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Sample records for coeval volcanic system

  1. Ages and geochemical comparison of coeval plutons and volcanics from the central and eastern Aleutian arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Y.; Kelemen, P. B.; Goldstein, S. L.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Hemming, S. R.; Rioux, M. E.; Cooperdock, E. H. G.

    2016-12-01

    On average, arc volcanics are compositionally different from the bulk continental crust. The relatively little known plutonic part of intra-oceanic arcs is more similar to continental crust, and may play a significant role for understanding continental crust formation. Our pilot study [1] demonstrated that in the central and eastern Aleutian islands, predominantly tholeiitic Quaternary volcanic rocks have statistically different Pb-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopic signatures than predominantly calc-alkaline Miocene and older plutonic rocks, showing that these plutonics and volcanics were derived from compositionally different sources. However, studies of older volcanics are needed to determine whether (1) there was a change in magma chemistry in the central and eastern Aleutian arc between the Miocene and the present-day, or (2) coeval plutonics and volcanics are compositionally different, and formed by different processes. For example, silica- and water-rich calc-alkaline magmas may preferentially stall and form plutons after extensive degassing and rapid viscosity increase in the mid-crust, while silica- and water-poor tholeiitic magmas tend to erupt at the surface. Here we report new geochronological and geochemical results on samples collected during the 2015 GeoPRISMS shared logistics field campaign. We collected more than 500 volcanic and plutonic samples from Unalaska, Umnak and Atka islands, including pillow lavas, sills, and larger plutons. A subset of 50 samples has been analyzed for major and trace element chemistry, Pb-Nd-Sr-Hf isotopes, and Ar-Ar geochronology. So far,40Ar/39Ar cooling dates measured for the volcanics span a wide range, from zero to 35 Ma, which is comparable to the age distribution of the plutons ( 9 Ma to 39 Ma) from these islands. The forthcoming, combined geochronology and geochemistry of coeval plutonics and volcanics will contribute to our understanding of the connections between arc magmatism and continental crust formation. [1] Cai et al

  2. Do siblings always form and evolve simultaneously? Testing the coevality of multiple protostellar systems through SEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, N. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Tobin, J. J.; Fedele, D.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Multiplicity is common in field stars and among protostellar systems. Models suggest two paths of formation: turbulent fragmentation and protostellar disk fragmentation. Aims: We attempt to find whether or not the coevality frequency of multiple protostellar systems can help to better understand their formation mechanism. The coevality frequency is determined by constraining the relative evolutionary stages of the components in a multiple system. Methods: Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for known multiple protostars in Perseus were constructed from literature data. Herschel PACS photometric maps were used to sample the peak of the SED for systems with separations ≥7″, a crucial aspect in determining the evolutionary stage of a protostellar system. Inclination effects and the surrounding envelope and outflows were considered to decouple source geometry from evolution. This together with the shape and derived properties from the SED was used to determine each system's coevality as accurately as possible. SED models were used to examine the frequency of non-coevality that is due to geometry. Results: We find a non-coevality frequency of 33 ± 10% from the comparison of SED shapes of resolved multiple systems. Other source parameters suggest a somewhat lower frequency of non-coevality. The frequency of apparent non-coevality that is due to random inclination angle pairings of model SEDs is 17 ± 0.5%. Observations of the outflow of resolved multiple systems do not suggest significant misalignments within multiple systems. Effects of unresolved multiples on the SED shape are also investigated. Conclusions: We find that one-third of the multiple protostellar systems sampled here are non-coeval, which is more than expected from random geometric orientations. The other two-thirds are found to be coeval. Higher order multiples show a tendency to be non-coeval. The frequency of non-coevality found here is most likely due to formation and enhanced by

  3. Evidence for rapid epithermal mineralization and coeval bimodal volcanism, Bruner Au-Ag property, NV USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Dylan

    The character of Au-Ag mineralization and volcanic/hydrothermal relationships at the underexplored Miocene-age Bruner low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposit are elucidated using field and laboratory studies. Bruner is located in central Nevada within the Great Basin extensional province, near several major volcanic trends (Western Andesite, Northern Nevada Rift) associated with world-class Miocene-age epithermal Au-Ag provinces. Despite its proximity to several >1 Moz Au deposits, and newly discovered high-grade drill intercepts (to 117 ppm Au/1.5m), there is no published research on the deposit, the style of mineralization has not been systematically characterized, and vectors to mineralization remain elusive. By investigating the nature of mineralization and time-space relationships between volcanic/hydrothermal activity, the deposit has been integrated into a regional framework, and exploration targeting improved. Mineralization occurs within narrow quartz + adularia +/- pyrite veins that manifest as sheeted/stockwork zones, vein swarms, and rare 0.3-2 m wide veins hosted by two generations of Miocene high-K, high-silica rhyolite flow dome complexes overlying an andesite flow unit. The most prominent structural controls on veining are N­striking faults and syn-mineral basalt/rhyolite dikes. Productive veins have robust boiling indicators (high adularia content, bladed quartz after calcite, recrystallized colloform quartz bands), lack rhythmic banding, and contain only 1-2 stages; these veins overprint, or occur separately from another population of barren to weakly mineralized rhythmically banded quartz-only veins. Ore minerals consist of coarse Au0.5Ag 0.5 electrum, fine Au0.7Ag0.3 electrum, acanthite, uytenbogaardtite (Ag3AuS2) and minor embolite Ag(Br,Cl). Now deeply oxidized, veins typically contain geothermal circulation along N-S structural fabric driven by heat from rhyolite domes; ~16.34 Ma, emplacement of NW trending basalt dikes, followed by violent

  4. Forecasting volcanic ash dispersal and coeval resuspension during the April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckziegel, F.; Bustos, E.; Mingari, L.; Báez, W.; Villarosa, G.; Folch, A.; Collini, E.; Viramonte, J.; Romero, J.; Osores, S.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric dispersion of volcanic ash from explosive eruptions or from subsequent fallout deposit resuspension causes a range of impacts and disruptions on human activities and ecosystems. The April-May 2015 Calbuco eruption in Chile involved eruption and resuspension activities. We overview the chronology, effects, and products resulting from these events, in order to validate an operational forecast strategy for tephra dispersal. The modelling strategy builds on coupling the meteorological Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF/ARW) model with the FALL3D dispersal model for eruptive and resuspension processes. The eruption modelling considers two distinct particle granulometries, a preliminary first guess distribution used operationally when no field data was available yet, and a refined distribution based on field measurements. Volcanological inputs were inferred from eruption reports and results from an Argentina-Chilean ash sample data network, which performed in-situ sampling during the eruption. In order to validate the modelling strategy, results were compared with satellite retrievals and ground deposit measurements. Results indicate that the WRF-FALL3D modelling system can provide reasonable forecasts in both eruption and resuspension modes, particularly when the adjusted granulometry is considered. The study also highlights the importance of having dedicated datasets of active volcanoes furnishing first-guess model inputs during the early stages of an eruption.

  5. Tectonic shortening and coeval volcanism during the Quaternary, Northeast Japan arc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koji Umeda; Masao Ban; Shintaro Hayashi; Tomohiro Kusano

    2013-02-01

    The Northeast Japan arc, a mature volcanic arc with a back-arc marginal basin (Japan Sea), is located on a convergent plate boundary along the subducting Pacific plate and the overriding North American plate. From a compilation and analysis of stratigraphy, radiometric age and data on erupted magma volumes, 176 eruptive episodes identified from 69 volcanoes so far, indicate that notable changes in eruption style, magma discharge rates and distribution of eruptive centres occurred around 1.0 Ma. Before ca.1.0 Ma, large-volume felsic eruptions were dominant, forming large calderas in the frontal arc, a region of low crustal strain rate. After ca. 1.0 Ma to the present, the calc-alkaline andesite magma eruptions in the frontal and rear arcs, synchronous with crustal shortening characterized by reverse faulting, resulted in stratovolcano development along narrow uplifted zones. Although, it is widely assumed that magma cannot rise easily in a compressional setting, some of the magma stored within basal sills could be extruded where N–S-trending uplifted mountains bounded by reverse faults formed since about ca.1.0 Ma.

  6. Do siblings always form and evolve simultaneously? Testing the coevality of multiple protostellar systems through SEDs

    CERN Document Server

    Murillo, Nadia M; Tobin, John J; Fedele, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Multiplicity is common in field stars and among protostellar systems. Models suggest two paths of formation: turbulent fragmentation and protostellar disk fragmentation. We attempt to find whether or not the coevality frequency of multiple protostellar systems can help to better understand their formation mechanism. The coevality frequency is determined by constraining the relative evolutionary stages of the components in a multiple system. SEDs for known multiple protostars in Perseus were constructed from literature data. Herschel PACS photometric maps were used to sample the peak of the SED for systems with separations >7", a crucial aspect in determining the evolutionary stage of a protostellar system. Inclination effects and the surrounding envelope and outflows were considered to decouple source geometry from evolution. This together with the shape and derived properties from the SED was used to determine each system's coevality as accurately as possible. SED models were used to examine the frequency of...

  7. A statistical test on the reliability of the non-coevality of stars in binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Valle, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Degl'Innocenti, S

    2016-01-01

    We develop a statistical test on the expected difference in age estimates of two coeval stars in detached double-lined eclipsing binary systems that are only caused by observational uncertainties. We focus on stars in the mass range [0.8; 1.6] Msun, and on stars in the main-sequence phase. The ages were obtained by means of the maximum-likelihood SCEPtER technique. The observational constraints used in the recovery procedure are stellar mass, radius, effective temperature, and metallicity [Fe/H]. We defined the statistic W computed as the ratio of the absolute difference of estimated ages for the two stars over the age of the older one. We determined the critical values of this statistics above which coevality can be rejected. The median expected difference in the reconstructed age between the coeval stars of a binary system -- caused alone by the observational uncertainties -- shows a strong dependence on the evolutionary stage. This ranges from about 20% for an evolved primary star to about 75% for a near Z...

  8. A statistical test on the reliability of the non-coevality of stars in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We develop a statistical test on the expected difference in age estimates of two coeval stars in detached double-lined eclipsing binary systems that are only caused by observational uncertainties. We focus on stars in the mass range [0.8; 1.6] M⊙, with an initial metallicity [Fe/H] from -0.55 to 0.55 dex, and on stars in the main-sequence phase. Methods: The ages were obtained by means of the SCEPtER technique, a maximum-likelihood procedure relying on a pre-computed grid of stellar models. The observational constraints used in the recovery procedure are stellar mass, radius, effective temperature, and metallicity [Fe/H]. To check the effect of the uncertainties affecting observations on the (non-)coevality assessment, the chosen observational constraints were subjected to a Gaussian perturbation before applying the SCEPtER code. We defined the statistic W computed as the ratio of the absolute difference of estimated ages for the two stars over the age of the older one. We determined the critical values of this statistics above which coevality can be rejected in dependence on the mass of the two stars, on the initial metallicity [Fe/H], and on the evolutionary stage of the primary star. Results: The median expected difference in the reconstructed age between the coeval stars of a binary system - caused alone by the observational uncertainties - shows a strong dependence on the evolutionary stage. This ranges from about 20% for an evolved primary star to about 75% for a near ZAMS primary. The median difference also shows an increase with the mass of the primary star from 20% for 0.8 M⊙ stars to about 50% for 1.6 M⊙ stars. The reliability of these results was checked by repeating the process with a grid of stellar models computed by a different evolutionary code; the median difference in the critical values was only 0.01. We show that the W test is much more sensible to age differences in the binary system components than the alternative approach of

  9. New Insights to the Mid Miocene Calc-alkaline Lavas of the Strawberry Volcanics, NE Oregon Surrounded by the Coeval Tholeiitic Columbia River Basalt Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Strawberry Volcanics (SV) of NE Oregon were distributed over 3,400 km2 during the mid-Miocene and comprise a diverse volcanic suite, which span the range of compositions from basalt to rhyolite. The predominant composition of this volcanic suite is calc-alkaline (CA) basaltic andesite and andesite, although tholeiitic (TH) lavas of basalt to andesite occur as well. The coeval flood basalts of the Columbia River province surround the SV. Here we will discuss new ages and geochemical data, and present a new geologic map and stratigraphy of the SV. The SV are emplaced on top of pre-Tertiary accreted terranes of the Blue Mountain Province, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and older Tertiary volcanic rocks thought to be mostly Oligocene of age. Massive rhyolites (~300 m thick) are exposed mainly along the western flank and underlie the intermediate composition lavas. In the southern portion of this study area, alkali basaltic lavas, thought to be late Miocene to early Pliocene in age, erupted and overlie the SV. In addition, several regional ignimbrites reach into the area. The 9.7 Ma Devine Canyon Tuff and the 7.1 Ma Rattlesnake Tuff also overlie the SV. The 15.9-15.4 Ma Dinner Creek Tuff is mid-Miocene, and clear stratigraphic relationships are found in areas where the tuff is intercalated between thick SV lava flows. All of the basalts of the SV are TH and are dominated by phenocryst-poor (≤2%) lithologies. These basalts have an ophitic texture dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine (often weathered to iddingsite). Basalts and basaltic andesites have olivine Fo #'s ranging from 44 at the rims (where weathered to iddingsite) and as high as 88 at cores. Pyroxene Mg #'s range from 65 to 85. Andesites of the SV are sub-alkaline, and like the basalts, are exceedingly phenocryst-poor (≤3%) with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene and olivine, which occasionally occur as crystal clots of ~1-3 mm instead of single crystals. In addition, minimal

  10. System of Volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVARI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made among the systems of B. G.
    Escher (3, of R. W. van Bemmelen (1 and that of the author (4. In this
    connection, on the basis of Esclier's classification, the terms of "constructiv
    e " and "destructive" eruptions are introduced into the author's system and
    at the same time Escher's concept on the possible relation between the depth
    of magma-chamber and the measure of the gas-pressure is discussed briefly.
    Three complementary remarks to the first paper (4 011 the subject of system
    of volcanic activity are added.

  11. Early Eocene volcanic ashes on Greifswalder Oie and their depositional environment, with an overview of coeval ash-bearing deposits in northern Germany and Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Karsten; Ansorge, Jörg; Matting, Sabine; Hüneke, Heiko

    2015-11-01

    Unconsolidated bentonites and carbonate-cemented volcanic ashes occur in northern Germany within the clay sequence of the Lamstedt and Schlieven Formations documented by several wells. Ash-bearing carbonate concretions (so-called cementstones) are also known from glacially transported rafts and erratic boulders on the Baltic Sea island Greifswalder Oie, representing the easternmost exposures of early Eocene sediments in the North Sea Basin. The ashes can be correlated with water-lain ashes of the Danish Fur and Ølst Formations (mo-clay) generated during the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean about 55 Ma ago. Two types of cementstones can be distinguished on the basis of the mineralogical composition, sedimentary features and fossil content. Greifswalder Oie type I contains a black, up to 12-cm-thick ash deposit that follows above two distinct thin grey ash layers. The major ash unit has a rather homogeneous lower part; only a very weak normal grading and faint lamination are discernible. In the upper part, however, intercalations with light mudstone, in part intensively bioturbated, together with parallel and cross-lamination suggest reworking of the ash in a shallow marine environment. Major and trace element compositions are used to correlate type I ashes with those of the Danish-positive series which represent rather uniform ferrobasalts of the Danish stage 4, probably related to the emergence of proto-Iceland. In contrast, type II ash comprises a single, normally graded, about 5-cm-thick layer of water-lain air-fall tuff, which is embedded in fine-grained sandstone to muddy siltstone. Type II ash is characterised by very high TiO2 but low MgO contents. Exceptional REE patterns with a pronounced positive Eu anomaly suggest intense leaching of the glass that hampers exact correlation with pyroclastic deposits within the North Atlantic Igneous Province.

  12. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro

  13. The interplay between tectonics and volcanism: a key to unravel the nature of Andean geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cembrano, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Field mapping combined with seismic data document the interplay between tectonics and volcanism in the Andes. In the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of northern Chile (22-24°S), Pleistocene east-west shortening and a thick crust (50-70 km) are associated with major composite dacitic-andesitic volcanoes and a few monogenetic basaltic eruptive centers. CVZ stratovolcanoes are devoided of flank vents; clusters of minor eruptive centers are uncommon. Composite volcanoes and minor eruptive centers are coeval with a NS-striking system of reverse faults and fault-propagation folds. Although dextral strike-slip crustal seismicity is recorded between 18 and 21°S, evidence for long-term, margin-parallel strike-slip deformation is absent. In contrast, volcanoes of the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), between 38 and 46°S are built on a much thinner crust (30-40 km) during intra-arc dextral transpression. Crustal seismicity shows dextral strike-slip focal mechanisms. There, a wide variety of volcanic forms and compositions coexist along the same volcanic arc. Volcanoes range from single monogenetic cones lying on master faults to major composite volcanoes organized into either NE- or NW-trending chains, oblique to the continental margin. Flank vents and elongated clusters of minor eruptive centers are common. Compositions range from primitive basalts at minor eruptive centers, to highly evolved magmas at mature stratovolcanoes. I hypothesize that the kinematics of fault-fracture networks under which magma is transported through the crust is one fundamental factor controlling the wide variety of volcanic forms, volcanic alignment patterns and rock compositions along a single volcanic arc. As a first approximation, a thicker crust favors magma differentiation processes whereas a thinner crust prevents it. Likewise, whereas bulk intra-arc compression (vertical σ3) enhances longer residence times of magmas in the CVZ, strike-slip deformation (horizontal σ3) in SVZ provides

  14. Volcanic alert system (VAS) developed during the 2011-2014 El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alicia; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, José M.; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-06-01

    The 2011 volcanic unrest at El Hierro Island illustrated the need for a Volcanic Alert System (VAS) specifically designed for the management of volcanic crises developing after long repose periods. The VAS comprises the monitoring network, the software tools for analysis of the monitoring parameters, the Volcanic Activity Level (VAL) management, and the assessment of hazard. The VAS presented here focuses on phenomena related to moderate eruptions, and on potentially destructive volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides. We introduce a set of new data analysis tools, aimed to detect data trend changes, as well as spurious signals related to instrumental failure. When data-trend changes and/or malfunctions are detected, a watchdog is triggered, issuing a watch-out warning (WOW) to the Monitoring Scientific Team (MST). The changes in data patterns are then translated by the MST into a VAL that is easy to use and understand by scientists, technicians, and decision-makers. Although the VAS was designed specifically for the unrest episodes at El Hierro, the methodologies may prove useful at other volcanic systems.

  15. Fluid-magmatic systems and volcanic centers in Northern Caucasus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobisevich, Alexey L.; Masurenkov, Yuri P.; Pouzich, Irina N.; Laverova, Ninel I.

    2013-04-01

    The central segment of Alpine mobile folded system and the Greater Caucasus is considered with respect to fluid-magmatic activity within modern and Holocene volcanic centers. A volcanic center is a combination of volcanoes, intrusions, and hydrothermal features supported by endogenous flow of matter and energy localised in space and steady in time; responsible for magma generation and characterized by structural representation in the form of circular dome and caldera associations. Results of complimentary geological and geophysical studies carried out in the Elbrus volcanic area and the Pyatogorsk volcanic center are presented. The deep magmatic source and the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Elbrus volcano are outlined via comparative analysis of geological and experimental geophysical data (microgravity studies, magneto-telluric profiling, temperature of carbonaceous mineral waters). It has been determined that the peripheral magmatic chamber and the deep magmatic source of the volcano are located at depths of 0-7 and 20-30 km below sea level, respectively, and the geothermal gradient beneath the volcano is 100°C/km. In this study, analysis of processes of modern heat outflux produced by carbonaceous springs in the Elbrus volcanic center is carried out with respect to updated information about spatial configuration of deep fluid-magmatic structures of the Elbrus volcano. It has been shown, that degradation of the Elbrus glaciers throughout the historical time is related both to climatic variations and endogenic heat. The stable fast rate of melting for the glaciers on the volcano's eastern slope is of theoretical and practical interest as factors of eruption prognosis. The system approach to studying volcanism implies that events that seem to be outside the studied process should not be ignored. This concerns glaciers located in the vicinity of volcanoes. The crustal rocks contacting with the volcanism products exchange matter and energy between each other

  16. The Earth System Science Pathfinder VOLCAM Volcanic Hazard Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Arlin J.

    1999-01-01

    The VOLCAM mission is planned for research on volcanic eruptions and as a demonstration of a satellite system for measuring the location and density of volcanic eruption clouds for use in mitigating hazards to aircraft by the operational air traffic control systems. A requirement for 15 minute time resolution is met by flight as payloads of opportunity on geostationary satellites. Volcanic sulfur dioxide and ash are detected using techniques that have been developed from polar orbiting TOMS (UV) and AVHRR (IR) data. Seven band UV and three band IR filter wheel cameras are designed for continuous observation of the full disk of the earth with moderate (10 - 20 km) ground resolution. This resolution can be achieved with small, low cost instruments but is adequate for discrimination of ash and sulfur dioxide in the volcanic clouds from meteorological clouds and ozone. The false alarm rate is small through use of sulfur dioxide as a unique tracer of volcanic clouds. The UV band wavelengths are optimized to detect very small sulfur dioxide amounts that are present in pre-eruptive outgassing of volcanoes. The system is also capable of tracking dust and smoke clouds, and will be used to infer winds at tropopause level from the correlation of total ozone with potential vorticity.

  17. Geothermal systems in volcanic arcs: Volcanic characteristics and surface manifestations as indicators of geothermal potential and favorability worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, P.; Shevenell, L.; Hinz, N.; Coolbaugh, M.; Melosh, G.; Cumming, W.

    2016-09-01

    This paper brings a global perspective to volcanic arc geothermal assessments by evaluating trends and correlations of volcanic characteristic and surface manifestation data from world power production sites in subduction zone volcanic settings. The focus of the work was to evaluate volcanic centers individually and as a group in these arcs by correlating various geologic characteristics with known potential to host electricity grade geothermal systems at the volcanic centers. A database was developed that describes key geologic factors expected to be indicative of productive geothermal systems in a global training set, which includes all 74 subduction zone volcanic centers world-wide with current or proven power production capability. Importantly, this data set only contains data from subduction zone volcanoes and contains no negative cases, limiting the populations of any statistical groups. Regardless, this is the most robust geothermal benchmark training set for magmatic-heated systems to date that has been made public. The work reported here is part of a larger project that included data collection, evaluation, correlations and weightings, fairway and favorability modeling and mapping, prediction of blind systems, and uncertainty analysis to estimate errors associated with model predictions. This first paper describes volcano characteristics, compositions and eruption ages and trends along with surface manifestation observations and temperatures as they relate to known power producing systems. Our findings show a strong correlation between the presence and size of active flank fumarole areas and installed power production. Additionally, the majority of volcanic characteristics, including long-held anecdotal correlations related to magmatic composition or size, have limited to no correlation with power production potential. Notable exceptions are correlations between greater power yield from geothermal systems associated with older (Pleistocene) caldera systems

  18. Geodetic Monitoring System Operating On Neapolitan Volcanic Area (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingue, F.; Ov-Geodesy Team

    The Neapolitan volcanic area is located in the southern sector of the Campanian Plain Graben including three volcanic active structures (Somma-Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei and Ischia). The Somma-Vesuvius complex, placed East of Naples, is a strato-volcano composed by a more ancient apparatus (Mt. Somma) and a younger cone (Mt. Vesu- vius) developed inside Somma caldera. Since last eruption (1944) it is in a quiescent state characterised by a low level seismicity and deformation activity. The Campi Fle- grei, located West of Naples, are a volcanic field inside an older caldera rim. The last eruption, occurred in the 1538, built up the Mt. Nuovo cone. The Campi Flegrei are subject to a slow vertical deformation, called bradyseism. In the 1970-1972 and 1982-1984 they have been affected by two intense episodes of ground upheaval (ac- companied by an intense seismic activity)0, followed by a subsidence phase, slower than uplift and still active. Though such phenomenon has not been followed by erup- tive events, it caused serious damages, emphasizing the high volcanic risk of the phle- grean caldera. The Ischia island, located SW of Naples, has been characterised by a volcanic activity both explosive and effusive, occurred mainly in the last 50,000 years. These events modelled the topography producing fault systems and structures delim- iting the Mt. Epomeo resurgent block. The last eruption has occurred on 1302. After, the dynamics of the island has been characterised by seismic activity (the strongest earthquake occurred on 1883) and by a meaningful subsidence, on the S and NW sec- tors of the island. The concentration of such many active volcanoes in an area with a dense urbanization (about 1,500,000 inhabitants live) needs systematic and contin- uous monitoring of the dynamics. These information are necessary in order to char- acterise eruptive precursors useful for modelling the volcanoes behaviour. Insofar, the entire volcanic Neapolitan area, characterised by a

  19. Application of Geographical Information Systems to Lahar Hazard Assessment on an Active Volcanic System

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Lahars (highly dynamic mixtures of volcanic debris and water) have been responsible for some of the most serious volcanic disasters and have killed tens of thousands of people in recent decades. Despite considerable lahar model development in the sciences, many research tools have proved wholly unsuitable for practical application on an active volcanic system where it is difficult to obtain field measurements. In addition, geographic information systems are tools that offer a great potenti...

  20. Preliminary Findings of Petrology and Geochemistry of The Aladaǧ Volcanic System and Surrounding Areas (Kars, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, Olgun; Keskin, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    Between the towns of Sarıkamış and Kaǧızman, NE Turkey, a medium-sized strato-volcano with satellite cones and domes on its slopes unconformably overlies the Erzurum-Kars Volcanic Plateau (EKVP) with a subhorizontal contact. It is called the Aladaǧ volcanic system (AVS). Dating results indicate that the AVS is Pliocene in age. The EKVP is known to be formed by a widespread volcanism between Middle Miocene to Pliocene. The young volcanism in E Turkey including the study area is linked to a collision between the Eurasia and Arabian continents, started almost 15 Ma ago. The EKVP lies over 2000 m above the sea level, and is deeply cut by the river Aras. On the slopes of the valley, one of the best volcano-stratigraphic transects of Eastern Anatolia, almost half a km thick, is exposed. That transect is composed of aphyric andesites-dacites, ignimbrites, tuffs, perlite and obsidian bands. Pyroclastic fall and surge-related pumice deposits are also widespread. Top of the plateau is composed of the andesitic to basaltic andesitic lavas containing plagioclase (Plg) and ortho/clino pyroxene (Opx/Cpx) phenocrysts set in glassy groundmass. In the northwest of the study area, an eroded stratovolcano, probably coeval with the plateau sequence is situated. It also consists of high-silica rhyolites and pyroclastic equivalents. The AVS is composed basically of intermediate lavas. The largest volcanic edifice of the Aladaǧ volcanic system, namely the Greater Aladaǧ stratovolcano reaches up to 3000 m height and includes a horseshoe shaped crater open to the North. Small volcanic cones and domes sit on the flanks of the Greater Aladaǧ volcano. The Aladaǧ lavas are divided into four sub-groups on the basis of their stratigraphic positions, mineral assemblages and textural properties. (1) The oldest products of the Greater Aladaǧ stratovolcano are andesitic and dasitic lavas. They directly sit on the EKVP. These are Plg and Opx/Cpx bearing lavas with porphric, vitrophyric

  1. Exploring the Potential Impacts of Historic Volcanic Eruptions on the Contemporary Global Food System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael J.; Chon, S.; Wada, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of volcanic impacts on crops is urgently needed, as volcanic eruptions and the associated climate anomalies can cause unanticipated shocks to food production. Such shocks are a major concern given the fragility of the global food system.

  2. Volcanic tremors: Good indicators of change in plumbing systems during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárraga, Marta; Martí, Joan; Abella, Rafael; Carniel, Roberto; López, Carmen

    2014-03-01

    Geophysical and geochemical signals recorded during episodes of unrest preceding volcanic eruptions provide information on movements of magma inside the lithosphere and on how magma prepares to reach the surface. When the eruption ensues continuous volcanic monitoring can reveal the nature of changes occurring in the volcano's plumbing system, which may be correlated with changes in both eruption behaviour and products. During the 2011-2012 submarine eruption of El Hierro (Canary Islands), the seismic signal, surface deformation, a broad stain on the sea surface of the eruption site, and the occasional appearance of floating lava balloons and pyroclastic fragments were the main observable signs. A strong continuous tremor in the vent accompanied the eruption and varied significantly in amplitude, frequency and dynamical parameters. We analysed these variations and correlated them with changes in the distribution of earthquakes and in the petrology of the erupting magma. This enabled us to relate variations in tremors to changes in the (i) stress conditions of the plumbing system, (ii) dimensions of the conduit and vent, (iii) intensity of the explosive episodes, and (iv) rheological changes in the erupting magma. The results obtained show how the tremor signal was strongly influenced by stress changes in the host rock and in the rheological variations in the erupting magma. We conclude that the tracking of real-time syn-eruptive tremor signals via the observation of variations in plumbing systems and magma physics is a potentially effective tool for interpreting eruption dynamics, and suggest that similar variations observed in pre-eruptive tremors will have a similar origin.

  3. The sub-volcanic system of El Hierro, Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, I.; Becerril, L.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The main volcanotectonic structures of El Hierro are three rift zones, trending northeast, west, and south. Most of the eruptions in El Hierro within these zones are basaltic fissure eruptions fed by subvertical dykes. The dykes appear as close to collinear or slightly offset segments, their surface expressions being clusters of cinder cones and eruptive vents. Three large landslides, referred to as El Golfo, El Julan, and Las Playas, have eroded the areas between rift axes and provide exposures that make it possible to provide a three-dimensional view of the uppermost part of the sub-volcanic system. Here we report the results of a structural study of the sub-volcanic system as obtained through the analysis of dykes and eruptive vents. The data obtained from surface outcrops have been combined with data from subsurface water galleries. More than 600 eruptive vents and 625 dykes have been studied in detail to characterise the subvolcanic system of the island. Using cinder-cone and other eruptive-vent alignments it has been possible to infer 115 eruptive fissures with lengths that range from 40 m to 2200 m. NE-SW trending volcanic fissures and dykes are common on the entire island and predominate in the northeast rift zone. The main strike of the dykes and fissures in the south and west rift zones are approximately NNW-SSE and E-W, respectively. However, in the west rift zone, eruptive fissures display a fan distribution with directions that range from N43°E to N124°E. Volcanic fissures within the El Golfo landslide valley trend parallel to the head scarp, except those that are close to the head of the valley, many of which are perpendicular to the scarp. Dykes show a radial distribution in the head scarp of the El Golfo landslide. Three feeder-dykes directly connected with their lava flows have been identified in El Hierro. Feeder dykes are difficult to observe in the field but provide important information when their lengths and thicknesses can be measured

  4. Neural networks and dynamical system techniques for volcanic tremor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Carniel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A volcano can be seen as a dynamical system, the number of state variables being its dimension N. The state is usually confined on a manifold with a lower dimension f, manifold which is characteristic of a persistent «structural configuration». A change in this manifold may be a hint that something is happening to the dynamics of the volcano, possibly leading to a paroxysmal phase. In this work the original state space of the volcano dynamical system is substituted by a pseudo state space reconstructed by the method of time-delayed coordinates, with suitably chosen lag time and embedding dimension, from experimental time series of seismic activity, i.e. volcanic tremor recorded at Stromboli volcano. The monitoring is done by a neural network which first learns the dynamics of the persistent tremor and then tries to detect structural changes in its behaviour.

  5. Magma chamber processes in central volcanic systems of Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Þórarinsson, Sigurjón Böðvar; Tegner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    New field work and petrological investigations of the largest gabbro outcrop in Iceland, the Hvalnesfjall gabbro of the 6-7 Ma Austurhorn intrusive complex, have established a stratigraphic sequence exceeding 800 m composed of at least 8 macrorhythmic units. The bases of the macrorhythmic units......3 of clinopyroxene and magnetite indicative of magma replenishment. Some macrorhythmic units show mineral trends indicative of up-section fractional crystallisation over up to 100 m, whereas others show little variation. Two populations of plagioclase crystals (large, An-rich and small, less An...... olivine basalts from Iceland that had undergone about 20% crystallisation of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene and that the macrorhythmic units formed from thin magma layers not exceeding 200-300 m. Such a "mushy" magma chamber is akin to volcanic plumbing systems in settings of high magma supply...

  6. G-EVER Activities and the Next-generation Volcanic Hazard Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) is a consortium of Asia-Pacific geohazard research institutes that was established in 2012. G-EVER aims to formulate strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions. G-EVER is working on enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information on the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The 1st G-EVER International Symposium was held in Tsukuba, Japan in March 11, 2013. The 2nd Symposium is scheduled in Sendai, Tohoku Japan, in Oct. 19-20, 2013. Currently, 4 working groups were proposed in the G-EVER Consortium. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment WG is developing a useful system for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is based on volcanic eruption history datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Volcanic eruption histories including precursor phenomena leading to major eruptions of active volcanoes are very important for future prediction of volcanic eruptions. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and types, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. Proposing international standards on how to estimate the volume of volcanic products is important to make a high quality volcanic eruption database. Spatial distribution database of volcanic products (e.g. tephra and pyroclastic flow distributions), encoded into a GIS based database is necessary for more precise area and volume estimation and risk assessments. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represents a subset of possible future scenarios. Therefore, numerical simulations with controlled parameters are needed for more precise volcanic eruption

  7. Does Students' Source of Knowledge Affect Their Understanding of Volcanic Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Thomas L.; Cervato, Cinzia; Gallus, William; Larsen, Michael; Hobbs, Jon; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A recent survey of undergraduates at five schools across the United States indicates that many undergraduates feel that they have learned more about volcanic systems from Hollywood films and the popular media than they learned in the course of their precollegiate formal education. Scores on the Volcanic Concept Survey, an instrument designed to…

  8. Integrating Community Volcanic Hazard Mapping, Geographic Information Systems, and Modeling to Reduce Volcanic Hazard Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajo Sanchez, Jorge V.

    This dissertation is composed of an introductory chapter and three papers about vulnerability and volcanic hazard maps with emphasis on lahars. The introductory chapter reviews definitions of the term vulnerability by the social and natural hazard community and it provides a new definition of hazard vulnerability that includes social and natural hazard factors. The first paper explains how the Community Volcanic Hazard Map (CVHM) is used for vulnerability analysis and explains in detail a new methodology to obtain valuable information about ethnophysiographic differences, hazards, and landscape knowledge of communities in the area of interest: the Canton Buenos Aires situated on the northern flank of the Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano, El Salvador. The second paper is about creating a lahar hazard map in data poor environments by generating a landslide inventory and obtaining potential volumes of dry material that can potentially be carried by lahars. The third paper introduces an innovative lahar hazard map integrating information generated by the previous two papers. It shows the differences in hazard maps created by the communities and experts both visually as well as quantitatively. This new, integrated hazard map was presented to the community with positive feedback and acceptance. The dissertation concludes with a summary chapter on the results and recommendations.

  9. Ambient Noise Surface Wave Tomography of the volcanic systems of eastern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. G.; Priestley, K. F.; White, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Vatnajökull region of central-east Iceland lies above the head of the Iceland mantle plume where the crust is thickest due to enhanced melt supply. As a result the region contains a high density of volcanic rift systems, with six large subglacial central volcanoes. Due to the ice cover, the geological structure of the area and the location of past eruptions are poorly known. Imaging of the crustal velocity heterogeneities beneath the ice sheet aims to reveal much in terms of the structure of these volcanic plumbing systems. Mapping of significant velocity changes through time may also be indicative of movement of melt around the central volcanoes; one of which (Bárðarbunga) experienced a major rifting event in August 2014 (Sigmundsson et al. Nature 2015, Green et al. Nature Geosci. 2015). We present results from tomographic imaging of the volcanic systems in the region, using continuous data from a local broadband seismic network in central-east Iceland which provides excellent ray path coverage of the volcanic systems. This is supplemented by data from the HOTSPOT and ICEMELT experiments and the permanent monitoring stations of the Icelandic Meteorological Office. We process the continuous data following Benson et al. 2007 and automatic frequency-time analysis (FTAN) routines are used to extract more than 9000 dispersion measurements. We then generate Rayleigh wave group velocity maps which we present here. We find low velocity regions beneath the Vatnajökull icecap which are bounded by the surface expression of the volcanic rift systems. The lower velocities also extend north-west to the volcanic system under the Hofsjökull ice cap, and northwards towards Askja and the volcanic systems of the northern volcanic zone. We also produce locations and focal mechanisms of earthquakes caused by magmatic and hydrothermal activity to correlate structure with the activity of the volcanic systems.

  10. The hydrothermal system of Volcan Puracé, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C.; Williams, Stanley N.; Sano, Yuji

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents chemical and isotopic data for thermal waters, gases and S deposits from Volcan Puracé (summit elevation ˜4600 m) in SW Colombia. Hot gas discharges from fumaroles in and around the summit crater, and thermal waters discharge from three areas on its flanks. The waters from all areas have δD values of-75±1, indicating a single recharge area at high elevation on the volcano. Aircorrected values of3He/4He in thermal waters range from 3.8 to 6.7 RA, and approach those for crater fumarole gas (6.1 7.1 RA), indicating widespread addition of magmatic volatiles. An economic S deposit (El Vinagre) is being mined in the Rio Vinagre fault zone at 3600 m elevation. Sulfur isotopic data are consistent with a magmatic origin for S species in thermal waters and gases, and for the S ore deposit. Isotopic equilibration between S species may have occurred at 220±40°C, which overlaps possible equilibration temperatures (170±40°C) determined by a variety of other geothermometers for neutral thermal waters. Apparent CH4-CO2 equilibration temperatures for gases from thermal springs (400±50°C) and crater fumaroles (520±60°C) reflect higher temperatures deeper in the system. Hot magmatic gas ascending through the Rio Vinagre fault zone is though to have precipitated S and generated thermal waters by interaction with descending meteoric waters.

  11. Volcanisme à travers le système solaire, Volcanism in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Frederic

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic activity at the surface of the Earth results from the cooling of our planet's interior. Other rocky planets and satellites of the Solar system, are also cooling down and are, or have been, experiencing volcanic activities. Details of these activities depend on planets and satellites properties, in particular their size and composition. In this article, the author briefly reviews our current knowledge of volcanic activity throughout the Solar system, based on observations made by past and recent space missions. Moon volcanism is dominated by lava floods that lead to the formation of the lunar maria. Unlike Earth, the surface of Venus and Mars are not animated by plate tectonics; this has strong implications on the type of volcanism operating on these planets. In the outer Solar system, the most spectacular volcanic activity can be observed at Io, the closest Galilean moon of Jupiter, entertained by the strong tidal forces exerted by Jupiter. Finally, evidences of cryo-volcanic activity, involving water and volatiles ices instead of silicate rocks, have been detected at the surface of icy moons of giant planets (e.g., Europa, Titan, Enceladus) and dwarf planets (Pluto).

  12. Tracking changes in volcanic systems with seismic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Matt; Alicia J. Hotovec-Ellis,; Ninfa L. Bennington,; Silvio De Angelis,; Clifford Thurber,

    2014-01-01

    The detection and evaluation of time-dependent changes at volcanoes form the foundation upon which successful volcano monitoring is built. Temporal changes at volcanoes occur over all time scales and may be obvious (e.g., earthquake swarms) or subtle (e.g., a slow, steady increase in the level of tremor). Some of the most challenging types of time-dependent change to detect are subtle variations in material properties beneath active volcanoes. Although difficult to measure, such changes carry important information about stresses and fluids present within hydrothermal and magmatic systems. These changes are imprinted on seismic waves that propagate through volcanoes. In recent years, there has been a quantum leap in the ability to detect subtle structural changes systematically at volcanoes with seismic waves. The new methodology is based on the idea that useful seismic signals can be generated “at will” from seismic noise. This means signals can be measured any time, in contrast to the often irregular and unpredictable times of earthquakes. With seismic noise in the frequency band 0.1–1 Hz arising from the interaction of the ocean with the solid Earth known as microseisms, researchers have demonstrated that cross-correlations of passive seismic recordings between pairs of seismometers yield coherent signals (Campillo and Paul 2003; Shapiro and Campillo 2004). Based on this principle, coherent signals have been reconstructed from noise recordings in such diverse fields as helioseismology (Rickett and Claerbout 2000), ultrasound (Weaver and Lobkis 2001), ocean acoustic waves (Roux and Kuperman 2004), regional (Shapiro et al. 2005; Sabra et al. 2005; Bensen et al. 2007) and exploration (Draganov et al. 2007) seismology, atmospheric infrasound (Haney 2009), and studies of the cryosphere (Marsan et al. 2012). Initial applications of ambient seismic noise were to regional surface wave tomography (Shapiro et al. 2005). Brenguier et al. (2007) were the first to

  13. Use of Low-Cost Acquisition Systems with an Embedded Linux Device for Volcanic Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, David; Torres, Pedro; Casas, Benito; Toma, Daniel; Blanco, María José; Del Río, Joaquín; Manuel, Antoni

    2015-08-19

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost multiparameter acquisition system for volcanic monitoring that is applicable to gravimetry and geodesy, as well as to the visual monitoring of volcanic activity. The acquisition system was developed using a System on a Chip (SoC) Broadcom BCM2835 Linux operating system (based on DebianTM) that allows for the construction of a complete monitoring system offering multiple possibilities for storage, data-processing, configuration, and the real-time monitoring of volcanic activity. This multiparametric acquisition system was developed with a software environment, as well as with different hardware modules designed for each parameter to be monitored. The device presented here has been used and validated under different scenarios for monitoring ocean tides, ground deformation, and gravity, as well as for monitoring with images the island of Tenerife and ground deformation on the island of El Hierro.

  14. Use of Low-Cost Acquisition Systems with an Embedded Linux Device for Volcanic Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Moure

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a low-cost multiparameter acquisition system for volcanic monitoring that is applicable to gravimetry and geodesy, as well as to the visual monitoring of volcanic activity. The acquisition system was developed using a System on a Chip (SoC Broadcom BCM2835 Linux operating system (based on DebianTM that allows for the construction of a complete monitoring system offering multiple possibilities for storage, data-processing, configuration, and the real-time monitoring of volcanic activity. This multiparametric acquisition system was developed with a software environment, as well as with different hardware modules designed for each parameter to be monitored. The device presented here has been used and validated under different scenarios for monitoring ocean tides, ground deformation, and gravity, as well as for monitoring with images the island of Tenerife and ground deformation on the island of El Hierro.

  15. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  16. Monitoring volcanic systems through cross-correlation of coincident A-Train satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, V. J. B.; Carn, S. A.; Wright, R.

    2014-12-01

    The remote location and inaccessibility of many active volcanic systems around the world hinders detailed investigation of their eruptive dynamics. One methodology for monitoring such locations is through the utilisation of multiple satellite datasets to elucidate underlying eruption dynamics and aid volcanic hazard mitigation. Whilst satellite datasets are often analysed individually, here we exploit the multi-platform NASA A-Train satellite constellation, including the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua. OMI measures volcanic emissions (e.g. sulphur dioxide, ash) whilst MODIS enables monitoring of thermal anomalies (e.g. lava flows, lava lakes, pyroclastic deposits), allowing analysis of a more diverse range of volcanic unrest than is possible using a single measurement technique alone, and permitting cross-correlation between datasets for specific locations to assess cyclic activity. A Multi-taper (MTM) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis was implemented at an initial sample site (Soufriere Hills volcano [SHV], Montserrat) facilitating cycle identification and subsequent comparison with existing ground-based data. Corresponding cycles at intervals of 8, 12 and ~50 days were identified in both the satellite-based SO2 and thermal infrared signals and ground-based SO2 measurements (Nicholson et al. 2013), validating the methodology. Our analysis confirms the potential for identification of cyclical volcanic activity through synergistic analysis of satellite data, which would be of particular value at poorly monitored volcanic systems. Following our initial test at SHV, further sample sites have been selected in locations with varied eruption dynamics and monitoring capabilities including Ambrym (Vanuatu), Kilauea (Hawaii), Nyiragongo (DR Congo) and Etna (Italy) with the intention of identifying not only cyclic signals that can be attributed to volcanic systems but also those which are

  17. Pattern of geochemical variations within the volcanic system of Mt Etna, Italy, from 1995 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, Rosa Anna; Falsaperla, Susanna; Langer, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic and evolution of magma in the plumbing system are key aspects in the evaluation of volcanic hazard. Eruptive phenomena involve indeed processes of magma upraise and storage, which may change in time and space, and mirror in the composition of volcanic products. In this study, we analyze the pattern of geochemical variations at Etna, Italy, from 1995 to 2013. In this time span, volcanic activity affected all the four craters close to the summit of the volcano (located at about 3300 m above the sea level), and fed eruptive fissures along its upper flanks. In addition, a new crater formed and rapidly built up, giving rise to spectacular lava fountains from 2011 on. Based on a dataset containing the geochemical composition of volcanic products collected over 18 years, we explored the application of data mining methods in the framework of the European MEDiterrranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED­-SUV) project. In the present application, we discuss the relationships among the composition of volcanic products sampled from all the afore-mentioned eruptive centers. Our results highlight differences in magma evolution, dynamic and eruptive style even within a single eruptive center.

  18. A multidisciplinary approach to quantify the permeability of the Whakaari/White Island volcanic hydrothermal system (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Ashworth, James; Mayer, Klaus; Letham-Brake, Mark; Reuschlé, Thierry; Gilg, H. Albert; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Siratovich, Paul; Cole, Jim; Jolly, Arthur D.; Baud, Patrick; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-02-01

    Our multidisciplinary study aims to better understand the permeability of active volcanic hydrothermal systems, a vital prerequisite for modelling and understanding their behaviour and evolution. Whakaari/White Island volcano (an active stratovolcano at the north-eastern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand) hosts a highly reactive hydrothermal system and represents an ideal natural laboratory to undertake such a study. We first gained an appreciation of the different lithologies at Whakaari and (where possible) their lateral and vertical extent through reconnaissance by land, sea, and air. The main crater, filled with tephra deposits, is shielded by a volcanic amphitheatre comprising interbedded lavas, lava breccias, and tuffs. We deployed field techniques to measure the permeability and density/porosity of (1) > 100 hand-sized sample blocks and (2) layered unlithified deposits in eight purpose-dug trenches. Our field measurements were then groundtruthed using traditional laboratory techniques on almost 150 samples. Our measurements highlight that the porosity of the materials at Whakaari varies from ∼ 0.01 to ∼ 0.7 and permeability varies by eight orders of magnitude (from ∼ 10-19 to ∼ 10-11 m2). The wide range in physical and hydraulic properties is the result of the numerous lithologies and their varied microstructures and alteration intensities, as exposed by a combination of macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) observations, quantitative mineralogical studies (X-ray powder diffraction), and mercury porosimetry. An understanding of the spatial distribution of lithology and alteration style/intensity is therefore important to decipher fluid flow within the Whakaari volcanic hydrothermal system. We align our field observations and porosity/permeability measurements to construct a schematic cross section of Whakaari that highlights the salient findings of our study. Taken together, the alteration typical of a volcanic

  19. Geochemical signatures of the diffuse CO2 emission from Brava volcanic system, Cape Verde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, F.; Bandomo, Z.; Barros, I.; Dias Fonseca, J.; Fernandes, P.; Rodrigues, J.; Melian Rodriguez, G.; Padron, E.; Dionis, S.; Sonia, S.; Gonçalves, A.; Fernandes, A.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Perez, N.

    2010-12-01

    Brava (67 km2) the smallest of the populated Cape Verde islands, lies at the southwestern end of the archipelagic crescent. Brava volcanic system has no documented historical eruptions, but its youthful volcanic morphology and the fact that earthquake swarms still occur indicate the potential for future eruptions. A geochemical survey of diffuse gas emissions was carried out in Brava island during February and March 2010. For this survey 228 sampling sites were selected all over the island to perform soil CO2 efflux measurements, using a portable accumulation chamber and an IR sensor, and soil temperature measurements at a depth of 30-50 cm. Soil gas samples were collected at 40 cm depth for chemical (He, H2, N2, CO2, CH4, Ar and O2) and isotopic (δ13C-CO2) analysis in 32 selected sampling sites. CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 1.343 g m-2 d-1. To quantify the total diffuse CO2 emission from Brava volcanic system, a CO2 efflux map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulations (sGs). Most of the studied area showed background levels of CO2 efflux (˜2 g m-2 d-1), while peak levels (>1300 g m-2 d-1) were mainly identified at Vinagre and Baleia areas. The total diffuse CO2 output from Brava volcanic system was estimated about 41.6 t d-1. The analysis of the carbon isotopic signature of the CO2 in the soil atmosphere provides an insight for evaluating the origin of the diffuse CO2 emission. Observed δ13C-CO2 values ranged from -20.86 to -1.26 ‰. A binary plot of CO2 concentrations versus δ13C-CO2 values allows us to represent three major geochemical reservoirs (atmospheric air, volcanic gas, and biogenic gas) and their related mixing lines. The chemical and isotopic analysis of Brava soil gas samples suggest a mixing with deep-seated CO2 and biogenic gas for the diffuse CO2 emission from Brava volcanic system. The lack of visible volcanic gas emission in Brava highlights the importance of monitoring diffuse CO2 emission to improve its

  20. Evolving volcanism at the tip of a propagating arc: The earliest high-Mg andesites in northern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booden, Mathijs A.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Black, Philippa M.

    2010-08-01

    A NNW-striking string of isolated volcanic centers, the Kiwitahi chain, erupted between 15 and 5.5 Ma in northern New Zealand. Prior to 6.2 Ma, the erupted rocks were plagioclase- and hornblende-dominated andesites, which are geochemically comparable to coeval andesites erupted in the nearby, much larger Coromandel Volcanic Zone (CVZ). Compared to CVZ andesites, however, the Kiwitahi andesites show more subdued incompatible element enrichments, and they generally have relatively unradiogenic Sr isotope compositions. These features, and the small eruption volumes involved, suggest that the Kiwitahi centers formed over the edge of a magmatic system that was centered on the CVZ. The Kiwitahi centers progressively become younger towards the SSE representing the migration over the time of the edge of this magmatic system. Between 6.2 and 5.5 Ma, four centers at the southern end of the chain erupted pyroxene-dominated, high-magnesium andesites that are geochemically unlike coeval andesites in the CVZ, but similar to Quaternary high-Mg andesites erupted along the western edge of the Taupo Volcanic Zone. These are the earliest known high-Mg andesites in northern New Zealand; their appearance may mark the inception of the current configuration where high-Mg andesite eruptions precede regular andesitic volcanism at the leading edge of the arc.

  1. Volcanic Lake System at Aso Volcano, Japan: Fluctuations in the Supply of Volcanic Fluid from the Hydrothermal System beneath the Crater Lake (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Kagiyama, T.

    2010-12-01

    Hot crater lakes that develop upon active volcanoes generally overlie the magma-hydrothermal system. At hot crater lakes, most of the thermal energy and mass injected into the lake bottom is trapped in the lake water. It is therefore possible to detect even slight changes in subaqueous geothermal activity. The 1st crater of Nakadake, Aso volcano, Japan, contains a hot crater lake, locally called Yudamari, which is about 200 m in diameter. During a recent calm period, water temperature is around 60-70 °C, and heat discharge from lake surface is approximately constant at 200-300 MW. Historical documents report that Yudamari has repeatedly appeared and disappeared over the past 1,500 years. Changes in water level and temperature suggest that the state of Yudamari is related to volcanic activity, as also reported for Poás in Costa Rica and for Ruapehu in New Zealand. These changes in lake water are probably caused by changes in the input of volcanic fluid to the crater bottom. Therefore, precise observations and analysis of a hot crater lake would reveal the nature of variations in the input of volcanic fluid that originated from the underlying hydrothermal system. However, direct monitoring of the lake water at Yudamari is made difficult by the steep topography and high concentrations of SO2 gas. The recent compilation of a 1-mesh digital surface model (DSM) and installation of a commercial digital camera enabled precise and continuous monitoring of water level with an average accuracy of 10-20 cm. As a result we observed characteristic patterns of change in lake level that show no direct correlation with precipitation, suggesting fluctuations in the supply of volcanic fluid to lake water. To estimate temporal variations in flux and enthalpy from the lake bottom, we developed a numerical model of a hot crater lake applied to the precise observation data for the period from July 2006 to January 2009. The analyses revealed seasonal changes in mass flux (66-132 kg

  2. Precise Hypocenter Relocation of Microearthquakes in the Torfajökull Volcanic System, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, R.; White, R. S.; Soosalu, H.

    2003-12-01

    The Torfajökull volcanic system is one of about 30 active volcanoes comprising the neovolcanic zones of Iceland. It is located at the rift-transform junction between the Eastern Volcanic Zone and the South Iceland Seismic Zone. The central volcanic part of the system is the largest silicic centre in Iceland with a caldera of about 12 km diameter. It's high-temperature geothermal system is one of the most powerful in Iceland. Torfajökull is the source of persistent seismicity, where both high- and low-frequency earthquakes occur. To study the microseismicity of the volcanic area in detail a temporary array of 20 broad-band seismic stations was deployed between May and November 2002. These temporary stations were embedded in the permanent South Iceland Lowland (SIL) network, and data from nine adjacent SIL-stations were included in the study. A 'minimum one-dimensional velocity model' with station corrections was computed for earthquake relocation by inverting manually picked P- and S- wave arrival times from events occurring in the Torfajökull volcanic centre, beneath Myrdalsjökull glacier south of the temporary array, and in the South Iceland Seismic Zone in the west. High-frequency earthquakes from the Torfajökull volcanic centre were then relocated using the program NonLinLoc, which calculates a non-linear, probabilistic solution to the earthquake location problem. From several hundred earthquakes in the Torfajökull area, 122 were well locatable (gap < 180 degrees, more than 10 observations). Subsequently, we correlated the waveforms of this sub-dataset (around 2000 obseravtions) to define linked events, calculated the relative travel time difference between event pairs, and solved for the hypocentral separation between these events with HypoDD. The resulting high-resolution pattern shows a tighter clustering in epicenter and focal depth when compared to original locations. All earthquakes are located beneath the caldera with hypocenters between 1 and 6 km

  3. Late Cretaceous volcanic arc system in Southwest Korea: Occurrence, lithological characteristics, SHRIMP zircon U-Pb age, and tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hee Jae; Kwon, Chang Woo

    2017-04-01

    In the southwest region of the Korean Peninsula, four large volcanoes, the Buan, Seonunsan, Wido, and Beopseongpo, with a maximum diameter of ca 20 km, form a distinct topographic undulation along the NE-SW-trending Hamyeol Fault. These volcanics comprise various types of pyroclastic, sedimentary, and lava/intrusive rocks, and are interpreted as remnants of calderas resulting from various volcanic eruptions, indicating that Hamyeol Fault, together with crustal extension, played an important role in volcano formation in this region. SHRIMP U-Pb ages of zircon isolated from each volcanics are as follows. For Buan Volcanics, Cheonmasan Tuff 87.23 ±0.92 Ma, Udongje Tuff 86.79 ±0.71 Ma, Seokpo Tuff 87.30 ±0.99 Ma and Yujeongje Tuff 86.66 ±0.93 Ma. For Seonunsan Volcanics, Gyeongsusan Tuff 84.9 ±1.1 Ma and Yeongije Tuff 86.61 ±0.67 Ma. These ages indicate that the four volcanics were formed in the Late Cretaceous. The ages are comparable to those of the volcanic rocks of the Aioi and Arima groups in Southwestern Japan, suggesting that the Late Cretaceous volcanic arc systems developed in a NE-SW direction from the Japanese Islands to the southwestern part of the Korean Peninsula caused by regional magmatism together with crustal deformation as reflected by occurrence of the volcanic rocks along the Hamyeol Fault.

  4. Interactions and interconnectivity of neighboring volcanic systems in southern Japan (Kyūshū)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothelande, E.; Amelung, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The global volcanic eruption record contains about 60 volcano pairs that erupted the same day and 30 pairs that erupted within 3 days. However, neighboring volcano interactions are still poorly understood, in mafic as well as in felsic systems. Here, we use GPS time series of Japan's Aira caldera and Kirishima volcanic system (andesitic systems) to search for interactions between the two neighboring plumbing systems. Aira caldera (17 km x 23 km), also known as Kagoshima Bay, was formed by a massive eruption about 22,000 years ago and is often considered as the world's most active caldera volcano. The center of the caldera is occupied by Sakurajima volcano, a volcanic island that emerged about 13,000 years ago. Today, the caldera hosts more than 1 million people living along the shore and in the city of Kagoshima. The Kirishima volcanoes are a group of 18 eruption cones located 20 km north of Aira caldera. An eruption, the largest in more than 50 years, occurred in 2011 at Shinmoe-dake volcano. The magmatic system of Kirishima volcano was considered to be independent of Aira caldera, but our preliminary results suggest that this may not be the case: it seems that subtle uplift of the Aira caldera occurring during at least the first decade of this century ceased with the 2011 eruption of the Kirishima system. Using deformation data and finite element modeling, we explore possible interactions between magma reservoirs at depth.

  5. Identification of geothermal system using 2D audio magnetotelluric method in Telomoyo volcanic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romadlon, Arriqo'Fauqi; Niasari, Sintia Windhi

    2017-07-01

    Geothermal area of Candi Umbul Telomoyo is one of geothermal fields in Indonesia. This geothermal field is located in the Grabag district, Magelang, Central Java. This geothermal field was formed in a volcanic quarter. The main aim in this study is to identify geothermal system at Telomoyo volcanic area through synthetic model analysis. There are surface manifestations such as warm springs and altered rocks. Results of geochemistry study showed reservoir's temperature was 230°C. The Warm spring in Candi Umbul was the outflow zone of the Telomoyo geothermal system. The Telomoyo geothermal system was indicated chloride-bicarbonate type of warm spring. In addition, the results of geological mapping indicate that the dominant fault structure has southwest-northeast orientation. The fault was caused by the volcanic activity of mount Telomoyo. In this research conducted data analysis from synthetics model. It aims to estimate the response of magnetotelluric methods in various models of geothermal systems. In this study, we assumed three models of geothermal system in Candi Umbul-Telomoyo area. From the data analysis it was known that the model 1 and model 2 can be distinguished if the measurements were conducted in a frequency range of 0.01 Hz to 1000 Hz. In response of tipper (Hz) had a small value on all models at all measurement points, so the tipper cannot distinguish between model 1, model 2 and model 3. From this analysis was known that TM mode is more sensitive than TE mode at the resistivity and phase responses.

  6. USGS Volcanic Activity Alert-Notification System Description

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Website provides plain-English description of the alert notification system that the USGS has adopted nationwide for characterizing the level of unrest and eruptive...

  7. UQ -- Fast Surrogates Key to New Methodologies in an Operational and Research Volcanic Hazard Forecasting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, C. G.; Stefanescu, R. E. R.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Singla, P.; Singh, T.; Pitman, E. B.; Morton, D.; Webley, P.

    2014-12-01

    As the decision to construct a hazard map is frequently precipitated by the sudden initiation of activity at a volcano that was previously considered dormant, timely completion of the map is imperative. This prohibits the calculation of probabilities through direct sampling of a numerical ash-transport and dispersion model. In developing a probabilistic forecast for ash cloud locations following an explosive volcanic eruption, we construct a number of possible meta-models (a model of the simulator) to act as fast surrogates for the time-expensive model. We will illustrate the new fast surrogates based on both polynomial chaos and multilevel sparse representations that have allowed us to conduct the Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) in a timely fashion. These surrogates allow orders of magnitude improvement in cost associated with UQ, and are likely to have a major impact in many related domains.This work will be part of an operational and research volcanic forecasting system (see the Webley et al companion presentation) moving towards using ensembles of eruption source parameters and Numerical Weather Predictions (NWPs), rather than single deterministic forecasts, to drive the ash cloud forecasting systems. This involves using an Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) as input to an ash transport and dispersion model, such as PUFF, to produce ash cloud predictions, which will be supported by a Decision Support System. Simulation ensembles with different input volcanic source parameters are intelligently chosen to predict the average and higher-order moments of the output correctly.

  8. Volcanic hazard assessment in monogenetic volcanic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolini, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    [eng] One of the most important tasks of modern volcanology, which represents a significant socio-economic implication, is to conduct hazard assessment in active volcanic systems. These volcanological studies are aimed at hazard that allows to constructing hazard maps and simulating different eruptive scenarios, and are mainly addressed to contribute to territorial planning, definition of emergency plans or managing volcanic crisis. The impact of a natural event, as a volcanic eruption, can s...

  9. Tracking a closing volcanic system using repeating earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurman, H.; West, M. E.; Grapenthin, R.

    2011-12-01

    Repeating, volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes were recorded at the end of the explosive phase of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. The events cluster into several families which exhibit cross-correlation values greater than 0.8 and are distributed between 0-10 km below the edifice. The earthquake magnitudes decline gradually with time, and the events also appear to shallow as the sequence progresses. This activity continued for over 2 months and accompanied steady dome growth, which halted around the same time that the last of the repeating VTs were recorded. The repetitive nature of these earthquakes, their relatively deep locations and their occurrence following 3 weeks of major explosive eruptions suggest that they are related to changes around the conduit system and/or the magma storage area as the last of the magma was removed from the mid-crustal storage area. Geodetic data indicate that the deflation of the edifice, which had been continuous throughout the explosive activity, ceased coincident with the onset of the repeating VT earthquakes. We use evidence from earthquake relocations and earthquake focal mechanisms to investigate the source for the repeating VT earthquakes. We propose a model in which the repeating earthquakes are closely related to the adjustment of the conduit system and mid crustal storage area in response to the last of the ascending magma.

  10. Eruption chronology of Ciomadul, a long dormant dacitic volcanic system in the Eastern Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Kata; Harangi, Szabolcs; Dunkl, István; Lukács, Réka; Kiss, Balázs; Schmitt, Axel K.; Seghedi, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    . Following a ca. 40 ka lull of volcanism, a more explosive phases with minor dome building activity occurred between ~56 and 32 ka. Since 32 ka, the volcano has been again in a dormant state. However, geophysical data still suggest melt-bearing magma body beneath the volcano. The zircon U-Th crystallization ages imply that a silicic crystal mush could have been present for several 100's ka before the eruptions and this was rapidly remobilized by uprising hot basaltic magmas. This new geochronological data set yields an unique insight into the temporal evolution of a dacitic volcanic complex and provides clear evidences for long (several 10's and even 100's kyr) repose times between the eruption periods that have to be considered in the volcanic hazard assessments of long dormant volcanic systems. This research is supported by the OTKA K116528 project

  11. Investigations of the geochemical controls on anomalous arsenic enrichment in the Santiago Peak Volcanics of Southern California: implications for arsenic distribution in volcanic arc systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, E. C.; Pollock, M.; Cathcart, E. M.; AlBashaireh, A.; O'shea, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Santiago Peak Volcanics (SPV) of Southern CA and Northern Baja CA, Mexico are remnants of a Cretaceous subaerial volcanic arc system that underwent greenschist facies metamorphism contemporaneous with volcanism. Observed SPV exposed at the surface of Black Mountain Open Space Park (San Diego, CA) exhibit anomalous arsenic (As) enrichment (100 - 480,000 ppm) up to five orders of magnitude greater than average for igneous rocks (1.5 ppm). We hypothesize that these rocks underwent localized syn-volcanic hydrothermal alteration along a highly fractured zone that today trends between N10°W and N20°W, leading to anomalous As enrichment on the spatial scale of tens of meters. We suspect that such As has been further mobilized by modern water-rock interactions. Using standard geochemical techniques (e.g. XRD, XRF, EDX) and mass balance analyses, we aim to (1) summarize the extent of As enrichment in altered SPV, and (2) present an integrated view of the interactions between ancient hydrothermal volcanic arc processes, surficial weathering, and observed As anomalies. Alteration textures of samples range from partially altered phenocrysts (i.e. minimally altered) to massive hydrothermal replacement, in which virtually all primary phases are altered to new hydrothermal minerals such as epidote, Fe-rich chlorite, and sericite (i.e. highly altered). Highly altered rocks contain average As concentrations (mean = 37,680 +/- 15,396 ppm, n = 23) >10,000 times that of minimally altered SPV (mean = 26 +/- 6 ppm As, n = 19). In some rocks, As-rich iron oxide and gypsum containing up to 900 ppm As are present as surficial rinds, suggesting modern day remobilization of As from hydrothermal host minerals, like arsenopyrite. These findings indicate that such As is highly soluble and, therefore, may be further mobilized by physical and chemical weathering. No other trace metals (e.g. Pb, Cu, Ag, Au) are consistently enriched above upper-crustal averages, and As does not always occur

  12. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, J. B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O.; Tesfai, T.; Duffield, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Smith, James G.; Woldegiorgis, L.; Weldemariam, K.; Kahsai, G.

