WorldWideScience

Sample records for coenzyme q10 effects

  1. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Spindler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal models, studies of mitochondria from patients, identification of genetic defects in patients with neurodegenerative disease, and measurements of markers of oxidative stress. Studies of in vitro models of neuronal toxicity and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects of CoQ10. With this data in mind, several clinical trials of CoQ10 have been performed in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with equivocal findings. CoQ10 is widely available in multiple formulations and is very well tolerated with minimal adverse effects, making it an attractive potential therapy. Phase III trials of high-dose CoQ10 in large sample sizes are needed to further ascertain the effects of CoQ10 in neurodegenerative diseases.Keywords: coenzyme Q10, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mitochondrial dysfunction

  2. Hepatoprotective effect of taurine and coenzyme Q10 and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stress in rats. Afaf Abbass Sayed ... Keywords: Taurine, Coenzyme Q10, Acrylamide, Oxidative stress, Biochemical profile, ... uses, AA formation in foods has its major routes through .... release of serum inflammatory markers and neutrophil ...

  3. The effect of coenzyme Q10 in statin myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatohlavek, Lukas; Vrablik, Michal; Grauova, Barbora; Motykova, Eva; Ceska, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Statins significantly reduce CV morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, one of the side effects of statins is myopathy, for which statins cannot be administered in sufficient doses or administered at all. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of coenzyme Q10 in patients with statin myopathy. Twenty eight patients aged 60.6±10.7 years were monitored (18 women and 10 men) and treated with different types and doses of statin. Muscle weakness and pain was monitored using a scale of one to ten, on which patients expressed the degree of their inconvenience. Examination of muscle problems was performed prior to administration of CQ10 and after 3 and 6 months of dosing. Statistical analysis was performed using Friedman test, Annova and Students t-test. Pain decreased on average by 53.8% (pmuscle weakness by 44.4% (pmuscle pain and sensitivity statistically significantly decreased.

  4. Topical treatment with coenzyme Q10-containing formulas improves skin's Q10 level and provides antioxidative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Anja; Achterberg, Volker; Smuda, Christoph; Mielke, Heiko; Sperling, Gabi; Dunckelmann, Katja; Vogelsang, Alexandra; Krüger, Andrea; Schwengler, Helge; Behtash, Mojgan; Kristof, Sonja; Diekmann, Heike; Eisenberg, Tanya; Berroth, Andreas; Hildebrand, Janosch; Siegner, Ralf; Winnefeld, Marc; Teuber, Frank; Fey, Sven; Möbius, Janne; Retzer, Dana; Burkhardt, Thorsten; Lüttke, Juliane; Blatt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10, Q10) represents an endogenously synthesized lipid-soluble antioxidant which is crucial for cellular energy production but is diminished with age and under the influence of external stress factors in human skin. Here, it is shown that topical Q10 treatment is beneficial with regard to effective Q10 replenishment, augmentation of cellular energy metabolism, and antioxidant effects. Application of Q10-containing formulas significantly increased the levels of this quinone on the skin surface. In the deeper layers of the epidermis the ubiquinone level was significantly augmented indicating effective supplementation. Concurrent elevation of ubiquinol levels suggested metabolic transformation of ubiquinone resulting from increased energy metabolism. Incubation of cultured human keratinocytes with Q10 concentrations equivalent to treated skin showed a significant augmentation of energy metabolism. Moreover, the results demonstrated that stressed skin benefits from the topical Q10 treatment by reduction of free radicals and an increase in antioxidant capacity. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Hepatoprotective effect of taurine and coenzyme Q10 and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CoQ10) for mitigation of acrylamide- induced oxidative damage. . Method: Acrylamide (AA), TA and CoQ10 were administered orally to rats for 2 and 4 weeks. Sixty albino rats of either sex weighing 200 ± 5 were randomly divided into five groups; ...

  6. Effect of coenzyme q10 on myopathic symptoms in patients treated with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Giuseppe; Kelly, Patricia; McNurlan, Margaret A; Lawson, William E

    2007-05-15

    Treatment of hypercholesterolemia with statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, statin use is often associated with a variety of muscle-related symptoms or myopathies. Myopathy may be related in part to statin inhibition of the endogenous synthesis of coenzyme Q10, an essential cofactor for mitochondrial energy production. The aim of this study is to determine whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation would reduce the degree of muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Patients with myopathic symptoms were randomly assigned in a double-blinded protocol to treatment with coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/day, n = 18) or vitamin E (400 IU/day, n = 14) for 30 days. Muscle pain and pain interference with daily activities were assessed before and after treatment. After a 30-day intervention, pain severity decreased by 40% (p pain interference with daily activities decreased by 38% (p pain severity (+9%, p = NS) or pain interference with daily activities (-11%, p = NS) was observed in the group treated with vitamin E. In conclusion, results suggest that coenzyme Q10 supplementation may decrease muscle pain associated with statin treatment. Thus, coenzyme Q10 supplementation may offer an alternative to stopping treatment with these vital drugs.

  7. Protective Effect of Coenzyme Q10 on Methamphetamine-Induced Apoptosis in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Gholipour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The negative consequence of methamphetamine abuse is due to neuropathologic changes in the brain, which reduces dopaminergic neurons and result in damage to different brain areas. Neurotoxicity induced by methamphetamine increases the oxidative stress and associated with neuronal apoptosis. The role of the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 probably produces its neuroprotective effects. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on methamphetamine-induced apoptosis in adult male rats.Materials and Methods: Fifty Wistar eight-week adult rats randomly divided into 5 groups: Healthy control, methamphetamine injection (Meth, methamphetamine injection and CoQ10 5mg/kg treatment (Meth+Post CoQ10 5mg/kg, methamphetamine injection and CoQ10 10mg/kg treatment (Meth+Post CoQ10 10mg/kg, methamphetamine injection and CoQ10 20mg/kg treatment (Meth+Post CoQ10 20mg/kg. Methamphetamine with a purity of 96% with a dosage of 20 mg/kg was injected Intraperitoneal. Coenzyme Q10 for three treatment groups was injected intraperitoneally for 14 days in a dosage of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. The protein expressions of Baxand Bcl2 were evaluated by western blotting technique.Results: Bax protein expression was significantly lower in Meth+Post CoQ10 5mg/kg (p=0.010 and so Meth+Post CoQ10 10mg/kg (p=0.004 comparing to Meth group. In addition, Bcl2 protein expression was significantly higher in Meth+Post CoQ10 5mg/kg comparing to Meth group (p=0.018. However, there were no significant differences between control and CoQ10 treatment groups. Bax/Bcl2 ratio was significantly lower in Meth+Post CoQ10 5mg/kg (p=0.005, Meth+Post CoQ10 10mg/kg (p=0.008 and Meth+Post CoQ10 20mg/kg (p=0.044 comparing to Meth group.Conclusion: We suggest that CoQ10 reduces the methamphetamine-induced apoptosis in the striatum of the rats through the reduction of apoptotic factors and increase of anti-apoptotic pathways.

  8. Effect of Coenzyme-Q10 on Doxorubicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza A. K. El-Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is one of the limiting factors for using doxorubicin (Dox as an anticancer chemotherapeutic. Here, we investigated possible protective effect of coenzyme-Q10 (CoQ10 on Dox-induced nephrotoxicity and the mechanisms involved. Two doses (10 and 100 mg/kg of CoQ10 were administered orally to rats for 8 days, in the presence or absence of nephrotoxicity induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Dox (15 mg/kg at day 4 of the experiment. Our results showed that the low dose of CoQ10 succeeded in reversing Dox-induced nephrotoxicity to control levels (e.g., levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, concentrations of renal reduced glutathione (GSH and malondialdehyde, catalase activity and caspase 3 expression, and renal histopathology. Alternatively, the high dose of CoQ10 showed no superior nephroprotection over the low dose, as there were no significant improvements in renal histopathology, catalase activity, or caspase 3 expression compared to the Dox-treated group. Interestingly, the high dose of CoQ10 alone significantly decreased renal GSH level as well as catalase activity and caused a mild induction of caspase 3 expression compared to control, probably due to a prooxidant effect at this dose of CoQ10. We conclude that CoQ10 protects from Dox-induced nephrotoxicity with a precaution to dosage adjustment.

  9. Cold-Induced Ascites in Broilers: Effects of Vitamin C and Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Nemati

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We hypothesized that the supplementation of vitamin C (Vit. C and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 alone or in combination could reduce the negative effects of cold stress in broilers. Four hundred male chicks were exposed for 24 h to cold stress (15 ºC starting from 15d of age, while a positive control group (PC, 100 birds was kept under normal temperature condition. The experimental groups under cold stress (four treatments in 5 replicates of 20 birds were: negative control (NC, basal diet, Vit. C (basal diet + 300 mg/kg Vit. C, CoQ10 (basal diet + 40 mg/kg CoQ10 and Vit. C plus CoQ10 (basal diet + Vit. C+ CoQ10at above mentioned doses. Vit. C or CoQ10 supplementation were restored (p<0.01 performance and lowered (p<0.01 ascites mortality. Blood hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were decreased (p<0.01 to the level comparable to PC by Vit. C supplementation. Lower plasma concentrations of thyroxin (T4 and higher triiodothyronine (T3 were observed in NC birds (p<0.01 and were not affected by Vit. C or CoQ10. In conclusion, supplementation of Vit. C or CoQ10 in diet of broilers under cold stress conditions resulted improved performance parameters (body weight and feed conversion ratio and ascites related traits (low red blood cell count, hematocrit, T3, and heart weights and high T4. No additional benefit was observed by combination of Vit. C and CoQ10.

  10. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Markers of Inflammation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Zhai

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation contributes to the onset and development of metabolic diseases. Clinical evidence has suggested that coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 has some effects on inflammatory markers. However, these results are equivocal. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of CoQ10 on serum levels of inflammatory markers in people with metabolic diseases.Electronic databases were searched up to February 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs. The outcome parameters were related to inflammatory factors, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and C reactive protein (CRP. RevMan software was used for meta-analysis. Meta-regression analysis, Egger line regression test and Begg rank correlation test were performed by STATA software.Nine trials involving 428 subjects were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that compared with control group, CoQ10 supplementation has significantly improved the serum level of CoQ10 by 1.17μg/ml [MD = 1.17, 95% CI (0.47 to 1.87 μg/ml, I2 = 94%]. Meanwhile, it has significantly decreased TNF-α by 0.45 pg/ml [MD = -0.45, 95% CI (-0.67 to -0.24 pg/ml, I2 = 0%]. No significant difference was observed between CoQ10 and placebo with regard to CRP [MD = -0.21, 95% CI (-0.60 to 0.17 mg/L, I2 = 21%] and IL-6 [MD = -0.89, 95% CI (-1.95 to 0.16 pg/ml, I2 = 84%].CoQ10 supplementation may partly improve the process of inflammatory state. The effects of CoQ10 on inflammation should be further investigated by conducting larger sample size and well-defined trials of long enough duration.

  11. Oxidative Stress Correlates with Headache Symptoms in Fibromyalgia: Coenzyme Q10 Effect on Clinical Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Mario D.; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. Methods We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. Results We found decreased CoQ10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively) We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P<0.001). Significant negative correlations between CoQ10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r = −0.59, P<0.05; r = −0.68, P<0.05, respectively). Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r = 0.33, P<0.05). Oral CoQ10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P<0.001). Discussion The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM. PMID:22532869

  12. Effects of benfotiamine and coenzyme Q10 on kidney damage induced gentamicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustuner, Mehmet Alperen; Kaman, Dilara; Colakoglu, Neriman

    2017-12-01

    Gentamicin (GM) is an effective antibiotic against severe infection but has limitations related to nephrotoxicity. In this study, we investigated whether benfotiamine (BFT) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), could ameliorate the nephrotoxic effect of GM in rats. Rats were divided into five groups. Group 1 and 2 served as control and sham respectively, Group 3 as GM group, Group 4 as GM+CoQ10 and Group 5 as GM+BFT for 8days. At the end of the study, all rats were euthanized by cervical decapitation and then blood samples and kidneys were collected for further analysis. Serum urea, creatinine, cytokine TNF-a, oxidant and antioxidant parameters, as well as histopathological examination of kidney tissues were assessed. Gentamicin administration caused a severe nephrotoxicity which was evidenced by an elevated serum creatinine, urea and KIM-1 level as compared with the controls. Moreover, a significant increase in serum malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione. Histopathological examination of renal tissue in gentamisin administered group, there were extremly pronounced necrotic tubules in the renal cortex and hyalen cast accumulation in the medullar tubuli. BFT given to GM rats reduced these nephrotoxicity parameters. Serum creatinine, urea, and KIM-1 were almost normalized in the GM+BFT group. Benfotiamin treatment was significantly decreased necrotic tubuli and hyalen deposition in gentamisin plus benfotiamin group. CoQ10 given to GM rats did not cause any statistically significant alterations in these nephrotoxicity parameters when compared with GM group but histopathological examination of renal tissue in GM+CoQ10 administered group, CoQ10 treatment was decreased necrotic tubuli rate and hyalen accumulation in tubuli. The results from our study indicate that BFT supplement attenuates gentamicin-induced renal injury via the amelioration of oxidative stress and inflammation of renal tubular cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Effect of phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10 on sports performance in professional volleyball players].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Verazaluce, Juan José; Vargas Corzo, María Del Carmen; Aguilar Cordero, María José; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco; Sarmiento Ramírez, Álvaro; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael

    2014-10-03

    Physical training programmes are based on provoking transitory states of fatigue in order to induce super compensation by the biological systems involved in the activity, in order to improve the athlete's medium-long term performance. The administration of nutritional supplements with antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties, such as Phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10, can be a very advantageous means of achieving recovery from the inflammation and tissue damage caused by the stress of prolonged, intense exercise. An experimental, longitudinal, double- blind experiment was conducted, with three randomised groups obtained from a sample of 30 male volleyball players (aged 22-32 years) at the University of Granada, with a high level of training (17 hours a week during the 6 months preceding the study). The effects were then evaluated of a month-long physical training programme, common to all the study groups, associated with the simultaneous administration of the following nutritional supplements: Phlebodium decumanum (4 capsules of 400 mg/capsule, daily), Experimental Group 1; Phlebodium decumanum (same dose and schedule as Group 1) plus coenzyme Q10 (4 capsules of 30 mg/ capsule, daily), Experimental Group 2; a placebo substance, Control Group. The following dependent blood variables were examined to assess the effects of the intervention on the basal immune and endocrine-metabolic profile: cortisol and interleukin-6, both related to the axis of exercise-induced stress; and lactic acid and ammonium, related essentially to the anaerobic metabolism of energy. All the study groups presented favourable adaptive changes with respect to the endocrine-metabolic and immune profile, as reflected by a significant decrease in the post-test concentrations of cortisol, interleukin 6, lactic acid and ammonium, compared to the values recorded before the physical activity with/without nutritional supplement, per protocol. The groups that achieved the most favourable profile

  14. Effect of the additives on clouding behavior and thermodynamics of coenzyme Q10-Kolliphor HS15 micelle aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Chao; Pan, Hong-chun; Liu, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Herein we investigate the effect of different additives (electrolytes, amino acids, PEG, and sugars) on the cloud points (CP) of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) - Kolliphor HS15 (HS15) micelle aqueous solutions. The CP values were decreased with the increase of electrolytes and sugars, following: CPAl3+ reduced the CP. A depression of CP for CoQ10-HS15 micelle solution with PEG was molecular weight of PEG dependent. The significant thermodynamic parameters were also evaluated and discussed.

