárquico na identificação de áreas favoráveis ao agroecossistema cafeeiro em escala municipal Analytical hierarchical process to identify favorable areas to the coffee crop agroecosystem at municipal scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Barros

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi delimitar áreas favoráveis ao agroecossistema cafeeiro, em quatro municípios do Estado de Minas Gerais, pela aplicação do processo analítico hierárquico (AHP. Uma função de ponderação aritmética foi obtida, com base nas premissas de favorabilidade à cafeicultura, considerando-se as seguintes variáveis: solo, declividade, orientação de vertentes, altimetria e as possíveis áreas de preservação permanente. Essa função permitiu combinar as condições adequadas ao cultivo do café e ressaltar as áreas com maior favorabilidade. Foi verificado que os quatro municípios diferem entre si quanto à favorabilidade ao agroecossistema cafeeiro; porém, ao se considerar apenas as áreas cultivadas com café, foi verificado que os municípios de Boa Esperança e Cristais não diferem entre si.The objective of this work was to delimitate favorable areas to the coffee agroecosystem, in four municipalities of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, using the analytical hierarchical process (AHP. An arithmetic pondering function was obtained, based on the favorability premises to coffee crop production, with regard to the following variables: soil, slope, slope aspect, altimetry, and areas that should be under permanent protection. This function allowed to combine the adequate conditions to coffee crop cultivation and gave emphasis to the most favorable areas. It was observed that all four municipalities were different in terms of their favorability to the coffee agroecosystem; however, when considering only the coffee cultivated areas, it was observed that the municipalities of Boa Esperança and Cristais were not significantly different.

  17. Optimization of processing conditions to improve antioxidant activities of apple juice and whey based novel beverage fermented by kefir grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabokbar, Nayereh; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Moosavi-Nasab, Marzieh

    2015-06-01

    A central composite design (CCD) was used to evaluate the effects of fermentation temperature (20-30 ºC) and kefir grains amount (2-8%w/v) on total phenolic content and antioxidant activities of apple juice and whey based novel beverage fermented by kefir grains. The response surface methodology (RSM) showed that the significant second-order polynomial regression equation with high R(2) (>0.86) was successfully fitted for all response as function of independent variable. The overall optimum region was found to be at the combined level of 7.56%w/v kefir grains and temperature of 24.82 ºC with the highest value for total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activities. At this optimum point TPC, 1, 1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging, metal chelating effect, reducing power, inhibition of linoleic acid autoxidation and inhibition of ascorbate autoxidation were 165.02 mgGA/l, 0.38 ml/1 ml, 0.757 (absorbance at 700 nm), 46.12 %, 65.33 % and 21 %, respectively. No significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between actual values and predicated values.

  18. Effect of Material and Process Atmosphere in the Preparation of Al-Ti-B Grain Refiner by SHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iban Vicario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Al-Ti-B master alloys are widely used in the aluminum industry as grain refiners for the control of the microstructure of the aluminum alloys. The SHS (self-propagating high-temperature synthesis is an ex situ method that uses exothermic reactions to sustain the chemical reaction in a combustion wave. The advantages of SHS are the low energy requirement, simplicity and product purity. However, the raw material used has to be very pure, with a very small size leading to the necessity of a reactor with a protective gas to produce the reaction. The purpose of this investigation is to fabricate SHS master alloys with commercial standard raw materials, with lower purity and higher grain size without a reactor or protective gas in order to (1 decrease the price and (2 improve the productivity of master alloy manufacturing. The possibility of using cheap borated salts instead of expensive pure boron has been studied. Different compositions of aluminum master alloy have been developed. Bigger TiB2 grain size has been obtained when using bigger commercial raw materials. Larger titanium powder can produce an aluminum master alloy with a maximum of 30% of aluminum without reactor. In comparison, SHS reaction is much more difficult when using finer titanium powder.

  19. Mathematical Model for the Mexican Coffee Market

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo, Gustavo Guerra; Moss, Charles B.

    2007-01-01

    The assumption that the production of quality coffee is more expensive than the production of coffee of less quality, also that market failures in the transmission of quality signals to producer lower the average quality of coffee produced industry. Used its simultaneous equations in three stage lest square we have found that some variable were significant; the size of the producer affects the share of sold cherry, the quality affects the international green coffee price of México and the qua...

  20. Heat of Combustion of Dried and Undried Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giso, Mathew; Amanuel, Samuel

    Globally, over two billion cups of coffee are consumed per day. During roasting, 15-20% of the weight of the coffee beans is lost. We studied the gasses released during the roasting process using an IR spectrometer and identified the evaporation profile of water as a function of temperature. The heat of combustion (Hºc) of the beans was also determined using an Isoperibol Oxygen-Bomb calorimeter and the Hºc of dry beans were determined to be 21.24 +/-0.13 MJ/kg while the Hºc of the wet beans were determined to be 19.56 +/-0.12 MJ/kg. This study can potentially lead to developing more economical and environmentally friendly techniques of roasting coffee beans. This work was partially supported by NSF-DMR: 1229142.

  1. Spinodal decomposition in fine grained materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A-rich grain boundary layer followed by a B-rich layer; the grain interior exhibits a spinodally decomposed microstructure, evolving slowly. Further, grain growth is suppressed completely during the decomposition process. Keywords. Spinodal decomposition; grain boundary effects; phase field models. 1. Introduction.

  2. Management zones in coffee cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João L. Jacintho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to apply precision agriculture techniques in coffee production, using correlation analysis in the definition of management zones. This work was carried out in a 22-ha area of coffee (Coffea arabica L., cv. ‘Topázio MG 1190’, which was sampled on a regular grid, using a topographic GPS, totaling 64 georeferenced samples (on average, 2.9 points per ha. Descriptive analysis was used in the data, followed by Pearson’s correlation analysis at 0.05 significance between soil chemical attributes, agronomic characteristics of the plants and altitude. It was possible to verify the correlation of soil chemical attributes, agronomic characteristics of the plants and altitude with coffee yield. Altitude was the variable most correlated with coffee yield through correlation analysis. Therefore, it was chosen as the best variable to define management zones and thematic maps capable to support coffee farmers. Three maps were generated to characterize the area in two, three and four management zones. There was a direct influence on mean yield.

  3. Coffee consumption and disease correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökcen, Büşra Başar; Şanlier, Nevin

    2017-08-30

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. It has primarily consumed due to its stimulant effect and unique taste since the ancient times. Afterwards, its consumption has been historically associated with a lower risk of some diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, cardiovascular disease and some type of cancer and thus it has also consumed due to health benefits. It contains many bioactive compounds such as caffeine, chlorogenic acids and diterpenoid alcohols which have so far been associated with many potential health benefits. For example, caffeine reduces risk of developing neurodegenerative disease and chlorogenic acids (CGA) and diterpene alcohols have many health benefits such as antioxidant and chemo-preventive. Coffee also have harmful effects. For example, diterpenoid alcohols increases serum homocysteine and cholesterol levels and thus it has adverse effects on cardiovascular system. Overall, the study that supports the health benefits of coffee is increasing. But, it is thought-provoking that the association with health benefits of coffee consumption and frequency at different levels in each study. For this reason, we aimed to examine the health effect of the coffee and how much consumption is to investigate whether it meets the claimed health benefits.

  4. Reconstruction of sediment provenance and transport processes from the surface textures of quartz grains from Late Pleistocene sandurs and an ice-marginal valley in NW Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Woronko Barbara; Pisarska-Jamroży Małgorzata; Loon A.J. (Tom) van

    2015-01-01

    During the Pomeranian phase of the Weichselian glaciation (~17–16 ka), the Toruń-Eberswalde ice-marginal valley (NW Poland and easternmost Germany) drained water from the Pomeranian ice sheet, while intensive aeolian process -es took place across Europe in the foreland of the Scandinavian ice sheet (‘European Sand Belt’). The micromorphology of the quartz grains in the Toruń-Eberswalde ice-marginal valley shows no traces of these aeolian processes, or only vague signs of aeolian a...

  5. Heavier smoking increases coffee consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørngaard, Johan H; Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Taylor, Amy E

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is evidence for a positive relationship between cigarette and coffee consumption in smokers. Cigarette smoke increases metabolism of caffeine, so this may represent a causal effect of smoking on caffeine intake. Methods: We performed Mendelian randomization analyses in the UK...... Biobank ( N  = 114 029), the Norwegian HUNT study ( N  = 56 664) and the Copenhagen General Population Study (CGPS) ( N  = 78 650). We used the rs16969968 genetic variant as a proxy for smoking heaviness in all studies and rs4410790 and rs2472297 as proxies for coffee consumption in UK Biobank and CGPS....... Analyses were conducted using linear regression and meta-analysed across studies. Results: Each additional cigarette per day consumed by current smokers was associated with higher coffee consumption (0.10 cups per day, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.17). There was weak evidence for an increase in tea consumption per...

  6. Quantification of fructans, galacto-oligosacharides and other short-chain carbohydrates in processed grains and cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiekierski, J R; Rosella, O; Rose, R; Liels, K; Barrett, J S; Shepherd, S J; Gibson, P R; Muir, J G

    2011-04-01

    Wholegrain grains and cereals contain a wide range of potentially protective factors that are relevant to gastrointestinal health. The prebiotics best studied are fructans [fructooligosaccharides (FOS), inulin] and galactooligosaccharides (GOS). These and other short-chain carbohydrates can also be poorly absorbed in the small intestine (named fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides and polyols; FODMAPs) and may have important implications for the health of the gut. In the present study, FODMAPs, including fructose in excess of glucose, FOS (nystose, kestose), GOS (raffinose, stachyose) and sugar polyols (sorbitol, mannitol), were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography with an evaporative light scattering detector. Total fructan was quantified using an enzymic hydrolysis method. Fifty-five commonly consumed grains, breakfast cereals, breads, pulses and biscuits were analysed. Total fructan were the most common short-chain carbohydrate present in cereal grain products and ranged (g per portion as eaten) from 1.12 g in couscous to 0 g in rice; 0.6 g in dark rye bread to 0.07 g in spelt bread; 0.96 g in wheat-free muesli to 0.11 g in oats; and 0.81 g in muesli fruit bar to 0.05 g in potato chips. Raffinose and stachyose were most common in pulses.   Composition tables including FODMAPs and prebiotics (FOS and GOS) that are naturally present in food will greatly assist research aimed at understanding their physiological role in the gut. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  7. Consumption of red and processed meat and refined grains for 4weeks decreases insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant adults: A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M

    2017-03-01

    Red and processed meat and refined grains are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Interventions are limited. We hypothesized that a diet high in red and processed meat and refined grains (HMD) would decrease insulin sensitivity compared to a diet high in whole grains, nuts, dairy and legumes with no red meat (HWD). Forty-nine subjects without diabetes [15 men and 34 women, age, 35.6±15.7 years, body mass index (BMI), 27±5.9kg/m(2)] underwent two 4-week weight-stable dietary interventions in a randomized crossover design. The insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was calculated from the last 30min of a continuous low-dose insulin (25mU/kg·h) and glucose (4mg/kg·min) infusion test (LDIGIT 120-150min) at the end of each diet. The population fell into two very discrete groups: those with a very low insulin response in the LDIGIT 120-150min on HMD (Group 156pmol/L, n=25). Group 2 had significantly higher insulin concentrations [(median and interquartile range) 153, 180 for HMD vs. 123, 149pmol/L for HWD; P=0.019] and glucose concentrations [(mean±standard deviation) 7.4±1.3 for HMD vs.6.7±1.2mmol/L for HWD; P=0.05], resulting in a significantly decreased ISI [(median and interquartile range) 21.1, 34.2 for HMD vs. 31.6, 39.4 for HWD; P=0.014] compared to HWD. Log ISI after HMD was significantly correlated with BMI (r=-0.5; P=0.009), fat mass (r=-0.55; P=0.004) and self-reported activity levels (r=-0.45; P=0.024). A dietary pattern high in red and processed meat and refined grains decreased insulin sensitivity compared to a dietary pattern high in whole grains, nuts, dairy products and legumes only in relatively insulin-resistant adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of Organic Grain Coatings by Surface-Mediated Reactions and the Consequences of This Process for Meteoritic Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    When hydrogen, nitrogen and CO are exposed to amorphous iron silicate surfaces at temperatures between 500 - 900K, a carbonaceous coating forms via Fischer-Tropsch type reactions. Under normal circumstances such a catalytic coating would impede or stop further reaction. However, we find that this coating is a better catalyst than the amorphous iron silicates that initiate these reactions. The formation of a self-perpetuating catalytic coating on grain surfaces could explain the rich deposits of macromolecular carbon found in primitive meteorites and would imply that protostellar nebulae should be rich in organic material. Many more experiments are needed to understand this chemical system and its application to protostellar nebulae.