    1999-01-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression.Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of approx. 10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures >225??C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO2, H2S and He) are largely

  13. Geochemical variability of hydrothermal emissions between three Pacific volcanic arc systems: Alaskan-Aleutian and Cascadian, North America and Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstock, J. M.; Horton, T. W.; Gravley, D. M.; Deering, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the source, transport, and fate of hydrothermal fluids in the upper crust informs our understanding and interpretation of ore-forming processes, volcanogenic hazards, geothermal resources, and volatile cycling. Co-variation between fluid inclusion CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios is an established tracer of magmatic, meteoric, and crustal fluid end-members. Yet, this tracer has had limited application to macroscopic fluid reservoirs accessible via geothermal wells and hydrothermal features (e.g. pools). In this study, we compared the covariance CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios of gases collected throughout the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand (TVZ), the Alaska-Aleutian Volcanic Arc, USA (AAVA), and the Cascadian Volcanic Arc, USA (CVA) with corresponding δ13C and 3He/4He values. Our findings show that there is good agreement between these proxies for different end-member contributions at coarse scales. However, some samples classified as meteoric water according to the CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios also show more positive δ13C values (~ -7.0 per mil) and relatively higher 3He/4He ratios indicative of magmatic input from primarily mantle sources. This unexpected result may be related to magmatic fluids, CO2 in particular, mixing with predominantly meteoric derived waters. The potential to identify magmatic CO2 in groundwater samples overlying geothermal systems in differing volcanic arc settings using simple and cost-effective gas ratios is a promising step forward in the search for ';surface blind' but developable geothermal systems and volcanic monitoring. 3He/4He anomalies also support this inference and underscore the potential decoupling of thermal anomalies and magmatic-derived fluids in the Earth's crust. The general agreement between the co-variation of CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios with other isotope and geochemical proxies for magmatic, meteoric, and crustal end-members is encouraging to employ expanded use of these ratios for both the exploration and monitoring of

  14. A first Event-tree for the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Iceland): from the volcanic crisis in 2014 towards a tool for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, Sara; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Jónsdottir, Kristín; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Larsen, Gudrun; Oddsson, Björn

    2015-04-01

    Bárdarbunga volcano is part of a large volcanic system that had its last confirmed eruption before the present unrest in 1910. This system is partially covered by ice within the Vatnajökull glacier and it extends further to the NNE as well as to SW. Based on historical data, its eruptive activity has been predominantly characterized by explosive eruptions, originating beneath the glacier, and important effusive eruptions in the ice-free part of the system itself. The largest explosive eruptions took place on the southern side of the fissure system in AD 1477 producing about 10 km3 of tephra. Due to the extension and location of this volcanic system, the range of potential eruptive scenarios and associated hazards is quite wide. Indeed, it includes: inundation, due to glacial outburst; tephra fallout, due to ash-rich plume generated by magma-water interaction; abundant volcanic gas release; and lava flows. Most importantly these phenomena are not mutually exclusive and might happen simultaneously, creating the premise for a wide spatial and temporal impact. During the ongoing volcanic crisis at Bárdarbunga, which started on 16 August, 2014, the Icelandic Meteorological Office, together with the University of Iceland and Icelandic Civil Protection started a common effort of drawing, day-by-day, the potential evolution of the ongoing rifting event and, based on the newest data from the monitoring networks, updated and more refined scenarios have been identified. Indeed, this volcanic crisis created the occasion for pushing forward the creation of the first Event-tree for the Bárðarbunga volcanic system. We adopted the approach suggested by Newhall and Pallister (2014) and a preliminary ET made of nine nodes has been constructed. After the two initial nodes (restless and genesis) the ET continues with the identification of the location of aperture of future eruptive vents. Due to the complex structure of the system and historical eruptions, this third node

  15. A geochemical reconnaissance of the Alid volcanic center and geothermal system, Danakil depression, Eritrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenstern, J.B.; Janik, C.J.; Fournier, R.O. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (US)] [and others

    1999-04-01

    Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermal system underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea. Alid is a very late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma, some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows. Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widely over an area of {approx} 10 km{sup 2} on the northern half of Alid suggest that an active hydrothermal system underlies much of that part of the mountain. Geothermometers indicate that the fumarolic gases are derived from a geothermal system with temperatures > 225{sup o}C. The isotopic composition of condensed fumarolic steam is consistent with these temperatures and implies that the source water is derived primarily from either lowland meteoric waters or fossil Red Sea water, or both. Some gases vented from the system (CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and He) are largely magmatic in origin. Permeability beneath the volcanic center may be high, given the amount of intrusion-related deformation and the active normal faulting within the Danakil depression. (author)

  16. Miocene fossil hydrothermal system associated with a volcanic complex in the Andes of central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Francisco; Aguirre, Luis; Vergara, Mario; Valdebenito, Leticia; Fonseca, Eugenia

    2004-11-01

    Cenozoic deposits in the Andes of central Chile have been affected by very low-grade burial metamorphism. At about 33°S in the Cuesta de Chacabuco area, approximately 53 km north of Santiago, two Oligocene and Miocene volcanic units form a ca. 1300-m-thick rock pile. The Miocene unit corresponds to a volcanic complex composed of two eroded stratovolcanoes. Secondary mineral assemblages in both units were studied petrographically and using X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses. Most of the igneous minerals are wholly or partially preserved, and the ubiquitous secondary minerals are zeolites and mafic phyllosilicates. The alteration pattern observed is characterized by a lateral zonation in secondary mineralogy related to a lateral increase in temperature but not to stratigraphic depth. The following three zones were established, mainly based on the distribution of zeolites: zone I comprises heulandite, thomsonite, mesolite, stilbite and tri-smectite; zone II contains laumontite, yugawaralite, prehnite, epidote and chlorite; and zone III comprises wairakite, epidote, chlorite, diopside, biotite and titanite. For each zone, the following temperature ranges were estimated: zone I, 100-180 °C; zone II, 180-270 °C; and zone III, 245-310 °C. The alteration episode was characterized by a high Pfluid/ Ptotal ratio (ca. 1.0), although slightly variable, a high geothermal gradient of ca. 160 °C km -1 and fluid pressures below 500 bars. Although temperature was the main control on the mineral zonation, several interrelated parameters, mainly fluid composition, porosity and permeability, were also important. Hot, near neutral to slightly alkaline pH, alkali chloride hydrothermal fluids with very low dissolved CO 2 contents deposited the secondary minerals. The alteration pattern is the result of depositing fluids in outflow regions from a hydrothermal system developed inside a volcanic complex during the Miocene. The hydrothermal system has been eroded to a

  17. Toward a unified dynamic model for dykes and cone sheets in volcanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Olivier; Burchardt, Steffi; Hallot, Erwan; Mourgues, Régis; Bulois, Cédric

    2014-05-01

    Igneous sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone sheets, represent various geometries of magma channels through the crust. In many volcanoes, they coexist as parts of complex plumbing systems and are likely fed by common sources. How they form is fundamental regarding volcanic hazards, but yet no dynamic model simulates and predicts satisfactorily the diversity of sheet intrusions observed in volcanic systems. Here we present scaled laboratory experiments that reproduced dyke and cone sheet intrusion geometries under controlled conditions. Combined to a parametric study, a dimensional analysis shows that two dimensionless numbers Π1 and Π2 govern the formation of these intrusions. Π1 is geometrical and describes the geometry of the magma source; Π2 is dynamical and compares the local viscous stresses in the flowing magma to the host-rock strength. Plotting our experiments against these two numbers results in a phase diagram evidencing a dyke and a cone-sheet field, separated by a sharp transition that fits a power law. This result shows that dykes and cone sheets correspond to two distinct physical regimes of magma emplacement in the Earth's crust. Cone sheets preferentially form when their source is shallow relative to their size, when the magma influx (or viscosity) is large, or when the host rock is weak. In addition, both dykes and cone sheets may form from the same source, the shift from one regime to the other being then controlled by magma dynamics, i.e. different values of Π2. We compare our phase diagram to geological data and show that the extrapolated empirical dyke-to-cone sheet transition predicts the occurrence of dykes and cone sheets in various natural volcanic settings. This study thus provides a unified dynamic model of sheet intrusions emplacement and captures fundamental mechanisms of magma transport in the Earth's crust.

  18. Halogens behaviours in Magma Degassing: Insights into Eruptive Dynamics, Hydrothermal Systems and Atmospheric Impact of Andesitic Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemant, B.; Balcone, H.; Mouatt, J.; Michel, A.; Komorowski, J.; Boudon, G.

    2007-12-01

    Shallow degassing of H2O in andesitic magmas determines the eruptive styles of volcanic eruptions and contributes to the hydrothermal systems developed around active volcanoes. Halogens behaviour during magma degassing primarily depends on their incompatible behaviour in the melts and on water solubility. Thus, residual contents of halogens in volcanic juvenile vitric clasts may be used as tracers of H2O degassing processes during explosive and effusive eruptions. Because of the large range of water-melt partition coefficients of halogens and their relatively low diffusion coefficients, a comparison of F, Cl, Br and I contents in volcanic clasts in function of their vesicularity and micro-cristallinity allows to precisely model the main degassing processes and to establish constraints on pre-eruptive conditions. Halogens acids (HCl, HBr and HI) extracted in the vapour phase have much more complex behaviours because of their high solubility in low temperature thermal waters, their variable condensation temperatures and their very high reactivity when mixed with low temperature and oxidizing atmospheric gases. A comparison of model compositions of high temperature gases with the composition of thermal waters, and gases from fumaroles or plumes of active volcanoes allows to characterise the shallow volcanic system and its evolutionary states. Variable halogen behaviours are discussed for a variety of eruption types (plinian, vulcanian and dome-forming) and active volcanic systems from the Lesser Antilles (Montagne Pelee, Soufrière of Guadeloupe, Soufriere Hills of Montserrat).

  19. Experimental Observations of Multiscale Dynamics of Viscous Fluid Behavior: Implications in Volcanic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Spina, L.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of Newtonian fluids with viscosities (10-1000 Pa s; corresponding to mafic to intermediate silicate melts) during slow decompression, in a Plexiglas shock tube. As an analogue fluid we used silicon oil saturated with Argon gas for 72 hours. Slow decompression, dropping from 10 MPa to ambient pressure, acts as the excitation mechanism, initiating several processes with their own distinct timescales. The evolution of this multi-timescale phenomenon generates complex non-stationary microseismic signals, which have been recorded with 7 high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors located along the conduit. Correlation analysis of these time series with the associated high-speed imaging enables characterization of distinct phases of the dynamics of these viscous fluids and the extraction of the time and the frequency characteristics of the individual processes. We have identified fluid-solid elastic interaction, degassing, fluid mass expansion and flow, bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence and collapse, foam building and vertical wagging. All these processes (in fine and coarse scales) are sequentially coupled in time, occur within specific pressure intervals, and exhibit a localized distribution in space. Their coexistence and interactions constitute the stress field and driving forces that determine the dynamics of the system. Our observations point to the great potential of this experimental approach in the understanding of volcanic processes and volcanic seismicity.

  20. The Spatial Response of the Climate System to Explosive Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P. M.; Jones, P. D.; Pengqun, Jia

    1996-05-01

    Determining the spatial response of the climate system to volcanic forcing is of importance in the development of short-term climate prediction and in the assesment of anthropogenic factors such as global warming. The June 1991 eruption of the Phillippine volcano, Mount Pinatubo, provides an important opportunity to test existing understanding and extend previous emperical analyses of volcanic effect. We identify the spatial climate response to historic eruptions in the surface air temperature and mean-sea- level pressure record and use this information to assess the impact of the Pinatubo eruption. The Pinatubo eruption clearly generated significant global cooling during the years after the event. The magnitude and timing of the cooling is similar to that associated with previous equatorial eruptions. There is good agreement between the spatial patterns of tempurature and circulation anomalies associated with the historic eruptions and those following the Mount Pinatubo event. Evidence of limited higher latitude warming and a major change in the atmospheric circulation is found over the Northern Hemisphere during the first winter after the equatorial eruptions analysed, followed by widespread cooling, but limited change in the atmosphere circulation, during the subsquent 2 years.

  1. The Domuyo volcanic system: An enormous geothermal resource in Argentine Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Giovanni; Liccioli, Caterina; Vaselli, Orlando; Calabrese, Sergio; Tassi, Franco; Caliro, Stefano; Caselli, Alberto; Agusto, Mariano; D'Alessandro, Walter

    2014-03-01

    A geochemical survey of the main thermal waters discharging in the southwestern part of the Domuyo volcanic complex (Argentina), where the latest volcanic activity dates to 0.11 Ma, has highlighted the extraordinarily high heat loss from this remote site in Patagonia. The thermal water discharges are mostly Na-Cl in composition and have TDS values up to 3.78 g L- 1 (El Humazo). A simple hydrogeochemical approach shows that 1,100 to 1,300 kg s- 1 of boiling waters, which have been affected by shallow steam separation, flow into the main drainage of the area (Rio Varvarco). A dramatic increase of the most conservative species such as Na, Cl and Li from the Rio Varvarco from upstream to downstream was observed and related solely to the contribution of hydrothermal fluids. The equilibrium temperatures of the discharging thermal fluids, calculated on the basis of the Na-K-Mg geothermometer, are between 190 °C and 230 °C. If we refer to a liquid originally at 220 °C (enthalpy = 944 J g- 1), the thermal energy release can be estimated as high as 1.1 ± 0.2 GW, a value that is much higher than the natural release of heat in other important geothermal fields worldwide, e.g., Mutnovsky (Russia), Wairakei (New Zealand) and Lassen Peak (USA). This value is the second highest measured advective heat flux from any hydrothermal system on Earth after Yellowstone.

  2. Lower Pliensbachian caldera volcanism in high-obliquity rift systems in the western North Patagonian Massif, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedini, Leonardo; Gregori, Daniel; Strazzere, Leonardo; Falco, Juan I.; Dristas, Jorge A.

    2014-12-01

    In the Cerro Carro Quebrado and Cerro Catri Cura area, located at the border between the Neuquén Basin and the North Patagonian Massif, the Garamilla Formation is composed of four volcanic stages: 1) andesitic lava-flows related to the beginning of the volcanic system; 2) basal massive lithic breccias that represent the caldera collapse; 3) voluminous, coarse-crystal rich massive lava-like ignimbrites related to multiple, steady eruptions that represent the principal infill of the system; and, finally 4) domes, dykes, lava flows, and lava domes of rhyolitic composition indicative of a post-collapse stage. The analysis of the regional and local structures, as well as, the architectures of the volcanic facies, indicates the existence of a highly oblique rift, with its principal extensional strain in an NNE-SSW direction (˜N10°). The analyzed rocks are mainly high-potassium dacites and rhyolites with trace and RE elements contents of an intraplate signature. The age of these rocks (189 ± 0.76 Ma) agree well with other volcanic sequences of the western North Patagonian Massif, as well as, the Neuquén Basin, indicating that Pliensbachian magmatism was widespread in both regions. The age is also coincident with phase 1 of volcanism of the eastern North Patagonia Massif (188-178 Ma) represented by ignimbrites, domes, and pyroclastic rocks of the Marifil Complex, related to intraplate magmatism.

  3. Evolution of Mass Functions of Coeval Stars through Wind Mass Loss and Binary Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, F R N; Langer, N; de Mink, S E

    2015-01-01

    Accurate determinations of stellar mass functions and ages of stellar populations are crucial to much of astrophysics. We analyse the evolution of stellar mass functions of coeval main sequence stars including all relevant aspects of single- and binary-star evolution. We show that the slope of the upper part of the mass function in a stellar cluster can be quite different to the slope of the initial mass function. Wind mass loss from massive stars leads to an accumulation of stars which is visible as a peak at the high mass end of mass functions, thereby flattening the mass function slope. Mass accretion and mergers in close binary systems create a tail of rejuvenated binary products. These blue straggler stars extend the single star mass function by up to a factor of two in mass and can appear up to ten times younger than their parent stellar cluster. Cluster ages derived from their most massive stars that are close to the turn-off may thus be significantly biased. To overcome such difficulties, we propose t...

  4. Intercomparison of SO2 camera systems for imaging volcanic gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Campion, Robin; Mori, Toshiya; Smekens, Jean-François; Stebel, Kerstin; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Burton, Mike; Platt, Ulrich; Prata, Fred

    2015-07-01

    SO2 camera systems are increasingly being used to image volcanic gas plumes. The ability to derive SO2 emission rates directly from the acquired imagery at high time resolution allows volcanic process studies that incorporate other high time-resolution datasets. Though the general principles behind the SO2 camera have remained the same for a number of years, recent advances in CCD technology and an improved understanding of the physics behind the measurements have driven a continuous evolution of the camera systems. Here we present an intercomparison of seven different SO2 cameras. In the first part of the experiment, the various technical designs are compared and the advantages and drawbacks of individual design options are considered. Though the ideal design was found to be dependent on the specific application, a number of general recommendations are made. Next, a time series of images recorded by all instruments at Stromboli Volcano (Italy) is compared. All instruments were easily able to capture SO2 clouds emitted from the summit vents. Quantitative comparison of the SO2 load in an individual cloud yielded an intra-instrument precision of about 12%. From the imagery, emission rates were then derived according to each group's standard retrieval process. A daily average SO2 emission rate of 61 ± 10 t/d was calculated. Due to differences in spatial integration methods and plume velocity determination, the time-dependent progression of SO2 emissions varied significantly among the individual systems. However, integration over distinct degassing events yielded comparable SO2 masses. Based on the intercomparison data, we find an approximate 1-sigma precision of 20% for the emission rates derived from the various SO2 cameras. Though it may still be improved in the future, this is currently within the typical accuracy of the measurement and is considered sufficient for most applications.

  5. Drilling of Submarine Shallow-water Hydrothermal Systems in Volcanic Arcs of the Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, S.; Augustin, N.; de Benedetti, A.; Esposito, A.; Gaertner, A.; Gemmell, B.; Gibson, H.; He, G.; Huegler, M.; Kleeberg, R.; Kuever, J.; Kummer, N. A.; Lackschewitz, K.; Lappe, F.; Monecke, T.; Perrin, K.; Peters, M.; Sharpe, R.; Simpson, K.; Smith, D.; Wan, B.

    2007-12-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal systems related to volcanic arcs are known from several localities in the Tyrrhenian Sea in water depths ranging from 650 m (Palinuro Seamount) to less than 50 m (Panarea). At Palinuro Seamount 13 holes (Metal enrichment at the top of the deposit is evident in some cores with polymetallic (Zn, Pb, Ag) sulfides overlying more massive and dense pyritic ore. The massive sulfide mineralization at Palinuro Seamount contains a number of unusual minerals, including enargite, tennantite, luzonite, and Ag-sulfosalts, that are not commonly encountered in mid-ocean ridge massive sulfides. In analogy to epithermal deposits forming on land, the occurrence of these minerals suggests a high sulfidation state of the hydrothermal fluids during deposition implying that the mineralizing fluids were acidic and oxidizing rather than near-neutral and reducing as those forming typical base metal rich massive sulfides along mid-ocean ridges. Oxidizing conditions during sulfide deposition can probably be related to the presence of magmatic volatiles in the mineralizing fluids that may be derived from a degassing magma chamber. Elevated temperatures within sediment cores and TV-grab stations (up to 60°C) indicate present day hydrothermal fluid flow. This is also indicated by the presence of small tube-worm bushes present on top the sediment. A number of drill holes were placed around the known phreatic gas-rich vents of Panarea and recovered intense clay-alteration in some holes as well as abundant massive anhydrite/gypsum with only trace sulfides along a structural depression suggesting the presence of an anhydrite seal to a larger hydrothermal system at depth. The aim of this study is to understand the role that magmatic volatiles and phase separation play in the formation of these precious and trace element-rich shallow water (hydrothermal systems in the volcanic arcs of the Tyrrhenian Sea.

  6. Intercomparison of SO2 camera systems for imaging volcanic gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Lübcke, Peter; Bobrowski, Nicole; Campion, Robin; Mori, Toshiya; Smekens, Jean-Francois; Stebel, Kerstin; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Burton, Mike; Platt, Ulrich; Prata, Fred

    2015-01-01

    SO2 camera systems are increasingly being used to image volcanic gas plumes. The ability to derive SO2 emission rates directly from the acquired imagery at high time resolution allows volcanic process studies that incorporate other high time-resolution datasets. Though the general principles behind the SO2 camera have remained the same for a number of years, recent advances in CCD technology and an improved understanding of the physics behind the measurements have driven a continuous evolution of the camera systems. Here we present an intercomparison of seven different SO2 cameras. In the first part of the experiment, the various technical designs are compared and the advantages and drawbacks of individual design options are considered. Though the ideal design was found to be dependent on the specific application, a number of general recommendations are made. Next, a time series of images recorded by all instruments at Stromboli Volcano (Italy) is compared. All instruments were easily able to capture SO2 clouds emitted from the summit vents. Quantitative comparison of the SO2 load in an individual cloud yielded an intra-instrument precision of about 12%. From the imagery, emission rates were then derived according to each group's standard retrieval process. A daily average SO2 emission rate of 61 ± 10 t/d was calculated. Due to differences in spatial integration methods and plume velocity determination, the time-dependent progression of SO2 emissions varied significantly among the individual systems. However, integration over distinct degassing events yielded comparable SO2 masses. Based on the intercomparison data, we find an approximate 1-sigma precision of 20% for the emission rates derived from the various SO2 cameras. Though it may still be improved in the future, this is currently within the typical accuracy of the measurement and is considered sufficient for most applications.

  7. Magma types and mantle sources of the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldórsson, Sæmundur; Rubin, Ken; Sverrisdóttir, Guðrún; Sigurðsson, Gylfi

    2015-04-01

    The Bárðarbunga volcanic system (BVS) represents one of the largest volcanic systems in Iceland, extending ~190 km from the northern boundary of Torfajökull in the south to Dyngjufjöll Ytri in the north, and intersecting the largely ice-covered Bárðarbunga volcano. The extensive length of the BVS thus allows sampling of an unusually large section of the mantle underlying Iceland's Eastern rift zone. Perhaps surprisingly, the degree of mantle source heterogeneity beneath the BVS remains poorly known. We have recently undertaken a detailed study of the BVS because such data are fundamental for understanding the magmatic history and magma delivery system beneath of the BVS, including those that led to recent volcanism north of Dyngjujökull. Here, we present major and trace element analyses, as well as high-precision Pb isotope analyses, of several Holocene lava flows from the Dyngjuháls area and from rocks representing the basement, flanks and nunataks of the ice-free part of the Bárðarbunga volcano. We compare these data to those on a suite of recently collected fissure basalts from the Veiðivötn fissure swarm in the south and the new lava north of Dyngjujökull in order to study the geochemical characteristics of the BVS as a whole. The BVS has generated fairly primitive tholeiites (MgO ~6-9 wt.%) throughout the Holocene. Evolved basaltic compositions (MgO ≤6 wt.%) that are often associated with large and mature caldera systems in Iceland (e.g., Krafla and Askja), appear to be notably absent in the BVS within our current sample set (although might still exist in the largely ice-covered Bárðarbunga volcano). Significantly, no highly evolved rocks (dacite, rhyolite) have been associated with the BVS. It is therefore unlikely that a long-lived and relatively shallow (18.40. In contrast, subglacial formations in the Dyngjuháls region, form a single trend with 206Pb/204Pb always melts to the BVS, in different proportions in space and time. However

  8. Catastrophic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  9. Volcanic pulses determined by local re-melting throughout plumbing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, V.; Moretti, R.; neuville, D. R.; Le Losq, C.; Allard, P.; Arienzo, I.; Civetta, L.; D'Antonio, M.; Flank, A.; Lagarde, P.; Metrich, N.; Orsi, G.; Papale, P.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from a thorough surveys of magma features from active southern Italy Volcanoes (Vesuvius, Campi Flegrei, Ischia, Stromboli) which are clearly related to a common subduction setting. In fact, the geochemical signatures of volcanic products from these sites show that their source regions are invested by melt/fluids released from the de-volatilizing slab. Volcanism at these volcanic sites is commonly seen as due to magmas ascending and differentiating from the parental melts originated in the mantle source. However, these volcanoes and their products, melt inclusions (MIs) particularly, show common features, such as: 1) a relatively modest magma production in recent times; 2) high total volatile contents and abundant gas emission at surface; 3) abundant CO2 in the gas phase coexisting with the melts at large depths, prior to any interaction with the carbonatic basement, if present; 4) CO2 fluxing of magmas; 5) vapor buffered trends bounding MIs on H2O-CO2 saturation diagrams; 6) evidences of isotopic disequilibria between minerals and melts; 7) high oxidation states also in deep mafic parental magmas, essentially governed by Fe2+/Fe3+ around 1; 8) relatively low-MgO contents of mafic parental magmas. All these features can be ascribed to multiple paths of magma mixing/mingling + degassing + fractional crystallization. Here we present a complementary hypothesis and suggest that the ascending slab-derived supercritical fluids may (re)melt pre-existing crystal mushes (e.g., Gaetani and Grove, 2003) at great crustal depths and then mobilize small batches of fluid-rich magmas, contributing to the above features. In this view, mafic magmas emitted at studied volcanoes during the last 10 ka could represent molten patches, formed under hydrous and oxidized conditions, of mush compositionally akin to mafic trachybasaltic rocks. Iron is in fact the most abundant multiple valence element within the mushy system, and during the fluid-driven melting at depth it

  10. The Pliocene initiation and Early Pleistocene volcanic disruption of the palaeo-Gediz fluvial system, Western Turkey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maddy, D.; Demir, T.; Bridgland, D.R.; Veldkamp, A.; Stemerdink, C.; Schriek, van der T.; Schreve, D.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest observations concerning a Pliocene and Early Pleistocene record from Western Turkey. The sedimentary sequence described comprises the fluvial deposits of an Early Pleistocene palaeo-Gediz river system and its tributaries prior to the onset of volcanism around Kula

  11. Understanding Hydrological and Climate Conditions on Early Mars Through Sulfate Cycling and Microbial Activity in Terrestrial Volcanic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynkiewicz, A.; Mikucki, J.; Vaniman, D.

    2017-10-01

    Our study is a type of Earth-based investigation in a Mars-analog environment that allows for determination of how changing wet and dry conditions in active volcanic/hydrothermal system affect sulfate fluxes into surface water and groundwater.

  12. LiDAR observations of an Earth magmatic plumbing system as an analog for Venus and Mars distributed volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jacob; Connor, Charles; Malservisi, Rocco; Bleacher, Jacob; Connor, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Clusters of tens to thousands of small volcanoes (diameters generally system of these clusters can constrain magma ascent processes as well as the regional magma production budget and heat flux beneath each cluster. Unfortunately, directly observing the plumbing systems of volcano clusters on Mars and Venus eludes our current geologic abilities. Because erosion exposes such systems at the Earth's surface, a better understanding of magmatic processes and migration can be achieved via field analysis. The terrestrial plumbing system of an eroded volcanic field may be a valuable planetary analog for Venus and Mars clusters. The magmatic plumbing system of a Pliocene-aged monogenetic volcanic field, emplaced at 0.8 km depth, is currently exposed as a sill and dike swarm in the San Rafael Desert of Central Utah, USA. The mafic bodies in this region intruded into Mesozoic sedimentary units and now make up the most erosion resistant units as sills, dikes, and plug-like conduits. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) can identify volcanic units (sills, dikes, and conduits) at high resolution, both geomorphologically and with near infrared return intensity values. Two Terrestrial LiDAR Surveys and an Airborne LiDAR Survey have been carried out over the San Rafael volcanic swarm, producing a three dimensional point cloud over approximately 36 sq. km. From the point clouds of these surveys, 1-meter DEMs are produced and volcanic intrusions have been mapped. Here we present reconstructions of the volcanic instrusions of the San Rafael Swarm. We create this reconstruction by extrapolating mapped intrustions from the LiDAR surveys into a 3D space around the current surface. We compare the estimated intrusive volume to the estimated conduit density and estimates of extrusive volume at volcano clusters of similar density. The extrapolated reconstruction and conduit mapping provide a first-order estimate of the final intrustive/extrusive volume ratio for the now eroded volcanic field

  13. An Early-Warning System for Volcanic Ash Dispersal: The MAFALDA Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsotti, S.; Nannipieri, L.; Neri, A.

    2006-12-01

    Forecasts of the dispersal of volcanic ash is a fundamental goal in order to mitigate its potential impact on urbanized areas and transport routes surrounding explosive volcanoes. To this aim we developed an early- warning procedure named MAFALDA (Modeling And Forecasting Ash Loading and Dispersal in the Atmosphere). Such tool is able to quantitatively forecast the atmospheric concentration of ash as well as the ground deposition as a function of time over a 3D spatial domain.\\The main features of MAFALDA are: (1) the use of the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code VOL-CALPUFF able to describe both the rising column phase and the atmospheric dispersal as a function of weather conditions, (2) the use of high-resolution weather forecasting data, (3) the short execution time that allows to analyse a set of scenarios and (4) the web-based CGI software application (written in Perl programming language) that shows the results in a standard graphical web interface and makes it suitable as an early-warning system during volcanic crises.\\MAFALDA is composed by a computational part that simulates the ash cloud dynamics and a graphical interface for visualizing the modelling results. The computational part includes the codes for elaborating the meteorological data, the dispersal code and the post-processing programs. These produces hourly 2D maps of aerial ash concentration at several vertical levels, extension of "threat" area on air and 2D maps of ash deposit on the ground, in addition to graphs of hourly variations of column height.\\The processed results are available on the web by the graphical interface and the users can choose, by drop-down menu, which data to visualize. \\A first partial application of the procedure has been carried out for Mt. Etna (Italy). In this case, the procedure simulates four volcanological scenarios characterized by different plume intensities and uses 48-hrs weather forecasting data with a resolution of 7 km provided by the Italian Air Force.

  14. The role of petrology in defining volcanic hazards and designing monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. E.; Turner, M. B.; Price, R. C.; Cronin, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Petrology is the study of magmatic systems; physical volcanology investigates processes of eruption. Physical volcanology provides the pre-eminent underpinning of the practical business of defining hazard scenarios, planning mitigation and designing monitoring strategies. Recent research in a variety of volcanic settings has demonstrated an important link between the petrologic processes that at a fundamental level drive the behavior of volcanoes and the processes that determine the eruptive style of a volcano. Together these define the hazards that arise from volcanic eruptions. Petrological studies of volcanoes are typically based on a study of lava because coherent rock is less vulnerable to weathering and alteration and is more durable in the geological record. Pyroclastic materials are commonly friable and glassy, are more easily eroded, and are more difficult to use in the analytical techniques that have become the staple basis of petrological studies. However, pyroclastic materials represent a complementary but different part of the magmatic story and it is only by integrating both effusive and explosive components of an eruption sequence that a complete picture of the behavior of the system feeding a volcano can be gained. Andesitic strato-cones are made up of a cone-building facies consisting mainly of primary magmatic products and usually dominated by lava flows because pyroclastic material is easily eroded from the slopes of a steep cone. The surrounding ring plain facies includes primary pyroclastic deposits but is typically dominated by redistributed material in the form of debris flow and lahar deposits together with reworked fluvial material. The deposits of each of these two facies are assembled on different time scales and they contain different aspects of the record of the evolution of the magmatic system that gave rise to them. An important practical consequence of this is that different parts of the geochemical record of the system can occur in

  15. Possible lava tube system in a hummocky lava flow at Daund, western Deccan Volcanic Province, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raymond A Duraiswami; Ninad R Bondre; Gauri Dole

    2004-12-01

    A hummocky flow characterised by the presence of toes, lobes, tumuli and possible lava tube system is exposed near Daund, western Deccan Volcanic Province, India. The lava tube system is exposed as several exhumed outcrops and is composed of complex branching and discontinuous segments. The roof of the lava tube has collapsed but original lava tube walls and fragments of the tube roof are seen at numerous places along the tube. At some places the tube walls exhibit a single layer of lava lining, whereas, at other places it shows an additional layer characterised by smooth surface and polygonal cracks. The presence of a branching and meandering lava tube system in the Daund flow, which represents the terminal parts of Thakurwadi Formation, shows that the hummocky flow developed at a low local volumetric flow rate. This tube system developed in the thinner parts of the flow sequence; and tumuli developed in areas where the tube clogged temporarily in the sluggish flow.

  16. Source Dynamics of Long-Period Seismicity in Volcanic and Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouet, B. A.

    2006-12-01

    Long-period (LP) seismicity, including individual LP events and tremor, is widely observed in relation to magmatic and hydrothermal activities in volcanic areas and is recognized as a precursory phenomenon for eruptive activity. The waveform of the LP event is characterized by simple decaying harmonic oscillations except for a brief interval at the event onset. This characteristic event signature is commonly interpreted as oscillations of a fluid-filled resonator in response to a time-localized excitation. By the same token, tremor may be viewed as oscillations of the same resonator in response to a sustained excitation. Because the properties of the resonator system at the source of the LP event can be inferred from the complex frequencies of the decaying harmonic oscillations in the tail of the seismogram, these events are particularly important in the quantification of volcanic and hydrothermal processes. The damped oscillations in the LP coda are characterized by two parameters, T and Q, where T is the period of the dominant mode of oscillation, and Q is the quality factor of the oscillatory system representing the combined effects of radiation and intrinsic losses. Typical periods observed for LP events are in the range 0.2 - 2 s, while observed Q range from values near 1 to values larger than 100. Waveform inversions of LP signals carried out so far point to a crack geometry at the source of these events. Detailed investigations of the oscillating characteristics of LP sources based on the fluid-filled crack model suggest source dimensions ranging from tens to several hundred meters. Such studies further indicate that dusty gases and bubbly basalt are the most common types of fluids involved at the source of LP events in magmatic systems, while misty gases, steam and bubbly water commonly represent LP events of hydrothermal origin. Observations carried out in different volcanic settings point to a wide variety of LP excitation mechanisms. At Stromboli

  17. Coeval Eocene blooms of the freshwater fern Azolla in and around Arctic and Nordic seas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barke, J.; Burgh, A.H.P. van der; Konijnenburg-van Cittert, J.H.A. van; Collinson, M.E.; Pearce, M.A.; Bujak, J.; Heilman-Clausen, C.; Lotter, A.F.; Speelman, E.N.; Kempen, M.M.L. van; Reichart, G.-J.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-01-01

    For a short time interval (c. 1.2 Myr) during the early middle Eocene (~ 49 Myr), the central Arctic Ocean was episodically densely covered by the freshwater fern Azolla, implying sustained freshening of surface waters. Coeval Azolla fossils in neighboring Nordic seas were thought to have been

  18. Development of a low cost and low power consumption system for monitoring CO_{2} soil concentration in volcanic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadallah Estévez, Shadia; Moure-García, David; Torres-González, Pedro; Acosta Sánchez, Leopoldo; Domínguez Cerdeña, Itahiza

    2017-04-01

    Volatiles dissolved in magma are released as gases when pressure or stress conditions change. H2O, CO2, SO2 and H2S are the most abundant gases involved in volcanic processes. Emission rates are related to changes in the volcanic activity. Therefore, in order to predict possible eruptive events, periodic measurements of CO2 concentrations from the soil should be carried out. In the last years, CO2 monitoring has been widespread for many reasons. A direct relationship between changes in volcanic activity and variations in concentration, diffuse flux and isotope ratios of this gas, have been observed prior to some eruptions or unrest processes. All these factors have pointed out the fact that CO2 emission data are crucial in volcanic monitoring programs. In addition, relevant instrumentation development has also taken place: improved accuracy, cost reduction and portability. Considering this, we propose a low cost and a low power consumption system for measuring CO2 concentration in the soil based on Arduino. Through a perforated pick-axe buried at a certain depth, gas samples are periodically taken with the aid of a piston. These samples are injected through a pneumatic circuit in the spectrometer, which measures the CO2 concentration. Simultaneously, the system records the following meteorological parameters: atmospheric pressure, precipitation, relative humidity and air and soil temperature. These parameters are used to correct their possible influence in the CO2 soil concentration. Data are locally stored (SD card) and transmitted via GPRS or WIFI to a data analysis center.

  19. Coeval giant landslides in the Canary Islands: Implications for global, regional and local triggers of giant flank collapses on oceanic volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulesteix, Thomas; Hildenbrand, Anthony; Soler, Vicente; Quidelleur, Xavier; Gillot, Pierre-Yves

    2013-05-01

    Giant landslides are an important part of the evolution of most intra-plate volcanic islands. They often proceed in catastrophic events, likely to generate voluminous debris avalanches and eventually trigger destructive tsunamis. Although knowledge of the timing of their recurrence is a key factor regarding the hazard assessment in coastal environments, only a few of them have been well dated. In this contribution, we focus on the La Orotava event on Tenerife, which we date with the unspiked K-Ar technique, between 534 and 523 ka. Such narrow temporal interval is compatible, within uncertainties, with the age of the Cumbre Nueva collapse on the neighboring island of La Palma. We thus examine here the possible common triggering mechanisms at the global, regional and local scales. Both events occurred shortly after the climax of the oxygen isotopic stage 14, during the rapid transition towards the interglacial stage 13, reinforcing the hypothesis of a control from global paleoclimatic changes on the destabilization of oceanic islands. Intense volcanic pulses at the regional scale also lead to the synchronous overgrowth of several volcanic islands in the archipelago, but coeval destabilization on Tenerife and La Palma appears significantly controlled by the intrinsic morphology of the edifices, with contrasted instability thresholds for shield volcanoes and volcanic ridges respectively. Finally, we propose that the two events may be genetically linked. Dynamic transfer of voluminous debris avalanches during a giant landslide episode can induce isostatic readjustments, generate significant ground acceleration and finally produce a large tsunami, three processes which can concur to trigger large scale flank collapse on a neighboring mature unstable volcanic island.

  20. Alkanes and alkenes in Mediterranean volcanic-hydrothermal systems: origins and geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Jens; D'Alessandro, Walter; Tassi, Franco; Woodland, Alan

    2010-05-01

    It is still a matter of debate if nature provides conditions for abiogenic production of hydrocarbons. Methane (C1) and the C2+ alkanes emanating from ultramafic hydrothermal systems such as Lost City have been considered to be abiogenic in origin, mainly because of the occurrence of an isotopic reversal between methane and the C2+hydrocarbons and C1/C2+ ratios >1000 [1]. Abiogenic production of methane has been postulated to occur under the relatively oxidizing redox conditions of continental-hydrothermal systems, too. It was observed that temperatures received from the H2-H2O-CO-CO2-CH4 geoindicator were coincident with temperatures derived from carbon isotope partitioning between CO2 and CH4in gases released from the Mediterranean volcanic-hydrothermal systems of Nisyros (Greece), Vesuvio and Ischia (both Italy) [2]. Such equilibrium pattern, if not fortuitous, can only be obtained if mantle- and marine limestone-derived CO2 is reduced to CH4. At Nisyros, observed C1/C2+ ratios from 300-4000 are in agreement with an abiogenic origin of the methane. Ethane and propane, however, were shown to be non-genetic with CO2 and methane. C1/C2 and C2/C3 distribution ratios may point to the admixture of small amounts of hydrocarbons deriving from the thermal decomposition of organic matter along with abiogenically equilibrated methane essentially devoid of the higher hydrocarbons [3]. Here, we provide new isotopic and hydrocarbon concentration data on several Mediterranean volcanic-hydrothermal systems, including Nisyros, Vesuvio, Ischia, Vulcano, Solfatara and Pantelleria. Wherever possible, we have extended our data set for the hydrogen isotope composition of CH4 and H2, n-alkane- and alkene/alkane-distribution ratios. At Nisyros, measured alkene/alkane- and H2/H2O concentration ratios confirm the attainment of equilibrium between CO2 and CH4. CO2 and CH4 appear to have equilibrated in the liquid phase at temperatures of ~360° C and redox conditions closely corresponding

  1. Alarm systems detect volcanic tremor and earthquake swarms during Redoubt eruption, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G.; West, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    We ran two alarm algorithms on real-time data from Redoubt volcano during the 2009 crisis. The first algorithm was designed to detect escalations in continuous seismicity (tremor). This is implemented within an application called IceWeb which computes reduced displacement, and produces plots of reduced displacement and spectrograms linked to the Alaska Volcano Observatory internal webpage every 10 minutes. Reduced displacement is a measure of the amplitude of volcanic tremor, and is computed by applying a geometrical spreading correction to a displacement seismogram. When the reduced displacement at multiple stations exceeds pre-defined thresholds and there has been a factor of 3 increase in reduced displacement over the previous hour, a tremor alarm is declared. The second algorithm was to designed to detect earthquake swarms. The mean and median event rates are computed every 5 minutes based on the last hour of data from a real-time event catalog. By comparing these with thresholds, three swarm alarm conditions can be declared: a new swarm, an escalation in a swarm, and the end of a swarm. The end of swarm alarm is important as it may mark a transition from swarm to continuous tremor. Alarms from both systems were dispatched using a generic alarm management system which implements a call-down list, allowing observatory scientists to be called in sequence until someone acknowledged the alarm via a confirmation web page. The results of this simple approach are encouraging. The tremor alarm algorithm detected 26 of the 27 explosive eruptions that occurred from 23 March - 4 April. The swarm alarm algorithm detected all five of the main volcanic earthquake swarm episodes which occurred during the Redoubt crisis on 26-27 February, 21-23 March, 26 March, 2-4 April and 3-7 May. The end-of-swarm alarms on 23 March and 4 April were particularly helpful as they were caused by transitions from swarm to tremor shortly preceding explosive eruptions; transitions which were

  2. Deep seismic sounding investigation into the deep structure of the magma system in Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张先康; 张成科; 赵金仁; 杨卓欣; 李松林; 张建狮; 刘宝峰; 成双喜; 孙国伟; 潘素珍

    2002-01-01

    The magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi Volcanic region is studied with three-dimensional deep seismic sounding (DSS) technique. The results show that the magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region, mainly characterized by low velocity of P wave, can be divided into three parts in terms of depth. At the depth range of 9(15 km, the distribution of the magma system is characterized by extensiveness, large scale and near-SN orientation. This layer is the major place for magma storage. From the depth of 15 km down to the lower crust, it is characterized by small lateral scale, which indicates the (trace( of magma intrusion from the upper mantle into the crust and also implies that the magma system most probably extends to the upper mantle, or even deeper.(less than 8(9 km deep), the range of magma distribution is even smaller, centering on an SN-oriented area just north of the Tianchi crater. If low velocity of P wave is related to the magma system, it then reflects that the magma here is still in a state of relatively high temperature. In this sense, the magma system of Changbaishan-Tianchi volcanic region is at least not (remains(, in other words, it is in an (active( state.

  3. Sr, Nd and Pb isotope and geochemical data from the Quaternary Nevado de Toluca volcano, a source of recent adakitic magmatism, and the Tenango Volcanic Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Serrano, Raymundo G.; Schaaf, Peter; Solís-Pichardo, Gabriela; Hernández-Bernal, Ma. del Sol; Hernández-Treviño, Teodoro; Julio Morales-Contreras, Juan; Macías, José Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volcanic activity at Nevado de Toluca (NT) volcano began 2.6 Ma ago with the emission of andesitic lavas, but over the past 40 ka, eruptions have produced mainly lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of predominantly orthopyroxene-hornblende dacitic composition. In the nearby Tenango Volcanic Field (TVF) pyroclastic products and lava flows ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to andesite were erupted at most of 40 monogenetic volcanic centers and were coeval with the last stages of NT. All volcanic rocks in the study area are characterized by a calc-alkaline affinity that is consistent with a subduction setting. Relatively high concentrations of Sr (>460 ppm) coupled with low Y (45 km) that underlies the volcanoes of the study area, the geochemical and isotopic patterns of these rocks indicate low interaction with this crust. NT volcano was constructed at the intersection of three fault systems, and it seems that the Plio-Quaternary E-W system played an important role in the ascent and storage of magmas during the recent volcanic activity in the two regions. Chemical and textural features of orthopyroxene, amphibole and Fe-Ti oxides from NT suggest that crystallization of magmas occurred at polybaric conditions, confirming the rapid upwelling of magmas.

  4. Evolution of the Plumbing System Beneath a Primitive Cinder Cone: Volcan Jorullo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E.; Wallace, P.; Cashman, K.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2006-12-01

    Detailed studies of the explosive products of monogenetic cinder cones can provide insight into the evolution of the plumbing systems beneath these volcanoes. We have studied tephra deposits from the 1759-1774 eruption of Volcan Jorullo in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The lava from Jorullo evolved during the eruption from primitive basalts to basaltic andesites (Luhr and Carmichael, 1985). In addition to lava flows, Jorullo erupted explosively, depositing a thick blanket of tephra and ash. We analyzed melt inclusions and their olivine hosts from two thick proximal ash fall sequences. Olivine are abundant as loose crystals in the tephra and their compositions evolve from the base (Fo88-91 cores) to the top (Fo84-87 cores) of the tephra sequence. Crystallization pressures for olivine, obtained from the concentration of CO2 and H2O in melt inclusions, decreased from early (50-4200 bars) to late (40-100 bars) in the eruption. The early erupted olivine crystallized over a much wider range in pressures, and interestingly, the most Fo-rich olivine (Fo90- 91) crystallized at the shallowest depths (~50 bars pressure) beneath the volcano, requiring rapid ascent rates of primitive melts. Olivine zoning profiles allow us to calculate crystal residence times, which increase from the early (~1-45 days) to late (~12-225 days) stages of the eruption. This increase in residence time, combined with the decrease in crystallization depth over time, suggest the formation of a shallow reservoir beneath the volcano as the eruption progressed. Formation of a shallow reservoir of degassed magma in which plagioclase and minor augite fractionation occurred together with assimilation of granitic wall rock is consistent with the temporal changes in lava flow and melt inclusion compositions. While the olivine and melt inclusion compositions evolve throughout our tephra section, we never see the most evolved values present in the lava flows. Although this may be the result of erosion of the

  5. The influence of cooling, crystallisation and re-melting on the interpretation of geodetic signals in volcanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricchi, Luca; Biggs, Juliet; Annen, Catherine; Ebmeier, Susanna

    2014-02-01

    Deformation of volcanic edifices is typically attributed to the movement of magma within the volcanic plumbing system, but a wide range of magmatic processes are capable of producing significant volume variations and may also produce deformation. In order to understand the evolution of magmatic systems prior to eruption and correctly interpret monitoring signals, it is necessary to quantify the patterns and timescales of surface deformation that processes such as crystallisation, degassing and expansion of the hydrothermal system can produce. We show how the combination of petrology and thermal modelling can be applied to geodetic observations to identify the processes occurring in a magmatic reservoir during volcanic unrest. Thermal modelling and petrology were used to determine the timescales and volumetric variations associated with cooling, crystallisation and gas exsolution. These calculations can be performed rapidly and highlight the most likely processes responsible for the variation of a set of monitoring parameters. We then consider the magnitude and timescales of deformation produced by other processes occurring within the vicinity of an active magma system. We apply these models to a time series of geodetic data spanning the period between the 1997 and 2008 eruptions of Okmok volcano, Aleutians, examining scenarios involving crystallisation, degassing and remelting of the crystallising shallow magmatic body and including a viscoelastic shell or hydrothermal system. The geodetic observations are consistent with the injection of a water-saturated basalt, followed by minor crystallisation and degassing. Other scenarios are not compatible either with the magnitude or rate of the deformation signals.

  6. Geochemical modeling of groundwater evolution in a volcanic aquifer system of Kumamoto area, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, S.; Hosono, T.; Ide, K.; Shimada, J.

    2013-12-01

    Inverse geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) was used to identify the evolution of groundwater in a volcanic aquifer system of Kumamoto area (103 Km2) in southern Japan. The modeling was based on flow paths proposed by different researcher using different techniques, and detailed chemical analysis of groundwater along the flow paths. Potential phases were constrained using general trends in hydrochemical data of groundwater, mineralogical data, and saturation indices data of minerals in groundwater. Hydrochemical data from a total of 180 spring, river and well water samples were used to evaluate water quality and to determine processes that control groundwater chemistry. The samples from the area were classified as recharge zone water (Ca-HCO3 and Ca-SO4 type), lateral flow to discharge zone water (Ca-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 type) and stagnant zone water (Na-Cl type). The inverse geochemical modeling demonstrated that relatively few phases are required to derive water chemistry in the area. The downstream changes in groundwater chemistry could be largely explained by the weathering of plagioclase to kaolinite, with possible contributions from weathering of biotite and pyroxene. In a broad sense, the reactions responsible for the hydrochemical evolution in the area fall into three categories (1) silicate weathering reactions (2) precipitation of amorphous silica and clay minerals and (3) Cation exchange reactions of Ca2+ to Na+.

  7. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  8. Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER) project and a next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, S.

    2012-12-01

    The first Workshop of Asia-Pacific Region Global Earthquake and Volcanic Eruption Risk Management (G-EVER1) was held in Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan from February 23 to 24, 2012. The workshop focused on the formulation of strategies to reduce the risks of disasters worldwide caused by the occurrence of earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions. More than 150 participants attended the workshop. During the workshop, the G-EVER1 accord was approved by the participants. The Accord consists of 10 recommendations like enhancing collaboration, sharing of resources, and making information about the risks of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions freely available and understandable. The G-EVER Hub website (http://g-ever.org) was established to promote the exchange of information and knowledge among the Asia-Pacific countries. Several G-EVER Working Groups and Task Forces were proposed. One of the working groups was tasked to make the next-generation real-time volcano hazard assessment system. The next-generation volcano hazard assessment system is useful for volcanic eruption prediction, risk assessment, and evacuation at various eruption stages. The assessment system is planned to be developed based on volcanic eruption scenario datasets, volcanic eruption database, and numerical simulations. Defining volcanic eruption scenarios based on precursor phenomena leading up to major eruptions of active volcanoes is quite important for the future prediction of volcanic eruptions. Compiling volcanic eruption scenarios after a major eruption is also important. A high quality volcanic eruption database, which contains compilations of eruption dates, volumes, and styles, is important for the next-generation volcano hazard assessment system. The volcanic eruption database is developed based on past eruption results, which only represent a subset of possible future scenarios. Hence, different distributions from the previous deposits are mainly observed due to the differences in

  9. Ecological characteristics and management of geothermal systems of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boothroyd, Ian K.G. [Golder Associates Ltd., P.O. Box 33849, Takapuna, and School of Geography, Geology and Environmental Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-03-15

    New Zealand has an array of geothermal systems with distinctive ecological features, with many occurring in the Taupo Volcanic Zone in the Central North Island. Associated with these geothermal features are characteristic geophysical and geochemical components, and distinctive terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with many attributes that are common across a range of the biotic groups. Zonation amongst vegetation communities is closely related to soil temperature and these associations generally occur in a predictable sequence along the soil temperature gradient. Similarly, clear distinctions in aquatic flora and fauna occur longitudinally downstream from the source of thermal springs and vertically on geyser mounds. The characteristic vegetation communities associated with geothermal fields and the invertebrate and algal communities found in geothermally influenced springs and streams are described, in particular the features of the Wairakei geothermal field. At this field four plant associations are recognized (non-vegetated soilfield, prostrate kanuka shrubland, prostrate kanuka scrub, mixed fernland), but all the major aquatic macroinvertebrate groups are represented and commonly found in natural freshwaters throughout New Zealand. The current management of geothermal ecosystems is reviewed with particular reference to the Waikato region of New Zealand. Management of geothermal resources in New Zealand aims to balance development with the protection of highly valued surface features via a series of regional policies, rules and regulations. Geothermal habitats, ecological gradients, and at-risk geothermal plants are included in the definition of geothermal systems for management purposes. With the recognition of the unique ecological diversity and function of geothermal ecosystems, knowledge and understanding of their ecological characteristics will be critical to the ability to utilize and sustain geothermal resources into the future. (author)

  10. Groundwater flow processes and mixing in active volcanic systems: the case of Guadalajara (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Antonio, A.; Mahlknecht, J.; Tamez-Meléndez, C.; Ramos-Leal, J.; Ramírez-Orozco, A.; Parra, R.; Ornelas-Soto, N.; Eastoe, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    other active volcanic systems on Earth.

  11. Bromo volcano area as human-environment system: interaction of volcanic eruption, local knowledge, risk perception and adaptation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachri, Syamsul; Stötter, Johann; Sartohadi, Junun

    2013-04-01

    People in the Bromo area (located within Tengger Caldera) have learn to live with the threat of volcanic hazard since this volcano is categorized as an active volcano in Indonesia. During 2010, the eruption intensity increased yielding heavy ash fall and glowing rock fragments. A significant risk is also presented by mass movement which reaches areas up to 25 km from the crater. As a result of the 2010 eruption, 12 houses were destroyed, 25 houses collapsed and there were severe also effects on agriculture and the livestock sector. This paper focuses on understanding the interaction of Bromo volcanic eruption processes and their social responses. The specific aims are to 1) identify the 2010 eruption of Bromo 2) examine the human-volcano relationship within Bromo area in general, and 3) investigate the local knowledge related to hazard, risk perception and their adaptation strategies in specific. In-depth interviews with 33 informants from four districts nearest to the crater included local people and authorities were carried out. The survey focused on farmers, key persons (dukun), students and teachers in order to understand how people respond to Bromo eruption. The results show that the eruption in 2010 was unusual as it took continued for nine months, the longest period in Bromo history. The type of eruption was phreatomagmatic producing material dominated by ash to fine sand. This kind of sediment typically belongs to Tengger mountain eruptions which had produced vast explosions in the past. Furthermore, two years after the eruption, the interviewed people explained that local knowledge and their experiences with volcanic activity do not influence their risk perception. Dealing with this eruption, people in the Bromo area applied 'lumbung desa' (traditional saving systems) and mutual aid activity for surviving the volcanic eruption. Keywords: Human-environment system, local knowledge, risk perception, adaptation strategies, Bromo Volcano Indonesia

  12. Testing a model-driven Geographical Information System for risk assessment during an effusive volcanic crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew; Latutrie, Benjamin; Andredakis, Ioannis; De Groeve, Tom; Langlois, Eric; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Del Negro, Ciro; Favalli, Massimiliano; Fujita, Eisuke; Kelfoun, Karim; Rongo, Rocco

    2016-04-01

    RED-SEED stands for Risk Evaluation, Detection and Simulation during Effusive Eruption Disasters, and combines stakeholders from the remote sensing, modeling and response communities with experience in tracking volcanic effusive events. It is an informal working group that has evolved around the philosophy of combining global scientific resources, in the realm of physical volcanology, remote sensing and modeling, to better define and limit uncertainty. The group first met during a three day-long workshop held in Clermont Ferrand (France) between 28 and 30 May 2013. The main recommendation of the workshop in terms of modeling was that there is a pressing need for "real-time input of reliable Time-Averaged Discharge Rate (TADR) data with regular up-dates of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) if modeling is to be effective; the DEMs can be provided by the radar/photogrammetry community." We thus set up a test to explore (i) which model source terms are needed, (ii) how they can be provided and updated, and (iii) how can models be run and applied in an ensemble approach. The test used two hypothetical effusive events in the Chaîne des Puys (Auvergne, France), for which a prototype Geographical Information System (GIS) was set up to allow loss assessment during an effusive crisis. This system drew on all immediately available data for population, land use, communications, utility and building-type. After defining lava flow model source terms (vent location, effusion rate, lava chemistry, temperature, crystallinity and vesicularity), five operational lava flow emplacement models were run (DOWNFLOW, FLOWGO, LAVASIM, MAGFLOW and VOLCFLOW) to produce a projection for likelihood of impact for all pixels within the area covered by the GIS, based on agreement between models. The test thus aimed not to assess the model output, but instead to examine overlapping output. Next, inundation maps and damage reports for impacted zones were produced. The exercise identified several

  13. Mount Kenya volcanic activity and the Late Cenozoic landscape reorganisation in the upper Tana fluvial system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, A.; Schoorl, J.M.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Claessens, L.F.G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic–fluvial landscape interaction of the late Cenozoic Mt Kenya region in the upper Tana catchment has been reconstructed. The oldest newly dated phonolite flow is 5.78 Ma (40Ar/39Ar), placing the initiation of Mt Kenya volcanic activity within the Late Miocene, much earlier than reported befor

  14. Hawaii and Beyond: Volcanic Islands as Model Systems for Biogeochemical and Human Ecodynamic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Hawaiian Islands provide an excellent natural lab for understanding geochemical and ecosystem processes. The most important features are: a) increasing volcano age with distance from the hotspot, b) asymmetric rainfall distribution imposed by the northeasterly trade winds and orographic processes, creating wet windward and dry leeward landscapes, c) an impoverished vegetation assemblage allowing the same species to grow in strongly varying climate and soil conditions, d) the ability to hold topography relatively constant over long time scales by sampling on volcanic shield remnants that are preserved even on the oldest high island, Kauai, and e) a long-term topographic evolution that carves the gently sloping shield surfaces into steep-sided, amphitheater headed, relatively flat floored valleys. Although deeply incised valleys are well represented in Kauai, the later stages of volcanic island evolution are not well expressed in the exposed Hawaiian Islands. Therefore, I also consider examples from the Society and Gambier Islands in French Polynesia to demonstrate the biogeochemical and human ecodynamic impacts of valley expansion and subsidence leading to drowning of all but the highest elevation interfluves. In Hawaii, I and many colleagues have characterized the details of biogeochemical processes such as: a) variations in oxygen isotopes in soil water and soil minerals, b) changing nutrient sources using Sr, Ca, and Mg isotopes, c) mineral - carbon sorption and its implications for carbon storage in soils and for mineral ripening, and d) the development of leaching and redox driven pedogenic thresholds. Here, I address how these biogeochemical features influence human land-use decisions in prehistoric Hawaii and elsewhere in the Pacific. Polynesian radiation into the eastern Pacific occurred rapidly after 1300 y bp. Although they carried with them a kitchen garden each new island presented a different environmental challenge. They were sensitive to

  15. The influence of volcanic activity in the Campi Flegrei coastal depositional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Crescenzo; Esposito, Eliana; Molisso, Flavia; Porfido, Sabina; Sacchi, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The Campi Flegrei coastal area includes the bay of Pozzuoli, Procida and Ischia islands, characterized by active tectonics and volcanism since the Pleistocene. Numerous monogenic volcanoes occur close to the shoreline and volcanic debris interpreted as submarine counterpart of subaerial flows and surges, have been detected offshore. In the Pozzuoli area the most recent eruptive volcanic activity occurred from 10.0 to 8.0 ky B.P and 4.5 to 3.7 ky B.P. followed by the September 1538 Monte Nuovo eruption. Here magma-related activity is testified by extensive hydrothermalism, and recent episodes (1970-71 and 1982-84 on Pozzuoli coast) of shallow seismicity and ground deformation, exceeding rates of 100 cm/year in the years 1983-1984. The most recent volcanic activity on Ischia island starts around 10.0 ky B.P. to which associates several eruptive centres mostly located in the western sector. The last eruption dates back to Arso flow in 1302. Nevertheless the landscape of Ischia is dominated by Mount Epomeo in the central part of the island, which is the highest peak (788 m). It is a volcano-tectonic structure that raised above sea level between 33 and 28 ka BP, due to the intrusion of magma at shallow depth. Procida island is composed of five monogenic Volcanoes (Vivara, Terra Murata, Pozzo Vecchio, Fiumicello and Solchiaro) that have been active over the last 80 ky producing pyroclastic deposits and a lava dome. A sixth volcanic structure has been reported recently off P.ta Serra by marine investigations and confirmed by airborne magnetic surveys. The emplacement of large amount of volcanoclastic material from volcanic and volcano-tectonic activity in the Campi Flegrei coastal area produced extensive avalanche deposits off Ischia island, seafloor instabilities in the form of creep/slump, channelled sediment flow and deep sedimentary fans, and is largely responsible for aggradation/progradation of the coastal area during the Quaternary. Moreover, numerous volcanic bank

  16. Provenance and drainage system of the Early Cretaceous volcanic detritus in the Himalaya as constrained by detrital zircon geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Mian Hu; Eduardo Garzanti; Wei An

    2015-01-01

    The age range of the major intra-plate volcanic event that affected the northern Indian margin in the Early Cretaceous is here deifned precisely by detrital zircon geochronol-ogy. U–Pb ages of Early Cretaceous detrital zircons found in the Cretaceous to the Paleocene sandstones cluster mainly between 142 Ma and 123 Ma in the northern Tethys Himalayan unit, and between 140 Ma and 116 Ma in the southern Tethys Himalayan unit. The youngest and oldest detrital zircons within this group indicate that volcanism in the source areas started in the latest Jurassic and ended by the early Albian. Stratigraphic data indicate that volcaniclastic sedimentation began signiifcantly earlier in southern Tibet (Tithonian) than in Nepal (Valangin-ian), and considerably later in Spiti and Zanskar (Aptian/Albian) to the west. This apparent westward migration of magmatism was explained with progressive westward propagation of extensional/transtensional tectonic activity and development of fractures cutting deeply across the Indian continental margin crust. However, detrital zircon geochronology provides no indi-cation of heterochroneity in magmatic activity in the source areas from east to west, and thus lends little support to such a scenario. Westward migration of volcaniclastic sedimentation may thus relfect instead the westward progradation of major drainage systems supplying vol-canic detritus sourced from the same volcanic centers in the east. Development of multiple radial drainage away from the domal surface uplift associated with magmatic upwelling, as observed for most large igneous provinces around the world, may also explain why U–Pb ages of detrital zircons tend to cluster around 133–132 Ma (the age of the Comei igneous province) in Tethys Himalayan units, but around 118–117 Ma (the age of the Rajmahal igneous province) in Lesser Himalayan units.

  17. Petrological mapping of Volcanic Plumbing Systems using amphiboles in mixed intermediate magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Balázs; Harangi, SzZabolcs; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Mason, Paul R. D.

    2016-04-01

    Petrological mapping of volcanic plumbing systems (VPS) is essential to understand the magma evolution and to interpret geophysical signals of monitored volcanoes. The mapping includes the determination of the compositions of magmas feed the system and their storage depths. Intermediate magmas are usually formed by magma mixing a processes that mask the real compositional variation of magmas feed the VPS. However phenocrysts can preserve this information in their chemical stratigraphy. Amphibole can be a powerful tool in these studies because it can incorporate petrogenetically important trace elements primarily controlled by the coexisting melt composition, additionally the major element composition can be used to calculate pressure. We studied the zoning, texture and major and trace element composition of amphiboles from the Ciomadul, a late pleistocen dacite volcano. The erupted dacites contain abundant amphibole phenocrysts. Amphibole coexist with all of the rock forming minerals (e.g. with quartz or with olivine) indicating their diverse origin. The amphiboles show large major element compositional variation (e.g. Al2O3: 6-15 wt%) accompanied with large variation in trace element (e.g. Cr: 10-3000 ppm, Sr: 55-855 ppm, Eu/Eu*: 0.62-1.19) even in a single sample or single crystal and they represent antecryst (reworked) and phenocryst (in situ crystallized) populations. Such a large compositional variation of amphiboles is commonly observed at andesite-dacite arc volcanoes. Hornblendes (antecryst1) have low Al, Mg/Fe, and negative Eu-anomaly; they equilibrated with rhyolitic melt at near-solidus temperature. Antecryst2 is represented by Cr-, Mg-rich amphiboles; they can contain Cr-spinel inclusions suggesting near-liquidus crystallization from primitive mafic melts. Phenocrysts show large compositional variation sample by sample that is different from the antecrysts suggesting variable pre-eruptive conditions. The antecrysts are derived from a stratified (mafic

  18. Historical volcanism and the state of stress in the East African Rift System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Wadge

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crustal extension at the East African Rift System (EARS should, as a tectonic ideal, involve a stress field in which the direction of minimum horizontal stress is perpendicular to the rift. A volcano in such a setting should produce dykes and fissures parallel to the rift. How closely do the volcanoes of the EARS follow this? We answer this question by studying the 21 volcanoes that have erupted historically (since about 1800 and find that 7 match the (approximate geometrical ideal. At the other 14 volcanoes the orientation of the eruptive fissures/dykes and/or the axes of the host rift segments are oblique to the ideal values. To explain the eruptions at these volcanoes we invoke local (non-plate tectonic variations of the stress field caused by: crustal heterogeneities and anisotropies (dominated by NW structures in the Protoerozoic basement, transfer zone tectonics at the ends of offset rift segments, gravitational loading by the volcanic edifice (typically those with 1-2 km relief and magmatic pressure in central reservoirs. We find that the more oblique volcanoes tend to have large edifices, large eruptive volumes and evolved and mixed magmas capable of explosive behaviour. Nine of the volcanoes have calderas of varying ellipticity, 6 of which are large, reservoir-collapse types mainly elongated across rift (e.g. Kone and 3 are smaller, elongated parallel to the rift and contain active lava lakes (e.g. Erta Ale, suggesting different mechanisms of formation and stress fields. Nyamuragira is the only EARS volcano with enough sufficiently well-documented eruptions to infer its long-term dynamic behaviour. Eruptions within 7 km of the volcano are of relatively short duration (<100 days, but eruptions with more distal fissures tend to have greater obliquity and longer durations, indicating a changing stress field away from the volcano. There were major changes in long-term magma extrusion rates in 1977 (and perhaps in 2002 due to major along

  19. Historical volcanism and the state of stress in the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadge, Geoffrey; Biggs, Juliet; Lloyd, Ryan; Kendall, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Crustal extension at the East African Rift System (EARS) should, as a tectonic ideal, involve a stress field in which the direction of minimum horizontal stress is perpendicular to the rift. A volcano in such a setting should produce dykes and fissures parallel to the rift. How closely do the volcanoes of the EARS follow this? We answer this question by studying the 21 volcanoes that have erupted historically (since about 1800) and find that 7 match the (approximate) geometrical ideal. At the other 14 volcanoes the orientation of the eruptive fissures/dykes and/or the axes of the host rift segments are oblique to the ideal values. To explain the eruptions at these volcanoes we invoke local (non-plate tectonic) variations of the stress field caused by: crustal heterogeneities and anisotropies (dominated by NW structures in the Protoerozoic basement), transfer zone tectonics at the ends of offset rift segments, gravitational loading by the volcanic edifice (typically those with 1-2 km relief) and magmatic pressure in central reservoirs. We find that the more oblique volcanoes tend to have large edifices, large eruptive volumes and evolved and mixed magmas capable of explosive behaviour. Nine of the volcanoes have calderas of varying ellipticity, 6 of which are large, reservoir-collapse types mainly elongated across rift (e.g. Kone) and 3 are smaller, elongated parallel to the rift and contain active lava lakes (e.g. Erta Ale), suggesting different mechanisms of formation and stress fields. Nyamuragira is the only EARS volcano with enough sufficiently well-documented eruptions to infer its long-term dynamic behaviour. Eruptions within 7 km of the volcano are of relatively short duration (<100 days), but eruptions with more distal fissures tend to have greater obliquity and longer durations, indicating a changing stress field away from the volcano. There were major changes in long-term magma extrusion rates in 1977 (and perhaps in 2002) due to major along-rift dyking

  20. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  1. Characterization of the Hydrothermal System of the Tinguiririca Volcanic Complex, Central Chile, using Structural Geology and Passive Seismic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez Orrego, Claudia; Tapia, Felipe; Comte, Diana; Gutierrez, Francisco; Lira, Elías; Charrier, Reynaldo; Benavente, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    A structural characterization of the hydrothermal-volcanic field associated with the Tinguiririca Volcanic Complex had been performed by combining passive seismic tomography and structural geology. This complex corresponds to a 20 km long succession of N25°E oriented of eruptive centers, currently showing several thermal manifestations distributed throughout the area. The structural behavior of this zone is controlled by the El Fierro - El Diablo fault system, corresponding to a high angle reverse faults of Oligocene - Miocene age. In this area, a temporary seismic network with 16 short-period stations was setup from January to April of 2010, in the context of the MSc thesis of Lira- Energía Andina (2010), covering an area of 200 km2 that corresponds with the hydrothermal field of Tinguiririca Volcanic Complex (TVC), Central Chile, Southern Central Andes. Using P- and S- wave arrival times, a 3D seismic velocity tomography was performed. High Vp/Vs ratios are interpreted as zones with high hot fluid content and high fracturing. Meanwhile, low Vp/Vs anomalies could represent the magmatic reservoir and the conduit network associated to the fluid mobility. Based on structural information and thermal manifestations, these anomalies have been interpreted. In order to visualize the relation between local geology and the velocity model, the volume associated with the magma reservoir and the fluid circulation network has been delimited using an iso-value contour of Vp/Vs equal to 1.70. The most prominent observed feature in the obtained model is a large "V" shaped low - velocity anomaly extending along the entire study region and having the same vergency and orientation as the existing high-angle inverse faults, which corroborates that El Fierro - El Diablo fault system represents the local control for fluid mobility. This geometry coincides with surface hydrothermal manifestations and with available geochemical information of the area, which allowed us to generate a

  2. Response of hydrothermal system to stress transients at Lassen Volcanic Center, California, inferred from seismic interferometry with ambient noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Brenguier, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Time-lapse monitoring of seismic velocity at volcanic areas can provide unique insight into the property of hydrothermal and magmatic fluids and their temporal variability. We established a quasi real-time velocity monitoring system by using seismic interferometry with ambient noise to explore the temporal evolution of velocity in the Lassen Volcanic Center, Northern California. Our monitoring system finds temporal variability of seismic velocity in response to stress changes imparted by an earthquake and by seasonal environmental changes. Dynamic stress changes from a magnitude 5.7 local earthquake induced a 0.1 % velocity reduction at a depth of about 1 km. The seismic velocity susceptibility defined as ratio of seismic velocity change to dynamic stress change is estimated to be about 0.006 MPa-1, which suggests the Lassen hydrothermal system is marked by high-pressurized hydrothermal fluid. By combining geodetic measurements, our observation shows that the long-term seismic velocity fluctuation closely tracks snow-induced vertical deformation without time delay, which is most consistent with an hydrological load model (either elastic or poroelastic response) in which surface loading drives hydrothermal fluid diffusion that leads to an increase of opening of cracks and subsequently reductions of seismic velocity. We infer that heated-hydrothermal fluid in a vapor-dominated zone at a depth of 2-4 km range is responsible for the long-term variation in seismic velocity[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quel Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  4. Aerosols Monitoring Network to Create a Volcanic ASH Risk Management System in Argentina and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quel, Eduardo; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Otero, Lidia; Jin, Yoshitaka; Ristori, Pablo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; González, Francisco; Papandrea, Sebastián; Shimizu, Atsushi; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Two main decisions were made in Argentina to mitigate the impact of the recent volcanic activity in de country basically affected by the presence of volcanic ash in the air and deposited over the Argentinean territory. The first one was to create a risk management commission were this risk between others were studied, and second to develop new ground based remote sensing technologies to be able to identify and inform the risk close to the airports. In addition the Japanese government program for Science and Technology joint Research Partnership between Argentina, Chile and Japan for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) accepted to fund this cooperation due to the potential future utilization of the research outcomes to the benefit of the society. This work present the actual achievements and expected advance of these projects that try to joint efforts between national and international agencies as well as countries on behalf of a better understanding of the risks and a joint collaboration on the mitigation of suspended ashes impact over the aerial navigation.