  15. Water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation in presbycusis: long-term effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastini, Luca; Mora, Renzo; Dellepiane, Massimo; Santomauro, Valentina; Giorgio, Manini; Salami, Angelo

    2011-05-01

    These findings provide the basis for understanding the duration of the effect after the last use of the drug and encourage a larger clinical trial to collect additional evidence on the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in preventing the development of hearing loss in subjects with presbycusis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of a water-soluble formulation of CoQ10 (Q-TER) in subjects with presbycusis. Sixty patients with presbycusis were included and divided at random into three numerically equal groups. For 30 days, group A underwent therapy with Q-TER, group B underwent therapy with vitamin E, and group C received placebo. Before, at the end, and 6 months after the end of the treatment, all patients underwent evaluation of pure tone audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and otoacoustic products of distortion, auditory brainstem response, and speech audiometry. Compared with group B, at the end of the treatment in group A the pure tone audiometry showed a significant (p < 0.05) improvement of the audiometric thresholds at 1000, 2000, 4000, and 8000 Hz. This improvement was confirmed by the speech audiometry and last check. We found no significant differences in the other parameters and in group C.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 and its effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Cristina dos Santos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available According to clinical and pre-clinical studies, oxidative stress and its consequences may be the cause or, at least, a contributing factor, to a large number of neurodegenerative diseases. These diseases include common and debilitating disorders, characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of neurons in specific regions of the brain. The most common neurodegenerative diseases are Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 has been extensively studied since its discovery in 1957. It is a component of the electron transportation chain and participates in aerobic cellular respiration, generating energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The property of CoQ10 to act as an antioxidant or a pro-oxidant, suggests that it also plays an important role in the modulation of redox cellular status under physiological and pathological conditions, also performing a role in the ageing process. In several animal models of neurodegenerative diseases, CoQ10 has shown beneficial effects in reducing disease progression. However, further studies are needed to assess the outcome and effectiveness of CoQ10 before exposing patients to unnecessary health risks at significant costs.De acordo com estudos clínicos e pré-clínicos, o estresse oxidativo e suas conseqüências podem ser a causa, ou, no mínimo, o fator que contribui para grande número de doenças degenerativas. Estas doenças incluem problemas comuns e debilitantes, caracterizados por perda progressiva e irreversível de neurônios em regiões específicas do cérebro. As doenças degenerativas mais comuns são doença de Parkinson, de Hutington, de Alzheimer e esclerose amiotrófica lateral. A Coenzima Q10 (CoQ10 tem sido intensamente estudada desde sua descoberta, em 1957. É um componente da cadeia de transporte eletrônico e participa da respiração aeróbica celular, gerando energia na forma de trifosfato de

  17. Effect of Simvastatin, Coenzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Acetylcysteine and Acetylcarnitine on Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Kopřivová, A; Macečková, D

    2016-01-01

    Some therapeutic and/or adverse effects of drugs may be related to their effects on mitochondrial function. The effects of simvastatin, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, acetylcysteine, and acetylcarnitine on Complex I-, Complex II-, or Complex IV-linked respiratory rate were determined in isolated brain mitochondria. The protective effects of these biologically active compounds on the calcium-induced decrease of the respiratory rate were also studied. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration (IC50 = 24.0 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 31.3 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 42.9 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration); the inhibitory effect of resveratrol was found at very high concentrations (IC50 = 162 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 564 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 1454 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration). Concentrations required for effective simvastatin- or resveratrol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration were found much higher than concentrations achieved under standard dosing of these drugs. Acetylcysteine and acetylcarnitine did not affect the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria. Coenzyme Q10 induced an increase of Complex I-linked respiration. The increase of free calcium ions induced partial inhibition of the Complex I+II-linked mitochondrial respiration, and all tested drugs counteracted this inhibition. None of the tested drugs showed mitochondrial toxicity (characterized by respiratory rate inhibition) at drug concentrations achieved at therapeutic drug intake. Resveratrol, simvastatin, and acetylcarnitine had the greatest neuroprotective potential (characterized by protective effects against calcium-induced reduction of the respiratory rate).

  18. Effects of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10) on myopathy in statin users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, C.F.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Statins are associated with muscle complaints, including myositis. The mechanism through which statin use causes muscle toxicity is unknown. One of the theories is that statin therapy reduces coenzyme Q10 levels in muscle mitochondria, which leads to muscle injury and myopathy.

  19. Antiatherogenic, hepatoprotective, and hypolipidemic effects of coenzyme Q10 in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadvand

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus, one of the leading metabolic syndromes, accounts for highest morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this study, we examined possible protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on lipid profile, atherogenic index, and liver enzyme markers in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats. METHODS: A total of 30 male rats were randomly divided into three groups; group 1 as control, group 2 diabetic untreatment, and group 3 treatments with coenzyme Q10 by 15 mg/kg i.p. daily, respectively .Diabetes was induced in the second and third groups by alloxan injection subcutaneously. After 8 weeks, the levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, low density lipoprotein (LDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, high density lipoprotein (HDL, atherogenic index, atherogenic coefficient, cardiac risk ratio, and the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP of all groups were analyzed. Data were analyzed using non-parametric Mann-Whitney test (using SPSS and P < 0.05 was considered as significant. RESULTS: Coenzyme Q10 inhibited significantly the activities of ALT (11.17%, AST (19.35% and ALP (36.67% and decreased FBG (21.19%, TG (37.24%, TC (17.15%, LDL (30.44%, VLDL (37.24%, atherogenic index (44.24%, atherogenic coefficient (49.69%, and cardiac risk ratio (37.97%, HDL level was significantly (33.38% increased when treated with coenzyme Q10. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggest that coenzyme Q10 exert beneficial effects on the lipid profile, atherogenic index, and liver enzymes activity in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats.   Keywords: Diabetes, Lipid Profile, Atherogenic Index, Rats, Liver Enzymes, Coenzyme Q10 

  20. Beneficial Effects of Coenzyme Q10 in Reduction of Testicular Tissue Alteration Following Induction of Diabetes in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianifard Davoud

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Various types of infertility are associated with uncontrolled hyperglycemia and diabetes. Development of oxidative stress is one the most important factors in the alteration of spermatogenesis in diabetic conditions. Consequently, the reduction of oxidative stress with antioxidant compounds can be effective in the reduction of tissue alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in improvement of spermatogenesis in adult diabetic rats. Material and Methods: 32 adult rats were divided into four groups of control and treatment. Coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg body weight - b.w. was administrated to one control and one diabetic (intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg b.w. of Streptozotocin groups. Blood concentrations of FSH, LH and Testosterone were measured. Histology of testicular tissue and sperm analysis were considered for evaluation of spermatogenesis. Results: Administration of Coenzyme Q10 led to increase of pituitary gonadotropins levels in diabetic rats. Testosterone levels were not changed significantly. Testicular morphology, spermatogenic indices and sperm analysis were improved in treated diabetic rats. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the use of Coenzyme Q10 has positive effects in reduction of spermatogenic alterations following induction of experimental diabetes in rats.

  1. Coenzyme Q10 treatment ameliorates acute cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, Amr A.; Al-Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Refaie, Shereen M.; Yacoubi, Mohamed T.

    2010-01-01

    The nephroprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 was investigated in mice with acute renal injury induced by a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (5 mg/kg). Coenzyme Q10 treatment (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 6 consecutive days, starting 1 day before cisplatin administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly reduced blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels which were increased by cisplatin. Coenzyme Q10 significantly compensated deficits in the antioxidant defense mechanisms (reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity), suppressed lipid peroxidation, decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide and platinum ion concentration, and attenuated the reductions of selenium and zinc ions in renal tissue resulted from cisplatin administration. Also, histopathological renal tissue damage mediated by cisplatin was ameliorated by coenzyme Q10 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the cisplatin-induced overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and p53 in renal tissue. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 represents a potential therapeutic option to protect against acute cisplatin nephrotoxicity commonly encountered in clinical practice.

  2. Effects of Oral, Vaginal, and Transdermal Hormonal Contraception on Serum Levels of Coenzyme Q10, Vitamin E, and Total Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhudas R. Palan

    2010-01-01

    coenzyme Q10 levels compared with normal subjects. Serum TAOC levels were significantly lower (P<.05 among the contraceptive user groups. Alterations in coenzyme Q10 and α-tocopherol induced by hormonal contraception and the potential effect(s of exogenous ovarian hormones should be taken into consideration in future antioxidant research.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Siciliano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, or ubiquinone is a small electron carrier of the mitochondrial respiratory chain with antioxidant properties. CoQ10 supplementation has been widely used for mitochondrial disorders. The rationale for using CoQ10 is very powerful when this compound is primary decreased because of defective synthesis. Primary CoQ10 deficiency is a treatable condition, so heightened “clinical awareness” about this diagnosis is essential. CoQ10 and its analogue, idebenone, have also been widely used in the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. These compounds could potentially play a therapeutic role in Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia, and other conditions which have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. This article reviews the physiological roles of CoQ10, as well as the rationale and the role in clinical practice of CoQ10 supplementation in different neurological diseases, from primary CoQ10 deficiency to neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Biochemical Assessment of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez-Aguilera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 deficiency syndrome includes clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases that show a variety of severe and debilitating symptoms. A multiprotein complex encoded by nuclear genes carries out CoQ10 biosynthesis. Mutations in any of these genes are responsible for the primary CoQ10 deficiency, but there are also different conditions that induce secondary CoQ10 deficiency including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion and mutations in genes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The diagnosis of CoQ10 deficiencies is determined by the decrease of its content in skeletal muscle and/or dermal skin fibroblasts. Dietary CoQ10 supplementation is the only available treatment for these deficiencies that require a rapid and distinct diagnosis. Here we review methods for determining CoQ10 content by HPLC separation and identification using alternative approaches including electrochemical detection and mass spectrometry. Also, we review procedures to determine the CoQ10 biosynthesis rate using labeled precursors.

  5. Effect of particle size on solubility, dissolution rate, and oral bioavailability: evaluation using coenzyme Q10 as naked nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jiao Sun,1 Fan Wang,1,2 Yue Sui,1 Zhennan She,1 Wenjun Zhai,1 Chunling Wang,1 Yihui Deng11College of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, China; 2Beijing Zhijianjinrui Applied Pharmaceutical Science Inc, Beijing, ChinaAbstract: In this paper work, four naked nanocrystals (size range 80–700 nm were prepared without any surfactant or polymer using the solvent/nonsolvent method. The effects of particle size on their solubility, dissolution, and oral bioavailability were investigated. Solubility and dissolution testing were performed in three types of dissolution medium, and the studies demonstrated that the equilibrium solubilities of coenzyme Q10 nanocrystals and bulk drugs were not affected by the dissolution media but the kinetic solubilities were. Kinetic solubility curves and changes in particle size distribution were determined and well explained by the proposed solubilization model for the nanocrystals and bulk drugs. The particle size effect on dissolution was clearly influenced by the diffusion coefficients of the various dissolution media, and the dissolution velocity of coenzyme Q10 increased as particle size decreased. The bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 after oral administration in beagle dogs was improved by reducing the particle size. For 700 nm nanocrystals, the AUC0–48 was 4.4-fold greater than that for the coarse suspensions, but a further decrease in particle size from 700 nm to 120 nm did not contribute to improvement in bioavailability until the particle size was reduced to 80 nm, when bioavailability was increased by 7.3-fold.Keywords: particle size, solubility, dissolution, nanocrystal, bioavailability, coenzyme Q10

  6. THE COMBINED EFFECT OF SCUTELLARIA BAICALENSIS EXTRACT AND COENZYME Q10 IN OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCED BY CHROMIUM COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sawicka

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The common use of antioxidants and its joint application brings the question whether they are useful in oxidative stress induced by the chemicals or whether they cause harmful interaction. Both Scutellaria baicalensis and CoQ10 are known as antioxidants, however one exogenous, the second endogenous. Chromium belongs equal to essential microelements and toxic factors. Therefore the aim of work was the evaluation joint effect of two examined antioxidants in exposure to chromium compounds.Materials and methods: The material was fresh blood obtained from healthy volunteers. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA in erythrocytes was evaluated using Stock’s method. The activity of mixture of Antoxyd and coenzyme Q10 was tested after exposure to chromium III and VI at concentrations: 0,05; 0,5 and 1,0 µg/ml. Antioxidants were used in concentrations : 8,0; 20; 60 and 100 µg/ml. Results: The influence of coenzyme Q10 in exposure to chromium III and chromium VI was statistically insignificant, but CoQ10 given together with Antoxyd in all used concentration statistically significant decreased the level of MDA in erythrocytes exposed to chromium compounds (p*0,001. Conclusions: Application of both antioxidants has exerted synergistic action lowering MDA level, which was elevated after chromium. No harmful interactions in the examined sample between antioxidants and chromium ions were noted.