  9. Multivariate analysis of sensory characteristics of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L. in the region of upper Paranaíba = Análise multivariada de características sensoriais de grãos de café de cultivares (Coffea arabica L. na região do alto Paranaíba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cláudio Pereira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the sensory characteristics of the grains of 21 cultivars of Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre from the essays of genetic improvement of EPAMIG, located in Patrocínio Municipality, Minas Gerais State, where they were collected through cloths stripping method and washed. Subsequently to dry (11 to 12% moisture b.u., we obtained the coffee designated as “natural”. The evaluated varieties were: Acaiá Cerrado MG 1474; Bourbon Vermelho DATERRA; Catiguá MG 1; Catiguá MG 2; Catuaí Amarelo IAC 62; Catuaí Vermelho IAC 15; H 419-3-1-4-2; H 419- 6-2 -5-2; H 419-6-2-5-3; H 419-6-2-7-3 Vermelho; H 493-1-2-10; H 514-7-10-1 Vermelho; H 514-7-10-6; H 515-4-2-2; H 518-3-6-1; Icatú Amarelo IAC 3282; MundoNovo 379-19; Mundo Novo IAC 376-4; Rubi MG 1192; Sacramento MG 1 and Topázio MG 1190, from 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 seasons. The cultivars according to the first principal component with notes above 80 points, regarded as superior drink according to attributes with the highest scores (flavor, sweetness, balance, acidity, clean drink, andaspect were: Catiguá MG2, Rubi MG 1192, 514-7-10-6 H, H 419-3-1-4-2, H 419-6-2-5-2, 493-1-2-10 H, H 514-7-10-1 Vermelho, Catiguá MG1, Sacramento MG1, 419-6-2-5-3 H, H 515-9-2-2 and Catuaí Amarelo IAC 62.O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar as características sensoriais dos grãos de 21 cultivares de (Coffea arabica L. provenientes do ensaio de melhoramento genético da Epamig, Fazenda Experimental dePatrocínio, Estado de Minas Gerais. Posteriormente à secagem (11 a 12% de umidade b.u., obteve-se o café designado como natural. Os frutos avaliados correspondiam às cultivares e progênies Acaiá Cerrado MG 1474; Bourbon Vermelho DATERRA; Catiguá MG 1; Catiguá MG 2; Catuaí Amarelo IAC 62; Catuaí Vermelho IAC 15; H 419-3-1-4-2; H 419-6-2-5-2; H 419-6-2-5-3; H 419-6-2-7-3 Vermelho; H 493-1-2-10; H 514-7-10-1 Vermelho; H 514-7-10-6; H 515-4-2-2; H 518-3-6-1; Icatu Amarelo

  10. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira-Neto Osmundo B; Souza Djair SL; Silva Maria CM; Albuquerque Érika VS; Barbosa Aulus EAD; Valencia Arnubio; Rocha Thales L; Grossi-de-Sa Maria F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hy...

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of a solar coffee maker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa-Montemayor, F.; Jaramillo, O.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Morelos CP 62580 (Mexico); del Rio, J.A. [Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Tranferencia Tecnologica, CCyTEM, Camino Temixco a Emiliano Zapata, Km 0.3, Colonia Emiliano Zapata, Morelos CP 62760 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we present a novel solar concentrating application, a coffee brewing system using a satellite TV mini-Dish concentrator coupled to a stovetop espresso coffee maker. We present a theoretical model for the thermal behavior of the water in the lower chamber of the coffee maker. We validate the model obtaining good agreement with the experimental results. Our findings indicate that the coffee brewing system works, it takes 30-50 min to complete its task. The model and our practical experience encourage us to improve the concentration device in order to obtain a useful solar coffee maker, using the theoretical model as a safe guide to achieve this. (author)

  12. Biodiesel Production from Spent Coffee Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinová, Lenka; Bartošová, Alica; Sirotiak, Maroš

    2017-06-01

    The residue after brewing the spent coffee grounds is an oil-containing waste material having a potential of being used as biodiesel feedstock. Biodiesel production from the waste coffee grounds oil involves collection and transportation of coffee residue, drying, oil extraction, and finally production of biodiesel. Different methods of oil extraction with organic solvents under different conditions show significant differences in the extraction yields. In the manufacturing of biodiesel from coffee oil, the level of reaction completion strongly depends on the quality of the feedstock oil. This paper presents an overview of oil extraction and a method of biodiesel production from spent coffee grounds.

  13. Biodiesel Production from Spent Coffee Grounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinová Lenka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The residue after brewing the spent coffee grounds is an oil-containing waste material having a potential of being used as biodiesel feedstock. Biodiesel production from the waste coffee grounds oil involves collection and transportation of coffee residue, drying, oil extraction, and finally production of biodiesel. Different methods of oil extraction with organic solvents under different conditions show significant differences in the extraction yields. In the manufacturing of biodiesel from coffee oil, the level of reaction completion strongly depends on the quality of the feedstock oil. This paper presents an overview of oil extraction and a method of biodiesel production from spent coffee grounds.

  14. Coffee consumption prevents fibrosis in a rat model that mimics secondary biliary cirrhosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Jonathan; Zarco, Natanael; Hernández-Aquino, Erika; Galicia-Moreno, Marina; Favari, Liliana; Segovia, José; Muriel, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Investigations demonstrated that oxidative stress plays an important role in injury promotion in cholestatic liver disease. We hypothesized that coffee attenuates cholestasis-induced hepatic necrosis and fibrosis via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic properties. The major aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective properties of coffee and caffeine in a model of chronic bile duct ligation (BDL) in male Wistar rats. Liver injury was induced by 28-day BDL, and conventional coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or caffeine was administered daily. After treatment, the hepatic oxidative status was estimated by measuring lipid peroxidation, the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio, and glutathione peroxidase. Fibrosis was assessed by measuring the liver hydroxyproline content. The transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, and interleukin-10 proteins and mRNAs were measured by Western blot and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Conventional coffee suppressed most of the changes produced by BDL; however, caffeine showed better antifibrotic effects. Coffee demonstrated antioxidant properties by restoring the redox equilibrium, and it also prevented the elevation of liver enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen depletion. Interestingly, coffee and caffeine administration prevented collagen increases. Western blot assays showed decreased expression levels of transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen 1 in the coffee- and caffeine-treated BDL groups. Similarly, coffee decreased the mRNA levels of these proteins. We conclude that coffee prevents liver cirrhosis induced by BDL by attenuating the oxidant processes, blocking hepatic stellate cell activation, and downregulating the main profibrotic molecules involved in extracellular matrix deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CoffeeScript application development

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Ian

    2013-01-01

    CoffeeScript Application Development is a practical, hands-on guide with step-by-step instructions. Follow the smooth and easy tutorial approach, covering examples that build in complexity. By the final chapter you'll be wondering why you didn't try CoffeeScript sooner.If you are a JavaScript developer who wants to save time and add power to your code, then this is the book that will help you do it. With minimal fuss you will learn a whole new language which will reduce your application development time from weeks to days.

  16. Tobacco use, occupation, coffee, various nutrients, and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G R; Burch, J D; Miller, A B; Cook, G M; Esteve, J; Morrison, B; Gordon, P; Chambers, L W; Fodor, G; Winsor, G M

    1980-04-01

    In a Canadian population-based case-control study of 480 males and 152 female case-control pairs, the relative risk for development of bladder cancer for ever used versus never used cigarettes was 3.9 for males and 2.4 for females, with a dose-response relationship in both sexes. A reduced risk was associated with the use of filter cigarettes compared to nonfilter cigarettes. After control for cigarette usage, a significant risk was noted for male pipe smokers. For male ex-smokers the risk after 15 years of no smoking was less than one-half that of current male smokers. Bladder cancer risk was found for workers in the chemical, rubber, photographic, petroleum, medical, and food processing industries among males and for workers occupationally exposed to dust or fumes among both sexes. Bladder cancer risk was elevated for males consuming all types of coffee, regular coffee, and instant coffee and for females consuming instant coffee, but no dose-response relationship was found. Risk was found for males consuming water from nonpublic supples but not for females. No risk was observed in males or females consuming nitrate-containing foods, beverages other than coffee, or fiddlehead greens. Hair dye usage in females and phenacetin usage in males and females carried no risk. Divergent findings by area for aspirin suggested that an overall association was not causal. Reevaluation of the data on artificial sweeteners confirmed a significant bladder cancer risk in males and a dose-response relationship. The cumulated population attributable risk for bladder cancer was 90% for males from cigarette smoking, industrial exposure, and exposure to nonpublic water supplies and 29% for females from cigarette smoking, industrial exposure, and instant coffee consumption.

  17. Analysis of acrylamide in coffee and dietary exposure to acrylamide from coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granby, Kit; Fagt, Sisse

    2004-01-01

    An analytical method for analysing acrylamide in coffee was validated. The analysis of prepared coffee includes a comprehensive clean-up using multimode solid-phase extraction (SPE) by automatic SPE equipment and detection by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray...... in the positive mode. The recoveries of acrylamide in ready-to-drink coffee spiked with 5 and 10 mug l(-1) were 96 +/- 14% and 100 +/- 8%, respectively. Within laboratory reproducibility for the same spiking levels were 14% and 9%, respectively. Coffee samples (n = 25) prepared twice by coffee machines and twice...... by a French Press Cafetiere coffee maker contained 8 +/- 3 mug l(-1) and 9 +/- 3 mug l(-1) acrylamide. Five ready-to-drink instant coffee prepared twice contained 8 +/- 2 mug l(-1). Hence, the results do not show significant differences in the acrylamide contents in ready-to-drink coffee prepared by coffee...

  18. Biological systems combined for the treatment of coffee processing wastewater: II - Removal of nutrients and phenolic compounds - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.13628

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Fia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Three treatment systems consisting of anaerobic filters with upward flow followed by constructed wetland systems (CW were evaluated for the removal of nutrients and phenolic compounds, in the treatment of coffee processing wastewater (WCP in Viçosa, Minas Gerais State. Filters were made of PVC (1.5 m high and 0.35 m diameter filled with gravel # 2 and CW were made of wooden boxes (1.5 m long, 0.4 m high and 0.5 m wide sealed by HDPE geomembrane and filled with gravel ‘zero’. The WCP had the pH adjusted with lime to values close to 7.0 and the nutrient concentration changed to obtain a BOD/N/P ratio of 100/5/1. As a result, hydraulic retention times longer than 160 h in all treatment systems during phase III had not promoted greater efficiencies for removal compared with the phase I, because the recovery time of the systems was inadequate. The F1+CW1 system that received the lowest organic load, showed a satisfactory performance with regard to the removal of nutrients (above 50%.  

  19. The benefits of coffee on skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks-Naylor, Amie J

    2015-12-15

    Coffee is consumed worldwide with greater than a billion cups of coffee ingested every day. Epidemiological studies have revealed an association of coffee consumption with reduced incidence of a variety of chronic diseases as well as all-cause mortality. Current research has primarily focused on the effects of coffee or its components on various organ systems such as the cardiovascular system, with relatively little attention on skeletal muscle. Summary of current literature suggests that coffee has beneficial effects on skeletal muscle. Coffee has been shown to induce autophagy, improve insulin sensitivity, stimulate glucose uptake, slow the progression of sarcopenia, and promote the regeneration of injured muscle. Much more research is needed to reveal the full scope of benefits that coffee consumption may exert on skeletal muscle structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Processing technologies and cell wall degrading enzymes to improve nutritional value of dried distillers grain with solubles for animal feed: an in vitro digestion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sonja; Pustjens, Annemieke M; Kabel, Mirjam A; Salazar-Villanea, Sergio; Hendriks, Wouter H; Gerrits, Walter J J

    2013-09-18

    Currently, the use of maize dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS) as protein source in animal feed is limited by the inferior protein quality and high levels of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP). Processing technologies and enzymes that increase NSP degradability might improve digestive utilization of DDGS, enhancing its potential as a source of nutrients for animals. The effects of various combinations of processing technologies and commercial enzyme mixtures on in vitro digestion and subsequent fermentation of DDGS were tested. Wet-milling, extrusion, and mild hydrothermal acid treatment increased in vitro protein digestion but had no effect on NSP. Severe hydrothermal acid treatments, however, effectively solubilized NSP (48-78%). Addition of enzymes did not affect NSP solubilization in unprocessed or processed DDGS. Although the cell wall structure of DDGS seems to be resistant to most milder processing technologies, in vitro digestion of DDGS can be effectively increased by severe hydrothermal acid treatments.

  1. The influence of beverage composition on delivery of phenolic compounds from coffee and tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2010-04-26

    Epidemiological data suggest that consumption of coffee and tea is associated with a reduced risk of several chronic and degenerative diseases including cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, obesity and neurodegenerative disorders. Both coffee and tea are a rich source of phenolic compounds including chlorogenic acids in coffee; and flavan-3-ols as well as complex theaflavins and thearubigens in tea. Coffee and tea are two of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and thus represent a significant opportunity to positively affect disease risk and outcomes globally. Central to this opportunity is a need to better understand factors that may affect the bioavailability of specific phenolic components from coffee and tea based beverages. An overview of the phenolic composition of coffee and tea is discussed in the context of how processing and composition might influence phenolic profiles and bioavailability of individual phenolic components. Specifically, the impact of beverage formulation, the extent and type of processing and the influence of digestion on stability, bioavailability and metabolism of bioactive phenolics from tea and coffee are discussed. The impact of co-formulation with ascorbic acid and other phytochemicals are discussed as strategies to improve absorption of these health promoting phytochemicals. A better understanding of how the beverage composition impacts phenolic profiles and their bioavailability is critical to development of beverage products designed to deliver specific health benefits. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of mycotoxins in coffee and risk assessment in Spanish adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moraleja, A; Font, G; Mañes, J; Ferrer, E

    2015-12-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic compounds produced by fungal secondary metabolism that cause toxicological effects. Coffee is a highly popular beverage that is susceptible to contamination by mycotoxigenic fungi. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of the following 21 mycotoxins in coffee using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS-IT): aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2; ochratoxin A; nivalenol; deoxynivalenol; 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol; 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol; diacetoxyscirpenol; neosolaniol; T-2 and HT-2 toxin; sterigmatocystin; enniatin A, A1, B, and B1; beauvericin; and fumonisin B1 and B2. We aimed to determine differences by coffee process (coffee maker, electrical machine, soluble and traditional Turkish process) and to calculate the estimated daily intake (EDI) and risk assessment of mycotoxins from coffee consumption using deterministic approach at various scenarios of food consumption in Spanish adolescents and adults. The results demonstrate that all studied mycotoxins were detected in samples with mean concentrations ranging from 0.69 µg/kg to 282.89 µg/kg. Eleven percent of samples did not show contamination with legislated mycotoxins. Only 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol, neosolaniol, fumonisin B1, and ochratoxin A exhibited significant differences between methods of coffee brewing. The results show that coffee intake does not represent a potential risk for consumers with respect to individual mycotoxin contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Volatile organic compound flux from manure of cattle fed diets differing in grain processing method and co-product inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Kristin; Parker, David B.; Cole, N. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Odor emissions from livestock production have become increasingly important in the past decade. Odors derived from animal feeding operations are caused by odorous VOC emitted from the mixture of feces and urine, as well as feed and silage which may be experiencing microbial fermentation. Distillers grains are a by-product of corn grain fermentation used to produce fuel ethanol, and this industry has grown rapidly throughout the U.S. in past years. Therefore, the use of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS) in feedlot cattle diets has also increased. The objective of this research was to determine specific VOC emissions from feces and urine or a mixture of both, from cattle fed steam flaked or dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets containing either 0% or 30% WDGS. Flux of dimethyl trisulfide was greater from feces of cattle fed DRC than steam-flaked corn (SFC) diets. No other differences in flux from feces were detected across dietary treatments for phenol, 4-methylphenol, indole, skatole, dimethyl disulfide, and flux of volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, isobutyric, butyric, isovaleric, and valeric acids (P > 0.15). Flux of skatole, acetic acid, and valeric acid from urine was greater for cattle fed SFC than DRC diets (P < 0.05). Moreover, dimethyl disulfide flux was greater for cattle fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). When evaluating WDGS inclusion in the diet, flux of acetic acid and heptanoic acid from urine was greater when cattle were fed diets containing 0% WDGS than 30% WDGS (P < 0.05). When combining urine and feces in the ratio in which they were excreted from the animal, flux of propionic acid was greater when cattle were fed DRC vs. SFC diets (P = 0.05). Based on these results, the majority of the VOC, VFA, and odor flux from cattle feeding operations is from the urine. Therefore, dietary strategies to reduce odor from cattle feeding facilities should primarily focus on reducing excretion of odorous compounds in the urine.