  5. Water and gas geochemistry of the Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) hydrothermal system (Ciudad Real, central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaselli, Orlando; Nisi, Barbara; Tassi, Franco; Giannini, Luciano; Grandia, Fidel; Darrah, Tom; Capecchiacci, Francesco; del Villar, Pèrez

    2013-04-01

    An extensive geochemical and isotopic investigation was carried out in the water and gas discharges of the Late Miocene-Quaternary Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) (Ciudad Real, Spain) with the aim reconstruct the fluid circulation in the area. CVP consists of a series of scattered (monogenetic) vents from where alkaline lava flows and pyroclastic deposits formed in two different periods. The first stage (8.7-6.4 Ma) mainly included ultra-potassic mafic extrusives, whilst the second stage (4.7-1.75 Ma) prevalently originated alkaline and ultra-alkaline volcanics. Both stages were followed by a volcanic activity that extended up to 1.3 and 0.7 Ma, respectively. This area can likely be regarded as one of the most important emitting zones of CO2 in the whole Peninsular Spain along with that of Selva-Emporda in northeastern Spain (Cataluña) and it can be assumed as one of the best examples of natural analogues of CO2 leakages in Spain. This latter aspect is further evidenced by the relatively common water-gas blast events that characterize the CCVF. In the last few years the presence of a CO2-pressurized reservoir at a relatively shallow level as indeed caused several small-sized explosion particularly during the drilling of domestic wells. The fluid discharging sites are apparently aligned along well-defined directions: NW-SE and NNW-SSE and subordinately, ENE-WSW, indicating a clear relationship between the thermal discharges and the volcanic centers that also distribute along these lineaments. The CVP waters are mostly hypothermal (up to 33 °C) and are generally Mg(Ca)-HCO3 in composition and occasionally show relatively high concentrations of Fe and Mn, with pH and electrical conductivity down to 5.5 and up to 6.5 mS/cm, respectively. The oxygen and hydrogen isotopes suggest a meteoric origin for these waters. The mantle source of these volcanic products is apparently preserved in the many CO2-rich (up to 990,000 mmol/mol) gas discharges that characterize CVP

  6. Volcanic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  7. Influence of explosive volcanic events on the activation versus de-activation of a modern turbidite system: the example of the Dohrn canyon-fan in the continental slope of the Campania volcanic district (Naples Bay, Italy - Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, M.; Budillon, F.; Pappone, G.; Insinga, D.

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between volcanic activity, volcano-clastic yield and activation/deactivation of a turbidite system can be evaluated along the continental margin of Campania region (Tyrrhenian Sea - Italy), an active volcanic area, where three wide canyon-fans occur at short distances one to another. Actually, the Dohrn, Magnaghi and Cuma canyons cut the continental slope and shelf off Ischia and Procida volcanic islands and off the Campania Plain where Phlegraean Field and Mt. Vesuvius active vents are located. This research, partly supported by the Italian Flagship Project Ritmare, is based on single-channel, high-resolution seismic profiles (Sparker-One 16 kJ, 0.5 s twtt), swath-bathymetry and litho- and tephra-stratigraphy of gravity cores. We focused on the stratigraphic constraint of paleo-thalweg features and channel/levees deposits in seismics, debris flow, turbidites and hemipelagites in cores, to learn more on the activation/deactivation stages of the canyon Dohrn, in the frame of relative eustatic sea level variations over the Middle Pleistocene-Holocene time span.Preliminary outcomes suggest that even major volcanic events occurred in the last 300 ky, such as ignimbrite eruptions or large fallouts, have caused the infilling of the canyon head and the cover of pre-existing seabed morphology. As a consequence, the temporary deactivation of the turbidite system has occurred, despite the volcano-clastic overload in the coastal environment. Phases of renewed activities of the thalweg are observed to be in step with falling stages of sea level, which have driven the re-incision of canyon valleys through continuous volcano-clastic debris and turbidites down-flows. Since Holocene, the quiescence of the Dohrn Canyon has been documented, despite the intense volcano-tectonic activity in the area.

  8. How temperature-dependent elasticity alters host rock/magmatic reservoir models: A case study on the effects of ice-cap unloading on shallow volcanic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Richard R.; Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    In geodynamic numerical models of volcanic systems, the volcanic basement hosting the magmatic reservoir is often assumed to exhibit constant elastic parameters with a sharp transition from the host rocks to the magmatic reservoir. We assess this assumption by deriving an empirical relation between elastic parameters and temperature for Icelandic basalts by conducting a set of triaxial compression experiments between 200 °C and 1000 °C. Results show a significant decrease of Young's modulus from ∼38 GPa to less than 4.7 GPa at around 1000 °C. Based on these laboratory data, we develop a 2D axisymmetric finite-element model including temperature-dependent elastic properties of the volcanic basement. As a case study, we use the Snæfellsjökull volcanic system, Western Iceland to evaluate pressure differences in the volcanic edifice and basement due to glacial unloading of the volcano. First, we calculate the temperature field throughout the model and assign elastic properties accordingly. Then we assess unloading-driven pressure differences in the magma chamber at various depths in models with and without temperature-dependent elastic parameters. With constant elastic parameters and a sharp transition between basement and magma chamber we obtain results comparable to other studies. However, pressure changes due to surface unloading become smaller when using more realistic temperature-dependent elastic properties. We ascribe this subdued effect to a transition zone around the magma chamber, which is still solid rock but with relatively low Young's modulus due to high temperatures. We discuss our findings in the light of volcanic processes in proximity to the magma chamber, such as roof collapse, dyke injection, or deep hydrothermal circulation. Our results aim at quantifying the effects of glacial unloading on magma chamber dynamics and volcanic activity.

  9. Climate effects on volcanism: influence on magmatic systems of loading and unloading from ice mass variations, with examples from Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Pinel, Virginie; Lund, Björn; Albino, Fabien; Pagli, Carolina; Geirsson, Halldór; Sturkell, Erik

    2010-05-28

    Pressure influences both magma production and the failure of magma chambers. Changes in pressure interact with the local tectonic settings and can affect magmatic activity. Present-day reduction in ice load on subglacial volcanoes due to global warming is modifying pressure conditions in magmatic systems. The large pulse in volcanic production at the end of the last glaciation in Iceland suggests a link between unloading and volcanism, and models of that process can help to evaluate future scenarios. A viscoelastic model of glacio-isostatic adjustment that considers melt generation demonstrates how surface unloading may lead to a pulse in magmatic activity. Iceland's ice caps have been thinning since 1890 and glacial rebound at rates exceeding 20 mm yr(-1) is ongoing. Modelling predicts a significant amount of 'additional' magma generation under Iceland due to ice retreat. The unloading also influences stress conditions in shallow magma chambers, modifying their failure conditions in a manner that depends critically on ice retreat, the shape and depth of magma chambers as well as the compressibility of the magma. An annual cycle of land elevation in Iceland, due to seasonal variation of ice mass, indicates an annual modulation of failure conditions in subglacial magma chambers.

  10. Fermi Problem: Power developed at the eruption of the Puyehue-Cord\\'on Caulle volcanic system in June 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, Hernan

    2011-01-01

    On June 4 2011 the Puyehue-Cord\\'on Caulle volcanic system produced a pyroclastic subplinian eruption reaching level 3 in the volcanic explosivity index. The first stage of the eruption released sand and ashes that affected small towns and cities in the surrounding areas, including San Carlos de Bariloche, in Argentina, one of the largest cities in the North Patagonian andean region. By treating the eruption as a Fermi problem, we estimated the volume and mass of sand ejected as well as the energy and power released during the eruptive phase. We then put the results in context by comparing the obtained values with everyday quantities, like the load of a cargo truck or the electric power produced in Argentina. These calculations have been done as a pedagogic exercise, and after evaluation of the hypothesis was done in the classroom, the calculations have been performed by the students. These are students of the first physics course at the Physics and Chemistry Teacher Programs of the Universidad Nacional de R\\...

  11. Chemical and isotopic compositions of minerals and waters from the Campi Flegrei volcanic system, Naples, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, G. M.; Cortecci, G.; Franco, E.; Stanzione, D.

    1999-08-01

    Based on their δ 34S signature, sulfate minerals and native sulfur around fumaroles and hot water pools from the Campi Flegrei volcanic area derive from supergenic oxidation of volcanic H 2S. Their mean δ 34S value (-0.2±1.7‰) matches with that of fumarolic H 2S at Solfatara (-0.3±0.3‰), as well as with the δ 34S of +1.4‰ obtained for total sulfur in fresh trachyte from the area. All δ 34S values indicate a mostly deep-seated origin for sulfur. Thermal waters were analysed for major and minor chemistry and for oxygen, hydrogen and sulfur isotope compositions. Pools at Pisciarelli are filled with evaporated meteoric water heated by rising (magmatic) gases. The water δ 18O (+3.8±1.3‰) and δ 2H (+6.5±2.2‰) values in these steam-heated waters are controlled by mixing and evaporation effects, and the δ 34S value of dissolved sulfate (-1.3±0.3‰) basically agrees with supergenic oxidation of deep-seated H 2S as the major source of sulfur. Instead, water from thermal springs and wells elsewhere in the Campi Flegrei appears to be a mixture between dilute meteoric and saline marine components. The latter may be local seawater from the bay of Pozzuoli. The δ 18O and δ 2H values of waters sampled during 1993-1994 range from -5.6 to +0.3‰ and from -33 to -3.4‰, respectively. The δ 34S values of dissolved sulfate range between -0.1 and +19.5‰. In general, sulfate is probably derived essentially from two sources, both within the volcanic cover, i.e., oxidation/dissolution of pyrite and anhydrite, and marine water. An occasional source of water and sulfate is represented by (magmatic) gases, which directly interact with shallow meteoric water as in the case of the Hotel Tennis well yielding steam-heated water with δ 18O=-1.5±0.2‰, δ 2H=-17±1‰ and δ 34S=-0.1‰.

  12. A Linearized Model for Wave Propagation through Coupled Volcanic Conduit-crack Systems Filled with Multiphase Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, C.; Dunham, E. M.; OReilly, O. J.; Karlstrom, L.

    2015-12-01

    Both the oscillation of magma in volcanic conduits and resonance of fluid-filled cracks (dikes and sills) are appealing explanations for very long period signals recorded at many active volcanoes. While these processes have been studied in isolation, real volcanic systems involve interconnected networks of conduits and cracks. The overall objective of our work is to develop a model of wave propagation and ultimately eruptive fluid dynamics through this coupled system. Here, we present a linearized model for wave propagation through a conduit with multiple cracks branching off of it. The fluid is compressible and viscous, and is comprised of a mixture of liquid melt and gas bubbles. Nonequilibrium bubble growth and resorption (BGR) is quantified by introducing a time scale for mass exchange between phases, following the treatment in Karlstrom and Dunham (2015). We start by deriving the dispersion relation for crack waves travelling along the multiphase-magma-filled crack embedded in an elastic solid. Dissipation arises from magma viscosity, nonequilibrium BGR, and radiation of seismic waves into the solid. We next introduce coupling conditions between the conduit and crack, expressing conservation of mass and the balance of forces across the junction. Waves in the conduit, like those in the crack, are influenced by nonequilibrium BGR, but the deformability of the surrounding solid is far less important than for cracks. Solution of the coupled system of equations provides the evolution of pressure and fluid velocity within the conduit-crack system. The system has various resonant modes that are sensitive to fluid properties and to the geometry of the conduit and cracks. Numerical modeling of seismic waves in the solid allows us to generate synthetic seismograms.

  13. The Guerrero suspect terrane (western Mexico) and coeval arc terranes (the Greater Antilles and the Western Cordillera of Colombia): a late Mesozoic intra-oceanic arc accreted to cratonal America during the Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, M.; Lapierre, H.; Freydier, C.; Coulon, C.; Gill, J.-B.; de Lepinay, B. Mercier; Beck, C.; Martinez R., J.; O. Talavera, M.; E. Ortiz, H.; Stein, G.; Bourdier, J.-L.; Yta, M.

    1994-02-01

    The Guerrero suspect terrane, composed of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous sequences, extends from Baja California to Acapulco and is considered to be coeval with the late Mesozoic igneous and sedimentary arc sequences of the Greater Antilles, the West Indies, Venezuela and the Western Cordillera of Colombia. These sequences represent the remnants of an arc which accreted to the North American and northern South American cratons at the end of the Cretaceous. In western Mexico, the arc sequences built on continental crust consist of high-K calc-alkaline basalts, andesites and rhyolites enriched in LREE with abundant siliceous pyroclastic rocks interbedded either with Aptian-Albian reefal limestones or red beds. They do not show magmatic changes during the arc development. In contrast, the arc sequences built on oceanic crust show an evolution with time. Arc activity began with the development of depleted low K-tholeiitic mafic suite (Guanajuato igneous sequence), followed first by mature tholeiitic basalts and then by calc-alkaline olivine basalts interbedded with micritic limestones and radiolarian oozes of Early Cretaceous age. At the end of the arc growth, during Aptian-Albian times, calc-alkaline pillow basalts and and esites poured out in the volcanic front while shoshonitic olivine basalts extruded in the back arc. The tholeiitic and shoshonitic mafic rocks as well as the calc-alkaline lavas are mildly enriched in LREE, Y and Nb and show high ɛNd ratios, typical of oceanic arcs. In contrast, the calc-alkaline mafic suite enriched in LREE, Y and Nb exhibits lower ɛNd ratios suggesting that it was derived by the partial melting of a mantle source contaminated either by Paleozoic subducted sediments or old source enrichments (OIB). The Cretaceous arc rocks of the Greater Antilles, interbedded with and/or capped by Aptian-Albian limestones, the Cretaceous andesites of northern Colombia, the Cretaceous tholeiitic and calc-alkaline volcanic rocks of Venezuela, and

  14. Reduced North Atlantic deep water coeval with the glacial Lake Agassiz freshwater outburst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiven, Helga Kikki Flesche; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Ninnemann, Ulysses S; Richter, Thomas O; Cortijo, Elsa

    2008-01-04

    An outstanding climate anomaly 8200 years before the present (B.P.) in the North Atlantic is commonly postulated to be the result of weakened overturning circulation triggered by a freshwater outburst. New stable isotopic and sedimentological records from a northwest Atlantic sediment core reveal that the most prominent Holocene anomaly in bottom-water chemistry and flow speed in the deep limb of the Atlantic overturning circulation begins at approximately 8.38 thousand years B.P., coeval with the catastrophic drainage of Lake Agassiz. The influence of Lower North Atlantic Deep Water was strongly reduced at our site for approximately 100 years after the outburst, confirming the ocean's sensitivity to freshwater forcing. The similarities between the timing and duration of the pronounced deep circulation changes and regional climate anomalies support a causal link.

  15. Detailed Image Comparison using MDI, HMI and GONG Co-Eval Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzennik, Sylvain G.

    2017-08-01

    I present preliminary results from detailed image comparison using MDI, HMI and GONG co-eval observations taken in 2014, when all three instruments were operational. This comparison allows me to estimate both the instrumental image distortion and the instrument PSF, with respect to HMI. Both intensity and velocity images are compared when available. The precise observing perspective of each instrument had to be accounted since it affects the projected image on the instrument detector at the required level of precision (i.e., a fraction of an HMI pixel). In the process, it was discovered that the meta data generated by the respective projects were not accurate enough. While the inclusion of the image distortion and the instrument PSF in the spatial decomposition will improve the determination of high degree modes, it may also benefit other local helioseismic analysis.

  16. Volcanic sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide measurements using small unmanned aerial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, D. C.; Diaz, J. A.; Fladeland, M. M.; Bland, G.; Alan, A., Jr.; Alegria, O.; Buongiorno, M. F.; Christensen, L. E.; Corrales, E.; Linick, J.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Ramsey, M. S.; Realmuto, V. J.; Schwandner, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanoes emit gases continuously with significant pre-post-eruption changes, mainly H2O and CO2, plus SO2, and others. The SO2/CO2 ratio changes within volcanic life cycles making it an indicator of oncoming eruption phases: it can dip weeks to months before eruptions, then increase, and decrease back to background after eruptions. Over the last five years, we have made an effort to develop small and inexpensive lighter-than-air and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platforms in Costa Rica at Turrialba Volcano. Turrialba is an appropriate natural laboratory to test and prove platforms and instrumentation in low-level steady state volcanogenic gas and aerosol emissions at moderate altitudes (UAVs during ASTER overpasses, and (3) reconciliation of the orbital results with in situ data to validate mass retrieval and transport models. As part of the NASA HyspIRI Preparatory Airborne Activities program, we will conduct similar observations at Kilauea volcano using small UAVs and for both SO2 and CO2 in situ. One of the salient characteristics of the long lived Kilauea eruptions since 1983 has been the emission of SO2 in significant amounts, generating environmental stresses on local inhabitants due to lowered air quality, and stress on vegetation. Kilauea volcanic plumes, as with Turrialba, are mainly gases and liquid--SO2 is hydrolyzed to H2SO4 and the resulting highly acidic liquid aerosol is termed "vog," an environmental health hazard. Measurement of the diffuse CO2 emissions at Kilauea will also be of interest. Such measurements at Turrialba, indicate summit CO2 concentrations of up to 4000ppmv, and flank CO2 values of up to1500ppmv. We will discuss our SO2 and CO2 results at Turrialba and in Italy, and plans for Hawaii. Work presented here was done, in part, under contract to the NASA Earth Surface and Interior Focus Area, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology.

  17. Geochemistry of Mesoproterozoic Volcanic Rocks in the Western Kunlun Mountains:Evidence for Plate Tectonic Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuanlin; DONG Yongguan; ZHAO Yu; WANG Aiguo; GUO Kunyi

    2003-01-01

    Mesoproterozoic volcanic rocks occurring in the north of the western Kunlun Mountains can be divided into two groups. The first group (north belt) is an reversely-evolved bimodal series. Petrochemistry shows that the alkalinity of the rocks decreases from early to late: alkaline→calc-alkaline→tholeiite, and geochemistry proves that the volcanic rocks were formed in rifting tectonic systems. The sedimentary facies shows characteristics of back-arc basins. The second (south belt) group, which occurs to the south of Yutian-Minfeng-Cele, is composed of calc-alkaline island arc (basaltic) andesite and minor rhyolite. The space distribution, age and geochemistry of the two volcanite groups indicate that they were formed in a back-arc basin (the first group) and an island arc (the second group) respectively and indicate the plate evolution during the Mesoproterozoic. The orogeny took place at ~1.05 Ga, which was coeval with the Grenville orogeny. This study has provided important geological data for exploring the position of the Paleo-Tarim plate in the Rodinia super-continent.

  18. Requirements and Implementation Feasibility for a CubeSat Thermal Infrared Imaging System to Monitor the Structure of Volcanic Ash Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, D.; Carroll, R.; Webley, P.; Hawkins, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland caused the cancellation of approximately 108,000 flights over an 8-day period, disrupted air traffic worldwide, and cost the airline industry more than $400 million per day. The inconvenience and economic impact of this and similar events, such as Puyehue-Cordon-Caulle in 2011, have heightened the interest in developing improved satellite remote sensing techniques for monitoring volcanic plumes and drifting clouds. For aviation safety, the operational/research community has started to move towards classifying the concentrations within volcanic plumes and clouds. Additionally, volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are often used for forecasting ash cloud locations and they require knowledge of the structure of the erupting column to improve their ash simulations and also downwind 3-D maps of the ash cloud to calibrate/validate their modeling output. Existing remote sensing satellites utilize a brightness temperature method with thermal infrared (TIR) measurements from 10 - 12 μm to determine mass loading of volcanic ash along a single line of sight, but they have infrequent revisit times and they cannot resolve the three-dimensional structure of the ash clouds. A cluster of CubeSats dedicated to the monitoring of volcanic ash and plumes could provide both more frequent updates and the multi-aspect images needed to resolve the density structure of volcanic ash clouds and plumes. In this presentation, we discuss the feasibility and requirements for a CubeSat TIR imaging system and the associated on-board image processing that would be required to monitor the structure of volcanic ash clouds from Low Earth Orbit.

  19. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai’i and Maui

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fercho, Steven [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Owens, Lara [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Walsh, Patrick [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Drakos, Peter [Ormat Nevada, Inc., Reno, NV (United States); Martini, Brigette [Corescan Inc., Ascot (Australia); Lewicki, Jennifer L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kennedy, Burton M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Suites of new geophysical and geochemical exploration surveys were conducted to provide evidence for geothermal resource at the Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone (HSWRZ) on Maui Island, Hawai’i. Ground-based gravity (~400 stations) coupled with heli-bourne magnetics (~1500 line kilometers) define both deep and shallow fractures/faults, while also delineating potentially widespread subsurface hydrothermal alteration on the lower flanks (below approximately 1800 feet a.s.l.). Multi-level, upward continuation calculations and 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling provide information on source depths, but lack of lithologic information leaves ambiguity in the estimates. Additionally, several well-defined gravity lows (possibly vent zones) lie coincident with magnetic highs suggesting the presence of dike intrusions at depth which may represent a potentially young source of heat. Soil CO2 fluxes were measured along transects across geophysically-defined faults and fractures as well as young cinder cones along the HSWRZ. This survey generally did not detect CO2 levels above background, with the exception of a weak anomalous flux signal over one young cinder cone. The general lack of observed CO2 flux signals on the HSWRZ is likely due to a combination of lower magmatic CO2 fluxes and relatively high biogenic surface CO2 fluxes which mix with the magmatic signal. Similar surveys at the Puna geothermal field on the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone (KLERZ) also showed a lack of surface CO2 flux signals, however aqueous geochemistry indicated contribution of magmatic CO2 and He to shallow groundwater here. As magma has been intercepted in geothermal drilling at the Puna field, the lack of measured surface CO2 flux indicative of upflow of magmatic fluids here is likely due to effective “scrubbing” by high groundwater and a mature hydrothermal system. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations, δ13C compositions and 3He/4He values were sampled at Maui from several shallow

  20. Volcanic Catastrophes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  1. The hydrothermal system of the Domuyo volcanic complex (Argentina): A conceptual model based on new geochemical and isotopic evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, F.; Liccioli, C.; Agusto, M.; Chiodini, G.; Vaselli, O.; Calabrese, S.; Pecoraino, G.; Tempesti, L.; Caponi, C.; Fiebig, J.; Caliro, S.; Caselli, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Domuyo volcanic complex (Neuquén Province, Argentina) hosts one of the most promising geothermal systems of Patagonia, giving rise to thermal manifestations discharging hot and Cl--rich fluids. This study reports a complete geochemical dataset of gas and water samples collected in three years (2013, 2014 and 2015) from the main fluid discharges of this area. The chemical and isotopic composition (δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O) of waters indicates that rainwater and snow melting are the primary recharge of a hydrothermal reservoir located at relative shallow depth (400-600 m) possibly connected to a second deeper (2-3 km) reservoir. Reactive magmatic gases are completely scrubbed by the hydrothermal aquifer(s), whereas interaction of meteoric waters at the surface causes a significant air contamination and dilution of the fluid discharges located along the creeks at the foothill of the Cerro Domuyo edifice. Thermal discharges located at relatively high altitude ( 3150 m a.s.l.), namely Bramadora, are less affected by this process, as also shown by their relatively high R/Ra values (up to 6.91) pointing to the occurrence of an actively degassing magma batch located at an unknown depth. Gas and solute geothermometry suggests equilibrium temperatures up to 220-240 °C likely referred to the shallower hydrothermal reservoir. These results, confirming the promising indications of the preliminary surveys carried out in the 1980‧s, provide useful information for a reliable estimation of the geothermal potential of this extinct volcanic system, although a detailed geophysical measurements is required for the correct estimation of depth and dimensions of the fluid reservoir(s).

  2. Fissure swarms and fracture systems within the Western Volcanic Zone, Iceland - Effects of spreading rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjartardóttir, Ásta Rut; Einarsson, Páll; Björgvinsdóttir, Sigríður G.

    2016-10-01

    The Western Volcanic Zone (WVZ) in Iceland is ∼120 km long and 40 km wide. It offers an opportunity to study rift zones in a local ultra-slow spreading area close to a hotspot. Fractures were mapped from aerial photographs and digital elevation models. Most surface fractures are located in the southern part of the WVZ. The majority of the fractures have a north-northeasterly orientation, some deviations occur from this, especially in the north part of the WVZ. Fracture orientations are therefore quite uniform in the southern, faster spreading part of the WVZ, but more irregular in the slower-spreading northern part. This suggests different stress fields in the north part, which could be due to the influence of the Hreppar microplate and possibly also due to stress fields induced by crustal deformation because of changes in glacial load in the area. Such glacially-induced stress fields may have similar or even more influence than crustal spreading in the slower spreading northern part of the WVZ. Lower fracture density towards the north within the WVZ suggests lower frequency of rifting events in the north part, in accordance with less spreading in the north as measured by GPS geodetic measurements.

  3. A multi-faceted approach to characterize acid-sulfate alteration processes in volcanic hydrothermal systems on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Emma Cordts

    Acid-sulfate alteration is a dominant weathering process in high temperature, low pH, sulfur-rich volcanic environments. Additionally, hydrothermal environments have been proposed as locations where life could have originated on Earth. Based on the extensive evidence of flowing surface water and persistent volcanism, similar locations and processes could have existed on early Mars. Globally observed alteration mineral assemblages likely represent relic Martian hydrothermal settings. Yet the limited understanding of environmental controls, limits the confidence of interpreting the paleoconditions of these hydrothermal systems and assessing their habitability to support microbial life. This thesis presents a series of laboratory experiments, geochemical models, analog fieldwork, and Martian remote sensing to characterize distinguishing features and controls of acid-sulfate alteration. The experiments and models were designed to replicate alteration is a highly acidic, sulfurous, and hot field sites. The basaltic minerals were individually reacted in both experimental and model simulations with varying initial parameters to infer the geochemical pathways of acid-sulfate alteration on Earth and Mars. It was found that for a specific starting material, secondary mineralogies were consistent. Variations in pH, temperature and duration affected the abundance, shape, and size of mineral products. Additionally evaporation played a key role in secondary deposits; therefore, both alteration and evaporitic processes need to be taken into consideration. Analog volcanic sites in Nicaragua were used to supplement this work and highlight differences between natural and simulated alteration. In situ visible near-infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that primary lithology and gas chemistry were dominant controls of alteration, with secondary effects from environmental controls, such as temperature and pH. The spectroscopic research from the field was directly related to Mars

  4. Coeval dust accumulation minima in Greenland and East Central Europe over 31-23 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Újvári, Gábor; Stevens, Thomas; Varga, György; Kovács, János; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    with the bulk loess median grain size (D50bulk) that is considered an integrated proxy of wind strength, dust source distance, aridity and vegetation cover. While an increase of dust flux and D50bulk with time is apparent, such a trend cannot be seen in the quartz grain size measures (D50quartz). This observation may imply that wind speeds were relatively constant in the studied time interval, while the turbulence of the flow may have been extremely varying (i.e. strong/rapid changes in the frequency/magnitude of dust storm events). A striking feature of the MAR record is that accumulation minima in the Dunaszekcsö record are synchronous with the Greenland Interstadials (GI-5.1 to GI-3). Subsequent Ca2+ minima in the NGRIP record at 26.22 and 25.02 ka (b2k) are also coeval with the MAR minima in the studied loess sequence. At the same time, these patterns are barely visible in the bulk and quartz grain size records. We speculate that the synchronous changes in the NGRIP Ca2+ and the Dunaszekcsö MAR records are results of millennial scale variations in the activity of Northern Hemisphere dust emitting regions shown in two archives from different environments. The very similar timing of MAR minima (and also some of the maxima) suggest a rapid aeolian system response in East Central Europe to abrupt climatic changes in the North Atlantic. Although such a synchronicity does not prove a Central European dust source to Greenland, it is consistent with this possibility. This study was supported by the OTKA PD-108639 grant and the Bolyai János Research Fellowship (both to GÚ). [1] Dansgaard, W., et al. (1993). Evidence for general instability of past climate from a 250-kyr ice-core record. Nature 364, 218-220. [2] Johnsen, S.J., et al. (1992). Irregular glacial interstadials recorded in a new Greenland ice core. Nature 359, 311-313. [3] Rasmussen, S.O., et al. (2014). A stratigraphic framework for abrupt climatic changes during the Last Glacial period based on three

  5. Numerical modeling of the three-layered hydrothermal system in the Kuju volcanic region, central Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araragi, K.; Ehara, S.; Fujimitsu, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical modeling of hydrothermal systems beneath active volcanoes has been conducted. Their purposes were, however, confined to interpret individual geothermal systems. We constructed a numerical model of the Kuju volcanic region, central Kyushu, Japan using 3-D finite-difference code HYDROTHERM ver.2.2 (Hayba and Ingebritsen, 1994). The central part of Kuju volcano is categorized as an active magmatic hydrothermal system. Otake-Hatchobaru geothermal area, where two geothermal power plants are in operation, is known as a typical liquid dominated hydrothermal system. These two types of geothermal systems are closely located in the region. Moreover, subsurface horizontal temperature distributions in the Kuju volcanic region consist of a three-layered structure. A horizontal temperature anomaly at a depth of -2000m separates into two anomalies at depths of about 0m. Five anomalies appear in the horizontal temperature distribution of 80m depth. Geothermal systems or such characteristics of the thermal structure should be related to the influence of the magma chamber in the region. Existence of molten magma was suggested from seismic observations (Yoshikawa et al., 2005). Therefore, we presumed that the geothermal systems in Otake- Hatchobaru geothermal area and in the central part of Kuju volcano can be explained by a common magma chamber. We determined the calculation time as 40000 based on the age of the latest large pyroclastic flow deposit (Kamata, 1997). The temperature of the magma chamber in the model was maintained at a constant value during the calculation. Parameter studies of crustal permeabilities were conducted to reproduce temperature profiles obtained by logging at shallow depths (NEDO, 1987). The calculated results show that temperature anomalies in the basement rock seemed to be directly affected by the magma chamber. The results also indicate that molten materials have been continuously supplied from the bottom of the magma chamber of Kuju volcano

  6. The Ventotene Volcanic Ridge: a newly explored complex in the central Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, Marco; Martorelli, Eleonora; Bosman, Alessandro; Conti, Alessia; Bigi, Sabina; Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Ligi, Marco; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Scrocca, Davide; Canese, Simonepietro; Chiocci, Francesco L.; Conte, Aida M.; Doglioni, Carlo; Perinelli, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    New high-resolution geophysical data collected along the eastern margin of the Tyrrhenian back-arc basin, in the Pontine Islands area, reveal a ˜NW-SE elongated morphological high, the Ventotene Volcanic Ridge (VR), located on the northern edge of the Ventotene Basin. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry, combined with magnetic data, multi- and single-channel seismic profiles, and ROV dives, suggest that VR results from aggregation of a series of volcanic edifices. The summit of these volcanoes is flat and occurs at about 170 m water depth. Given their depths, we propose that flat morphologies were probably caused by surf erosion during Quaternary glacial sea level lowstands. Seismic stratigraphy together with magnetic data suggest that the volcanic activity in this area is older than 190-130 ka age and may be coeval with that of Ventotene Island (Middle Pleistocene). The submarine volcanoes, located 25 km north of Ventotene, are part of a ˜E-W regional volcanic alignment and extend the Pontine volcanism landward toward the Gaeta bay. Integration of structural data from multichannel seismic profiles in this sector of the eastern Tyrrhenian margin indicates that several normal and/or transtensional faults, striking WNW-ESE, NNW-SSE, and NE-SW, offset the basement and form alternating structural highs and depressions filled by thick, mostly undeformed, sedimentary units. Arc-related magmatism is widespread in the study area, where the VR is placed at the hangingwall of the west-directed Apennines subduction zone, which is undergoing tensional and transtensional tectonics. Bathymetric and topographic evidence shows that VR lies in between a major NE-SW trending escarpment east of Ponza and a NE-SW trending graben southwest of the Roccamonfina volcano, a NE-SW transfer zone that accommodate the extension along this segmented portion of the margin. This suggests that the interaction between NE-SW and NW-SE trending fault systems acts as a structural control on

  7. Tectonic localization of multi-plume hydrothermal fluid flow in a segmented rift system, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, J. V.; Downs, D. T.; Scholz, C.; de P. S. Zuquim, M.

    2013-05-01

    High-temperature (>250°C) multi-plume hydrothermal systems occur in a range of tectonic settings, though most are extensional or transtensional. A key feature of such settings is their tendency to partition into discrete structural elements that scale with the thickness of the seismogenic zone. The late Miocene to present record of arc magmatism and rifting in the North Island of New Zealand illustrates the importance of structural segmentation and reactivation of inherited basement fabrics on the localisation of hydrothermal upflow. The 15 My record of similarly-oriented magmatism, rifting and hydrothermal activity associated with subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the North Island of New Zealand. Lateral migration of the locus of arc magmatism, concomitant with roll-back of the subducting slab, is supported by the SE-directed younging of: 1) volcanism; 2) fault-controlled rift basins; and 3) hydrothermal activity, represented by the distribution of epithermal mineralisation within the ~15-3 Ma Coromandel Volcanic Zone (CVZ), and geothermal activity within the TVZ. Currently the TVZ is extending in a NW-SE direction at a rate that varies from ~3 mm/yr to ~15 mm/yr from SW to NE, respectively. The TVZ is partitioned into discrete rift segments, comprising arrays of NE-striking normal faults of ~20 km in length, as expected on mechanical grounds for the 6-8 km-thick seismogenic zone. Transfer zones between rift segments coincide with N-to-NW-trending alignments of geothermal fields, spaced ~ 30 km apart can be recognized elsewhere within the CVZ. The most productive epithermal deposits to date are localised where these inferred transfer zones intersect arc-parallel fault arrays. A similar tectonic configuration occurs in the Deseado Massif, Argentinian Patagonia, where interplay between transfer and rift faults is inferred to have localized hydrothermal fluids in small pull-apart basins and arrays of extension veins for durations >30 My.

  8. Experimental observations of pressure oscillations and flow regimes in an analogue volcanic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S.J.; Chouet, B.A.; Phillips, J.C.; Dawson, P.; Ryan, G.A.; Hurst, E.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-liquid flows, designed to be analogous to those in volcanic conduits, are generated in the laboratory using organic gas-gum rosin mixtures expanding in a vertically mounted tube. The expanding fluid shows a range of both flow and pressure oscillation behaviors. Weakly supersaturated source liquids produce a low Reynolds number flow with foam expanding from the top surface of a liquid that exhibits zero fluid velocity at the tube wall; i.e., the conventional "no-slip" boundary condition. Pressure oscillations, often with strong long-period characteristics and consistent with longitudinal and radial resonant oscillation modes, are detected in these fluids. Strongly supersaturated source liquids generate more energetic flows that display a number of flow regimes. These regimes include a static liquid source, viscous flow, detached flow (comprising gas-pockets-at-wall and foam-in-gas annular flow, therefore demonstrating strong radial heterogeneity), and a fully turbulent transonic fragmented or mist flow. Each of these flow regimes displays characteristic pressure oscillations that can be related to resonance of flow features or wall impact phenomena. The pressure oscillations are produced by the degassing processes without the need of elastic coupling to the confining medium or flow restrictors and valvelike features. The oscillatory behavior of the experimental flows is compared to seismoacoustic data from a range of volcanoes where resonant oscillation of the fluid within the conduit is also often invoked as controlling the observed oscillation frequencies. On the basis of the experimental data we postulate on the nature of seismic signals that may be measured during large-scale explosive activity. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Imaging the Roots of Geothermal Systems: 3-D Inversion of Magnetotelluric Array Data in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, E. A.; Caldwell, G.; Bannister, S. C.; Hill, G.; Bennie, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), located in the central North Island of New Zealand, is a rifted arc that contains more than 20 liquid-dominated high-temperature geothermal systems, which together discharge ~4.2 GW of heat at the surface. The shallow (upper ~500 m) extent of these geothermal systems is marked by low-resistivity, mapped by tens-of-thousands of DC resistivity measurements collected throughout the 1970's and 80's. Conceptual models of heat transport through the brittle crust of the TVZ link these low-resistivity anomalies to the tops of vertically ascending plumes of convecting hydrothermal fluid. Recently, data from a 40-site array of broadband seismometers with ~4 km station spacing, and an array of 270 broadband magnetotelluric (MT) measurements with ~2 km station spacing, have been collected in the south-eastern part of the TVZ in an experiment to image the deep structure (or roots) of the geothermal systems in this region. Unlike DC resistivity, these MT measurements are capable of resolving the resistivity structure of the Earth to depths of 10 km or more. 2-D and 3-D models of subsets of these MT data have been used to provide the first-ever images of quasi-vertical low-resistivity zones (at depths of 3-7 km) that connect with the near-surface geothermal fields. These low-resistivity zones are interpreted to represent convection plumes of high-temperature fluids ascending within fractures, which supply heat to the overlying geothermal fields. At the Rotokawa, Ngatamariki and Ohaaki geothermal fields, these plumes extend to a broad layer of low-resistivity, inferred to represent a magmatic, basal heat source located below the seismogenic zone (at ~7-8 km depth) that drives convection in the brittle crust above. Little is known about the mechanisms that transfer heat into the hydrothermal regime. However, at Rotokawa, new 3-D resistivity models image a vertical low-resistivity zone that lies directly beneath the geothermal field. The top of this

  10. Multitasking in academia: Effective combinations of research, education and public outreach illustrated by a volcanic ash warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B. L.; Plag, H.

    2011-12-01

    Science permeates our society. Its role and its perceived importance evolves with time. Scientists today are highly specialized, yet society demands they master a variety of skills requiring not only a number of different competencies but also a broad mindset. Scientists are subjected to a meritocracy in terms of having to produce scientific papers. Peer-reviewed scientific publications used to be sufficient to meet the various laws and regulations with respect to dissemination of scientific results. This has dramatically changed; both expressed directly through public voices (such as in the climate change discourses), but also by politicians and policy makers. In some countries research funding now comes with specific requirements concerning public outreach that go way beyond peer-reviewed publications and presentation at scientific conferences. Science policies encourage multidisciplinary cooperation and scientific questions themselves often cannot be answered without knowledge and information from several scientific areas. Scientists increasingly need to communicate knowledge and results in more general terms as well as educating future generations. A huge challenge lies in developing the knowledge, human capacity and mindset that will allow an individual academician to contribute to education, communicate across scientific fields and sectors in multidisciplinary cross sectoral cooperations and also reach out to the general public while succeeding within the scientific meritocracy. We demonstrate how research, education and communication within and outside academia can effectively be combined through a presentation of the International Airways Volcano Watch that encompasses an operational volcanic ash warning system for the aviation industry. This presentation will show the role of science throughout the information flow, from basic science to the pilots' decision-making. Furthermore, it will illustrate how one can connect specific scientific topics to societal

  11. The Geothermal Systems along the Watukosek fault system (East Java, Indonesia):The Arjuno-Welirang Volcanic Complex and the Lusi Mud-Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Mazzini, Adriano; Vita, Fabio; Sciarra, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    The Java Island is characterized by an intense volcanic activity with more then 100 active volcanoes. Moreover, this island is also known by the presence of many mud volcanoes and hydrothermal springs. In particular, in the 2006 several sudden hot mud eruptions, with fluids around 100° C, occurred in the NE side of the island resulting in a prominent eruption named Lusi (contraction of Lumpur Sidoarjo) located along the major Watukosek strike-slip fault zone. The Watukosek fault system, strikes from the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex, intersects Lusi and extends towards the NE of the Java island. Conversely of the normal mud eruptions (cold fluids emitted in a short time period of few days), the Lusi eruption was characterized by a persistent effusive hot fluids emissions for a long-time period of, so far, nearly a decade. Moreover, the isotopic composition of emitted gases like Helium showed a clear magmatic origin. For this reasons we decided to investigate the near Arjuno-Welirang complex located on the same strike-slip fault. Arjuno-Welirang is a twin strato-volcano system located in the East of Java along the Watukosek fault, at about 25 km SW respect to the Lusi volcano system. It features two main peaks: Arjuno (3339 masl) and Welirang (3156 masl). The last recorded eruptive activity took place in August 1950 from the flanks of Kawah Plupuh and in October 1950 from the NW part of the Gunung Welirang. This strato-volcano is characterized by a S-rich area, with high T-vent fumarole at least up to 220° C (and likely higher), located mainly in the Welirang crater. In addition, several hot springs vent from the flanks of the volcano, indicate the presence of a large hydrothermal system. During July 2015, in the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126), we carried out a geochemical field campaign on the Arjuno-Welirang volcano hydrothermal system area, sampling water and dissolved gases from the thermal and cold springs located on the flanks of

  12. Diffuse H_{2} emission: a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity at El Hierro volcano system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; González-Santana, Judit; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of interfering processes affecting reactive gases as CO2 during its ascent from magmatic bodies or hydrothermal systems toward the surface environment hinders the interpretation of their enrichments in the soil atmosphere and fluxes for volcano monitoring purposes (Marini and Gambardella, 2005). These processes include gas scrubbing by ground-waters and interaction with rocks, decarbonatation processes, biogenic production, etc. Within the rest of the soil gases, particularly interest has been addressed to light and highly mobile gases. They offer important advantages for the detection of vertical permeability structures, because their interaction with the surrounding rocks or fluids during the ascent toward the surface is minimum. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach, 1987). Although H2 can be produced in soils by N2-fixing and fertilizing bacteria, soils are considered nowadays as sinks of molecular hydrogen (Smith-Downey et al., 2006). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 generated within the crust moves rapidly and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 one of the best geochemical indicators of magmatic and geothermal activity at depth. El Hierro is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands and the scenario of the last volcanic eruption of the archipelago, a submarine eruption that took place 2 km off the southern coast of the island from October 2011 to March 2012. Since at El Hierro Island there are not any surface geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Here we show the results of soil H2 emission surveys that have been carried out regularly since mid-2012. Soil gas samples were collected in ˜600 sites selected based on their accessibility and geological criteria. Soil gases were sampled at ˜40

  13. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  14. Subdiffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study is performed on volcanic seismicities at Mt.Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland and Mt. Etna in Sicily, Italy, from the viewpoint of science of complex systems, and the discovery of remarkable similarities between them regarding their exotic spatio-temporal properties is reported. In both of the volcanic seismicities as point processes, the jump probability distributions of earthquakes are found to obey the exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distributions follow the power law. In particular, a careful analysis is made about the finite size effects on the waiting-time distributions, and accordingly, the previously reported results for Mt. Etna [S. Abe and N. Suzuki, EPL 110, 59001 (2015)] are reinterpreted. It is shown that spreads of the volcanic earthquakes are subdiffusive at both of the volcanoes. The aging phenomenon is observed in the "event-time-averaged" mean-squared displacements of the hypocenters. A comment is also made on presence/absence of long term memories in the context of t...

  15. YOLANDA’S PORTRAIT: A STORY OF TRIQUI LINGUISTIC RESISTANCE MEDIATED BY ENGLISH AND ETHNOGRAPHIC COEVALNESS IN OAXACA, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemente, Ángeles

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This ethnographic study provides insights into the social contradictions of everyday language use in the multicultural context of Oaxaca, México. Following a coeval perspective (Fabian, 2007, the researchers, along with the participant, co-construct or co-perform the ethnographic encounter. Based on a larger ethnographic study on how Oaxacan university students perform English with a ‘postcolonial accent,’ the authors explore Yolanda’s use of English, along with Spanish and Triqui, as a series of multilingual social and cultural performances (Clemente and Higgins, 2008. This study takes place within the B.A. program in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language (TEFL at the Language Centre of the state university of Oaxaca. Here, Yolanda becomes the sole focus within the coeval ethnographic perspective; that is, Yolanda is the co-performer of the ethnographic encounter.

  16. Volcanic history of Lipari (Aeolian Islands, Italy) during the last 10,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, M.; Frazzetta, G.; La Volpe, L.

    1986-01-01

    Examination of the volcanic stratigraphy of deposits younger than 10,000 years on Lipari indicates four principal periods of volcanic activity related to specific centers. The products from each different volcanic center are defined as volcano-stratigraphic unit (VSU). From the oldest these are: the Canneto Dentro, Gabellotto-Fiume Bianco, Forgia Vecchia and Monte Pilato-Rocche Rosse VSUs. The study of textures and dispersal of the deposits permitted the vents to be localized and the recent volcanic history of Lipari to be reconstructed. The oldest event formed a small explosion breccia cone with a final obsidian lava in the Canneto Dentro area. Immediately afterward, a complex series of explosions produced the widespread dry-surge deposits of the Gabellotto-Fiume Bianco sequence. This activity ended with the extrusion of a domical lava flow. The renewal of activity occurred in the Pirrera area with an explosive eruption that produced explosion breccia deposits. The last eruptions from this vent were coeval with the first eruption of M. Pilato. The rim of the explosion breccia cone was partially destroyed by the Forgia Vecchia lava flow. M. Pilato cone grew in a very short period of time due to a continuous swarm of explosive events. After a short repose time, a series of more energetic and superficial explosions occurred through a vent slightly to the south. The extrusion of the Rocche Rosse lava flow (about 729 A.D.) ended this cycle of activity. All the volcanic centers follow a quite similar stochastic pattern starting with a fall or surge eruption and ending with effusion of viscous rhyolitic lavas. The four centers are aligned along either NW-SE or NE-SW fault systems according to the structural pattern of the island. They can be placed into two groups: the Canneto Dentro-Gabellotto centers and the Forgia Vecchia-M. Pilato centers. A long quiescence ( ⋍ 3,500 years) separates the activity of these two groups while inside of each the activities were nearly

  17. YOLANDA’S PORTRAIT: A STORY OF TRIQUI LINGUISTIC RESISTANCE MEDIATED BY ENGLISH AND ETHNOGRAPHIC COEVALNESS IN OAXACA, MEXICO

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente, Ángeles; Higgins, Michael J.; Merino-López, Yolanda; Sughrua, William

    2009-01-01

    This ethnographic study provides insights into the social contradictions of everyday language use in the multicultural context of Oaxaca, México. Following a coeval perspective (Fabian, 2007), the researchers, along with the participant, co-construct or co-perform the ethnographic encounter. Based on a larger ethnographic study on how Oaxacan university students perform English with a ‘postcolonial accent,’ the authors explore Yolanda’s use of English, along with Spanish and Triqui, as a se...

  18. Water in volcanic glass: From volcanic degassing to secondary hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Angela N.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Watkins, James M.; Ross, Abigail M.

    2016-10-01

    Volcanic glass is deposited with trace amounts (0.1-0.6 wt.%) of undegassed magmatic water dissolved in the glass. After deposition, meteoric water penetrates into the glass structure mostly as molecular H2O. Due to the lower δD (‰) values of non-tropical meteoric waters and the ∼30‰ offset between volcanic glass and environmental water during hydration, secondary water imparts lighter hydrogen isotopic values during secondary hydration up to a saturation concentration of 3-4 wt.% H2O. We analyzed compositionally and globally diverse volcanic glass from 0 to 10 ka for their δD and H2Ot across different climatic zones, and thus different δD of precipitation, on a thermal conversion elemental analyzer (TCEA) furnace attached to a mass spectrometer. We find that tephrachronologically coeval rhyolite glass is hydrated faster than basaltic glass, and in the majority of glasses an increase in age and total water content leads to a decrease in δD (‰), while a few equatorial glasses have little change in δD (‰). We compute a magmatic water correction based on our non-hydrated glasses, and calculate an average 103lnαglass-water for our hydrated felsic glasses of -33‰, which is similar to the 103lnαglass-water determined by Friedman et al. (1993a) of -34‰. We also determine a smaller average 103lnαglass-water for all our mafic glasses of -23‰. We compare the δD values of water extracted from our glasses to local meteoric waters following the inclusion of a -33‰ 103lnαglass-water. We find that, following a correction for residual magmatic water based on an average δD and wt.% H2Ot of recently erupted ashes from our study, the δD value of water extracted from hydrated volcanic glass is, on average, within 4‰ of local meteoric water. To better understand the difference in hydration rates of mafic and felsic glasses, we imaged 6 tephra clasts ranging in age and chemical composition with BSE (by FEI SEM) down to a submicron resolution. Mafic tephra

  19. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  20. Plio-Pleistocene volcanic history of the Ahuachapan geothermal system, El Salvador: the Concepcion de Ataco caldera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partida, Eduardo Gonzalez; Rodriguez, Vicente Torres; Birkle, Peter [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), Dept. de Geotermia, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    1997-12-01

    The Concepcion de Ataco caldera in the Ahuachapan-Chipilapa region is part of the southern, Plio-Pleistocene volcanic belt that borders the Central Graben of El Salvador. About 17 km{sup 3} of primitive lavas erupted between 1.7 and 0.77 Ma, covering basaltic-andesitic lavas and older agglomerates forming the Cuyanausul, Apaneca and Empalizada volcanoes. These lavas preceded the evacuation of 63 km{sup 3} of silicic pyroclastics (i.e. breccias, surge deposits, and ignimbrites) associated with the main caldera cycle. The eruption of this pyroclastic material led to the collapse of a 5 km by 3.5 km caldera between the times of the youngest pre-caldera eruptions (0.77 Ma) and the intrusion of the Himalaya dome (0.28 Ma). The caldera collapse was reactivated at its north eastern flank by a new eruption of pyroclastics of limited areal distribution. These distinctive pyroclastics correspond to laminated tuffs (Cebra tuffs). Domes of dacitic-to-andesitic composition erupted along the caldera border as well as within it. Their magmatism is calc-alkaline; their ages vary between 0.28 and 0.1 Ma. Three phreatic explosions, whose craters are in the eastern part of the Concepcion de Ataco caldera structure, only deposited debris locally. A hydrothermal systems was emplaced during the final stage of the post-magmatic activity, evidenced by areas of hydrothermal alteration and surface manifestations. Four main fault systems, oriented NE-SW, NW-SE, NNW-SSE, and semicircular, have been identified. These faults created relatively high-permeability regions within the caldera and nearby grabens, that are favorable for the development of geothermal systems. (Author)

  1. Multistation alarm system for eruptive activity based on the automatic classification of volcanic tremor: specifications and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Horst; Falsaperla, Susanna; Messina, Alfio; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    With over fifty eruptive episodes (Strombolian activity, lava fountains, and lava flows) between 2006 and 2013, Mt Etna, Italy, underscored its role as the most active volcano in Europe. Seven paroxysmal lava fountains at the South East Crater occurred in 2007-2008 and 46 at the New South East Crater between 2011 and 2013. Month-lasting lava emissions affected the upper eastern flank of the volcano in 2006 and 2008-2009. On this background, effective monitoring and forecast of volcanic phenomena are a first order issue for their potential socio-economic impact in a densely populated region like the town of Catania and its surroundings. For example, explosive activity has often formed thick ash clouds with widespread tephra fall able to disrupt the air traffic, as well as to cause severe problems at infrastructures, such as highways and roads. For timely information on changes in the state of the volcano and possible onset of dangerous eruptive phenomena, the analysis of the continuous background seismic signal, the so-called volcanic tremor, turned out of paramount importance. Changes in the state of the volcano as well as in its eruptive style are usually concurrent with variations of the spectral characteristics (amplitude and frequency content) of tremor. The huge amount of digital data continuously acquired by INGV's broadband seismic stations every day makes a manual analysis difficult, and techniques of automatic classification of the tremor signal are therefore applied. The application of unsupervised classification techniques to the tremor data revealed significant changes well before the onset of the eruptive episodes. This evidence led to the development of specific software packages related to real-time processing of the tremor data. The operational characteristics of these tools - fail-safe, robustness with respect to noise and data outages, as well as computational efficiency - allowed the identification of criteria for automatic alarm flagging. The

  2. Mineralogical study on volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano, central Japan: correlation with porphyry copper systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yusuke; Imura, Takumi; Hayashi, Shintaro; Ohba, Tsukasa

    2016-04-01

    The volcanic ash of the eruption on September 27, 2014 at Ontake volcano consists mostly of altered rock fragments. The ash contains partly altered volcanic rock fragments consisting of primary igneous minerals (plagioclase, orthopyroxene, titanomagnetite, and feldspars) and volcanic glass accompanied by alteration minerals to some extents, and contains no juvenile fragments. These features indicate that the eruption was a non-juvenile hydrothermal eruption that was derived from the hydrothermal system developed under the crater. The major minerals derived from hydrothermal alteration zones are silica mineral, kaolin-group mineral, smectite, pyrophyllite, muscovite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, pyrite, K-feldspar, albite, and rutile. Minor chlorite, biotite, and garnet are accompanied. Five types of alteration mineral associations are identified from observations on individual ash particles: silica-pyrite, silica-pyrite ± alunite ± kaolin, silica-pyrophyllite-pyrite, silica-muscovite ± chlorite, and silica-K-feldspar ± albite ± garnet ± biotite. The associations indicate development of advanced argillic, sericite, and potassic alteration zones under the crater. Occurrence of anhydrite veinlet and the set of alteration zones indicate hydrothermal alteration zones similar to late-stage porphyry copper systems. Comparing the mineral associations with the geologic model of the late-stage porphyry copper systems, the source depths of mineral associations are estimated to range from near surface to >2 km. The depths of advanced argillic alteration, sericite, and potassic zones are 0 to ~2, ~1.5 to ~2, and >2 km, respectively.

  3. Segmented lateral dyke growth in a rifting event at Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andrew; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Vogfjörd, Kristín S; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G; Heimisson, Elías Rafn; Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Spaans, Karsten; Gudmundsson, Gunnar B; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Gudmundsson, Magnús T; Högnadóttir, Thórdís; Fridriksdóttir, Hildur María; Hensch, Martin; Einarsson, Páll; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Samsonov, Sergey; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís; White, Robert S; Ágústsdóttir, Thorbjörg; Greenfield, Tim; Green, Robert G; Hjartardóttir, Ásta Rut; Pedersen, Rikke; Bennett, Richard A; Geirsson, Halldór; La Femina, Peter C; Björnsson, Helgi; Pálsson, Finnur; Sturkell, Erik; Bean, Christopher J; Möllhoff, Martin; Braiden, Aoife K; Eibl, Eva P S

    2015-01-08

    Crust at many divergent plate boundaries forms primarily by the injection of vertical sheet-like dykes, some tens of kilometres long. Previous models of rifting events indicate either lateral dyke growth away from a feeding source, with propagation rates decreasing as the dyke lengthens, or magma flowing vertically into dykes from an underlying source, with the role of topography on the evolution of lateral dykes not clear. Here we show how a recent segmented dyke intrusion in the Bárðarbunga volcanic system grew laterally for more than 45 kilometres at a variable rate, with topography influencing the direction of propagation. Barriers at the ends of each segment were overcome by the build-up of pressure in the dyke end; then a new segment formed and dyke lengthening temporarily peaked. The dyke evolution, which occurred primarily over 14 days, was revealed by propagating seismicity, ground deformation mapped by Global Positioning System (GPS), interferometric analysis of satellite radar images (InSAR), and graben formation. The strike of the dyke segments varies from an initially radial direction away from the Bárðarbunga caldera, towards alignment with that expected from regional stress at the distal end. A model minimizing the combined strain and gravitational potential energy explains the propagation path. Dyke opening and seismicity focused at the most distal segment at any given time, and were simultaneous with magma source deflation and slow collapse at the Bárðarbunga caldera, accompanied by a series of magnitude M > 5 earthquakes. Dyke growth was slowed down by an effusive fissure eruption near the end of the dyke. Lateral dyke growth with segment barrier breaking by pressure build-up in the dyke distal end explains how focused upwelling of magma under central volcanoes is effectively redistributed over long distances to create new upper crust at divergent plate boundaries.

  4. Mercury isotopic composition of hydrothermal systems in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, L.S.; Blum, J.D.; Nordstrom, D.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Barkay, T.; Vetriani, C.

    2009-01-01

    To characterize mercury (Hg) isotopes and isotopic fractionation in hydrothermal systems we analyzed fluid and precipitate samples from hot springs in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and vent chimney samples from the Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift. These samples provide an initial indication of the variability in Hg isotopic composition among marine and continental hydrothermal systems that are controlled predominantly by mantle-derived magmas. Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente hot spring in Yellowstone range in δ202Hg from - 1.02‰ to 0.58‰ (± 0.11‰, 2SD) and solid precipitate samples from Guaymas Basin range in δ202Hg from - 0.37‰ to - 0.01‰ (± 0.14‰, 2SD). Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of Hg from the vent (δ202Hg = 0.10‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) to the end of the outflow channel (&delta202Hg = 0.58‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) in conjunction with a decrease in Hg concentration from 46.6pg/g to 20.0pg/g. Although a small amount of Hg is lost from the fluids due to co-precipitation with siliceous sinter, we infer that the majority of the observed MDF and Hg loss from waters in Ojo Caliente is due to volatilization of Hg0(aq) to Hg0(g) and the preferential loss of Hg with a lower δ202Hg value to the atmosphere. A small amount of mass-independent fractionation (MIF) was observed in all samples from Ojo Caliente (Δ199Hg = 0.13‰ ±1 0.06‰, 2SD) but no significant MIF was measured in the sea-floor rift samples from Guaymas Basin. This study demonstrates that several different hydrothermal processes fractionate Hg isotopes and that Hg isotopes may be used to better understand these processes.

  5. Bi-decadal variability excited in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system by strong tropical volcanic eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanchettin, D.; Lorenz, S.; Lohmann, K.; Jungclaus, J.H. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Ocean in the Earth System Department, Hamburg (Germany); Timmreck, C. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Atmosphere in the Earth System Department, Hamburg (Germany); Graf, H.-F. [University of Cambridge, Centre for Atmospheric Science, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rubino, A. [Ca' Foscari University, Department of Environmental Sciences, Venice (Italy); Krueger, K. [Leibniz-Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Decadal and bi-decadal climate responses to tropical strong volcanic eruptions (SVEs) are inspected in an ensemble simulation covering the last millennium based on the Max Planck Institute - Earth system model. An unprecedentedly large collection of pre-industrial SVEs (up to 45) producing a peak annual-average top-of-atmosphere radiative perturbation larger than -1.5 Wm{sup -2} is investigated by composite analysis. Post-eruption oceanic and atmospheric anomalies coherently describe a fluctuation in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system with an average length of 20-25 years. The study provides a new physically consistent theoretical framework to interpret decadal Northern Hemisphere (NH) regional winter climates variability during the last millennium. The fluctuation particularly involves interactions between the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and the North Atlantic gyre circulation closely linked to the state of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation. It is characterized by major distinctive details. Among them, the most prominent are: (a) a strong signal amplification in the Arctic region which allows for a sustained strengthened teleconnection between the North Pacific and the North Atlantic during the first post-eruption decade and which entails important implications from oceanic heat transport and from post-eruption sea ice dynamics, and (b) an anomalous surface winter warming emerging over the Scandinavian/Western Russian region around 10-12 years after a major eruption. The simulated long-term climate response to SVEs depends, to some extent, on background conditions. Consequently, ensemble simulations spanning different phases of background multidecadal and longer climate variability are necessary to constrain the range of possible post-eruption decadal evolution of NH regional winter climates. (orig.)

  6. Insights from gas and water chemistry on the geothermal system of the Domuyo volcanic complex (Patagonia, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, F.; Liccioli, C.; Chiodini, G.; Agusto, M.; Caselli, A. T.; Caliro, S.; Vaselli, O.; Pecoraino, G.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the geochemistry of geothermal fluids discharging from the western flank of the Domuyo volcanic complex (Argentina), which is hosted within an extensional basins that interrupts the Andes at latitudes comprises between 35° and 39°S. The analytical results of gas and water samples collected during three sampling campaigns (2013, 2014 and 2015) are presented and discussed in order to: i) evaluate the equilibrium temperature(s) of the main fluid reservoir, ii) provide information on the origin of the fluid discharges and the secondary processes controlling their chemistry. Geothermometry based on the chemical composition of thermal waters indicates a maximum equilibrium temperature of 220 °C. This temperature, coupled with the measured amount of discharged Cl, suggest that the total energy released from this system is 1.1±0.2 GW. Atmospheric gases from a thick shallow aquifer contaminate most gas emissions, masking the chemical features of the deep fluid component, with the only exception of a jet fumarole located at 3,000 m a.s.l. (Bramadora). The H2O-CO2-CH4-H2-CO-C3H6-C3H8 composition of this gas emission was used to construct a geochemical conceptual model showing that the hydrothermal reservoir is liquid-dominated and thermally stratified, with temperatures ranging from 180 to 270 °C. The helium isotopic ratios (up to 6.8 Ra) and the δ13C-CO2 values (from -7.05 to -7.75 ‰ V-PDB) indicate that mantle degassing represents the dominant primary source for this dormant volcano. These results highlight the huge potential of this system as energy resource for the region. Accordingly, the regional authorities have recently planned and approved an investigation project aimed to provide further insights into the fluid geochemistry and the geostructural assessment in this promising area.

  7. Experiment of "No-Tillage" Farming System on the Volcanic Soils of Tropical Islands of Micronesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Golabi

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study are; 1 to evaluate the use of crop rotation and tillage management for increasing organic-matter content to improve the overall quality of these severely eroded soils, 2 to evaluate the effect of conservation practices on harvested yield and crop productivity of these eroded soils and, 3 to assess the effects of conservation techniques including no-tillage systems on water runoff and infiltration. This paper discusses the effect of conservation strategies and techniques on these severely eroded soils of southern Guam.