  7. Protective effect of coenzyme Q10 in simvastatin and gemfibrozil induced rhabdomyolysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farswan, Mamta; Rathod, S P; Upaganlawar, A B; Semwal, Arvind

    2005-10-01

    Administration of simvastatin (80 mg/kg, po. evening dose) and gemfibrozil (600 mg/kg, po twice) for 30 days produced significant decrease in the level of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and increase in the level of lipid peroxidation and various serum parameters (creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, creatinine, urea and blood urea nitrogen). This suggested involvement of oxidative stress in rhabdomyolysis. Increase in the level of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and decrease in the level of lipid peroxidation and serum parameters after administration of antioxidant CoQ10 (10 mg/kg.ip) proved the protective effect of CoQ10 in rhabdomyolysis.

  8. Effect of DHA and CoenzymeQ10 Against Aβ- and Zinc-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Sadli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beta-amyloid (Aβ protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and it has been reported that mitochondria is involved in the biochemical pathway by which Aβ can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in AD. Zinc toxicity also affects cellular energy production by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR and ATP turnover in human neuronal cells, which can be restored by the neuroprotective effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Method: In the present study, using Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analysis we investigated the effect of DHA and CoQ10 alone and in combination against Aβ- and zinc-mediated changes in the mitochondrial function of M17 neuroblastoma cell line. Results: Here, we observed that DHA is specifically neuroprotective against zinc-triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, but does not directly affect Aβ neurotoxicity. CoQ10 has shown to be protective against both Aβ- and zinc-induced alterations in mitochondrial function. Conclusion: Our results indicate that DHA and CoQ10 may be useful for the prevention, treatment and management of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD.

  9. Antioxidant vitamins C, E and coenzyme Q10 vs Dexamethasone: comparisons of their effects in pulmonary contusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Mertol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of our study is to evaluate the effects of antioxidant vitamins (vitamin C and E, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and dexamethasone (Dxm in experimental rat models with pulmonary contusion (PC. Methods Rats were randomly divided into six groups. Except for the control, all subgroups had a moderate pulmonary contusion. Animals in the group I and group II received intraperitoneal saline, group III received 10mg.kg-1 CoQ10 group IV received 100mg.kg-1 vitamin C, group V received 150mg.kg-1 vitamin E, and group VI received 10mg.kg-1 Dxm. Blood gas analysis, serum nitric oxide (NO and malondialdehyde (MDA levels as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD activity assays, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and histopathological examination were performed. Results Administration of CoQ10 resulted in a significant increase in PaO2 values compared with the group I (p = 0.004. Levels of plasma MDA in group II were significantly higher than those in the group I (p = 0.01. Early administration of vitamin C, CoQ10, and Dxm significantly decreased the levels of MDA (p = 0.01. Lung contusion due to blunt trauma significantly decreased SOD activities in rat lung tissue compared with group I (p = 0.01. SOD levels were significantly elevated in animals treated with CoQ10, Vitamin E, or Dxm compared with group II (p = 0.01. Conclusions In our study, CoQ10, vitamin C, vitamin E and Dxm had a protective effect on the biochemical and histopathological outcome of PC after experimental blunt thorax trauma.

  10. Effects of coenzyme Q10 on statin-induced myopathy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach, Maciej; Serban, Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Ursoniu, Sorin; Rysz, Jacek; Muntner, Paul; Toth, Peter P; Jones, Steven R; Rizzo, Manfredi; Glasser, Stephen P; Lip, Gregory Y H; Dragan, Simona; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on statin-induced myopathy. We searched the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and EMBASE databases (November 1, 1987, to May 1, 2014) to identify randomized controlled trials investigating the impact of CoQ10 on muscle pain and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity as 2 measures of statin-induced myalgia. Two independent reviewers extracted data on study characteristics, methods, and outcomes. We included 6 studies with 302 patients receiving statin therapy: 5 studies with 226 participants evaluated the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on plasma CK activity, and 5 studies (4 used in the CK analysis and 1 other study) with 253 participants were included to assess the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on muscle pain. Compared with the control group, plasma CK activity was increased after CoQ10 supplementation, but this change was not significant (mean difference, 11.69 U/L [to convert to μkat/L, multiply by 0.0167]; 95% CI, -14.25 to 37.63 U/L; P=.38). Likewise, CoQ10 supplementation had no significant effect on muscle pain despite a trend toward a decrease (standardized mean difference, -0.53; 95% CI, -1.33 to 0.28; P=.20). No dose-effect association between changes in plasma CK activity (slope, -0.001; 95% CI, -0.004 to 0.001; P=.33) or in the indices of muscle pain (slope, 0.002; 95% CI, -0.005 to 0.010; P=.67) and administered doses of CoQ10 were observed. The results of this meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials do not suggest any significant benefit of CoQ10 supplementation in improving statin-induced myopathy. Larger, well-designed trials are necessary to confirm the findings from this meta-analysis. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro effects of zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 on sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacone, Filippo; Condorelli, Rosita A; Mongioì, Laura M; Bullara, Valentina; La Vignera, Sandro; Calogero, Aldo E

    2017-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species favor reproductive processes at low concentrations, but damage spermatozoa and decrease their fertilizing capacity at high concentrations. During infection and/or inflammation of the accessory sex glands reactive oxygen species overproduction may occur which, in turn, may negatively impact on sperm motility, sperm DNA fragmentation, and lipid peroxidation. A number of nutraceutical formulations containing antioxidant molecules have been developed to counteract the deleterious effects of the oxidative stress. A recent formulation containing zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 is present in the pharmaceutical market. Based on these premises, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of this combination on spermatozoa in vitro. The study was conducted on 24 men (32.2 ± 5.5 years): 12 normozoospermic men and 12 asthenozoospermic patients. Spermatozoa from each sample were divided into two control aliquots (aliquot A and B) and an aliquot incubated with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (aliquot C). After 3 h of incubation, the following parameters were evaluated: progressive motility, number of spermatozoa with progressive motility recovered after swim-up, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Incubation with zinc, D-aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 maintained sperm motility in normozoospermic men (37.7 ± 1.2 % vs. 35.8 ± 2.3 % at time zero) and improved it significantly in asthenozoospermic patients (26.5 ± 1.9 % vs. 18.8 ± 2.0 % at time zero) (p aspartic acid, and coenzyme-Q10 (p < 0.05) in both normozospermic men (1.0 ± 0.4 % vs. 2.4 ± 0.9 %) and asthenozooseprmic patients (0.2 ± 0.1 % vs. 0.6 ± 0.2 %). No statistically significant effect was observed on sperm DNA fragmentation. This nutraceutical formulation may be indicated in vitro during the separation of the spermatozoa in the assisted reproduction techniques, during which the spermatozoa

  12. Coenzyme Q 10: multiple benefits in one ingredient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littarru Gian Paolo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q is a lipid molecule widely diffused in nature; in humans and other mammals it is present as coenzyme Q10. (CoQ10. The first recognized role of CoQ10 was in mitochondrial bioenergetics, where it plays a central role in the production of ATP. It is also present in other subcellular organelles, both in its oxidized and in its reduced state (ubiquinol-10. The reduced form of CoQ10 is endowed with powerful antioxidant activity: it acts as a chain-breaking antioxidant and is also capable of egenerating alpha-tocopherol, the active form of vitamin E. By these mechanisms CoQ10, together with vitamin E, protects lipoproteins from oxidation a process which bears considerable interest in preventing atherosclerosis. CoQ10 has also been found to support cardiovascular function and the latest findings indicate an active role in counteracting endothelial dysfunction, which is closely implicated in cardiovascular disease. CoQ10 also improves sperm motility, an effect which might be related both to its antioxidant and to its bioenergetic properties. Oxidative stress might be involved in neurodegenerative disease, and in migraine, two fields where the positive effects of CoQ10 have been documented. CoQ10 is synthesized by our body but is also present in food and can be taken as a nutritional supplement. The main source of industrially produced CoQ10 is yeast fermentation. The process results in CoQ10 which is identical to the naturally occurring molecule. Ubiquinol, the reduced form of CoQ10, has recently become available.

  13. The Protective Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid and Coenzyme Q10 Combination on Ovarian Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ali Tuncer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to evaluate whether alpha-lipoic acid and/or coenzyme Q10 can protect the prepubertal ovarian tissue from ischemia-reperfusion injury in an experimental rat model of ovarian torsion. Materials and Methods. Forty-two female preadolescent Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 6 equal groups randomly. The sham group had laparotomy without torsion; the other groups had torsion/detorsion procedure. After undergoing torsion, group 2 received saline, group 3 received olive oil, group 4 received alpha-lipoic acid, group 5 received coenzyme Q10, and group 6 received both alpha-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 orally. The oxidant-antioxidant statuses of these groups were compared using biochemical measurement of oxidized/reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and malondialdehyde, pathological evaluation of damage and apoptosis within the ovarian tissue, and immunohistochemical assessment of nitric oxide synthase. Results. The left ovaries of the alpha-lipoic acid + coenzyme Q10 group had significantly lower apoptosis scores and significantly higher nitric oxide synthase content than the left ovaries of the control groups. The alpha-lipoic acid + coenzyme Q10 group had significantly higher glutathione peroxidase levels and serum malondialdehyde concentrations than the sham group. Conclusions. The combination of alpha-lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 has beneficial effects on oxidative stress induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury related to ovarian torsion.

  14. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin C on Growth Performance and Blood Components in Broiler Chickens under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeisi-Zeydabad S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was carried out to study the effects of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and vitamin C (VC on growth performance and blood biochemistry in broiler chickens under heat stress conditions. One of three levels of CoQ10 (0, 20, and 40 mg/kg of diet and one of two levels of VC (0 and 250 mg/kg of diet were supplemented to diets of chicks (from 1-42 d of age in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement. Each dietary treatment had four replicate pens (10 chicks/pen. In order to create chronic heat stress, the house temperature was set at an ambient temperature of 35±2°C for 8 hrs daily (09:00 to 17:00 between 25-42 d of age. Feed intake, body weight gain (BWG, and feed to gain ratio (F:G were recorded at d 10, 25 and 42. At the end of experiment, two chicks/pen were randomly selected to assess blood components. CoQ10 supplementation improved BWG and F:G during 11-25 days, 26-42 days, and the whole period of the experiment (P < 0.05, while VC supplementation improved BWG and F:G only during 11-25 d of age. Blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations were reduced (P < 0.05 by addition of CoQ10 to the diet. Both Supplementation of CoQ10 and VC together lowered heterophil (H count but increased lymphocyte (L count, thereby reducing H/L ratio (P < 0.05. Serum concentrations of corticosterone and T4 were positively affected by dietary supplementation of CoQ10 (P < 0.05, but no differences were obtained with addition of VC to the diet. In conclusion, our observations demonstrated that dietary supplementation of 40 mg/kg CoQ10 or 250 mg/kg VC improves the growth performance of broiler chickens under the heat stress.

  15. Effect of dietary coenzyme Q10 supplementation on serum and bone minerals and leg weakness mortality in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gopi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This work was carried out to study the effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on serum calcium and phosphorus levels, tibial bone weight, bone ash, bone calcium and phosphorus levels and mortality of birds due to leg weakness when the broilers were maintained under high environmental temperature. Materials and Methods: The trial was carried out on 216 Cobb400 broiler chicks and divided into four groups with nine replicates and each replicate consisting of six birds. The treatments include normal energy diet (NE (as per breeder's specifications (G1, high energy (HE (NE plus 100 kcal/kg diet without CoQ10 supplementation (G2, high energy diet supplemented with CoQ10 at 20 mg/kg (G3 and high energy diet supplemented with CoQ10 at 40 mg/kg (G4. The experiment was carried out when the temperature humidity index (THI ranged from 33.05 to 38.65oC for a period of 42 days. Results: The serum calcium and phosphorus levels in the G1, G2, G3 and G4 were 9.07 ± 0.22, 8.48 ± 0.10, 8.30 ± 0.10, 8.32 ± 0.12 and 4.90 ± 0.20, 4.06 ± 0.32, 3.96 ± 0.17, 4.02 ± 0.24, respectively. The tibial bone weight (g was 21.58 ± 1.32, 17.92 ± 1.90, 18.67 ± 1.30 and 17.42 ± 1.18; tibial bone Ash (% 46.67 ± 2.71, 44.48 ± 2.40, 44.66 ± 3.09 and 44.62 ± 1.74; Bone calcium (% 33.57 ± 0.2, 31.27 ± 0.55, 31.50 ± 0.45 and 31.47 ± 0.83, bone phosphorus (% was 11.86 ± 0.16, 10.38 ± 0.11, 10.68 ± 0.08 and 10.39 ± 0.17, respectively in G1, G2, G3 and G4 groups. The serum calcium and phosphorus levels were significantly higher (P<0.05 in G1 over the other three groups. The tibial bone weight was not altered by the energy level or the coenzyme Q10 supplementation. The tibial bone calcium and phosphorus levels were significantly higher in G1 than the other three groups. Conclusion: The supplementation of coenzyme Q10 did not alter the serum and tibial bone calcium and phosphorus levels. The leg abnormality associated mortality was significantly decreased in G3

  16. The effect of coenzyme Q10 on morbidity and mortality in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Svend A; Rosenfeldt, Franklin; Kumar, Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    .32 to 0.80; p = 0.003) by intention-to-treat analysis. The following secondary endpoints were significantly lower in the CoQ10 group compared with the placebo group: cardiovascular mortality (9% vs. 16%, p = 0.026), all-cause mortality (10% vs. 18%, p = 0.018), and incidence of hospital stays for HF (p...