  4. Landscape context and scale differentially impact coffee leaf rust, coffee berry borer, and coffee root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, Jacques; Romero-Gurdián, Alí; Cruz-Cuellar, Héctor F; Declerck, Fabrice A J

    2012-03-01

    Crop pest and disease incidences at plot scale vary as a result of landscape effects. Two main effects can be distinguished. First, landscape context provides habitats of variable quality for pests, pathogens, and beneficial and vector organisms. Second, the movements of these organisms are dependent on the connectivity status of the landscape. Most of the studies focus on indirect effects of landscape context on pest abundance through their predators and parasitoids, and only a few on direct effects on pests and pathogens. Here we studied three coffee pests and pathogens, with limited or no pressure from host-specific natural enemies, and with widely varying life histories, to test their relationships with landscape context: a fungus, Hemileia vastatrix, causal agent of coffee leaf rust; an insect, the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); and root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp. Their incidence was assessed in 29 coffee plots from Turrialba, Costa Rica. In addition, we characterized the landscape context around these coffee plots in 12 nested circular sectors ranging from 50 to 1500 m in radius. We then performed correlation analysis between proportions of different land uses at different scales and coffee pest and disease incidences. We obtained significant positive correlations, peaking at the 150 m radius, between coffee berry borer abundance and proportion of coffee in the landscape. We also found significant positive correlations between coffee leaf rust incidence and proportion of pasture, peaking at the 200 m radius. Even after accounting for plot level predictors of coffee leaf rust and coffee berry borer through covariance analysis, the significance of landscape structure was maintained. We hypothesized that connected coffee plots favored coffee berry borer movements and improved its survival. We also hypothesized that wind turbulence, produced by low-wind-resistance land uses such as pasture, favored removal of coffee

  5. The role of whole-wheat grain and wheat and rye ingredients on the digestion and fermentation processes in the gut - a model experiment with pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legall, Maud; Serena, Anja; Jørgensen, Henry

    2009-01-01

    The effect of wheat and rye breads made from white wheat flour with added refined fibre (WFL), whole-wheat grain, wheat aleurone flour (WAF) or rye aleurone flour (RAF) on digestion and fermentation processes in the gut was studied in a model experiment with pigs. The diets were similar in dietary...... of the wheat-based diets primarily due to the higher intestinal viscosity. The DF composition had an impact on (P,0001) the site for fibre degradation in the large intestine. Thus, AX of the WAF bread, with the lowest degree of substitution, were fermented as much in the caecum as in the colon, whereas AX...

  6. The Impact of Market Reform Programmes on Coffee Prices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of coffee production, marketing and trade. The institutionalization of coffee ... years and its demise meant allowing coffee prices to vary based on the market forces of supply and demand. Also the purpose of liberalizing coffee .... question with respect to effects of reform policies on the direction and magnitude of coffee price.

  7. The composition of wax and oil in green coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folstar, P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the isolation of wax and oil from green coffee beans were studied and a method for the quantitative extraction of coffee oil from the beans was introduced. Coffee wax, coffee oil and wax-free coffee oil as well as the unsaponifiable matter prepared from each were fractionated by column

  8. Supplemental selenium improves wheat grain yield and quality through alterations in biochemical processes under normal and water deficit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Fahim; Ashraf, M Y; Ahmad, R; Waraich, E A; Shabbir, R N; Bukhari, M A

    2015-05-15

    The paper mainly reported the effects of exogenous selenium (Se) supply (Se seed priming, Se fertigation and Se foliar spray) on physiological and antioxidant system of wheat aiming to clarify its effect on yield and nutritional quality of wheat under both normal and water deficit conditions. Water stress markedly decreased the grain Se, iron (Fe), phosphorous (P), zinc (Zn) and magnesium (Mg) contents. Supplemental Se (Na2SeO4) improved the yield and quality of water stressed plants due to enhancement in the production of osmoprotectants and increased activity of antioxidant enzymes. The foliar spray of Se was more effective than Se fertigation and Se seed treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first elaborate study that involved various Se application methods to evaluate the efficiency of Se supply to plants that would be crucial to develop better understanding of Se translocation and accumulation within crop plants under drought stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term reticuloruminal pH dynamics and markers of liver health in early-lactating cows of various parities fed diets differing in grain processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, E; Khol-Parisini, A; Gruber, L; Gasteiner, J; Abdel-Raheem, Sh M; Zebeli, Q

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the long-term effect of feeding barley grain steeped in lactic acid (La) with or without thermal treatment on reticuloruminal pH dynamics and metabolic activity of the liver in 12 primiparous and 18 multiparous early-lactating dairy cows. All cows were included on d 21 postpartum and sampled until d 90 postpartum. Cows were fed a diet based on differently processed ground barley grain: untreated grain (control diet, CON), or grain treated with 1% La alone for 24 h before feeding (La), or with an additional oven-heating at 55°C for 12 h (LaH). The reticuloruminal pH and temperature were measured via indwelling sensors that allowed for continuous (every 10min) and long-term measurement from d 21 to 80 postpartum. Blood samples were taken on d 21, 40, and 90 of lactation and analyzed for liver enzymes aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase, and glutamate dehydrogenase, as well as bilirubin, bile acids, and serum amyloid A. Dry matter intake was higher in multiparous cows (20.7±0.27 kg/d) compared with primiparous cows (18.2±0.33 kg/d), but was not affected by dietary treatment. Overall, the relatively short duration (51±5min/d) of reticuloruminal pH pH effect of feeding the La-treated barley on time duration of pH pH readings and shorter periods in which the ruminal pH dropped below the threshold of pH 5.8. The reticuloruminal temperature was not affected by dietary treatment, whereas parity affected the time duration of reticuloruminal temperature >39.5°C, being 60±19min/d shorter in primiparous cows. The measured activities of the liver enzymes AST, gamma-glutamyltransferase, and glutamate dehydrogenase, as well as bilirubin, bile acids, and the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, were not affected by grain feeding. Additionally, only one small effect of parity on investigated serum variables was noticed, showing slightly but significantly higher values of AST in multiparous (80.5±1.4 U/L) compared

  10. Double Coffee opens in China

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Läti suursaadik Ingrida Levrence avas esimese Double Coffee kohviku Hiina pealinnas Pekingi südames. Rahvusvaheline kohvikukett kavatseb laieneda mõne kohviku võrra igal aastal. Seni tegutsetakse Lätis, Eestis, Leedus, Ukrainas ja Valgevenes

  11. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  12. Coffee consumption and incident dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Mirza (Saira); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); R.F.A.G. de Bruijn (Renée); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); M.A. Ikram (Arfan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractCoffee consumption has been frequently reported for its protective association with incident dementia. However, this association has mostly been reported in studies with short follow-up periods, and it remains unclear to what extent reverse causality influences this association. Studying

  13. Integrated volarization of spent coffee grounds to biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrahtu Haile

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a renewable energy source produced from natural oils and fats, and is being used as a substitute for petroleum diesel. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using spent coffee grounds for biodiesel production and its by-products to produce pelletized fuel, which is expected to help the biodiesel production process achieve zero waste. For this experiment, spent coffee grounds sample was collected from Kaldis coffee, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Extraction of the spent coffee grounds oil was then conducted using n-hexane, ether and mixture of isopropanol to hexane ratio (50:50 %vol, and resulted in oil yield of 15.6, 17.5 and 21.5 %w/w respectively. A two-step process was used in biodiesel production with conversion of about 82 %w/w. The biodiesel quality parameters were evaluated using the American Standard for Testing Material (ASTM D 6751. The major fatty acid compositions found by Gas chromatography were linoleic acid (37.6%, palmitic acid (39.8%, oleic (11.7%, and stearic acid (8.6%. In addition, solid waste remaining after oil extraction and glycerin ratio (glycerin content from 20-40% was evaluated for fuel pellet (19.3-21.6 MJ/Kg applications. Therefore, the results of this work could offer a new perspective to the production of biofuel from waste materials without growing plants and/or converting food to fuel.

  14. Optimal conditions and operational parameters for conversion of Robusta coffee residues in a continuous stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Msambichaka, B.L.; Kivaisi, A.K.; Rubindamayugi, M.S.T. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This experiment studied the possibility of optimizing anaerobic degradation, developing microbial adaptation and establishing long term process stability in a Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) running on Robusta coffee hulls as feed substrate. Decrease in lag phase and increase in methane production rate in batch culture experiment conducted before and after process stabilization of each operational phase in the CSTR clearly suggested that microbial adaptation to increasing coffee percentage composition was attained. Through gradual increase of coffee percentage composition, from 10% coffee, 2% VS, 20 days HRT and a 1 g VS/1/day loading rate to 80% coffee, 4.5% VS, 12 days HRT and a loading rate of 3 g VS/1/day the CSTR system was optimized at a maximum methane yield of 535 ml/g VS. Again it was possible to attain long term process stability at the above mentioned optimal operational parameters for a further 3 month period. (au)

  15. The influence of slow cooling on Y211 size and content in single-grain YBCO bulk superconductor through the infiltration-growth process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouerghi, A [Systems and Applied Mechanics Laboratory LASMAP, Polytechnic School of Tunisia, Rue El Kawarezmi La Marsa 743, Université de Carthage Tunis (Tunisia); Moutalbi, N., E-mail: nahed.moutalbi@yahoo.fr [Systems and Applied Mechanics Laboratory LASMAP, Polytechnic School of Tunisia, Rue El Kawarezmi La Marsa 743, Université de Carthage Tunis (Tunisia); Noudem, J.G. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN (UMR-CNRS 6508), Université de Caen-Basse-Normandie, F-14050 Caen (France); LUSAC, Université de Caen-Basse-Normandie F-50130 Cherbourg-Octeville (France); M' chirgui, A. [Systems and Applied Mechanics Laboratory LASMAP, Polytechnic School of Tunisia, Rue El Kawarezmi La Marsa 743, Université de Carthage Tunis (Tunisia)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • YBCO bulk superconductors are produced by optimized Seeded Infiltration and Growth process. • The slow cooling time, in a fixed slow cooling temperature window, affects considerably the surface morphology and the bulk’s microstructure. • The Y211 particle’s size and content depend on the slow cooling time and its distribution behavior changes from one position to another. • There is an optimum slow cooling time, estimated to 88h, over which the shrinkage for both the liquid phase and the Y211 pellet is maximal, without any improvement of the crystal grain growth. • The magnetic trapped flux distribution for a given sample brings out the single grain characteristic. - Abstract: Highly textured YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ} (Y123) superconductors were produced using modified Textured Top Seeded Infiltration Growth (TSIG) process. The liquid source is made of only Y123 powder whereas the solid source is composed of Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} (Y211) powder. We aim to control the amount of liquid that infiltrates the solid pellet, which in turn controls the final amount of Y{sub 2}BaCuO{sub 5} particles in Y123 matrix. The effect of the slow cooling kinetics on sample morphology, on grain growth and on final microstructure was too investigated. It is shown that appropriate slow cooling time may also contribute to the control of the amount of Y211 inclusions in the final structure of Y123 bulk. We report herein the Y211 particle size and density distribution in the whole Y123 matrix. The present work proves that finest Y211 particles locate under the seed and that their size and density increase with distance from the seed.

  16. Antioxidant Activity of Fermented and Nonfermented Coffee (Coffea arabica Pulp Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Saucedo-Castañeda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee pulp contains natural antioxidants like hydroxycinnamic acids, most of which are covalently linked to the cell wall. These compounds can be released by fermentation or enzymatic processes. In this study, the antioxidant properties of fermented and nonfermented coffee pulp have been evaluated. Coffee pulp was fermented by solid-state fermentation using the fungus Aspergillus tamarii. Fermented and nonfermented samples of coffee pulp were extracted with aqueous methanol followed by alkaline hydrolysis. In both cases, the total polyphenol concentration was quantified by Folin-Ciocalteu method, then hydroxycinnamic acids were concentrated using ethyl acetate and quantified by HPLC. The antioxidant properties of samples were determined by radical monocation of 2,2’-azinobis-( 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid [ABTS]·+: the antioxidant activity was determined by kinetic parameters known as ED50, tED50 and antiradical efficiency (AE. Fermented extracts containing free hydroxycinnamic acids showed better antiradical activity against [ABTS]·+ than the other nonfermented ones. There were no significant differences in the total content of polyphenols in fermented and nonfermented coffee pulp, but the content of total hydroxycinnamic acids was higher in the nonfermented coffee pulp extracts (47.1 g/kg than in the fermented coffee pulp (30.9 g/kg. Nevertheless, the fermentation process increased the fraction of free hydroxycinnamic acids (47 % and consequently decreased those covalently linked to the cell wall. The results of the antioxidant activity assays could be explained by the presence of free hydroxycinnamic acids. Fermented coffee pulp assays showed that free hydroxycinnamic acids were metabolised by A. tamarii. This study shows the potential of using coffee pulp as a natural source of antioxidants.