  8. Impact of volcanic processes on the cryospheric system of the Peteroa Volcano, Andes of southern Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaudat, Dario Trombotto; Penas, Pablo; Aloy, Gustavo

    2014-03-01

    Soil temperatures of the active Volcanic Complex Peteroa situated in the Cordillera Principal between Chile and Argentina at 35°15‧ S and 70°35‧ W (approximately) were monitored in the area, and local geomorphology (periglacial geomorphology, presence of permafrost, and cryoforms) was studied. The present contribution also resulted in a comparison of two consecutive analyses of the volcano peak carried out with special thermocameras (AGEMA TVH 550, FUR P660) in order to study the thermal range of different hot and cold sites selected in 2009. The thermocameras were used ascending by foot and also during flights with a Cessna 180. A night expedition to the volcanic avalanche caldera, at up to 3900 m asl (approximately), completed the monitoring activity of 2010. Hot zones were associated to present volcanism and cold zones to the presence of glacier ice and shadowy slopes with possible presence of permafrost. Identifying and mapping uncovered and covered ice was possible with the help of monitoring and geomorphological interpretation related to the upper englacement, which is severely affected by volcanism. Glaciers are retreating toward the north or approaching the rims of the volcanic avalanche caldera leaving islands of ice associated with superficial permafrost. The cryogenic area with slope permafrost was identified through active protalus and sedimentary cryogenic slopes. Craters have undergone considerable thermal changes in comparison to the year 2009; and new, much more vigorous fumaroles have appeared in hot areas detected in 2009 following a tendency toward the west. New subaquatic heat columns that appeared in crater 3, crater walls, and glaciated areas vanished, supplying cold water and thus contributing to the formation of a new lake in crater 4. A possible post-seismic shift of the volcanic activity may provide geodynamical evidence of the changes registered in other areas after the earthquake of 27 February 2010.

  9. Geomagnetic imprint of the Persani volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Seghedi, Ioan; Zlagnean, Luminita; Atanasiu, Ligia; Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Pomeran, Mihai; Visan, Madalina

    2016-04-01

    The Persani small volume volcanism is located in the SE corner of the Transylvanian Depression, at the north-western edge of the intra-mountainous Brasov basin. It represents the south-easternmost segment of the Neogene-Quaternary volcanic chain of the East Carpathians. The alkaline basalt monogenetic volcanic field is partly coeval with the high-K calc-alkaline magmatism south of Harghita Mountains (1-1.6 Ma). Its eruptions post-dated the calc-alkaline volcanism in the Harghita Mountains (5.3-1.6 Ma), but pre-dated the high-K calc-alkaline emissions of Ciomadul volcano (1.0-0.03 Ma). The major volcanic forms have been mapped in previous geological surveys. Still, due to the small size of the volcanoes and large extent of tephra deposits and recent sediments, the location of some vents or other volcanic structures has been incompletely revealed. To overcome this problem, the area was subject to several near-surface geophysical investigations, including paleomagnetic research. However, due to their large-scale features, the previous geophysical surveys proved to be an inappropriate approach to the volcanological issues. Therefore, during the summers of 2014 and 2015, based on the high magnetic contrast between the volcanic rocks and the hosting sedimentary formations, a detailed ground geomagnetic survey has been designed and conducted, within central Persani volcanism area, in order to outline the presence of volcanic structures hidden beneath the overlying deposits. Additionally, information on the rock magnetic properties was also targeted by sampling and analysing several outcrops in the area. Based on the acquired data, a detailed total intensity scalar geomagnetic anomaly map was constructed by using the recent IGRF12 model. The revealed pattern of the geomagnetic field proved to be fully consistent with the direction of magnetisation previously determined on rock samples. In order to enhance the signal/noise ratio, the results were further processed by

  10. Permeability Reduction in Passively Degassing Seawater-dominated Volcanic-hydrothermal systems: Processes and Perils on Raoul Island, Kermadecs (NZ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, B. W.; Reyes, A. G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2006 eruption from Raoul Island occurred apparently in response to local tectonic swarm activity, but without any precursory indication of volcanic unrest within the hydrothermal system on the island. The eruption released some 200 T of SO2, implicating the involvement of a deep magmatic vapor input into the system during/prior to the event. In the absence of any recognized juvenile material in the eruption products, previous explanations for this eruptive event focused on this vapor being a driving force for the eruption. In 2004, at least 80 T/d of CO2 was escaping from the hydrothermal system, but mainly through areas that did not correspond to the 2006 eruption vents. The lack of a pre-eruptive hydrothermal system response related to the seismic event in 2006 can be explained by the presence of a hydrothermal mineralogic seal in the vent area of the volcano. Evidence for the existence of such a seal was found in eruption deposits in the form of massive fracture fillings of aragonite, calcite and anhydrite. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in these phases range from ca. 140 °C to 220 °C which, for pure water indicate boiling point depths of between 40 and 230 m assuming a cold hydrostatic pressure constraint. Elevated pressures behind this seal are consistent with the occurrence of CO2 clathrates in some inclusion fluids, indicating CO2 concentrations approaching 1 molal in the parent fluids. Reactive transport modeling of magmatic volatile inputs into what is effectively a seawater-dominated hydrothermal system provide valuable insights into seal formation. Carbonate mineral phases ultimately come to saturation along this flow path, but we suggest that focused deposition of the observed massive carbonate seal is facilitated by near-surface boiling of these CO2-enriched altered seawaters, leading to large degrees of supersaturation which are required for the formation of aragonite. As the seal grew and permeability declined, pore pressures

  11. Geochronological and geochemical assessment of Cenozoic volcanism from the Terror Rift region of the West Antarctic Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, Sarah E.

    The work presented in this dissertation explains results from three different methods to determine the relation between tectonism and rift-related volcanism in the Terror Rift region of the West Antarctic Rift System (WARS). Alkaline lavas from seven submarine features, Beaufort Island and Franklin Islands, and several locations near Mt Melbourne were dated by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and analyzed for elemental and isotopic chemical signatures. Each chapter addresses a different aspect of the hypothesis that the presence of volatiles, primarily H2O or CO2, in the magma source has led to anomalously high volumes of magmatism after rift-related decompressional melting rather than requiring an active mantle plume source. Chapter 2 provides the temporal framework, illustrating that the sampled features range in age from 6.7 Ma to 89 ka, post-dating the main Miocene age phase of Terror Rift extension. Chapter 3 illustrates the traditional enriched elemental and isotopic chemical signatures to support the overall homogeneity of these lavas and previously analyzed areas of the WARS. This chapter also provides a new model for the generation of the Pb isotopic signatures consistent with a history of metasomatism in the magma source. Chapter 4 provides an entirely new chemical dataset for the WARS. The first platinum group element (PGE) abundances and extremely unradiogenic Os isotopic signatures of Cenozoic lavas from Antarctica provide the strongest evidence of melting contributions from a lithospheric mantle source. The combined results from these three studies consistently support the original hypothesis of this dissertation. New evidence suggests that WARS related lavas are not related to a mantle plume(s) as previously proposed. Instead, they are generated by passive, decompressional melting of a source, likely a combination of the asthenospheric and lithospheric mantle, which has undergone previous melting events and metasomatism.

  12. Scientific and public responses to the ongoing volcanic crisis at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: Importance of an effective hazards-warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Tilling, Robert I.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other potentially hazardous natural phenomena occur independently of any human actions. However, such phenomena can cause disasters when a society fails to foresee the hazardous manifestations and adopt adequate measures to reduce its vulnerability. One of the causes of such a failure is the lack of a consistent perception of the changing hazards posed by an ongoing eruption, i.e., with members of the scientific community, the Civil Protection authorities and the general public having diverging notions about what is occurring and what may happen. The problem of attaining a perception of risk as uniform as possible in a population measured in millions during an evolving eruption requires searching for communication tools that can describe—as simply as possible—the relations between the level of threat posed by the volcano, and the level of response of the authorities and the public. The hazards-warning system adopted at Popocatépetl Volcano, called the Volcanic Traffic Light Alert System(VTLAS), is a basic communications protocol that translates volcano threat into seven levels of preparedness for the emergency-management authorities, but only three levels of alert for the public (color coded green–yellow–red). The changing status of the volcano threat is represented as the most likely scenarios according to the opinions of an official scientific committee analyzing all available data. The implementation of the VTLAS was intended to reduce the possibility of ambiguous interpretations of intermediate levels by the endangered population. Although the VTLAS is imperfect and has not solved all problems involved in mass communication and decision-making during a volcanic crisis, it marks a significant advance in the management of volcanic crises in Mexico.

  13. Scientific and public responses to the ongoing volcanic crisis at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: Importance of an effective hazards-warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Tilling, Robert I.

    2008-02-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other potentially hazardous natural phenomena occur independently of any human actions. However, such phenomena can cause disasters when a society fails to foresee the hazardous manifestations and adopt adequate measures to reduce its vulnerability. One of the causes of such a failure is the lack of a consistent perception of the changing hazards posed by an ongoing eruption, i.e., with members of the scientific community, the Civil Protection authorities and the general public having diverging notions about what is occurring and what may happen. The problem of attaining a perception of risk as uniform as possible in a population measured in millions during an evolving eruption requires searching for communication tools that can describe—as simply as possible—the relations between the level of threat posed by the volcano, and the level of response of the authorities and the public. The hazards-warning system adopted at Popocatépetl Volcano, called the Volcanic Traffic Light Alert System (VTLAS), is a basic communications protocol that translates volcano threat into seven levels of preparedness for the emergency-management authorities, but only three levels of alert for the public (color coded green-yellow-red). The changing status of the volcano threat is represented as the most likely scenarios according to the opinions of an official scientific committee analyzing all available data. The implementation of the VTLAS was intended to reduce the possibility of ambiguous interpretations of intermediate levels by the endangered population. Although the VTLAS is imperfect and has not solved all problems involved in mass communication and decision-making during a volcanic crisis, it marks a significant advance in the management of volcanic crises in Mexico.

  14. Copahue Geothermal System: A Volcanic Environment with Rich Extreme Prokaryotic Biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sofía Urbieta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Copahue geothermal system is a natural extreme environment located at the northern end of the Cordillera de los Andes in Neuquén province in Argentina. The geochemistry and consequently the biodiversity of the area are dominated by the activity of the Copahue volcano. The main characteristic of Copahue is the extreme acidity of its aquatic environments; ponds and hot springs of moderate and high temperature as well as Río Agrio. In spite of being an apparently hostile location, the prokaryotic biodiversity detected by molecular ecology techniques as well as cultivation shows a rich and diverse environment dominated by acidophilic, sulphur oxidising bacteria or archaea, depending on the conditions of the particular niche studied. In microbial biofilms, found in the borders of the ponds where thermal activity is less intense, the species found are completely different, with a high presence of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic species. Our results, collected during more than 10 years of work in Copahue, have enabled us to outline geomicrobiological models for the different environments found in the ponds and Río Agrio. Besides, Copahue seems to be the habitat of novel, not yet characterised autochthonous species, especially in the domain Archaea.

  15. Copahue Geothermal System: A Volcanic Environment with Rich Extreme Prokaryotic Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbieta, María Sofía; Porati, Graciana Willis; Segretín, Ana Belén; González-Toril, Elena; Giaveno, María Alejandra; Donati, Edgardo Rubén

    2015-07-08

    The Copahue geothermal system is a natural extreme environment located at the northern end of the Cordillera de los Andes in Neuquén province in Argentina. The geochemistry and consequently the biodiversity of the area are dominated by the activity of the Copahue volcano. The main characteristic of Copahue is the extreme acidity of its aquatic environments; ponds and hot springs of moderate and high temperature as well as Río Agrio. In spite of being an apparently hostile location, the prokaryotic biodiversity detected by molecular ecology techniques as well as cultivation shows a rich and diverse environment dominated by acidophilic, sulphur oxidising bacteria or archaea, depending on the conditions of the particular niche studied. In microbial biofilms, found in the borders of the ponds where thermal activity is less intense, the species found are completely different, with a high presence of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic species. Our results, collected during more than 10 years of work in Copahue, have enabled us to outline geomicrobiological models for the different environments found in the ponds and Río Agrio. Besides, Copahue seems to be the habitat of novel, not yet characterised autochthonous species, especially in the domain Archaea.

  16. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.

    2012-12-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of these aerosol clouds produce responses in the climate system. Observations and numerical models of the climate system show that volcanic eruptions produce global cooling and were the dominant natural cause of climate change for the past millennium, on timescales from annual to century. Major tropical eruptions produce winter warming of Northern Hemisphere continents for one or two years, while high latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere weaken the Asian and African summer monsoon. The Toba supereruption 74,000 years ago caused very large climate changes, affecting human evolution. However, the effects did not last long enough to produce widespread glaciation. An episode of four large decadally-spaced eruptions at the end of the 13th century C.E. started the Little Ice Age. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade had a small effect on global temperature trends. The June 13, 2011 Nabro eruption in Eritrea produced the largest stratospheric aerosol cloud since Pinatubo, and the most of the sulfur entered the stratosphere not by direct injection, but by slow lofting in the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Volcanic eruptions warn us that while stratospheric geoengineering could cool the surface, reducing ice melt and sea level rise, producing pretty sunsets, and increasing the CO2 sink, it could also reduce summer monsoon precipitation, destroy ozone, allowing more harmful UV at the surface, produce rapid warming when stopped, make the sky white, reduce solar power, perturb the ecology with more diffuse radiation, damage airplanes flying in the stratosphere, degrade astronomical observations, affect remote sensing, and affect

  17. Impact of an extremely large magnitude volcanic eruption on the global climate and carbon cycle estimated from ensemble Earth System Model simulations

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    J. Segschneider

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of the global climate-carbon cycle system to an extremely large Northern Hemisphere mid latitude volcanic eruption is investigated using ensemble integrations with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM. The model includes dynamical compartments of the atmosphere and ocean and interactive modules of the terrestrial biosphere as well as ocean biogeochemistry. The MPI-ESM was forced with anomalies of aerosol optical depth and effective radius of aerosol particles corresponding to a super eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic system. The model experiment consists of an ensemble of fifteen model integrations that are started at different pre-ENSO states of a contol experiment and run for 200 yr after the volcanic eruption. The climate response to the volcanic eruption is a maximum global monthly mean surface air temperature cooling of 3.8 K for the ensemble mean and from 3.3 K to 4.3 K for individual ensemble members. Atmospheric pCO2 decreases by a maximum of 5 ppm for the ensemble mean and by 3 ppm to 7 ppm for individual ensemble members approximately 6 yr after the eruption. The atmospheric carbon content only very slowly returns to near pre-eruption level at year 200 after the eruption. The ocean takes up carbon shortly after the eruption in response to the cooling, changed wind fields, and ice cover. This physics driven uptake is weakly counteracted by a reduction of the biological export production mainly in the tropical Pacific. The land vegetation pool shows a distinct loss of carbon in the initial years after the eruption which has not been present in simulations of smaller scale eruptions. The gain of the soil carbon pool determines the amplitude of the CO2 perturbation and the long term behaviour of the overall system: an initial gain caused by reduced soil respiration is followed by a rather slow return towards pre-eruption levels. During this phase, the ocean compensates partly for the

  18. Impact of an extremely large magnitude volcanic eruption on the global climate and carbon cycle estimated from ensemble Earth System Model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Segschneider

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The response of the global climate-carbon cycle system to an extremely large Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude volcanic eruption is investigated using ensemble integrations with the comprehensive Earth System Model MPI-ESM. The model includes dynamical compartments of the atmosphere and ocean and interactive modules of the terrestrial biosphere as well as ocean biogeochemistry. The MPI-ESM was forced with anomalies of aerosol optical depth and effective radius of aerosol particles corresponding to a super eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic system. The model experiment consists of an ensemble of fifteen model integrations that are started at different pre-ENSO states of a control experiment and run for 200 years after the volcanic eruption. The climate response to the volcanic eruption is a maximum global monthly mean surface air temperature cooling of 3.8 K for the ensemble mean and from 3.3 K to 4.3 K for individual ensemble members. Atmospheric pCO2 decreases by a maximum of 5 ppm for the ensemble mean and by 3 ppm to 7 ppm for individual ensemble members approximately 6 years after the eruption. The atmospheric carbon content only very slowly returns to near pre-eruption level at year 200 after the eruption. The ocean takes up carbon shortly after the eruption in response to the cooling, changed wind fields and ice cover. This physics-driven uptake is weakly counteracted by a reduction of the biological export production mainly in the tropical Pacific. The land vegetation pool shows a decrease by 4 GtC due to reduced short-wave radiation that has not been present in a smaller scale eruption. The gain of the soil carbon pool determines the amplitude of the CO2 perturbation and the long-term behaviour of the overall system: an initial gain caused by reduced soil respiration is followed by a rather slow return towards pre-eruption levels. During this phase, the ocean compensates partly for the reduced atmospheric

  19. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrande, Allegra N.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions represent some of the most climatically important and societally disruptive short-term events in human history. Large eruptions inject ash, dust, sulfurous gases (e.g. SO2, H2S), halogens (e.g. Hcl and Hbr), and water vapor into the Earth's atmosphere. Sulfurous emissions principally interact with the climate by converting into sulfate aerosols that reduce incoming solar radiation, warming the stratosphere and altering ozone creation, reducing global mean surface temperature, and suppressing the hydrological cycle. In this issue, we focus on the history, processes, and consequences of these large eruptions that inject enough material into the stratosphere to significantly affect the climate system. In terms of the changes wrought on the energy balance of the Earth System, these transient events can temporarily have a radiative forcing magnitude larger than the range of solar, greenhouse gas, and land use variability over the last millennium. In simulations as well as modern and paleoclimate observations, volcanic eruptions cause large inter-annual to decadal-scale changes in climate. Active debates persist concerning their role in longer-term (multi-decadal to centennial) modification of the Earth System, however.

  20. Spatial and temporal variations of diffuse CO2 degassing at El Hierro volcanic system: Relation to the 2011-2012 submarine eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melián, Gladys; Hernández, Pedro A.; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán.; Dionis, Samara; Rodríguez, Fátima; Calvo, David; Nolasco, Dacil

    2014-09-01

    We report herein the results of extensive diffuse CO2 emission surveys performed on El Hierro Island in the period 1998-2012. More than 17,000 measurements of the diffuse CO2 efflux were carried out, most of them during the volcanic unrest period that started in July 2011. Two significant precursory signals based on geochemical and geodetical studies suggest that a magma intrusion processes might have started before 2011 in El Hierro Island. During the preeruptive and eruptive periods, the time series of the diffuse CO2 emission released by the whole island experienced two significant increases. The first started almost 2 weeks before the onset of the submarine eruption, reflecting a clear geochemical anomaly in CO2 emission, most likely due to increasing release of deep-seated magmatic gases to the surface. The second one, between 24 October and 27 November 2011, started before the most energetic seismic events of the volcanic-seismic unrest. The data presented here demonstrate that combined continuous monitoring studies and discrete surveys of diffuse CO2 emission provide important information to optimize the early warning system in volcano monitoring programs and to monitor the evolution of an ongoing volcanic eruption, even though it is a submarine eruption.

  1. Geopulsation, Volcanism and Astronomical Periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xuexiang; Chen Dianyou; Yang Xiaoying; Yang Shuchen

    2000-01-01

    Volcanism is mainly controlled by the intermittent release of energy in the earth. As far as the differential rotation of the earth's inner core is concerned, the Galactic Year may change the gravitational constant G, the solar radiative quantity and the moving speed of the solar system and affect the exchange of angular momentum between core and mantle as well as the energy exchange between crust and mantle. As a result, this leads to eruptions of superplumes and magma, and controls the energy flow from core - mantle boundary (CMB) to crust. When the earth' s speed decreases, it will release a huge amount of energy. They are the reason of the correspondence of the volcanic cycles one by one with the astronomical periods one by one. According to the astronomical periods, volcanic eruptions may possibly be predicted in the future.

  2. Delineation of the High Enthalpy Reservoirs of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Geothermal System, South-Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M.; Muñoz, M.; Parada, M.

    2011-12-01

    Geothermal system associated with the Pleistocene-Holocene Sierra Nevada volcano (SNVGS) in the Araucanía Region of Chile has surface manifestations from the north-western flank of the volcano, up to Manzanar and Malalcahuello. Baños del Toro, located on the northwestern flank of the volcano, has numerous fumaroles and acid pools (acid sulfate waters, T=~90°C, pH=2.1, TDS=3080 mg/L); while Aguas de la Vaca, near the base of the volcano, has a bubbling spring (chloride-sulfate waters, T=~60°C, pH=7.0, TDS=950 mg/L). Five shallow (low TDS (130-210mg/L). The main heat source of the geothermal system is apparently the magmatic system of the Sierra Nevada volcano. Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ) that transects the area forms excellent conduits for the flow of the geothermal waters. The geothermal reservoirs are hosted in the volcanic rocks interceded with glacial deposits over the North Patagonian Batholith that forms an impermeable barrier, and thus constitutes the lower boundary of the geothermal system and also controls the lateral flow of the fluids. An equilibrium temperature of ~210°C is derived from gas geothermometry (CO2/Ar-H2/Ar) of the discharges at Baños del Toro. Geothermal fluids from the upflow area on the northwestern flank of the volcano migrate northwards to the Cautín River Valley. The geothermal system has a high enthalpy reservoir(s) on the northwestern flank of the Sierra Nevada volcano and low-enthalpy reservoirs in the Cautín River Valley that have been tapped to form spas at Manzanar and Malalcahuello. While sub-vertical fractures of LOFZ facilitate the recharge of the system, lateral flow of the geothermal fluids is apparently controlled by lithology; Melipueclo Pluton in particular prevents the westward flow from the upflow zone, causing the flow only northwards to Malalcahuello and subsequently westward on meeting poorly permeable Guapitrío Member of the Cura-Mallín Formation. This change in the flow direction from northwestward up

  3. Evolution of the East African rift: Drip magmatism, lithospheric thinning and mafic volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Tanya; Nelson, Wendy R.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.

    2016-07-01

    The origin of the Ethiopian-Yemeni Oligocene flood basalt province is widely interpreted as representing mafic volcanism associated with the Afar mantle plume head, with minor contributions from the lithospheric mantle. We reinterpret the geochemical compositions of primitive Oligocene basalts and picrites as requiring a far more significant contribution from the metasomatized subcontinental lithospheric mantle than has been recognized previously. This region displays the fingerprints of mantle plume and lithospheric drip magmatism as predicted from numerical models. Metasomatized mantle lithosphere is not dynamically stable, and heating above the upwelling Afar plume caused metasomatized lithosphere with a significant pyroxenite component to drip into the asthenosphere and melt. This process generated the HT2 lavas observed today in restricted portions of Ethiopia and Yemen now separated by the Red Sea, suggesting a fundamental link between drip magmatism and the onset of rifting. Coeval HT1 and LT lavas, in contrast, were not generated by drip melting but instead originated from shallower, dominantly anhydrous peridotite. Looking more broadly across the East African Rift System in time and space, geochemical data support small volume volcanic events in Turkana (N. Kenya), Chyulu Hills (S. Kenya) and the Virunga province (Western Rift) to be derived ultimately from drip melting. The removal of the gravitationally unstable, metasomatized portion of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle via dripping is correlated in each case with periods of rapid uplift. The combined influence of thermo-mechanically thinned lithosphere and the Afar plume together thus controlled the locus of continental rift initiation between Africa and Arabia and provide dynamic support for the Ethiopian plateau.

  4. The behaviour of REE and Zr-Hf fractionation in the volcanic waters of Nevado del Ruiz system (Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguaggiato, Claudio; Censi, Paolo; Zuddas, Pierpaolo; Makario Londoño, John; Chacón, Zoraida; Alzate, Diego; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The geochemical behaviour of Rare Earth Element (REE), Zr and Hf have been investigated in the thermal waters of Nevado del Ruiz volcanic system. These fluids are characterised by a wide range of pH ranging between 1.0 and 8.8. The acidic waters are sulphate dominated with different Cl/SO4 ratios. The Nevado del Ruiz waters allowed to investigate the behaviour of investigated elements in a wide spectrum of pH and chemical composition of water. The important role of the pH and the ionic complexes have been evidenced in the distribution of REE, Zr and Hf in the aqueous phase. The pH rules the precipitation of authigenic oxyhydroxides of Fe, Al producing changes in REE, Zr, Hf amount and strong anomalies of Cerium and Europium. Y-Ho and Zr-Hf (twin pairs) have different behaviour in strong acidic waters with respect to the water with higher pH. Yttrium and Ho have the same behaviour of Zr and Hf in waters with pH near neutral-to-neutral, showing super-chondritic ratios. The twin pairs showed to be sensitive to the co-precipitation and/or adsorption onto the surface of authigenic particulate suggesting an enhanced scavenging of Ho and Hf respect to Y and Zr, leading to super-chondritic ratios. In acidic waters a different behaviour of twin pairs occurs with chondritic Y/Ho ratios (reflecting the Y/Ho ratio of average local rock) and sub-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios. For the first time, Zr and Hf have been investigated in natural acidic fluids to understand the behaviour of these elements in extreme acidic conditions and different major anions chemistry. Zr/Hf molar ratio changes from 4.75 to 49.29 in water with pH<3.6. In strong acidic waters, a different fractionation of Zr and Hf have been recognised as function of major anion contents (Cl and SO4), suggesting the formation of complexes leading to sub-chondritic Zr/Hf molar ratios.

  5. The link between volcanism and plutonism in epizonal magma systems; high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology from the Organ Mountains caldera and batholith, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Matthew; Farmer, G. Lang; Bowring, Samuel A.; Wooton, Kathleen M.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Coleman, Drew S.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2016-02-01

    fluxes for the Organ Needle pluton range from 0.0006 to 0.0030 km3/year, in agreement with estimates from other well-studied plutons. The petrogenetic evolution proposed here may be common to many small-volume silicic volcanic systems.

  6. A kinematic model for the Plio-Quaternary evolution of the Tyrrhenian Apenninic system: implications for rifting processes and volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, E.; Zuppetta, A.

    1998-06-01

    During the frontal accretion due to the Late Miocene-Quaternary thrusting, the interior of the Apenninic chain underwent large-scale extension which produced the opening of the Tyrrhenian Oceanic Basin, a back-arc basin in respect to the late Cenozoic Apenninic chain, and the onset of the Quaternary volcanic activity in the Campanian Plain and more generally in the Tyrrhenian area. To outline the space/time distribution and the geotectonic setting of the Tyrrhenian volcanics we approached the problem from a kinematic point of view. A synthesis of the available geological and geophysical data leads us to suggest that the progressive migration of the Apenninic Arcs is responsible for the extension phenomena which took place during the last 5 Ma. At first, the extension resulted from the kinematic interaction between the Northern Apenninic Arc and the Southern Apenninic Arc during the Late Pliocene. Then, from the Early Pleistocene the extension was controlled by the SE migration of the Southern arc only, and therefore it can be regarded as part of the general Southern Tyrrhenian extension phenomenon. Due to the intense thinning, the isotherms migrated upward very rapidly within the Toscana, Latium and Campania lithosphere where the melting point was reached, giving rise to the onset of volcanic activity at the end of the Early Pleistocene.

  7. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William; Barbieri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the city of Viterbo in the Cimino-Vico volcanic district of west-Central Italy. The geothermal system hosts many thermal springs and gas vents, but the resource is still unexploited. Water chemistry is controlled by mixing between low salinity,HCO3-rich fresh waters (<24.2°C) flowing in shallow volcanic rocks and SO4-rich thermal waters (25.3°C to 62.2°C) ascending from deep, high permeability Mesozoic limestones. The (equivalent) SO4/Cl (0.01–0.02), Na/Cl (2.82–5.83) and B/Cl ratios (0.02–0.38) of thermal waters differs from the ratios in other geothermal systems from Central Italy, probably implying a lack of hydraulic continuity across the region. The δ18O (−6.6‰ to −5.9‰) and δD (−40.60‰ to −36.30‰) isotopic composition of spring water suggest that the recharge area for the geothermal system is the summit region of Mount Cimino. The strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) of thermal waters (0.70797–0.70805) are consistent with dissolution of the Mesozoic evaporite-carbonate units that constitute the reservoir, and the ratios of cold fresh waters mainly reflect shallow circulation through the volcanic cover and some minor admixture (<10%) of thermal water as well. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of fresh waters (−5.00 and 6.12‰) is similar to that of the volcanic cover, but the δ11B of thermal waters (−8.37‰ to −4.12‰) is a mismatch for the Mesozoic reservoir rocks and instead reflects dissolution of secondary boron minerals during fluid ascent through flysch units that overlie the reservoir. A slow and tortuous ascent enhances extraction of boron but also promotes conductive cooling, partially masking the heat present in the

  8. Volcanic forcing in decadal forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménégoz, Martin; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; Guemas, Virginie; Asif, Muhammad; Prodhomme, chloe

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can significantly impact the climate system, by injecting large amounts of particles into the stratosphere. By reflecting backward the solar radiation, these particles cool the troposphere, and by absorbing the longwave radiation, they warm the stratosphere. As a consequence of this radiative forcing, the global mean surface temperature can decrease by several tenths of degrees. However, large eruptions are also associated to a complex dynamical response of the climate system that is particularly tricky do understand regarding the low number of available observations. Observations seem to show an increase of the positive phases of the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) the two winters following large eruptions, associated to positive temperature anomalies over the Eurasian continent. The summers following large eruptions are generally particularly cold, especially over the continents of the Northern Hemisphere. Overall, it is really challenging to forecast the climate response to large eruptions, as it is both modulated by, and superimposed to the climate background conditions, largely driven themselves by internal variability at seasonal to decadal scales. This work describes the additional skill of a forecast system used for seasonal and decadal predictions when it includes observed volcanic forcing over the last decades. An idealized volcanic forcing that could be used for real-time forecasts is also evaluated. This work consists in a base for forecasts that will be performed in the context of the next large volcanic eruption.

  9. Inverse Dipolar Magnetic Anomaly Over the Volcanic Cone Linked to Reverse Polarity Magnetizations in Lavas and Tuffs - Implications for the Conduit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Trigo-Huesca, A.

    2012-12-01

    A combined magnetics and paleomagnetic study of Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a magnetic link between lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that lavas and ash tuffs carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Conduit geometry is one of the important controlling factors in eruptive dynamics of basaltic volcanoes. However volcanic conduits are often not, or only partly, exposed. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  10. Boundary of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field from Laczniak and others (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF), an area of thick, regionally distributed volcanic rocks within the...

  11. Boundary of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field from Laczniak and others (1996), for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF), an area of thick, regionally distributed volcanic rocks within the...

  12. MID-MIOCENE SEQUENCES OF HIGH- AND MODERATE-MG VOLCANIC ROCKS IN VITIM PLATEAU, SOUTHERN SIBERIA: IMPACT OF A SUB-LITHOSPHERIC CONVECTIVE MATERIAL ON THE LITHOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Chuvashova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of major elements, trace elements, and isotopes in high- and moderate-Mg volcanic sequences of 16–14 and 14–13 Ma, respectively, has been performed in the Bereya volcanic center. In the former (small volume sequence, contaminated by crustal material basalts and trachybasalts of K–Na series were followed by uncontaminated basanites and basalts of transitional (K–Na–K compositions and afterwards by picrobasalts and ba­salts of K series. From pressure estimates using equation [Scarrow, Cox, 1995], high-Mg magma originated at the deep range of 115–150 km. In the latter (high-volume sequence, basalts and basaltic andesites of transitional (Na–K–Na compositions and basalts of Na series were overlain by basalts and trachybasalts of K–Na series. First, there was a strong melting of its shallow garnet-free part with coeval weak melting of more deep garnet-bearing portion, then only a deep garnet-bearing portion of the lithospheric mantle melted. It is suggested that the sequential formation of high- and moderate-Mg melts reflected the mid-Miocene thermal impact of the lithosphere by hot material from the Transbaikalian low-velocity domain, which had the potential temperature Tp as high as 1510 °С. This thermal impact triggered the rifting in the lithosphere of the Baikal Rift System.

  13. Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of 1.77-1.58 Ga rift-related granites and volcanics of the Goias tin province, Central Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Marcio M.; Botelho, Nilson F. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: marcio@unb.br

    2001-06-01

    Supracrustal rocks of the Arai Group, together with coeval A-type granites represent a ca. 1.77-1.58 Ga old continental rift in Brazil. Two granite families are identified: the older (1.77 Ga) group forms small undeformed plutons, and the younger granites (ca. 1.58 Ga) constitute larger, deformed plutons. Sr-Nd isotopic data for these rocks indicate that the magmatism is mostly produced of re-melting of Paleoproterozoic sialic crust. Initial Sr ratios for both granite families are ca 0.276 and 0.720. Most TDM model ages are between 2.58 and 1.80 Ga. {epsilon}{sub Nd} (T) values are between +3.6 and -11.9. Arai volcanics are bimodal, with basalts and dacites/rhyolites interlayered with continental sediments. The felsic volcanics show Nd isotopic characteristics which are very similar to the granites, and are also interpreted as reworking of Paleoproterozoic crust. Detrital sediments of the Arai Group revealed T{sub DM} model ages between 2.4 and 2.16 Ga., indicating that they are the product of erosion of Paleoproterozoic crust. The data indicate that the Arai rift system was established on crust that had just become stable after the Paleoproterozoic orogeny. (author)

  14. The magmatic system of Ischia island: another piece in the puzzle of the fluid-saturated, CO2-sustained, Neapolitan volcanism (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, R.; Arienzo, I.; Civetta, L.; Orsi, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2012-04-01

    Melt inclusions in phenocrysts from some shoshonite to latite eruptive products of Ischia Island (Southern Italy) provide a window on the deep magmatic feeding system. Together with similar products from the other Neapolitan volcanoes (Procida, Campi Flegrei and Somma-Vesuvius), they probe the deep physico-chemical conditions of magmas generated in a mantle contaminated by slab derived fluids/melts largely dominated by CO2. The analyzed melt inclusions bear clear evidence for CO2 dominated gas fluxing and consequent dehydration of magma portions stagnating at major crustal discontinuities. In general, magma differentiation at Ischia takes place under very oxidized conditions determined by an unusual, nearly equimolar, proportion of divalent and trivalent iron in the melt. Budgets of magma degassing show that at Ischia there is much less magma than that needed to directly supply the amount of magmatic fluids released at surface, thus constraining the role of CO2 rich deep fluids in originating the volcanism and generating caldera resurgence. The acquired data, together with those from the other Neapolitan volcanoes, show that, despite the compositional and eruptive style differences within the poorly extended Neapolitan Volcanic area, the different kinds of volcanism are linked by supercritical CO2 fluids produced by devolatilization of subducted terrigenous-carbonatic metasediment, that infiltrate the mantle wedge, generate magmas and control their ascent up to eruption. In particular, fluid upraise and accumulation at crustal levels beneath Neapolitan volcanoes occurs with different flow-rates that depend on the major geological structures, particularly NW-SE normal and NE-SW transfer regional fault systems.

  15. Ancient plate kinematics derived from the deformation pattern of continental crust: Paleo- and Neo-Tethys opening coeval with prolonged Gondwana-Laurussia convergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Uwe; Roscher, Marco; Romer, Rolf L.

    2016-06-01

    The formation and destruction of supercontinents requires prolonged convergent tectonics between particular plates, followed by intra-continental extension during subsequent breakup stages. A specific feature of the Late Paleozoic supercontinent Pangea is the prolonged and diachronous formation of the collisional belts of the Rheic suture zone coeval with recurrent continental breakup and subsequent formation of the mid-ocean ridge systems of the Paleo- and Neo-Tethys oceans at the Devonian and Permian margins of the Gondwana plate, respectively. To decide whether these processes are causally related or not, it is necessary to accurately reconstruct the plate motion of Gondwana relative to Laurussia. Here we propose that the strain pattern preserved in the continental crust can be used for the reconstruction of ancient plate kinematics. We present Euler pole locations for the three fundamental stages of the Late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea and closure of the Rheic Ocean: (I) Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma) collisional tectonics affected Gondwana at the Armorican Spur north of western Africa and at the promontory of the South China block/Australia of eastern Gondwana, resulting in the Variscan and the Qinling orogenies, respectively. The Euler pole of the rotational axis between Gondwana and Laurussia is positioned east of Gondwana close to Australia. (II) Continued subduction of the western Rheic Ocean initiates the clockwise rotation of Gondwana that is responsible for the separation of the South China block from Gondwana and the opening of Paleo-Tethys during the Late Devonian. The position of the rotational axis north of Africa reveals a shift of the Euler pole to the west. (III) The terminal closure of the Rheic Ocean resulted in the final tectonics of the Alleghanides, the Mauritanides and the Ouachita-Sonora-Marathon belt, occurred after the cessation of the Variscan orogeny in Central Europe, and is coeval with the formation of the Central European Extensional

  16. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  17. Volcanism and associated hazards: The Andean perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilling, R.I.

    2009-01-01

    Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA), which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years) than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions") recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene. The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru). The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars) were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent hazardous eruptions in Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has spurred significant improvements in reducing volcano risk in the Andean region. But much remains to be done.

  18. Mechanisms of aggradation in fluvial systems influenced by explosive volcanism: An example from the Upper Cretaceous Bajo Barreal Formation, San Jorge Basin, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umazano, Aldo M.; Bellosi, Eduardo S.; Visconti, Graciela; Melchor, Ricardo N.

    2008-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous succession of the San Jorge Basin (Patagonia, Argentina) records different continental settings that interacted with explosive volcanism derived from a volcanic arc located in the western part of Patagonia. This paper discusses the contrasting aggradational mechanisms in fluvial systems strongly influenced by explosive volcanism which took place during sedimentation of the Bajo Barreal Formation. During deposition of the lower member of the unit, common ash-fall events and scarce sandy debris-flows occurred, indicating syn-eruptive conditions. However, the record of primary pyroclastic deposits is scarce because they were reworked by river flows. The sandy fluvial channels were braided and show evidence of important variations in water discharge. The overbank flows (sheet-floods) represent the main aggradational mechanism of the floodplain. In places, subordinate crevasse-splays and shallow lakes also contributed to the floodplain aggradation. In contrast, deposition of the upper member occurred in a fluvial-aeolian setting without input of primary volcaniclastic detritus, indicating inter-eruptive conditions. The fluvial channels were also braided and flowed across low-relief floodplains that mainly aggraded by deposition of silt-sized sediments of aeolian origin (loess) and, secondarily by sheet-floods. The Bajo Barreal Formation differs from the classic model of syn-eruptive and inter-eruptive depositional conditions in the presence of a braided fluvial pattern during inter-eruptive periods, at least at one locality. This braided fluvial pattern is attributed to the high input of fine-grained pyroclastic material that composes the loessic sediments.

  19. A Volcanic Hydrogen Habitable Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ramses M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    The classical habitable zone (HZ) is the circular region around a star in which liquid water could exist on the surface of a rocky planet. The outer edge of the traditional N2–CO2–H2O HZ extends out to nearly ∼1.7 au in our solar system, beyond which condensation and scattering by CO2 outstrips its greenhouse capacity. Here, we show that volcanic outgassing of atmospheric H2 can extend the outer edge of the HZ to ∼2.4 au in our solar system. This wider volcanic-hydrogen HZ (N2–CO2–H2O–H2) can be sustained as long as volcanic H2 output offsets its escape from the top of the atmosphere. We use a single-column radiative-convective climate model to compute the HZ limits of this volcanic hydrogen HZ for hydrogen concentrations between 1% and 50%, assuming diffusion-limited atmospheric escape. At a hydrogen concentration of 50%, the effective stellar flux required to support the outer edge decreases by ∼35%–60% for M–A stars. The corresponding orbital distances increase by ∼30%–60%. The inner edge of this HZ only moves out ∼0.1%–4% relative to the classical HZ because H2 warming is reduced in dense H2O atmospheres. The atmospheric scale heights of such volcanic H2 atmospheres near the outer edge of the HZ also increase, facilitating remote detection of atmospheric signatures.

  20. Experimental generation of volcanic lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarelli, Corrado; Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel; Kueppers, Ulrich; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2014-05-01

    Ash-rich volcanic plumes that are responsible for injecting large quantities of aerosols into the atmosphere are often associated with intense electrical activity. Direct measurement of the electric potential at the crater, where the electric activity in the volcanic plume is first observed, is severely impeded, limiting progress in its investigation. We have achieved volcanic lightning in the laboratory during rapid decompression experiments of gas-particle mixtures under controlled conditions. Upon decompression (from ~100 bar argon pressure to atmospheric pressure), loose particles are vertically accelerated and ejected through a nozzle of 2.8 cm diameter into a large tank filled with air at atmospheric conditions. Because of their impulsive character, our experiments most closely represent the conditions encountered in the gas-thrust region of the plume, when ash is first ejected from the crater. We used sieved natural ash with different grain sizes from Popocatépetl (Mexico), Eyjafjallajökull (Iceland), and Soufrière Hills (Montserrat) volcanoes, as well as micrometric glass beads to constrain the influence of material properties on lightning. We monitored the dynamics of the particle-laden jets with a high-speed camera and the pressure and electric potential at the nozzle using a pressure transducer and two copper ring antennas connected to a high-impedance data acquisition system, respectively. We find that lightning is controlled by the dynamics of the particle-laden jet and by the abundance of fine particles. Two main conditions are required to generate lightning: 1) self-electrification of the particles and 2) clustering of the particles driven by the jet fluid dynamics. The relative movement of clusters of charged particles within the plume generates the gradient in electrical potential, which is necessary for lightning. In this manner it is the gas-particle dynamics together with the evolving particle-density distribution within different regions of

  1. Controls on volcanism at intraplate basaltic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hove, Jackson C.; Van Otterloo, Jozua; Betts, Peter G.; Ailleres, Laurent; Cas, Ray A. F.

    2017-02-01

    IBVFs used for comparison have long-term eruptive fluxes that are considerably less than definitive plume-related volcanic systems. Along with their spatio-temporal patterns and other analysis it is suggested that the NVP and the vast majority of low- and high-flux IBVFs appear to be the result of tectonic processes without requiring additional thermal input from a deep mantle source. Considering a control on volcanism by tectonic processes, the range of eruptive flux of IBVFs is related to variations in the rate of the effecting tectonic process, mantle composition, and the size of the mantle source zone where melt generation and accumulation is taking place.

  2. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William C.; Barbieri, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the city of Viterbo in the Cimino-Vico volcanic district of west-Central Italy. The geothermal system hosts many thermal springs and gas vents, but the resource is still unexploited. Water chemistry is controlled by mixing between low salinity,HCO3-rich fresh waters (extraction of boron but also promotes conductive cooling, partially masking the heat present in the reservoir. Overall data from this study is consistent with previous studies that concluded that the geothermal system has a large energy potential.

  3. Distribution and size of lava shields on the Al Haruj al Aswad and the Al Haruj al Abyad Volcanic Systems, Central Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaafi, Abdelsalam; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2017-05-01

    The Al Haruj Volcanic Province (AHVP) consists of two distinct volcanic systems. In the north is the system of Al Haruj al Aswad, covering an area of 34,200 km2, while in the south the system of Al Haruj al Abyad, covering an area of 7,850 km2. The systems have produced some 432 monogenetic volcanoes, primarily scoria (cinder) cones, lava shields, and maars. The density distribution of the volcanoes in each system, plotted as eruption points or sites, has a roughly elliptical surface expression, suggesting similar plan-view geometry of the magma sources, here suggested as deep-seated reservoirs. More specifically, the Al Haruj al Aswad magma reservoir has major and minor axes of 210 km and 119 km, respectively, and an area of 19,176 km2, the corresponding figures for the Haruj al Abyad reservoir being 108 km and 74 km, for the axes, and 6209 km2 for the area. We measured 55 lava shields on the AHVP. They are mostly restricted to the northern and southern parts of AHVP and date from late Miocene to (at least) the end of Pleistocene, while some may have been active into Holocene. In fact, although primarily monogenetic, some of the lava shields show evidence of (possibly Holocene) fissure eruptions in the summit parts. The early lava shields tend to be located at the edges of volcanic systems and with greater volumes than later (more central) shields. The average lava shield basal diameter is 4.5 km and height 63 m. There is strong linear correlation between lava shield volume and basal area, the coefficient of determination (R2) being about 0.75. When 22 Holocene Icelandic lava shields are added to the dataset, for comparison, the correlation between volume and basal area becomes R2 = 0.95. Numerical models suggest that the local stress fields favoured rupture and dyke injection at the margins of the source reservoirs during late Miocene - early Pliocene, in agreement with the distribution of the early, large-volume shields.

  4. Geochemistry of the late Holocene rocks from the Tolbachik volcanic field, Kamchatka: Quantitative modelling of subduction-related open magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Duggen, Svend; Hauff, Folkmar; Mironov, Nikita; Bindeman, Ilya; Thirlwall, Matthew; Hoernle, Kaj

    2015-12-01

    We present new major and trace element, high-precision Sr-Nd-Pb (double spike), and O-isotope data for the whole range of rocks from the Holocene Tolbachik volcanic field in the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD). The Tolbachik rocks range from high-Mg basalts to low-Mg basaltic trachyandesites. The rocks considered in this paper represent mostly Late Holocene eruptions (using tephrochronological dating), including historic ones in 1941, 1975-1976 and 2012-2013. Major compositional features of the Tolbachik volcanic rocks include the prolonged predominance of one erupted magma type, close association of middle-K primitive and high-K evolved rocks, large variations in incompatible element abundances and ratios but narrow range in isotopic composition. We quantify the conditions of the Tolbachik magma origin and evolution and revise previously proposed models. We conclude that all Tolbachik rocks are genetically related by crystal fractionation of medium-K primary magmas with only a small range in trace element and isotope composition. The primary Tolbachik magmas contain ~ 14 wt.% of MgO and ~ 4% wt.% of H2O and originated by partial melting (~ 6%) of moderately depleted mantle peridotite with Indian-MORB-type isotopic composition at temperature of ~ 1250 °C and pressure of ~ 2 GPa. The melting of the mantle wedge was triggered by slab-derived hydrous melts formed at ~ 2.8 GPa and ~ 725 °C from a mixture of sediments and MORB- and Meiji-type altered oceanic crust. The primary magmas experienced a complex open-system evolution termed Recharge-Evacuation-Fractional Crystallization (REFC). First the original primary magmas underwent open-system crystal fractionation combined with periodic recharge of the magma chamber with more primitive magma, followed by mixing of both magma types, further fractionation and finally eruption. Evolved high-K basalts, which predominate in the Tolbachik field, and basaltic trachyandesites erupted in 2012-2013 approach steady-state REFC

  5. Spatial distribution of cones and satellite-detected lineaments in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field (southernmost Patagonia): insights into the tectonic setting of a Neogene rift system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; D'Orazio, Massimo

    2003-07-01

    The relationships between the distribution and morphometric features of eruptive structures (scoria and spatter cones, maar, tuff rings) and the fracture network were investigated in the Pliocene-Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (southernmost Patagonia, Argentina-Chile). The alkali basaltic/basanitic magmas which erupted in this area have nearly primary magma compositions and often bear mantle xenoliths; hence magma ascent from deep-seated reservoirs was probably very fast, with no significant stagnation at crustal levels. Field surveys and satellite image analysis led to the identification of up to 467 eruptive structures and four main NW-SE, NE-SW, E-W and N-S fracture systems. The spatial distribution of eruptive cones and fractures was investigated through the computation of power-law exponents ( Df) for self-similar clustering. The self-similarity of cones and fractures was defined between lower and upper cut-offs which were in turn related to the thickness of the fractured mechanical layer. The fractal character of cones and fracture distribution (clustering) in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field area was thus correlated with crustal thickness. The self-similarity of fractures was used to establish the relative chronology of the detected fracture systems. The self-similar clustering exponent is highest in the E-W and NW-SE fracture systems ( Df=1.78 and 1.77, respectively), and lowest in the N-S system ( Df=1.65). The self-similar clustering of eruptive structures is well defined ( Df=1.45). The intense volcano-tectonic activity in the Pali Aike area marks a major Pliocene-Quaternary phase in the development of the Magellan Neogene Rift System.

  6. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-08-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania—Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries.

  7. Global positioning system survey data for active seismic and volcanic areas of eastern Sicily, 1994 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonforte, Alessandro; Fagone, Sonia; Giardina, Carmelo; Genovese, Simone; Aiesi, Gianpiero; Calvagna, Francesco; Cantarero, Massimo; Consoli, Orazio; Consoli, Salvatore; Guglielmino, Francesco; Puglisi, Biagio; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2016-08-01

    This work presents and describes a 20-year long database of GPS data collected by geodetic surveys over the seismically and volcanically active eastern Sicily, for a total of more than 6300 measurements. Raw data were initially collected from the various archives at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Catania-Osservatorio Etneo and organized in a single repository. Here, quality and completeness checks were performed, while all necessary supplementary information were searched, collected, validated and organized together with the relevant data. Once all data and information collections were completed, raw binary data were converted into the universal ASCII RINEX format; all data are provided in this format with the necessary information for precise processing. In order to make the data archive readily consultable, we developed software allowing the user to easily search and obtain the needed data by simple alphanumeric and geographic queries.

  8. The use of geographical information systems for disaster risk reduction strategies: a case study of Volcan de Colima, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeg, O.

    Contemporary disaster risk management requires the analysis of vulnerability and hazard exposure, which is imperative at Volcan de Colima (VdC), Mexico, due to the predicted, large-magnitude eruption forecast to occur before 2025. The methods used to gauge social vulnerability included the development and application of proxies to census records, the undertaking of a building vulnerability survey and the spatial mapping of civil and emergency infrastructure. Hazard exposure was assessed using primary modelling of laharic events and the digitalisation of secondary data sources detailing the modelled extent of pyroclastic flows and tephra deposition associated with a large-magnitude (VEI 5) eruption at VdC. The undertaking and analysis of a risk perception survey of the population enabled an understanding of the cognitive behaviour of residents towards the volcanic risk. In comparison to the published hazard map, the GIS analysis highlighted an underestimation of lahar hazard on the western flank of VdC and the regional tephra hazard. Vulnerability analysis identified three communities where social deprivation is relatively high, and those with significant elderly and transient populations near the volcano. Furthermore, recognition of the possibility of an eruption in the near future was found to be low across the study region. These results also contributed to the analysis of emergency management procedures and the preparedness of the regional authorities. This multidisciplinary research programme demonstrates the success of applying a GIS platform to varied integrative spatial and temporal analysis. Furthermore, ascertaining the impact of future activity at VdC upon its surrounding populations permits the evaluation of emergency preparedness and disaster risk reduction strategies.

  9. Double, double, (but mostly) toil, and trouble: A multidisciplinary approach to quantify the permeability of an active volcanic hydrothermal system (Whakaari volcano, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael; Kennedy, Ben; Farquharson, Jamie; Ashworth, James; Mayer, Klaus; Letham-Brake, Mark; Reuschlé, Thierry; Gilg, Albert; Scheu, Betty; Lavallée, Yan; Siratovich, Paul; Cole, Jim; Jolly, Art; Dingwell, Donald

    2016-04-01

    Our multidisciplinary approach, which combines field techniques and traditional laboratory methods, aims to better understand the permeability of an active volcanic hydrothermal system, a vital prerequisite for understanding and modelling the behaviour of hydrothermal systems worldwide. Whakaari volcano (an active stratovolcano located 48 km off New Zealand's North Island) hosts an open, highly reactive hydrothermal system (hot springs and mud pools, fumaroles, acid streams and lakes) and represents an ideal natural laboratory to undertake such a study. We first gained an appreciation of the different lithologies at Whakaari and (where possible) their lateral and vertical extent through reconnaissance by land, sea, and air. Due to the variable nature of these altered lithologies (mainly lavas and tuffs), we measured porosity-permeability for in excess of a hundred rock hand samples using field techniques. We also measured the permeability of recent, unconsolidated deposits using a field soil permeameter. Our field measurements were then groundtruthed on a subset of these samples (~40-50) using traditional laboratory techniques: helium pycnometry and measurements of permeability using a benchtop permeameter, including measurements under increasing confining pressure (i.e., depth). In all, our measurements highlight that the porosity of the materials at Whakaari can vary from ~0.01 to ~0.6, and permeability can vary by eight orders of magnitude. However, our data show no discernable trend between porosity and permeability. A combination of macroscopic and microscopic observations, chemistry (XRF), mineralogy (XRD), and mercury porosimetry highlight that the absence of a robust porosity-permeability relationship is the product of an insane variability in alteration and microstructure (pore size, particle size, pore connectivity, presence/absence of microcracks, layering, amongst others). While our systematic study offers the most complete porosity-permeability dataset

  10. Volcanic signals in oceans

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2009-08-22

    Sulfate aerosols resulting from strong volcanic explosions last for 2–3 years in the lower stratosphere. Therefore it was traditionally believed that volcanic impacts produce mainly short-term, transient climate perturbations. However, the ocean integrates volcanic radiative cooling and responds over a wide range of time scales. The associated processes, especially ocean heat uptake, play a key role in ongoing climate change. However, they are not well constrained by observations, and attempts to simulate them in current climate models used for climate predictions yield a range of uncertainty. Volcanic impacts on the ocean provide an independent means of assessing these processes. This study focuses on quantification of the seasonal to multidecadal time scale response of the ocean to explosive volcanism. It employs the coupled climate model CM2.1, developed recently at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration\\'s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, to simulate the response to the 1991 Pinatubo and the 1815 Tambora eruptions, which were the largest in the 20th and 19th centuries, respectively. The simulated climate perturbations compare well with available observations for the Pinatubo period. The stronger Tambora forcing produces responses with higher signal-to-noise ratio. Volcanic cooling tends to strengthen the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Sea ice extent appears to be sensitive to volcanic forcing, especially during the warm season. Because of the extremely long relaxation time of ocean subsurface temperature and sea level, the perturbations caused by the Tambora eruption could have lasted well into the 20th century.

  11. Geomorphic and exhumational response of the Central American Volcanic Arc to Cocos Ridge subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Kristin D.; Kirby, Eric; Fisher, Donald M.; van Soest, Matthijs

    2012-04-01

    The timing of collision of the Cocos Ridge at the Middle America Trench remains one of the outstanding questions in the tectonic evolution of the Central American convergent margin. New analyses of the tectonic geomorphology of the Cordillera de Talamanca, the extinct volcanic arc inboard of the Cocos Ridge, coupled with low temperature thermochronometry data, provide insight into the cooling and erosional history of the arc from late Miocene to present. We identify a low-relief surface at high elevation along the northeastern flanks of the range, which represents a relict erosional landscape cut across shallow plutonic rocks of the arc edifice. Longitudinal profiles of rivers on this surface are isolated from steep downstream sections by prominent knickzones that are interpreted to reflect a migrating wave of transient incision generated during differential rock uplift of the range. Reconstruction of pre-incision profiles suggests that rock uplift during the growth of the Cordillera de Talamanca is no greater than ˜2 km. This inference is corroborated by results from our apatite (U-Th)/He and apatite fission track analyses along an elevation transect on Mt. Chirripó, the highest mountain in the Cordillera de Talamanca. Low-temperature cooling ages overlap significantly with published high-temperature40Ar/39Ar ages; the combined results imply that rapid cooling in the late Miocene was related to secular cooling of a shallow pluton, rather than exhumation. Our results imply that rapid incision along downstream channel segments, differential rock uplift, and growth of the Talamanca as a bivergent orogenic wedge associated with the onset of Cocos Ridge subduction are relatively young characteristics of the range. A review of previously published radiometric ages and revised plate reconstructions for the late Miocene further suggest that the cessation of arc volcanism in both the Cordillera de Talamanca and the Cordillera Central of western Panama was coeval with the

  12. Petrogenesis and Tectonic-Magmatic Interplays in Extensive Recent NE Lau Basin Boninite to Dacite Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, K. H.; Embley, R. W.; Hellebrand, E.; Jenner, F. E.; Glancy, S.

    2016-12-01

    The world's fastest opening back-arc region, the NE Lau Basin, hosts a large (roughly 20x20 km) province of visually young boninite volcanoes flanked on the south and west by an even more extensive young dacite volcanism terrane, all in the rear arc, near the northern plate boundary of the basin. The youngest boninite volcanoes are the Mata seamounts, including recently active W. Mata and 8 other discrete volcanoes; the young dacites (more than 300 km2) occur at Niuatahi seamount and in several large low-relief lava fields between the arc and the NE Lau Spreading Center. ROV and dredge sampling on 4 expeditions since 2009 reveals a surprising diversity of boninite and closely related high-Mg andesite lithologies in the Matas, with similar major element compositions to other western Pacific boninite localities (e.g., the Izu-Bonin-Mariana system), but that display significant trace element and isotopic variability over sub-km spatial domains. Together, magma compositions allow for a common boninite petrogenesis process but at a range of source compositions and melting conditions in the NE Lau. In contrast, the dacites are glassy and nearly aphyric, showing very limited major element range, for instance flow LL-B (at 136 km2, the largest and best sampled dacite flow) has remarkably consistent mean silica content of 65.6 ±0.2. Dacites have major and trace element patterns consistent with differentiation of one endmember boninite composition erupted nearby. The close association of boninite and dacite volcanic centers and the petrogenetic link indicate a likely common origin, with crustal storage conditions controlling the extent of pre-eruptive magma differentiation. The highly dispersed arrangement of volcanoes and large lava flow fields in this part of the basin and their association with rift structures suggest a common, widespread and highly productive boninite parent melt regime coupled to tectonic control on the sites of volcanism in the area, with migration

  13. About the Mechanism of Volcanic Eruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    A new approach to the volcanic eruption theory is proposed. It is based on a simple physical mechanism of the imbalance in the system "magma-crust-fluid". This mechanism helps to explain from unified positions the different types of volcanic eruptions. A criterion of imbalance and magma eruption is derived. Stratovolcano and caldera formation is analyzed. High explosive eruptions of the silicic magma is discussed

  14. Chlorine isotope and Cl-Br fractionation in fluids of Poás volcano (Costa Rica): Insight into an active volcanic-hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Eggenkamp, H. G. M.; Martínez-Cruz, María; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2016-10-01

    Halogen-rich volcanic fluids issued at the surface carry information on properties and processes operating in shallow hydrothermal systems. This paper reports a long-term record of Cl-Br concentrations and δ37Cl signatures of lake water and fumaroles from the active crater of Poás volcano (Costa Rica), where surface expressions of magmatic-hydrothermal activity have shown substantial periodic changes over the last decades. Both the hyperacid water of its crater lake (Laguna Caliente) and subaerial fumaroles show significant temporal variability in Cl-Br concentrations, Br/Cl ratios and δ37Cl, reflecting variations in the mode and magnitude of volatile transfer. The δ37Cl signatures of the lake, covering the period 1985-2012, show fluctuations between + 0.02 ± 0.06‰ and + 1.15 ± 0.09‰. Condensate samples from adjacent fumaroles on the southern shore, collected during the interval (2010-2012) with strong changes in gas temperature (107-763°C), display a much larger range from - 0.43 ± 0.09‰ to + 14.09 ± 0.08‰. Most of the variations in Cl isotope, Br/Cl and concentration signals can be attributed to interaction between magma-derived gas and liquid water in the volcanic-hydrothermal system below the crater. The δ37Cl were lowest and closest to magmatic values in (1) fumarolic gas that experienced little or no interaction with subsurface water and followed a relatively dry pathway, and (2) water that captured the bulk of magmatic halogen output so that no phase separation could induce fractionation. In contrast, elevated δ37Cl can be explained by partial scavenging and fractionation during subsurface gas-liquid interaction. Hence, strong Cl isotope fractionation leading to very high δ37Cl in Poás' fumaroles indicates that they followed a wet pathway. Highest δ37Cl values in the lake water were found mostly in periods when it received a significant input from subaqueous fumaroles or when high temperatures and low pH caused HCl evaporation. It is

  15. The link between volcanism and plutonism in epizonal magma systems; high-precision U–Pb zircon geochronology from the Organ Mountains caldera and batholith, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Matthew; Farmer, Lang; Bowring, Samuel; Wooton, Kathleen M.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Coleman, Drew S.; Verplanck, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    final eruption. Calculated magmatic fluxes for the Organ Needle pluton range from 0.0006 to 0.0030 km3/year, in agreement with estimates from other well-studied plutons. The petrogenetic evolution proposed here may be common to many small-volume silicic volcanic systems.

  16. The Pliocene-Quaternary South Harghita (Romania) volcanic chain-ending segment - a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Szakács, Alexandru

    2016-04-01

    South Harghita, the chain terminus segment of the Cǎlimani-Gurghiu-Harghita volcanic range is notorious for its specific characteristics. It consist of different and unique volcanological and petrological features, as compared with the rest of the range, including lowest erupted magma volumes and eruption rates, which originate from changes of the geodynamic setting along with magma generation processes. The Pliocene-Quaternary calc- alkaline volcanism developed in the 5.3 - 0.3 Ma time interval with two gaps at 3.9-2.8 and 1.6-1.0 Ma, respectively, but the volcanoes partially overlap each other along the NW-SE direction, crosscutting the Carpathian internal folded units. At 1.6 - 1.4 Ma K-alkalic volcanism developed at Bicsad/Malnaş at the southward extension of the South Harghita chain, whereas Na-alkalic volcanism (1.2-0.6 Ma) developed 40 km to the west in the Perşani Mountains. There are four major volcanic edifices recognized in this chain segment: Luci-Lazul, Cucu, Pilişca and Ciomadul. Luci-Lazu, the northernmost andesitic volcano shows a typical shield morphology. The Cucu andesite-dacite volcano displays a multiple-crater edifice topped by lava domes. Inside the craterial area there is a complex intrusive assemblage. The next volcano in the row, Pilişca is an andesitic composite volcano topped by steep dacitic lava dome complexes. The south-easternmost dacitic Ciomadul volcanic complex is most well-preserved consisting of a lava dome and flow complex and twin-crater pyroclastic cones developed during several explosive eruptions between 55.9 - 32.6 Ka. According to the recent studies Ciomadul can be viewed as having some residual magma in its crustal magma chamber whose future eruption potential is unclear. The compositional changes from calc-alkaline (Luci-Lazul) to adakite-like calc-alkaline (Cucu-Ciomadul) may be connected to the sinking of the block/slab beneath the active Vrancea seismic zone and coeval with the tearing along the Trotuş fault

  17. Anomalous diffusion of volcanic earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic seismicity at Mt. Etna is studied. It is found that the associated stochastic process exhibits a subdiffusive phenomenon. The jump probability distribution well obeys an exponential law, whereas the waiting-time distribution follows a power law in a wide range. Although these results would seem to suggest that the phenomenon could be described by temporally-fractional kinetic theory based on the viewpoint of continuous-time random walks, the exponent of the power-law waiting-time distribution actually lies outside of the range allowed in the theory. In addition, there exists the aging phenomenon in the event-time averaged mean squared displacement, in contrast to the picture of fractional Brownian motion. Comments are also made on possible relevances of random walks on fractals as well as nonlinear kinetics. Thus, problems of volcanic seismicity are highly challenging for science of complex systems.

  18. Tectonic evolution of the central-eastern sector of Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt and its influence on the eruptive history of the Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, F.; Capra, L.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.

    2006-11-01

    The Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano of Late Pliocene-Holocene age located within the central and eastern sectors of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Morphostructural analysis, aerial photograph and satellite image interpretation, structural analysis and geological fieldwork were methods used to investigate the relationship between the evolution of the volcano and the tectonic framework of its basement. The study revealed that the area of Nevado de Toluca is affected by three main fault systems that intersect close to the volcanic edifice. These are from oldest to youngest, the Taxco-Querétaro, San Antonio and Tenango fault systems. The NNW-SSE Taxco-Querétaro fault system was active in the area since Early Miocene, and is characterized by right-lateral transtensive movement. Its reactivation during Early to Middle Pleistocene was responsible for the emplacement of andesitic to dacitic lava flows and domes of La Cieneguilla Supersynthem. The NE-SW San Antonio fault system was active during Late Pliocene, before the reactivation of the Taxco-Querétaro fault system, and is characterized by extensional left-lateral oblique-slip kinematics. The youngest is the E-W Tenango fault system that has been active since Late Pleistocene. This fault system is characterized by transtensive left-lateral strike-slip movement, and partly coeval with the youngest eruptive phase, the Nevado Supersynthem, which formed the present summit cone of the Nevado de Toluca volcano. The stress re-orientation from the Taxco-Querétaro to the Tenango fault system during Late Pleistocene is responsible for the ˜ 1 Ma hiatus in the magmatic activity between 1.15 Ma and 42 ka. After this period of repose, the eruptive style drastically changed from effusive to explosive with the emission of dacitic products. The methodology presented here furnish new data that can be used to better assess the complex structural evolution of this sector of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

  19. Volcanic Rocks and Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanoes have contributed significantly to the formation of the surface of our planet. Volcanism produced the crust we live on and most of the air we breathe. The...

  20. Exponential decay of concentration variance during magma mixing: Robustness of a volcanic chronometer and implications for the homogenization of chemical heterogeneities in magmatic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stefano; Petrelli, Maurizio; Morgavi, Daniele; González-García, Diego; Fischer, Lennart A.; Vetere, Francesco; Perugini, Diego

    2017-08-01

    The mixing of magmas is a fundamental process in the Earth system causing extreme compositional variations in igneous rocks. This process can develop with different intensities both in space and time, making the interpretation of compositional patterns in igneous rocks a petrological challenge. As a time-dependent process, magma mixing has been suggested to preserve information about the time elapsed between the injection of a new magma into sub-volcanic magma chambers and eruptions. This allowed the use of magma mixing as an additional volcanological tool to infer the mixing-to-eruption timescales. In spite of the potential of magma mixing processes to provide information about the timing of volcanic eruptions its statistical robustness is not yet established. This represents a prerequisite to apply reliably this conceptual model. Here, new chaotic magma mixing experiments were performed at different times using natural melts. The degree of reproducibility of experimental results was tested repeating one experiment at the same starting conditions and comparing the compositional variability. We further tested the robustness of the statistical analysis by randomly removing from the analysed dataset a progressively increasing number of samples. Results highlight the robustness of the method to derive empirical relationships linking the efficiency of chemical exchanges and mixing time. These empirical relationships remain valid by removing up to 80% of the analytical determinations. Experimental results were applied to constrain the homogenization time of chemical heterogeneities in natural magmatic system during mixing. The calculations show that, when the mixing dynamics generate millimetre thick filaments, homogenization timescales of the order of a few minutes are to be expected.