  17. Comparision of Inhibitory effects of Satureja Khozistanica,vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 on LDL peroxidation induced-CuSO4 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hasan Ahmadvand

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL has been strongly suggested as a key factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Thus the inclusion of some anti-oxidant compounds such as Satureja Khozistanica,vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 in daily dietary food stuff may inhibit the production of oxidized LDL and may decrease both the development and the progression of atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of Satureja Khozistanica, vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 on LDL peroxidation induced by CuSO4 quantitatively in vitro. Materials and Methods: LDL was incubated with CuSO4 and the formation of conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS of LDL were monitored as markers of LDL oxidation. Inhibition of this Cu-induced oxidation was studied in the presence of extracts of Satureja Khozistanica,vitamin E and coenzyme Q10. Results: It was demonstrated that Satureja Khozistanica like vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 is able to inhibit LDL oxidation and decrease the resistance of LDL against oxidation in vitro. Conclusion: This study showed that Satureja Khozistanica similar to vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 prevented the oxidation of LDL in vitro and it may suggest that they have the similar effect in vivo

  18. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Hernández-Camacho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q (CoQ is an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and an antioxidant in plasma membranes and lipoproteins. It is endogenously produced in all cells by a highly regulated pathway that involves a mitochondrial multiprotein complex. Defects in either the structural and/or regulatory components of CoQ complex or in non-CoQ biosynthetic mitochondrial proteins can result in a decrease in CoQ concentration and/or an increase in oxidative stress. Besides CoQ10 deficiency syndrome and aging, there are chronic diseases in which lower levels of CoQ10 are detected in tissues and organs providing the hypothesis that CoQ10 supplementation could alleviate aging symptoms and/or retard the onset of these diseases. Here, we review the current knowledge of CoQ10 biosynthesis and primary CoQ10 deficiency syndrome, and have collected published results from clinical trials based on CoQ10 supplementation. There is evidence that supplementation positively affects mitochondrial deficiency syndrome and the symptoms of aging based mainly on improvements in bioenergetics. Cardiovascular disease and inflammation are alleviated by the antioxidant effect of CoQ10. There is a need for further studies and clinical trials involving a greater number of participants undergoing longer treatments in order to assess the benefits of CoQ10 treatment in metabolic syndrome and diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, and human fertility.

  19. The effect of long-term treatment with coenzyme Q10 on nucleic acid modifications by oxidation in children with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Emil List; Padella, Lucia; Bergholdt, Helle Kirstine Mørup

    2018-01-01

    Elevated levels of oxidative nucleic acid modifications have been proposed to be associated with some of the clinical characteristics of Down syndrome. Oral intake of coenzyme Q10 improves oxidative status and shows a tendency toward protective effect on DNA oxidation in certain age groups...... of children with Down syndrome. Here, we demonstrate that long-term (i.e., 4 years) treatment with coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) at the dosage of 4 mg/kg/d does not affect whole body DNA and RNA oxidation....

  20. Balneotherapy and coenzyme Q10 in clinical and experimental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdjakova, Anna; Kucharska, Jarmila; Sykora, L'ubomir; Singh, Ram B

    2014-01-01

    Balneotherapy or Spa therapy is used in neurological, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, dermatological and gynecological diseases, in infertility as well as in metabolic disturbances. Beneficial effects of balneotherapy at the metabolic level is not fully understood. Authors have documented enhancement of antioxidants concentrations (coenzyme Q10- CoQ(10-OX) and alpha-tocopherol) of women with gynecological diseases by treatment with natural mineral water (Spa Lucky balneotherapy, Slovakia). In an experiment with rats, drinking of Spa Lucky mineral water decreased oxidative stress and enhanced concentrations of antioxidants CoQ(9-OX), CoQ(10-OX) in the myocardium, and alpha-tocopherol in uterus, ovaries and myocardium. Drinking of Spa Lucky water by rats stimulated myocardial mitochondrial respiration and energy production, and diminished skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Simultaneous ingestion of coenzyme Q10 with drinking spa water returned mitochondrial parameters to the values of the control group. This pilot study helps explain the role of antioxidants, oxidative stress and mitochondrial energy production in beneficial effects of Spa Lucky balneotherapy.

  1. Potential Cardiovascular and Renal Protective Effects of Vitamin D and Coenzyme Q10 in l-NAME-Induced Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamardl, Hanan A; El-Ashmony, Sahar M; Kamel, Hala F; Fatani, Sameer H

    2017-08-01

    Hypertension is one of the primary modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Adequate vitamin D (vit D) levels have been shown to reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction and to increase arterial compliance, which may be beneficial in hypertension. Further, coenzyme Q10 (COQ10) through its action to lower oxidative stress has been reported to have beneficial effects on hypertension and heart failure. This study examined the possible cardiac and renal protective effects of vit D and COQ10 both separately and in combination with an angiotensin II receptor blocker, valsartan (vals) in l-NAME hypertensive rats. Hypertension was induced in rats by l-NAME administration. Following induction of hypertension, the rats were assigned into the following 6 subgroups: an l-NAME alone group and treated groups receiving the following drugs intraperitoneally for 6 weeks; vals, vit D, COQ10 and combination of vals with either vit D or COQ10. A group of normotensive rats were used as negative controls. At the end of the treatment period, blood pressure, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lipids and serum, cardiac and renal parameters of oxidative stress were measured. Compared to the l-NAME only group, all treatments lowered systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and creatinine levels as well as TNF-α and malondialdehyde. Further, the agents increased serum, cardiac and renal total antioxidant capacity. Interestingly, the combination of agents had further effects on all the parameters compared to treatment with each single agent. The study suggests that the additive protective effects of vit D and COQ10 when used alone or concurrent with vals treatment in hypertensive rats may be due to their effects as antioxidants, anticytokines and blood pressure conservers. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasma coenzyme Q10 concentrations are not decreased in male patients with coronary atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, L.P.L. van de; Weber, C.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Grobbee, D.E.; Princen, H.M.G.; Poppel, G. van

    1999-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an important mitochondrial electron transfer component and has been postulated to function as a powerful antioxidant protecting LDL from oxidative damage. It could thus reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Thus far, beneficial effects of supplementation with CoQ10 have

  3. Decreased coenzyme Q10 concentration in plasma of children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, J.H.; Lecluse, A.L.Y.; Berg, R. van den; Vaes, W.H.J.; Laag, J. van der; Houwen, R.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an effective lipophilic antioxidant and protects against lipid peroxidation by scavenging radicals. Patients with cystic fibrosis generally have fat malabsorption; thus, we hypothesized that overall plasma CoQ10 concentration in pediatric patients with cystic

  4. The effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on maternally inherited diabetes mellitus and deafness, and mitochondrial DNA 3243 (A to G) mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, S; Hinokio, Y; Ohtomo, M; Hirai, M; Hirai, A; Chiba, M; Kasuga, S; Satoh, Y; Akai, H; Toyota, T

    1998-05-01

    The characteristic clinical features of diabetes mellitus with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 3243(A-G) mutation are progressive insulin secretory defect, neurosensory deafness and maternal inheritance, referred to as maternally inherited diabetes mellitus and deafness (MIDD). A treatment for MIDD to improve insulin secretory defects and reduce deafness has not been established. The effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) treatment on insulin secretory response, hearing capacity and clinical symptoms of MIDD were investigated. 28 MIDD patients (CoQ10-DM), 7 mutant subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 15 mutant subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) were treated daily with oral administration of 150 mg of CoQ10 for 3 years. Insulin secretory response, blood lactate after exercise, hearing capacity and other laboratory examinations were investigated every year. In the same way we evaluated 16 MIDD patients (control-DM), 5 mutant IGT and 5 mutant NGT subjects in yearly examinations. The insulin secretory response assessed by glucagon-induced C-peptide secretion and 24 h urinary C-peptide excretion after 3 years in the CoQ10-DM group was significantly higher than that in the control-DM group. CoQ10 therapy prevented progressive hearing loss and improved blood lactate after exercise in the MIDD patients. CoQ10 treatment did not affect the diabetic complications or other clinical symptoms of MIDD patients. CoQ10 treatment did not affect the insulin secretory capacity of the mutant IGT and NGT subjects. There were no side effects during therapy. This is the first report demonstrating the therapeutic usefulness of CoQ10 on MIDD.

  5. Breeding of Coenzyme Q10 Produced Strain by Low-Energy Ion Implantation and Optimization of Coenzyme Q10 Fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Dejun; Zheng Zhiming; Wang Peng; Wang Li; Yuan Hang; Yu Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase the production efficiency of coenzyme Q 10 , the original strain Agrobacterium tumefaciens ATCC 4452 was mutated by means of Nitrogen ions implantation. A mutant strain, ATX 12, with high contents of coenzyme Q 10 was selected. Subsequently, the conditions such as carbohydrate concentration, nitrogen source concentration, inoculum's size, seed age, aeration and temperature which might affect the production of CoQ 10 were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the maximum concentration of the intracellular CoQ 10 reached 200.3 mg/L after 80 h fed-batch fermentation, about 245% increasing in CoQ 10 production after ion implantation, compared to the original strain. (ion beam bioengineering)

  6. Beneficial effects of co-enzyme Q10 and rosiglitazone in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan M. Mansour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased fructose consumption is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome (MS. This study was performed to elucidate the role of co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ and/or rosiglitazone (Rosi in fructose induced MS. Four groups of rats (n = 8–10 were fed on fructose-enriched diet (FED for 16 weeks. One served as FED-control while the remaining groups were treated with CoQ (10 mg/kg/day, Rosi (4 mg/kg/day or their combination during the last 6 weeks. Another group was fed on normal laboratory chow (normal control. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected for estimation of markers related to MS. In addition, histological examination of liver, kidney and pancreas samples was done. Induction of the MS was associated with increased body weight gain (34% coupled with elevated levels of blood glucose (48%, insulin (86%, insulin resistance (270%, uric acid (69%, urea (155%, creatinine (129% and blood lipids with different degrees. Fructose-induced MS also reduced plasma catalase (62% and glutathione peroxidase (89% activities parallel to increased serum leptin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α levels. These changes were coupled by marked histological changes in the examined tissues. Treatment with CoQ or Rosi attenuated most of MS-induced changes. Besides, the combination of both agents further reduced blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and urea levels, as well as, normalized serum levels of leptin and TNF-α. In addition, combined therapy of both agents elevated HDL-cholesterol level and glutathione peroxidase activity. In conclusion, the present study proves the benefits of co-supplementation of CoQ and Rosi in a fructose-induced model of insulin resistance.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugahara

    Full Text Available It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group. In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM. Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mutations have occurred in the COQ2 , COQ4 , COQ6 , COQ8A , and COQ8B genes. Smaller numbers of mutations in other COQ genes have also been found ... primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency ... Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation and how do mutations occur? How can gene ...

  9. Coenzyme Q10 effect in prevention of atrial fibrillation after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Moludi

    2015-05-01

    Results: Thirty-eight women and forty-two men with a mean age of 58.37±7.98 years were enrolled in the study in two CoQ10 and placebo groups (each consisting of 40 patients. The incidence of postoperative AF was 45% in the control group to 20% in the intervention group decreased after supplementation (P=0.030. ICU stay and length of in-hospital stay did not significant. The incidence of arrhythmias ventricular tachycardia (VT and VF in this period was not significant (P=0.865. Conclusion: Q10 supplements have low side effects. Due to the reduction in the incidence of AF in patients after, CABG, these supplements can be recommended for the prevention of AF.

  10. The effect of short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation and pre-cooling strategy on cardiac damage markers in elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Ali; Tofighi, Asghar; Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Bazargani-Gilani, Behnaz

    2018-02-01

    Strenuous physical exercise and hyperthermia may paradoxically induce oxidative stress and adverse effects on myocardial function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 14-d coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation and pre-cooling on serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), cardiac Troponin I (cTnI), myoglobin (Mb), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and CoQ10 concentration in elite swimmers. In total, thirty-six healthy males (mean age 17 (sd 1) years) were randomly selected and divided into four groups of supplementation, supplementation with pre-cooling, pre-cooling and control. During an eighteen-session protocol in the morning and evening, subjects attended speed and endurance swimming training sessions for 5 km in each session. Blood sampling was done before (two stages) and after (two stages) administration of CoQ10 and pre-cooling. ANCOVA and repeated measurement tests with Bonferroni post hoc test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. There was no significant statistical difference among groups for the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD, TAC, LPO and CoQ10 at the presampling (stages 1 and 2) (P>0·05). However, pre-cooling and control groups show a significant increase in the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD and LPO compared with the supplementation and supplementation with pre-cooling groups in the post-sampling (stages 1 and 2) (Pcompetition phase. Meanwhile, the pre-cooling strategy individually has no desired effect on the levels of CK-MB, cTnI, Mb, LD, LPO, TAC and CoQ10.