  17. The Impact of Coffee on Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieber, Karen

    2017-11-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular and widely consumed beverages worldwide due to its stimulating effects on the central nervous system as well as its taste and aroma. Coffee is a complex mixture of more than 800 volatile compounds whereas caffeine and chlorogenic acids are the most common compounds. During the last years, coffee has progressively moved to a less negative position on health due to its better-known pharmacology. Caffeine, e.g., in a cup of coffee, appears to exert most of its effects through an antagonism of the adenosine receptors. Novel approaches in epidemiological studies and experimental researches suggest that coffee consumption may help to prevent several chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and liver disease. Most prospective cohort studies have not found coffee consumption to be associated with a significantly increased cardiovascular disease risk. There is also evidence that decaffeinated coffee may, in some respect, have similar benefits as regular coffee, indicating that besides caffeine other components contribute to the health protecting effects. For adults consuming moderate amounts of coffee (3 - 4 cups/d providing 300 - 400 mg/d of caffeine), there is little evidence of health risks and some evidence of health benefits. This review provides up-to-date information about coffee on health. Topics addressed include the cardiovascular system, liver diseases, and diabetes as well as gastrointestinal disorders. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Differentiation of market coffee and its infusions in view of their mineral composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grembecka, Malgorzata; Malinowska, Ewa; Szefer, Piotr. E-mail: pszef@amg.gda.pl

    2007-09-20

    The concentrations of 14 elements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) were determined in market coffee samples after dry mineralisation of both dry samples and infusions evaporated to dryness. The total metal contents were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) using deuterium-background correction. Phosphorus was determined in the form of phosphomolybdate by spectrophotometric method. Reliability of the procedure was checked by the analysis of the certified reference materials Tea (NCS DC 73351), Cabbage (IAEA-359) and Spinach leaves (NIST-1570). It was concluded, based on RDA calculated for essential metals, that coffee infusions are not an important source of bioelements in human diet. In the case of toxic elements Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) was estimated and there is no health hazard associated with exposure to Cd and Pb via coffee consumption. Significant correlation coefficients (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) were found between concentrations of some metals in coffee. Factor analysis and canonical analysis were applied to the data processing in order to characterise the market coffee samples. The 12 metals determined were considered as chemical descriptors of each sample. Based on the mineral composition, it was possible to differentiate chemometrically particular types of coffee distinguishing arabica from robusta, ground from instant coffee, and their infusions.

  19. Differentiation of market coffee and its infusions in view of their mineral composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembecka, Małgorzata; Malinowska, Ewa; Szefer, Piotr

    2007-09-20

    The concentrations of 14 elements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) were determined in market coffee samples after dry mineralisation of both dry samples and infusions evaporated to dryness. The total metal contents were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) using deuterium-background correction. Phosphorus was determined in the form of phosphomolybdate by spectrophotometric method. Reliability of the procedure was checked by the analysis of the certified reference materials Tea (NCS DC 73351), Cabbage (IAEA-359) and Spinach leaves (NIST-1570). It was concluded, based on RDA calculated for essential metals, that coffee infusions are not an important source of bioelements in human diet. In the case of toxic elements Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) was estimated and there is no health hazard associated with exposure to Cd and Pb via coffee consumption. Significant correlation coefficients (p<0.001, p<0.01 and p<0.05) were found between concentrations of some metals in coffee. Factor analysis and canonical analysis were applied to the data processing in order to characterise the market coffee samples. The 12 metals determined were considered as chemical descriptors of each sample. Based on the mineral composition, it was possible to differentiate chemometrically particular types of coffee distinguishing arabica from robusta, ground from instant coffee, and their infusions.

  20. Ochratoxigenic fungi associated with green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L. in conventional and organic cultivation in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela de Fátima Rezende

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The genera Aspergillus comprises species that produce mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin. These are cosmopolitan species, natural contaminants of agricultural products. In coffee grains, the most important Aspergillus species in terms of the risk of presenting mycotoxins belong to the genera Aspergillus Section Circumdati and Section Nigri. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of isolated ochratoxigenic fungi of coffee grains from organic and conventional cultivation from the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil, as well as to evaluate which farming system presents higher contamination risk by ochratoxin A (OTA produced by fungi. Thirty samples of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L. were analysed, being 20 of them of conventional coffee grains and 10 of them organic. The microbiological analysis was done with the Direct Plating Technique in a Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC media. The identification was done based on the macro and micro morphological characteristics and on the toxigenic potential with the Plug Agar technique. From the 30 samples analysed, 480 filamentous fungi of the genera Aspergillus of the Circumdati and Nigri Sections were isolated. The ochratoxigenic species identified were: Aspergillus auricoumus, A. ochraceus, A. ostianus, A. niger and A. niger Aggregate. The most frequent species which produces ochratoxin A among the isolated ones was A. ochraceus, corresponding to 89.55%. There was no significant difference regarding the presence of ochratoxigenic A. ochreceus between the conventional and organic cultivation systems, which suggests that the contamination risk is similar for both cultivation systems.

  1. Ochratoxigenic fungi associated with green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) in conventional and organic cultivation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Rezende, Elisângela; Borges, Josiane Gonçalves; Cirillo, Marcelo Ângelo; Prado, Guilherme; Paiva, Leandro Carlos; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The genera Aspergillus comprises species that produce mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin. These are cosmopolitan species, natural contaminants of agricultural products. In coffee grains, the most important Aspergillus species in terms of the risk of presenting mycotoxins belong to the genera Aspergillus Section Circumdati and Section Nigri. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of isolated ochratoxigenic fungi of coffee grains from organic and conventional cultivation from the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil, as well as to evaluate which farming system presents higher contamination risk by ochratoxin A (OTA) produced by fungi. Thirty samples of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L.) were analysed, being 20 of them of conventional coffee grains and 10 of them organic. The microbiological analysis was done with the Direct Plating Technique in a Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC) media. The identification was done based on the macro and micro morphological characteristics and on the toxigenic potential with the Plug Agar technique. From the 30 samples analysed, 480 filamentous fungi of the genera Aspergillus of the Circumdati and Nigri Sections were isolated. The ochratoxigenic species identified were: Aspergillus auricoumus, A. ochraceus, A. ostianus, A. niger and A. niger Aggregate. The most frequent species which produces ochratoxin A among the isolated ones was A. ochraceus, corresponding to 89.55%. There was no significant difference regarding the presence of ochratoxigenic A. ochreceus between the conventional and organic cultivation systems, which suggests that the contamination risk is similar for both cultivation systems.

  2. Q0 Improvement of Large-Grain Multi-Cell Cavities by Using JLab's Standard ILC EP Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, K. X. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China); Lu, X. Y. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhao, K. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    As reported previously at the Berlin workshop, applying the JLab standard ILC electropolishing (EP) recipe on previously buffered chemical polishing (BCP) etched fine-grain multi-cell cavities results in improvement both in gradient and Q{sub 0}. We recently had the opportunity to experiment with two 1300 MHz 9-cell large-gain niobium cavities manufactured by JLab and Peking University. Both cavities were initially BCP etched and further processed by using JLab's standard ILC EP recipe. Due to fabrication defects, these two cavities only reached a gradient in the range of 20-30 MV/m. Interestingly both cavities demonstrated significant Q{sub 0} improvement in the gradient range of 15-20 MV/m. At 2K, a Q{sub 0} value of 2E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. At a reduced temperature of 1.8K, a Q{sub 0} value of 3E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. These results suggest that a possible path for obtaining higher Q{sub 0} in the medium gradient range is to use the large-grain material for cavity fabrication and EP and low temperature bake for cavity processing.

  3. Coffee brew melanoidins Structural and Functional Properties of Brown-Colored Coffee Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekedam, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this thesis was the identification of structural and functional properties of coffee brew melanoidins, and their formation mechanisms, that are formed upon roasting of coffee beans.

  4. Analysis of Energy Characteristics of Rice and Coffee Husks Blends

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuthbert F. Mhilu

    2014-01-01

    .... This paper reports work done to determine energy characteristics of rice and coffee husks. The results show that coffee husks have better energy quality than rice husks, while heating values of coffee are 18.34 MJ/kg...

  5. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira-Neto Osmundo B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei, is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an α-amylase inhibitor gene (α-AI1, which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. Results We transformed C. arabica with the α-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (α-AI1 from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L. The presence of the α-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against α-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum α-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the α-AI1 protein against H. hampei α-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. Conclusions This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee.

  6. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an α-amylase inhibitor gene (α-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. Results We transformed C. arabica with the α-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (α-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the α-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against α-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum α-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the α-AI1 protein against H. hampei α-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. Conclusions This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee. PMID:20565807

  7. Alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits alpha-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Souza, Djair S L; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Valencia, Arnubio; Rocha, Thales L; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2010-06-17

    Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an alpha-amylase inhibitor gene (alpha-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. We transformed C. arabica with the alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (alpha-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the alpha-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against alpha-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum alpha-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the alpha-AI1 protein against H. hampei alpha-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee.

  8. Evaluation of an ergonomics intervention among Nicaraguan coffee harvesting workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Stewart, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated an ergonomics intervention among Nicaraguan coffee harvesting workers, using electromyography and questionnaire survey techniques. Nicaraguan researchers were involved in the study so that they could gain hands-on experience with ergonomics research and applications, and eventually be the specialists conducting ergonomics interventions in Nicaraguan workplaces. Coffee harvesting activities were studied individually and physical hazards were identified accordingly. The results showed decreased muscle loading on the erector spinae muscle and improved comfort reporting in the back region compared to the commonly used baskets. This fulfils the design objective of a newly developed bag that was used in the intervention to reduce physical workload on the coffee harvesting workers. Workers' opinion survey results showed some issues related to the size of the new bag and the lumbar-shoulder belt mechanism. This information can be used in the modification of the bag in the next design. Key players in the process have been identified. Stimulating ergonomics activities in developing countries is suggested by many experts. This study provided an example from coffee workers in Nicaragua. Commonly used job evaluation procedures and physical load quantification methods were used. Ergonomics researchers and practitioners in developing countries may do similar projects on their own in the future.

  9. Walking with coffee: when and why coffee spills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Hans C.; Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2011-11-01

    In our busy lives, almost all of us have to walk with a cup of coffee. Needless to say, under certain conditions we spill that precious liquid. This is a common example of the interplay between the mechanics of the complex motion of a walking individual and the fluid dynamics of a low viscosity liquid contained in a cup. We report on the results of an experimental investigation undertaken to explore the particular conditions under which coffee spills. Frame-by-frame analysis of recorded movies helps to elucidate the trajectory of the cup for various walking speeds and initial liquid levels. These kinematics, including both regular and irregular motions, are connected to instances during walking that result in spilled liquid. The coupling between mechanical aspects of walking and the fluid motion are analyzed based on which we determine a basic operational space with which one can confidently walk with cup in hand.

  10. Modulation of coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with Rhizopus oligosporus: I. Green coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Liang Wei; Cheong, Mun Wai; Curran, Philip; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan

    2016-11-15

    Modulation of coffee aroma via the biotransformation/fermentation of different coffee matrices during post-harvest remains sparingly explored despite some studies showing their positive impacts on coffee aroma. Therefore, this is an unprecedented study aimed at modulating coffee aroma via the fermentation of green coffee beans with a food-grade fungus Rhizopus oligosporus. The objective of part I of this two-part study was to characterize the volatile and non-volatile profiles of green coffee beans after fermentation. Proteolysis during fermentation resulted in 1.5-fold increase in the concentrations of proline and aspartic acid which exhibited high Maillard reactivity. Extensive degradation of ferulic and caffeic acids led to 2-fold increase in the total concentrations of volatile phenolic derivatives. 36% of the total volatiles detected in fermented green coffee beans were generated during fermentation. Hence, the work presented demonstrated that R. oligosporus fermentation of green coffee beans could induce modification of the aroma precursors of green coffees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhanced extraction of phenolic compounds from coffee industry’s residues through solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lady Rossana PALOMINO García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of agroindustrial residues is an economical solution to industrial biotechnology. Coffee husk and pulp are abounding residues from coffee industry which can be used as substrates in solid state fermentation process, thus allowing a liberation and increase in the phenolic compound content with high added value. By employing statistical design, initial moisture content, pH value in the medium, and the incubation temperature were evaluated, in order to increase the polyphenol content in a process of solid state fermentation by Penicillium purpurogenum. The main phenolic compounds identified through HPLC in fermented coffee residue were chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin. Data obtained through HPLC with the radical absorbance capacity assay suggest the fermented coffee husk and pulp extracts potential as a source of phenolic acids and flavonoids. Results showed good perspectives when using P. purpurogenum strain to enhance the liberation of phenolic compounds in coffee residues.

  12. Tea and coffee consumption in relation to glioma: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmir, Hanieh; Shayanfar, Mehdi; Mohammad-Shirazi, Minoo; Tabibi, Hadi; Sharifi, Giuve; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2017-11-09

    Data on the link between tea and coffee consumption and risk of glioma are controversial. We aimed to examine the association between tea and coffee consumption and glioma in Iranian adults. In this hospital-based case-control study, we enrolled 128 pathologically confirmed new cases of glioma and 256 age- and sex-matched controls. Dietary intakes of study participants including tea and coffee consumption was assessed using the validated Block-format 123-item semi-quantitative FFQ. Participants were categorized based on tertiles of tea and coffee consumption. Data on potential confounders were also collected through the use of pre-tested questionnaire. Individuals with the greatest tea consumption were less likely to have glioma compared with those with the lowest consumption (0.36; 0.20-0.68). This inverse association was not changed after controlling for energy intake. The association remained statistically significant even after taking other potential confounders, including dietary intakes of red and processed meats, legumes and nuts, fruits, salt and mutual effects of tea and coffee consumption, into account (0.33; 0.13-0.86). Additional adjustments for BMI did not alter the association. After controlling for potential confounders, including dietary intakes and BMI, coffee consumption was inversely associated with odds of glioma; such that individuals in the top category of coffee consumption were 91% less likely to have glioma compared with those in the bottom category (0.09; 0.03-0.24). Considering coffee and tea intake combined, those in the highest tertile were 65% less likely to have glioma compared with those in the lowest tertile (0.35; 0.15-0.83). We found an inverse association between tea and coffee consumption and odds of glioma, even after controlling for a wide range of confounders.