  1. Volcanic structure and composition of Old Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbach, Natalia; Portnyagin, Maxim; Tembrel, Igor

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports results of a new comprehensive geological mapping of the Late Pleistocene Old Shiveluch volcano. The mapping results and geochemical data on major and trace element composition of the volcanic rocks are used to characterize spatial distribution, eruptive sequence and volumetric relationships between different rock types of the volcano. Old Shiveluch volcano had been constructed during two main stages: initial explosive and subsequent effusive ones. Pyroclastic deposits of the initial stage are represented by agglomerate and psephytic tuffs with very few lava flows and form at least 60% of volume of the Old Shiveluch edifice. The deposits of the second stage are dominantly lava flows erupted from four vents: Central, Western, Baidarny and Southern, reconstructed from the field relationships of their lava flows. About 75% of the Old Shiveluch edifice, both pyroclastic deposits and lava, are composed of magnesian andesites (SiO2 = 57.3-63.8 wt.%, Mg# = 0.53-0.57). The most abundant andesitic lavas were coevally erupted from the Central and Western vents in the central part of the edifice. Less voluminous high-Al basaltic andesites (SiO2 = 53.5-55.7 wt.%, Mg# = 0.52-0.56) were produced by the Western, Baidarny and Southern vents situated in the south-western sector. Small volume high-Mg basaltic andesites (SiO2 = 53.9-55.0 wt.%, Mg# = 0.59-0.64) occur in the upper part of the pyroclastic deposits. Andesites of Old and Young Shiveluch Volcanoes have similar compositions, whereas Old Shiveluch basaltic andesites are compositionally distinctive from those of the Young Shiveluch by having lower Mg#, SiO2, Cr and Ni, and higher Al2O3, FeOT, CaO, TiO2, and V contents at given MgO. Geochemical modeling suggests that the compositions of the intermediate Old Shiveluch magmas can be reasonably explained by simple fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase and magnetite (± hornblende) from water-bearing (~ 3 wt.% H2O) high-Mg# basaltic

  2. Volcanic Plume Measurements with UAV (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H.; Kaneko, T.; Ohminato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volatiles in magmas are the driving force of volcanic eruptions and quantification of volcanic gas flux and composition is important for the volcano monitoring. Recently we developed a portable gas sensor system (Multi-GAS) to quantify the volcanic gas composition by measuring volcanic plumes and obtained volcanic gas compositions of actively degassing volcanoes. As the Multi-GAS measures variation of volcanic gas component concentrations in the pumped air (volcanic plume), we need to bring the apparatus into the volcanic plume. Commonly the observer brings the apparatus to the summit crater by himself but such measurements are not possible under conditions of high risk of volcanic eruption or difficulty to approach the summit due to topography etc. In order to overcome these difficulties, volcanic plume measurements were performed by using manned and unmanned aerial vehicles. The volcanic plume measurements by manned aerial vehicles, however, are also not possible under high risk of eruption. The strict regulation against the modification of the aircraft, such as installing sampling pipes, also causes difficulty due to the high cost. Application of the UAVs for the volcanic plume measurements has a big advantage to avoid these problems. The Multi-GAS consists of IR-CO2 and H2O gas analyzer, SO2-H2O chemical sensors and H2 semiconductor sensor and the total weight ranges 3-6 kg including batteries. The necessary conditions of the UAV for the volcanic plumes measurements with the Multi-GAS are the payloads larger than 3 kg, maximum altitude larger than the plume height and installation of the sampling pipe without contamination of the exhaust gases, as the exhaust gases contain high concentrations of H2, SO2 and CO2. Up to now, three different types of UAVs were applied for the measurements; Kite-plane (Sky Remote) at Miyakejima operated by JMA, Unmanned airplane (Air Photo Service) at Shinomoedake, Kirishima volcano, and Unmanned helicopter (Yamaha) at Sakurajima

  3. New Pliocene-Pleistocene 40Ar/ 39Ar ages fill in temporal gaps in the Nicaraguan volcanic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, Ian; Gazel, Esteban; Carr, Michael J.; Swisher, Carl C., III; Turrin, Brent

    2011-04-01

    The volcanic record of western Nicaragua documents a significant lull in volcanic activity that has persisted from the late Miocene (~ 7 Ma) to the formation of the modern volcanic front around 350 ka. This study fills this gap for the first time with samples collected in Northwest Nicaragua between Cosigüina and San Cristóbal volcanoes and with samples collected from the Nicaraguan Depression. We found two previously unknown volcanic units ranging from 3.6 to 1.3 Ma and the improved volcanic record allows us to reconstruct the geochemical evolution of the Nicaraguan arc. U/Th values increased by nearly threefold since the Miocene following the "carbonate crash" at 10 Ma, when dominantly carbonate sediment deposition shifted toward hemipelagic sediment deposition. This transition was thought to be abrupt, however our new data show that it took place gradually over the last 7 Ma. Northwest Nicaragua is a particularly interesting case study because it contains Middle Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression, the Coyol Formation (25-7 Ma) to the East and the Tamarindo Formation (14.7-11.7 Ma) to the West. The presence of Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression has led to the hypothesis that the two coeval units, currently separated by ~ 100 km, were once connected and have since been separated by extension. Here, we present data suggesting that the Tamarindo and Coyol are geochemically distinct and therefore cannot be considered part of the same unit.

  4. Crustal and tectonic controls on large-explosive volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Tom; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Quantifying the frequency-Magnitude (f-M) relationship for volcanic eruptions is important to estimate volcanic hazard. Furthermore, understanding how this relationship varies between different groups of volcanoes can provide insights into the processes that control the size and rate of volcanic events. Using a Bayesian framework, which allows us to conceptualise the volcanic record as a series of individual and unique time series, associated by a common group behaviour, we identify variations in the size and rate of volcanism in different volcanic arcs. These variations in behaviour are linked to key parameters that include the motion of subduction, rate of subduction, age of the slab and thickness of the crust. The effects of these parameters on volcanism are interpreted in terms of variations in mantle productivity and the thermal efficiency of magma transfer in arc crustal systems. Understanding the link between subduction architecture, heat content of magmatic systems, and volcanic activity will serve to improve our capacity to quantify volcanic hazard in regions with limited geological and historical records of volcanic activity.

  5. A Survey for a Coeval, Comoving Group Associated with HD 141569

    CERN Document Server

    Aarnio, Alicia N; Stassun, Keivan G; Mamajek, Eric E; James, David J

    2008-01-01

    We present results of a search for a young stellar moving group associated with the star HD 141569, a nearby, isolated Herbig AeBe primary member of a 5+/-3 Myr-old triple star system on the outskirts of the Sco-Cen complex. Our spectroscopic survey identified a population of 21 Li-rich, <30 Myr-old stars within 30 degrees of HD 141569 which possess similar proper motions with the star. The spatial distribution of these Li-rich stars, however, is not suggestive of a moving group associated with the HD 141569 triplet, but rather this sample appears cospatial with Upper Scorpius and Upper Centaurus Lupus. We apply a modified moving cluster parallax method to compare the kinematics of these youthful stars with Upper Scorpius and Upper Centaurus Lupus. Eight new potential members of Upper Scorpius and five new potential members of Upper Centaurus Lupus are identified. A substantial moving group with an identifiable nucleus within 15 degrees (~30 pc) of HD 141569 is not found in this sample. Evidently, the HD 1...

  6. Rapid Coeval Black Hole and Host Galaxy Growth in MRC 1138-262: The Hungry Spider

    CERN Document Server

    Seymour, N; De Breuck, C; Barthel, P; Coia, D; Conversi, L; Dannerbauer, H; Dey, A; Dickinson, M; Drouart, G; Galametz, A; Greve, T R; Haas, M; Hatch, N; Ibar, E; Ivison, R; Jarvis, M; Kovacs, A; Kurk, J; Lehnert, M; Miley, G; Nesvadba, N; Rawlings, J I; Rettura, A; Rottgering, H; Rocca-Volmerange, B; Sanchez-Portal, M; Santos, J S; Stern, D; Stevens, J; Valtchanov, I; Vernet, J; Wylezalek, D

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the infrared spectral energy distribution of the high-redshift radio galaxy MRC 1138-26 at z = 2.156, also known as the Spiderweb Galaxy. By combining photometry from Spitzer, Herschel and LABOCA we fit the rest-frame 5-300 um emission using a two component, starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN), model. The total infrared (8 - 1000 um) luminosity of this galaxy is (1.97+/-0.28)x10^13 Lsun with (1.17+/-0.27) and (0.79+/-0.09)x10^13 Lsun due to the AGN and starburst components respectively. The high derived AGN accretion rate of \\sim20% Eddington, and the measured star formation rate (SFR) of 1390pm150 Msun/yr, suggest that this massive system is in a special phase of rapid central black hole and host galaxy growth, likely caused by a gas rich merger in a dense environment. The accretion rate is sufficient to power both the jets and the previously observed large outflow. The high SFR and strong outflow suggest this galaxy could potentially exhaust its fuel for stellar growth...

  7. Somatic expressions of grief and psychosomatic illness in the works of William Shakespeare and his coevals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Kenneth W

    2012-10-01

    To find out if Shakespeare, famed for his insights into human nature, is exceptional in how much his characters express grief through somatic symptoms and signs, and by physical illness. The texts of all large-scale works currently attributed to Shakespeare (39 plays, 3 long narrative poems) were systematically searched for bodily changes and for evidence of grief as dominating the character's emotional state at the time. The findings were compared with those from a search of 46 works, similar in genre, by 15 prominent playwrights active at the same time as Shakespeare. In Shakespeare 31 different grief-associated symptoms or signs were found, in 140 instances. They are present in all but two of his plays and long poems and involve most systems of the body. With non-Shakespearean writers there were 26 kinds, 132 instances. Twenty-two changes are common to both groups, including fainting, death (sudden or after a decline), and wrinkled face, and symptoms such as malaise, fatigue, awareness of the heart-beat, and anorexia. Ten somatic expressions of grief were found only in Shakespeare, including hyperventilation, hair turning white and premature childbirth. Four were found only in his contemporaries but were trivial or unconvincing. Deaths and non-fatal illnesses are prevalent in Shakespeare. Grieving Shakespearean characters exhibit many somatic symptoms and signs and a wide range of psychosomatic illnesses. This panoply of psychosomatic phenomena may be an artistic artefact but it also confirms that Shakespeare's empathy with grieving humanity was unrivalled. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project: analysis of radio source properties between 5 and 217 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Massardi, Marcella; Bonavera, Laura; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Galluzzi, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project has yielded observations of 464 sources with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) between 4.5 and 40 GHz. The main purpose of the project was to investigate the spectral properties of mm-selected radio sources at frequencies below and overlapping with the ESA's Planck satellite frequency bands, minimizing the variability effects by observing almost simultaneously with the first two Planck all-sky surveys. In this paper we present the whole catalogue of observations in total intensity. By comparing PACO with the various measures of Planck Catalog of Compact Sources (PCCS) flux densities we found the best consistency with the PCCS "detection pipeline" photometry (DETFLUX) that we used to investigate the spectral properties of sources from 5 to 217 GHz. Of our sources, 91% have remarkably smooth spectrum, well described by a double power law over the full range. This suggests a single emitting region, at variance with the notion that "flat" spectra resu...

  9. Can we develop an effective early warning system for volcanic eruptions using `off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2016-12-01

    An effective early warning system to detect volcanic activity is an invaluable tool, but often very expensive. Detecting and monitoring precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing eruptions in near real-time is essential, but conventional methods are often logistically challenging, expensive, and difficult to maintain. Our investigation explores the use of `off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras, operating in the visible to near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, to detect and monitor volcanic incandescent activity. Large databases of webcam imagery already exist at institutions around the world, but are often extremely underutilised and we aim to change this. We focus on the early detection of thermal signatures at volcanoes, using automated scripts to analyse individual images for changes in pixel brightness, allowing us to detect relative changes in thermally incandescent activity. Primarily, our work focuses on freely available streams of webcam images from around the world, which we can download and analyse in near real-time. When changes in activity are detected, an alert is sent to the users informing them of the changes in activity and a need for further investigation. Although relatively rudimentary, this technique provides constant monitoring for volcanoes in remote locations and developing nations, where it is not financially viable to deploy expensive equipment. We also purchased several of our own cameras, which were extensively tested in controlled laboratory settings with a black body source to determine their individual spectral response. Our aim is to deploy these cameras at active volcanoes knowing exactly how they will respond to varying levels of incandescence. They are ideal for field deployments as they are cheap (0-1,000), consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered near real-time data. Data from Shiveluch volcano, Russia and our spectral response lab experiments are presented here.

  10. Comprehensive study of the seismotectonics of the easter Aleutian arc and associated volcanic systems. Annual progress report, March 1, 1978--February 28, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, K.H.; Davies, J.N.; Beavan, J.; Johnson, D.; House, L.; Krause, J.; Hickman, S.; Winslow, M.; Hauptman, J.; Mori, J.; Sykes, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    Based on the historic seismic record and accurate hypocenter data obtained from the eastern Aleutian seismic network, a relationship between the subduction-zone seismicity, volcano-trench separation, and the occurrence of great thrust earthquakes has been established for the Aleutian arc. On the basis of strong-motion accelerometer data it was found that high stress drops (540 t 650 bars) were associated with two moderate-size earthquakes (m/sub b/ = 6.0 and 5.8) within the Shumagin Islands seismic gap. This indicates that near the down-dip end of the major thrust zone, at depths of about 40 km, high tectonic stresses have accumulated within the gap segment of the arc. That such accumulation of stress is presently an ongoing process is corroborated by results from geodetic precision leveling on Unga Island. The leveling data indicate tilt rates of about 1 microradian/year. The tilting is directed down towards the trench and up towards the volcanic arc. Whether the recent activity of Pavlof, Shishaldin and Westdahl volcanoes indicates transmission of high tectonic stresses from the major thrust zone to the volcanic arc is unresolved. The search for a shallow magma chamber beneath the seismically monitored Pavlof volcano is still inconclusive although large amounts of recently acquired data remain to be analyzed. A geologic reconnaissance of the Shumagin Islands and the Adjacent Alaska Peninsula revealed Quaternary uplifted marine terraces and evidence for Holocene faulting. Both findings have severe implications for long-term tectonic activity and seismic hazards in the region of this seismic gap, portions of which are presently considered for off-shore hydrocarbon exploration and development. A critical analysis of th presently operating seimic data acquisition system reveals that a major change in remote sensing and central recording equipment is urgently needed for the Pavlof, Cold Bay, and Shumagin sections of the seismic array.

  11. Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1989-03-01

    K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

  12. Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Tilling

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Andean volcanism occurs within the Andean Volcanic Arc (AVA, which is the product of subduction of the Nazca Plate and Antarctica Plates beneath the South America Plate. The AVA is Earth's longest but discontinuous continental-margin volcanic arc, which consists of four distinct segments: Northern Volcanic Zone, Central Volcanic Zone, Southern Volcanic Zone, and Austral Volcanic Zone. These segments are separated by volcanically inactive gaps that are inferred to indicate regions where the dips of the subducting plates are too shallow to favor the magma generation needed to sustain volcanism. The Andes host more volcanoes that have been active during the Holocene (past 10 000 years than any other volcanic region in the world, as well as giant caldera systems that have produced 6 of the 47 largest explosive eruptions (so-called "super eruptions" recognized worldwide that have occurred from the Ordovician to the Pleistocene.

    The Andean region's most powerful historical explosive eruption occurred in 1600 at Huaynaputina Volcano (Peru. The impacts of this event, whose eruptive volume exceeded 11 km3, were widespread, with distal ashfall reported at distances >1000 km away. Despite the huge size of the Huaynaputina eruption, human fatalities from hazardous processes (pyroclastic flows, ashfalls, volcanogenic earthquakes, and lahars were comparatively small owing to the low population density at the time. In contrast, lahars generated by a much smaller eruption (<0.05 km3 in 1985 of Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia killed about 25 000 people – the worst volcanic disaster in the Andean region as well as the second worst in the world in the 20th century. The Ruiz tragedy has been attributed largely to ineffective communications of hazards information and indecisiveness by government officials, rather than any major deficiencies in scientific data. Ruiz's disastrous outcome, however, together with responses to subsequent

  13. Diffuse emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from soil in volcanic and hydrothermal systems: evidences for the influence of microbial activity on the carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturi, Stefania; Tassi, Franco; Fazi, Stefano; Vaselli, Orlando; Crognale, Simona; Rossetti, Simona; Cabassi, Jacopo; Capecchiacci, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Soils in volcanic and hydrothermal areas are affected by anomalously high concentrations of gases released from the deep reservoirs, which consists of both inorganic (mainly CO2 and H2S) and organic (volatile organic compounds; VOCs) species. VOCs in volcanic and hydrothermal fluids are mainly composed of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons (alkanes, aromatics, alkenes, and cyclics), with variable concentrations of O- and S-bearing compounds and halocarbons, depending on the physicochemical conditions at depth. VOCs in interstitial soil gases and fumarolic emissions from four volcanic and hydrothermal systems in the Mediterranean area (Solfatara Crater, Poggio dell'Olivo and Cava dei Selci, in Italy, and Nisyros Island, in Greece) evidenced clear compositional differences, suggesting that their behavior is strongly affected by secondary processes occurring at shallow depths and likely controlled by microbial activity. Long-chain saturated hydrocarbons were significantly depleted in interstitial soil gases with respect to those from fumarolic discharges, whereas enrichments in O-bearing compounds (e.g. aldehydes, ketones), DMSO2 and cyclics were commonly observed. Benzene was recalcitrant to degradation processes, whereas methylated aromatics were relatively instable. The chemical and isotopic (δ13C in CO2 and CH4) composition of soil gases collected along vertical profiles down to 50 cm depth at both Solfatara Crater and Poggio dell'Olivo (Italy) showed evidences of relevant oxidation processes in the soil, confirming that microbial activity likely plays a major role in modifying the composition of deep-derived VOCs. Despite their harsh conditions, being typically characterized by high temperatures, low pH, and high toxic gases and metal contents, the variety of habitats characterizing volcanic and hydrothermal environments offers ideal biomes to extremophilic microbes, whose metabolic activity can consume and/or produce VOCs. In the Solfatara Crater, microbial

  14. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  15. Contribution of the FUTUREVOLC project to the study of segmented lateral dyke growth in the 2014 rifting event at Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Hooper, Andrew; Hreinsdóttir, Sigrún; Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Rafn Heimisson, Elías; Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Spaans, Karsten; Guðmundsson, Gunnar B.; Drouin, Vincent; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Samsonov, Sergey; Brandsdóttir, Bryndís; White, Robert S.; Ágústsdóttir, Thorbjörg; Björnsson, Helgi; Bean, Christopher J.

    2015-04-01

    The FUTUREVOLC project (a 26-partner project funded by FP7 Environment Programme of the European Commission, addressing topic "Long-term monitoring experiment in geologically active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards: the Supersite concept) set aims to (i) establish an innovative volcano monitoring system and strategy, (ii) develop new methods for near real-time integration of multi-parametric datasets, (iii) apply a seamless transdisciplinary approach to further scientific understanding of magmatic processes, and (iv) to improve delivery, quality and timeliness of transdisciplinary information from monitoring scientists to civil protection. The project duration is 1 October 2012 - 31 March 2016. Unrest and volcanic activity since August 2014 at one of the focus areas of the project in Iceland, at the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, near the middle of the project duration, has offered unique opportunities for this project. On 16 August 2014 an intense seismic swarm started in Bárðarbunga, the beginning of a major volcano-tectonic rifting event forming over 45 km long dyke extending from the caldera to Holuhraun lava field outside the northern margin of Vatnajökull. A large basaltic, effusive fissure eruption began in Holuhraun on 31 August which had by January formed a lava field with a volume in excess of one cubic kilometre. We document how the FUTUREVOLC project has contributed to the study and response to the subsurface dyke formation, through increased seismic and geodetic coverage and joint interpreation of the data. The dyke intrusion in the Bárðarbunga volcanic system, grew laterally for over 45 km at a variable rate, with an influence of topography on the direction of propagation. Barriers at the ends of each segment were overcome by the build-up of pressure in the dyke end; then a new segment formed and dyke lengthening temporarily peaked. The dyke evolution, which occurred over 14 days, was revealed by propagating seismicity, ground

  16. The Maar-Diatreme System in a Mixed "Hard/Soft-Rock" Setting: an Example from the Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpit, S.; Ross, P.

    2009-05-01

    The eruptive processes in diatremes remain poorly understood compared to those at other volcano types, because these processes occur at depth. Except for maar-diatreme volcanoes formed during kimberlitic eruptions, volcanologists agree that these systems are of phreatomagmatic origin. The origin of kimberlitic diatremes is more contentious, but studying non kimberlitic equivalents can be a good approach to better understand kimberlitic diatremes considering their numerous common characteristics. The geometry of maar-diatreme systems is strongly influenced by their setting in "hard-rock" or "soft-rock" environments (Lorenz, 2003, Geolines 15:72-83). Formation of maar-diatreme systems in "hard-rock" environments, like in the West Eifel Volcanic Field of Germany, is largely described in the literature but emplacement in "soft-rock" environments or mixed settings is not. In the case of "hard-rock" environments external water is provided by fracture aquifers. The eruption products are juvenile clasts and country rock fragments. The inner crater walls of the maar, and the diatreme walls, have steep slopes. In the case of "soft- rock" environments, water is contained in the sediment pores and the walls tend to be at lower angles. We recently conducted field work on maars, cinder cones and spatter rings of the Pali Aike Volcanic Field of southern Argentina as part of the Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project (PASADO). These Quaternary monogenetic volcanoes were emplaced in a mixed "hard/soft-rock" environment containing young glacial sediments, basaltic lava flows, partly consolidated fluviatile sediments, and older indurated sedimentary rocks. The mixed environment of emplacement is reflected in a phreatomagmatic deposit on the inner slope of a tephra ring exposing some lapilli-tuff layers. The lapilli fraction comprises approximately 40% lithics on average (visual estimate): at least half of the fraction is composed of basaltic lava derived from a pre

  17. Precambrian Lunar Volcanic Protolife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Green

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Five representative terrestrial analogs of lunar craters are detailed relevant to Precambrian fumarolic activity. Fumarolic fluids contain the ingredients for protolife. Energy sources to derive formaldehyde, amino acids and related compounds could be by flow charging, charge separation and volcanic shock. With no photodecomposition in shadow, most fumarolic fluids at 40 K would persist over geologically long time periods. Relatively abundant tungsten would permit creation of critical enzymes, Fischer-Tropsch reactions could form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and soluble volcanic polyphosphates would enable assembly of nucleic acids. Fumarolic stimuli factors are described. Orbital and lander sensors specific to protolife exploration including combined Raman/laser-induced breakdown spectrocsopy are evaluated.

  18. Mercury emissions from soils and fumaroles of Nea Kameni volcanic centre, Santorini (Greece)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    BAGNATO, EMANUELA; TAMBURELLO, GIANCARLO; AIUPPA, ALESSANDRO; SPROVIERI, MARIO; VOUGIOUKALAKIS, GEORGE E; PARKS, MICHELLE

    2013-01-01

    There have been limited studies to date targeting mercury emissions from volcanic fumarolic systems, and no mercury flux data exist for soil or fumarolic emissions at Santorini volcanic complex, Greece...

  19. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  20. Volcanism and Oil & Gas In Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Xuanlong

    2000-01-01

    Based on study on the relation with volcanic rock and oil & gas in Songliao Basin and Liaohe Basin in northeast China, author proposes that material from deep by volcanism enrichs the resources in basins, that heat by volcanism promotes organic matter transforming to oil and gas, that volcanic reservoir is fracture, vesicular, solution pore, intercrystal pore.Lava facies and pyroclastic facies are favourable reservoir. Mesozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of intermediate, acid rock,but Cenozoic volcanic reservoir is majority of basalt. Types of oil and gas pool relating to volcanic rock include volcanic fracture pool, volcanic unconformity pool, volcanic rock - screened pool, volcanic darpe structural pool.

  1. Conceptual model of Enchereda aquifer system (La Gomera, Canary Islands): contributions to other volcanic islands; Modelo conceptual del sistema acuifero de Enchereda (La Gomera, Islas Canarias): contribuciones a otras islas volcanicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izquierdo, T.; Herrera, R.; Marquez, A.

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogeological conceptual models are difficult to develop in volcanic islands due to scarce hydrogeologic information in the inner parts of the islands and the complex structure of volcanic materials. This complexity is increased by 1) destruction processes (for example, flank collapse) and 2) dike intrusion. Dikes can both channel groundwater flow parallel to their general trend or act as barriers impounding it. In this paper we evaluate the role of dikes and volcanoclastic deposits in Enchereda aquifer system (La Gomera, Canary Islands) regional flow and particularly, in its higher area. In this aquifer system three hydrostratigraphic units can be identified: the Lower Old Basalts, with low permeability; the Volcanic Breccia, impermeable; and the Upper Old Basalts, permeable. The breccia seems to act as the impermeable limit of the aquifer and the reconstruction of its geometry shows a coherent surface dipping about 13 degree centigrade towards the ESE what determines the regional flow in the aquifer. After dike mapping using aerial photograph and ortho photograph as well as mapping in the field and inside Ipalan water tunnel, four dike swarms have been identified. NW-SE dikes are the most frequent ones, and show a maximum density of more than 10 dikes/100 m, similar to rift zones in volcanic islands. These dikes are parallel to the regional flow and channel water flow whereas the N-S and NE-SW swarms impound groundwater rising the water table level forming a stepped surface as they are perpendicular to the regional flow. Lastly, W-E dikes seem to have little influence on the aquifer. Our results show the need of a re-evaluation of the role of dikes in the regional flow in other volcanic island aquifers in which their influence have been minimized as overlapping of different dike swarms can condition regional flow in the aquifer. (Author)

  2. The Temporal and Spatial Association of Faulting and Volcanism in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field - Rio Grande Rift, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. A.; Hudson, M. R.; Minor, S. A.; McIntosh, W. C.; Miggins, D. P.; Grauch, V.

    2008-12-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Cerros del Rio volcanic field (CdRVF) in northern New Mexico is one of the largest ( greater than 700 square kilometers) predominantly basaltic and andesitic volcanic centers of the Rio Grande rift; it records the late-stage, volcano-tectonic evolution of the SW part of the Espanola Basin. The CdRVF reflects both regional proclivity toward Pliocene basaltic volcanism following protracted Neogene extensional tectonism and localized eruptive response to migration of basin- bounding faults. Approximately 180 cubic kilometers of flat lying to gently dipping basalt, andesite, and minor dacite lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of the CdRVF were erupted from more than 50 exposed vents between 2.8 Ma and 1.14 Ma. Subsurface interpretations of drill hole data and incised canyon exposures of the Rio Grande show that volcanic deposits are interbedded with Santa Fe Group sediments deposited in actively subsiding sub-basins of the southernmost Espanola Basin. Major basin-bounding faults in this area strike north to northwest, dip basinward, and have mostly dip-slip and subordinate strike-slip displacement. Although major basin-bounding faults were active prior to the onset of volcanism in the CdRVF, protracted extension resulted in a westward migration of graben-bounding faults. Phases of coeval volcanism at 2.8-2.6 Ma, 2.5-2.2 Ma, and 1.5-1.1 Ma, decreased in eruptive volume through time and are delineated on the basis of mapped stratigraphy, argon geochronology, paleomagnetic and aeromagnetic properties, and record a syntectonic westward migration of eruptive centers. The alignment of vent areas with mapped faults strongly suggests deep magmatic sources utilized local structures as conduits (i.e. faults and fractures developed in response to regional stress). However, some near-surface feeder dikes associated with eroded cinder cones record orientations that are not typically correlative with regional fault patterns suggesting near-surface conduits are

  3. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard...

  4. Petrologic imaging of silicic magma chambers: new calibration of Al-in-hornblende barometry and applications to the Long Valley - Mono - Inyo active volcanic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional Al-in-hornblende barometry relies on the hypothesis that the Al content in amphibole only depends on pressure, through the Tschermack substitution. However, Al content in amphibole also varies with temperature through the edenite substitution, resulting in large errors in amphibole barometry. Using literature data, we have recalibrated a temperature-independent barometer based on octahedral Al for amphiboles in rhyolitic and dacitic compositions (Médard et al., Goldschmidt 2013). Experimental pressures are reproduced with an average error of 36 MPa in the 100-400 MPa range. Our new amphibole barometer has been used to investigate the depth of magma storage underneath the recent eruptions of the Mono-Inyo volcanic chain. Preliminary investigation of samples from the Glass Creek and Obsidian flows, associated with the youngest eruptive activity to the South of the chain (the 1350 AD Inyo eruption), contain Al-rich amphiboles ( 10 wt% Al2O3) crystallized at pressures of 260 ± 20 MPa (9.8 ± 0.7 km) and a temperature of 835 °C. Similar amphibole crystals have been analyzed from products of the 1700 AD eruption on Pahoa island to the north of the chain by Bray (2014). Identical crystallization pressures of 260 ± 40 MPa are derived from their compositions, suggesting a constant pressure of magma storage under the entire Mono-Inyo volcanic chain. Highly crystalline mush samples from the Glass Creek dome have been interpreted as remobilized magma from the older Long Valley magma chamber. Low-Al amphiboles ( 7 wt% Al2O3) from a mush sample also crystallized at 260 ± 20 MPa and a temperature of 705 °C. The storage depth has thus been constant in the entire Long Valley - Mono - Inyo system over time. A storage depth of 9.8 ± 0.7 km is in excellent agreement with recent seismic work by Seccia et al. (2011) who used Vs to infer the presence of a highly molten (30-60 % melt) magmatic reservoir 7-11 km beneath the Long Valley caldera. Traditional Al

  5. Towards understanding the puzzling lack of acid geothermal springs in Tibet (China): Insight from a comparison with Yellowstone (USA) and some active volcanic hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghai; Kirk Nordstrom, D.; Blaine McCleskey, R.

    2014-11-01

    Explanations for the lack of acid geothermal springs in Tibet are inferred from a comprehensive hydrochemical comparison of Tibetan geothermal waters with those discharged from Yellowstone (USA) and two active volcanic areas, Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia) and Miravalles (Costa Rica) where acid springs are widely distributed and diversified in terms of geochemical characteristic and origin. For the hydrothermal areas investigated in this study, there appears to be a relationship between the depths of magma chambers and the occurrence of acid, chloride-rich springs formed via direct magmatic fluid absorption. Nevado del Ruiz and Miravalles with magma at or very close to the surface (less than 1-2 km) exhibit very acidic waters containing HCl and H2SO4. In contrast, the Tibetan hydrothermal systems, represented by Yangbajain, usually have fairly deep-seated magma chambers so that the released acid fluids are much more likely to be fully neutralized during transport to the surface. The absence of steam-heated acid waters in Tibet, however, may be primarily due to the lack of a confining layer (like young impermeable lavas at Yellowstone) to separate geothermal steam from underlying neutral chloride waters and the possible scenario that the deep geothermal fluids below Tibet carry less H2S than those below Yellowstone.

  6. Volcanic air pollution hazards in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jeff

    2017-04-20

    Noxious sulfur dioxide gas and other air pollutants emitted from Kīlauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i react with oxygen, atmospheric moisture, and sunlight to produce volcanic smog (vog) and acid rain. Vog can negatively affect human health and agriculture, and acid rain can contaminate household water supplies by leaching metals from building and plumbing materials in rooftop rainwater-catchment systems. U.S. Geological Survey scientists, along with health professionals and local government officials are working together to better understand volcanic air pollution and to enhance public awareness of this hazard.

  7. The relationship between carbonate facies, volcanic rocks and plant remains in a late Palaeozoic lacustrine system (San Ignacio Fm, Frontal Cordillera, San Juan province, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, P.; Méndez-Bedia, I.; Gallastegui, G.; Colombo, F.; Cardó, R.; Limarino, O.; Heredia, N.; Césari, S. N.

    2013-07-01

    The San Ignacio Fm, a late Palaeozoic foreland basin succession that crops out in the Frontal Cordillera (Argentinean Andes), contains lacustrine microbial carbonates and volcanic rocks. Modification by extensive pedogenic processes contributed to the massive aspect of the calcareous beds. Most of the volcanic deposits in the San Ignacio Fm consist of pyroclastic rocks and resedimented volcaniclastic deposits. Less frequent lava flows produced during effusive eruptions led to the generation of tabular layers of fine-grained, greenish or grey andesites, trachytes and dacites. Pyroclastic flow deposits correspond mainly to welded ignimbrites made up of former glassy pyroclasts devitrified to microcrystalline groundmass, scarce crystals of euhedral plagioclase, quartz and K-feldspar, opaque minerals, aggregates of fine-grained phyllosilicates and fiammes defining a bedding-parallel foliation generated by welding or diagenetic compaction. Widespread silicified and silica-permineralized plant remains and carbonate mud clasts are found, usually embedded within the ignimbrites. The carbonate sequences are underlain and overlain by volcanic rocks. The carbonate sequence bottoms are mostly gradational, while their tops are usually sharp. The lower part of the carbonate sequences is made up of mud which appear progressively, filling interstices in the top of the underlying volcanic rocks. They gradually become more abundant until they form the whole of the rock fabric. Carbonate on volcanic sandstones and pyroclastic deposits occur, with the nucleation of micritic carbonate and associated production of pyrite. Cyanobacteria, which formed the locus of mineral precipitation, were related with this nucleation. The growth of some of the algal mounds was halted by the progressive accumulation of volcanic ash particles, but in most cases the upper boundary is sharp and suddenly truncated by pyroclastic flows or volcanic avalanches. These pyroclastic flows partially destroyed the

  8. Developing International Guidelines on Volcanic Hazard Assessments for Nuclear Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Worldwide, tremendous progress has been made in recent decades in forecasting volcanic events, such as episodes of volcanic unrest, eruptions, and the potential impacts of eruptions. Generally these forecasts are divided into two categories. Short-term forecasts are prepared in response to unrest at volcanoes, rely on geophysical monitoring and related observations, and have the goal of forecasting events on timescales of hours to weeks to provide time for evacuation of people, shutdown of facilities, and implementation of related safety measures. Long-term forecasts are prepared to better understand the potential impacts of volcanism in the future and to plan for potential volcanic activity. Long-term forecasts are particularly useful to better understand and communicate the potential consequences of volcanic events for populated areas around volcanoes and for siting critical infrastructure, such as nuclear facilities. Recent work by an international team, through the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency, has focused on developing guidelines for long-term volcanic hazard assessments. These guidelines have now been implemented for hazard assessment for nuclear facilities in nations including Indonesia, the Philippines, Armenia, Chile, and the United States. One any time scale, all volcanic hazard assessments rely on a geologically reasonable conceptual model of volcanism. Such conceptual models are usually built upon years or decades of geological studies of specific volcanic systems, analogous systems, and development of a process-level understanding of volcanic activity. Conceptual models are used to bound potential rates of volcanic activity, potential magnitudes of eruptions, and to understand temporal and spatial trends in volcanic activity. It is these conceptual models that provide essential justification for assumptions made in statistical model development and the application of numerical models to generate quantitative forecasts. It is a

  9. Exploring Hawaiian Volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-02-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai`i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO's founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists' understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  10. Exploring Hawaiian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Okubo, Paul G.; Hon, Ken

    2013-01-01

    In 1912 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Thomas A. Jaggar Jr. on the island of Hawaii. Driven by the devastation he observed while investigating the volcanic disasters of 1902 at Montagne Pelée in the Caribbean, Jaggar conducted a worldwide search and decided that Hawai‘i provided an excellent natural laboratory for systematic study of earthquake and volcano processes toward better understanding of seismic and volcanic hazards. In the 100 years since HVO’s founding, surveillance and investigation of Hawaiian volcanoes have spurred advances in volcano and seismic monitoring techniques, extended scientists’ understanding of eruptive activity and processes, and contributed to development of global theories about hot spots and mantle plumes.

  11. Anatomy of a deep crustal volcanic conduit system; The Reinfjord Ultramafic Complex, Seiland Igneous Province, Northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Thomas B.; Larsen, Rune B.; Anker-Rasch, Lars; Grannes, Kim Rune; Iljina, Markku; McEnroe, Suzanne; Nikolaisen, Even; Schanche, Mona; Øen, Endre

    2016-05-01

    The Reinfjord Ultramafic Complex, Seiland Igneous Province represents a lower crustal magma chamber (25-30 km depth) that likely records a deep conduit system for mantle derived melts ascending through the continental crust. It consists of cumulates of dunite, wehrlite, olivine clinopyroxene as well as subordinate lherzolite and websterites, intruded into gabbro-norite and metasediment gneisses. Field, petrographic and geochemical data show that the intrusion developed through fractional crystallization and interactions between new batches of magma and partially solidified cumulates. This resulted in a 'reverse fractionation sequence' whereby cumulates became progressively more MgO and olivine rich with time. Contamination by partial melting of the gabbro-norite is evident in the marginal zones, but is limited in the central parts of the intrusion. Interrupted crystallization sequences of olivine → olivine + clinopyroxene and the absence of significant amounts of more evolved melts, suggests that large volumes of melt passed through the system to shallower levels in the crust leaving behind the cumulate sequences observed at Reinfjord. Therefore, the Reinfjord Ultramafic Complex represents a deep crustal conduit system, through which mantle derived melts passed. The parent melts are likely to have formed from partial melting of mantle with residual garnet and clinopyroxene.

  12. Record of Volcanism Since 7000 B.C. from the GISP2 Greenland Ice Core and Implications for the Volcano-Climate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, G A; Mayewski, P A; Meeker, L D; Whitlow, S; Twickler, M S; Morrison, M; Meese, D A; Gow, A J; Alley, R B

    1994-05-13

    Sulfate concentrations from continuous biyearly sampling of the GISP2 Greenland ice core provide a record of potential climate-forcing volcanism since 7000 B.C. Although 85 percent of the events recorded over the last 2000 years were matched to documented volcanic eruptions, only about 30 percent of the events from 1 to 7000 B.C. were matched to such events. Several historic eruptions may have been greater sulfur producers than previously thought. There are three times as many events from 5000 to 7000 B.C. as over the last two millennia with sulfate deposition equal to or up to five times that of the largest known historical eruptions. This increased volcanism in the early Holocene may have contributed to climatic cooling.

  13. Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: Outstanding Research Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions inject sulfur gases into the stratosphere, which convert to sulfate aerosols with an e-folding residence time of about one year. The radiative and chemical effects of this aerosol cloud produce responses in the climate system. Based on observations after major eruptions of the past and experiments with numerical models of the climate system, we understand much about their climatic impact, but there are also a number of unanswered questions. Volcanic eruptions produce global cooling, and are an important natural cause of interannual, interdecadal, and even centennial-scale climate change. One of the most interesting volcanic effects is the "winter warming" of Northern Hemisphere continents following major tropical eruptions. During the winter in the Northern Hemisphere following every large tropical eruption of the past century, surface air temperatures over North America, Europe, and East Asia were warmer than normal, while they were colder over Greenland and the Middle East. This pattern and the coincident atmospheric circulation correspond to the positive phase of the Arctic Oscillation. While this response is observed after recent major eruptions, most state-of-the-art climate models have trouble simulating winter warming. Why? High latitude eruptions in the Northern Hemisphere, while also producing global cooling, do not have the same impact on atmospheric dynamics. Both tropical and high latitude eruptions can weaken the Indian and African summer monsoon, and the effects can be seen in past records of flow in the Nile and Niger Rivers. Since the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the Philippines in 1991, there have been no large eruptions that affected climate, but the cumulative effects of small eruptions over the past decade have had a small effect on global temperature trends. Some important outstanding research questions include: How much seasonal, annual, and decadal predictability is possible following a large volcanic eruption? Do

  14. Monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Scollo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the results of a project ongoing at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV. The objective is to develop and implement a system for monitoring and forecasting volcanic plumes of Etna. Monitoring is based at present by multispectral infrared measurements from the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager on board the Meteosat Second Generation geosynchronous satellite, visual and thermal cameras, and three radar disdrometers able to detect ash dispersal and fallout. Forecasting is performed by using automatic procedures for: i downloading weather forecast data from meteorological mesoscale models; ii running models of tephra dispersal, iii plotting hazard maps of volcanic ash dispersal and deposition for certain scenarios and, iv publishing the results on a web-site dedicated to the Italian Civil Protection. Simulations are based on eruptive scenarios obtained by analysing field data collected after the end of recent Etna eruptions. Forecasting is, hence, supported by plume observations carried out by the monitoring system. The system was tested on some explosive events occurred during 2006 and 2007 successfully. The potentiality use of monitoring and forecasting Etna volcanic plumes, in a way to prevent threats to aviation from volcanic ash, is finally discussed.

  15. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of a restless caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, A.; Gottsmann, J.; Whitaker, F.; Rust, A.; Currenti, G.; Jasim, A.; Bunney, S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground deformation and gravity changes in restless calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide). Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling), which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains.Informed by constraints available for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy), a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value) of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas). Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of unrest

  16. Numerical models for ground deformation and gravity changes during volcanic unrest: simulating the hydrothermal system dynamics of an active caldera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ground deformation and gravity changes in active calderas during periods of unrest can signal an impending eruption and thus must be correctly interpreted for hazard evaluation. It is critical to differentiate variation of geophysical observables related to volume and pressure changes induced by magma migration from shallow hydrothermal activity associated with hot fluids of magmatic origin rising from depth. In this paper we present a numerical model to evaluate the thermo-poroelastic response of the hydrothermal system in a caldera setting by simulating pore pressure and thermal expansion associated with deep injection of hot fluids (water and carbon dioxide. Hydrothermal fluid circulation is simulated using TOUGH2, a multicomponent multiphase simulator of fluid flows in porous media. Changes in pore pressure and temperature are then evaluated and fed into a thermo-poroelastic model (one-way coupling, which is based on a finite-difference numerical method designed for axi-symmetric problems in unbounded domains. Based on data for the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy, a series of simulations assess the influence of fluid injection rates and mechanical properties on the hydrothermal system, uplift and gravity. Heterogeneities in hydrological and mechanical properties associated with the presence of ring faults are a key determinant of the fluid flow pattern and consequently the geophysical observables. Peaks (in absolute value of uplift and gravity change profiles computed at the ground surface are located close to injection points (namely at the centre of the model and fault areas. Temporal evolution of the ground deformation indicates that the contribution of thermal effects to the total uplift is almost negligible with respect to the pore pressure contribution during the first years of the unrest, but increases in time and becomes dominant after a long period of the simulation. After a transient increase over the first years of unrest, gravity

  17. Litter production, soil organic matter dynamics and microbial activity in two coeval forest stands on Mount Vesuvius

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marco, Anna; Esposito, Fabrizio; Giordano, Maria; Vittozzi, Paola; Virzo de Santo, Amalia

    2010-05-01

    Forest ecosystems in different climatic zones may accumulate different amounts of soil organic matter (SOM) with different chemical-physical properties. C inputs to SOM are related to net primary production, however C accumulation in the soil largely depends on the balance between net primary production and decomposition. On the other side rates of SOM decomposition are the major control over the supply of mineral nutrients to vegetation and thus over primary production. This study was performed in two coeval (36 years old), adjacent forest stands, a Corsican pine (Pinus nigra Arn.) and a Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) forest (Atrio del Cavallo, 40° 49'N, 14° 26'E; 810 a.s.l.). The two forests were implanted in 1970 on piroclastic material of the last eruption of Mount Vesuvius (1944). We assessed the quantity and the quality of SOM in a vertical gradient in the continuum of the litter layer, humus layer and mineral soil for the whole soil profile. Moreover we estimated litter production and decomposition, litter and mineral soil (0-5cm) respiration as well as microbial biomass and total and active fungal biomass. Litter fall (measured throughout the years 2006-2008) was higher in the Corsican pine than in the Black locust stand (5234 vs. 2396 g/m2/y). Black locust leaf litter and Corsican pine needle litter reached respectively 60 % and 50% of initial mass after 600 days in situ decomposition. Consistently with the lower litter input and the higher decomposition of black locust, the amount of organic C in the organic soil layers (litter + humus), was significantly higher in the Corsican pine as compared to the Black locust stand (2702 vs. 1636 g/m2). In contrast, in the mineral layers (0-15 cm) the amount of soil organic C was slightly higher in Black locust than in Corsican pine stand (136 vs. 116 g/m2). Litter quality, decomposition dynamics, and SOM quality and activity may help to understand the reason for the uneven distribution of organic carbon

  18. Aurorae and Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Thermal-IR Observations of Jupiter and Io with ISAAC at the VLT Summary Impressive thermal-infrared images have been obtained of the giant planet Jupiter during tests of a new detector in the ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). . They show in particular the full extent of the northern auroral ring and part of the southern aurora. A volcanic eruption was also imaged on Io , the very active inner Jovian moon. Although these observations are of an experimental nature, they demonstrate a great potential for regular monitoring of the Jovian magnetosphere by ground-based telescopes together with space-based facilities. They also provide the added benefit of direct comparison with the terrestrial magnetosphere. PR Photo 21a/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (L-band: 3.5-4.0 µm) . PR Photo 21b/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 4.07 µm) . PR Photo 21c/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.28 µm) . PR Photo 21d/01 : ISAAC image of Jupiter (Narrow-band 3.21 µm) . PR Photo 21e/01 : ISAAC image of the Jovian aurorae (false-colour). PR Photo 21f/01 : ISAAC image of volcanic activity on Io . Addendum : The Jovian aurorae and polar haze. Aladdin Meets Jupiter Thermal-infrared images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io have been obtained during a series of system tests with the new Aladdin detector in the Infrared Spectrometer And Array Camera (ISAAC) , in combination with an upgrade of the ESO-developed detector control electronics IRACE. This state-of-the-art instrument is attached to the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory. The observations were made on November 14, 2000, through various filters that isolate selected wavebands in the thermal-infrared spectral region [1]. They include a broad-band L-filter (wavelength interval 3.5 - 4.0 µm) as well as several narrow-band filters (3.21, 3.28 and 4.07 µm). The filters allow to record the light from different components of the Jovian atmosphere

  19. The excitation and characteristic frequency of the long-period volcanic event: An approach based on an inhomogeneous autoregressive model of a linear dynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, M.; Kumagai, H.; Kumazawa, M.; Yamaoka, K.; Chouet, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method to quantify the source excitation function and characteristic frequencies of long-period volcanic events. The method is based on an inhomogeneous autoregressive (AR) model of a linear dynamic system, in which the excitation is assumed to be a time-localized function applied at the beginning of the event. The tail of an exponentially decaying harmonic waveform is used to determine the characteristic complex frequencies of the event by the Sompi method. The excitation function is then derived by operating an AR filter constructed from the characteristic frequencies to the entire seismogram of the event, including the inhomogeneous part of the signal. We apply this method to three long-period events at Kusatsu-Shirane Volcano, central Japan, whose waveforms display simple decaying monochromatic oscillations except for the beginning of the events. We recover time-localized excitation functions lasting roughly 1 s at the start of each event and find that the estimated functions are very similar to each other at all the stations of the seismic network for each event. The phases of the characteristic oscillations referred to the estimated excitation function fall within a narrow range for almost all the stations. These results strongly suggest that the excitation and mode of oscillation are both dominated by volumetric change components. Each excitation function starts with a pronounced dilatation consistent with a sudden deflation of the volumetric source which may be interpreted in terms of a choked-flow transport mechanism. The frequency and Q of the characteristic oscillation both display a temporal evolution from event to event. Assuming a crack filled with bubbly water as seismic source for these events, we apply the Van Wijngaarden-Papanicolaou model to estimate the acoustic properties of the bubbly liquid and find that the observed changes in the frequencies and Q are consistently explained by a temporal change in the radii of the bubbles

  20. Thermal mapping: the hydrothermal system of a volcano used to map faults and palaeostructures within stratified ground. The Yasur-Yenkahe volcanic complex (Vanuatu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Douillet, Guilhem; Peltier, Aline; Finizola, Anthony; Brothelande, Elodie; Garaebiti, Esline

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements provide a valuable tool to map hydrothermal-fluid release zones in activevolcanic areas. On explosive volcanoes, where ash fall layers deposit parallel to the ground surface, hydrothermal fluids are trapped in the stratification due to the variations in permeability in deposits of the different explosive phases. Thermal fluids thus travel parallel to the surface close to the ground. This horizontal flux can only escape when faults break the seals of stratification. On the Yasur-Yenkahe volcanic complex (Tanna Island, Vanuatu archipelago), fumaroles andhot springs abound, signs of upraising heat fluxes associated to a well-developed hydrothermal activity. Combinationof high resolution mapping of ground thermal anomalies with geomorphological analysis allows thecharacterization of the structural relationships between the active Yasur volcano and the Yenkahe resurgent dome. A complex system of heat release and hydrothermal fluid circulation below the Yasur-Yenkahe complex isevidenced. Circulation, though propagating vertically as a whole, is funneled by stratification. Thus, the main thermal fluid release is almost exclusively concentrated along structural limits that break the seals inducedby the stratified nature of the ground. Three types of medium/high temperature anomalies have beenevidenced: (1) broad hydrothermalized areas linked with planar stratification that favor lateral spreading,(2) linear segments that represent active faults, and (3) arcuate segments related to paleo-crater rims. Thelimit between the Yasur volcano and the Yenkahe resurgent dome is characterized by an active fault systemaccommodating both the rapid uplift of the Yenkahe block and the overloading induced by the volcanoweight. In such a setting, faults converge below the cone of Yasur, which acts as a focus for the faults. Evidenceof such structures, sometimes hidden in the landscape but detected by thermal measurements, iscritical for risk assessment of

  1. Real Time Volcanic Cloud Products and Predictions for Aviation Alerts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Habib, Shahid; da Silva, Arlindo; Hughes, Eric; Yang, Kai; Brentzel, Kelvin; Seftor, Colin; Li, Jason Y.; Schneider, David; Guffanti, Marianne; Hoffman, Robert L.; Myers, Tim; Tamminen, Johanna; Hassinen, Seppo

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can inject significant amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and volcanic ash into the atmosphere, posing a substantial risk to aviation safety. Ingesting near-real time and Direct Readout satellite volcanic cloud data is vital for improving reliability of volcanic ash forecasts and mitigating the effects of volcanic eruptions on aviation and the economy. NASA volcanic products from the Ozone Monitoring Insrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite have been incorporated into Decision Support Systems of many operational agencies. With the Aura mission approaching its 10th anniversary, there is an urgent need to replace OMI data with those from the next generation operational NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar Partnership (SNPP) satellite. The data provided from these instruments are being incorporated into forecasting models to provide quantitative ash forecasts for air traffic management. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the volcanic near-real time and Direct Readout data products from the new Ozone Monitoring and Profiling Suite (OMPS) ultraviolet sensor onboard SNPP for monitoring and forecasting volcanic clouds. The transition of NASA data production to our operational partners is outlined. Satellite observations are used to constrain volcanic cloud simulations and improve estimates of eruption parameters, resulting in more accurate forecasts. This is demonstrated for the 2012 eruption of Copahue. Volcanic eruptions are modeled using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) and the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol and Radiation Transport (GOCART) model. A hindcast of the disruptive eruption from Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull is used to estimate aviation re-routing costs using Metron Aviation's ATM Tools.

  2. Pre-eruptive volatile and erupted gas phase characterization of the 2014 basalt of Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Baptiste; Moune, Séverine; Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean; Gouhier, Mathieu

    2015-04-01

    The 2014 Holuhraun eruption on the Bárðarbunga Volcanic System is the largest fissure eruption in Iceland since the 1783 Laki eruption. The eruption started end of August 2014 and has been characterized by large emission of SO2 into the atmosphere. It provides a rare opportunity to study in details magmatic and degassing processes during a large-volume fissure eruption. In order to characterize the pre-eruptive magmatic composition and to assess the plume chemistry at the eruption site, lava and tephra were sampled together with the eruption plume. The basalt composition is olivine tholeiite with MgO close to 7 wt%. It is phenocryst-poor with plagioclase as the dominant mineral phase but olivine and clinopyroxene are also present together with sulphide globules composed principally of pyrite and chalcopyrite. The volatile (S, Cl and F) and major element concentrations were measured by the electron microprobe in melt inclusions (MIs) trapped in plagioclase and clinopyroxene and groundmass glass. The MIs composition ranges from fairly primitive basaltic compositions (MgO: 9.03 wt%) down to evolved qz-tholeiites (MgO: 5.57 wt%), with estimated pre-eruptive S concentrations of 1500 ppm. Tephra groundmass glass contains 400 ppm S, whereas Cl and F concentrations are respectively slightly lower and indistinguishable from those in the MIs. This implies limited exsolution of halogens but 75% of the initial sulphur content. Relatively to their total iron content, MIs are sulphur saturated, and their oxygen fugacity close to the FMQ buffer. The difference between the estimated initial volatile concentrations measured in the MIs and in the tephra groundmass (i.e. the so-called petrological method) yields 7.2 Mt SO2, limited HCl and no HF atmospheric mass loading from the Holuhraun 2014 eruption. The SO2/HCl molar ratio of the gas phase, calculated from the MIs, is 13 and 14, respectively, using average and estimated pre-eruptive S and Cl concentrations in the MIs. Filter

  3. Volcanic Ash Nephelometer Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes may enable unprecedented observations of...

  4. Oroclinal Bending and Slab-Break-Off Causing Coeval East-West Extension and East-West Contraction in the Pamir-Nanga Parbat Syntaxis in the Past 10 m.y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, A.; Robinson, A.; Manning, C. E.

    2001-12-01

    Active deformation of the Pamir-Nanga Parbat syntaxis system is dominated by east-west contraction in the south and east-west extension in the north on map view and a narrow zone of deep earthquakes up to 200 km beneath central Pamir and the Hindu Kush region on cross-sectional view. The deep seismicity shows a prominent gap between 15 and 70 km. E-W contractional tectonics is exemplified by the development of the north-trending Nanga Parbat synform and north-striking thrusts, while E-W extension is expressed by the Karakul rift in the north-central Pamirs of Tajikistan and the Kongur Shan normal fault in the eastern Pamir of China. Recent geochronologic and structural studies by several research groups show that east-west contraction in the Nanga Parbat region initiated at about 10 Ma, associated with extensive crustal melting. Our own investigations along the Kongur Shan normal fault indicate that extension across this system initiated between 10 and 8 Ma, coeval with the initiation of the Nanga Parbat contractional structure. The concentration of extensional and contractional strain along the north-south axis of the Pamir arc and location of extension in the outer arc and contraction in the inner arc of the ayntaxis system lead us to suggest that the coeval extension and contraction are controlled by oroclinal bending of the Pamir arc caused by torque exerted by the left-slip Cheman fault during the northward indentation of India. However, this explanation raises the question of why coeval extension and contraction occurred so late in the past 10 m.y. while the Indo-Asian collision and northward indentation of the Pamir promontory started at least 60 m.y. ago. One possible explanation is that the aseismic gap in the northern Pamir and Hindu Kush region represents a zone of ductile deformation along which a subducted oceanic (?) slab of either the Indian or Asian (Tadjik) plate was detached into the mantle. This slab break-off event may have occurred as a

  5. Researches of Fractal Features of Radial River System in the Changbaishan Volcanic Area%长白山火山区放射状水系分形特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽红; 刘永顺; 彭年; 聂保锋

    2011-01-01

    The values of fractal dimension of river system reflect their degree of development and complexity of river channel. On the basis of remote sensing data, fractal geometry and image analysis software, the values of boxcounting fractal dimension for the radial river system of Changbaishan volcanic area are calculated,and carried out statistical calculations in EXCEL. The region can be subdivided into four distinct areas characterized by different geomorpholo-gic features and their values of fractal dimension also can be obtained respectively. The results show that the maximum value D= 1. 425 of fractal dimension of river system in the Changbai-shan volcanic area appears in the west part of volcanic area while the minimum D = 1. 212 in the eastern part. The differences of fraetal dimension values of the four distinct areas show the erosive degree of the fluvial landform, but in the whole, the degree of development is still in the primary stage. The contributing factors of fluvial landform are related with volcanic topography,volcanic activities and their forming fracture, mass movement and rock of underlying surface,among which the fracture is main.%水系分维反映了水系的发育程度,体现了河道的复杂程度.以TM遥感数据和分形几何理论为基础,应用图像分析软件ENVI对长白山火山区水系进行了盒维数计算,经统计分析得到了该区四个子区域水系及整个区域水系的分维数.结果表明:长白山火山区水系分维数西部最大D=1.425,东部最小D=1.212;四个分区分维数的差异直接反映了其流域地貌侵蚀发育的程度,但从整体上来看仍处于河流地貌发育的初级阶段.流域地貌的发育状态与火山地形、火山活动及其形成的断裂构造、块体运动以及下覆地面岩性有关,其中断裂构造是最主要的.

  6. Geology of the Ivanhoe Hg-Au district, northern Nevada: Influence of Miocene volcanism, lakes, and active faulting on epithermal mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The mercury-gold deposits of the Ivanhoe mining district in northern Nevada formed when middle Miocene rhyolitic volcanism and high-angle faulting disrupted a shallow lacustrine environment. Sinter and replacement mercury deposits formed at and near the paleosurface, and disseminated gold deposits and high-grade gold-silver veins formed beneath the hot spring deposits. The lacustrine environment provided abundant meteoric water; the rhyolites heated the water; and the faults, flow units, and lakebeds provided fluid pathways for the hydrothermal fluids. A shallow lake began to develop in the Ivanhoe area about 16.5 Ma. The lake progressively expanded and covered the entire area with fine-grained lacustrine sediments. Lacustrine sedimentation continued to at least 14.4 Ma, and periodic fluctuations in the size and extent of the lake may have been responses to both climate and nearby volcanism. The eruption of rhyolite and andesite flows and domes periodically disrupted the lacustrine environment and produced interfingered flows and lake sediments. The major pulse of rhyolitic volcanism took place between 15.16 ± 0.05 and 14.92 ± 0.05 Ma. High-angle faulting began in the basement about 15.2 Ma, penetrated to and disrupted the paleosurface after 15.10 ± 0.06 Ma, and largely ceased by 14.92 ± 0.05 Ma. Ground motion related to both faulting and volcanism created debris flows and soft-sediment deformation in the lakebeds. Mercury-gold mineralization was coeval with rhyolite volcanism and high-angle faulting, and it took place about 15.2 to 14.9 Ma. At and near the paleosurface, hydrothermal fluids migrated through tuffaceous sediments above relatively impermeable volcanic and Paleozoic units, creating chalcedonic, cinnabar-bearing replacement bodies and sinters. Disseminated gold was deposited in sedimentary and volcanic rocks beneath the mercury deposits, although the hydrologic path between the two ore types is unclear. Higher-grade gold-silver deposits formed in

  7. Melting of a subduction-modified mantle source: A case study from the Archean Marda Volcanic Complex, central Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P. A.; Kirkland, C. L.

    2014-03-01

    Subduction processes on early earth are controversial, with some suggestions that tectonics did not operate until the earth cooled to a sufficient point around the Archean-Proterozoic boundary. One way of addressing this issue is to examine well-preserved successions of Archean supracrustal rocks. Here we discuss petrography, whole-rock chemical and isotopic data combined with zircon Hf isotopes from andesites, high-magnesium andesites (HMA), dacites, high-magnesium dacites (HMD), rhyolites and coeval felsic intrusive rocks of the c. 2730 Ma Marda Volcanic Complex (MVC) in the central Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia. We demonstrate that these rocks result from melting of a metasomatized mantle source, followed by fractional crystallization in a crustal magma chamber. Contamination of komatiite by Archean crust, to produce the Marda Volcanic Complex andesites, is not feasible, as most of these crustal sources are too radiogenic to act as viable contaminants. The ɛNd(2730) of MVC andesites can be produced by mixing 10% Narryer semi-pelite with komatiite, consistent with modelling using Hf isotopes, but to achieve the required trace element concentrations, the mixture needs to be melted by about 25%. The most likely scenario is the modification of a mantle wedge above a subducting plate, coeval with partial melting, producing volcanic rocks with subduction signatures and variable Mg, Cr and Ni contents. Subsequent fractionation of cognate phases can account for the chemistry of dacites and rhyolites.

  8. Organic Entrainment and Preservation in Volcanic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Ojha, Lujendra; Brunner, Anna E.; Dufek, Josef D.; Wray, James Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Unaltered pyroclastic deposits have previously been deemed to have "low" potential for the formation, concentration and preservation of organic material on the Martian surface. Yet volcanic glasses that have solidified very quickly after an eruption may be good candidates for containment and preservation of refractory organic material that existed in a biologic system pre-eruption due to their impermeability and ability to attenuate UV radiation. Analysis using NanoSIMS of volcanic glass could then be performed to both deduce carbon isotope ratios that indicate biologic origin and confirm entrainment during eruption. Terrestrial contamination is one of the biggest barriers to definitive Martian organic identification in soil and rock samples. While there is a greater potential to concentrate organics in sedimentary strata, volcanic glasses may better encapsulate and preserve organics over long time scales, and are widespread on Mars. If volcanic glass from many sites on Earth could be shown to contain biologically derived organics from the original environment, there could be significant implications for the search for biomarkers in ancient Martian environments.

  9. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  10. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  11. Apparent Non-Coevality among the Stars in Upper Scorpio: Resolving the Problem using a Model of Magnetic Inhibition of Convection

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, James

    2016-01-01

    Two eclipsing binaries in the USco association have recently yielded precise values of masses and radii for 4 low-mass members of the association. Standard evolution models would require these dM4.5-dM5 stars to have ages which are younger than the ages of more massive stars in the association by factors which appear (in extreme cases) to be as large as ~3. Are the stars in the association therefore non-coeval? We suggest that the answer is No: by incorporating the effects of magnetic inhibition of convective onset, we show that the stars in U Sco can be restored to coevality provided that the 4 low-mass member stars have surface fields in the range 200-500 G. Fields of such magnitude have already been measured on the surface of certain solar-type stars in young clusters: if such fields could be measured in low-mass U Sco stars, they might help to discriminate between different approaches which have been suggested for modeling magneto-convection.

  12. Age and duration of intra-oceanic arc volcanism built on a suprasubduction zone type oceanic crust in southern Neotethys, SE Anatolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Karaoğlan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The southeastern Anatolia comprises numbers of tectono-magmatic/stratigraphic units such as the metamorphic massifs, the ophiolites, the volcanic arc units and the granitoid rocks. All of them play important role for the late Cretaceous evolution of the southern Neotethys. The spatial and temporal relations of these units suggest the progressive development of coeval magmatism and thrusting during the late Cretaceous northward subduction/accretion. Our new U-Pb zircon data from the rhyolitic rocks of the wide-spread volcanic arc unit show ages of (83.1 ± 2.2–(74.6 ± 4.4 Ma. Comparison of the ophiolites, the volcanic arc units and the granitoids suggest following late Cretaceous geological evolution. The ophiolites formed in a suprasubduction zone (SSZ setting as a result of northward intra-oceanic subduction. A wide-spread island-arc tholeiitic volcanic unit developed on the top of the SSZ-type crust during 83–75 Ma. Related to regional plate convergence, northward under-thrusting of SSZ-type ophiolites and volcanic arc units was initiated beneath the Tauride platform (Malatya-Keban and followed by the intrusion of I-type calc-alkaline volcanic arc granitoids during 84–82 Ma. New U-Pb ages from the arc-related volcanic-sedimentary unit and granitoids indicate that under-thrusting of ophiolites together with the arc-related units beneath the Malatya-Keban platform took place soon after the initiation of the volcanic arc on the top of the SSZ-type crust. Then the arc-related volcanic-sedimentary unit continued its development and lasted at ∼75 Ma until the deposition of the late Campanian–Maastrichtian shallow marine limestone. The subduction trench eventually collided with the Bitlis-Pütürge massif giving rise to HP-LT metamorphism of the Bitlis massif. Although the development of the volcanic arc units and the granitoids were coeval at the initial stage of the subduction/accretion both tectono-magmatic units were

  13. Episodes of volcanic activity and their environmental effects in the Okinawa Trough during the last 150 ka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A piston core Z14-6 was used in this study. The core, 896 cm long, was collected from eastern slope of the Okinawa Trough (27°07′N, 127°27′E, water depth 739m). The δ18O and δ13C values of the sediment bearing planktonic foraminifera G. sacculifer and N. dutertrei were determined; and the abundance of volcanic glass was analyzed. The volcanic glass content high occurred in early stage of polar ice-sheet growth period, or the beginning of cold climate periods corresponding to Milankovitch cycles (Peak Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅴ are corresponding to the beginnings of oxygen isotopic stages 2, 4 and 6, and Peak Ⅲ and Ⅳ are matching oxygen isotopic stage 5b-5d.). It might be possible that volcanic episodes and climate changes were responding to orbital forcing in the Okinawa Trough in late Quaternary. The δ18O difference between N. dutertrei and G. sacculifer shows no clear correlation to the volcanic glass content high, which suggests that the volcanic eruptions did not influence the structure of upper water column. However, the low δ13C difference between G. sacculifer and N. dutertrei is coeval with the volcanic glass high or sub-high content. This fact suggests that volcanic eruptions might influence the reduction in vertical nutritional gradient and carbon cycle process in upper water column. A possible mechanism is that huge quantity of ash and dust had weakened the light intensity, resulting in photosynthesis reduction, productivity decrease, and biological pumping.