  11. Coenzyme Q10: A New Treatment for Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-29

    SUBJECT TERMS hemorrhagic shock, ubiquinol, Coenzyme Q10, patient outcome 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...o leo& to tboOigllll failure. The < Iota fur AlM •1 ha"’ boon ._...runym.,..,; •• ted in p=en~atlons and publiobed tn Expu""’""" P/u<llology. Tho

  12. Hormonal Influence on Coenzyme Q10 Levels in Blood Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Pontecorvi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone for its presence in all body cells, is an essential part of the cell energy-producing system. However, it is also a powerful lipophilic antioxidant protecting lipoproteins and cell membranes. Due to these two actions, CoQ10 is commonly used in clinical practice in chronic heart failure, male infertility, and neurodegenerative disease. However, it is also taken as an anti-aging substance by healthy people aiming for long-term neuroprotection and by sportsmen to improve endurance. Many hormones are known to be involved in body energy regulation, in terms of production, consumption and dissipation, and their influence on CoQ10 body content or blood values may represent an important pathophysiological mechanism. We summarize the main findings of the literature about the link between hormonal systems and circulating CoQ10 levels. In particular the role of thyroid hormones, directly involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, is discussed. There is also a link with gonadal and adrenal hormones, partially due to the common biosynthetic pathway with CoQ10, but also to the increased oxidative stress found in hypogonadism and hypoadrenalism.

  13. Effect of cooking and in vitro digestion on the stability of co-enzyme Q10 in processed meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian D; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hamill, Ruth; Kerry, Joseph P

    2014-05-01

    The use of CoQ10 fortification in the production of a functional food has been demonstrated in the past but primarily for dairy products. This study aimed to determine the bio-accessibility of CoQ10 in processed meat products, beef patties and pork breakfast sausages, fortified with CoQ10. Both the patties and sausages were fortified with a micellarized form of CoQ10 to enhance solubility to a concentration of 1mg/g of sample (NovaSolQ®). An assay was developed combining in vitro digestion and HPLC analysis to quantify the CoQ10 present in fortified products (100mg/g). The cooking retention level of CoQ10 in the products was found to be 74±1.42% for patties and 79.69±0.75% for sausages. The digestibility for both products ranged between 93% and 95%, sausages did have a higher digestibility level than patties but this was not found to be significant (P<0.01). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation and exercise-induced oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östman, Bengt; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The theoretically beneficial effects of coenzyme Q10 (Q10) on exercise-related oxidative stress and physical capacity have not been confirmed to our knowledge by interventional supplementation studies. Our aim was to investigate further whether Q10 supplementation at a dose recommended...... the groups were detected for hypoxanthine or uric acid (serum markers of oxidative stress) or creatine kinase (a marker of skeletal muscle damage). Conclusion: Although in theory Q10 could be beneficial for exercise capacity and in decreasing oxidative stress, the present study could not demonstrate...

  15. Role of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in cardiac disease, hypertension and Meniere-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Adarsh; Kaur, Harharpreet; Devi, Pushpa; Mohan, Varun

    2009-12-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone) is a mitochondrial coenzyme which is essential for the production of ATP. Being at the core of cellular energy processes it assumes importance in cells with high energy requirements like the cardiac cells which are extremely sensitive to CoQ10 deficiency produced by cardiac diseases. CoQ10 has thus a potential role for prevention and treatment of heart ailments by improving cellular bioenergetics. In addition it has an antioxidant, a free radical scavenging and a vasodilator effect which may be helpful in these conditions. It inhibits LDL oxidation and thus the progression of atherosclerosis. It decreases proinflammatory cytokines and decreases blood viscosity which is helpful in patients of heart failure and coronary artery disease. It also improves ischemia and reperfusion injury of coronary revascularisation. Significant improvement has been observed in clinical and hemodynamic parameters and in exercise tolerance in patients given adjunctive CoQ10 in doses from 60 to 200 mg daily in the various trials conducted in patients of heart failure, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and other cardiac illnesses. Recently it has been found to be an independent predictor of mortality in congestive heart failure. It has also been found to be helpful in vertigo and Meniere-like syndrome by improving the immune system. Further research is going on to establish firmly its role in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. The effect of coenzyme Q10 included by γ-cyclodextrin on the growth of fission yeast studied by microscope Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Tatsuro; Kaino, Tomohiro; Ikarashi, Ryo; Nakata, Daisuke; Terao, Keiji; Ando, Masahiro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o.; Kawamukai, Makoto; Yamamoto, Tatsuyuki

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion complex of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) by γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), CoQ10-CD complex, was recently developed. The addition of the CoQ10-CD complex recovered the growth of a fission yeast mutant strain, Δdps1, which otherwise cannot grow well due to the lack of coenzyme Q producing ability. However, the oxygen consumption rate of this strain was not restored by the addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. The addition of two other anti-oxidative reagents, glutathione and ascorbic acid, also recovered the growth of the Δdps1 strain as well. These results indicated that the recovery of the growth of Δdps1 was brought about by the anti-oxidative property of CoQ10. The intensity of Raman spectra of Δdps1 at 1602 cm-1, which is prominently observed for the wild type of the fission yeast, was compared between before and after addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. The signal was very weakly observed for Δdps1 and did not increase in intensity by the addition of the CoQ10-CD complex. These results suggested the recovery of the growth of Δdps1 was brought about not by the restoration of respiration function of Δdps1 but by the anti-oxidative property of CoQ10 to result in the decrease in the oxidative stress.

  17. Micronutrient special issue: Coenzyme Q10 requirements for DNA damage prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmelzer, Constance; Döring, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an essential component for electron transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as cofactor in several biological processes. The reduced form of CoQ 10 (ubiquinol, Q 10 H 2 ) is an effective antioxidant in biological membranes. During the last years, particular interest has been grown on molecular effects of CoQ 10 supplementation on mechanisms related to DNA damage prevention. This review describes recent advances in our understanding about the impact of CoQ 10 on genomic stability in cells, animals and humans. With regard to several in vitro and in vivo studies, CoQ 10 provides protective effects on several markers of oxidative DNA damage and genomic stability. In comparison to the number of studies reporting preventive effects of CoQ 10 on oxidative stress biomarkers, CoQ 10 intervention studies in humans with a direct focus on markers of DNA damage are limited. Thus, more well-designed studies in healthy and disease populations with long-term follow up results are needed to substantiate the reported beneficial effects of CoQ 10 on prevention of DNA damage.

  18. Novel Lipid-Free Nanoformulation for Improving Oral Bioavailability of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the bioavailability of orally administered lipophilic coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, we formulated a novel lipid-free nano-CoQ10 system stabilized by various surfactants. Nano-CoQ10s, composed of 2.5% (w/w CoQ10, 1.67% (w/w surfactant, and 41.67% (w/w glycerol, were prepared by hot high-pressure homogenization. The resulting formulations were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. We found that the mean particle size of all nano-CoQ10s ranged from 66.3±1.5 nm to 92.7±1.5 nm and the zeta potential ranged from -12.8±1.4 mV to -41.6±1.4 mV. The CoQ10 in nano-CoQ10s likely existed in a supercooled state, and nano-CoQ10s stored in a brown sealed bottle were stable for 180 days at 25°C. The bioavailability of CoQ10 was evaluated following oral administration of CoQ10 formulations in Sprague-Dawley rats. Compared to the values observed following administration of CoQ10-Suspension, nano-CoQ10 modified with various surfactants significantly increased the maximum plasma concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve. Thus, the lipid-free system of a nano-CoQ10 stabilized with a surfactant may be an effective vehicle for improving oral bioavailability of CoQ10.

  19. Therapeutic effects of coenzyme Q10 on dilated cardiomyopathy. Assessment by {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A multicenter trial in Osaka University Medical School Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Hori, Masatsugu [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate therapeutic effects of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), 15 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy were investigated by {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The BMIPP defect score was determined semiquantitatively by using representative short and long axial SPECT images. Mean BMIPP defect score with CoQ10 treatment was significantly low, 7.7{+-}6.1 compared to 12.7{+-}7.4 without CoQ10 treatment. On the other hand, in 8 patients of dilated cardiomyopathy, % fractional shortening using echocardiography was not different before and after CoQ10 treatment. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT was proved to be sensitive to evaluate the therapeutic effects of CoQ10, which improve myocardial mitochondrial function, in the cases of dilated cardiomyopathy. (author).

  20. Application of coenzyme Q10 for accelerating soft tissue wound healing after tooth extraction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Toshiki; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Kawabata, Yuya; Ekuni, Daisuke; Azuma, Tetsuji; Kataoka, Kota; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Morita, Manabu

    2014-12-10

    Accelerating wound healing after tooth extraction is beneficial in dental treatment. Application of antioxidants, such as reduced coenzyme Q10 (rCoQ10), may promote wound healing after tooth extraction. In this study, we examined the effects of topical application of rCoQ10 on wound healing after tooth extraction in rats. After maxillary first molars were extracted, male Fischer 344 rats (8 weeks old) (n = 27) received topical application of ointment containing 5% rCoQ10 (experimental group) or control ointment (control group) to the sockets for 3 or 8 days (n = 6-7/group). At 3 days after extraction, the experimental group showed higher collagen density and lower numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the upper part of socket, as compared to the control group (p healing in the soft tissue of the alveolar socket, but that rCoQ10 has a limited effect on bone remodeling in rats.

  1. Effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on the anthropometric variables, lipid profiles and liver enzymes in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Jafarvand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 41 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Patients in intervention group received 100 mg/day coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 for four weeks. There was a significant reduction in waist circumference and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations after CoQ10 supplementation (p<0.05. Dietary fiber was in negative correlation with change in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT concentrations (r = -410, p = 0.04, and dietary fat intake was in positive relation with serum triglyceride (r = 463, p = 0.04 and in negative relation with serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C (r = -533, p = 0.02 in CoQ10-treated group. CoQ10 supplement is able to reduce central obesity and improve liver function in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Dietary factors were also significant determinants of change in liver-specific enzyme ALT and lipid profile in these patients. Further trials with higher dose of CoQ10 and longer treatment periods are warranted to better clarify these findings.

  2. Coenzyme Q10 defects may be associated with a deficiency of Q10-independent mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Fragaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone deficiency can be due either to mutations in genes involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis pathway, or to mutations in genes unrelated to CoQ10 biosynthesis. CoQ10 defect is the only oxidative phosphorylation disorder that can be clinically improved after oral CoQ10 supplementation. Thus, early diagnosis, first evoked by mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC spectrophotometric analysis, then confirmed by direct measurement of CoQ10 levels, is of critical importance to prevent irreversible damage in organs such as the kidney and the central nervous system. It is widely reported that CoQ10 deficient patients present decreased quinone-dependent activities (segments I + III or G3P + III and II + III while MRC activities of complexes I, II, III, IV and V are normal. We previously suggested that CoQ10 defect may be associated with a deficiency of CoQ10-independent MRC complexes. The aim of this study was to verify this hypothesis in order to improve the diagnosis of this disease. RESULTS: To determine whether CoQ10 defect could be associated with MRC deficiency, we quantified CoQ10 by LC-MSMS in a cohort of 18 patients presenting CoQ10-dependent deficiency associated with MRC defect. We found decreased levels of CoQ10 in eight patients out of 18 (45 %, thus confirming CoQ10 disease. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that CoQ10 defect can be associated with MRC deficiency. This could be of major importance in clinical practice for the diagnosis of a disease that can be improved by CoQ10 supplementation.

  3. Protection of dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and nigrostriatal neuronal death by chronic Coenzyme Q10 pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binukumar, BK; Gupta, Nidhi; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and increased risk of developing Parkinson's diseases. Oxidative stress generated as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an important factor in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Previously, we reported that chronic dichlorvos exposure causes mitochondrial impairments and nigrostriatal neuronal death in rats. The present study was designed to test whether Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) administration has any neuroprotective effect against dichlorvos mediated nigrostriatal neuronal death, α-synuclein aggregation, and motor dysfunction. Male albino rats were administered dichlorvos by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight over a period of 12 weeks. Results obtained there after showed that dichlorvos exposure leads to enhanced mitochondrial ROS production, α-synuclein aggregation, decreased dopamine and its metabolite levels resulting in nigrostriatal neurodegeneration. Pretreatment by Coenzyme Q 10 (4.5 mg/kg ip for 12 weeks) to dichlorvos treated animals significantly attenuated the extent of nigrostriatal neuronal damage, in terms of decreased ROS production, increased dopamine and its metabolite levels, and restoration of motor dysfunction when compared to dichlorvos treated animals. Thus, the present study shows that Coenzyme Q 10 administration may attenuate dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration, α-synuclein aggregation and motor dysfunction by virtue of its antioxidant action. - Highlights: → CoQ 10 administration attenuates dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegenaration. → CoQ 10 pre treatment leads to preservation of TH-IR neurons. → CoQ 10 may decrease oxidative damage and α-synuclin aggregation. → CoQ 10 treatment enhances motor function and protects rats from catalepsy.

  4. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Exogenous coenzyme Q10 modulates MMP-2 activity in MCF-7 cell line as a breast cancer cellular model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmiranpour Hossein

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 is a key molecule in cellular invasion and metastasis. Mitochondrial ROS has been established as a mediator of MMP activity. Coenzyme Q10 contributes to intracellular ROS regulation. Coenzyme Q10 beneficial effects on cancer are still in controversy but there are indications of Coenzyme Q10 complementing effect on tamoxifen receiving breast cancer patients. Methods In this study we aimed to investigate the correlation of the effects of co-incubation of coenzyme Q10 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC on intracellular H2O2 content and Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 activity in MCF-7 cell line. Results and Discussion Our experiment was designed to assess the effect in a time and dose related manner. Gelatin zymography and Flowcytometric measurement of H2O2 by 2'7',-dichlorofluorescin-diacetate probe were employed. The results showed that both coenzyme Q10 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduce MMP-2 activity along with the pro-oxidant capacity of the MCF-7 cell in a dose proportionate manner. Conclusions Collectively, the present study highlights the significance of Coenzyme Q10 effect on the cell invasion/metastasis effecter molecules.