  13. Climate Change Impacts on Worldwide Coffee Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, T.; Rising, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) plays a vital role in many countries' economies, providing necessary income to 25 million members of tropical countries, and supporting a $81 billion industry, making it one of the most valuable commodities in the world. At the same time, coffee is at the center of many issues of sustainability. It is vulnerable to climate change, with disease outbreaks becoming more common and suitable regions beginning to shift. We develop a statistical production model for coffee which incorporates temperature, precipitation, frost, and humidity effects using a new database of worldwide coffee production. We then use this model to project coffee yields and production into the future based on a variety of climate forecasts. This model can then be used together with a market model to forecast the locations of future coffee production as well as future prices, supply, and demand.

  14. Changes in sensory quality characteristics of coffee during storage

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuml, Michaela T L; Majchrzak, Dorota; Ploederl, Bettina; Koenig, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    How long can roasted coffee beans be stored, without reducing the typical coffee flavor which is mainly responsible for consumers’ enjoyment? In Austria, most coffee packages have a best-before date between 12 and 24 months, but it is not regulated by law. Therefore, there is the need to evaluate changes in sensory qualities of coffee beverages prepared from stored coffee beans. For preparation of the coffee beverages, the paper filter method was used. In the quantitative descriptive analysis...

  15. Coffee berry borer joins bark beetles in coffee klatch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Jaramillo

    Full Text Available Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and α-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  16. Coffee berry borer joins bark beetles in coffee klatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Torto, Baldwyn; Mwenda, Dickson; Troeger, Armin; Borgemeister, Christian; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Francke, Wittko

    2013-01-01

    Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and α-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  17. Coffee Berry Borer Joins Bark Beetles in Coffee Klatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Juliana; Torto, Baldwyn; Mwenda, Dickson; Troeger, Armin; Borgemeister, Christian; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Francke, Wittko

    2013-01-01

    Unanswered key questions in bark beetle-plant interactions concern host finding in species attacking angiosperms in tropical zones and whether management strategies based on chemical signaling used for their conifer-attacking temperate relatives may also be applied in the tropics. We hypothesized that there should be a common link in chemical signaling mediating host location by these Scolytids. Using laboratory behavioral assays and chemical analysis we demonstrate that the yellow-orange exocarp stage of coffee berries, which attracts the coffee berry borer, releases relatively high amounts of volatiles including conophthorin, chalcogran, frontalin and sulcatone that are typically associated with Scolytinae chemical ecology. The green stage of the berry produces a much less complex bouquet containing small amounts of conophthorin but no other compounds known as bark beetle semiochemicals. In behavioral assays, the coffee berry borer was attracted to the spiroacetals conophthorin and chalcogran, but avoided the monoterpenes verbenone and α-pinene, demonstrating that, as in their conifer-attacking relatives in temperate zones, the use of host and non-host volatiles is also critical in host finding by tropical species. We speculate that microorganisms formed a common basis for the establishment of crucial chemical signals comprising inter- and intraspecific communication systems in both temperate- and tropical-occurring bark beetles attacking gymnosperms and angiosperms. PMID:24073204

  18. Assessment of Cellular Mutagenicity of Americano Coffees from Popular Coffee Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Po-Wen; Wang, Jung-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is a popular beverage worldwide, but coffee beans can be contaminated with carcinogens. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test is often used for analysis of carcinogens for mutagenicity. However, previous studies have provided controversial data about the direct mutagenicity of coffee beans based on Ames test results. This study was conducted to determine the mutagenicity of popular Americano coffee based on results from the Ames test. Coffee samples without additives that were served by five international coffee chain restaurants were subjected to the analysis using Salmonella Typhimurium tester strains TA98, TA100, and TA1535. The levels of bacterial revertants in samples from coffee chains were lower than the twofold criterion of the control sets, and no significant dose-response effect was observed with or without rat liver enzyme activation. These data indicate that Americano coffees from the selected coffee chains possessed no direct mutagenic activity with or without enzyme activation. These findings suggest a low mutagenic risk from Americano coffees served by the selected coffee chains and support the use of other methods to confirm the nonmutagenicity of coffee products. These results are consistent with most recent epidemiological reports.

  19. Rationally Addicted to Cigarettes, Alcohol and Coffee? A Pseudo Panel Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Koksal, Aycan; Wohlgenant, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, using pseudo panel data we analyze the relation between cigarette, alcohol, and coffee consumption within the rational addiction framework. Our purpose in this study is twofold. First, we want to get more insights about behavioral processes concerning cigarette, alcohol and coffee consumption. Second, we hope that our attempt to generalize rational addiction model to include three addictive goods will be useful to generate further research in the related literature. We found th...

  20. The Role of Small Farmer Cooperatives in the Management of Voluntary Coffee Certifications in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Snider, Anna Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary certifications offer consumers information on the process in which products are produced. They can use this information to make more informed purchasing decisions and to espouse the issues of sustainability they deem important. Voluntary coffee certifications were some of the first certifications available to consumers. These certifications are purported to promote environmental, social and financial sustainability in the countries of coffee production, but empirical evidence shows ...

  1. The impact of coffee on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Marquina, A; Tarín, J J; Cano, A

    2013-05-01

    Coffee is a beverage used worldwide. It includes a wide array of components that can have potential implication on health. We have reviewed publications on the impact of coffee on a series of health outcomes. Articles published between January 1990 and December 2012 were selected after crossing coffee or caffeine with a list of keywords representative of the most relevant health areas potentially affected by coffee intake. Caffeine, chlorogenic acids and diterpenes are important components of coffee. Tolerance often acts as a modulator of the biological actions of coffee. There is a significant impact of coffee on the cardiovascular system, and on the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Contrary to previous beliefs, the various forms of arterial cardiovascular disease, arrhythmia or heart insufficiency seem unaffected by coffee intake. Coffee is associated with a reduction in the incidence of diabetes and liver disease. Protection seems to exist also for Parkinson's disease among the neurological disorders, while its potential as an osteoporosis risk factor is under debate. Its effect on cancer risk depends on the tissue concerned, although it appears to favor risk reduction. Coffee consumption seems to reduce mortality. The information gathered in recent years has generated a new concept of coffee, one which does not match the common belief that coffee is mostly harmful. This view is further supported by the discovery of a series of phyto-components with a beneficial profile. Reasonable optimism needs to be tempered, however, by the insufficiency of the clinical data, which in most cases stem from observational studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neglected Food Bubbles: The Espresso Coffee Foam

    OpenAIRE

    Illy, Ernesto; Navarini, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    Coffee beverage known as espresso, must be topped by a velvety thick, reddish-brown foam called crema, to be considered properly prepared and to be appreciated by connoisseurs. In spite of the relevant role played by crema as a quality marker, espresso coffee foam has not yet been the subject of detailed investigations. Only recently, some aspects of the Physics and Chemistry behind the espresso coffee foam have attracted the attention of scientists. In addition to sharing several characteris...

  3. The effects of coffee on glucose metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Tracey M.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that coffee drinking may confer a beneficial effect on health by reducing the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and indeed there is much epidemiological evidence for a reduced incidence of T2DM in habitual coffee drinkers. However, many acute studies have reported a temporary worsening in postprandial glycaemia following caffeinated coffee (CC) consumption. Varied methodologies have been employed by these studies with many giving their participants large...

  4. Roasting Enhances the Anti-Cataract Effect of Coffee Beans: Ameliorating Selenite-Induced Cataracts in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Nana; Oguchi, Jun; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Kobata, Kenji; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2017-06-01

    Coffee is a widely consumed beverage. While recent studies have linked its intake to a reduced risk of cataracts, caffeine is believed to be the key factor for its effect. To know how roasting beans affects the effect of coffee on cataract formation, we investigated the impact roasting using a selenite-induced cataract rat model. Sprague Dawley rats were given a single injection of sodium selenite, which induced formation of nuclear cataracts by day 6, with or without coffee intake (100% coffee, 0.2 mL/day) for following 3 days. The concentrations of glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) in selenite-induced cataract lenses declined to half that of controls. However, 3 days of coffee intake ameliorated the reduction of GSH and AsA so that concentrations remained at 70-80% that of controls. Roasting enhanced the preventive effect of coffee by further reducing cataract formation and ameliorating selenite-induced reduction of antioxidants. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed degradation of chlorogenic acid and generation of pyrocatechol during the coffee roasting process. We discovered that pyrocatechol, at doses equivalent to that found in dark-roasted coffee, was equally effective as caffeine at reducing cataract formation and ameliorating the reduction of antioxidants. Our results indicate that pyrocatechol, generated during the roasting process, acts as an antioxidant together with caffeine to prevent cataract formation.

  5. An Environmentally Benign Approach for As (V Absorption from Wastewater Using Untreated Coffee Grounds—Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnu Nam

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of water is a worldwide issue due to its severe effects on the human body. Coffee grounds are a porous material with network structures, making it absorb other substances such as some gases or elements. In this research, renewable coffee wastes were used as an adsorbent to extract arsenic (As from wastewater. In order to evaluate the usefulness of untreated coffee grounds, a series of preliminary tests for attachment of arsenic to coffee grounds were provided. The Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET surface area and adsorption–desorption isotherms of an untreated coffee ground obtained from N2 gas adsorption were provided, and pore sizes was obtained using Barrett–Joyner–Halenda (BJH method. The adsorption capacities of the coffee waste were verified through a series of experimental processes changing the conditions such as concentration of arsenic, initial amount of coffee grounds, and pH. The maximum absorption concentration of 6.44 mg/L on 1 g of coffee grounds at 1.00 mM of arsenic solution was observed. It was demonstrated that the modification by the cation species or pretreatment processes, such as calcination, will be necessary to enhance the absorption capacity for the extraction of arsenic.

  6. Hydrothermal grain pre-processing and ultra-fine milling for the production of durum wheat flour fractions with high nutritional value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccoritti, Roberto; Terracciano, Giovanna; Cammerata, Alessandro; Sgrulletta, Daniela; Del Frate, Viviana; Gazza, Laura; Nocente, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    This work describes a process for producing durum wheat flour fractions with high potential nutritional value using grain pre-milling hydrothermal treatment and ultra-fine grinding (micronization), coupled with air classification. The difference of bioactive value of the flour fractions in relation to dietary fibre and phenolic compounds was monitored on four durum wheat cultivars by analysing total arabinoxylans, water extractable arabinoxylans and 5- n-alkylresorcinols. The extractability of the analysed compounds was most significantly affected by hydrothermal treatment. On average, the hydrothermally treated kernels compared with the untreated ones presented a marked increase of water extractable arabinoxylans and alkylresorcinols (about 25 and 48%, respectively), whereas slightly lower total arabinoxylans content (about 9%) was detected. The air classification applied on micronized kernels produced two flour fractions, coarse and fine, with the last showing, irrespective of the hydrothermal treatment, an increment of alkylresorcinols (24 and 22% in untreated and treated samples) and of total arabinoxylans (13 and 20% in untreated and treated samples) in comparison with the coarse one. The fine fraction (particles ≤ 120 µm), resulting richer in bioactive compounds, provides an interesting raw material to enrich traditional semolina in which, due to the removal of the external layers, the losses of total arabinoxylans and of alkylresorcinols were more than 60 and 90% alkylresorcinols, respectively, if compared with whole wheat grain.

  7. The Little Book on CoffeeScript

    CERN Document Server

    MacCaw, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This little book shows JavaScript developers how to build superb web applications with CoffeeScript, the remarkable little language that's gaining considerable interest. Through example code, this guide demonstrates how CoffeeScript abstracts JavaScript, providing syntactical sugar and preventing many common errors. You'll learn CoffeeScript's syntax and idioms step by step, from basic variables and functions to complex comprehensions and classes. Written by Alex MacCaw, author of JavaScript Web Applications (O'Reilly), with contributions from CoffeeScript creator Jeremy Ashkenas, this book

  8. HOW COFFEE COMPANIES CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

    OpenAIRE

    RALUCA DANIELA RIZEA; ROXANA SARBU; ELENA CONDREA

    2014-01-01

    The coffee shop industry in the U.S. includes 20,000 stores with combined annual revenue of about $11 billion. Major companies include Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, Caribou, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Diedrich (Gloria Jean’s). The industry is highly concentrated at the top and fragmented at the bottom: the top 50 companies have over 70 percent of industry sales. Coffee is one of the world’s largest commodities. The top green coffee producing countries are Brazil, Colombia, and Vietnam. Many...

  9. Coffee: biochemistry and potential impact on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Clifford, Michael N; Lean, Michael E J; Ashihara, Hiroshi; Crozier, Alan

    2014-08-01

    This review provides details on the phytochemicals in green coffee beans and the changes that occur during roasting. Key compounds in the coffee beverage, produced from the ground, roasted beans, are volatile constituents responsible for the unique aroma, the alkaloids caffeine and trigonelline, chlorogenic acids, the diterpenes cafestol and kahweol, and melanoidins, which are Maillard reaction products. The fate of these compounds in the body following consumption of coffee is discussed along with evidence of the mechanisms by which they may impact on health. Finally, epidemiological findings linking coffee consumption to potential health benefits including prevention of several chronic and degenerative diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease, are evaluated.