  14. Friction in volcanic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic landscapes are amongst the most dynamic on Earth and, as such, are particularly susceptible to failure and frictional processes. In rocks, damage accumulation is frequently accompanied by the release of seismic energy, which has been shown to accelerate in the approach to failure on both a field and laboratory scale. The point at which failure occurs is highly dependent upon strain-rate, which also dictates the slip-zone properties that pertain beyond failure, in scenarios such as sector collapse and pyroclastic flows as well as the ascent of viscous magma. High-velocity rotary shear (HVR) experiments have provided new opportunities to overcome the grand challenge of understanding faulting processes during volcanic phenomena. Work on granular ash material demonstrates that at ambient temperatures, ash gouge behaves according to Byerlee's rule at low slip velocities, but is slip-weakening, becoming increasingly lubricating as slip ensues. In absence of ash along a slip plane, rock-rock friction induces cataclasis and heating which, if sufficient, may induce melting (producing pseudotachylyte) and importantly, vesiculation. The viscosity of the melt, so generated, controls the subsequent lubrication or resistance to slip along the fault plane thanks to non-Newtonian suspension rheology. The shear-thinning behaviour and viscoelasticity of frictional melts yield a tendency for extremely unstable slip, and occurrence of frictional melt fragmentation. This velocity-dependence acts as an important feedback mechanism on the slip plane, in addition to the bulk composition, mineralogy and glass content of the magma, that all influence frictional behaviour. During sector collapse events and in pyroclastic density currents it is the frictional properties of the rocks and ash that, in-part, control the run-out distance and associated risk. In addition, friction plays an important role in the eruption of viscous magmas: In the conduit, the rheology of magma is integral

  15. Volcanic lake systematics II. Chemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, J.C.; Pasternack, G.B.; Rowe, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    A database of 373 lake water analyses from the published literature was compiled and used to explore the geochemical systematics of volcanic lakes. Binary correlations and principal component analysis indicate strong internal coherence among most chemical parameters. Compositional variations are influenced by the flux of magmatic volatiles and/or deep hydrothermal fluids. The chemistry of the fluid entering a lake may be dominated by a high-temperature volcanic gas component or by a lower-temperature fluid that has interacted extensively with volcanic rocks. Precipitation of minerals like gypsum and silica can strongly affect the concentrations of Ca and Si in some lakes. A much less concentrated geothermal input fluid provides the mineralized components of some more dilute lakes. Temporal variations in dilution and evaporation rates ultimately control absolute concentrations of dissolved constituents, but not conservative element ratios. Most volcanic lake waters, and presumably their deep hydrothermal fluid inputs, classify as immature acid fluids that have not equilibrated with common secondary silicates such as clays or zeolites. Many such fluids may have equilibrated with secondary minerals earlier in their history but were re-acidified by mixing with fresh volcanic fluids. We use the concept of 'degree of neutralization' as a new parameter to characterize these acid fluids. This leads to a classification of gas-dominated versus rock-dominated lake waters. A further classification is based on a cluster analysis and a hydrothermal speedometer concept which uses the degree of silica equilibration of a fluid during cooling and dilution to evaluate the rate of fluid equilibration in volcano-hydrothermal systems.

  16. The ice-core record of volcanism: Status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigl, Michael; McConnell, Joseph R.; Chellman, Nathan; Ludlow, Francis; Curran, Mark; Plunkett, Gill; Büntgen, Ulf; Toohey, Matthew; Burke, Andrea; Grieman, Mackenzie

    2016-04-01

    Radiative forcing resulting from stratospheric aerosols produced by major volcanic eruptions is a dominant driver of climate variability in the Earth's past. Accurate knowledge of the climate anomalies resulting from volcanic eruptions provides important information for understanding the global and regional responses of the Earth system to external forcing agents. Based on a unique compilation of newly obtained, high-resolution, ice-core measurements, as well as palaeo-climatic evidence inferred from existing tree-ring records and historical documentary sources, we revised the dating of ice-core based reconstructions of past volcanic eruptions and confirmed the dominant role of explosive volcanism on short-term summer temperature variability throughout the past 2,500 years. Continuous weekly surface snow measurements obtained from Summit, Greenland (2005-2014) further allow placing volcanic sulphate emissions arising from a series of moderate volcanic eruptions during the last decade into a multi-millennial context. While these updated ice core records provide a more accurate constraint on the timing and magnitude of volcanic eruptions, there is also new data emerging on the geographic locations of past eruptions, atmospheric transport of volcanic fallout and climatic consequences (e.g. sea-ice; hydro-climate) from studying volcanic deposits (e.g. extent of volcanic ash deposition), proxy data and historical records. On the basis of selected case studies we will discuss the role volcanic eruptions have played in the Earth's climate system during the past and identify potential additional constraints provided by ice cores.

  17. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  18. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  19. The Role of Volcanic Activity in Climate and Global Change

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2015-09-23

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are magnificent events that in many ways affect the Earth\\'s natural processes and climate. They cause sporadic perturbations of the planet\\'s energy balance, activating complex climate feedbacks and providing unique opportunities to better quantify those processes. We know that explosive eruptions cause cooling in the atmosphere for a few years, but we have just recently realized that volcanic signals can be seen in the subsurface ocean for decades. The volcanic forcing of the previous two centuries offsets the ocean heat uptake and diminishes global warming by about 30%. The explosive volcanism of the twenty-first century is unlikely to either cause any significant climate signal or to delay the pace of global warming. The recent interest in dynamic, microphysical, chemical, and climate impacts of volcanic eruptions is also excited by the fact that these impacts provide a natural analogue for climate geoengineering schemes involving deliberate development of an artificial aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere to counteract global warming. In this chapter we aim to discuss these recently discovered volcanic effects and specifically pay attention to how we can learn about the hidden Earth-system mechanisms activated by explosive volcanic eruptions. To demonstrate these effects we use our own model results when possible along with available observations, as well as review closely related recent publications.

  20. Volcanic edifice weakening via decarbonation: A self-limiting process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Silvio; Heap, Michael J.; Iezzi, Gianluca; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-08-01

    The inherent instability of volcanic edifices, and their resultant propensity for catastrophic collapse, is a constant source of volcanic risk. Structural instability of volcanic edifices may be amplified by the presence of carbonate rocks in the sub-volcanic strata, due to the debilitating response of carbonates to thermally-induced alteration. Nonetheless, decarbonation reactions (the primary weakening mechanism), may stall when the system becomes buffered by rising levels of a reaction product, carbon dioxide. Such thermodynamic stalling might be inferred to serve to circumvent the weakness of volcanic structures. However, the present study shows that, even when decarbonation is halted, rock physical properties continue to degrade due to thermal microcracking. Furthermore, as a result, the pathways for the escape of carbon dioxide are numerous within a volcanic edifice. Therefore, in the case of an edifice with a sub-volcanic sedimentary basement, the generation of carbon dioxide via decarbonation is unlikely to hinder its impact on instability, and thus potentially devastating flank collapse.

  1. Lunar Pyroclastic Eruptions: Basin Volcanism's Dying Gasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Nahm, A.; McGovern, P. J.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    spatially isolated volcanic units, both confined within the central peak ring. One is a thin mare deposit to the north, and to the south is a 8.5 km long pyroclastic vent. The basin also a series of fractures, which exhibit complex cross-cutting relationships with each other and the basin floor materials, thereby offering clues about the timing of their formation. Some of these fractures widen as they cut across the uplifted peak ring, indicating that they are the surface manifestations of deep faulting and are younger. An orthogonal system of fractures in the southern basin floor outside of the peak ring is of particular interest because of its possible relationship to Schrodinger's basin volcanism. We are exploring the hypothesis that an expanding magma chamber once resided in this location, uplifted the basin floor, and formed these orthogonal fractures. Post-inflation, the reservoir was emptied via a propagating dike and sill complex that eventually surfaced at the location of the pyroclastic vent. [1] Saal et al. (2008) Nature; [2] Hauri et al. (2011) Science; [3] Saal et al. (2011) NASA Lunar Sci. Inst. Forum; [4] Delano (1986) JGR; [5] Head (1976) Rev. Geophys. Space Phys.; [6] McGovern & Litherland (2011) LPSC 42;McGovern et al. (2011) AGU Fall Session

  2. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  3. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    The extensive Quaternary volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Mendoza, Argentina, is investigated in this study by major and trace element analyses, Sr, Nd, Hf and Pb-isotopic analyses and Zr-Hf isotope dilution data on samples from almost the entire province. The samples are mainly...... in basalts from all the studied volcanic fields in Payenia is signs of lower crustal contamination indicating assimilation of, in some cases, large amounts of trace element depleted, mafic, plagioclase-bearing rocks. The northern Payenia is dominated by backarc basalts erupted between late Pliocene to late...

  4. Noise-induced variability of volcanic extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Bashkirtseva, I. A.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by important physical applications, we study a non-linear dynamics of volcanic extrusions on the basis of a simple pressure-mass flow model. We demonstrate that the deterministic phase portrait represents either the bulbous-type curves or closed paths stretched to their left depending on the initial conditions. The period of phase trajectories therewith increases when the pressure drop between the conduit top and bottom compensates the lava column pressure in it. Stochastic forcing changes the system dynamics drastically. We show that a repetitive scenario of volcanic behaviour with intermittency of stochastic oscillations of different extrusion amplitudes and frequencies appears in the presence of noises. As this takes place, the mean values of interspike intervals characterizing the system periodicity have a tendency to grow with increasing the noise intensity. The probability distribution functions confirming this dynamic behaviour are constructed.

  5. On the plumbing system of volcanic complexes: field constraints from the Isle of Skye (UK) and FEM elasto-plastic modelling including gravity and tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, A.; Pisterna, R.; Romano, V.; Rust, D.; Tibaldi, A.

    2009-04-01

    The plumbing system that connects a sub-volcanic magma reservoir to the surface has been the object of field characterization and mechanical modelling efforts since the pioneering work by Anderson (1936), who produced a detailed account of the spectacular Cullin Cone-sheet Complex (Isle of Skye, UK) and a geometrical and mechanical model aimed at defining the depth to the magma chamber. Since this work, the definition of the stress state in the half space comprised between the magma reservoir and the surface (modelled either as a flat surface or a surface comprising a volcanic edifice) was considered the key point in reconstructing dike propagation paths from the magma chamber. In fact, this process is generally seen as the propagation in an elastic media of purely tensional joints (mode I or opening mode propagation), which follow trajectories perpendicular to the least compressive principal stress axis. Later works generally used different continuum mechanics methodologies (analytic, BEM, FEM) to solve the problem of a pressure source (the magma chamber, either a point source or a finite volume) in an elastic (in some cases heterogeneous) half space (bounded by a flat topography or topped by a "volcano"). All these models (with a few limited exceptions) disregard the effect of the regional stress field, which is caused by tectonic boundary forces and gravitational body load, and consider only the pressure source represented by the magma chamber (review in Gudmundsson, 2006). However, this is only a (sometimes subordinate) component of the total stress field. Grosfils (2007) first introduced the gravitational load (but not tectonic stresses) in an elastic model solved with FEM in a 2D axisymmetric half-space, showing that "failure to incorporate gravitational loading correctly" affect the calculated stress pattern and many of the predictions that can be drawn from the models. In this contribution we report on modelling results that include: 2D axisymmetric or true

  6. Calculation of multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid- liquid systems: calculation methods, thermochemical data, and applications to studies of high-temperature volcanic gases with examples from Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, R.B.; Reed, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents the numerical formulations, thermochemical data base, and possible applications of computer programs, SOLVGAS and GASWORKS, for calculating multicomponent chemical equilibria in gas-solid-liquid systems. SOLVGAS and GASWORKS compute simultaneous equilibria by solving simultaneously a set of mass balance and mass action equations written for all gas species and for all gas-solid or gas-liquid equilibria. Examples of gas-evaporation-from-magma and precipitation-with-cooling calculations for volcanic gases collected from Mount St. Helens are shown. -from Authors

  7. Long term volcanic hazard analysis in the Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, L.; Galindo, I.; Laín, L.; Llorente, M.; Mancebo, M. J.

    2009-04-01

    Historic volcanism in Spain is restricted to the Canary Islands, a volcanic archipelago formed by seven volcanic islands. Several historic eruptions have been registered in the last five hundred years. However, and despite the huge amount of citizens and tourist in the archipelago, only a few volcanic hazard studies have been carried out. These studies are mainly focused in the developing of hazard maps in Lanzarote and Tenerife islands, especially for land use planning. The main handicap for these studies in the Canary Islands is the lack of well reported historical eruptions, but also the lack of data such as geochronological, geochemical or structural. In recent years, the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and the improvement in the volcanic processes modelling has provided an important tool for volcanic hazard assessment. Although this sophisticated programs are really useful they need to be fed by a huge amount of data that sometimes, such in the case of the Canary Islands, are not available. For this reason, the Spanish Geological Survey (IGME) is developing a complete geo-referenced database for long term volcanic analysis in the Canary Islands. The Canarian Volcanic Hazard Database (HADA) is based on a GIS helping to organize and manage volcanic information efficiently. HADA includes the following groups of information: (1) 1:25.000 scale geologic maps, (2) 1:25.000 topographic maps, (3) geochronologic data, (4) geochemical data, (5) structural information, (6) climatic data. Data must pass a quality control before they are included in the database. New data are easily integrated in the database. With the HADA database the IGME has started a systematic organization of the existing data. In the near future, the IGME will generate new information to be included in HADA, such as volcanological maps of the islands, structural information, geochronological data and other information to assess long term volcanic hazard analysis. HADA will permit

  8. California's Vulnerability to Volcanic Hazards: What's at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Wood, N. J.; Dinitz, L.

    2015-12-01

    California is a leader in comprehensive planning for devastating earthquakes, landslides, floods, and tsunamis. Far less attention, however, has focused on the potentially devastating impact of volcanic eruptions, despite the fact that they occur in the State about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have occurred in the past 1,000 years—most recently in northern California (Lassen Peak 1914 to 1917)—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The likelihood of renewed volcanism in California is about one in a few hundred to one in a few thousand annually. Eight young volcanoes, ranked as Moderate to Very High Threat [1] are dispersed throughout the State. Partially molten rock (magma) resides beneath at least seven of these—Medicine Lake Volcano, Mount Shasta, Lassen Volcanic Center, Clear Lake Volcanic Field, Long Valley Volcanic Region, Coso Volcanic Field, and Salton Buttes— causing earthquakes, toxic gas emissions, hydrothermal activity, and (or) ground deformation. Understanding the hazards and identifying what is at risk are the first steps in building community resilience to volcanic disasters. This study, prepared in collaboration with the State of California Governor's Office of Emergency Management and the California Geological Survey, provides a broad perspective on the State's exposure to volcano hazards by integrating mapped volcano hazard zones with geospatial data on at-risk populations, infrastructure, and resources. The study reveals that ~ 16 million acres fall within California's volcano hazard zones, along with ~ 190 thousand permanent and 22 million transitory populations. Additionally, far-field disruption to key water delivery systems, agriculture, utilities, and air traffic is likely. Further site- and sector-specific analyses will lead to improved hazard mitigation efforts and more effective disaster response and recovery. [1] "Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities

  9. Basaltic ignimbrites in monogenetic volcanism: the example of La Garrotxa volcanic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, J.; Planagumà, L. l.; Geyer, A.; Aguirre-Díaz, G.; Pedrazzi, D.; Bolós, X.

    2017-05-01

    Ignimbrites are pyroclastic density current deposits common in explosive volcanism involving intermediate and silicic magmas and in less abundance in eruptions of basaltic central and shield volcanoes. However, they are not widely described in association with monogenetic volcanism, where typical products include lava flows, scoria and lapilli fall deposits, as well as various kinds of pyroclastic density current deposits and explosion breccias. In La Garrotxa basaltic monogenetic volcanic field, part of the Neogene-Quaternary European rift system located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, we have identified a particular group of pyroclastic density current deposits that show similar textural characteristics to silicic ignimbrites, indicating an overlap in transport and depositional processes. These deposits can be clearly distinguished from other pyroclastic density current deposits generated during phreatomagmatic phases that typically correspond to thinly laminated units with planar-to-cross-bedded stratification. The monogenetic ignimbrite deposits correspond to a few meters to several tens of meters thick units rich in lithic- and lapilli scoria fragments, with an abundant ash matrix, and internally massive structure, emplaced along valleys and gullies, with run-out distances up to 6 km and individual volumes ranging from 106 to 1.5 × 107 m3. The presence of flattened scoria and columnar jointing in some of these deposits suggests relatively high emplacement temperatures, coinciding with available paleomagnetic data that suggests an emplacement temperature around 450-500 °C. In this work, we describe the main characteristics of these pyroclastic deposits that were generated by a number of phreatomagmatic episodes. Comparison with similar deposits from silicic eruptions and previous examples of ignimbrites associated with basaltic volcanism allows us to classify them as `basaltic ignimbrites'. The recognition in monogenetic volcanism of such

  10. 40Ar-39Ar Age Constraints on Volcanism and Tectonism in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Volcanic sills and dikes inferred from seismic reflection profiles and geophysical studies of the Ross Sea are thought to be related to the rift basins in the region, and their emplacement to be coeval with extension. However, lack of precise geochronology in the Terror Rift of the Ross Sea region has left these inferred relationships poorly constrained and has hindered neotectonic studies, because of the large temporal gaps between seismic reflectors of known ages. New 40Ar/39Ar geochronology presented here for submarine volcanic rocks provides better age constraints for neotectonic interpretations within the Terror Rift. Several samples from seamounts yielded young ages between 156 ± 21 and 122 ± 26 Ka. These ages support interpretations that extension within the Terror Rift was active at least through the Pleistocene. Three evenly spaced samples from the lowermost 100 m of Franklin Island range in age from 3.28 ± 0.04 to 3.73 ± 0.05 Ma. These age determinations demonstrate that construction of a small volcanic edifice such as Franklin Island took at least several hundred thousand years, and therefore that much larger ones in the Erebus Volcanic Province are likely to have taken considerably longer than previously inferred. This warrants caution in applying a limited number of age determinations to define the absolute ages of events in the Ross Sea region

  11. Submarine Volcanic Morphology of Santorini Caldera, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Croff Bell, K.; Carey, S.; Bejelou, K.; Parks, M.; Antoniou, V.

    2012-04-01

    Santorini volcanic group form the central part of the modern Aegean volcanic arc, developed within the Hellenic arc and trench system, because of the ongoing subduction of the African plate beneath the European margin throughout Cenozoic. It comprises three distinct volcanic structures occurring along a NE-SW direction: Christianna form the southwestern part of the group, Santorini occupies the middle part and Koloumbo volcanic rift zone extends towards the northeastern part. The geology of the Santorini volcano has been described by a large number of researchers with petrological as well as geochronological data. The offshore area of the Santorini volcanic field has only recently been investigated with emphasis mainly inside the Santorini caldera and the submarine volcano of Kolumbo. In September 2011, cruise NA-014 on the E/V Nautilus carried out new surveys on the submarine volcanism of the study area, investigating the seafloor morphology with high-definition video imaging. Submarine hydrothermal vents were found on the seafloor of the northern basin of the Santorini caldera with no evidence of high temperature fluid discharges or massive sulphide formations, but only low temperature seeps characterized by meter-high mounds of bacteria-rich sediment. This vent field is located in line with the normal fault system of the Kolumbo rift, and also near the margin of a shallow intrusion that occurs within the sediments of the North Basin. Push cores have been collected and they will provide insights for their geochemical characteristics and their relationship to the active vents of the Kolumbo underwater volcano. Similar vent mounds occur in the South Basin, at shallow depths around the islets of Nea and Palaia Kameni. ROV exploration at the northern slopes of Nea Kameni revealed a fascinating underwater landscape of lava flows, lava spines and fractured lava blocks that have been formed as a result of 1707-1711 and 1925-1928 AD eruptions. A hummocky topography at

  12. Io. [theories concerning volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. V.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A report on the continuing investigation of Io is presented. Gravitational resonance is discussed as the cause of Io's volcanism, and the volcanic activity is explained in terms of sulfur chemistry. Theories concerning the reasons for the two main types of volcanic eruptions on Io are advanced and correlated with geographical features of the satellite. The sulfur and silicate models of the calderas are presented, citing the strengths and weaknesses of each. Problems of the gravitational resonance theory of Io's heat source are then described. Finally, observations of Io planned for the Galileo mission are summarized.

  13. Fluid evolution in a volcanic-hosted epithermal carbonate-base metal-gold vein system: Alto de la Blenda, Farallón Negro, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Zavalía, M. Florencia; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Alto de la Blenda is a ˜6.6-Ma intermediate-sulphidation epithermal vein system in the Farallón Negro Volcanic Complex, which also hosts the 7.1-Ma porphyry-Cu-Au deposit of Bajo de la Alumbrera. The epithermal vein system is characterised by a large extent and continuity (2 km × 400 m open to depth × 6 m maximum width) and an average gold grade of ˜8 g/t. The vein is best developed within an intrusion of a fine-grained equigranular monzonite, interpreted as the central conduit of a stratovolcano whose extrusive activity ended prior to porphyry-Cu-Au emplacement at Bajo de la Alumbrera, which is in turn cut by minor epithermal veins. The Alto de la Blenda vein consists predominantly of variably Mn-rich carbonates and quartz, with a few percent of pyrite, sphalerite, galena and other sulphide and sulphosalt minerals. Four phases of vein opening, hydrothermal mineralisation and repeated brecciation can be correlated between different vein segments. Stages 2 and 3 contain the greatest fraction of sulphide and gold. They are separated by the emplacement of a polymictic breccia containing clasts of quartz feldspar porphyry as well as basement rocks. Fluid inclusions in quartz related to stages 2 to 4 are liquid rich with 2-4 wt% NaCl(eq). They homogenise between 160 and 300 °C, with very consistent values within each assemblage. Vapour inclusions are practically absent in the epithermal vein. Quartz fragments in the polymictic breccia contain inclusions of intermediate to vapour-like density and similar low salinity (˜3 wt% NaCl(eq)), besides rare brine inclusions containing halite. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of epithermal inclusions indicate high concentrations of K, Fe, As, Sb, Cs, and Pb that significantly vary within and through subsequent vein stages. Careful consideration of detection limits for individual inclusions shows high gold concentrations of ˜0.5 to 3 ppm dissolved in the ore fluid, which

  14. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    supply managers include: monitoring turbidity levels in raw water intakes, and if necessary increasing chlorination to compensate for higher turbidity; managing water demand; and communicating monitoring results with the public to allay fears of contamination. Ash can cause major damage to wastewater disposal systems. Ash deposited onto impervious surfaces such as roads and car parks is very easily washed into storm drains, where it can form intractable masses and lead to long-term flooding problems. It can also enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), both through sewer lines and by direct fallout. Damage to modern WWTPs can run into millions of dollars. Ash falls reduce visibility creating hazards for ground transportation. Dry ash is also readily remobilised by vehicle traffic and wind, and dry and wet ash deposits will reduce traction on paved surfaces, including airport runways. Ash cleanup from road and airports is commonly necessary, but the large volumes make it logistically challenging. Vehicles are vulnerable to ash; it will clog filters and brake systems and abrade moving parts within engines. Lastly, modern telecommunications networks appear to be relatively resilient to volcanic ash fall. Signal attenuation and interference during ash falls has not been reported in eruptions over the past 20 years, with the exception of interference from ash plume-generated lightning. However, some telecommunications equipment is vulnerable to airborne ash, in particular heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems which may become blocked from ash ingestion leading to overheating. This summary of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure provides insight into the relative vulnerability of infrastructure under a range of different ashfall scenarios. Identifying and quantifying these impacts is an essential step in building resilience within these critical systems. We have attempted to consider interdependencies between sectors in a holistic way using

  15. Cluster Analysis of vents in monogenetic volcanic fields, Lunar Crater Volcanic Field (Nevada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, A.; Cortes, J. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Johnson, P. J.; Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L.

    2012-12-01

    Monogenetic volcanic fields pose a serious risk to human activities and settlements due to their high occurrence around the world and because of the type of eruptive activity that they exhibit. The need of adequate tools to better undertake volcanic hazard assessment for volcanic fields, especially from a spatial point of view, is of key importance at the time of mitigate such hazard. Among these tools, a better understanding of the spatial distribution of cones and vents and any structural/tectonical relationship are essential to understand the plumbing system of the field and thus help to predict the likelihood location of future eruptions. In this study we have developed a spatial methodology, which is the combination of various methodologies developed for volcanic textures and other clustering goals [1,2], to study the clustering of volcanic vents and their relation with structural features from satellite images. The methodology first involves the statistical identification and removal of spatial outliers using a predictive elliptical area [2] and the generation of randomly distributed points in the same predictive area. A comparison of the Near Neighbor Distance (NND) between the generated data and the data measured in a volcanic field is used to determine whether the vents are clustered or not. If the vents are clustered, a combination of hierarchical clustering and K-means [3] is then used to identify the clusters and their related vents. Results are then further constrained with the study of lineaments and other structural features that can be affected and related with the clusters. The methodology was tested in the Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada (USA) and successfully has helped to identify tectonically controlled lineaments from those that are resultant of geomorphological processes such the drainage control imposed by the cone clusters. Theoretical approaches has been developed before to constrain the plumbing of a volcanic field [4], however these

  16. Learning to recognize volcanic non-eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    An important goal of volcanology is to answer the questions of when, where, and how a volcano will erupt—in other words, eruption prediction. Generally, eruption predictions are based on insights from monitoring data combined with the history of the volcano. An outstanding example is the A.D. 1980–1986 lava dome growth at Mount St. Helens, Washington (United States). Recognition of a consistent pattern of precursors revealed by geophysical, geological, and geochemical monitoring enabled successful predictions of more than 12 dome-building episodes (Swanson et al., 1983). At volcanic systems that are more complex or poorly understood, probabilistic forecasts can be useful (e.g., Newhall and Hoblitt, 2002; Marzocchi and Woo, 2009). In such cases, the probabilities of different types of volcanic events are quantified, using historical accounts and geological studies of a volcano's past activity, supplemented by information from similar volcanoes elsewhere, combined with contemporary monitoring information.

  17. Volcanic Debris Flows in the Elysium Region of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, E. H.; Ryan, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Photogeologic studies of the Elysium volcanic province appear to provide a specific example of the importance of volcanic-ice interaction to produce the channels of Hrad and Granicus Valles. In addition, these studies shows that the channels lie on the surface of a large sedimentary deposit which is interpreted as an accumulation of volcanic debris flows or lahars. In spite of some similarities with Martian outflow channels, this latter difference may distinguish the Elysium channels from other types of Martian channels. Geologic relations are described which demonstrate that the debris flows formed amidst other volcanic activity in the Elysium region thereby suggesting that the magmatism was important to the generation of the mobilizing liquid. The lahars resulted from the melting of ground ice and liquefaction of subsurface materials. The intersection of this fluid reservoir with the regional fracture system lead to the rapid expulsion of a muddy slurry down the steep western slope of the province.

  18. Geologic Model of a Non-Volcanic Hydrothermal System: San Bartolome de Los Banos, Guanajuato, Mexico; Modelo geologico de un sistema hidrotermal no volcanico: San Bartolome de Los Banos, Guanajuato, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Hernandez, Aida [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, Morelia (Mexico)

    1996-01-01

    The San Bartolome de Los Banos area is associated with a steeped hydraulic interconnected basins system, limited by regional Pliocene faults. The depressions are filled by sedimentary and volcanic products. The thermal manifestations, with temperatures over 90 degrees celsius, are associated to the main faults. The thermal anomaly is not related to recent volcanic activity, probably it is due to deep circulating water, moved by the hydraulic regional gradient. The thermal springs are discharges from the hydraulic system produced when the fluids are forced to flow up owing to hydraulic constrictions, that set up forced convection phenomena. [Espanol] La zona hidrotermal de San Bartolome de Los Banos esta formada por un sistema de cuencas escalonadas e interconectadas hidrologicamente, limitadas por fallas regionales originadas durante el Plioceno. Las estructuras afectaron a una secuencia de rocas volcanicas cuyas edades oscilan entre el Terciario Inferior y el Plioceno. Las depresiones estan rellenas por sedimentos y productos volcanicos. Existen manifestaciones termales asociadas a las zonas de debilidad, generadas por las fallas principales; las temperaturas superficiales son superiores a los 90 grados celsius. El termalismo en esta zona no esta asociado con actividad volcanica reciente, en apariencia se debe a la circulacion profunda de los fluidos, movidos por el gradiente hidraulico regional. Las manifestaciones termales corresponden a las zonas de descarga del sistema y se originan porque los fluidos son forzados a ascender al encontrar constricciones, produciendose una conveccion forzada.

  19. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  20. Los volcanes y los hombres

    OpenAIRE

    García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Desde las entrañas de la tierra, los volcanes han creado la atmósfera, el agua de los océanos, y esculpido los relieves del planeta: son, pues, los zahoríes de la vida. Existen volcanes que los hombres explotan o cultivan, y otros sobre los cuales se han construido observatorios en los que se llevan a cabo avanzadas investigaciones científicas.

  1. Volcanic hazards and aviation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; Thompson, Theodore B.; Ewert, John W.; ,

    1996-01-01

    An aeronautical chart was developed to determine the relative proximity of volcanoes or ash clouds to the airports and flight corridors that may be affected by volcanic debris. The map aims to inform and increase awareness about the close spatial relationship between volcanoes and aviation operations. It shows the locations of the active volcanoes together with selected aeronautical navigation aids and great-circle routes. The map mitigates the threat that volcanic hazards pose to aircraft and improves aviation safety.

  2. Scaling properties of planetary calderas and terrestrial volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sanchez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Volcanism plays an important role in transporting internal heat of planetary bodies to their surface. Therefore, volcanoes are a manifestation of the planet's past and present internal dynamics. Volcanic eruptions as well as caldera forming processes are the direct manifestation of complex interactions between the rising magma and the surrounding host rock in the crust of terrestrial planetary bodies. Attempts have been made to compare volcanic landforms throughout the solar system. Different stochastic models have been proposed to describe the temporal sequences of eruptions on individual or groups of volcanoes. However, comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for volcano formation and eruption and more specifically caldera formation remains elusive. In this work, we propose a scaling law to quantify the distribution of caldera sizes on Earth, Mars, Venus, and Io, as well as the distribution of calderas on Earth depending on their surrounding crustal properties. We also apply the same scaling analysis to the distribution of interevent times between eruptions for volcanoes that have the largest eruptive history as well as groups of volcanoes on Earth. We find that when rescaled with their respective sample averages, the distributions considered show a similar functional form. This result implies that similar processes are responsible for caldera formation throughout the solar system and for different crustal settings on Earth. This result emphasizes the importance of comparative planetology to understand planetary volcanism. Similarly, the processes responsible for volcanic eruptions are independent of the type of volcanism or geographical location.

  3. Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham J. Weir

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A conceptual model of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ is developed, to a depth of 25 km, formed from three constant density layers. The upper layer is formed from eruption products. A constant rate of eruption is assumed, which eventually implies a constant rate of extension, and a constant rate of volumetric creation in the middle and bottom layers. Tectonic extension creates volume which can accomodate magmatic intrusions. Spreading models assume this volume is distributed throughout the whole region, perhaps in vertical dykes, whereas rifting models assume the upper crust is thinned and the volume created lies under this upper crust. Bounds on the heat flow from such magmatic intrusions are calculated. Heat flow calculations are performed and some examples are provided which match the present total heat output from the TVZ of about 4200 MW, but these either have extension rates greater than the low values of about 8 ± 4 mm/a being reported from GPS measurements, or else consider extension rates in the TVZ to have varied over time.

  4. Efusiones subácueas del arco volcánico ordovícico en el norte del sistema de Famatina Subaqueous eruptions in the Ordovician volcanic arc in the northern Famatina System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Eugenia Cisterna

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La sucesión volcánica - sedimentaria analizada, ubicada entre los 27°47`00" - 27°49`18" S y 68°04`52" - 68°02`27" O en la sierra de Las Planchadas, norte del Sistema de Famatina, registra la evolución de un arco volcánico ordovícico. Sus representantes volcánicos mayoritarios, lavas basálticas y en menor medida dacíticas, fragmentadas, autoclásticas e hialoclastitas indican el predominio de un volcanismo efusivo subácueo. Mientras tanto el elevado volumen de depósitos volcaniclásticos asociados, especialmente en los tramos superiores, generados por flujos gravitacionales en masa, ya sea por corrientes de turbidez, como por flujos de detritos y vinculados con episodios de sedimentación sin-volcánicos, evidencian la eficiencia de los procesos de fragmentación y de la erosión recurrente durante la evolución de esta cuenca ordovícica. El contenido fosilífero en las facies volcanogénicas y las asociaciones de limolitas, fangolitas y psamitas finas con abundante material de origen piroclástico y lapilli acrecional, atestiguan en favor de un ambiente somero para su depositación. Las características de los depósitos volcanogénicos, su proveniencia prácticamente única, la variación de sus facies, junto a las características geoquímicas de sus representantes magmáticos apoyan la idea para la región de un volcanismo de arco ligado a la evolución de la cuenca, mientras tenía lugar un intermitente aporte de sedimentos intracuencales, debidos a la inestabilidad de la misma.The volcanic - sedimentary sequence studied, exposed along the 27°47`00" - 27°49`18" S and 68°04`52" - 68°02`27" Win the sierra de Las Planchadas, northern Famatina System, records the evolution of an Ordovician volcanic arc. The main volcanic members are basaltic and dacitic lavas and significant volumes of lava-derived clastic aggregates that are produced by quench fragmentation and gravitational collapse. Fragmented lavas, autobreccias and

  5. Amazonian volcanism inside Valles Marineris on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brož, Petr; Hauber, Ernst; Wray, James J.; Michael, Gregory

    2017-09-01

    The giant trough system of Valles Marineris is one of the most spectacular landforms on Mars, yet its origin is still unclear. Although often referred to as a rift, it also shows some characteristics that are indicative of collapse processes. For decades, one of the major open questions was whether volcanism was active inside the Valles Marineris. Here we present evidence for a volcanic field on the floor of the deepest trough of Valles Marineris, Coprates Chasma. More than 130 individual edifices resemble scoria and tuff cones, and are associated with units that are interpreted as lava flows. Crater counts indicate that the volcanic field was emplaced sometime between ∼0.4 Ga and ∼0.2 Ga. The spatial distribution of the cones displays a control by trough-parallel subsurface structures, suggesting magma ascent in feeder dikes along trough-bounding normal faults. Spectral data reveal an opaline-silica-rich unit associated with at least one of the cones, indicative of hydrothermal processes. Our results point to magma-water interaction, an environment of astrobiological interest, perhaps associated with late-stage activity in the evolution of Valles Marineris, and suggest that the floor of Coprates Chasma is promising target for the in situ exploration of Mars.

  6. Self-potential anomalies in some Italian volcanic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Silenziario

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of Self-Potential (SP space and time variations in volcanic areas may provide useful information on both the geometrical structure of the volcanic apparatuses and the dynamical behaviour of the feeding and uprising systems. In this paper, the results obtained on the islands of Vulcano (Eolian arc and Ponza (Pontine archipelago and on the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius complex are shown. On the island of Vulcano and on the Mt. Somma-Vesuvius apparatus areal SP surveys were performed with the aim of evidencing anomalies closely associated to the zones of major volcanic activity. On the island of Vulcano a profile across the fumaroles along the crater rim of the Fossa Cone was also carried out in order to have a direct relationship between fumarolic fracture migration and flow rate and SP anomaly space and time variations. The areal survey on the island of Ponza, which is considered an inactive area, is assumed as a reference test with which to compare the amplitude and pattern of the anomalies in the active areas. A tentative interpretation of the SP anomalies in volcanic areas is suggested in terms of electrokinetic phenomena, related to the movement of fluids of both volcanic and non-volcanic origin.

  7. Quaternary basaltic volcanism in the Payenia volcanic province, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søager, Nina

    primitive basalts and trachybasalts but also more evolved samples from the retroarc region and the larger volcanoes Payún Matrú and Payún Liso are presented. The samples cover a broad range of compositions from intraplate lavas similar to ocean island basalts to arc andesites. A common feature found...... Pleistocene times. These basalts mark the end of a period of shallow subduction of the Nazca slab beneath the Payenia province and volcanism in the Nevado volcanic field apparently followed the downwarping slab in a north-northwest direction ending in the Northern Segment. The northern Payenia basalts...... the literature. The Nevado basalts have been modelled by 4-10 % melting of a primitive mantle added 1-5 % upper continental crust. In the southern Payenia province, intraplate basalts dominate. The samples from the Payún Matrú and Río Colorado volcanic fields are apparently unaffected by the subducting slab...

  8. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  9. Climatic impact of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, Michael R.

    1991-01-01

    Studies have attempted to 'isolate' the volcanic signal in noisy temperature data. This assumes that it is possible to isolate a distinct volcanic signal in a record that may have a combination of forcings (ENSO, solar variability, random fluctuations, volcanism) that all interact. The key to discovering the greatest effects of volcanoes on short-term climate may be to concentrate on temperatures in regions where the effects of aerosol clouds may be amplified by perturbed atmospheric circulation patterns. This is especially true in subpolar and midlatitude areas affected by changes in the position of the polar front. Such climatic perturbation can be detected in proxy evidence such as decrease in tree-ring widths and frost rings, changes in the treeline, weather anomalies, severity of sea-ice in polar and subpolar regions, and poor grain yields and crop failures. In low latitudes, sudden temperature drops were correlated with the passage overhead of the volcanic dust cloud (Stothers, 1984). For some eruptions, such as Tambora, 1815, these kinds of proxy and anectdotal information were summarized in great detail in a number of papers and books (e.g., Post, 1978; Stothers, 1984; Stommel and Stommel, 1986; C. R. Harrington, in press). These studies lead to the general conclusion that regional effects on climate, sometimes quite severe, may be the major impact of large historical volcanic aerosol clouds.

  10. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  11. Syn-convergence extension in the southern Lhasa terrane: Evidence from late Cretaceous adakitic granodiorite and coeval gabbroic-dioritic dykes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuxuan; Xu, Zhiqin; Meert, Joseph G.

    2017-10-01

    Late Cretaceous (∼100-80 Ma) magmatism in the Gangdese magmatic belt plays a pivotal role in understanding the evolutionary history and tectonic regime of the southern Lhasa terrane. The geodynamic process for the formation of the early Late Cretaceous magmatism has long been an issue of hot debates. Here, petrology, geochronology and geochemistry of early Late Cretaceous granodiorite and coeval gabbroic-dioritic dykes in the Caina region, southern Lhasa, were investigated in an effort to ascertain their petrogenesis, age of intrusion, magma mixing and tectonic setting. Zircon U-Pb dating of granodiorite yields 206Pb/238U ages of 85.8 ± 1.7 and 86.4 ± 1.1 Ma, whilst that of the E-W trending dykes yields ages of 82.7 ± 2.6 and 83.5 ± 3.5 Ma. Within error, the crystallization ages of the dykes and the granodiorite are indistinguishable. Field observations and mineralogical microstructures are suggestive of a magma mixing process during the formation of the dykes and the granodiorite. The granodiorite exhibits geochemical features that are in agreement with those of subduction-related high-SiO2 adakites. The granodiorite and dykes have relatively constant εNd(t) values of +2.2 to +4.9 and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7045-0.7047). These similar characteristics are herein interpreted as an evolutionary series from the dykes to granodiorite, consistent with magma mixing process. Ti-in-zircon thermometer and Al-in-hornblende barometer indicate that the granodiorite and the dioritic dyke crystallized at temperatures of ca. 750 and 800 °C, depths of ca. 6-10 and 5-9 km, respectively. Taking into account the synchronous magmatic rocks in the Gangdese Belt and the coeval rifted basin within the Lhasa terrane, the granodiorite and dykes reveal an early Late Cretaceous syn-convergence extensional regime in the southern Lhasa terrane, triggered by slab rollback of the Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere.

  12. Volcanic eruptions and solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    The historical record of large volcanic eruptions from 1500 to 1980 is subjected to detailed time series analysis. In two weak but probably statistically significant periodicities of about 11 and 80 yr, the frequency of volcanic eruptions increases (decreases) slightly around the times of solar minimum (maximum). Time series analysis of the volcanogenic acidities in a deep ice core from Greenland reveals several very long periods ranging from about 80 to about 350 yr which are similar to the very slow solar cycles previously detected in auroral and C-14 records. Solar flares may cause changes in atmospheric circulation patterns that abruptly alter the earth's spin. The resulting jolt probably triggers small earthquakes which affect volcanism.

  13. Geochemical study for volcanic surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panichi, C.; La Ruffa, G. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, International Institute for Geothermal Research Ghezzano, PI (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    For years, geologists have been striving to reconstruct volcanic eruptions from the analysis of pyroclastic deposits and lava flows on the surface of the earth and in the oceans. This effort has produced valuable information on volcanic petrology and magma generation, separation, mixing, crystallisation, and interaction with water in phreatomagmatic and submarine eruptions. The volcanological process are tied to the dynamics of the earth's crust and lithosphere. The mantle, subducted oceanic crust, and continental crust contain different rock types and are sources of different magmas. Magmas consist primarily of completely or partially molten silicates containing volatile materials either dissolved in the melt or as bubbles of gas. The silicate and volatile portions affect the physical properties of magma and, therefore, the nature of a volcanic eruption.

  14. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  15. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  16. On a Possible Unified Scaling Law for Volcanic Eruption Durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavò, Flavio; Nunnari, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    Volcanoes constitute dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom. Their eruptions are the result of complex processes that involve interacting chemical-physical systems. At present, due to the complexity of involved phenomena and to the lack of precise measurements, both analytical and numerical models are unable to simultaneously include the main processes involved in eruptions thus making forecasts of volcanic dynamics rather unreliable. On the other hand, accurate forecasts of some eruption parameters, such as the duration, could be a key factor in natural hazard estimation and mitigation. Analyzing a large database with most of all the known volcanic eruptions, we have determined that the duration of eruptions seems to be described by a universal distribution which characterizes eruption duration dynamics. In particular, this paper presents a plausible global power-law distribution of durations of volcanic eruptions that holds worldwide for different volcanic environments. We also introduce a new, simple and realistic pipe model that can follow the same found empirical distribution. Since the proposed model belongs to the family of the self-organized systems it may support the hypothesis that simple mechanisms can lead naturally to the emergent complexity in volcanic behaviour.

  17. Morphotectonics of Kid drainage basin, Southeastern Sinai: A landscape evolution coeval to Gulf of Aqaba - Dead Sea rifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, Ahmed; Shawky, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    The Pleistocene fluvio-tectonic conditions have shaped the landscapes of Sinai Peninsula through development of small sedimentary traps following preexisting lineaments. In the Gulf of Aqaba region, orientation of these lineaments with respect to the Pleistocene stress field develops strike-slip simple and dip-slip pure extensional shear models that induced rifting of the Gulf of Aqaba - Dead Sea fault system. The Beida and Nabq grabens are two major rift-related depressions at the southwestern coast of the Gulf of Aqaba region. Both grabens are landscapes that received alluvial sediments of the Kid drainage basin (KDB), which is one of the largest drainage systems in the western region of the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp. The Beida graben is formed at a horse tail structure next to Abiad and Kid faults, while the Nabq graben is a pull-apart structure formed as onshore continuation of the Dakar deep. The geometry and origin of these landscapes are the intrinsic themes of this study to investigate the morphotectonic evolution of the KDB terrain within the tectonic framework of the Gulf of Aqaba - Dead Sea rift. The hanging terraces and canyons being at higher elevations on the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp; and the accumulation of younger alluvial fans, talus cones and bajada on its footslope indicate that the KDB landscape is basically shaped; and evolutionary modified by hinterland uplifting of the Gulf of Aqaba region. Hence, two morphotectonic evolution periods of the KDB terrain coincide with the early NE- and late NNE-trending extensional Pleistocene axes. The early period started with deposition of the older alluvial fan sediments that emerged at the outlet of KDB, and partially buried the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp. Subsequent hinterland uplifting revived the Gulf of Aqaba fault-scarp with development of hanging alluvial and bed-rock terraces; and the older alluvial fan sediments are uplifted on the footwall of southward-dipping normal faults whose hanging

  18. Contrasting mechanisms of magma fragmentation during coeval magmatic and hydromagmatic activity: the Hverfjall Fires fissure eruption, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A. C.; Höskuldsson, A.

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence for significant magmatic vesiculation prior to magma-water interaction (MWI) has brought into question the use of `diagnostic' features, such as low vesicularities and blocky morphologies, to identify hydromagmatic pyroclasts. We address this question by quantifying co-variations in particle size, shape and texture in both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits from the Hverfjall Fires fissure eruption, Iceland. Overlapping vesicularity and bubble number density distributions measured in rapidly quenched magmatic and hydromagmatic pyroclasts indicate a shared initial history of bubble nucleation and growth, with substantial vesiculation prior to MWI. Hydromagmatic fragmentation occurred principally by brittle mechanisms, where the length scale and geometry of fracturing was controlled by the bubble population. This suggests that the elevated fragmentation efficiency of hydromagmatic deposits is driven, at least in part, by brittle disintegration of vesicular pyroclasts due to high thermal stress generated during rapid cooling. In this way, the shape and size distributions of hydromagmatic pyroclasts, both critical input parameters for ash dispersion models, are strongly influenced by the dynamics of vesiculation prior to MWI. This result underlines the need to analyse multiple grain-size fractions to characterise the balance between magmatic and hydromagmatic processes. During the Hverfjall Fires eruption, the external water supply was sufficient to maintain MWI throughout the eruption, with no evidence for progressive exhaustion of a water reservoir. We suggest that both the longevity and the spatial distribution of MWI were determined by the pre-existing regional hydrology and represent continuous interaction between a propagating dike and a strong groundwater flow system hosted within permeable basalt lavas.

  19. 3.30 Ga high-silica intraplate volcanic-plutonic system of the Gavião Block, São Francisco Craton, Brazil: Evidence of an intracontinental rift following the creation of insulating continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zincone, Stefano A.; Oliveira, Elson P.; Laurent, Oscar; Zhang, Hong; Zhai, Mingguo

    2016-12-01

    High-silica rhyolites having U-Pb zircon ages of 3303 ± 11 Ma occur along the eastern border of the Gavião Block (Brazil) associated with the Contendas-Mirante and Mundo Novo supracrustal belts. Unlike many Archean greenstone sequences, they are not interlayered with mafic to intermediate units. Instead, they belong to an inter-related plutonic-volcanic system, together with granitic massifs having similar zircon crystallization ages of ca. 3293 ± 3 Ma and 3328 ± 3 Ma and plotting along the same geochemical trends as the rhyolites. The rhyolites show well-preserved primary volcanic features such as magma flow textures and euhedral phenocrysts. High emplacement temperatures are indicated by petrographic evidence (β-quartz phenocrysts), zircon saturation temperatures (915-820 °C) and geochemical data, especially high SiO2 (74-79 wt.%) together with elevated Fe2O3(T) ( 3 wt.%), MgO (0.5-1.5 wt.%) and low Al2O3 (extraction and eruption of highly silicic residual liquid formed by crystallization of granitic magma in a relatively shallow (< 10 km) reservoir, now represented by the granite massifs. The granite magma was formed by melting or differentiation of material similar to the diorite gneiss that occurs regionally. The 3.30 Ga volcanic-plutonic systems formed after a period of crustal growth and stabilization of a thick continental lithosphere, represented by massive 3.40-3.33 Ga TTG and medium to high-K calk-alkaline magmatism in the Gavião Block. The 3.30 Ga-old rhyolites and granites would therefore have formed in an intracontinental tectonic setting after the formation and stabilization of new continental crust, and accordingly would represent the first stages of rifting and continental break-up. Intraplate magmatism and intracrustal differentiation processes took place on Earth at 3.3 Ga and produced magmas that were distinct from Archean TTGs, questioning the reliability (or at least the uniqueness) of "intraplate models" to explain the origin of the

  20. Recurrence models of volcanic events: Applications to volcanic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Picard, R.; Valentine, G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Perry, F.V. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-03-01

    An assessment of the risk of future volcanism has been conducted for isolation of high-level radioactive waste at the potential Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada. Risk used in this context refers to a combined assessment of the probability and consequences of future volcanic activity. Past studies established bounds on the probability of magmatic disruption of a repository. These bounds were revised as additional data were gathered from site characterization studies. The probability of direct intersection of a potential repository located in an eight km{sup 2} area of Yucca Mountain by ascending basalt magma was bounded by the range of 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}10} yr{sup {minus}1 2}. The consequences of magmatic disruption of a repository were estimated in previous studies to be limited. The exact releases from such an event are dependent on the strike of an intruding basalt dike relative to the repository geometry, the timing of the basaltic event relative to the age of the radioactive waste and the mechanisms of release and dispersal of the waste radionuclides in the accessible environment. The combined low probability of repository disruption and the limited releases associated with this event established the basis for the judgement that the risk of future volcanism was relatively low. It was reasoned that that risk of future volcanism was not likely to result in disqualification of the potential Yucca Mountain site.

  1. Miocene core complex development and coeval supradetachment basin evolution of Paros, Greece, insights from (U-Th)/He thermochronometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargnesi, Evan A.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Mancktelow, Neil; Soukis, Konstantinos

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean region of Greece hosts a series of crustal-scale extensional detachment systems that have accommodated the southward retreating Hellenic subduction zone. Extension has overprinted and dissected the Alpine nappe pile and locally exhumed Cordilleran-type metamorphic core complexes. On the island of Paros, a low-angle extensional detachment fault separates metamorphic footwall rocks from an unmetamorphosed sedimentary succession of the hanging wall. Basement orthogneisses were extensionally sheared in the footwall of the detachment until after 16 Ma (zircon U-Pb age of a slightly deformed granite), but pervasive ductile deformation had ceased by 7 Ma (zircon U-Pb age of an undeformed rhyolite dike that intrudes gneisses). Apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He ages from the gneisses confirm a period of cooling at rates > 100 °C/Ma from 16 to 7 Ma. In the upper-plate, the basal sedimentary unit yields reset detrital apatite (U-Th)/He (DAHe) ages from 17 to 7 Ma and detrital zircon (U-Th)/He (DZHe) ages ranging from 270 to 18 Ma. DAHe ages from the stratigraphically higher fanglomerate units are reset to 10-7 Ma. The DZHe data have a primary thermal signature of 12-7 Ma, but preserve ages up to 113 Ma. The uppermost conglomerates exhibit completely reset DAHe ages of 15-9 Ma and reset DZHe ages from 10 to 8 Ma, with DZHe ages up to 104 Ma. Reset DAHe ages indicate late exposure of the footwall and constrain the depositional age of most sedimentary rocks on Paros to be from 14 to 7 Ma. Unreset DZHe ages preserve thermal signatures from the major Mesozoic-Tertiary tectonic events in the Aegean Region: [1] Cretaceous Pelagonian-type metamorphism; [2] Eocene peak HP metamorphism; and [3] Miocene Barrovian overprinting. Preservation of these signatures indicates long-term upper-plate recycling prior to syn-extensional deposition. The Paros supradetachment basin represents a classic inverted unroofing sequence deposited during progressive core complex exhumation in the

  2. H2O-rich melt inclusions in fayalitic olivine from Hekla volcano: Implications for phase relationships in silicic systems and driving forces of explosive volcanism on Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Hoernle, Kaj; Storm, Sonja; Mironov, Nikita; van den Bogaard, Christel; Botcharnikov, Roman

    2012-12-01

    Silicic Icelandic magmas are widely believed to contain low to moderate H2O content prior to degassing, and that their high explosivity mostly results from the interaction of the magmas with ice or meteoric water. Here we report the compositions of glass inclusions (SiO2=57-72 wt%, K2O=1.3-2.6 wt%) in Fe-rich olivines (Fo2-42) from the largest Holocene eruptions of Hekla volcano (H3 and H4) on Iceland, which preserved quenched melts with very high primary H2O contents (3.3-6.2 wt%). The silicic Hekla melts originate primarily by extensive (˜90%) crystal fractionation of H2O-poor (˜0.6 wt%) basalts and represent an end member in the systematics of terrestrial magmas because they originate at low fO2 (ΔQFM ˜-0.1 to -0.4) and have as high H2O contents as significantly more oxidized island-arc magmas (ΔQFM≥1). This demonstrates that H2O and ΔQFM do not correlate in silicic magmas from different tectonic settings, and that fO2, not H2O content, shows a major difference between silicic ocean-island (e.g., Icelandic) and island-arc magmas. Analysis of available experimental data suggests that high H2O activity and low fO2 expand the field of olivine stability in silicic melts. Low fO2 and low MgO content could also suppress crystallization of amphibole. On the basis of these results we propose that an anhydrous mineral assemblage bearing Fe-rich olivine in evolved volcanic and Skaergaard-type intrusive rocks does not imply low H2O in magmas prior to degassing but, in contrast to the commonly held view, is an indicator of H2O-rich silicic parental magmas crystallized at low fO2. Finally, the high H2O content in magma was a major driving force of the largest explosive eruptions of Hekla volcano and must be at least as important for driving silicic explosive volcanism on Iceland as magma-ice interaction.

  3. The `Strawberry Volcanic Field' of Northeastern Oregon: Another Piece of the CRB Puzzle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Mid to Late Miocene Strawberry Volcanics field (SVF) located along the southern margin of the John Day valley of NE Oregon, comprise a diverse group of volcanic rocks ranging from basalt to rhyolite. The main outcrop area of the SVF (3,400 km2) is bordered by units from the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), with the main CRB units to the north, the Picture Gorge Basalt to the east and Steens Basalt to the south. The geographic position and age of the Strawberry Volcanics make a genetic relationship to CRB volcanism likely, yet little is known about this diverse volcanic field. This research aims at refining the stratigraphic and age relationships as well as the petrology and geochemistry of magmas associated with the SVF. Previous investigations (e.g. Robyn, 1977) found that the SVF was active between 20 to 10 Ma with the main pulse largely being coeval with the 15 Ma CRBG eruptions. Lavas and tuffs from the SVF are calc-alkaline with low FeO*/MgO (~ 2.56 wt. %), high Al2O3 (~ 16.4 wt. %), low TiO2 (~ 1.12 wt.%), and span the entire compositional range from basalt to rhyolite (47-78 wt. % SiO2) with andesite as the dominant lithology. Basaltic lavas from the SVF have compositional affinities to earlier Steens Basalt, and some trace element concentrations and ratios are indistinguishable from those of CRBG lavas (e.g. Zr, Ba, Sr, and Ce/Y). Andesites are calc-alkaline, but contrary to typical arc (orogenic) andesites, SVF andesites are exceedingly phenocryst poor (Strawberry Volcanics are largely the product of hot-spot related basaltic magmas interacting with the continental crust. The range in compositions from calc-alkaline andesite to rhyolite may be attributed to the hybridization of mantle-derived and crustal melts, with the more evolved compositions reflecting greater proportions of crustally derived material and/or higher degrees of differentiation. Furthermore, since the earliest SVF eruption is 3 Ma older than the proposed onset of the CRBG (~ 17 Ma

  4. Coeval doming and stretching of the eastern end of the India-Asia collision zone - Namche Barwa Syntaxis, Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, A.; Handy, M. R.; Crupi, P.

    2013-12-01

    of the NBS. The NBS is bounded to the W and E by steep sinistral and dextral transpressional faults, respectively. Based on map-scale relations, we link these faults to the South Tibetan Detachment (STD) which in the NBS area is sited along the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone and juxtaposes the Late Oligocene granulites in its footwall with Eocene or older amphibolite-facies rocks in its hangingwall. The STD cuts mylonitic faults in its footwall, including the aforementioned thrust separating the HP and non-HP granulites. Taken together, the STD is interpreted as a system of stretching faults that attenuated the crust in a N-S direction during doming of the NBS. The age of extensional exhumation is poorly constrained, but certainly pre-dated rapid exhumation and cooling (>5 mm/a, >50° C/ Ma) of the NBS in Pliocene time (4-2 Ma) related to ductile-brittle faulting at ≤300° C of the northern part of the NBS and northerly adjacent Asian units (Stewart et al. 2008). We attribute Miocene doming and extensional exhumation of the NBS to tearing of the Indian slab. The lateral propagation of this tear allowed Asian asthenosphere to escape clockwise around the front of the subducting Indian plate.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar dating, geochemistry, and isotopic analyses of the quaternary Chichinautzin volcanic field, south of Mexico City: implications for timing, eruption rate, and distribution of volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, J. L.; Layer, P. W.; Lassiter, J. C.; Benowitz, J. A.; Macías, J. L.; Ramírez-Espinosa, J.

    2013-12-01

    Monogenetic structures located at the southern and western ends of the Chichinautzin volcanic field (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico) yield 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging from 1.2 Ma in the western portion of the field to 1.0-0.09 Ma in the southern portion, all of which are older than the volcanic field. These new ages indicate: (1) an eruption rate of 0.47 km3/kyr, which is much lower than the 11.7 km3/kyr previously estimated; (2) that the Chichinautzin magmatism coexisted with the Zempoala (0.7 Ma) and La Corona (1.0 Ma) polygenetic volcanoes on the southern edge of Las Cruces Volcanic Range (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt); and confirm (3) that the drainage system between the Mexico and Cuernavaca basins was closed during early Pleistocene forming the Texcoco Lake. Whole-rock chemistry and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic data indicate heterogeneous magmatism throughout the history of Chichinautzin activity that likely reflects variable degrees of slab and sediment contributions to the mantle wedge, fractional crystallization, and crustal assimilation. Even with the revised duration of volcanism within the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, its eruption rate is higher than most other volcanic fields of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and is comparable only to the Tacámbaro-Puruaran area in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field to the west. These variations in eruption rates among different volcanic fields may reflect a combination of variable subduction rates of the Rivera and Cocos plates along the Middle America Trench, as well as different distances from the trench, variations in the depth with respect to the subducted slab, or the upper plate characteristics.

  6. Global volcanic aerosol properties derived from emissions, 1990-2014, using CESM1(WACCM): VOLCANIC AEROSOLS DERIVED FROM EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Michael J. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Schmidt, Anja [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Easter, Richard [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Solomon, Susan [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts USA; Kinnison, Douglas E. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Neely, Ryan R. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Marsh, Daniel R. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Conley, Andrew [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Bardeen, Charles G. [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Gettelman, Andrew [Atmospheric Chemistry Observations and Modeling Laboratory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA

    2016-03-06

    Accurate representation of global stratospheric aerosol properties from volcanic and non-volcanic sulfur emissions is key to understanding the cooling effects and ozone-loss enhancements of recent volcanic activity. Attribution of climate and ozone variability to volcanic activity is of particular interest in relation to the post-2000 slowing in the apparent rate of global average temperature increases, and variable recovery of the Antarctic ozone hole. We have developed a climatology of global aerosol properties from 1990 to 2014 calculated based on volcanic and non-volcanic emissions of sulfur sources. We have complied a database of volcanic SO2 emissions and plume altitudes for eruptions between 1990 and 2014, and a new prognostic capability for simulating stratospheric sulfate aerosols in version 5 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, a component of the Community Earth System Model. Our climatology shows remarkable agreement with ground-based lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD), and with in situ measurements of aerosol surface area density (SAD). These properties are key parameters in calculating the radiative and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols. Our SAOD climatology represents a significant improvement over satellite-based analyses, which ignore aerosol extinction below 15 km, a region that can contain the vast majority of stratospheric aerosol extinction at mid- and high-latitudes. Our SAD climatology significantly improves on that provided for the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, which misses 60% of the SAD measured in situ. Our climatology of aerosol properties is publicly available on the Earth System Grid.

  7. Magma genesis of the acidic volcanism in the intra-arc rift zone of the Izu volcanic arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.; Tokuyama, H.; Ishii, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Izu volcanic arc extends over 550 km from the Izu Peninsula, Japan, to the Nishinoshima Trough or Sofugan tectonic line. It is the northernmost segment of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system, which is located at the eastern side of the Philippine Sea Plate. The recent magmatism of the Izu arc is bimodal and characterized by basalt and rhyolite (e.g. Tamura and Tatsumi 2002). In the southern Izu arc, volcanic front from the Aogashima to the Torishima islands is characterized by submarine calderas and acidic volcanisms. The intra-arc rifting, characterized by back-arc depressions, small volcanic knolls and ridges, is active in this region. Volcanic rocks were obtained in 1995 during a research cruise of the R/V MOANA WAVE (Hawaii University, cruise MW9507). Geochemical variation of volcanic rocks and magma genesis was studied by Hochstaedter et al. (2000, 2001), Machida et al (2008), etc. These studies focused magma and mantle dynamics of basaltic volcanism in the wedge mantle. Acidic volcanic rocks were also dredged during the curies MW9507. However, studies of these acidic volcanics were rare. Herein, we present petrographical and chemical analyses of these acidic rocks, and compare these results with those of other acidic rocks in the Izu arc and lab experiments, and propose a model of magma genesis in a context of acidic volcanism. Dredge sites by the cruise MW9507 are 120, and about 50 sites are in the rift zone. Recovered rocks are dominated by the bimodal assemblage of basalt-basaltic andesite and dacite-rhyolite. The most abundant phase is olivine basalt, less than 50 wt% SiO2. Andesites are minor in volume and compositional gap from 56 to 65 wt% SiO2 exists. The across-arc variation of the HFSE contents and ratios, such as Zr/Y and Nb/Zr of rhyolites exhibit depleted in the volcanic front side and enriched in reararc side. This characteristic is similar to basaltic volcanism pointed out by Hochstaedter et al (2000). The petrographical features of rhyolites

  8. Using multiple data sets to populate probabilistic volcanic event trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, C.G.; Pallister, John S.

    2014-01-01

    The key parameters one needs to forecast outcomes of volcanic unrest are hidden kilometers beneath the Earth’s surface, and volcanic systems are so complex that there will invariably be stochastic elements in the evolution of any unrest. Fortunately, there is sufficient regularity in behaviour that some, perhaps many, eruptions can be forecast with enough certainty for populations to be evacuated and kept safe. Volcanologists charged with forecasting eruptions must try to understand each volcanic system well enough that unrest can be interpreted in terms of pre-eruptive process, but must simultaneously recognize and convey uncertainties in their assessment. We have found that use of event trees helps to focus discussion, integrate data from multiple sources, reach consensus among scientists about both pre-eruptive process and uncertainties and, in some cases, to explain all of this to officials. Figure 1 shows a generic volcanic event tree from Newhall and Hoblitt (2002) that can be modified as needed for each specific volcano. This paper reviews how we and our colleagues have used such trees during a number of volcanic crises worldwide, for rapid hazard assessments in situations in which more formal expert elicitations could not be conducted. We describe how Multiple Data Sets can be used to estimate probabilities at each node and branch. We also present case histories of probability estimation during crises, how the estimates were used by public officials, and some suggestions for future improvements.

  9. A quantitative model for volcanic hazard assessment

    OpenAIRE

    W. Marzocchi; Sandri, L.; Furlan, C

    2006-01-01

    Volcanic hazard assessment is a basic ingredient for risk-based decision-making in land-use planning and emergency management. Volcanic hazard is defined as the probability of any particular area being affected by a destructive volcanic event within a given period of time (Fournier d’Albe 1979). The probabilistic nature of such an important issue derives from the fact that volcanic activity is a complex process, characterized by several and usually unknown degrees o...

  10. Assessment of hydraulic properties of sedimentary and volcanic aquifer systems under arid conditions in the Republic of Djibouti (Horn of Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalludin, Mohamed; Razack, Moumtaz

    The Republic of Djibouti (23,000 km2 500,000 inhabitants), located within the Horn of Africa, undergoes an arid climate with an average annual rainfall less than 150 mm. Water resources are provided up to 98% by groundwater. Two types of aquifers are encountered: volcanic and sedimentary aquifers. This paper focuses on the assessment of their hydraulic properties, which is necessary for future tasks regarding the management of these aquifers. To this end, a data base consisting of all available pumping test data obtained since the 1960s was compiled. Pumping tests have been interpreted to determine transmissivity. Solely for volcanic aquifers, transmissivity also has been estimated through an empirical relationship using specific capacity corrected for turbulent well losses. The transmissivity of each type of aquifer can span up to four orders of magnitude, pointing out their strong heterogeneity. For the various volcanic rocks, the younger the rock, the higher the transmissivity. The transmissivity of volcanic rocks has therefore decreased in the course of geological time. At present, a much better understanding of the hydraulic properties of these complex aquifers has been obtained, which should enable optimal management of their groundwater resources through the use of numerical modeling. La République de Djibouti (23,000 km2 500,000 habitants), située dans la Corne de l'Afrique, subit un climat aride avec une pluviométrie moyenne annuelle inférieure à 150 mm. Les ressources en eau sont fournies à plus de 98% par les eaux souterraines contenues dans des aquifères sédimentaires ou volcaniques. Cet article a pour objectif l'évaluation des propriétés hydrauliques de ces aquifères, étape indispensable pour entreprendre par la suite des études en vue de la gestion de ces aquifères. Une base rassemblant les données d'essais par pompage disponibles depuis les années Soixante a d'abord été établie. Les essais par pompage ont été interprétés pour

  11. Automatic landslides detection on Stromboli volcanic Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silengo, Maria Cristina; Delle Donne, Dario; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Cigolini, Corrado; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Landslides occurring in active volcanic islands play a key role in triggering tsunami and other related risks. Therefore, it becomes vital for a correct and prompt risk assessment to monitor landslides activity and to have an automatic system for a robust early-warning. We then developed a system based on a multi-frequency analysis of seismic signals for automatic landslides detection occurring at Stromboli volcano. We used a network of 4 seismic 3 components stations located along the unstable flank of the Sciara del Fuoco. Our method is able to recognize and separate the different sources of seismic signals related to volcanic and tectonic activity (e.g. tremor, explosions, earthquake) from landslides. This is done using a multi-frequency analysis combined with a waveform patter recognition. We applied the method to one year of seismic activity of Stromboli volcano centered during the last 2007 effusive eruption. This eruption was characterized by a pre-eruptive landslide activity reflecting the slow deformation of the volcano edifice. The algorithm is at the moment running off-line but has proved to be robust and efficient in picking automatically landslide. The method provides also real-time statistics on the landslide occurrence, which could be used as a proxy for the volcano deformation during the pre-eruptive phases. This method is very promising since the number of false detections is quite small (landslide increases. The final aim will be to apply this method on-line and for a real-time automatic detection as an improving tool for early warnings of tsunami-genic landslide activity. We suggest that a similar approach could be also applied to other unstable non-volcanic also slopes.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Volcanic Inflation—Deflation Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwer, D.; Ghil, M.; Calais, E.