  6. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragip Pala, Cemal Orhan, Mehmet Tuzcu, Nurhan Sahin, Shakir Ali, Vedat Cinar, Mustafa Atalay, Kazim Sahin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB, inhibitors of kappa B (IκB, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 and hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1 in rats after chronic exercise training for 6 weeks. 8-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of four treatments planned in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of two condition (sedentary vs. exercise training, and two coenzyme Q10 levels (0 and 300 mg/kg per day for 6 weeks. The expression levels of the target proteins were determined in the heart, liver and muscle, and biochemical parameters including creatinine, urea, glucose and lipid profile were investigated in plasma. When compared with sedentary group, significant decreases in heart, liver and muscle NFκB levels by 45%, 26% and 44% were observed in Q10 supplemented rats after exercise training, respectively, while the inhibitory protein IκB increased by 179%, 111% and 127% in heart, liver and muscle tissues. Q10 supplementation caused an increase in Nrf2 (167%, 165% and 90% and HO-1 (107%, 156% and 114% after exercise training in heart, liver and muscle tissues (p < 0.05. No significant change was observed in any of the parameters associated with protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, except that exercise caused a decrease in plasma triglyceride, which was further decreased by Q10. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q10 modulates the expression of NFκB, IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 in exercise training, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of Q10 and emphasizes its role in antioxidant defense.

  7. Effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on plasma C-reactive protein concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Banach, Maciej

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective interventional studies was to investigate the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CQ10) on plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. PubMed/Medline, Web of Science (WoS), Cochrane Database and Google Scholar databases were searched (up to December 2016) to identify prospective studies evaluating the impact of CQ10 supplementation on CRP. Random effects models meta-analysis was used for quantitative data synthesis. Sensitivity analysis used the leave-one-out method, and heterogeneity was quantitatively assessed using the I 2 index. Systematic review PROSPERO database registration: CRD42016038155. From a total of 119 entries identified via searches, 7 studies were finally included to the analysis. The results of the meta-analysis indicated a non-significant reduction in CRP concentrations following supplementation with CQ10 with a weighted mean difference [WMD] of -0.25mg/l (95% confidence intervals [CI] -0.56 to 0.06, I 2 =42.0%). The WMD for the effects on interleukin 6 (IL6) was -0.72pg/dl, (95% CI -1.24 to -0.24, I 2 =51.8%). These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses. Random-effects meta-regression revealed that changes in plasma CRP levels were independent of the dosage of CQ10 (slope: -0.0005; 95% CI: -0.005, 0.004; p=0.832) while duration of supplementation was the dependent mediator (slope: slope: -0.111; 95% CI: -0.21, -0.004; p=0.042). In conclusion, CQ10 supplementation has a borderline favourable effect on CRP levels, and a significant effect on IL-6 level. This suggests that CQ10 supplementation likely attenuates subclinical inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A randomized trial of coenzyme Q10 in patients with confirmed statin myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beth A; Lorson, Lindsay; White, C Michael; Thompson, Paul D

    2015-02-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation is the most popular therapy for statin myalgia among both physicians and patients despite limited and conflicting evidence of its efficacy. This study examined the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on simvastatin-associated muscle pain, muscle strength and aerobic performance in patients with confirmed statin myalgia. Statin myalgia was confirmed in 120 patients with prior symptoms of statin myalgia using an 8-week randomized, double-blind crossover trial of simvastatin 20 mg/d and placebo. Forty-one subjects developed muscle pain with simvastatin but not with placebo and were randomized to simvastatin 20 mg/d combined with CoQ10 (600 mg/d ubiquinol) or placebo for 8 weeks. Muscle pain (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), time to pain onset, arm and leg muscle strength, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were measured before and after each treatment. Serum CoQ10 increased from 1.3 ± 0.4 to 5.2 ± 2.3 mcg/mL with simvastatin and CoQ10, but did not increase with simvastatin and placebo (1.3 ± 0.3 to 0.8 ± 0.2) (p pain severity and interference scores increased with simvastatin therapy (both p muscle strength or VO2max with simvastatin with or without CoQ10 (all p > 0.10). Marginally more subjects reported pain with CoQ10 (14 of 20 vs 7 of 18; p = 0.05). There was no difference in time to pain onset in the CoQ10 (3.0 ± 2.0 weeks) vs. placebo (2.4 ± 2.1 wks) groups (p = 0.55). A similar lack of CoQ10 effect was observed in 24 subjects who were then crossed over to the alternative treatment. Only 36% of patients complaining of statin myalgia develop symptoms during a randomized, double-blind crossover of statin vs placebo. CoQ10 supplementation does not reduce muscle pain in patients with statin myalgia. Trial RegistrationNCT01140308; www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Coenzyme Q10 (Q-ter) in treatment of functional voice disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensini, M; Corvino, A; Passeri, L; Gallone, G O; Landolfo, V; Raimondo, L; Giordano, C

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the effectivness of Coenzyme Q-Ter and Vitamin A in functional voice disorders. Twenty two patients were treated with CoQ10-ter and vitamin A twice a day for ten days. A general otolaryngological/foniatric and logopedic examination were performed. Videolaringostroboscopy, GIRBAS, Voice Handicap Index questionnaire and Multi-Dimensional Voice analysis were carried out before and after treatment. In all patients an improvement was observed in almost all parameters considered after treatment. CoQ10-ter and Vitamin A risulted effective in treatment of patients with functional voice disorders (caused by vocal "malmenage" or "surmenage").

  10. Coenzyme Q10 protects retinal cells from apoptosis induced by radiation in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lulli, M.; Witort, E.; Papucci, L.; Torre, E.; Schiavone, N.; Capaccioli, S.; Dal Monte, M.

    2012-01-01

    The key pathogenetic event of many retinopathies is apoptosis of retinal cells. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) prevents apoptosis of corneal keratocytes both in vitro and in vivo, by virtue of its ability to inhibit mitochondrial depolarization, independently of its free radical scavenger role. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether CoQ10 can protect cultured retinal cells and the retinas of rats from radiation-induced apoptosis, if instilled as eye drops in the cornea. In vitro experiments were carried out on cultured ARPE-19 or retinal ganglion cells (RGC)-5 cells pretreated with CoQ10 before eliciting apoptosis by ultraviolet (UV)- and γ-radiation, chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A) and serum starvation. Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. Apoptotic events were scored by time-lapse videomicroscopy. Mitochondrial permeability transition was evaluated by JC-1. The anti-apoptotic effectiveness of CoQ10 in retina was also evaluated by an in situ end-labeling assay in Wistar albino rats treated with CoQ10 eye drops prior to UV irradiation of the eye. CoQ10 substantially increased cell viability and lowered retinal cell apoptosis in response both to UV- and γ-radiation and to chemical hypoxia or serum starvation by inhibiting mitochondrion depolarization. In the rat, CoQ10, even when applied as eye drops on the cornea, protected all retina layers from ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 to protect retinal cells from radiation-induced apoptosis following its instillation on the cornea suggests the possibility for CoQ10 eye drops to become a future therapeutic countermeasure for radiation-induced retinal lesions. (author)

  11. A Direct Comparison of Anti-ulcer Effects of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin C on Indomethacin-induced Gastric Ulcer in Rat: A Controlled Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Indomethacin increases generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS which have a crucial role in the indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer. Coenzyme Q10 has an antioxidant activity on mitochondria and cell membranes and protects lipids from oxidation and is essential for stabilizing biological membranes. Superoxide dismutase (SOD acts as one of the defense mechanisms against free radicals. When the generation of ROS overwhelms, the antioxidant defense, lipid peroxiation of cell membrane occurs and cause cell damage. Materials and Methods: Male adult Wistar rats were divided into A and B groups. The rats in group A were then further divided into three subgroups of 6 animals each and received one of the following treatments: Animals in the first subgroup received saline. Animals in the second subgroup received saline and indomethacin. Animals in the third subgroup received vitamin C and indomethacin. The rats in group B were also further divided into 3 subgroups of 6 rats each and treated with one of the following treatments: Animals in first subgroup received 1% Tween 80 as vehicle. Animals In second subgroup received 1% Tween 80 and indomethacin. Animals in third subgroup received CoQ10 and indomethacin. Four hours after the last treatment, animals were killed and the stomachs removed were cut and gastric mucosal lesions were examined. Ulcer indexes were determined and SOD activity measured in plasma                                                             Results: Pretreatment with both vitamin C and coenzyme Q10 was associated with attenuation of ulcer index and increased SOD activity compared with animals treated with indomethacin alone (P

  12. The effect of n-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 supplementation on neutrophil leukotrienes, mediators of inflammation resolution and myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Anne E; Shinde, Sujata; Burke, Valerie; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J; Irish, Ashley B; Watts, Gerald F; Mori, Trevor A

    2018-03-22

    Neutrophils release leukotriene (LT)B 4 and myeloperoxidase (MPO) that may be important mediators of chronic inflammation in chronic kidney disease (CKD). The n-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have the potential to attenuate inflammation through production of LTB 5 and the Specialized Proresolving Lipid Mediators (SPM) that promote the resolution of inflammation. In animal models, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) also attenuates inflammation by reducing MPO and LTB 4 . This study evaluated the independent and combined effects of n-3 FA and CoQ supplementation on neutrophil leukotrienes, the pro-inflammatory eicosanoid 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), SPM, and plasma MPO, in patients with CKD. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention of factorial design, 85 patients with CKD were randomized to either n-3 FA (4 g), CoQ (200 mg), both supplements, or control (4 g olive oil), daily for 8 weeks. Plasma MPO and calcium ionophore-stimulated neutrophil release of LTs, 5-HETE and SPM were measured at baseline and after 8 weeks. Seventy four patients completed the intervention. n-3 FA, but not CoQ, significantly increased neutrophil LTB 5 (P n-3 FA or CoQ. Plasma MPO was significantly reduced with n-3 FA alone (P = 0.013) but not when given in combination with CoQ. n-3 FA supplementation in patients with CKD leads to increased neutrophil release of LTB 5 and several SPM, as well as a reduction in plasma MPO that may have important implications for limiting chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on cardiometabolic markers in overweight type 2 diabetic patients with stable myocardial infarction: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Mehdi Mirhashemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Limited data are present that have assessed the effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 intake on cardiometabolic markers in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (CHD. This study was done to determine the effects of CoQ10 administration on cardiometabolic markers in overweight diabetic patients with stable myocardial infarction. METHODS: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was done among 60 diabetic patients with CHD aged 45-75 years old. Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either 100 mg/day CoQ10 supplements (n = 30 or placebo (n = 30 for 8 weeks. RESULTS: Compared with the placebo, CoQ10 intake led to a significant reduction in serum interleukin 6 (IL-6 (-1.7 ± 1.6 vs. 0.8 ± 1.7 ng/l, P < 0.001 and protein carbonyl (PCO levels (-0.2 ± 0.3 vs. 0.1 ± 0.2 nmol/mg protein, P < 0.001. Supplementation with CoQ10 did not affect serum lipoprotein(a, advanced glycation end-products and thiol concentrations compared with the placebo. CONCLUSION: Overall, this study indicated that CoQ10 intake after 8 weeks among diabetic patients with the stable CHD had beneficial effects on serum IL-6 and PCO levels, but did not alter other cardiometabolic markers.  

  14. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in health and disease conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodick TC

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Taylor C Rodick,1 Donna R Seibels,2 Jeganathan Ramesh Babu,1 Kevin W Huggins,1 Guang Ren,3 Suresh T Mathews2 1Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, & Hospitality Management, Auburn University, Auburn, 2Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Samford University, 3Medicine-Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, an endogenously produced compound, is found in all human cells. Within the mitochondria, it plays a substantial role in energy production by acting as a mobile electron carrier in the electron transport chain. Outside the mitochondria, it acts as an excellent antioxidant by sequestering free radicals and working synergistically with other antioxidants, including vitamin E. Dietary contribution is limited, making endogenous production the primary source for optimal function. Now widely available as an over-the-counter supplement, CoQ10 has gained attention for its possible therapeutic use in minimizing the outcomes of certain metabolic diseases, notably cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurodegenerative disease, and cancer. Research has shown positive results in subjects supplemented with CoQ10, especially in relation to upregulating antioxidant capability. Emerging research suggests beneficial effects of CoQ10 supplementation in individuals on statin medications. CoQ10 supplementation in individuals participating in strenuous exercise seems to exert some beneficial effects, although the data are conflicting with other types of physical activity. This broad review of current CoQ10 literature, while outlining its physiological/functional significance in health and disease conditions, also offers a dietitian’s perspective on its potential use as a supplement in the promotion of health and management of disease conditions. Keywords: coenzyme Q, antioxidant, oxidative stress, dietary supplement, statin

  15. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation decreases statin-related mild-to-moderate muscle symptoms: a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Turk, Martina; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-11-06

    Statin use is frequently associated with muscle-related symptoms. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has yielded conflicting results in decreasing statin myopathy. Herein, we tested whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation could decrease statin-associated muscular pain in a specific group of patients with mild-to-moderate muscle symptoms. Fifty patients treated with statins and reporting muscle pain were recruited. The Q10 group (n=25) received coenzyme Q10 supplementation over a period of 30 days (50 mg twice daily), and the control group (n=25) received placebo. The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) questionnaire was used and blood testing was performed at inclusion in the study and after 30 days of supplementation. The intensity of muscle pain, measured as the Pain Severity Score (PSS), in the Q10 group was reduced from 3.9±0.4 to 2.9±0.4 (PPain Interference Score (PIS) after Q10 supplementation was reduced from 4.0±0.4 to 2.6±0.4 (Pstatin-related muscle symptoms in 75% of patients. The relative values of PSS and PIS significantly decreased (-33.1% and -40.3%, respectively) in the Q10 group compared to placebo group (both Pmuscle enzymes or cholesterol values were found. The present results show that coenzyme Q10 supplementation (50 mg twice daily) effectively reduced statin-related mild-to-moderate muscular symptoms, causing lower interference of statin-related muscular symptoms with daily activities.