  10. The reactive element effect; ionic processes of grain-boundary segregation and diffusion in chromium oxide scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polman, E.A.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The transport processes in chromium oxide reviewed here, are related to the basic ionic processes in oxide. Solid state science has been effective in describing the complicated diffusion-controlled oxide growth of chromium and chromia-forming alloys. Additions of reactive elements to chromia-forming

  11. Application of Moringa Oleifera seed extract to treat coffee fermentation wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, William K; Buchberger, Steven G; Wendell, David; Kupferle, Margaret J

    2017-05-05

    Wastewater generated from wet processing of coffee cherries degrades stream water quality downstream of processing mills and impacts human health. The widespread popularity of coffee as an export makes this a global problem, although the immediate impact is local. Approximately 40% of all coffee around the world is wet processed, producing wastewater rich in organic nutrients that can be hazardous to aquatic systems. Moringa Oleifera Seed Extract (MOSE) offers promise as a local and affordable "appropriate" coagulation technology for aiding in the treatment of coffee wastewater. Field research was conducted at the Kauai Coffee Company to investigate the application of MOSE to treat coffee fermentation wastewater (CFW). Coagulation tests were conducted at five pH CFW levels (3-7) and MOSE doses (0-4g/L). After settling, TSS, COD, nitrate, nitrite, total nitrogen, and pH of supernatant from each test were measured. MOSE reduced TSS, COD, nitrate, and nitrite in CFW to varying degrees dependent on pH and dose applied. TSS removal ranged from 8% to 54%. Insoluble COD removal ranged from 26% to 100% and total COD removal ranged from 1% to 25%. Nitrate and nitrite reduction ranged from 20% to 100%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Concepts on Low Temperature Mechanical Grain Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, John Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.; Boyce, Brad Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Metallurgy and Materials Joining Dept.

    2013-11-01

    In metals, as grain size is reduced below 100nm, conventional dislocation plasticity is suppressed resulting in improvements in strength, hardness, and wears resistance. Existing and emerging components use fine grained metals for these beneficial attributes. However, these benefits can be lost in service if the grains undergo growth during the component’s lifespan. While grain growth is traditionally viewed as a purely thermal process that requires elevated temperature exposure, recent evidence shows that some metals, especially those with nanocrystalline grain structure, can undergo grain growth even at room temperature or below due to mechanical loading. This report has been assembled to survey the key concepts regarding how mechanical loads can drive grain coarsening at room temperature and below. Topics outlined include the atomic level mechanisms that facilitate grain growth, grain boundary mobility, and the impact of boundary structure, loading scheme, and temperature.

  13. Seed Storage Proteins In Coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Bau S.M.T.; Mazzafera P.; Santoro L.G.

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that Coffea arabica seeds contain as the main reserve protein, a legumin-like protein, constituted of two subunits, alpha and beta, of approximately 35 and 20 kDa. In this work the seed proteins of several coffee species and varieties were investigated by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. No differences were observed in the electrophoretic profiles among varieties of C. arabica, however, marked differences were observed among species, or even among individuals of some species....

  14. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF GRAIN MICRONIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Afanas’ev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. During micronisation grain moisture evaporates mainly in decreasing drying rate period. Grain layer located on the surface of the conveyor micronisers will be regarded as horizontal plate. Due to the fact that the micronisation process the surface of the grain evaporates little moisture (within 2-7 % is assumed constant plate thickness. Because in the process of micronization grain structure is changing, in order to achieve an exact solution of the equations necessary to take into account changes thermophysical, optical and others. Equation of heat transfer is necessary to add a term that is responsible for the infrared heating. Because of the small thickness of the grain, neglecting the processes occurring at the edge of the grain, that is actually consider the problem of an infinite plate. To check the adequacy of the mathematical model of the process of micronisation of wheat grain moisture content must be comparable to the function of time, obtained by solving the system of equations with the measured experimental data of experience. Numerical solution of a system of equations for the period of decreasing drying rate is feasible with the help of the Maple 14, substituting the values of the constants in the system. Calculation of the average relative error does not exceed 7- 10 %, and shows a good agreement between the calculated data and the experimental values.

  15. Measuring and Managing the Environmental Cost of Coffee Production in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arce Victor Julio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is a major international commodity, and because of this, coffee production has the potential for considerable global impacts on the environment. These impacts can include the consumption of energy, water, land and the loss of native forest. Here we quantify these costs using Costa Rica as a case study, and describe an initiative undertaken at the Montes de Oro Cooperative in which these impacts are reduced substantially through the development and application of alternative technologies. We show how these processes reduce the consumption of resources, and also reduce economic costs to the farmer, thus providing a market-based incentive for conservation. The initiatives undertaken at Montes de Oro can provide a model for the future, for reducing the environmental costs of coffee production, while simultaneously improving the economic conditions of the people in coffee producing regions.

  16. HOW COFFEE COMPANIES CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RALUCA DANIELA RIZEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee shop industry in the U.S. includes 20,000 stores with combined annual revenue of about $11 billion. Major companies include Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, Caribou, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Diedrich (Gloria Jean’s. The industry is highly concentrated at the top and fragmented at the bottom: the top 50 companies have over 70 percent of industry sales. Coffee is one of the world’s largest commodities. The top green coffee producing countries are Brazil, Colombia, and Vietnam. Many grower countries are small, poor developing nations that depend on coffee to sustain local economies. The U.S. is the world’s largest importer of green coffee beans and the largest consumer of coffee. The main objective of this study is to investigate the competitive strategies that U.S. coffee franchise companies adopt considering customers’ expectations and industry best practices. In order to achieve this objective, a best practice benchmarking analysis was performed taking into account the top U.S. coffee companies This analysis showed that product and service innovation are necessary in order to stay competitive in the market and attract new or to keep existing customers successfully. Many customers focus on the special atmosphere each store has and which is characterized by the location, music, interior design, seating or whether internet access is provided. Particularly for specialty coffee shops it is important not to sell only the beverage but the whole experience. Coffee shops have to establish a unique image that prevents customers from buying products from another shop or use home-brewing systems which are also on the rise in American households. In addressing the increased level of competition, every company’s focus should be on differentiating from the rest of the market in every possible business segment (products, atmosphere, location, image etc..

  17. Genetics of coffee consumption and its stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitala, Venla S; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri

    2008-12-01

    Coffee is a highly popular drink associated with the pathogenesis of several diseases and the use of tobacco and alcohol. Considering the worldwide consumption, coffee has a substantial effect on individual wellbeing and public health. The role of genetic factors contributing to interindividual differences and their stability in coffee use is not well known. We analysed the heritability of coffee consumption and its stability in a large population-based sample of Finnish twins. In 1975 and 1981 a postal questionnaire on coffee consumption was sent to all Finnish same-sex twin pairs born before 1958. Responses were obtained from 10 716 complete twin pairs in 1975 (3409 monozygotic and 7307 dizygotic), of whom 8124 also responded in 1981. The data were analysed using classical twin modelling based on linear structural equations. Additive genetic and unique environmental factors affected coffee drinking, whereas shared environmental factors did not show any effect. Heritability of coffee consumption, adjusted for age and sex, was estimated as 0.56 in 1975 and 0.45 in 1981. Coffee consumption showed a moderate correlation between these two time-points (r = 0.58 in men and 0.55 in women). Genetic factors affecting coffee consumption were stable: additive genetic correlations were 0.84 in men and 0.83 in women, whereas unique environmental correlations were moderate (0.45 and 0.36). Additive genetic factors had the highest contribution in young adults. Coffee consumption is affected by both additive genetic and unique environmental factors, each of which plays an almost equally important role. The long-term stability of coffee consumption is affected mainly by a stable set of additive genetic factors.

  18. Dietary supplementation with decaffeinated green coffee improves diet-induced insulin resistance and brain energy metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lap; Varghese, Merina; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Fei; Knable, Lindsay Alexis; Ferruzzi, Mario; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2012-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that coffee consumption may reduce risk for type 2 diabetes, a known risk factor for Alzheimer's and other neurological diseases. Coffee consumption is also associated with reduced risk for Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer's dementias. However, preventive and therapeutic development of coffee is complicated by the cardiovascular side effects of caffeine intake. As coffee is also a rich source of chlorogenic acids and many bioactive compounds other than caffeine, we hypothesized that decaffeinated coffee drinks may exert beneficial effects on the brain. We have investigated whether dietary supplementation with a standardized decaffeinated green coffee preparation, Svetol®, might modulate diet-induced insulin resistance and brain energy metabolism dysfunction in a high-fat diet mouse model. As expected, dietary supplementation with Svetol® significantly attenuated the development of high-fat diet-induced deficits in glucose-tolerance response. We have also found that Svetol®) treatment improved brain mitochondrial energy metabolism as determined by oxygen consumption rate. Consistent with this evidence, follow-up gene expression profiling with Agilent whole-genome microarray revealed that the decaffeinated coffee treatment modulated a number of genes in the brain that are implicated in cellular energy metabolism. Our evidence is the first demonstration that dietary supplementation with a decaffeinated green coffee preparation may beneficially influence the brain, in particular promoting brain energy metabolic processes.

  19. 'Sensory analysis of specialty coffee from different environmental conditions in the region of Matas de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice de Souza Silveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Specialty coffees can be differentiated in various ways, including the environmental conditions in which they are produced and the sensory composition of the drink. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of altitude, slope exposure and fruit color on the sensory attributes of cafes of the region of Matas de Minas. Sampling points were georeferenced in four altitude ranges (< 700 m; 700 ≤ x ≤ 825 m, 825 < x < 950 m and ≥ 950 m of the coffee crop; two fruit colors of var. Catuaí (yellow and red; and two slope exposures (North-facing and South-facing. Coffee fruit at the cherry stage were processed and submitted to sensory analysis. The sensory attributes evaluated were overall perception, clean cup, balance, aftertaste, sweetness, acidity, body and flavor, which made up the final score. The scores were examined by ANOVA and means were compared by the Tukey test (p ≤ 0.05. From the sensory standpoint, coffee fruits of both colors are similar, as well as the coffees from both slope exposures when these factors were analyzed separately. However, at higher altitudes, Yellow Catuaí produces coffees with better sensory quality. Similarly, coffees from North-facing slopes, at higher altitudes produce better quality cup. The altitude is the main factor that interferes with coffee quality in the area. All factors together contribute to the final quality of the beverage produced in the region of Matas de Minas.

  20. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-04

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants.

  1. Studies on acrylamide levels in roasting, storage and brewing of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Ingo; Ternité, Ruediger; Wilkens, Jochen; Hoenicke, Katrin; Guenther, Helmut; van der Stegen, Gerrit H D

    2006-11-01

    The content of acrylamide in coffee reaches a peak early in the roasting process, reflecting occurrence of both formation and destruction of acrylamide during roasting. Levels of acrylamide in the fully roasted product are a small fraction of the peak reached earlier. Glucose and moisture in green coffee do not show a significant correlation with acrylamide in roasted coffee. Pre-roasting levels of asparagine show a correlation only in Arabica coffee. The main factors affecting the level of acrylamide in roasted coffee appear to be the Arabica/Robusta ratio, with Robusta giving higher levels; time and degree of roast, with both shorter and lighter roasting at the edges of the normal roasting range giving higher levels; storage condition and time, with clear reduction at ambient storage. This storage reduction of acrylamide followed second order reaction kinetics with an activation energy of 73 KJ/mole. The acrylamide in roasted coffee is largely extracted into the brew and stable within usual time of consumption. As these four main factors also substantially affect the sensorial characteristics of the brew, and as modifications of the process have to comply with the consumer-accepted boundaries of taste profiles, only small effects on the acrylamide level are expected to be achievable.

  2. Technological properties of precooked flour containing coffee powder and rice by thermoplastic extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Ferreira da Silva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although Brazil is a country of tradition in both the production and consumption of coffee, the most of the coffee is consumed as a beverage, which reduces greatly the competitiveness on international market, for reducing the chances of supplying the product under other forms of consumption. Owing to that, the aim of this study was developing a precooked mixed flour containing coffee powder and rice for use in coffee flavored products. Mixtures of rice and coffee in the proportions of 900:100, 850:150 and 800:200 g, respectively, were processed in a single screw extruder (Brabender DS-20, Duisburg, German and the effect of the extrusion process on the variables moisture content (16%, 18% and 20% and temperature in the third extruding zone (140 °C, 160 °C and 180 °C was studied. The results for expansion index ranged from 2.91 to 11.11 mm in diameter; the water absorption index from 4.59 to 6.33 g gel/g sample and the water solubility index varied from 4.05% to 8.57%. These results showed that, despite coffee powder influenced the variables studied, the expanded product after milling resulted in a extruded mixture with good absorption and water solubility indices, which favors the use of the precooked mixed flour for human consumption.

  3. A Method to Increase Current Density in a Mono Element Internal Tin Processed Superconductor Utilizing Zr Oxide to Refine Grain Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce A. Zeitlin, Eric Gregory

    2008-04-07

    The effect of Oxygen on (Nb1Zr)3Sn multifilament conductors manufactured by the Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) process was explored to improve the current density by refining the grain size. This followed work first done by General Electric on the Nb3Sn tape process. Techniques to fabricate the more difficult Nb1Zr composites are described and allowed fabrication of long lengths of .254 mm diameter wire from an 88.9 mm diameter billet. Oxygen was incorporated through the use of SnO2 mixed with tin powder and incorporated into the core. These were compared to samples with Ti+Sn and Cu+Sn cores. Heat treatments covered the range of 700 C to 1000 C. Current density vs. H, grain size, and reaction percentages are provided for the materials tested. The Oxygen gave superior results in the temperature range of 815-1000 C. It also stabilized the filament geometry of the array in comparison to the other additions at the higher temperatures. At 815 C a peak in layer Jc yielded values of 2537 A/mm2 at 12 T and 1353 A/mm2 at 15T, 8-22% and 30-73% greater respectively than 700 C values. Results with Oxygen at high temperature show the possibility of high speed continuous reaction of the composite versus the current batch or react in place methods. In general the Ti additions gave superior results at the lower reaction temperature. Future work is suggested to determine if the 815 C reaction temperature can lead to higher current density in high tin (Nb1Zr+Ox)3Sn conductors. A second technique incorporated oxygen directly into the Nb1Zr rods through heat treatment with Nb2O5 at 1100 C for 100 hours in vacuum prior to extrusion. The majority of the filaments reduced properly in the composite but some local variations in hardness led to breakage at smaller diameters.