    2016-12-01

    GPS geodetic data together with INSAR images are often used to formulate kinematic models of the sources of volcanic deformations. The increasing amount of data now available allows one to produce time series that are several years long and thus capture continuously the history of volcanic deformations, in particular their nonlinear behavior. This information is highly valuable in helping understand the dynamics of volcanic systems.Nonlinear deformation signals are, however, difficult to extract from the background noise inherent in the GPS time series. It is also arduous to unravel the signal of interest from other nonlinear signals, such as the seasonal oscillations associated with mass variations in the atmosphere, the ocean, and the hydrological reservoirs. Here we use Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M-SSA) — an advanced, data-adaptive method for time series analysis that exploits simultaneously the temporal and spatial correlations of geophysical fields — to extract such deformation signals.We apply M-SSA to GPS data sets from four volcanoes: Akutan, Alaska; Okmok, Alaska; Westdahl, Alaska; and Piton de la Fournaise, La Reunion. Our analyses show that all four volcanoes share similar features in their deformation history, suggesting similarities in the dynamics that generate the inflation-deflation cycles. In particular, all four volcanic systems exhibit sawtooth-shaped oscillations with slow inflations followed by slower deflations, with time scales that vary from 6 months to 4 years. This relation of dynamical similarity is further highlighted by the phase portrait reconstruction of the four systems in the plane of deformation vs. rate-of-deformation, as obtained from the deformation signals extracted from the GPS time series using M-SSA.The inflating phase of these oscillations is followed by eruptions at Okmok volcano and at Piton de la Fournaise. These analysis results suggest that these volcanic inflation—deflation cycles are associated

  13. Devonian sand injections and volcanism in the Murzuq Basin (south-west Libya)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Ghienne, Jean-Francois

    The highly prolific Murzuq basin in SW Libya was considered devoid of large sand injection system and volcanic activity during the Lower Palaeozoic. This study identified numerous evidences of kilometre-scale sand injections in association with volcanism of Lower Devonian age. The sand injection...

  14. Deccan Volcanism: a main trigger of environmental changes leading to the KTB mass extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatte, Thierry; Fantasia, Alicia; Samant, Bandana; Mohabey, Dhananjay; Keller, Gerta; Gertsch, Brian

    2014-05-01

    , palynoflora are dominated by gymnosperms and angiosperms with a rich canopy of gymnosperms (Conifers and Podocarpaceae) and an understory of palms and herbs. Immediately after the onset of Deccan phase-2, this floral association was decimated leading to dominance by angiosperms and pteridophytes at the expense of gymnosperms. In subsequent intertrappean sediments a sharp decrease in pollen and spores coupled with the appearance of fungi mark increasing stress conditions apparently as a direct result of volcanic activity. The inter-trappean sediments corresponding to Phase-2 (80% of Deccan basalt emissions, latest Maastrichtian) are characterized by the highest alteration CIA index values. This is probably better explained by increased acid rains due to SO2 emissions than a global climatic shift; since clay minerals from the corresponding sediments do not reflect a significant climatic change. This increased alteration is coeval with the sharp decline in pollen and an increase in fungal spores observed by Samant and Mohabey, (2009) and corresponds to the main phase of Deccan activity. Beyond India, multiproxy studies also place the main Deccan phase in the uppermost Maastrichtian C29r below the KTB (planktic foraminiferal zones CF2-CF1), as indicated by a rapid shift in 187Os/188Os ratios in deep-sea sections from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, coincident with rapid climate warming, coeval increase in weathering, a significant decrease in bulk carbonate indicative of acidification due to volcanic SO2, and major biotic stress conditions expressed in species dwarfing and decreased abundance in calcareous microfossils (planktic foraminifera and nannofossils). These observations indicate that Deccan volcanism played a key role in increasing atmospheric CO2 and SO2 levels that resulted in global warming and acidified oceans, respectively, increasing biotic stress that predisposed faunas to eventual extinction at the KTB.

  15. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, Arnold; Lu, Sha; Segers, Arjo; Weber, Konradin; Lin, Hai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption, in an ensemble-based data assimilation system combined with a volcanic ash transport model to investigate the potential improvement on the forecast accuracy with regard to the distal volcanic ash plume. We show that the error of the analyzed volcanic ash state can be significantly reduced through assimilating real-life in situ measurements. After a continuous assimilation, it is shown that the aviation advice for Germany, the Netherlands and Luxembourg can be significantly improved. We suggest that with suitable aircrafts measuring once per day across the distal volcanic ash plume, the description and prediction of volcanic ash clouds in these areas can be greatly improved.

  16. Geology and geochemistry characteristics of the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (Central Area), Chiapas Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, J. C.; Jaimes-Viera, M. C.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Layer, P. W.; Pompa-Mera, V.; Godinez, M. L.

    2007-04-01

    The Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc (CVA), located in the central portion of the State of Chiapas, is a 150 km stretch of volcanoes irregularly aligned in the northwest direction between two great volcanic features: the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the northwest and the Central American Volcanic Arc to the southeast. The CVA is located in a complex zone marking the interaction of the North American, Caribbean and Cocos plates, near the Motagua-Polochic fault system, the boundary between North American and Caribbean plates. The central part of the CVA is composed of an irregular northwest alignment of at least 10 volcanic structures generally lying along NNW-SSE-trending faults splayed from the Motagua-Polochic system. Among the structures there are seven volcanic domes (Huitepec, Amahuitz, La Iglesia, Mispía, La Lanza, Venustiano Carranza and Santotón), one explosion crater (Navenchauc), one collapse structure (Apas), and one dome complex (Tzontehuitz). In the majority of the structures there is a clear resurgence with the formation of several domes in the same structure, with the destruction of previous domes (Navenchauc) or with the formation of new explosion craters or collapse structures (Apas). The volcanic activity in the CVA was mainly effusive accompanied by explosive and phreatomagmatic events and is characterized by volcanic domes accompanied by block-and-ash-flows, ash flows with accretionary lapilli, falls, and pumice flows. The volcanic structures and deposits are calcalkaline in composition with a medium to high content of potassium. CVA volcanic rocks vary from andesite to dacite with SiO 2 between 57 and 66 wt.%, show low concentrations of Ti, P, Nb and Ta, are enriched in Light Rare Earths, depleted in Heavy Rare Earths, and show a small Eu anomaly; all indicative of arc-related volcanism associated with subduction of the Cocos plate under the North American plate, but complicated by the geometry of the plate boundary fault system.

  17. Structure Of Conduits Of The Acidic Volcanism And Related Deposits In The Paraná-Etendeka Magmatic Province, São Marcos Region, South Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, L. F.; De Campos, C. P.; Lima, E. F. D.; Janasi, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Voluminous acidic volcanics from the Paraná-Etendeka Magmatic Province crop out in the southern part of Brazil. The conduits responsible for the feeding of this intermediate/acid volcanism are preserved and well exposed in the São Marcos region (Lima et al. 2012; Geologia USP 12:49-64). Conduits are aligned along a NW-SE trend and have thicknesses up to 1 km. These structures are often characterized by mixing between dacitic and rhyodacitic magmas, with intercalation between two major zones: 1) reddish or grayish vitrophiricdacite/rhyodacite, sub-divided in massive or vesiculated; 2) reddish or grayish vitrophiric fragmented dacite/rhyodacite composed of bubble-rich angular to rounded blocks. Such fragments commonly deform coeval to the flow. A third zone dominated by filaments depicts a chaotic stretching-and-folding process from the mixture of the acid magmas. We used classical field measurements of flow structures and recognized main flow directions in these feeder-dikes. They follow two preferential directions: NW, ranging from N272° to N 355°, and NE, varying from N20° to N85°. These directions are indicative of a transtensive fissural system, which seems to be related to conjugated fractures. Evidence of an important fragmentation process in the conduits point towards the presence of related products in this region, thus rheomorphic deposits such as those observed elsewhere (e.g. Uruguay and Namibia) are expected to occur. Possible vestiges of these deposits could be represented by restricted outcrops of lens-shaped and banded hipohyaline, occasionally bubble-rich, dacites. The presence of continuous pseudotachylitic levels, tightly folded bands with horizontal axial planes together with local deformed bubble-rich pumice-like lens could be indicative of remelting and rheomorphism of previous vulcanoclastic material. Coulees and compound (lobed) dacitic lava flows, reaching up to 5-8 meters length, occur as the uppermost deposits and correspond to the

  18. The volcanic and tectonic history of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J.S.; Pozio, S.

    1996-01-01

    Enceladus has a protracted history of impact cratering, cryo-volcanism, and extensional, compressional, and probable strike-slip faulting. It is unique in having some of the outer Solar System's least and most heavily cratered surfaces. Enceladus' cratering record, tectonic features, and relief elements have been analyzed more comprehensively than done previously. Like few other icy satellites, Enceladus seems to have experienced major lateral lithospheric motions; it may be the only icy satellite with global features indicating probable lithospheric convergence and folding. Ridged plains, 500 km across, consist of a central labyrinthine ridge complex atop a broad dome surrounded by smooth plains and peripheral sinuous ridge belts. The ridged plains have few if any signs of extension, almost no craters, and an average age of just 107 to 108 years. Ridge belts have local relief ranging from 500 to 2000 m and tend to occur near the bottoms of broad regional troughs between swells. Our reanalysis of Peter Thomas' (Dermott, S. F., and P. C. Thomas, 1994, The determination of the mass and mean density of Enceladus from its observed shape, Icarus, 109, 241-257) limb profiles indicates that high peaks, probably ridge belts, also occur in unmapped areas. Sinuous ridges appear foldlike and are similar to terrestrial fold belts such as the Appalachians. If they are indeed folds, it may require that the ridged plains are mechanically (perhaps volcanically) layered. Regional topography suggests that folding may have occurred along zones of convective downwelling. The cratered plains, in contrast to the ridged plains, are heavily cratered and exhibit extensional structures but no obvious signs of compression. Cratered plains contain a possible strike-slip fault (Isbanir Fossa), along which two pairs of fractures seem to have 15 km of right-lateral offset. The oldest cratered plains might date from shortly after the formation of the saturnian system or the impact disruption and

  19. K-Ar geochronology of the late cenozoic volcanic rocks of the Cordillera Occidental, southernmost Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosdal, Richard M.; Farrar, Edward; Clark, Alan H.

    1981-05-01

    Twenty-four K-Ar radiometric ages are presented for late Cenozoic continental volcanic rocks of the Cordillera Occidental of southernmost Perú (lat. 16° 57'-17° 36'S). Rhyodacitic ignimbrite eruptions began in this transect during the Late Oligocene and continued episodically through the Miocene. The development of andesitic-dacitic strato volcanoes was initiated in the Pliocene and continues to the present. The earliest ignimbrite flows (25.3-22.7 Ma) are intercalated in the upper, coarsely-elastic member of the Moquegua Formation and demonstrate that this sedimentary unit accumulated in a trough, parallel to Andean tectonic trends, largely in the Oligocene. More voluminous ash-flow eruptions prevailed in the Early Miocene (22.8-17.6 Ma) and formed the extensively preserved Huaylillas Formation. This episode was coeval with a major phase of Andean uplift, and the pyroclastics overlie an erosional surface of regional extent incised into a Paleogene volcano-plutonic arc terrain. An age span of 14.2-8.9 Ma (mid-Late Miocene) is indicated for the younger Chuntacala Formation, which again comprises felsic ignimbrite flows, largely restricted to valleys incised into the pre-Huaylillas Formation lithologies, and, at lower altitudes, an extensive aggradational elastic facies. The youngest areally extensive ignimbrites, constituting the Sencca Formation, were extruded during the Late Miocene. In the earliest Pliocene, the ignimbrites were succeeded by more voluminous calcalkaline, intermediate flows which generated numerous large and small stratovolcanoes; these range in age from 5.3 to 1.6 Ma. Present-day, or Holocene, volcanism is restricted to several large stratovolcanoes which had begun their development during the Pleistocene (by 0.7 Ma). The late Oligocene/Early Miocene (ca. 22-23 Ma) reactivation of the volcanic arc coincided with a comparable increase in magmatic activity throughout much of the Cordilleras Occidental and Oriental of the Central Andes.

  20. Was Global Warming at the Paleocene-Eocene Boundary Terminated by Flood Volcanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Larsen, R. B.

    2008-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) has recently been attributed to greenhouse gases released from sedimentary basins in the Northeast Atlantic due to interaction with continental flood basalt magmatism. In the marine section in Denmark the alkaline Ash-17 has been dated at 55.1 plus minus 0.1 Ma and the PETM at 55.6-55.4 Ma. A similar alkaline tephra deposit in the uppermost part of the East Greenland flood basalt succession has also been dated at 55.1 plus minus 0.1 Ma and provides a linkage to Ash-17. Our recent results on the pressure of the coeval Skaergaard intrusion indicate that the majority of flood basalts erupted in less than 300,000 years. It is therefore possible to correlate the main flood basalt event with the interval immediately postdating PETM (55.4-55.1 Ma). This is consistent with a report of a small dinoflagellate cyst assemblage with a high proportion of Apectodinium homomorphum in one productive sample from sediments within the lower volcanics underlying the main flood basalt succession. The Apectodinium genus is usually abundant in the PETM interval. A scarcity of ash layers within the PETM interval also supports a correlation of the main flood basalt event with the overlying marine section including more abundant ash layers. The high eruption rate of the main flood basalts is likely to have resulted in atmospheric cooling caused by sulfuric acid aerosols produced from volcanic sulfur dioxide. Available estimates for volume and composition of the Northeast Atlantic flood basalts indicate that at least 36 teratonnes of sulfur dioxide was pumped into the atmosphere. This average 120 megatonnes per year over 300,000 years. For comparison, the historic Laki eruption in Iceland is estimated to have released 120 megatonnes sulfur dioxide over 5 months. We suggest that flood volcanism of the Northeast Atlantic terminated the global warming event at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary.

  1. Modeling transport and aggregation of volcanic ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Durant, Adam

    2010-05-01

    A complete description of ash aggregation processes in volcanic clouds is an very arduous task and the full coupling of ash transport and ash aggregation models is still computationally prohibitive. A large fraction of fine ash injected in the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate because of complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in settling velocities. The formation of aggregates of size and density different from those of the primary particles dramatically changes the sedimentation dynamics and results in lower atmospheric residence times of ash particles and in the formation of secondary maxima of tephra deposit. Volcanic ash transport models should include a full aggregation model accounting for all particle class interaction. However this approach would require prohibitive computational times. Here we present a simplified model for wet aggregation that accounts for both atmospheric and volcanic water transport. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average efficiencies factors, and collision frequency functions accounting for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, such as the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. Moreover, understanding aggregation processes in volcanic clouds will contribute to mitigate the risks related with volcanic ash transport and sedimentation.

  2. Io - One of at Least Four Simultaneous Erupting Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    This photo of an active volcanic eruption on Jupiter's satellite Io was taken 1 hour, 52 minutes after the accompanying picture, late in the evening of March 4, 1979, Pacific time. On the limb of the satellite can be seen one of at least four simultaneous volcanic eruptions -- the first such activity ever observed on another celestial body. Seen against the limb are plume-like structures rising more than 60 miles (100 kilometers) above the surface. Several eruptions have been identified with volcanic structures on the surface of Io, which have also been identified by Voyager 1's infrared instrument as being abnormally hot -- several hundred degrees warmer than surrounding terrain. The fact that several eruptions appear to be occurring at the same time suggests that Io has the most active surface in the solar system and that volcanism is going on there essentially continuously. Another characteristic of the observed volcanism is that it appears to be extremely explosive, with velocities more than 2,000 miles an hour (at least 1 kilometer per second). That is more violent than terrestrial volcanoes like Etna, Vesuvius or Krakatoa.

  3. Months between rejuvenation and volcanic eruption at Yellowstone caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Christy B.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Boyce, Jeremy W

    2015-01-01

    Rejuvenation of previously intruded silicic magma is an important process leading to effusive rhyolite, which is the most common product of volcanism at calderas with protracted histories of eruption and unrest such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Valles, USA. Although orders of magnitude smaller in volume than rare caldera-forming super-eruptions, these relatively frequent effusions of rhyolite are comparable to the largest eruptions of the 20th century and pose a considerable volcanic hazard. However, the physical pathway from rejuvenation to eruption of silicic magma is unclear particularly because the time between reheating of a subvolcanic intrusion and eruption is poorly quantified. This study uses geospeedometry of trace element profiles with nanometer resolution in sanidine crystals to reveal that Yellowstone’s most recent volcanic cycle began when remobilization of a near- or sub-solidus silicic magma occurred less than 10 months prior to eruption, following a 220,000 year period of volcanic repose. Our results reveal a geologically rapid timescale for rejuvenation and effusion of ~3 km3 of high-silica rhyolite lava even after protracted cooling of the subvolcanic system, which is consistent with recent physical modeling that predict a timescale of several years or less. Future renewal of rhyolitic volcanism at Yellowstone is likely to require an energetic intrusion of mafic or silicic magma into the shallow subvolcanic reservoir and could rapidly generate an eruptible rhyolite on timescales similar to those documented here.

  4. Global monsoon precipitation responses to large volcanic eruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Chai, Jing; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-11

    Climate variation of global monsoon (GM) precipitation involves both internal feedback and external forcing. Here, we focus on strong volcanic forcing since large eruptions are known to be a dominant mechanism in natural climate change. It is not known whether large volcanoes erupted at different latitudes have distinctive effects on the monsoon in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH). We address this issue using a 1500-year volcanic sensitivity simulation by the Community Earth System Model version 1.0 (CESM1). Volcanoes are classified into three types based on their meridional aerosol distributions: NH volcanoes, SH volcanoes and equatorial volcanoes. Using the model simulation, we discover that the GM precipitation in one hemisphere is enhanced significantly by the remote volcanic forcing occurring in the other hemisphere. This remote volcanic forcing-induced intensification is mainly through circulation change rather than moisture content change. In addition, the NH volcanic eruptions are more efficient in reducing the NH monsoon precipitation than the equatorial ones, and so do the SH eruptions in weakening the SH monsoon, because the equatorial eruptions, despite reducing moisture content, have weaker effects in weakening the off-equatorial monsoon circulation than the subtropical-extratropical volcanoes do.

  5. Volcanic hazard assessment at Deception Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, S.; Sobradelo, R.; Geyer, A.; Martí, J.

    2012-04-01

    Deception Island is the most active volcano of the South Shetland Islands (Antarctica) with more than twenty eruptions recognised over the past two centuries. The island was formed on the expansion axis of the Central Bransfield Strait and its evolution consists of constructive and destructive phases. A first a shield phase was followed by the construction of a central edifice and formation of the caldera with a final monogenetic volcanism along the caldera rim. The post-caldera magma composition varies from andesitic-basaltic to dacitic. The activity is characterised by monogenetic eruptions of low volume and short duration. The eruptions show a variable degree of explosivity, strombolian or phreatomagmatic, with a VEI 2 to 4, which have generated a wide variety of pyroclastic deposits and lavas. It is remarkable how many phases of phreatic explosive eruptions are associated to the emission of large ballistic blocks. Tephra record preserved in the glacier ice of Livingston Island or in marine sediments show the explosive power of the phreatomagmatic phases and the wide dispersal of its finest products in a great variety of directions of the prevailing winds. Also it is important to highlight the presence of different lahar deposits associated with some of these eruptions. In this contribution we present the guidelines to conduct a short-term and long-term volcanic hazard assessment at Deception Island. We apply probabilistic methods to estimate the susceptibility, statistical techniques to determine the eruption recurrence and eruptive scenario, and reproduce the effects of historical eruptions too. Volcanic hazard maps and scenarios are obtained using a Voris-based model tool (Felpeto et al., 2007) in a free Geographical Information System (GIS), a Quantum GIS.

  6. Structural significance of the south Tyrrhenian volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiosi, G.; Musacchio, G.; Ventura, G.; de Astis, G.

    2003-04-01

    The southern part of the Tyrrhenian Sea represents a transition from ocenic- (the Tyrrhenian Sea) to continental-domain (the Calabrian Arc) and is affected by active calkalkaline to potassic volcanism (the Eolian Islands). Active extensional tectonics, coupled with the general upwelling of northern Sicily and Calabria continental crust, coexists with active subduction of the Ionian Plate beneath the Calabrian Arc. This has been interpreted as the result of the detachment of the slab beneath the Calbrian Arc. Present-day tectonics is characterized by NE-SW normal faults and NNW- SSE dextral oblique-slip faults. The normal faults form the major peri- Tyrrhenian basins. Refraction and high resolution onshore-offshore wide-angle-reflection profiles, as well as potential field modeling, provide a 3D image of the Moho. Short wave-length undulations characterize the Moho beneath the Aeolian Arch. The major upraise is about 6 km, beneath the Aeolian active volcanic area, and affects all the crustal boundaries. Another sharp crustal thinning is observed beneath the gulf of Patti at the south-eastern edge of the Tyrrhenian basin. We suggest that the graben-like structure, occurring along the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano islands and oriented at high angles to the trench, is lithospheric and can be followed down to Moho depths. NNW-SSE dextral oblique-slip faults, like the Tindari Letojanni fault system, control the Salina-Lipari-Vulcano portion of the Aeolian volcanism and connect the oceanic crust of the Marsili Basin to the Malta Escarpment, through the Etna volcano. Across this lineament seismicity changes from mostly shallow to the west, to deep intra- slab to the east.

  7. How Volcanism Controls Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Large explosive volcanoes eject megatons of sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere where it spreads around the world within months and is oxidized slowly to form a sulfuric-acid aerosol with particle sizes that grow large enough to reflect and scatter solar radiation, cooling Earth ~0.5C for up to 3 years. Explosive eruptions also deplete total column ozone ~6% causing up to 3C winter warming at mid-latitudes over continents. Global cooling predominates. Extrusive, basaltic volcanoes deplete ozone ~6% but do not eject much sulfur dioxide into the lower stratosphere, causing net global warming. Anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) deplete ozone ~3% for up to a century while each volcanic eruption, even small ones, depletes ozone twice as much but for less than a decade through eruption of halogens and ensuing photochemical processes. The 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, the 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn, plus anthropogenic CFCs depleted ozone over Toronto Canada 14% in 2012, causing an unusually warm winter and drought. Total column ozone determines how much solar ultraviolet energy with wavelengths between 290 and 340 nanometers reaches Earth where it is absorbed most efficiently by the ocean. A 25% depletion of ozone increases the amount of this radiation reaching Earth by 1 W m-2 for overhead sun and 0.25 W m-2 for a solar zenith angle of 70 degrees. The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere heated from below by a sun-warmed Earth and the stratosphere heated from above by the Sun through photodissociation primarily of oxygen and ozone. The mean annual height of the tropopause increased ~160 m between 1980 and 2004 at the same time that northern mid-latitude total column ozone was depleted by ~4%, the lower stratosphere cooled ~2C, the upper troposphere warmed ~0.1C, and mean surface temperatures in the northern hemisphere rose ~0.5C. Regional total ozone columns are observed to increase as rapidly as 20% within 5 hours with an associated 5

  8. Petrogenesis of coeval sodic and potassic alkaline magmas at Spanish Peaks, Colorado: Magmatism related to the opening of the Rio Grande rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, A. Brooke Hamil; McGregor, Heath; Roden, Michael F.; Salters, Vincent J. M.; Sarafian, Adam; Leahy, Rory

    2016-07-01

    Approximately coeval, relatively primitive (∼5-10% MgO with exception of a trachyandesite) alkaline mafic dikes and sills at or near Spanish Peaks, CO are divided into relatively sodic and potassic varieties on the basis of K2O/Na2O. Many of these dikes are true lamprophyres. In spite of variable alkali element ratios, the alkaline rocks share a number of geochemical similarities: high LIL element contents, high Ba and similar Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios near that of Bulk Earth. One important difference is that the potassic rocks are characterized by lower Al2O3 contents, typically less than 12 wt.%, than the sodic dikes/sills which typically have more than 13 wt.% Al2O3, and this difference is independent of MgO content. We attribute the distinct Al2O3 contents to varying pressure during melting: a mica-bearing, Al-poor vein assemblage for the potassic magmas melted at higher pressure than an aluminous amphibole-bearing vein assemblage for the sodic magmas. Remarkable isotopic and trace element similarities with approximately contemporaneous, nearby Rio Grande rift-related basalts in the San Luis Valley, indicate that the magmatism at Spanish Peaks was rift-related, and that lithosphere sources were shared between some rift magmas and those at Spanish Peaks. High Zn/Fe ratios in the Spanish Peaks mafic rocks point to a clinopyroxene- and garnet-rich source such as lithosphere veined by pyroxenite or eclogite. Lithospheric melting was possibly triggered by foundering of cool, dense lithosphere beneath the Rio Grande rift during the initiation of rifting with the potassic parent magmas generated by higher pressure melting of the foundered lithosphere than the sodic parent magmas. This process, caused by gravitational instability of the lithosphere (Elkins-Tanton, 2007) may be common beneath active continental rifts.

  9. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  10. Geology and geothermal potential of Alid volcanic center, Eritrea, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynne, Michael A.; Duffield, Wendell A.; Fournier, Robert O.; Giorgis, Leake W.; Janik, Cathy J.; Kahsai, Gabreab; Lowenstern, Jacob; Mariam, Kidane W.; Smith, James G.; Tesfai, Theoderos; ,

    1996-01-01

    Alid volcanic center, a 700-meter-tall mountain in Eritrea, northeast Africa, straddles the axis of an active crustal-spreading center called the Danakil Depression. Boiling-temperature fumaroles are common on Alid, and their gas compositions indicate a reservoir temperature of at least 250 ??C. The history of volcanism and the high reservoir temperature indicated by the Alid fumarole gases suggest that a geothermal resource of electrical grade lies beneath the mountain. Though drilling is needed to determine subsurface conditions, the process of dome formation and the ongoing crustal spreading can create and maintain fracture permeability in the hydrothermal system that feeds the Alid fumaroles.

  11. Evolution Of An Upper Crustal Plutonic-Volcanic Plumbing System:Insights From High Precision U-Pb Zircon Geochronology Of Intracaldera Tuff And Intrusions In Silver Creek Caldera, Arizona, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Mundil, R.; Miller, C. F.; Miller, J. S.; Paterson, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    Study of both plutonic and volcanic regimes in one single magmatic system is a powerful approach towards obtaining a more complete view of the long-term evolution of magma systems. The recently discovered Silver Creek caldera is the source of the voluminous Peach Spring Tuff (PST) (Ferguson, 2008) and presents a unique opportunity to study a field laboratory of a linked plutonic-volcanic system. This relict west-facing half caldera is predominantly filled with trachytic intracaldera tuff with the caldera margin intruded by several petrologically distinct hypabyssal intrusions. These include porphyritic granite with granophyric texture, felsic leucogranite, porphyritic monzonite exposed on NE side of the caldera that is zoned from more felsic to more mafic, and quartz-phyric dikes that intrude the caldera fill. We present preliminary single zircon ages from 4 samples that have been analyzed using the CA-TIMS method after thermal annealing and chemical leaching (Mattinson 2005), including 1 sample from intracaldera tuff and 3 samples from caldera-related intrusions. 3-D total U/Pb isochron ages from all four samples fall within a range of 18.32-18.90 Ma with uncertainties between 0.09 and 0.39 Ma, although some of them lack precision and are compromised by elevated common Pb. For example, zircon from the dated porphyritic monzonite yields an age of 18.32±0.42 Ma (MSWD=2.7) where the excess scatter may result from real age dispersion and/or different compositions of the common Pb contribution. The PST had been dated to ~18.5 Ma by 40Ar/39Ar techniques (Nielson et al., 1990). In order to be compared to U/Pb ages the 40Ar/39Ar age must be adjusted for a revised age for the then used flux monitor (MMbh-1) and corrected for the now quantified systematic bias between 40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb ages (Renne et al., 2010), which results in a corrected age of 18.8 Ma. Thus, the ages for our samples match that of the PST within error. Based on current results, the age difference

  12. Automatic classification of seismo-volcanic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfante, Marielle; Dalla Mura, Mauro; Mars, Jérôme; Macedo, Orlando; Inza, Adolfo; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The prediction of volcanic eruptions and the evaluation of their associated risks is still a timely and open issue. For this purpose, several types of signals are recorded in the proximity of volcanoes and then analysed by experts. Typically, seismic signals that are considered as precursor or indicator of an active volcanic phase are detected and manually classified. In this work, we propose an architecture for automatic classification of seismo-volcanic waves. The system we propose is based on supervised machine learning. Specifically, a prediction model is built from a large dataset of labelled examples by the means of a learning algorithm (Support Vector Machine or Random Forest). Four main steps are involved: (i) preprocess the signals, (ii) from each signal, extract features that are useful for the classes discrimination, (iii) use an automatic learning algorithm to train a prediction model and (iv) classify (i.e., assign a semantic label) newly recorded and unlabelled examples. Our main contribution lies in the definition of the feature space used to represent the signals (i.e., in the choice of the features to extract from the data). Feature vectors describe the data in a space of lower dimension with respect to the original one. Ideally, signals are separable in the feature space depending on their classes. For this work, we consider a large set of features (79) gathered from an extensive state of the art in both acoustic and seismic fields. An analysis of this feature set shows that for the application of interest, 11 features are sufficient to discriminate the data. The architecture is tested on 4725 seismic events recorded between June 2006 and September 2011 at Ubinas, the most active volcano of Peru. Six main classes of signals are considered: volcanic tremors (TR), long period (LP), volcano-tectonic (VT), explosion (EXP), hybrids (HIB) and tornillo (TOR). Our model reaches above 90% of accuracy, thereby validating the proposed architecture and the

  13. Hydrocarbon- Generating Model of the Area Covered With Volcanic Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Zhanqian; Zhang Yuwei

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of Oil & gas fields shows their close relationship with the most active tectonic regions. This is not a coincidence but having a scientific reasons. The crustal active regions, refer to the places where the active natural earthquake, volcanic activities, underground water happened, and the areas of the leaking off of natural gas to the surface of the crust. The magma of volcanic activities brings the organic "kitchen range body" hydrocarbon- generating model and inorganic genetic hydrocarbon to the regions covered by volcanic rock. Underground water brings a catalytic hydrocarbongenerating model for organic matter, and the leaking- off of H2 and CO2 contributes a synthetic hydrocarbon - generating model. Volcanic activities bring the assemblage of Source, Reservoir and Seal formed by the sediments and magma the sedimentary basins, and the hydrocarbon - generating system with a "water - volcano" binary structure is formed. All these conditions are favorable and excellent for the formation of oil & gas fields. The distribution of American oil & gas fields have very close relationship with the mines of Fe, Mn, Ct, Mo, W and V, deposits of Zn, Cu, V, Pb, Al and Hg, and the deposits of fluorite, sulfur, potassium salt, phosphate and halite, and the distribution of sulfate- chloride of river water. The reason why few oil & gas fields discovered in the regions covered by volcanic rock in western America maybe because of the view of "inconsistency between petroleum and volcano". Further more, It's very difficult to carry out a geophysical exploration in such kinds of regions.This paper examined a few hydrocarbon-generating models (systems) mentioned above and came up with some fresh ideas on the exploration in the areas covered with volcanic rocks.

  14. Source mechanisms of volcanic tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Raphaël

    2015-10-28

    Volcanic tsunamis are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including volcano-tectonic earthquakes, slope instabilities, pyroclastic flows, underwater explosions, shock waves and caldera collapse. In this review, we focus on the lessons that can be learnt from past events and address the influence of parameters such as volume flux of mass flows, explosion energy or duration of caldera collapse on tsunami generation. The diversity of waves in terms of amplitude, period, form, dispersion, etc. poses difficulties for integration and harmonization of sources to be used for numerical models and probabilistic tsunami hazard maps. In many cases, monitoring and warning of volcanic tsunamis remain challenging (further technical and scientific developments being necessary) and must be coupled with policies of population preparedness. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Mid Miocene volcanism in Nicaragua and implications for the formation of the Nicaraguan Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, I.; Gazel, E.; Carr, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Northwest Nicaragua contains Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression consisting of portions of the Coyol Formation to the East and the Tamarindo Formation to the West. The Tamarindo Formation is a narrow band of basaltic to andesitic lavas interlayered with thick ignimbrite deposits and volcaniclastic sediments that parallel Nicaragua’s Pacific coast to the west of the modern volcanic front with ages from 14.7-11.7 Ma. The Coyol represents primarily Miocene volcanism from 25-7 Ma and lies east of the active front. The presence of Mid Miocene volcanism on either side of the Nicaraguan Depression has led to speculation that the two coeval units, which are currently separated by almost 100km, were once connected and have since been separated by extension. Here, we present data that show the Tamarindo and Coyol are geochemically distinct and therefore cannot be considered part of the same unit. First, the Tamarindo has lower La/Yb values than Coyol, which suggests that the Tamarindo was formed by a higher degree of partial melting, assuming that mantle source compositions are similar for both units. In addition, the Tamarindo has higher Zr/Nb values than Coyol, which are indicative of High Field Strength Element (HFSE) depletion common in arc volcanics. Because the degree of partial melting and HFSE depletion is expected to increase towards the trench, both Tamarindo’s La/Yb and Zr/Nb values are consistent with its being emplaced closer to the trench than Coyol and the presence of these two units of Mid-Miocene age on opposite sides of the Nicaraguan Depression cannot be used as proof of significant extension. In addition, currently available data do not show the significant crustal thinning and large-scale structural surface features that would be expected if the Tamarindo and Coyol were once connected and later separated by extension. Fault displacement along the Nicaraguan Depression is insufficient to accommodate this extension and

  16. The impact of stratospheric volcanic aerosol on decadal-scale climate predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmreck, Claudia; Pohlmann, Holger; Illing, Sebastian; Kadow, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of a large future volcanic eruption provides arguably the largest uncertainty concerning the evolution of the climate system on the time scale of a few years; but also the greatest opportunity to learn about the behavior of the climate system, and our models thereof. So the question emerges how large will the uncertainty be for future decadal climate predictions if no volcanic aerosol is taken into account? And how strong has volcanic aerosol affected decadal prediction skill on annual and multi-year seasonal scales over the CMIP5 hindcast period? To understand the impact of volcanic aerosol on multi-year seasonal and decadal climate predictions we performed CMIP5-type hindcasts without volcanic aerosol using the German MiKlip prediction system system baseline 1 from 1961 to 1991 and compared them to the corresponding simulations including aerosols. Our results show that volcanic aerosol significantly affects the prediction skill for global mean surface air temperature in the first five years after strong volcanic eruptions. Also on the regional scale a volcanic imprint on decadal-scale variability is detectable. Neglecting volcanic aerosol leads to a reduced prediction skill over the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Indic and West Pacific but to an improvement over the tropical East-Pacific, where the model has in general no skill. Multi-seasonal differences in the skill for seasonal-mean temperatures are evident over Continental Europe with significant skill loss due to neglection of volcanic aerosol in boreal winter over central Europe, Scandinavia and over south-eastern Europe and the East-Mediterranean in boreal summer.

  17. Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 μg kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 μg kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 μg kg-1) and bark (6.0 μg kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

  18. Devonian sand injections and volcanism in the Murzuq Basin (south-west Libya)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Ghienne, Jean-Francois

    The highly prolific Murzuq basin in SW Libya was considered devoid of large sand injection system and volcanic activity during the Lower Palaeozoic. This study identified numerous evidences of kilometre-scale sand injections in association with volcanism of Lower Devonian age. The sand injection...... system is original by its interaction with volcanism and its situation in an epicontinental intracratonic basin. The sand injections form a seal-bypass system between the Ordovician-Cambrian reservoirs and the Lower Devonian sandstones, breaching through the Silurian shale seal (and source rock...

  19. Spatial variation of volcanic rock geochemistry in the Virunga Volcanic Province: Statistical analysis of an integrated database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barette, Florian; Poppe, Sam; Smets, Benoît; Benbakkar, Mhammed; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2017-10-01

    We present an integrated, spatially-explicit database of existing geochemical major-element analyses available from (post-) colonial scientific reports, PhD Theses and international publications for the Virunga Volcanic Province, located in the western branch of the East African Rift System. This volcanic province is characterised by alkaline volcanism, including silica-undersaturated, alkaline and potassic lavas. The database contains a total of 908 geochemical analyses of eruptive rocks for the entire volcanic province with a localisation for most samples. A preliminary analysis of the overall consistency of the database, using statistical techniques on sets of geochemical analyses with contrasted analytical methods or dates, demonstrates that the database is consistent. We applied a principal component analysis and cluster analysis on whole-rock major element compositions included in the database to study the spatial variation of the chemical composition of eruptive products in the Virunga Volcanic Province. These statistical analyses identify spatially distributed clusters of eruptive products. The known geochemical contrasts are highlighted by the spatial analysis, such as the unique geochemical signature of Nyiragongo lavas compared to other Virunga lavas, the geochemical heterogeneity of the Bulengo area, and the trachyte flows of Karisimbi volcano. Most importantly, we identified separate clusters of eruptive products which originate from primitive magmatic sources. These lavas of primitive composition are preferentially located along NE-SW inherited rift structures, often at distance from the central Virunga volcanoes. Our results illustrate the relevance of a spatial analysis on integrated geochemical data for a volcanic province, as a complement to classical petrological investigations. This approach indeed helps to characterise geochemical variations within a complex of magmatic systems and to identify specific petrologic and geochemical investigations

  20. Submarine volcanoes along the Aegean volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Alexandri, Matina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Rousakis, Grigoris

    2013-06-01

    The Aegean volcanic arc has been investigated along its offshore areas and several submarine volcanic outcrops have been discovered in the last 25 years of research. The basic data including swath bathymetric maps, air-gun profiles, underwater photos and samples analysis have been presented along the four main volcanic groups of the arc. The description concerns: (i) Paphsanias submarine volcano in the Methana group, (ii) three volcanic domes to the east of Antimilos Volcano and hydrothermal activity in southeast Milos in the Milos group, (iii) three volcanic domes east of Christiana and a chain of about twenty volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini in the Santorini group and (iv) several volcanic domes and a volcanic caldera together with very deep slopes of several volcanic islands in the Nisyros group. The tectonic structure of the volcanic centers is described and related to the geometry of the arc and the neotectonic graben structures that usually host them. The NE-SW direction is dominant in the Santorini and Nisyros volcanic groups, located at the eastern part of the arc, where strike-slip is also present, whereas NW-SE direction dominates in Milos and Methana at the western part, where co-existence of E-W disrupting normal faults is observed. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from the outcrops of the volcanic centers emerging usually at 400-600 m depth and ending either below sea level or at high altitudes of 600-700 m on the islands. Hydrothermal activity at relatively high temperatures observed in Kolumbo is remarkable whereas low temperature phenomena have been detected in the Santorini caldera around Kameni islands and in the area southeast of Milos. In Methana and Nisyros, hydrothermal activity seems to be limited in the coastal areas without other offshore manifestations.

  1. Seismicity at Lusi and the adjacent volcanic complex, Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Anne; Karyono, Karyono; Diehl, Tobias; Lupi, Matteo; Mazzini, Adriano

    2017-04-01

    We study the local seismicity around the spectacular Lusi eruption site, a sedimentary- hosted hydrothermal system in East Java. Lusi is located 10 km NE of the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex and is fed by both mantellic and hydrothermal fluids rising and mixing with those present in the sedimentary formations. During a period of 17 months, we observed 289 micro-seismic earthquakes with local magnitudes ranging from ML0.5 to ML1.7. The events predominantly nucleate at depths of 8-13 km below the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex. Despite the geological evidence of active tectonic deformation and faulting observed at the surface, little to no seismicity is observed in the sedimentary basin hosting Lusi. Although we cannot entirely rule out artifacts due to a significantly increased detection threshold in the sedimentary basin, the deficit in seismicity suggests aseismic deformation beneath Lusi due to the large amount of fluids that may lubricate the fault system. An analysis of focal mechanisms of seven selected events around the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicate predominantly strike-slip faulting activity in the region SW of Lusi. This type of activity is consistent the orientation and the movements observed for the Watukosek fault system that extends from the volcanic complex towards the NE of Java. Our results suggest that the tectonic deformation of the region is characterized by scattered faulting, rather than localized along a distinct fault plane.

  2. An aggregation model for ash particles in volcanic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A.; Folch, A.; Macedonio, G.; Durant, A.

    2009-12-01

    A large fraction of fine ash particles injected into the atmosphere during explosive eruptions aggregate through complex interactions of surface liquid layers, electrostatic forces, and differences in particle settling velocities. The aggregates formed have a different size and density compared to primary particles formed during eruption which dramatically changes the dynamics of sedimentation from the volcanic cloud. Consequently, the lifetime of ash particles in the atmosphere is reduced and a distal mass deposition maximum is often generated in resulting tephra deposits. A complete and rigorous description of volcanic ash fallout requires the full coupling of models of volcanic cloud dynamics and dispersion, and ash particle transport, aggregation and sedimentation. Furthermore, volcanic ash transport models should include an aggregation model that accounts for the interaction of all particle size classes. The problem with this approach is that simulations would require excessively long computational times thereby prohibiting its application in an operational setting during an explosive volcanic eruption. Here we present a simplified model for ash particle transport and aggregation that includes the effects of water in the volcanic cloud and surrounding atmosphere. The aggregation model assumes a fractal relationship for the number of primary particles in aggregates, average sticking efficiency factors, and collision frequency functions that account for Brownian motion, laminar and turbulent fluid shear, and differential settling velocity. A parametric study on the key parameters of the model was performed. We implemented the aggregation model in the WRF+FALL3D coupled modelling system and applied it to different eruptions where aggregation has been recognized to play an important role, including the August and September 1992 Crater Peak eruptions and the 1980 Mt St Helens eruption. In these cases, mass deposited as a function of deposit area and the particle

  3. The Extremes of Volcanic Activity: Earth and Jupiter's Moon Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L. L.; Lopes, R.

    2004-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is the solar system's most volcanically active body, and the only place that magmatic volcanic eruptions have been observed beyond Earth. One of the first images of Io obtained by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft in 1979 shows a plume above one of its volcanoes. The NASA Voyager and Galileo spacecraft imaged many explosive eruptions of plumes and deposits - which travel hundreds of kilometers (farther than on the Earth or the Moon). Very hot lavas that are erupting from volcanic vents on Io may be similar to lavas that erupted on Earth billions of years ago. Understanding the physical processes driving volcanic eruptions is important for the understanding of terrestrial volcanoes, not only because of their potential hazards, but also as geologic resources, biologic environments, and for their role in shaping the surface of Earth and other planets. Volcanic eruptions are perhaps the most dramatic events on Earth, and are of intrinsic interest to students, youth, and adults. Topics involving volcanoes are a part of the national science education benchmarks for understanding the Earth's composition and structure for grades 6-8 (the process of creating landforms) and grades 9-12 (the effects of movement of crustal plates). Natural events on Earth coupled with exciting discoveries in space can serve to heighten the awareness of these phenomena and provide learning opportunities for real world applications of science. Educational applications for youth to compare volcanic activity on Io and Earth have been done through NASA-sponsored field trip workshops to places such as Yellowstone National Park (allowing educators to experience environments similar to those on other worlds), targeted classroom and hands-on activities, special interest books, and other resources. A sampling of such activities will be presented, and discussion invited on other related developmentally appropriate resources and activities.

  4. Planetary Aspects of Volcanism: Insights Into the Volcano - Tectonic Relationship on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, E.

    2009-12-01

    There are many alternative definitions of a volcanic system, each focusing on different aspects of volcanic and/or magmatic activity. Although all of these definitions contribute to increase our understanding of volcanic phenomena, each was conceived with a specific aspect of volcanism in mind, therefore reducing its utility when problems beyond its own limits are considered, and perhaps more importantly, introducing subtle biases in the form in which we approach the study of this type of phenomena. In particular, the volcano-tectonic relationship most commonly used in volcanology textbooks seems to be biased towards volcanic activity on Earth, disregarding the presence of this type of phenomena in other planets, moons and even asteroids of our solar system. As a cursory examination of volcanism in the solar system reveals, the causes of volcanic activity deserve to be examined independently of any tectonic influence. Any model of volcanism of this type, however, needs to be flexible enough to accommodate tectonic variables if so required. In this work, such a flexible model of volcanism is outlined. This model is constructed by first exploring the form in which the Tectonic and the Volcanic systems are related to each other in different planets by using a mechanical analogy. Second, the analogy is used to identify key components of the volcanic system that need to be quantified first, therefore leading to the introduction of fundamental physical principles in the conceptual model of volcanism that is independent of the tectonic scenario. Third, the predictive capabilities of this model are compared to specific cases on Earth where the type of required information has been gathered previously. The results suggest that the physical constraints of the model are reasonable, therefore paving the road for further studies aiming to identify the tectonic contribution of volcanism on a case by case basis. Two corollaries of this study are that we need to learn to formulate

  5. Explosive volcanism and associated pressures - Implications for models of endogenically shocked quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, S. L.; Wolff, J. A.; Sharpton, V. L.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of explosive volcanic phenomena and associated pressures, both from field and theoretical perspectives, is discussed. An endogenic origin for shocked quartz at the K/T boundary requires impulsive pressures greater than 60 kbars to be generated during explosive volcanism. Explosive volcanic eruptions which are events of sustained decompression may be initiated by impulsive explosions while the magnitudes of the overpressures are small. These maximum overpressures can be controlled mainly by the tensile strength of the rock surrounding the magma chamber-conduit system. Thus maximum overpressures in the volcanic environment are limited to less than 500 bars which are orders of magnitude less than those required for shock quartz (greater than 60 kbars). This observation is found to be consistent with the complete lack of field or petrographic evidence in support of shock metamorphism associated with volcanic eruptions and their products.

  6. Electrochemical sensor monitoring of volcanic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tjarda; Freshwater, Ray; Oppenheimer, Clive; Saffell, John; Jones, Rod; Griffiths, Paul; Braban, Christine; Mead, Iqbal

    2010-05-01

    Advances in instrumentation have fuelled a recent growth of interest in using portable sensor systems for environmental monitoring of pollution. Developments in wireless technology are enabling such systems to operate remotely and autonomously, generating a wealth of environmental data. We report here on the application of miniature Alphasense electrochemical sensors to the detection and characterisation of gases in volcanic plumes. A highly portable sensor system was developed to operate an array of 6 low cost electrochemical sensors to detect CO, H2, HCl, SO2, H2S and NO2 at 1 Hz. A miniature pump draws air over all sensors simultaneously (i.e. sensors arranged in parallel). The sensor output in these campaigns was logged on PDAs for real-time viewing, and later download (with a view to future data-streaming). The instrument was deployed at a number of volcanoes and was subject to extremely harsh conditions including highly acidic environments, low (Antarctic) temperatures, and transport over rough terrain. Analysis methods are demonstrated that consider calibration, cross-sensitivities of the sensors to multiple gases, differing sensor response times, temperature dependence, and background sensor drift with time. The analysis is applied to a range of plume field-measurements to extract gas concentrations ranging from 100's ppmv to sub-ppmv and to characterise the individual volcano emissions. Applications of similar sensor systems for real-time long-term monitoring of volcanic emissions (which may indicate and ultimately predict eruptive behavior), and UAV and balloon-borne plume sampling are now already being realised. This work focused on demonstrating the application of electrochemical sensors to monitoring of environmental pollution from volcanoes. Other applications for similar sensors include the near-source monitoring of industrial emissions, and of pollutant levels enhanced by traffic emissions in the urban environment.

  7. A massive input of coarse-grained siliciclastics in the Pyrenean Basin during the PETM: the missing ingredient of a coeval abrupt change in hydrological regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pujalte

    2015-07-01

    seasons facilitated the erosion of landscapes, whereas a dramatic enhancement of precipitation extremes during the wet seasons led to intensified flood events with rivers carrying greater volumes of bed and suspended loads. This scenario argues against the possibility that PETM kaolinites indicate a coeval warm and humid climate in northern Spain. Instead, the erosion of thick Cretaceous lateritic profiles developed in the Hercinian basement is proposed here as the most likely alternative.

  8. A massive input of coarse-grained siliciclastics in the Pyrenean Basin during the PETM: the missing ingredient of a coeval abrupt change in hydrological regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujalte, V.; Baceta, J. I.; Schmitz, B.

    2015-07-01

    facilitated the erosion of landscapes, whereas a dramatic enhancement of precipitation extremes during the wet seasons led to intensified flood events with rivers carrying greater volumes of bed and suspended loads. This scenario argues against the possibility that PETM kaolinites indicate a coeval warm and humid climate in northern Spain. Instead, the erosion of thick Cretaceous lateritic profiles developed in the Hercinian basement is proposed here as the most likely alternative.

  9. Protracted, coeval crust and mantle melting during Variscan late-orogenic evolution: U-Pb dating in the eastern French Massif Central

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Couzinié, Simon; Zeh, Armin; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Moyen, Jean-François; Villaros, Arnaud; Gardien, Véronique; Chelle-Michou, Cyril

    2017-03-01

    The late stages of the Variscan orogeny are characterized by middle to lower crustal melting and intrusion of voluminous granitoids throughout the belt, which makes it akin to "hot" orogens. These processes resulted in the development of large granite-migmatite complexes, the largest of which being the 305-300-Ma-old Velay dome in the eastern French Massif Central (FMC). This area also hosts a wide range of late-Variscan plutonic rocks that can be subdivided into four groups: (i) cordierite-bearing peraluminous granites (CPG); (ii) muscovite-bearing peraluminous granites (MPG); (iii) K-feldspar porphyritic, calc-alkaline granitoids (KCG) and (iv) Mg-K-rich (monzo)diorites and lamprophyres ("vaugnerites"). New results of LA-SF-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon and monazite dating on 33 samples from all groups indicate that both granites and mafic rocks emplaced together over a long period of 40 million years throughout the Carboniferous, as shown by intrusion ages between 337.4 ± 1.0 and 298.9 ± 1.8 Ma for the granitoids, and between 335.7 ± 2.1 and 299.1 ± 1.3 Ma for the vaugnerites. Low zircon saturation temperatures and abundant inherited zircons with predominant late Ediacaran to early Cambrian ages indicate that the CPG and MPG formed through muscovite or biotite dehydration melting of ortho- and paragneisses from the Lower Gneiss Unit. The KCG and vaugnerites contain very few inherited zircons, if any, suggesting higher magma temperatures and consistent with a metasomatized lithospheric mantle source for the vaugnerites. The KCG can be explained by interactions between the CPG/MPG and the vaugnerites, or extensive differentiation of the latter. The new dataset provides clear evidence that the eastern FMC was affected by a long-lived magmatic episode characterized by coeval melting of both crustal and mantle sources. This feature is suggested here to result from a lithospheric-scale thermal anomaly, triggered by the removal of the lithospheric mantle root. The spatial

  10. Protracted, coeval crust and mantle melting during Variscan late-orogenic evolution: U-Pb dating in the eastern French Massif Central

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Oscar; Couzinié, Simon; Zeh, Armin; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier; Moyen, Jean-François; Villaros, Arnaud; Gardien, Véronique; Chelle-Michou, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    The late stages of the Variscan orogeny are characterized by middle to lower crustal melting and intrusion of voluminous granitoids throughout the belt, which makes it akin to "hot" orogens. These processes resulted in the development of large granite-migmatite complexes, the largest of which being the 305-300-Ma-old Velay dome in the eastern French Massif Central (FMC). This area also hosts a wide range of late-Variscan plutonic rocks that can be subdivided into four groups: (i) cordierite-bearing peraluminous granites (CPG); (ii) muscovite-bearing peraluminous granites (MPG); (iii) K-feldspar porphyritic, calc-alkaline granitoids (KCG) and (iv) Mg-K-rich (monzo)diorites and lamprophyres ("vaugnerites"). New results of LA-SF-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon and monazite dating on 33 samples from all groups indicate that both granites and mafic rocks emplaced together over a long period of 40 million years throughout the Carboniferous, as shown by intrusion ages between 337.4 ± 1.0 and 298.9 ± 1.8 Ma for the granitoids, and between 335.7 ± 2.1 and 299.1 ± 1.3 Ma for the vaugnerites. Low zircon saturation temperatures and abundant inherited zircons with predominant late Ediacaran to early Cambrian ages indicate that the CPG and MPG formed through muscovite or biotite dehydration melting of ortho- and paragneisses from the Lower Gneiss Unit. The KCG and vaugnerites contain very few inherited zircons, if any, suggesting higher magma temperatures and consistent with a metasomatized lithospheric mantle source for the vaugnerites. The KCG can be explained by interactions between the CPG/MPG and the vaugnerites, or extensive differentiation of the latter. The new dataset provides clear evidence that the eastern FMC was affected by a long-lived magmatic episode characterized by coeval melting of both crustal and mantle sources. This feature is suggested here to result from a lithospheric-scale thermal anomaly, triggered by the removal of the lithospheric mantle root. The spatial

  11. Local to global: a collaborative approach to volcanic risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Eliza; Loughlin, Sue; Barsotti, Sara; Bonadonna, Costanza; Jenkins, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    -economic conditions tending to influence longer term well-being and recovery. The volcanological community includes almost 100 Volcano Observatories worldwide, the official institutions responsible for monitoring volcanoes. They may be dedicated institutions, or operate from national institutions (geological surveys, universities, met agencies). They have a key role in early warning, forecasting and long term hazard assessment (often in the form of volcanic hazards maps). The complexity of volcanic systems means that once unrest begins there are multiple potential eruptive outcomes and short term forecasts can change rapidly. This local knowledge of individual volcanoes underpins hazard and risk assessments developed at national, regional and global scales. Combining this local expertise with the knowledge of the international research community (including interdisciplinary perspectives) creates a powerful partnership. A collaborative approach is therefore needed to develop effective volcanic risk assessments at regional to global scale. The World Organisation of Volcano Observatories is a Commission of IAVCEI, alongside other Commissions such as 'Hazard and Risk' (with an active working group on volcanic hazards maps) and the 'Cities and Volcanoes' Commission. The Global Volcano Model network is a collaborative initiative developing hazards and risk information at national to global scales, underpinned by local expertise. Partners include IAVCEI, Smithsonian Institution, International Volcanic Health Hazard Network, VHub and other initiatives and institutions.

  12. Interpreting subsurface volcanic structures using geologically constrained 3-D gravity inversions: Examples of maar-diatremes, Newer Volcanics Province, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, T. N.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present results and a method to geophysically image the subsurface structures of maar volcanoes to better understand eruption mechanisms and risks associated with maar-forming eruptions. High-resolution ground gravity and magnetic data were acquired across several maar volcanoes within the Newer Volcanics Province of southeastern Australia, including the Ecklin maar, Red Rock Volcanic Complex, and Mount Leura Volcanic Complex. The depth and geometry of subsurface volcanic structures were determined by interpretation of gridded geophysical data and constrained 2.5-D forward and 3-D inverse modeling techniques. Bouguer gravity lows identified across the volcanic craters reflect lower density lake sediments and pyroclastic debris infilling the underlying maar-diatremes. These anomalies were reproduced during modeling by shallow coalesced diatremes. Short-wavelength positive gravity and magnetic anomalies identified within the center of the craters suggest complex internal structures. Modeling identified feeder vents, consisting of higher proportions of volcanic debris, intrusive dikes, and ponded magma. Because potential field models are nonunique, sensitivity analyses were undertaken to understand where uncertainty lies in the interpretations, and how the models may vary between the bounds of the constraints. Rather than producing a single "ideal" model, multiple models consistent with available geologic information are created using different inversion techniques. The modeling technique we present focuses on maar volcanoes, but there are wider implications for imaging the subsurface of other volcanic systems such as kimberlite pipes, scoria cones, tuff rings, and calderas.

  13. Magma storage under Iceland's Eastern Volcanic Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclennan, J.; Neave, D.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Thordarson, T.; Morgan, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern Volcanic Zone (EVZ) of Iceland is defined by a number of volcanic systems and large basaltic eruptions occur both through central volcanoes (e.g. Grímsvötn) and on associated fissure rows (e.g. Laki, Eldgjá). We have collected a large quantity of micro-analytical data from a number of EVZ eruptions, with the aim of identifying common processes that occur in the premonitory stages of significant volcanic events. Here, we focus on the AD 1783 Laki event, the early postglacial Saksunarvatn tephra and the sub-glacially erupted Skuggafjöll tindar and for each of these eruptions we have >100 olivine-hosted or plagioclase-hosted melt inclusion analyses for major, trace and volatile elements. These large datasets are vital for understanding the history of melt evolution in the plumbing system of basaltic volcanoes. Diverse trace element compositions in melt inclusions hosted in primitive macrocrysts (i.e. Fo>84, An>84) indicate that the mantle melts supplied to the plumbing system of EVZ eruptions are highly variable in composition. Concurrent mixing and crystallisation of these melts occurs in crustal magma bodies. The levels of the deepest of these magma bodies are not well constrained by EVZ petrology, with only a handful of high-CO2 melt inclusions from Laki providing evidence for magma supply from >5 kbar. In contrast, the volatile contents of melt inclusions in evolved macrocrysts, which are close to equilibrium with the carrier liquids, indicate that final depths of inclusion entrapment are 0.5-2 kbar. The major element composition of the matrix glasses shows that the final pressure of equilibration between the melt and its macrocryst phases also occurred at 0.5-2 kbar. The relationship between these pressures and seismic/geodetic estimates of chamber depths needs to be carefully evaluated. The melt inclusion and macrocryst compositional record indicates that injection of porphyritic, gas-rich primitive melt into evolved/enriched and degassed shallow

  14. Spreading dynamic of viscous volcanic ash in stimulated jet engine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    song, wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2016-04-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash is widely recognised as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The volcanic ash deposition process in a jet turbine is potentially complex. Volcanic ash in the air stream enters the inner liners of the combustors and partially or completely melts under the flames up to 2000 °C, at which point part of the ash deposits in the combustor fuel nozzle. Molten volcanic particles within high energy airflow escape the combustor to enter the turbine and impact the stationary (e.g., inlet nozzle guide vanes) and rotating airfoils (e.g., first stage high-pressure turbine blades) at high speed (up to Mach 1.25) in different directions, with the result that ash may stick, flow and remain liquid or solidify. Thus, the wetting behaviour of molten volcanic ash particle is fundamental to investigate impingement phenomena of ash droplet on the surface of real jet engine operation. The topic of wetting has received tremendous interest from both fundamental and applied points of view. However, due to the interdisciplinary gap between jet engine engineering and geology science, explicit investigation of wetting behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperature is in its infancy. We have taken a big step towards meeting this challenge. Here, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the wetting behaviour of viscous volcanic ash over a wide temperature range from 1100 to 1550 °C using an improved sessile-drop method. The results of our experiment demonstrate that temperature and viscosity play a critical role in determining the wetting possibility and governing the spreading kinetics of volcanic ash at high temperatures. Our systemic analysis of spreading of molten volcanic ash systems allows us to report on the fundamental differences between the mechanisms controlling spreading of organic liquids at room temperature and molten volcanic ash droplets.

  15. Catastrophic volcanic collapse: relation to hydrothermal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, D L; Williams, S N

    1993-06-18

    Catastrophic volcanic collapse, without precursory magmatic activity, is characteristic of many volcanic disasters. The extent and locations of hydrothermal discharges at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia, suggest that at many volcanoes collapse may result from the interactions between hydrothermal fluids and the volcanic edifice. Rock dissolution and hydrothermal mineral alteration, combined with physical triggers such as earth-quakes, can produce volcanic collapse. Hot spring water compositions, residence times, and flow paths through faults were used to model potential collapse at Ruiz. Caldera dimensions, deposits, and alteration mineral volumes are consistent with parameters observed at other volcanoes.

  16. Nephelometric Dropsonde for Volcanic Ash Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced dropsondes that could effectively be guided through atmospheric regions of interest such as volcanic plumes could enable unprecedented observations of...

  17. SO2 flux and the thermal power of volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Richard W.; Hughes, Graham O.

    2016-09-01

    A description of the dynamics, chemistry and energetics governing a volcanic system can be greatly simplified if the expansion of magmatic gas can be assumed to be adiabatic as it rises towards the surface. The conditions under which this assumption is valid are clarified by analysis of the transfer of thermal energy into the low conductivity wallrocks traversed by fractures and vents from a gas phase expanding over a range of mass flux rates. Adiabatic behavior is predicted to be approached typically within a month after perturbations in the release of source gas have stabilized, this timescale being dependent upon only the characteristic length scale on which the host rock is fractured and the thermal diffusivity of the rock. This analysis then enables the thermal energy transport due to gas release from volcanoes to be evaluated using observations of SO2 flux with reference values for the H2O:SO2 ratio of volcanic gas mixtures discharging through high temperature fumaroles in arc and mantle-related volcanic systems. Thermal power estimates for gas discharge are 101.8 to 104.1 MWH during quiescent, continuous degassing of arc volcanoes and 103.7 to 107.3 MWH for their eruptive stages, the higher value being the Plinean Pinatubo eruption in 1991. Fewer data are available for quiescent stage mantle-related volcanoes (Kilauea 102.1 MWH) but for eruptive events power estimates range from 102.8 MWH to 105.5 MWH. These estimates of thermal power and mass of gas discharges are commensurate with power estimates based on the total mass of gas ejected during eruptions. The sustained discharge of volcanic gas during quiescent and short-lived eruptive stages can be related to the hydrodynamic structure of volcanic systems with large scale gaseous mass transfer from deep in the crust coupled with episodes of high level intrusive activity and gas release.

  18. Thermal vesiculation during volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Cimarelli, Corrado; Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; von Aulock, Felix W.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Andrews, Benjamin J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Rhodes, Emma; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial volcanic eruptions are the consequence of magmas ascending to the surface of the Earth. This ascent is driven by buoyancy forces, which are enhanced by bubble nucleation and growth (vesiculation) that reduce the density of magma. The development of vesicularity also greatly reduces the ‘strength’ of magma, a material parameter controlling fragmentation and thus the explosive potential of the liquid rock. The development of vesicularity in magmas has until now been viewed (both thermodynamically and kinetically) in terms of the pressure dependence of the solubility of water in the magma, and its role in driving gas saturation, exsolution and expansion during decompression. In contrast, the possible effects of the well documented negative temperature dependence of solubility of water in magma has largely been ignored. Recently, petrological constraints have demonstrated that considerable heating of magma may indeed be a common result of the latent heat of crystallization as well as viscous and frictional heating in areas of strain localization. Here we present field and experimental observations of magma vesiculation and fragmentation resulting from heating (rather than decompression). Textural analysis of volcanic ash from Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala reveals the presence of chemically heterogeneous filaments hosting micrometre-scale vesicles. The textures mirror those developed by disequilibrium melting induced via rapid heating during fault friction experiments, demonstrating that friction can generate sufficient heat to induce melting and vesiculation of hydrated silicic magma. Consideration of the experimentally determined temperature and pressure dependence of water solubility in magma reveals that, for many ascent paths, exsolution may be more efficiently achieved by heating than by decompression. We conclude that the thermal path experienced by magma during ascent strongly controls degassing, vesiculation, magma strength and the effusive

  19. DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

    2005-11-01

    The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

  20. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  1. Seaward dipping reflectors along the SW continental margin of India: Evidence for volcanic passive margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ajay, K.K.; Chaubey, A.K.; Krishna, K.S.; Rao, D.G.; Sar, D.

    of the Chagos-Laccadive Ridge system. Velocity structure, seismic character, 2D gravity model and geographic locations of the dipping reflectors suggest that these reflectors are volcanic in origin, which are interpreted as Seaward Dipping Reflectors (SDRs...

  2. Environmental and anthropogenic factors affecting the respiratory toxicity of volcanic ash in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomašek, Ines; Horwell, Claire J.; Damby, David E.; Ayris, Paul M.; Barošová, Hana; Geers, Christoph; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Clift, Martin J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Human exposure to inhalable volcanic ash particles following an eruption is a health concern, as respirable-sized particles can potentially contribute towards adverse respiratory health effects, such as the onset or exacerbation of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Although there is substantial information on the mineralogical properties of volcanic ash that may influence its biological reactivity, knowledge as to how external factors, such as air pollution, contribute to and augment the potential reactivity is limited. To determine the respiratory effects of volcanic particle interactions with anthropogenic pollution and volcanic gases we will experimentally assess: (i) physicochemical characteristics of volcanic ash relevant to respiratory toxicity; (ii) the effects of simultaneously inhaling anthropogenic pollution (i.e. diesel exhaust particles (DEP)) and volcanic ash (of different origins); (iii) alteration of volcanic ash toxicity following interaction with volcanic gases. In order to gain a first understanding of the biological impact of the respirable fraction of volcanic ash when inhaled with DEP in vitro, we used a sophisticated 3D triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar epithelial tissue barrier. The multi-cellular system was exposed to DEP [0.02 mg/mL] and then exposed to either a single or repeated dose of well-characterised respirable volcanic ash (0.26 ± 0.09 or 0.89 ± 0.29 μg/cm2, respectively) from the Soufrière Hills volcano, Montserrat for a period of 24 hours using a pseudo-air liquid interface approach. Cultures were subsequently assessed for adverse biological endpoints including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and (pro)-inflammatory responses. Results indicated that the combination of DEP and respirable volcanic ash at sub-lethal concentrations incited a significant release of pro-inflammatory markers that was greater than the response for either DEP or volcanic ash, independently. Further work is planned, to determine if

  3. Monitoring volcanic threats using ASTER satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, K.A.; Wessels, R.; Ramsey, M.; Dehn, J.