  16. Reversal of statin-induced memory dysfunction by co-enzyme Q10: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeahialam BN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Basil N Okeahialam Cardiology Sub-Unit 1, Department of Medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria Abstract: Statins are useful in the armamentarium of the clinician dealing with dyslipidemia, which increases cardiovascular morbi-mortality in hypertensive and diabetic patients among others. Dyslipidemia commonly exists as a comorbidity factor in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Use of statins is however associated with side effects which at times are so disabling as to interfere with activities of daily living. There are various ways of dealing with this, including use of more water-soluble varieties, intermittent dosing, or use of statin alternatives. Of late, use of co-enzyme Q10 has become acceptable for the muscle side effects. Only one report of any benefit on the rarely reported memory side effect was encountered by the author in the search of English medical literature. This is a report of a documented case of a Nigerian woman with history of statin intolerance in this case, memory dysfunction despite persisting dyslipidemia comorbidity. Her memory dysfunction side effect which interfered with activities of daily living and background muscle pain cleared when coenzyme Q10 was administered alongside low dose statin. Her lipid profile normalized and has remained normal. It is being recommended for use when statin side effects (muscle- and memory-related impair quality of life and leave patient at dyslipidemia-induced cardiovascular morbi-mortality. Keywords: statin, memory dysfunction, co-enzyme Q10, improvement

  17. Coenzyme Q10 and alpha-tocopherol protect against amitriptyline toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Mario D.; Moreno-Fernandez, Ana Maria; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Miguel, Manuel de; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Oropesa-Avila, Manuel; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Angeles; Navas, Placido; Sanchez-Alcazar, Jose Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Since amitriptyline is a very frequently prescribed antidepressant drug, it is not surprising that amitriptyline toxicity is relatively common. Amitriptyline toxic systemic effects include cardiovascular, autonomous nervous, and central nervous systems. To understand the mechanisms of amitriptyline toxicity we studied the cytotoxic effects of amitriptyline treatment on cultured primary human fibroblasts and zebrafish embryos, and the protective role of coenzyme Q 10 and alpha-tocopherol, two membrane antioxidants. We found that amitriptyline treatment induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in primary human fibroblasts. Mitochondrial dysfunction in amitriptyline treatment was characterized by reduced expression levels of mitochondrial proteins and coenzyme Q 10 , decreased NADH:cytochrome c reductase activity, and a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential. Moreover, and as a consequence of these toxic effects, amitriptyline treatment induced a significant increase in apoptotic cell death activating mitochondrial permeability transition. Coenzyme Q 10 and alpha-tocopherol supplementation attenuated ROS production, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death, suggesting that oxidative stress affecting cell membrane components is involved in amitriptyline cytotoxicity. Furthermore, amitriptyline-dependent toxicity and antioxidant protection were also evaluated in zebrafish embryos, a well established vertebrate model to study developmental toxicity. Amitriptyline significantly increased embryonic cell death and apoptosis rate, and both antioxidants provided a significant protection against amitriptyline embryotoxicity

  18. Preformed β-amyloid fibrils are destabilized by coenzyme Q10 in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu; Yamada, Masahito

    2005-01-01

    Inhibition of the formation of β-amyloid fibrils (fAβ), as well as the destabilization of preformed fAβ in the CNS, would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported previously that nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and wine-related polyphenol, myricetin (Myr), inhibit fAβ formation from Aβ and destabilize preformed fAβ in vitro. Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fAβ at pH 7.5 at 37 deg C in vitro. We next compared the anti-amyloidogenic activities of CoQ 10 with NDGA and Myr. CoQ 10 dose-dependently inhibited fAβ formation from amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), as well as their extension. Moreover, it destabilized preformed fAβs. The anti-amyloidogenic effects of CoQ 10 were slightly weaker than those of NDGA and Myr. CoQ 10 could be a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for AD

  19. Application of Coenzyme Q10 for Accelerating Soft Tissue Wound Healing after Tooth Extraction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Yoneda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating wound healing after tooth extraction is beneficial in dental treatment. Application of antioxidants, such as reduced coenzyme Q10 (rCoQ10, may promote wound healing after tooth extraction. In this study, we examined the effects of topical application of rCoQ10 on wound healing after tooth extraction in rats. After maxillary first molars were extracted, male Fischer 344 rats (8 weeks old (n = 27 received topical application of ointment containing 5% rCoQ10 (experimental group or control ointment (control group to the sockets for 3 or 8 days (n = 6–7/group. At 3 days after extraction, the experimental group showed higher collagen density and lower numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the upper part of socket, as compared to the control group (p < 0.05. Gene expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB were also lower in the experimental group than in the control group (p < 0.05. At 8 days after tooth extraction, there were no significant differences in collagen density, number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and bone fill between the groups. Our results suggest that topical application of rCoQ10 promotes wound healing in the soft tissue of the alveolar socket, but that rCoQ10 has a limited effect on bone remodeling in rats.

  20. Coenzyme Q10 and soyphosphatidylcholine in EK extender on preservation of Rhode Island Red poultry semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Nath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of EK extender alone or incorporation with CoenzymeQ10 (CoQ10 and/or soyphosphatidylcholine (SPC in poultry semen and their effects on seminal traits during temporal storage at 4⁰C for different time intervals (12 h, 24 h, and 36 h. Heterospermic pooled semen samples diluted (1:4 with EK, EK + SPC, EK+ CoQ10 and EK + SPC + CoQ10 extenders separately, preserved and different spermiogram were assessed. Various seminal traits within the same extender differ significantly (p<0.05 among different groups and with different time intervals of storage. CoQ10 and SPC in the EK extender exhibited favorable synergistic effect on sperm quality and were able to protect the male gametes against cold-stress up to 36h at 4⁰C. In this study, we concluded that incorporation of SPC and CoQ10 together in EK extender possess novel potentiality to maintain seminal quality during liquid storage of poultry semen at 4⁰C and for their safe transportation and further use for Artificial Reproductive technologies (ARTs.

  1. Plasma coenzyme Q10 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Orhan; Bilen, Habip; Keles, Sadullah; Alp, H. Hakan; Keleş, Mevlüt Sait; Yıldırım, Kenan; Öndaş, Osman; Pınar, L. Can; Civelekler, Mustafa; Baykal, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    AIM To determine the relationship between proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDRP) and plasma coenzyme Q10(CoQ10) concentration. METHODS Patients with type 2 diabetes and PDRP were determined to be the case group (n=50). The control group was consist of healthy individuals (n=50). Plasma CoQ10 and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in both groups. RESULTS Ubiquinone-10 (Coenzyme Q10) levels in PDRP and control subjects are 3.81±1.19µmol/L and 1.91±0.62µmol/L, respectively. Plasma MDA levels in PDRP and control subjects were 8.16±2µmol/L and 3.44±2.08µmol/L, respectively. Ratio of Ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 in PDRP and control subjects were 0.26±0.16 and 1.41±0.68, respectively. CONCLUSION The ratio of ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 is found lower in patients with PDRP. High levels of plasma ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 ratio indicate the protective effect on diabetic retinopathy. PMID:24195048

  2. Plasma coenzyme Q10 levels in type 2 diabetic patients with retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Ates

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the relationship between proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDRP and plasma coenzyme Q10(CoQ10 concentration.METHODS: Patients with type 2 diabetes and PDRP were determined to be the case group (n=50. The control group was consist of healthy individuals (n=50. Plasma CoQ10 and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were measured in both groups.RESULTS: Ubiquinone-10 (Coenzyme Q10 levels in PDRP and control subjects are 3.81±1.19µmol/L and 1.91±0.62µmol/L, respectively. Plasma MDA levels in PDRP and control subjects were 8.16±2µmol/L and 3.44±2.08µmol/L, respectively. Ratio of Ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 in PDRP and control subjects were 0.26±0.16 and 1.41±0.68, respectively.CONCLUSION:The ratio of ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 is found lower in patients with PDRP. High levels of plasma ubiquinol-10/ubiquinone-10 ratio indicate the protective effect on diabetic retinopathy.

  3. Effects of metabolic modifiers such as carnitines, coenzyme Q10, and PUFAs against different forms of neurotoxic insults: metabolic inhibitors, MPTP, and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew

    2005-08-01

    A number of strategies using the nutritional approach are emerging for the protection of the brain from damage caused by metabolic toxins, age, or disease. Neural dysfunction and metabolic imbalances underlie many diseases, and the inclusion of metabolic modifiers may provide an alternative and early intervention approach that may prevent further damage. Various models have been developed to study the impact of metabolism on brain function. These have also proven useful in expanding our understanding of neurodegeneration processes. For example, the metabolic compromise induced by inhibitors such as 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA), rotenone, and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) can cause neurodegeneration in animal models and these models are thought to simulate the processes that may lead to diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. These inhibitors of metabolism are thought to selectively kill neurons by inhibiting various mitochondrial enzymes. However, the eventual cell death is attributed to oxidative stress damage of selectively vulnerable cells, especially highly differentiated neurons. Various studies indicate that the neurotoxicity resulting from these types of metabolic compromise is related to mitochondrial dysfunction and may be ameliorated by metabolic modifiers such as L-carnitine (L-C), creatine, and coenzyme Q10, as well as by antioxidants such as lipoic acid, vitamin E, and resveratrol. Mitochondrial function and cellular metabolism are also affected by the dietary intake of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which may regulate membrane composition and influence cellular processes, especially the inflammatory pathways. Cellular metabolic function may also be ameliorated by caloric restriction diets. L-C is a naturally occurring quaternary ammonium compound that is a vital cofactor for the mitochondrial entry and oxidation of fatty acids. Any factors affecting L-C levels may also affect ATP levels. This endogenous compound

  4. Acute Hypoglycemia Induces Painful Neuropathy and the Treatment of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ping Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathic pain is reduced with tight glycemic control. However, strict control increases the risk of hypoglycemic episodes, which are themselves linked to painful neuropathy. This study explored the effects of hypoglycemia-related painful neuropathy. Pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was performed to explore the preventive effect of CoQ10 on hypoglycemia-related acute neuropathic pain. Two strains of mice were used and 1 unit/kg of insulin was given to induce hypoglycemia. Mechanical sensitivity of hindpaw withdrawal thresholds was measured using von Frey filaments. Blood glucose levels were clamped at normal levels by joint insulin and glucose injection to test whether insulin itself induced hypersensitivity. Results suggest that the increased mechanical sensitivity after insulin injection is related to decreased blood glucose levels. When blood glucose levels remained at a normal level by the linked administration of insulin and glucose, mice demonstrated no significant change in mechanical sensitivity. Pretreatment with CoQ10 prevented neuropathic pain and the expression of the stress factor c-Fos. These results support the concept that pain in the diabetic scenario can be the result of hypoglycemia and not insulin itself. Additionally, pretreatment with CoQ10 may be a potent preventive method for the development of neuropathic pain.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 production in plants: current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Sanjay Singh; Jaiwal, Anjali; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Jaiwal, Pawan K

    2015-06-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or Ubiquinone10 (UQ10), an isoprenylated benzoquinone, is well-known for its role as an electron carrier in aerobic respiration. It is a sole representative of lipid soluble antioxidant that is synthesized in our body. In recent years, it has been found to be associated with a range of patho-physiological conditions and its oral administration has also reported to be of therapeutic value in a wide spectrum of chronic diseases. Additionally, as an antioxidant, it has been widely used as an ingredient in dietary supplements, neutraceuticals, and functional foods as well as in anti-aging creams. Since its limited dietary uptake and decrease in its endogenous synthesis in the body with age and under various diseases states warrants its adequate supply from an external source. To meet its growing demand for pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries, there is a great interest in the commercial production of CoQ10. Various synthetic and fermentation of microbial natural producers and their mutated strains have been developed for its commercial production. Although, microbial production is the major industrial source of CoQ10 but due to low yield and high production cost, other cost-effective and alternative sources need to be explored. Plants, being photosynthetic, producing high biomass and the engineering of pathways for producing CoQ10 directly in food crops will eliminate the additional step for purification and thus could be used as an ideal and cost-effective alternative to chemical synthesis and microbial production of CoQ10. A better understanding of CoQ10 biosynthetic enzymes and their regulation in model systems like E. coli and yeast has led to the use of metabolic engineering to enhance CoQ10 production not only in microbes but also in plants. The plant-based CoQ10 production has emerged as a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach capable of supplying CoQ10 in ample amounts. The current strategies, progress and constraints of

  6. Supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhua Shen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with ever increasing prevalence in the United States and worldwide. There is growing body of evidence suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Coenzyme Q10 is an important micronutrient acting on the electron transport chain of the mitochondria with two major functions: (1 synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; and (2 a potent antioxidant. Deficiency in coenzyme Q10 is often seen in patients with T2DM. Whether restoration of coenzyme Q10 will help alleviate oxidative stress, preserve mitochondrial function, and thus improve glycemic control in T2DM is unclear. This article reviews the relationships among oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and T2DM and examines the evidence for potential use of coenzyme Q10 as a supplement for the treatment of T2DM.