  4. PROCESSING OATS GRAIN FOR CULL COWS FINISHED IN FEEDLOT PROCESSAMENTO DO GRÃO DE AVEIA PARA ALIMENTAÇÃO DE VACAS DE DESCARTE TERMINADAS EM CONFINAMENTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Restle

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The processing of oats grain (entire or grounded on the performance of feedlot finished cull cows was studied. Cows were fed with 60% of corn silage and 40% of concentrate, composed by oats grain, urea, limestone and salt.  The treatments were Treatment 1 with whole oats grain, Treatment 2 with 50% grounded grain, e Treatment 3 with 100% grounded grain. The data were analyzed by regression. Grinding did not affect dry matter intake, being the average values 10.563 kg/animal/day, 2.2% when expressed per 100 kg of live weight and 102.94 g when expressed per metabolic weight. Average daily weight gain increased linearly with the inclusion of grounded oats in the diet (Y=.79976+.0033X, while feed conversion declined linearly (Y=13.21155-.04021X. Subcutaneous fat thickness increased lenarly with the increase of grounded oats in the diet. The better use of the grounded oats resulted in higher weight gain and slaughter weight, which explains the higher fat deposition of cows fed with grounded oats.

    KEY WORDS: Feed conversion, intake, weight gain.
    Foi estudado o efeito do processamento do grão de aveia-preta sobre o desempenho de vacas de descarte em confinamento. As vacas foram alimentadas com 60% de silagem de milho e 40% de concentrado, composto por grãos de aveia-preta, ureia, calcário calcítico e cloreto de sódio. A forma como se forneceram os grãos aos animais representaram os tratamentos, ou seja, Tratamento 1 com grãos de aveia fornecidos inteiros, Tratamento 2 com 50% dos grãos fornecidos moídos, e Tratamento 3 com 100% dos grãos fornecidos moídos. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de regressão polinomial a 5% de significância. A moagem da aveia não influenciou o consumo dos animais, que apresentaram consumo de 10,563 kg/dia, ou 2,2% quando ajustado para peso vivo e 102,94 g por unidade de tamanho metabólico. O ganho de peso apresentou comportamento linear com a substituição do grão inteiro por grão mo

  5. Preliminary design of a coffee harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Magalhães Gomes Moreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Design of an agricultural machine is a highly complex process due to interactions between the operator, machine, and environment. Mountain coffee plantations constitute an economic sector that requires huge investments for the development of agricultural machinery to improve the harvesting and post-harvesting processes and to overcome the scarcity of work forces in the fields. The aim of this study was to develop a preliminary design for a virtual prototype of a coffee fruit harvester. In this study, a project methodology was applied and adapted for the development of the following steps: project planning, informational design, conceptual design, and preliminary design. The construction of a morphological matrix made it possible to obtain a list of different mechanisms with specific functions. The union between these mechanisms resulted in variants, which were weighed to attribute scores for each selected criterion. From each designated proposal, two variants with the best scores were selected and this permitted the preparation of the preliminary design of both variants. The archetype was divided in two parts, namely the hydraulically articulated arms and the harvesting system that consisted of the vibration mechanism and the detachment mechanism. The proposed innovation involves the use of parallel rods, which were fixed in a plane and rectangular metal sheet. In this step, dimensions including a maximum length of 4.7 m, a minimum length of 3.3 m, and a total height of 2.15 m were identified based on the functioning of the harvester in relation to the coupling point of the tractor.

  6. Dust exposure and chronic respiratory symptoms among coffee curing workers in Kilimanjaro: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwari, Gloria; Bråtveit, Magne; Mamuya, Simon H D; Moen, Bente E

    2011-11-24

    Coffee processing causes organic dust exposure which may lead to development of respiratory symptoms. Previous studies have mainly focused on workers involved in roasting coffee in importing countries. This study was carried out to determine total dust exposure and respiratory health of workers in Tanzanian primary coffee-processing factories. A cross sectional study was conducted among 79 workers in two coffee factories, and among 73 control workers in a beverage factory. Personal samples of total dust (n = 45 from the coffee factories and n = 19 from the control factory) were collected throughout the working shift from the breathing zone of the workers. A questionnaire with modified questions from the American Thoracic Society questionnaire was used to assess chronic respiratory symptoms. Differences between groups were tested by using independent t-tests and Chi square tests. Poisson Regression Model was used to estimate prevalence ratio, adjusting for age, smoking, presence of previous lung diseases and years worked in dusty factories. All participants were male. The coffee workers had a mean age of 40 years and were older than the controls (31 years). Personal total dust exposure in the coffee factories were significantly higher than in the control factory (geometric mean (GM) 1.23 mg/m3, geometric standard deviation (GSD) (0.8) vs. 0.21(2.4) mg/m3). Coffee workers had significantly higher prevalence than controls for cough with sputum (23% vs. 10%; Prevalence ratio (PR); 2.5, 95% CI 1.0-5.9) and chest tightness (27% vs. 13%; PR; 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.2). The prevalence of morning cough, cough with and without sputum for 4 days or more in a week was also higher among coffee workers than among controls. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Workers exposed to coffee dust reported more respiratory symptoms than did the controls. This might relate to their exposure to coffee dust. Interventions for reduction of dust levels and provision of

  7. Dust exposure and chronic respiratory symptoms among coffee curing workers in Kilimanjaro: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakwari Gloria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffee processing causes organic dust exposure which may lead to development of respiratory symptoms. Previous studies have mainly focused on workers involved in roasting coffee in importing countries. This study was carried out to determine total dust exposure and respiratory health of workers in Tanzanian primary coffee-processing factories. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 79 workers in two coffee factories, and among 73 control workers in a beverage factory. Personal samples of total dust (n = 45 from the coffee factories and n = 19 from the control factory were collected throughout the working shift from the breathing zone of the workers. A questionnaire with modified questions from the American Thoracic Society questionnaire was used to assess chronic respiratory symptoms. Differences between groups were tested by using independent t-tests and Chi square tests. Poisson Regression Model was used to estimate prevalence ratio, adjusting for age, smoking, presence of previous lung diseases and years worked in dusty factories. Results All participants were male. The coffee workers had a mean age of 40 years and were older than the controls (31 years. Personal total dust exposure in the coffee factories were significantly higher than in the control factory (geometric mean (GM 1.23 mg/m3, geometric standard deviation (GSD (0.8 vs. 0.21(2.4 mg/m3. Coffee workers had significantly higher prevalence than controls for cough with sputum (23% vs. 10%; Prevalence ratio (PR; 2.5, 95% CI 1.0 - 5.9 and chest tightness (27% vs. 13%; PR; 2.4, 95% CI 1.1 - 5.2. The prevalence of morning cough, cough with and without sputum for 4 days or more in a week was also higher among coffee workers than among controls. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Workers exposed to coffee dust reported more respiratory symptoms than did the controls. This might relate to their exposure to coffee dust

  8. Dust exposure and chronic respiratory symptoms among coffee curing workers in Kilimanjaro: a cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Coffee processing causes organic dust exposure which may lead to development of respiratory symptoms. Previous studies have mainly focused on workers involved in roasting coffee in importing countries. This study was carried out to determine total dust exposure and respiratory health of workers in Tanzanian primary coffee-processing factories. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among 79 workers in two coffee factories, and among 73 control workers in a beverage factory. Personal samples of total dust (n = 45 from the coffee factories and n = 19 from the control factory) were collected throughout the working shift from the breathing zone of the workers. A questionnaire with modified questions from the American Thoracic Society questionnaire was used to assess chronic respiratory symptoms. Differences between groups were tested by using independent t-tests and Chi square tests. Poisson Regression Model was used to estimate prevalence ratio, adjusting for age, smoking, presence of previous lung diseases and years worked in dusty factories. Results All participants were male. The coffee workers had a mean age of 40 years and were older than the controls (31 years). Personal total dust exposure in the coffee factories were significantly higher than in the control factory (geometric mean (GM) 1.23 mg/m3, geometric standard deviation (GSD) (0.8) vs. 0.21(2.4) mg/m3). Coffee workers had significantly higher prevalence than controls for cough with sputum (23% vs. 10%; Prevalence ratio (PR); 2.5, 95% CI 1.0 - 5.9) and chest tightness (27% vs. 13%; PR; 2.4, 95% CI 1.1 - 5.2). The prevalence of morning cough, cough with and without sputum for 4 days or more in a week was also higher among coffee workers than among controls. However, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Workers exposed to coffee dust reported more respiratory symptoms than did the controls. This might relate to their exposure to coffee dust. Interventions for

  9. Influence of the degree of roasting on the antioxidant capacity and genoprotective effect of instant coffee: contribution of the melanoidin fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pino-García, Raquel; González-SanJosé, María L; Rivero-Pérez, María D; Muñiz, Pilar

    2012-10-24

    The roasting process induces chemical changes in coffee beans that strongly affect the antioxidant activity of coffee. In this study, the polyphenol and melanoidin contents and the antioxidant activity of three instant coffees with different roasting degrees (light, medium, and dark) were assessed. Coffee brews were separated into fractions, and the potential biological activity of the melanoidins was evaluated by simulating their gastrointestinal digestion. Total antioxidant capacity, hydroxyl radical scavenger activity, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity, and protection against DNA oxidative damage (in vitro and ex vivo genoprotective effects) were determined. We report that instant coffee has a high total antioxidant capacity and protective effect against certain oxidative stress biomarkers (lipids and DNA), although this capacity decreases with the roasting degree. Our study confirms the hypothesis that several of the polyphenols present in coffee may become part of the melanoidins generated during roasting. Furthermore, the elevated genoprotective effect of melanoidin-digested fractions is noteworthy.

  10. Self Reported Symptoms associated with Coffee Consumption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the psycho physiological effects of coffee consumption as reported by University students. The relationship between coffee consumption and anxiety was also explored. It was hypothesized that heavy caffeine users would report significantly higher anxiety and more psychophysical symptoms of ...

  11. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance in Rats fed on High-Sucrose Diet. ... Summary: Several epidemiological evidences indicate that consumption of coffee is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) however; there is dearth of experimental data to support these ...

  12. Coffee Consumption Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Glucose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    beneficial health effects of coffee consumption have received considerable scientific attention (Nawrot et al. ... coffee may reduce the cariogenic potential of foods by reducing plaque formation (Armstrong et al. 2005). .... hour (16-hr) fast, blood was collected from the tail of the animals and used for the determination of the.

  13. Coffee farming and soil management in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nzeyimana, I.; Hartemink, A.E.; Graaff, de J.

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture is the cornerstone of Rwanda's economy. The authors review how the sector has changed and specifically what soil management practices are now being implemented to enhance coffee production. Coffee covers around 2.3% of total cultivated arable land, and is grown mainly by smallholder

  14. Coffee and cardiovascular risk; an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.A. Bak (Annette)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis comprises several studies on the effect of coffee and caffeine on cardiovascular risk in general, and the effect on serum lipids, blood pressure and selected hemostatic variables in particular. The association between coffee use and cardiovascular morbidity and

  15. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  16. Effect of different processing techniques on nutritional characteristics of oat (Avena sativa) grains and formulated weaning mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Neha; Awasthi, Pratima

    2014-09-01

    One of the variety of oat, UPO 94 was processed by two simple processing techniques. One method is malting and other is roasting. Malted and roasted oat flour as well as weaning mixes prepared from these two processed flour were analyzed for their nutrient composition, alpha amylase activity and in-vitro protein digestibility. For making weaning mix, oat flour, wheat flour, green gram and skim milk powder were taken in a ratio of 30:30:25:15 respectively. Higher moisture, ash, crude fat, energy, amylase activity, and in-vitro protein digestibility were reported in malted oat flour and weaning mix prepared from malted flour. The minerals, calcium (180.0 mg/100 g) and iron (7.9 mg/100 g) were also higher in malted weaning mix as compared to roasted weaning mix. Both malted and roasted weaning gruels were evaluated for sensory quality characteristics and both were found acceptable by the panel members.

  17. Magnetically modified spent coffee grounds for dyes removal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafařík, Ivo; Horská, Kateřina; Svobodová, Barbora; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 234, č. 2 (2012), s. 345-350 ISSN 1438-2377 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09052; GA MPO 2A-1TP1/094 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : coffee grounds * magnetic fluid * adsorption * dyes * magnetic solid-phase extraction Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2012

  18. Microbiological Spoilage of Spices, Nuts, Cocoa, and Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkas, Joan M.; Battista, Karen; Morille-Hinds, Theodora

    Spices, nuts, cocoa, and coffee are raw materials that may be used alone or as ingredients in the manufacture of processed food products. The control of microbiological spoilage of these raw materials at the ingredient stage will enable the food processor to better assure the production of high-quality foods with an acceptable shelf life. While this chapter is limited to four materials, many of the spoilage control procedures recommended can also be applied to other raw materials of a similar nature.

  19. Caffeine adsorption of montmorillonite in coffee extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Takashi; Yamamoto, Kenichiro; Yotsumoto, Yuko; Yoshida, Aruto

    2017-08-01

    The growth in health-conscious consumers continues to drive the demand for a wide variety of decaffeinated beverages. We previously developed a new technology using montmorillonite (MMT) in selective decaffeination of tea extract. This study evaluated and compared decaffeination of coffee extract using MMT and activated carbon (AC). MMT adsorbed caffeine without significant adsorption of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs), feruloylquinic acids (FQAs), dicaffeoylquinic acids (di-CQAs), or caffeoylquinic lactones (CQLs). AC adsorbed caffeine, chlorogenic acids (CGAs) and CQLs simultaneously. The results suggested that the adsorption selectivity for caffeine in coffee extract is higher in MMT than AC. The caffeine adsorption isotherms of MMT in coffee extract fitted well to the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption properties in coffee extracts from the same species were comparable, regardless of roasting level and locality of growth. Our findings suggest that MMT is a useful adsorbent in the decaffeination of a wide range of coffee extracts.