    2008-01-01

    This document summarizes ongoing activities associated with a research project funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) focusing on volcanic change detection through the use of satellite imagery. This work includes systems development as well as improvements in data analysis methods. Participating organizations include the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS), the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Science Team, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) at the USGS Alaska Science Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology (JPL/CalTech), the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  4. Gravimetric control of active volcanic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic activity includes phases of magma chamber inflation and deflation, produced by movement of magma and/or hydrothermal processes. Such effects usually leave their imprint as deformation of the ground surfaces which can be recorded by GNSS and other methods, on one hand, and on the other hand they can be modeled as elastic deformation processes, with deformation produced by volcanic masses of finite dimensions such as spheres, ellipsoids and parallelograms. Such volumes are modeled on the basis of inversion (non-linear, numerical solution) of systems of equations relating the unknown dimensions and location of magma sources with observations, currently mostly GNSS and INSAR data. Inversion techniques depend on the misfit between model predictions and observations, but because systems of equations are highly non-linear, and because adopted models for the geometry of magma sources is simple, non-unique solutions can be derived, constrained by local extrema. Assessment of derived magma models can be provided by independent observations and models, such as micro-seismicity distribution and changes in geophysical parameters. In the simplest case magmatic intrusions can be modeled as spheres with diameters of at least a few tens of meters at a depth of a few kilometers; hence they are expected to have a gravimetric signature in permanent recording stations on the ground surface, while larger intrusions may also have an imprint in sensors in orbit around the earth or along precisely defined air paths. Identification of such gravimetric signals and separation of the "true" signal from the measurement and ambient noise requires fine forward modeling of the wider areas based on realistic simulation of the ambient gravimetric field, and then modeling of its possible distortion because of magmatic anomalies. Such results are useful to remove ambiguities in inverse modeling of ground deformation, and also to detect magmatic anomalies offshore.

  5. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  6. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Airborne volcanic ash; a global threat to aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Guffanti, Marianne C.

    2010-01-01

    The world's busy air traffic corridors pass over or downwind of hundreds of volcanoes capable of hazardous explosive eruptions. The risk to aviation from volcanic activity is significant - in the United States alone, aircraft carry about 300,000 passengers and hundreds of millions of dollars of cargo near active volcanoes each day. Costly disruption of flight operations in Europe and North America in 2010 in the wake of a moderate-size eruption in Iceland clearly demonstrates how eruptions can have global impacts on the aviation industry. Airborne volcanic ash can be a serious hazard to aviation even hundreds of miles from an eruption. Encounters with high-concentration ash clouds can diminish visibility, damage flight control systems, and cause jet engines to fail. Encounters with low-concentration clouds of volcanic ash and aerosols can accelerate wear on engine and aircraft components, resulting in premature replacement. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with national and international partners, is playing a leading role in the international effort to reduce the risk posed to aircraft by volcanic eruptions.

  8. The lateral extent of volcanic interactions during unrest and eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Juliet; Robertson, Elspeth; Cashman, Katharine

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions often occur simultaneously or tap multiple magma reservoirs. Such lateral interactions between magmatic systems are attributed to stress changes or hydraulic connections but the precise conditions under which coupled eruptions occur have yet to be quantified. Here we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar satellite data to analyse the surface deformation generated by volcanic unrest in the Kenyan Rift. We identify several magma sources located at depths of 2-5 km importantly, sources that are spaced less than about 10 km apart interact, whereas those spaced more than about 25 km apart do not. However, volcanoes up to 25 km apart have interacted in the geologic past. Thus, volcanic coupling is not simply controlled by the distance between the magma reservoirs. We then consider different tectonic settings globally, including intraplate volcanoes such as Hawaii and Yellowstone, arc volcanism in Alaska and Chile, and other rift settings, such as New Zealand, Iceland and Afar. We find that the most closely spaced magmatic interactions are controlled by the extent of a shallow crystal mush layer, stress changes can couple large eruptions over distances of about 20-40 km, and only large dyke intrusions or subduction earthquakes could generate coupled eruptions over distances of about 50-100 km.

  9. Database for potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Melissa N.; Ramsey, David W.; Miller, C. Dan

    2011-01-01

    More than 500 volcanic vents have been identified in the State of California. At least 76 of these vents have erupted, some repeatedly, during the past 10,000 yr. Past volcanic activity has ranged in scale and type from small rhyolitic and basaltic eruptions through large catastrophic rhyolitic eruptions. Sooner or later, volcanoes in California will erupt again, and they could have serious impacts on the health and safety of the State's citizens as well as on its economy. This report describes the nature and probable distribution of potentially hazardous volcanic phenomena and their threat to people and property. It includes hazard-zonation maps that show areas relatively likely to be affected by future eruptions in California. This digital release contains information from maps of potential hazards from future volcanic eruptions in the state of California, published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1847. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, main report text, and accompanying hazard tables from Bulletin 1847. It should be noted that much has been learned about the ages of eruptive events in the State of California since the publication of Bulletin 1847 in 1989. For the most up to date information on the status of California volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  10. Surface complexation modeling of americium sorption onto volcanic tuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M; Kelkar, S; Meijer, A

    2014-10-01

    Results of a surface complexation model (SCM) for americium sorption on volcanic rocks (devitrified and zeolitic tuff) are presented. The model was developed using PHREEQC and based on laboratory data for americium sorption on quartz. Available data for sorption of americium on quartz as a function of pH in dilute groundwater can be modeled with two surface reactions involving an americium sulfate and an americium carbonate complex. It was assumed in applying the model to volcanic rocks from Yucca Mountain, that the surface properties of volcanic rocks can be represented by a quartz surface. Using groundwaters compositionally representative of Yucca Mountain, americium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd, L/Kg) values were calculated as function of pH. These Kd values are close to the experimentally determined Kd values for americium sorption on volcanic rocks, decreasing with increasing pH in the pH range from 7 to 9. The surface complexation constants, derived in this study, allow prediction of sorption of americium in a natural complex system, taking into account the inherent uncertainty associated with geochemical conditions that occur along transport pathways.

  11. Precursory volcanic CO2 signals from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kataoka, Fumie; Kuze, Akihiko; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki

    2016-04-01

    Identification of earliest signals heralding volcanic unrest benefits from the unambiguous detection of precursors that reflect deviation of magmatic systems from metastable background activity. Ascent and emplacement of new basaltic magma at depth may precede eruptions by weeks to months. Transient localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions stemming from exsolution from depressurized magma are expected, and have been observed weeks to months ahead of magmatic surface activity. Detecting such CO2 precursors by continuous ground-based monitoring operations is unfortunately not a widely implemented method yet, save a handful of volcanoes. Detecting CO2 emissions from space offers obvious advantages - however it is technologically challenging, not the least due to the increasing atmospheric burden of CO2, against which a surface emission signal is hard to discern. In a multi-year project, we have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 passive degassing signals using observations from the Greenhouse Gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Since 2010, we have observed over 40 active volcanoes from space using GOSAT's special target mode. Over 72% of targets experienced at least one eruption over that time period, demonstrating the potential utility of space-borne CO2 observations in non-imaging target-mode (point source monitoring mode). While many eruption precursors don't produce large enough CO2 signals to exceed space-borne detection thresholds of current satellite sensors, some of our observations have nevertheless already shown significant positive anomalies preceding eruptions at basaltic volcanoes. In 2014, NASA launched its first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2). Its observation strategy differs from the single-shot GOSAT instrument. At the expense of GOSAT's fast time series capability (3-day repeat cycle, vs. 16 for OCO-2), its 8-footprint continuous swath can slice

  12. Volcanic ash vs. sand and dust - "to stick or not to stick" in jet engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, U.; Song, W.; Lavallée, Y.; Hess, K. U.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Safe air travel activity requires clean flight corridors. But particles scattered in the atmosphere, whether volcanic ash, dust or sand, may present a critical threat to aviation safety. When these foreign particles are ingested into jet engines, whose interiors (e.g., the combustor and turbine blades) reach 1200-2000 °C, they can abrade, melt, and stick to the internal components of the engine, clogging ventilation traps of the cooling system as well as imparting substantial damage and potentially resulting in catastrophic system failure. To date, no criterion predicts ash behaviour at high temperature. Here, we experimentally develop the first quantitative model to predict melting and sticking conditions for the compositional range of volcanic ash encountered worldwide (Fig.1). The assumption that volcanic ash can be approximated by sand or dust is wholly inadequate, leading to an overestimation of sticking temperature and a correspondingly severe underestimation of the thermal hazard. Our findings confirm that the melting/softening behaviour of volcanic ash at high temperatures is essentially controlled by the composition of erupted ash - which may serve as an accurate proxy of the thermal hazard potential of volcanic ash interaction with jet engines. The criterion proposed here successfully parameterizes the potentially complex "melting" process of volcanic ash and can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash upon ingestion into hot jet engines.

  13. Combining observations and model simulations to reduce the hazard of Etna volcanic ash plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, Simona; Boselli, Antonella; Coltelli, Mauro; Leto, Giuseppe; Pisani, Gianluca; Prestifilippo, Michele; Spinelli, Nicola; Wang, Xuan; Zanmar Sanchez, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world with a recent activity characterized by powerful lava fountains that produce several kilometres high eruption columns and disperse volcanic ash in the atmosphere. It is well known that, to improve the volcanic ash dispersal forecast of an ongoing explosive eruption, input parameters used by volcanic ash dispersal models should be measured during the eruption. In this work, in order to better quantify the volcanic ash dispersal, we use data from the video-surveillance system of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo, and from the lidar system together with a volcanic ash dispersal model. In detail, the visible camera installed in Catania, 27 km from the vent is able to evaluate the evolution of column height with time. The Lidar, installed at the "M.G. Fracastoro" astrophysical observatory (14.97° E, 37.69° N) of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Catania, located at a distance of 7 km from the Etna summit craters, uses a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser source operating at a 532-nm wavelength, with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Backscattering and depolarization values measured by the Lidar system can give, with a certain degree of uncertainty, an estimation of volcanic ash concentration in atmosphere. The 12 August 2011 activity is considered a perfect test case because volcanic plume was retrieved by both camera and Lidar. We evaluated the mass eruption rate from the column height and used best fit procedures comparing simulated volcanic ash concentrations with those extracted by the Lidar data. During this event, powerful lava fountains were well visible at about 08:30 GMT and a sustained eruption column was produced since about 08:55 GMT. Ash emission completely ceased around 11:30 GMT. The proposed approach is an attempt to produce more robust ash dispersal forecasts reducing the hazard to air traffic during Etna volcanic crisis.

  14. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the ci...

  15. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  16. Magma evolution and ascent at the Craters of the Moon and neighboring volcanic fields, southern Idaho, USA: implications for the evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, Keith D.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Unruh, Daniel M.; Vaid, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields must reflect differences in magma processing during ascent. To assess their evolution we use thermobarometry and geochemistry to evaluate ascent paths for neighboring, nearly coeval volcanic fields in the Snake River Plain, in south-central Idaho, derived from (1) dominantly Holocene polygenetic evolved lavas from the Craters of the Moon lava field (COME) and (2) Quaternary non-evolved, olivine tholeiites (NEOT) from nearby monogenetic volcanic fields. These data show that NEOT have high magmatic temperatures (1205 + or - 27 degrees C) and a narrow temperature range (50 degrees C). Prolonged storage of COME magmas allows them to evolve to higher 87Sr/86Sr and SiO2, and lower MgO and 143Nd/144Nd. Most importantly, ascent paths control evolution: NEOT often erupt near the axis of the plain where high-flux (Yellowstone-related), pre-Holocene magmatic activity replaces granitic middle crust with basaltic sills, resulting in a net increase in NEOT magma buoyancy. COME flows erupt off-axis, where felsic crustal lithologies sometimes remain intact, providing a barrier to ascent and a source for crustal contamination. A three-stage ascent process explains the entire range of erupted compositions. Stage 1 (40-20 km): picrites are transported to the middle crust, undergoing partial crystallization of olivine + or - clinopyroxene. COME magmas pass through unarmored conduits and assimilate 1% or less of ancient gabbroic crust having high Sr and 87Sr/86Sr and low SiO2. Stage 2 (20-10 km): magmas are stored within the middle crust, and evolve to moderate MgO (10%). NEOT magmas, reaching 10% MgO, are positively buoyant and migrate through the middle crust. COME magmas remain negatively buoyant and so crystallize further and assimilate middle crust. Stage 3 (15-0 km): final ascent and eruption occurs when volatile contents, increased by differentiation, are sufficient (1-2 wt % H2O) to provide magma buoyancy through the

  17. Relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption inferred from historical records

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪洲; 高峰; 吴雪娟; 孟宪森

    2004-01-01

    A large number of seismic records are discovered for the first time in the historical materials about Wudalianchi volcanic group eruption in 1720~1721, which provides us with abundant volcanic earthquake information. Based on the written records, the relationship between earthquake and volcanic eruption is discussed in the paper. Furthermore it is pointed that earthquake swarm is an important indication of volcanic eruption. Therefore, monitoring volcanic earthquakes is of great significance for forecasting volcanic eruption.

  18. A catalogue of caldera unrest at Taupo Volcanic Centre, New Zealand, using the Volcanic Unrest Index (VUI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sally H.; Scott, Bradley J.; Jolly, Gill E.; Johnston, David M.; Neall, Vince E.

    2015-09-01

    Caldera unrest occurs frequently at Taupo Volcanic Centre (TVC), New Zealand, occasionally resulting in deleterious socio-economic impacts. This large silicic volcano most recently erupted in 232 AD in an explosive, caldera-forming rhyolitic eruption, devastating the central North Island. Eruptions are preceded by volcanic unrest, often consisting of seismicity, deformation, degassing, and/or geothermal system changes. These phenomena may also occur due to non-magmatic processes, complicating eruption forecasting. As volcanic unrest may or may not lead to an eruption, it needs to be characterised to provide effective warnings; this is best achieved by understanding past unrest. In this research, a catalogue of caldera unrest at TVC is developed using an historical chronology methodology, spanning from 1872 to December 2011. The Volcanic Unrest Index (VUI), which is introduced by Potter et al. (2015), is estimated for the catalogue, demonstrating its use and providing a characterisation of unrest at TVC. Sixteen episodes of unrest are identified; 4 are classified as moderate unrest (VUI 3), and 12 are classified as minor unrest (VUI 2). There has been median interval of approximately 3 years between unrest episodes and a median unrest episode duration of just under 5 months. This research provides context for future caldera unrest crises at TVC and contributes to the global caldera unrest dataset.

  19. Petrology and geochronology of lavas from Ka'ula Volcano: Implications for rejuvenated volcanism of the Hawaiian mantle plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Michael O.; Weis, Dominique; Jicha, Brian R.; Ito, Garrett; Hanano, Diane

    2016-07-01

    Marine surveying and submersible sampling of Ka'ula Volcano, located 100 km off the axis of the Hawaiian chain, revealed widespread areas of young volcanism. New 40Ar/39Ar and geochemical analyses of the olivine-phyric submarine and subaerial volcanic rocks show that Ka'ula is shrouded with 1.9-0.5 Ma alkalic basalts. The ages and chemistry of these rocks overlap with rejuvenated lavas on nearby, northern Hawaiian Island shields (Ni'ihau, Kaua'i and South Kaua'i Swell). Collectively, these rejuvenated lavas cover a vast area (∼7000 km2), much more extensive than any other area of rejuvenated volcanism worldwide. Ka'ula rejuvenated lavas range widely in alkalinity and incompatible element abundances (e.g., up to 10× P2O5 at a given MgO value) and ratios indicating variable degrees of melting of a heterogeneous source. Heavy REE elements in Ka'ula lavas are pinned at a mantle normalized Yb value of 10 ± 1, reflecting the presence of garnet in the source. Trace element ratios indicate the source also contained phlogopite and an Fe-Ti oxide. The new Ka'ula ages show that rejuvenated volcanism was nearly coeval from ∼0.3 to 0.6 Ma along a 450 km segment of the Hawaiian Islands (from West Maui to north of Ka'ula). The ages and volumes for rejuvenated volcanism are inconsistent with all but one geodynamic melting model proposed to date. This model advocates a significant contribution of pyroxenite to rejuvenated magmas. Analyses of olivine phenocryst compositions suggest a major (33-69%) pyroxenite component in Ka'ula rejuvenated lavas, which correlates positively with radiogenic Pb isotope ratios for Ka'ula. This correlation is also observed in lavas from nearby South Kaua'i lavas, as was reported for Atlantic oceanic islands. The presence of pyroxenite in the source may have extended the duration and volume of Hawaiian rejuvenated volcanism.

  20. The evolution of Neoproterozoic magmatism in Southernmost Brazil: shoshonitic, high-K tholeiitic and silica-saturated, sodic alkaline volcanism in post-collisional basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommer Carlos A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neoproterozoic shoshonitic and mildly alkaline bimodal volcanism of Southernmost Brazil is represented by rock assemblages associated to sedimentary successions, deposited in strike-slip basins formed at the post-collisional stages of the Brasilian/Pan-African orogenic cycle. The best-preserved volcano sedimentary associations occur in the Camaquã and Campo Alegre Basins, respectively in the Sul-riograndense and Catarinense Shields and are outside the main shear belts or overlying the unaffected basement areas. These basins are characterized by alternation of volcanic cycles and siliciclastic sedimentation developed dominantly on a continental setting under subaerial conditions. This volcanism and the coeval plutonism evolved from high-K tholeiitic and calc-alkaline to shoshonitic and ended with a silica-saturated sodic alkaline magmatism, and its evolution were developed during at least 60 Ma. The compositional variation and evolution of post-collisional magmatism in southern Brazil are interpreted as the result mainly of melting of a heterogeneous mantle source, which includes garnet-phlogopite-bearing peridotites, veined-peridotites with abundant hydrated phases, such as amphibole, apatite and phlogopite, and eventually with the addition of an asthenospheric component. The subduction-related metasomatic character of post-collisional magmatism mantle sources in southern Brazil is put in evidence by Nb-negative anomalies and isotope features typical of EM1 sources.

  1. 2015 Volcanic activity in Alaska—Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Iezzi, Alexandra M.; Wallace, Kristi

    2017-09-28

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 14 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2015. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of continuing intermittent ash eruptions from Cleveland and Shishaldin volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands. Two eruptive episodes, at Veniaminof and Pavlof, on the Alaska Peninsula ended in 2015. During 2015, AVO re-established the seismograph network at Aniakchak, installed six new broadband seismometers throughout the Aleutian Islands, and added a Multiple component Gas Analyzer System (MultiGAS) station on Augustine.

  2. Experimental study on the effect of calcination on the volcanic ash activity of diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liguang; Pang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The volcanic ash activity of diatomite was studied under the conditions of aerobic calcination and vacuum calcination by the combined water rate method, it was characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The results showed that the volcanic ash activity of diatomite under vacuum conditions was higher than that of aerobic calcination, 600°C vacuum calcination 2h, the combined water rate of diatomite-Ca(OH)2-H2O system was increased from 6.24% to 71.43%, the volcanic ash activity reached the maximum value, the specific surface

  3. Lakshmi Planum: A distinctive highland volcanic province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kari M.; Head, James W.

    Lakshmi Planum, a broad smooth plain located in western Ishtar Terra and containing two large oval depressions (Colette and Sacajawea), has been interpreted as a highland plain of volcanic origin. Lakshmi is situated 3 to 5 km above the mean planetary radius and is surrounded on all sides by bands of mountains interpreted to be of compressional tectonic origin. Four primary characteristics distinguish Lakshmi from other volcanic regions known on the planet, such as Beta Regio: (1) high altitude, (2) plateau-like nature, (3) the presence of very large, low volcanic constructs with distinctive central calderas, and (4) its compressional tectonic surroundings. Building on the previous work of Pronin, the objective is to establish the detailed nature of the volcanic deposits on Lakshmi, interpret eruption styles and conditions, sketch out an eruption history, and determine the relationship between volcanism and the tectonic environment of the region.

  4. Potassic volcanic rocks and adakitic intrusions in southern Tibet: Insights into mantle-crust interaction and mass transfer from Indian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhao, Zhidan; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Meng, Fan-Yi; Shi, Qingshang; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating geodynamic processes at depth relies on a correct interpretation of petrological and geochemical features in magmatic records. In southern Tibet, both potassic volcanic rocks and adakitic intrusions exhibit high Sr/Y and La/Yb, and low Y and Yb concentrations. But these two rock types have contrasting temporal-spatial distributions and isotopic variations. Here we present a systematic study on the postcollisional potassic and adakitic rocks in order to investigate their petrogenetic links with the coeval mantle-derived ultrapotassic rocks and shed light on the potential input from underthrusted Indian continental crust. We found that adakitic intrusions with higher K2O/Na2O tend to display lower Y and higher SiO2, suggesting that the mantle-derived ultrapotassic melts, showing relatively high Y and Yb concentrations, only played a minor role in adakitic magmatism. Therefore, the unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and the dramatic decrease of zircon εHf(t) values since 35 Ma shown by postcollisional adakites should be interpreted as reflecting the crustal input from Indian plate. Unlike adakitic intrusions in southern Lhasa subterrane, potassic volcanic rocks share similar spatial distributions with ultrapotassic rocks, and their isotopic discrepancy is diminishing with volcanic activity becomes younger and migrates eastward. Evidence from whole-rock Pb and zircon Hf isotopes further indicates that potassic volcanic rocks are more likely to originate from partial melting of the overthickened and isotopically heterogeneous Lhasa terrane crust rather than the underthrusted Indian continental crust. The elevated Rb/Sr and varying Sr/CaO in potassic volcanic rocks provide an argument for sanidine + plagioclase + clinopyroxene as the major fractionating phases during magmatic differentiation. These findings not only highlight the significance of potassic and adakitic rocks in providing constraints on the geodynamic processes beneath southern Tibet, but also imply that

  5. Geomorphological Approach for Regional Zoning In The Merapi Volcanic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langgeng Wahyu Santosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphologial approach can be used as the basic for identifying and analyzing the natural resources potentials, especially in volcanic landscape. Based on its geomorphology, Merapi volcanic landscape can be divided into 5 morphological units, i.e.: volcanic cone, volcanic slope, volcanic foot, volcanic foot plain, and fluvio-volcanic plain. Each of these morphological units has specific characteristic and natural resources potential. Based on the condition of geomorphology, the regional zoning can be compiled to support the land use planning and to maintain the conservation of environmental function in the Merapi Volcanic area.

  6. Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H. J.; Lee, S.; Choi, S. H.; Yun, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural Fragility Estimates Subjected to Volcanic Ash Fall Hazards Hee Jung Ham1, Seung-Hun Choi1, Woo-Seok Yun1, Sungsu Lee2 1Department of Architectural Engineering, Kangwon National University, Korea 2Division of Civil Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Korea ABSTRACT In this study, fragility functions are developed to estimate expected volcanic ash damages of the agricultural sector in Korea. The fragility functions are derived from two approaches: 1) empirical approach based on field observations of impacts to agriculture from the 2006 eruption of Merapi volcano in Indonesia and 2) the FOSM (first-order second-moment) analytical approach based on distribution and thickness of volcanic ash observed from the 1980 eruption of Mt. Saint Helens and agricultural facility specifications in Korea. Fragility function to each agricultural commodity class is presented by a cumulative distribution function of the generalized extreme value distribution. Different functions are developed to estimate production losses from outdoor and greenhouse farming. Seasonal climate influences vulnerability of each agricultural crop and is found to be a crucial component in determining fragility of agricultural commodities to an ash fall. In the study, the seasonality coefficient is established as a multiplier of fragility function to consider the seasonal vulnerability. Yields of the different agricultural commodities are obtained from Korean Statistical Information Service to create a baseline for future agricultural volcanic loss estimation. Numerically simulated examples of scenario ash fall events at Mt. Baekdu volcano are utilized to illustrate the application of the developed fragility functions. Acknowledgements This research was supported by a grant 'Development of Advanced Volcanic Disaster Response System considering Potential Volcanic Risk around Korea' [MPSS-NH-2015-81] from the Natural Hazard Mitigation Research Group, Ministry of Public Safety and Security of

  7. Handbook for Volcanic Risk Management: an outcome from MIAVITA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, Christian; Bosi, Vittorio; Costantini, Licia; Cristiani, Chiara; Lavigne, Franck; Thierry, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions are one of the most impressive, violent and dramatic agents of change on Earth, threatening hundreds of millions of people. The crises management implies a strong cooperation among the main stakeholders (e.g., civil protection authorities, scientific institutions, operational forces). Considering the great amount of different actions required during the whole volcanic cycle (e.g., preparedness, unrest phase, crisis management, resilience), the role and responsibilities of stakeholders should be clarified in advance. In particular, the role of scientists, fundamental in all the phases, should be well discussed with the other stakeholders and well defined, for every country. This will allow a better management and response, and contribute to avoid misunderstanding. The new "Handbook for Volcanic Risk Management" issued by the MIAVITA European project, funded by the European Commission (Mitigate and Assess risk from Volcanic Impact on Terrain and human Activities) gives a contribution to that. Indeed, this handbook aims at synthesizing the acquired knowledge on volcanic risk management, such as prevention, preparedness, mitigation, intervention, crisis management and resilience, in a practical and useful way. It promotes the creation of an ideal bridge between different actors involved in risk management, improving and facilitating interactions among authorities and scientists. This work is based on current scientific research and the shared experience of the different MIAVITA project partners as well as on international good practices previously recommended. The handbook is composed of six sections. The first one briefly explains the global volcanic context and the principles of corresponding risk management. Section 2 contains a description of volcanic phenomena, damage and understanding size and effects that can be expected. Sections 3, 4 and 5 meet preparation and prevention issues and describe actions to be undertaken during the response phase

  8. Spatio-temporal evolution of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs Nawotniak, S. E.; Espindola, J.; Godinez, L.

    2010-12-01

    Mapping of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF), located in Veracruz, Mexico, through the use of digital elevation models, aerial photography, and field confirmation has found 353 distinct cones, 4 large composite volcanoes, and 42 maars. Eruptive activity in the TVF began in the late Miocene, underwent a quiescent period approximately 2.6-0.8 Ma, and continues into historic times with the most recent eruption occurring at San Martín Tuxtla volcano in 1793. The covariance of the minimum cone separation in the TVF indicates that, despite the influence of clear vent alignments following regional faulting trends, the field as a whole is anticlustered. Dividing the cones by morphometric age shows that while the older cones have an anti-clustered distribution, the younger cones (Catemaco. These areas of concentrated volcanism roughly correspond to the locations of two gravity anomalies previously identified in the area. While the average height/width ratio is equal between the two clusters, the cones in the eastern group are significantly smaller than their counterparts in the western group. The maars of the TVF are mostly located within the younger volcanic series, west of Laguna Catemaco, and have an anticlustered distribution; many of the maars are evenly spaced along curved lines, where they are weakly grouped according to crater diameter. Results indicate volcanism TVF has undergone continued spatial restriction over time, concentrating in the western half of the TVF with the onset of the eruption of the younger volcanic series 0.8 Ma and further contracting along the principle fault system within the last 50 Ka.

  9. Frequent underwater volcanism in the central Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebscher, C.; Ruhnau, M.; Dehghani, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The extinction of the Minoan culture in the mid second millennium BCE is a well known consequence of the Plinian eruption of Thera volcano (Santorini Island). Santorini is a member of the South Aegean arc forming a chain from the Gulf of Saronikos (Susaki, Egina, Poros, Methana) at West, to an area close to the Anatolian coast at East (Kos, Nisyros and minor islands), through the central part (Milos and Santorini island groups). Underwater volcanic activity was manifested historically only once. During 1649-1650 CE the Kolumbo underwater volcano evolved about 8 km northeast of Santorini. As a consequence of this eruption volcanic ash covered the entire Aegean area and a hazardous tsunami was triggered. Here we show by means of reflection seismic and magnetic data that underwater volcanism occurred more frequently in the central Aegean Sea than previously assumed. Seismic data show that Kolumbo constitutes of five vertically stacked cones of pyroclastic sediment plus at least four smaller cones on the flank of the volcano. The formation of Kolumbo started synchronous with Santorini Island. The entire volume of the Kolumbo pyroclastic cones is estimated to more than 15 cubic-kilometers. Several small-scale cones have been detected in the Anyhdros Basin some km north-east of Kolumbo, being previously interpreted as mud volcanoes by other authors. However, the similarity of seismic and magnetic signatures of these cones and Kolumbo strongly suggest that these cones were also created by underwater volcanism. Volcanic cones, Kolumbo and Santorini are situated along a NE-SW striking graben system that evolved during five extensional tectonic pulses in the Pliocene.

  10. Scientific Drilling in a Central Italian Volcanic District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Montone

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Colli Albani Volcanic District, located 15 km SE of Rome (Fig. 1, is part of the Roman Magmatic Province, a belt of potassic to ultra-potassic volcanic districts that developed along the Tyrrhenian Sea margin since Middle Pleistocene time (Conticelli and Peccerillo, 1992; Marra et al., 2004; Giordano et al., 2006 and references therein. Eruption centers are aligned along NW-SE oriented majorextensional structures guiding the dislocation of Meso-Cenozoic siliceous-carbonate sedimentary successions at the rear of the Apennine belt. Volcanic districts developed in structural sectors with most favorable conditions for magma uprise. In particular, the Colli Albani volcanism is located in a N-S shear zone where it intersects the extensional NW- and NE-trending fault systems. In the last decade, geochronological measurements allowed for reconstructions of the eruptive history and led to the classification as "dormant" volcano. The volcanic history may be roughly subdivided into three main phases marked by different eruptive mechanisms andmagma volumes. The early Tuscolano-Artemisio Phase (ca. 561–351 ky, the most explosive and voluminous one, is characterized by five large pyroclastic flow-forming eruptions. After a ~40-ky-long dormancy, a lesser energetic phase of activity took place (Faete Phase; ca. 308–250 ky, which started with peripheral effusive eruptions coupled with subordinate hydromagmatic activity. A new ~50-ky-long dormancypreceded the start of the late hydromagmatic phase (ca. 200–36 ky, which was dominated by pyroclastic-surge eruptions, with formation of several monogenetic or multiple maars and/or tuff rings.

  11. Quiescent Diffusive and Fumarolic Volcanic Bromocarbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Giźe, A. P.; Seward, T. M.; Hall, P. A.; Dietrich, V. J.

    2002-12-01

    volcanic "soil" close to high-temperature fumaroles. Other ODS found significantly above air, field and analytical system blanks include CH3Cl, CH3I, chlorophenols and chlorobenzenes. Abundances range from upper pptv to ppmv (e.g. CFC-11: max. 1200 pptv diffusive, 3700 pptv fumarolic/dry gas, dry air: 268 pptv). References\\ Bureau H. et al. (2000), EPSL 183 (1-2):51-60.\\Butler J.H. (2000), Nature 403:560-261.\\Gan J. Y. et al. (1995), J. Agric. Food Chem. 43:1361-1367.\\Gribble G. W. (2000), Environ. Sci. Pollut. Res. 7(1), 37-49.\\Isidorov V. A. et al. (1990), J. Atmos. Chem. 10(3):329-340.\\Jordan A. et al.(2000), ES&T 34:1122-1124.\\Rasmussen R. A. et al. (1980), EOS Transact. 61(6):67.\\Schwandner F. M. et al. (2000), J. Conf. Abs. 5(2):898.\\Schwandner F. M. et al. (2001), Chimia 55(7-8):590.\\Schwandner F.M. et al. (2002), Geoch. Soc. Spec. Publ. 8 (subm.).\\Solomon S. et al. (1992), JGR-A. 97:825-842.\\Stoiber R. E. (1995), In: A handbook of physical constants, AGU Reference Shelf 1:308-319.\\Wahrenberger C. et al. (1996), EOS Trans. 77(46):804.\\WMO (1998) Scientific assessment of ozone depletion. WMO Rep. No. 44, World Meteorological Organisation (WMO), Geneva.

  12. Spatial Compilation of Holocene Volcanic Vents in the Western Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Siebert, L.

    2015-12-01

    A spatial compilation of all known Holocene volcanic vents in the western conterminous United States has been assembled. This compilation records volcanic vent location (latitude/longitude coordinates), vent type (cinder cone, dome, etc.), geologic map unit description, rock type, age, numeric age and reference (if dated), geographic feature name, mapping source, and, where available, spatial database source. Primary data sources include: USGS geologic maps, USGS Data Series, the Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program (GVP) catalog, and published journal articles. A total of 726 volcanic vents have been identified from 45 volcanoes or volcanic fields spanning ten states. These vents are found along the length of the Cascade arc in the Pacific Northwest, widely around the Basin and Range province, and at the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau into New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) identifies 28 volcanoes and volcanic centers in the western conterminous U.S. that pose moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. This compilation enhances the understanding of volcano hazards that could threaten people and property by providing the context of where Holocene eruptions have occurred and where future eruptions may occur. Locations in this compilation can be spatially compared to located earthquakes, used as generation points for numerical hazard models or hazard zonation buffering, and analyzed for recent trends in regional volcanism and localized eruptive activity.

  13. Palynological constraints on timing and duration of Siberian Traps volcanic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Henk; Svensen, Henrik; Looy, Cindy; Fristad, Kirsten; Polozov, Alexander; Planke, Sverre

    2010-05-01

    Basin and the crater-lake sediments associated with phreatomagmatic volcanism towards the south. Our interpretation of the palynological record corroborates a Late Permian age. Comparable assemblages are known from Permian-Triassic boundary sections in North China, the Russian Platform, the Barents Sea, Greenland and Canada. These records were previously regarded as earliest Triassic, but are now known to predate the first appearance of the conodont Hindeodus parvus, which formally defines the base of the Triassic. They are presently considered to represent the latest Permian (late Changshingian). A latest Permian age for the main phase of Siberian Traps magmatism confirms age concepts based on U-Pb and 40Ar-39Ar geochronology. Palynomorph assemblages from sedimentary interbeds of the predominantly pyroclastic lower part of the Siberian Traps succession can be readily distinguished from those of the flood basalts and crater lakes. Yet they are also Late Permian in age, and can be correlated with similar assemblages from North China and the Russian Platform. It remains questionable whether the volcanic deposits of the Tunguska Basin cross the Permian-Triassic boundary. Triassic continuation of volcanic activity may be apparent in the West Siberian Basin and on the Taymyr Peninsula, but palynological information from these areas needs further verification. It may be concluded that our palynological age-assessment of Siberian flood volcanism and coeval phreatomagmatic activity in the Tunguska Basin would support a first-order causal link between the most prominent phase of Siberian Traps magmatism and the end-Permian biosphere crisis. Ongoing paleoecological analysis of the Siberian floral records may contribute to an understanding of the precise nature of this link.

  14. On the origin of Mount Etna eruptive cycles and Stromboli volcano paroxysms: implications for an alternative mechanism of volcanic eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Nechayev, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    New mechanism of imbalance between magma column and fluid volume, accumulated in the magmatic system, is considered as a driving force of the volcanic eruption. Conditions of eruption based on this mechanism are used to explain main features of the volcanic activity (eruptive cycles and paroxysms) of the volcanoes Etna and Stromboli (Italy).

  15. Recent advances in ground-based ultraviolet remote sensing of volcanic SO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euripides P. Kantzas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of volcanic SO2 emission rates have been the mainstay of remote-sensing volcanic gas geochemistry for almost four decades, and they have contributed significantly to our understanding of volcanic systems and their impact upon the atmosphere. The last ten years have brought step-change improvements in the instrumentation applied to these observations, which began with the application of miniature ultraviolet spectrometers that were deployed in scanning and traverse configurations, with differential optical absorption spectroscopy evaluation routines. This study catalogs the more recent empirical developments, including: ultraviolet cameras; wide-angle field-of-view differential optical absorption spectroscopy systems; advances in scanning operations, including tomography; and improved understanding of errors, in particular concerning radiative transfer. Furthermore, the outcomes of field deployments of sensors during the last decade are documented, with respect to improving our understanding of volcanic dynamics and degassing into the atmosphere.

  16. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the

  17. SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, F. V.; Crowe, G. A.; Valentine, G. A.; Bowker, L. M.

    1997-09-23

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the

  18. Volcanic unrest and hazard communication in Long Valley Volcanic Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Mangan, Margaret T.; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    emissions. Initial response plans developed by county and state agencies in response to the volcanic unrest began with “The Mono County Volcano Contingency Plan” and “Plan Caldera” by the California Office of Emergency Services in 1982–84. They subsequently became integrated in the regularly updated County Emergency Operation Plan. The alert level system employed by the USGS also evolved from the three-level “Notice-Watch-Warning” system of the early 1980s through a five level color-code to the current “Normal-Advisory-Watch-Warning” ground-based system in conjunction with the international 4-level aviation color-code for volcanic ash hazards. Field trips led by the scientists proved to be a particularly effective means of acquainting local residents and officials with the geologically active environment in which they reside. Relative caldera quiescence from 2000 through 2011 required continued efforts to remind an evolving population that the hazards posed by the 1980–2000 unrest persisted. Renewed uplift of the resurgent dome from 2011 to 2014 was accompanied by an increase in low-level earthquake activity in the caldera and beneath Mammoth Mountain and continues through May 2016. As unrest levels continue to wax and wane, so will the communication challenges.

  19. Subterranean fragmentation of magma during conduit initiation and evolution in the shallow plumbing system of the small-volume Jagged Rocks volcanoes (Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Arizona, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Muirhead, James D.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-08-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes have limited magma supply and lack long-lived sustained magma plumbing systems. They erupt once, often from multiple vents and sometimes over several years, and are rarely or never re-activated. Eruptive behavior is very sensitive to physical processes (e.g., volatile exsolution, magma-water interaction) occurring in the later stages of magma ascent at shallow crustal depths (flowing through dikes fragmented and conduits were formed. We have identified three main types of fragmental deposits, (1) buds (which emerge from dikes), (2) pyroclastic massifs, and (3) diatremes; these represent three different styles and intensities of shallow-depth magma fragmentation. They may develop successively and at different sites during the evolution of a monogenetic volcano. The deposits consist of a mixture of pyroclasts with varying degrees of welding and country-rock debris in various proportions. Pyroclasts are commonly welded together, but also reveal in places features consistent with phreatomagmatism, such as blocky shapes, dense groundmasses, and composite clasts (loaded and cored). The extent of fragmentation and the formation of subterranean open space controlled the nature of the particles and the architecture and geometry of these conduit structures and their deposits.

  20. New strategies for volcanic hazard and risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Biasse, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions are amongst the most intense and majestic display of natu- re’s power that can dramatically impact the Earth system and our modern societies. The recent 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull demonstrated how eruptions of moderate size can impact modern globalised societies. Most of the European airspace was closed for a week and the air traffic over the North Atlantic was interrupted. 313 airports were closed, 104,000 flights cancelled, 10 million passengers stranded, causing a...

  1. The NASA Applied Sciences Program: Volcanic Ash Observations and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John J.; Fairlie, Duncan; Green, David; Haynes, John; Krotkov, Nickolai; Meyer, Franz; Pavolonis, Mike; Trepte, Charles; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the NASA Applied Sciences Program has been actively transitioning observations and research to operations. Particular success has been achieved in developing applications for NASA Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) sensors, integrated observing systems, and operational models for volcanic ash detection, characterization, and transport. These include imager applications for sensors such as the MODerate resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) on NASA Terra and Aqua satellites, and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite; sounder applications for sensors such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP; UV applications for the Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI) on the NASA Aura Satellite and the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) on Suomi NPP including Direct readout capabilities from OMI and OMPS in Alaska (GINA) and Finland (FMI):; and lidar applications from the Caliop instrument coupled with the imaging IR sensor on the NASA/CNES CALIPSO satellite. Many of these applications are in the process of being transferred to the Washington and Alaska Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) where they support operational monitoring and advisory services. Some have also been accepted, transitioned and adapted for direct, onboard, automated product production in future U.S. operational satellite systems including GOES-R, and in automated volcanic cloud detection, characterization and alerting tools at the VAACs. While other observations and applications remain to be developed for the current constellation of NASA EOS sensors and integrated with observing and forecast systems, future requirements and capabilities for volcanic ash observations and applications are also being developed. Many of these are based on technologies currently being tested on NASA aircraft, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and balloons. All of these efforts and the potential advances

  2. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  3. Volcanic succession and feeder systems of acidic lava-domes of Serra Geral Formation in São Marcos-Antônio Prado region, South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fernandes de Lima

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the São Marcos (RS and Antonio Prado (RS, the Serra Geral Formation exposes at the base basalts of pahoehoe type, coveredby basalts of the ´a´ā type. The first succession was generated by a low rate of eruption in a closed flow system allowed the flow toreach distances > 100 km of the source.T he ´a´ā lava flow types were generated by higher rates of eruption andt ransported in openchannels where rapid cooling prevented long distances from the source to be reached. The two types of basalts are low-TiO2 tholeiiticand the morphology of flows is not related to variations in SiO2 and MgO contents. Above these rock types outcrop acidic volcanicrocks geochemically of Caxias Group (Palmas Subgroup. Dimension stones extraction exposed the inner portions of the acidicfeeder dikes with vertical magmatic foliations. The lava domes have exogenous characteristics and horizontal foliations. We proposea model for the generation of domes involving the diapirically rise of acids magmas that become vesicular and more viscous, thatstop near the surface. New magmatic pulses extracted “pieces” of the vesicular fraction generating autobreccias in the conduit andvertical structures that extend laterally toward the surface organizing the lava domes with vitrophyres in the base and in the top, witha thin massive phaneritic core. Magmatic textures of the domes are typical of effusive units and the identification of the feeder dykesin the area allows the understanding of the emplacement process of acidic flows in the Serra Geral Formation.

  4. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

    1984-12-01

    Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

  5. Field-trip guide to Columbia River flood basalts, associated rhyolites, and diverse post-plume volcanism in eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, Mark L.; Streck, Martin J.; McClaughry, Jason D.

    2017-08-09

    The Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) is the youngest and best preserved continental flood basalt province on Earth, linked in space and time with a compositionally diverse succession of volcanic rocks that partially record the apparent emergence and passage of the Yellowstone plume head through eastern Oregon during the late Cenozoic. This compositionally diverse suite of volcanic rocks are considered part of the La Grande-Owyhee eruptive axis (LOEA), an approximately 300-kilometer-long (185 mile), north-northwest-trending, middle Miocene to Pliocene volcanic belt located along the eastern margin of the Columbia River flood basalt province. Volcanic rocks erupted from and preserved within the LOEA form an important regional stratigraphic link between the (1) flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau on the north, (2) bimodal basalt-rhyolite vent complexes of the Owyhee Plateau on the south, (3) bimodal basalt-rhyolite and time-transgressive rhyolitic volcanic fields of the Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Plateau, and (4) the High Lava Plains of central Oregon.This field-trip guide describes a 4-day geologic excursion that will explore the stratigraphic and geochemical relationships among mafic rocks of the Columbia River Basalt Group and coeval and compositionally diverse volcanic rocks associated with the early “Yellowstone track” and High Lava Plains in eastern Oregon. Beginning in Portland, the Day 1 log traverses the Columbia River gorge eastward to Baker City, focusing on prominent outcrops that reveal a distal succession of laterally extensive, large-volume tholeiitic flood lavas of the Grande Ronde, Wanapum, and Saddle Mountains Basalt formations of the CRBG. These “great flows” are typical of the well-studied flood basalt-dominated Columbia Plateau, where interbedded silicic and calc-alkaline lavas are conspicuously absent. The latter part of Day 1 will highlight exposures of middle to late Miocene silicic ash-flow tuffs, rhyolite domes, and

  6. Volcanic Plume Above Mount St. Helens Detected with GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlié, N.; Briole, P.; Nercessian, A.; Murakami, M.

    2005-07-01

    Eruptions can produce not only flows of incandescent material along the slopes of a volcano but also ash plumes in the troposphere [Sparks et al., 1997] that can threaten aircraft flying in the vicinity [Fisher et al., 1997]. To protect aircraft, passengers, and crews, the International Civil Aviation Organization and the World Meteorological Organization created eight Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC, http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/VAAC/vaac.html) around the globe with the goal of tracking volcanic plumes and releasing eruption alerts to airports, pilots, and companies. Currently, the VAAC monitoring system is based mostly on the monitoring systems of any local volcano observatories and on real-time monitoring of data acquired by meteorological satellites. In the case of the 18 August 2000 eruption of the Miyakejima volcano in Japan, Houlié et al. [2005] showed that the Global Positioning System(GPS) might be used as an additional tool for monitoring volcanic plumes. The present article indicates that the 9 March 2005 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, also produced detectable anomalies in GPS data.>

  7. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task D. Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems. Phase 1 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States); Barr, D. [Office of Repository Development, DOE (United States)

    2007-02-15

    The general goal of this project is to encourage multidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modeling coupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performance assessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-year project stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade, mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical processes. Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX is under way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal, Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stage aims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previous DECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes important for repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads Task D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled 'Long-term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC and THM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems.' In its leadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction for the cooperative research activities of the international research teams engaged in Task D. The research program developed for Task D of DECOVALEX-THMC involves geomechanical and geochemical research areas. THM and THC processes may lead to changes in hydrological properties that are important for performance because the flow processes in the vicinity of emplacement tunnels will be altered from their initial state. Some of these changes can be permanent (irreversible), in which case they persist after the thermal conditions have returned to ambient; i.e., they will affect the entire regulatory compliance period. Geochemical processes also affect the water and gas chemistry close to the waste packages, which are relevant for waste package corrosion, buffer stability, and radionuclide transport. Research teams participating in Task D evaluate long-term THM and THC processes in two generic geologic

  8. Volcanic caves of East Africa - an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim W. Simons

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Tertiary to recent volcanoes are located in East Africa. Thus, much of the region is made up volcanic rock, which hosts the largest and greatest variety of East Africas caves. Exploration of volcanic caves has preoccupied members of Cave Exploration Group of East Africa (CEGEA for the past 30 years. The various publications edited by CEGEA are in this respect a treasure troves of speleological information. In the present paper an overview on the most important volcanic caves and areas are shortly reported.

  9. Toward Forecasting Volcanic Eruptions using Seismic Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Brenguier, Florent; Campillo, Michel; Ferrazzini, Valerie; Duputel, Zacharie; Coutant, Olivier; Nercessian, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    During inter-eruption periods, magma pressurization yields subtle changes of the elastic properties of volcanic edifices. We use the reproducibility properties of the ambient seismic noise recorded on the Piton de la Fournaise volcano to measure relative seismic velocity variations of less than 0.1 % with a temporal resolution of one day. Our results show that five studied volcanic eruptions were preceded by clearly detectable seismic velocity decreases within the zone of magma injection. These precursors reflect the edifice dilatation induced by magma pressurization and can be useful indicators to improve the forecasting of volcanic eruptions.

  10. Arsenic in volcanic geothermal fluids of Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Dina L; Bundschuh, Jochen; Birkle, Peter; Armienta, Maria Aurora; Cumbal, Luis; Sracek, Ondra; Cornejo, Lorena; Ormachea, Mauricio

    2012-07-01

    Numerous volcanoes, hot springs, fumaroles, and geothermal wells occur in the Pacific region of Latin America. These systems are characterized by high As concentrations and other typical geothermal elements such as Li and B. This paper presents a review of the available data on As concentrations in geothermal systems and their surficial discharges and As data on volcanic gases of Latin America. Data for geothermal systems in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Chile are presented. Two sources of As can be recognized in the investigated sites: Arsenic partitioned into volcanic gases and emitted in plumes and fumaroles, and arsenic in rocks of volcanic edifices that are leached by groundwaters enriched in volcanic gases. Water containing the most elevated concentrations of As are mature Na-Cl fluids with relatively low sulfate content and As concentrations reaching up to 73.6 mg L⁻¹ (Los Humeros geothermal field in Mexico), but more commonly ranging from a few mg L⁻¹ to tens of mg L⁻¹. Fluids derived from Na-Cl enriched waters formed through evaporation and condensation at shallower depths have As levels of only a few μg L⁻¹. Mixing of Na-Cl waters with shallower meteoric waters results in low to intermediate As concentrations (up to a few mg L⁻¹). After the waters are discharged at the ground surface, As(III) oxidizes to As(V) and attenuation of As concentration can occur due to sorption and co-precipitation processes with iron minerals and organic matter present in sediments. Understanding the mechanisms of As enrichment in geothermal waters and their fate upon mixing with shallower groundwater and surface waters is important for the protection of water resources in Latin America.

  11. The geochemical variations of the upper cenozoic volcanism along the Calama Olacapato El Toro transversal fault system in central Andes (˜24°S): petrogenetic and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteini, M.; Mazzuoli, R.; Omarini, R.; Cas, R.; Maas, R.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, we present new geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data for several Upper Miocene volcanic centres aligned along one of the most extensive transcurrent lineament in the Central Andes, the Calama-Olacapato-El Toro (COT). The transversal volcanic belt along COT is constituted by large composite volcanoes and a caldera structure; they are, from NW to SE, Puntas Negras, Rincon, Tul Tul, Del Medio and Pocitos (TUMEPO), Quevar Aguas Calientes and Tastil. In order to compare chemical data from the different centres along the COT transect, differentiation effects were minimised by using data extrapolated at 60% SiO2 with least-square regression method. In the western sector of the COT, the volcanic products of Puntas Negras and Rincon show relatively high K2O and 87Sr/86Sr and low Rb/Cs, Ta/Th, La/Yb, 143Nd/144Nd. To the east, the TUMEPO products have high Sr and 143Nd/144Nd, La/Yb and Ba/Rb and low Y, 87Sr/86Sr. In the easternmost COT sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil volcanic complexes exhibit low La/Yb, high87Sr/Sr86 and low 143Nd/144Nd. On the basis of these data, we propose a petrogenetic and geodynamical model for Central Andes at 24°S. In correspondence of Miocene-Quaternary volcanic arc (Puntas Negras and Rincon), the magmas inherited a calcalkaline signature partly modified by upper crustal and/or sediment assimilation. In the central eastern sector, melting, assimilation, storage and homogenisation (MASH) processes occurred at the base of a thickened crust. In this COT sector, TUMEPO products show an evident lower crust signature and could be considered representative for MASH derived magmas. In the easternmost sector, Quevar, Aguas Calientes and Tastil products could represent magmas generated by partial melting of underthrusted Brasilian shield and mixed with magmas derived by MASH processes.

  12. Mode switching in volcanic seismicity: El Hierro 2011-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nick S.; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.

    2016-05-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter b value is commonly used in volcanic eruption forecasting to infer material or mechanical properties from earthquake distributions. Such studies typically analyze discrete time windows or phases, but the choice of such windows is subjective and can introduce significant bias. Here we minimize this sample bias by iteratively sampling catalogs with randomly chosen windows and then stack the resulting probability density functions for the estimated b>˜ value to determine a net probability density function. We examine data from the El Hierro seismic catalog during a period of unrest in 2011-2013 and demonstrate clear multimodal behavior. Individual modes are relatively stable in time, but the most probable b>˜ value intermittently switches between modes, one of which is similar to that of tectonic seismicity. Multimodality is primarily associated with intermittent activation and cessation of activity in different parts of the volcanic system rather than with respect to any systematic inferred underlying process.

  13. Unmanned aerial vehicle measurements of volcanic carbon dioxide fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, A. J. S.; Aiuppa, A.; Giudice, G.; Tamburello, G.; Hodson, A. J.; Gurrieri, S.

    2008-03-01

    We report the first measurements of volcanic gases with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The data were collected at La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, during April 2007, with a helicopter UAV of 3 kg payload, carrying an ultraviolet spectrometer for remotely sensing the SO2 flux (8.5 Mg d-1), and an infrared spectrometer, and electrochemical sensor assembly for measuring the plume CO2/SO2 ratio; by multiplying these data we compute a CO2 flux of 170 Mg d-1. Given the deeper exsolution of carbon dioxide from magma, and its lower solubility in hydrothermal systems, relative to SO2, the ability to remotely measure CO2 fluxes is significant, with promise to provide more profound geochemical insights, and earlier eruption forecasts, than possible with SO2 fluxes alone: the most ubiquitous current source of remotely sensed volcanic gas data.

  14. Evidence for young volcanism on Mercury from the third MESSENGER flyby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prockter, Louise M; Ernst, Carolyn M; Denevi, Brett W; Chapman, Clark R; Head, James W; Fassett, Caleb I; Merline, William J; Solomon, Sean C; Watters, Thomas R; Strom, Robert G; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marchi, Simone; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-08-06

    During its first two flybys of Mercury, the MESSENGER spacecraft acquired images confirming that pervasive volcanism occurred early in the planet's history. MESSENGER's third Mercury flyby revealed a 290-kilometer-diameter peak-ring impact basin, among the youngest basins yet seen, having an inner floor filled with spectrally distinct smooth plains. These plains are sparsely cratered, postdate the formation of the basin, apparently formed from material that once flowed across the surface, and are therefore interpreted to be volcanic in origin. An irregular depression surrounded by a halo of bright deposits northeast of the basin marks a candidate explosive volcanic vent larger than any previously identified on Mercury. Volcanism on the planet thus spanned a considerable duration, perhaps extending well into the second half of solar system history.

  15. Microscopic Evolution of Laboratory Volcanic Hybrid Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Griffith, W. A.; Benson, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the interaction between fluids and microscopic defects is one of the long-standing challenges in understanding a broad range of cracking processes, in part because they are so difficult to study experimentally. We address this issue by reexamining records of emitted acoustic phonon events during rock mechanics experiments under wet and dry conditions. The frequency spectrum of these events provides direct information regarding the state of the system. Such events are typically subdivided into high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) events, whereas intermediate “Hybrid” events, have HF onsets followed by LF ringing. At a larger scale in volcanic terranes, hybrid events are used empirically to predict eruptions, but their ambiguous physical origin limits their diagnostic use. By studying acoustic phonon emissions from individual microcracking events we show that the onset of a secondary instability-related to the transition from HF to LF-occurs during the fast equilibration phase of the system, leading to sudden increase of fluid pressure in the process zone. As a result of this squeezing process, a secondary instability akin to the LF event occurs. This mechanism is consistent with observations of hybrid earthquakes.

  16. Microscopic Evolution of Laboratory Volcanic Hybrid Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, H. O.; Griffith, W. A.; Benson, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the interaction between fluids and microscopic defects is one of the long-standing challenges in understanding a broad range of cracking processes, in part because they are so difficult to study experimentally. We address this issue by reexamining records of emitted acoustic phonon events during rock mechanics experiments under wet and dry conditions. The frequency spectrum of these events provides direct information regarding the state of the system. Such events are typically subdivided into high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) events, whereas intermediate “Hybrid” events, have HF onsets followed by LF ringing. At a larger scale in volcanic terranes, hybrid events are used empirically to predict eruptions, but their ambiguous physical origin limits their diagnostic use. By studying acoustic phonon emissions from individual microcracking events we show that the onset of a secondary instability–related to the transition from HF to LF–occurs during the fast equilibration phase of the system, leading to sudden increase of fluid pressure in the process zone. As a result of this squeezing process, a secondary instability akin to the LF event occurs. This mechanism is consistent with observations of hybrid earthquakes. PMID:28074878

  17. Volcanic Rocks As Targets For Astrobiology Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N.

    2010-12-01

    Almost two decades of study highlight the importance of terrestrial subaqueous volcanic rocks as microbial habitats, particularly in glass produced by the quenching of basaltic lava upon contact with water. On Earth, microbes rapidly begin colonizing glassy surfaces along fractures and cracks exposed to water. Microbial colonization of basaltic glass leads to enhanced alteration through production of characteristic granular and/or tubular bioalteration textures. Infilling of formerly hollow alteration textures by minerals enable their preservation through geologic time. Basaltic rocks are a major component of the Martian crust and are widespread on other solar system bodies. A variety of lines of evidence strongly suggest the long-term existence of abundant liquid water on ancient Mars. Recent orbiter, lander and rover missions have found evidence for the presence of transient liquid water on Mars, perhaps persisting to the present day. Many other solar system bodies, notably Europa, Enceladus and other icy satellites, may contain (or have once hosted) subaqueous basaltic glasses. The record of terrestrial glass bioalteration has been interpreted to extend back ~3.5 billion years and is widespread in modern oceanic crust and its ancient metamorphic equivalents. The terrestrial record of glass bioalteration strongly suggests that glassy or formerly glassy basaltic rocks on extraterrestrial bodies that have interacted with liquid water are high-value targets for astrobiological exploration.

  18. Volcanic Ash Advisory Database, 1983-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aviation and can also affect global climate patterns. To ensure safe navigation and monitor possible climatic impact, the...

  19. Palaeoclimate: Volcanism caused ancient global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Katrin J.; Bralower, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    A study confirms that volcanism set off one of Earth's fastest global-warming events. But the release of greenhouse gases was slow enough for negative feedbacks to mitigate impacts such as ocean acidification. See Letter p.573

  20. Volcanics in the Gulf Coast [volcanicg

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The volcanic provinces are modified after Plate 2, Principal structural features, Gulf of Mexico Basin (compiled by T.E. Ewing and R.F. Lopez) in Volume J, The...

  1. Volcanic rock properties control sector collapse events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amy; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Hornby, Adrian; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes constructed by superimposed layers of varying volcanic materials are inherently unstable structures. The heterogeneity of weak and strong layers consisting of ash, tephra and lavas, each with varying coherencies, porosities, crystallinities, glass content and ultimately, strength, can promote volcanic flank and sector collapses. These volcanoes often exist in areas with complex regional tectonics adding to instability caused by heterogeneity, flank overburden, magma movement and emplacement in addition to hydrothermal alteration and anomalous geothermal gradients. Recent studies conducted on the faulting properties of volcanic rocks at variable slip rates show the rate-weakening dependence of the friction coefficients (up to 90% reduction)[1], caused by a wide range of factors such as the generation of gouge and frictional melt lubrication [2]. Experimental data from experiments conducted on volcanic products suggests that frictional melt occurs at slip rates similar to those of plug flow in volcanic conduits [1] and the bases of mass material movements such as debris avalanches from volcanic flanks [3]. In volcanic rock, the generation of frictional heat may prompt the remobilisation of interstitial glass below melting temperatures due to passing of the glass transition temperature at ˜650-750 ˚C [4]. In addition, the crushing of pores in high porosity samples can lead to increased comminution and strain localisation along slip surfaces. Here we present the results of friction tests on both high density, glass rich samples from Santaguito (Guatemala) and synthetic glass samples with varying porosities (0-25%) to better understand frictional properties underlying volcanic collapse events. 1. Kendrick, J.E., et al., Extreme frictional processes in the volcanic conduit of Mount St. Helens (USA) during the 2004-2008 eruption. J. Structural Geology, 2012. 2. Di Toro, G., et al., Fault lubrication during earthquakes. Nature, 2011. 471(7339): p. 494-498. 3

  2. The strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks: A 2D approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Xu, Tao; Chen, Chong-feng; Tang, Chun'an

    2016-06-01

    Volcanic rocks typically contain heterogeneities in the form of crystals and pores. We investigate here the influence of such heterogeneity on the strength of volcanic rocks using an elastic damage mechanics model in which we numerically deform two-dimensional samples comprising low-strength elements representing crystals and zero-strength elements representing pores. These circular elements are stochastically generated so that there is no overlap in a medium representing the groundmass. Our modelling indicates that increasing the fraction of pores and/or crystals reduces the strength of volcanic rocks, and that increasing the pore fraction results in larger strength reductions than increasing the crystal fraction. The model also highlights an important weakening role for pore diameter, but finds that crystal diameter has a less significant influence for strength. To account for heterogeneity (pores and crystals), we propose an effective medium approach where we define an effective pore fraction ϕp‧ = Vp/(Vp + Vg) where Vp and Vg are the pore and groundmass fractions, respectively. Highly heterogeneous samples (containing high pore and/or crystal fractions) will therefore have high values of ϕp‧, and vice-versa. When we express our numerical samples (more than 200 simulations spanning a wide range of crystal and pore fractions) in terms of ϕp‧, we find that their strengths can be described by a single curve for a given pore diameter. To provide a predictive tool for the strength of heterogeneous volcanic rocks, we propose a modified version of 2D solution for the Sammis and Ashby (1986) pore-emanating crack model, a micromechanical model designed to estimate strength using microstructural attributes such as porosity, pore radius, and fracture toughness. The model, reformulated to include ϕp‧ (and therefore crystal fraction), captures the strength curves for our numerical simulations over a sample heterogeneity range relevant to volcanic systems. We find

  3. Engineering a robotic approach to mapping exposed volcanic fissures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcheta, C. E.; Parness, A.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Field geology provides a framework for advanced computer models and theoretical calculations of volcanic systems. Some field terrains, though, are poorly preserved or accessible, making documentation, quantification, and investigation impossible. Over 200 volcanologists at the 2012 Kona Chapman Conference on volcanology agreed that and important step forward in the field over the next 100 years should address the realistic size and shape of volcanic conduits. The 1969 Mauna Ulu eruption of Kīlauea provides a unique opportunity to document volcanic fissure conduits, thus, we have an ideal location to begin addressing this topic and provide data on these geometries. Exposed fissures can be mapped with robotics using machine vision. In order to test the hypothesis that fissures have irregularities with depth that will influence their fluid dynamical behavior, we must first map the fissure vents and shallow conduit to deci- or centimeter scale. We have designed, constructed, and field-tested the first version of a robotic device that will image an exposed volcanic fissure in three dimensions. The design phase included three steps: 1) create the payload harness and protective shell to prevent damage to the electronics and robot, 2) construct a circuit board to have the electronics communicate with a surface-based computer, and 3) prototype wheel shapes that can handle a variety of volcanic rock textures. The robot's mechanical parts were built using 3d printing, milling, casting and laser cutting techniques, and the electronics were assembled from off the shelf components. The testing phase took place at Mauna Ulu, Kīlauea, Hawai'i, from May 5 - 9, 2014. Many valuable design lessons were learned during the week, and the first ever 3D map from inside a volcanic fissure were successfully collected. Three vents had between 25% and 95% of their internal surfaces imaged. A fourth location, a non-eruptive crack (possibly a fault line) had two transects imaging the textures

  4. Volcanism on the Red Planet: Mars. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Bridges, Nathan T.; Crown, David A.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Zimbelman, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Of all the planets in the Solar System, Mars is the most Earthlike in its geological characteristics. Like Earth, it has been subjected to exogenic processes, such as impact cratesing and erosion by wind and water, as well as endogenic processes, including tectonic deformation of the crust and volcanism. The effects of these processes are amply demonstrated by the great variety of surface features, including impact craters, landslides, former river channels, sand dunes, and the largest volcanoes in the Solar System. Some of these features suggest substantial changes in Mars' environment during its history. For example, as reviewed by Carr, today Mars is a cold, dry desert with an average atmospheric pressure of only 5.6 mbar which does not allow liquid water to exist on the surface. To some planetary scientists, the presence of the channels bespeaks a time when Mars was warmer and wetter. However, others have argued that these features might have formed under current conditions and that there might not have been a shift in climate. Could the morphology of volcanoes and related features provide clues to past Martian environments? What role is played by atmospheric density in the styles of eruptions on Mars and resulting landforms? If these and related questions can be answered, then we may have a means for assessing the conditions on Mars' surface in the past and comparing the results with models of Martian evolution. In this chapter, we outline the sources of information available for volcanism on Mars, explore the influence of the Martian environment on volcanic processes, and describe the principal volcanic features and their implications for understanding the general evolution of the Martian surface.

  5. Volcanism on the Red Planet: Mars. Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Bridges, Nathan T.; Crown, David A.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Zimbelman, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Of all the planets in the Solar System, Mars is the most Earthlike in its geological characteristics. Like Earth, it has been subjected to exogenic processes, such as impact cratesing and erosion by wind and water, as well as endogenic processes, including tectonic deformation of the crust and volcanism. The effects of these processes are amply demonstrated by the great variety of surface features, including impact craters, landslides, former river channels, sand dunes, and the largest volcanoes in the Solar System. Some of these features suggest substantial changes in Mars' environment during its history. For example, as reviewed by Carr, today Mars is a cold, dry desert with an average atmospheric pressure of only 5.6 mbar which does not allow liquid water to exist on the surface. To some planetary scientists, the presence of the channels bespeaks a time when Mars was warmer and wetter. However, others have argued that these features might have formed under current conditions and that there might not have been a shift in climate. Could the morphology of volcanoes and related features provide clues to past Martian environments? What role is played by atmospheric density in the styles of eruptions on Mars and resulting landforms? If these and related questions can be answered, then we may have a means for assessing the conditions on Mars' surface in the past and comparing the results with models of Martian evolution. In this chapter, we outline the sources of information available for volcanism on Mars, explore the influence of the Martian environment on volcanic processes, and describe the principal volcanic features and their implications for understanding the general evolution of the Martian surface.

  6. Episodic Volcanism and Geochemistry in Western Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saginor, I.; Carr, M. J.; Gazel, E.; Swisher, C.; Turrin, B.

    2007-12-01

    The active volcanic arc in western Nicaragua is separated from the Miocene arc by a temporal gap in the volcanic record, during which little volcanic material was erupted. Previous work suggested that this gap lasted from 7 to 1.6 Ma, during which volcanic production in Nicaragua was limited or nonexistent. Because the precise timing and duration of this gap has been poorly constrained, recent fieldwork has focused on locating samples that may have erupted close to or even during this apparent hiatus in activity. Recent 40Ar/39Ar dates reveal pulses of low- level episodic volcanism at 7 Ma and 1 Ma between the active and Miocene arcs with current volcanism beginning ~350 ka. In addition, sampling from an inactive area between Coseguina and San Cristobal yielded two distinct groupings of ages; one of Tamarindo age (13 Ma) and the other around 3.5 Ma-the only samples of that age collected on-strike with the active arc. This raises the possibility the bases of the other active volcanoes contain lavas that are older than expected, but have been covered by subsequent eruptions. The Miocene arc differs from the active arc in Central America in several ways, with the latter having higher Ba/La and U/Th values due to increased slab input and changes in subducted sedim