  20. Coffee Consumption During Pregnancy and Birth Weight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Bodil Hammer; Frydenberg, Morten; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    2015-01-01

    Background: A previous randomized trial demonstrated an association between coffee intake and birth weight in smokers only. This could be a chance finding or because smoking interferes with caffeine metabolism. This study assessed the association between coffee intake during pregnancy and birth...... weight and whether it was modified by the mothers' smoking habits. Methods: In the Danish National Birth Cohort, coffee intake and smoking during pregnancy were recorded prospectively in 89,539 pregnancies that ended with live born singletons. Information on birth weight was obtained from the Danish...... Medical Birth Register. For a total of 71,000 pregnancies, complete information was available on coffee intake and all covariates for the second trimester. Results: Second-trimester coffee intake was associated with reduced birth weight in a dose–response pattern for non-smokers and smokers (9 g...

  1. Coordinating quality practices in Direct Trade coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Emil; Kjeldsen, Chris; Kerndrup, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, many food niches have emerged with a specific focus on quality. In specialty coffee, micro roasters have brought about Direct Trade coffee as a way of organising an alternative around new tastes and qualities through ongoing and ‘direct’ relations to farmers...... and cooperatives. But Direct Trade also involves exporters. We ask, how do exporters and roasters work together in these new coffee relations, and what do they work on? We observe and participate in a situation where Colombian coffee exporters visit Danish roasters. They tour the roasting facilities and taste...... a number of coffees. Often, the term power is used to analyse such value chain interactions, but we argue that the term coordination better opens up these interactions for exploration and analysis. What emerges is a coordination of quality. Through touring and tasting, issues emerge and differences...

  2. Caffeine, coffee, and appetite control: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Matthew M; Irwin, Christopher; Seay, Rebekah F; Clarke, Holly E; Allegro, Deanne; Desbrow, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Coffee and caffeine consumption has global popularity. However, evidence for the potential of these dietary constituents to influence energy intake, gut physiology, and appetite perceptions remains unclear. The purpose of this review was to examine the evidence regarding coffee and caffeine's influence on energy intake and appetite control. The literature was examined for studies that assessed the effects of caffeine and coffee on energy intake, gastric emptying, appetite-related hormones, and perceptual measures of appetite. The literature review indicated that coffee administered 3-4.5 h before a meal had minimal influence on food and macronutrient intake, while caffeine ingested 0.5-4 h before a meal may suppress acute energy intake. Evidence regarding the influence of caffeine and coffee on gastric emptying, appetite hormones, and appetite perceptions was equivocal. The influence of covariates such as genetics of caffeine metabolism and bitter taste phenotype remain unknown; longer controlled studies are needed.

  3. A perception on health benefits of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sunitha Elizabeth; Ramalakshmi, Kulathooran; Mohan Rao, Lingamallu Jagan

    2008-05-01

    Coffee, consumed for its refreshing and stimulating effect, belongs to the tribe Coffea of the subfamily Cinchonoidea of Rubiaceae family. Coffee is a complex chemical mixture composed of several chemicals. It is responsible for a number of bioactivities and a number of compounds accounting for these effects. Few of the significant bioactivities documented are antioxidant activity, anticarcinogenic activity, antimutagenic activity etc. Various compounds responsible for the chemoprotective effects of coffee are mainly polyphenols including chlorogenic acids and their degradation products. Others include caffeine, kahweol, cafestol, and other phenolics. Coffee also shows protective or adverse effects on various systems like the skeletal (bone) system, the reproductive system, the nervous system, the cardiovascular system, the homocysteine levels, the cholesterol levels etc. Harmful effects of coffee are associated with people who are sensitive to stimulants. Overall, with the available information, it can be concluded that the moderate consumption, corresponding to 3 to 4 cups/day with average strength is safer to human health.

  4. Development of a method for the mineralization of coffee husk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every year, large quantities of husk resulting from the dry method of treatment of robusta coffee are dumped into nature. This generates multiple harmful ecological effects. The downward trend of coffee prices and the rise in the cost of manure has urged coffee farmers to better exploit the by-products of coffee transformation.

  5. Innovative Strategies for Control of Coffee Insect Pests in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee insect pests are one of the major factors which affect coffee production and quality. globally, coffee insect pests are estimated to cause losses of about 13%. However in Africa, yield losses can be much higher, particularly where Arabica and Robusta coffee are grown for a long time. In Tanzania the major insect pests ...

  6. Effect of Dominant Shade Trees on Coffee Production in Manasibu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of shade trees species on coffee production in Manasibu district, West Ethiopia was assessed by the current study. It was aimed to (i) identify the most suitable dominant shade tree species for coffee production; (ii) assess the status of coffee production under different dominant coffee shade trees and unshaded areas ...

  7. A repellent against the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer continues to pose a formidable challenge to coffee growers worldwide. Due to the cryptic life habit of the insect inside coffee berries, effective pest management strategies have been difficult to develop. A sesquiterpene, (E,E)-a-farnesene, produced by infested coffee berries...

  8. Coffee consumption is associated with DNA methylation levels of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Quach, Austin; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles; Horvath, Steve; Ritz, Beate

    2017-05-01

    Beneficial health effects have been attributed to coffee consumption, but it is not yet known whether epigenetics may have a role in this process. Here we associate epigenome-wide DNA methylation levels to habitual coffee consumption from two studies with blood (2100 and 215 participants), and one with saliva samples (256 participants). Adjusting for age, gender, and blood cell composition, one CpG (cg21566642 near ALPPL2) surpassed genome-wide significance (P=3.7 × 10 -10 ) and from among 10 additional CpGs significant at P≤5.0 × 10 -6 , six were located within 1500 bps of a transcriptional start site. Results for these 11 top-ranked CpGs remained significant after further adjusting for smoking. Also, methylation levels of another 135 CpGs were influenced by both coffee drinking and smoking (P≤1.0 × 10 -7 ). Functional enrichment analysis suggested that coffee-associated CpGs were located near transcription factor binding (P=1.2 × 10 -6 ) and protein kinase activity genes (P=2.9 × 10 -5 ). Interestingly, when we stratified by menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), methylation differences with coffee consumption were observed only in women who never used MHT. We did not replicate any of the associations found in blood in our saliva samples, suggesting that coffee may affect DNA methylation levels in immune cells of the blood but not in saliva.

  9. Effect of water coffee extract on kidney volume (a stereological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Dehghani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coffee is a traditional drinking used by most of the people around the world. Overuse of coffee leads to many side effects on body. In this study, the effect of different doses of coffee extract on kidney volume was studied by the stereological method. Material and Methods: Sixty spragu-dawley male rats were divided into 6 groups. Control group was given tap water (0.5ml and experimental groups were given coffee extract orally for 14 days with doses (0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5gr/kg with the same volume of control group. Then rats were anesthetized (with ether, sacrificed and their right kidneys were removed, fixed, tissue processed and stained with H&E. The 5µm slides were studied by Cavalieri principle. Results: Higher doses of water coffee extract were associated with decreased kidney volume and volumes of glomerules but in lower doses it increased related to control group. Conclusion: It seems that, high doses of coffee has side effect on kidneyand reduces volume of kidney and its glomerules. However further studies are required to confirm this research.

  10. Biosorption of Am-241 and Cs-137 by radioactive liquid waste by coffee husk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Bellini, Maria Helena; Marumo, Julio Takehiro, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive Waste Management Laboratory of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN-CNEN/SP, has stored many types of radioactive liquid wastes, including liquid scintillators, mixed wastes from chemical analysis and spent decontamination solutions. These wastes need special attention, because the available treatment processes are often expensive and difficult to manage. Biosorption using biomass of vegetable using agricultural waste has become a very attractive technique because it involves the removal of heavy metals ions by low cost biossorbents. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of the coffee husk to remove Am-241 and Cs-137 from radioactive liquid waste. The coffee husk was tested in two forms, treated and untreated. The chemical treatment of the coffee husk was performed with HNO{sub 3} and NaOH diluted solutions. The results showed that the coffee husk did not showed significant differences in behavior and capacity for biosorption for Am-241 and Cs-137 over time. Coffee husk showed low biosorption capacity for Cs-137, removing only 7.2 {+-} 1.0% in 4 hours of contact time. For Am-241, the maximum biosorption was 57,5 {+-} 0.6% in 1 hours. These results suggest that coffee husk in untreated form can be used in the treatment of radioactive waste liquid containing Am-241. (author)

  11. Coffee silverskin: a possible valuable cosmetic ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Francisca; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno; Amaral, M Helena; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2015-03-01

    Currently, there is a great tendency in cosmetic area to use natural extracts. Coffee silverskin (CS) is the most abundant solid by-product generated during roasting of coffee processing. To evaluate different CS extracts as promising cosmetic ingredients, regarding antioxidant, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic properties. Aqueous, hydroalcoholic and ethanolic CS extracts were obtained by an environmentally friendly procedure considering costs and pollution. Extracts were characterized for total phenolic and flavonoid contents (TPC and TFC, respectively), antioxidant activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), antimicrobial activity expressed as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and cytotoxicity using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays in two skin cell lines (fibroblasts and keratinocytes). The TPC of extracts was 18.33-35.25 mg of gallic acid equivalents per g of material on a dry basis (mg GAE/g db). The TFC of extracts was 1.08-2.47 µg cathechin equivalents per g dry material (µg CE/g db). The antioxidant activity was high, with values ranging between 95.95 and 216.40 µmol Fe(2+)/g for aqueous and alcoholic samples, respectively. Preliminary assays for antimicrobial potential showed that extracts display antibacterial activity. The MIC varied from 31.3 to 250 µg/mL for Gram-positive, and from 31.3 to 1000 µg/mL for Gram-negative. Extracts did not affect in vitro cell viability, with values near 100% in all concentrations tested. RESULTS seem show that CS is a safe source of natural antioxidants with antifungal and antibacterial activity and no cytotoxicity, with potential usefulness for cosmetic applications.

  12. FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, A.J.

    1962-04-24

    A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

  13. Science with coffee and hobnobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Hannah D.; Macdonald, Averil M.; Eason, Robert W.

    2005-10-01

    Many parents or guardians of primary school pupils have little knowledge of science, and many lack confidence in their ability to help their children, though most welcome the chance to do so. We describe our experiences running a series of meetings in the form of coffee sessions at local primary schools, where parents can increase their knowledge and confidence in the science their children study, and engage in simple experiments with their children to apply the knowledge they gain. We discuss how this programme can be instrumental in improving the profile of scientific education and scientific careers for children of a young age.

  14. Polyphenoloxidase activity in coffee leaves and its role in resistance against the coffee leaf miner and coffee leaf rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Geraldo Aclécio; Shimizu, Milton Massao; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2006-02-01

    In plants, PPO has been related to defense mechanism against pathogens and insects and this role was investigated in coffee trees regarding resistance against a leaf miner and coffee leaf rust disease. PPO activity was evaluated in different genotypes and in relation to methyl-jasmonate (Meja) treatment and mechanical damage. Evaluations were also performed using compatible and incompatible interactions of coffee with the fungus Hemileia vastatrix (causal agent of the leaf orange rust disease) and the insect Leucoptera coffeella (coffee leaf miner). The constitutive level of PPO activity observed for the 15 genotypes ranged from 3.8 to 88 units of activity/mg protein. However, no direct relationship was found with resistance of coffee to the fungus or insect. Chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid), the best substrate for coffee leaf PPO, was not related to resistance, suggesting that oxidation of other phenolics by PPO might play a role, as indicated by HPLC profiles. Mechanical damage, Meja treatment, H. vastatrix fungus inoculation and L. coffeella infestation caused different responses in PPO activity. These results suggest that coffee resistance may be related to the oxidative potential of the tissue regarding the phenolic composition rather than simply to a higher PPO activity.

  15. A model for coupled electro-hydro-mechanical processes in fine grained soils accounting for gas generation and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Tamagnini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical and numerical model is developed for the quantitative analysis of coupled processes taking place in active waste containment systems, such as electrokinetic barriers or fences, in which alow intensity DC current is circulated across the clay barrier to move polar and non-polar contaminants. A novel feature of the proposed approach is the allowance for the presence of air in the pore space. Under unsaturated conditions, all transport coefficients involved in the electrokinetic process are strongly dependent on the degree of saturation of pore liquid. In order to assess the predictive capability of the proposed theory and to appreciate the impact of gas production at the electrodes, a series of numerical simulations of simple onedimensional electrokinetic tests have been performed. The results of the simulations compare reasonably well with data obtained from laboratory experiments performed on an illitic clayey silt. The numerical results indicate that the impact of gas production at the electrodes can be significant, even in low-intensity and short-duration treatments.Um modelo teórico e computacional é desenvolvido para a análise quantitativa de processos acoplados que tomam lugar em sistemas de contenção de lixo tais como barreiras ou grades eletrocinéticas no qual uma DC corrente de baixa intensidade é circulada através da barreira de argila para movimentar contaminantes polares e não polares. Uma nova característica da abordagem proposta é permitir a presença de ar nos poros. Sob condições não saturadas todos os coeficientes de transporte envolvidos nos processos eletrocinéticos são fortemente dependentes do grau de saturação do líquido. Com o objetivo de avaliar a capacidade do modelo proposto de predizer e de apreciar o impacto da produção de gás nos eletrodos uma série de simulações numéricas foi realizada em testes eletrocinéticos simples unidimensionais. Os resultados das simulações concordam

  16. Comparison of Attenuated Total Reflectance Mid-Infrared, Near Infrared, and 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopies for the Determination of Coffee's Geographical Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jessica; Caro Rodríguez, Diana; Arana, Victoria A; Bernal, Andrés; Esseiva, Pierre; Wist, Julien

    2017-01-01

    The sensorial properties of Colombian coffee are renowned worldwide, which is reflected in its market value. This raises the threat of fraud by adulteration using coffee grains from other countries, thus creating a demand for robust and cost-effective methods for the determination of geographical origin of coffee samples. Spectroscopic techniques such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), near infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared (mIR) have arisen as strong candidates for the task. Although a body of work exists that reports on their individual performances, a faithful comparison has not been established yet. We evaluated the performance of 1H-NMR, Attenuated Total Reflectance mIR (ATR-mIR), and NIR applied to fraud detection in Colombian coffee. For each technique, we built classification models for discrimination by species (C. arabica versus C. canephora (or robusta)) and by origin (Colombia versus other C. arabica) using a common set of coffee samples. All techniques successfully discriminated samples by species, as expected. Rega