  7. Effect of Magnetic Field Exposure on Testicular function and Prophylactic Role of Coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, L.A.; Abd-Allah, A.R.A.; Aly, H.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The protective effect of L-carnitine or Co enzyme Q 10 (Co Q 10) against high magnetic field (20 mt) induced testicular toxicity in mice was evaluated. Animals were injected with L-carnitine (200 mg/kg i.p.) or Co Q 10(200 mg/kg per o.s.) 1 hr before exposure to fractionated doses (1/2 h/day, 3 times per week for 2 weeks) or acute dose (3 hr) of magnetic field. Total sperm count motility, daily sperm production and testicular LDH-X activity as well as histopathological examination were investigated. Exposure of mice to fractionated doses of magnetic field caused a significant decrease in sperm count, motility, daily sperm production and LDH-X activity,which were more pronounced than those of acute dose. Moreover,marked testicular histopathological changes were observed after exposure to fractionated doses of magnetic field. Pretreatment of mice with L-carnitine or Co Q 10 1 hr before exposure to the magnetic field caused a significant recovery of testicular damage induced by high magnetic field (20 mT)

  8. Interaction of Coenzyme Q10 with Liposomes and its Impact on Suppression of Selenite – Induced Experimental Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat Wahba Shafaa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To stress the influence of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 on the structural properties of liposomes as model membranes and to investigate the possible role of CoQ10 or CoQ10 doped in liposomes when topically instilled as eye drops, in preventing cataract. Methods: The molecular interaction between liposomes and Coenzyme Q10 was examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Rat pups were randomly divided into six groups comprising 15 pups. Group (1, control group. Group (2, untreated model of cataract, received a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite. Instillation of pure CoQ10 (Group 3, CoQ10 encapsulated into neutral (Group 4, positive (Group 5 and negative (Group 6 Dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC liposomes on the opacification of lenses in rat pups after sodium selenite injection was topically received. Results: The incorporated CoQ10 is probably associated with lipid bilayers where it interacts to a large extent and perturbs them. This results in strong broadening and shift to lower temperature (94°C of the major characteristic endothermic peak of pure DPPC at 105°C. FTIR showed that the incorporation of CoQ10 into DPPC induces a conformational change in the polar region of DPPC. Ophthalmological and Biochemical studies revealed that CoQ10 alone followed by negatively charged liposomes doped with CoQ10 are more effective in reducing the progress of cataract as well as improving the lens soluble proteins levels and total antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: The interactions of CoQ10 with membrane systems may contribute to a better understanding of CoQ10 physiological properties and the development of therapeutically advanced systems.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation and Oocyte Aneuploidy in Women Undergoing IVF-ICSI Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov Bentov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The age-related reduction in live-birth rate is attributed to a high rate of aneuploidy and follicle depletion. We showed in an animal model that treatment with Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 markedly improved reproductive outcome. The aim of this study was to compare the post-meiotic oocyte aneuploidy rate in in vitro fertilization (IVF and intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI patients treated with CoQ10 or placebo. Methods We conducted a double blind placebo controlled randomized trial that included IVF-ICSI patients 35-43 years of age. The patients were treated with either 600 mg of CoQ10 or an equivalent number of placebo caps. We compared the post-meiotic aneuploidy rate using polar body biopsy (PBBX and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. According to the power calculation, 27 patients were needed for each arm. Results Owing to safety concerns regarding the effects of polar body biopsy on embryo quality and implantation, the study was terminated before reaching the target number of participants. A total of 39 patients were evaluated and randomized (17 CoQ10, 22 placebo, 27 were given the study medication (12 CoQ10, 15 placebo, and 24 completed an IVF-ICSI cycle including PBBX and embryo transfer (10 CoQ10, 14 placebo. Average age, base line follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, peak estradiol and progesterone serum level, as well as the total number of human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG units–-did not differ between the groups. The rate of aneuploidy was 46.5% in the CoQ10 group compared to 62.8% in the control. Clinical pregnancy rate was 33% for the CoQ10 group and 26.7% for the control group. Conclusion No significant differences in outcome were detected between the CoQ10 and placebo groups. However, the final study was underpowered to detect a difference in the rate of aneuploidy.

  10. Paraquat induces oxidative stress and neuronal cell death; neuroprotection by water-soluble Coenzyme Q10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, S.; Somayajulu, M.; Sikorska, M.; Borowy-Borowski, H.; Pandey, S.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress is correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. The causes of sporadic forms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases are still unknown. Recently, a correlation between paraquat exposure and neurodegenerative diseases has been observed. Paraquat, a nonselective herbicide, was once widely used in North America and is still routinely used in Taiwan. We have used differentiated Human Neuroblastoma (SHSY-5Y) cells as an in vitro model to study the mechanism of cell death induced by paraquat. We observed that paraquat-induced oxidative stress in differentiated SHSY-5Y cells as indicated by an increase in the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, apoptosis was evident as indicated by cellular and nuclear morphology and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, pretreatment of SHSY-5Y cells with water-soluble Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) before paraquat exposure inhibited ROS generation. Pretreatment with CoQ 10 also significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. We also analyzed the effect of paraquat and CoQ 10 on isolated mitochondria. Our results indicated that treatment with paraquat induced the generation of ROS from isolated mitochondria and depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Pretreatment with CoQ 10 was able to inhibit ROS generation from isolated mitochondria as well as the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that water-soluble CoQ 10 can prevent oxidative stress and neuronal damage induced by paraquat and therefore, can be used for the prevention and therapy of neurodegenerative diseases caused by environmental toxins

  11. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Decreases Statin-Related Mild-to-Moderate Muscle Symptoms: A Randomized Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Skarlovnik, Ajda; Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Turk, Martina; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-01-01

    Background Statin use is frequently associated with muscle-related symptoms. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has yielded conflicting results in decreasing statin myopathy. Herein, we tested whether coenzyme Q10 supplementation could decrease statin-associated muscular pain in a specific group of patients with mild-to-moderate muscle symptoms. Material/Methods Fifty patients treated with statins and reporting muscle pain were recruited. The Q10 group (n=25) received coenzyme Q10 supplementation o...

  12. The antioxidant status of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkholy, Usama M; Abdalmonem, Nermin; Zaki, Ahmed; Elkoumi, Mohamed A; Hashim, Mustafa I Abu; Basset, Maha A A; Salah, Hossam E

    2018-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant status of plasma vitamin E and plasma and intracellular coenzyme Q10 in children with type 1 diabetes. This case-control study was conducted on 72 children with type 1 diabetes and compared to 48 healthy children, who were age, sex, and ethnicity-matched. The diabetic children were divided according to their glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c %) into two groups: poor and good glycemic control groups. All children underwent full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory measurement of complete blood count, A1c %, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and vitamin E levels and coenzyme Q10 levels in plasma, erythrocytes, and platelets. Children with poor glycemic control showed significantly higher plasma vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, triglycerides, low-density lipoproteins, waist circumference/height ratio, cholesterol levels, and lower high-density lipoproteins and platelet coenzyme Q10 redox status in comparison to those with good glycemic control and the control group (p<0.05). Plasma coenzyme Q10 showed a positive correlation with the duration of type 1 diabetes, triglycerides, cholesterol, vitamin E, and A1c %, and negative correlation with the age of the diabetic group (p<0.05). The platelet redox status showed a negative correlation with the A1c % levels (r=-0.31; p=0.022) and the duration of type 1 diabetes (r=-0.35, p=0.012). Patients with type 1 diabetes, especially poorly controlled, had elevation of plasma vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 levels and decreased platelet redox status of coenzyme Q10, which may be an indicator of increased oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement of Coenzyme Q10 Production: Mutagenesis Induced by High Hydrostatic Pressure Treatment and Optimization of Fermentation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahong Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone, a potent antioxidative dietary supplement, was produced by submerged fermentation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens instead of chemical synthesis or solvent extraction. Agrobacterium tumefaciens 1.2554 was subjected to mutagenesis using a series of treatments including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP treatment, UV irradiation, and diethyl sulfate (DES treatment to obtain mutant strains showing higher CoQ10 production than wild-type strains. A mutant strain PK38 with four genetic markers was isolated: the specific CoQ10 content of the mutant strain increased by 52.83% compared with the original strain. Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on CoQ10 production with PK38 were studied. Sucrose at concentration of 30 g/l was tested as the best carbon source, and yeast extract at concentration of 30 g/l supplemented with 10 g/l of ammonium sulfate was identified to be the most favorable for CoQ10 production using PK38. Fed-batch culture strategy was then used for increasing production of CoQ10 in 5-l fermentor. Using the exponential feeding fed-batch culture of sucrose, cell growth and CoQ10 formation were significantly improved. With this strategy, the final cell biomass, CoQ10 production, and specific CoQ10 production increased by 126.11, 173.12, and 22.76%, respectively, compared to those of batch culture.

  14. The Antioxidant Status and Concentrations of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin E in Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hua Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E and the antioxidant status in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS. Subjects with MS (n=72 were included according to the criteria for MS. The non-MS group (n=105 was comprised of healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E concentrations, lipid profiles, and antioxidant enzymes levels (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase were measured. The subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of plasma coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E than those in the non-MS group, but these differences were not significant after being normalized for triglyceride level. The levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group. The subjects with the higher antioxidant enzymes activities had significant reductions in the risk of MS (P<0.01 after being adjusted for coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. In conclusion, the subjects with MS might be under higher oxidative stress resulting in low levels of antioxidant enzyme activities. A higher level of antioxidant enzymes activities was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of MS independent of the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E.

  15. Therapeutic implication of coenzyme Q10 during statin therapy: pros and cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Jamal Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is a vitamin-like substance, and a natural intermediate of electron transport chain (ETC of mitochondria which can accepts and donates electrons from complex I and complex II. CoQ10 shares a biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol and dolichol thus it can be a potential target of the widely available lipid-lowering drugs. The lipid lowering drugs such as statins, are widely administered to individuals who have high cholesterol levels. This article reviews the a clinical benefits of CoQ10 b association between administration of statin and CoQ10 deficiency and c involvement of CoQ10 in statin-associated myopathy.

  16. Therapeutic effect of co-enzyme Q10 on idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: assessment by iodine-123 labelled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid myocardial single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-ih [Department of Internal Medicine, Nishiyodo Hospital, Nishiyodo (Japan); Sawada, Yoshihiro [Department of Internal Medicine, Nishiyodo Hospital, Nishiyodo (Japan); Fujiwara, Go [Department of Radiology, Nishiyodo Hospital, Nishiyodo (Japan); Chiba, Hiroshi [Department of Internal Medicine, Mimihara General Hospital, Mimihara (Japan); Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Division of Tracer Kinetics, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-06-10

    It has been reported that myocardial mitochondrial function can be improved by the administration of co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Recently, iodine-123 labelled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) was developed for metabolic imaging using single-photon emission tomography (SPET). This study was conducted to determine whether the therapeutic effects of CoQ10 on idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy can be evaluated by BMIPP myocardial SPET. Fifteen patients, comprising 14 men and one woman (mean age: 64{+-}12 years), were examined. CoQ10 was administered at 30 mg/day for a period of 35.7{+-}12.4 days. BMIPP myocardial SPET was carried out before and after CoQ10 treatment. The count ratio of the heart (H) to the upper mediastinum (M) (H/M ratio) was calculated using a region of interest method with anterior planar imaging. Representative short-axis tomograms were divided into 27 segments (three slices x nine segments). Each segmental score was analysed semiquantitatively using a four-point scoring system (normal=0, mild low uptake=1, severe low uptake=2, defect=3). The H/M ratio showed a significant improvement, from 2.39{+-}0.39 to 2.54{+-}0.47, after treatment (P<0.05). The BMIPP total defect score after CoQ10 treatment was significantly decreased to 10.1{+-}4.3, compared to 13.9{+-}4.5 without CoQ10 treatment (P<0.001). However, the percent fractional shortening measured using echocardiography was not significantly different before and after CoQ treatment (19.2{+-}8.1 vs 19.7{+-}7.1). BMIPP myocardial SPET was confirmed to be sensitive in evaluating the therapeutic effects of CoQ10 in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. This method is unique, since the therapeutic effects can be estimated from the perspective of metabolic SPET imaging. (orig.). With 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Supplementing in the diet of lactating Holstein cows may naturally produce coenzyme Q10-enriched milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-Seck Bae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To examine the effects of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R. sphaeroides supplementation as a direct-fed microbial (DFM on rumen fermentation in dairy cows and on coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 transition into milk, an in vitro rumen simulation batch culture and an in vivo dairy cow experiment were conducted. Methods The characteristics of in vitro ruminal fermentation were investigated using rumen fluids from six cannulated Holstein dairy cows at 2 h post-afternoon feeding. A control treatment was included in the experiments based on a typified total mixed ration (TMR for lactating dairy cows, which was identical to the one used in the in vivo study, plus R. sphaeroides at 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5% TMR dry matter. The in vivo study employed six ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows randomly allotted to either the control TMR (C-TMR treatment or to a diet supplemented with a 0.5% R. sphaeroides culture (S-TMR, dry matter basis ad libitum. The presence of R. sphaeroides was verified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE applied to the bacterial samples obtained from the in vivo study. The concentration of CoQ10 in milk and in the supernatant from the in vitro study was determined using high performance liquid chromatography. Results The results of the in vitro batch culture and DGGE showed that the concentration of CoQ10 significantly increased after 2 h of R. sphaeroides supplementation above 0.1%. When supplemented to the diet of lactating cows at the level of 0.5%, R. sphaeroides did not present any adverse effect on dry matter intake and milk yield. However, the concentration of CoQ10 in milk dramatically increased, with treated cows producing 70.9% more CoQ10 than control cows. Conclusion The CoQ10 concentration in milk increased via the use of a novel DFM, and R. sphaeroides might be used for producing value-added milk and dairy products in the future.

  18. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Lopes-Ramos

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3 protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84. In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials.

  19. Characterisation and Skin Distribution of Lecithin-Based Coenzyme Q10-Loaded Lipid Nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huafeng; Yue, Yang; Liu, Guanlan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yan, Zemin; Duan, Mingxing

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the inner lipid ratio on the physicochemical properties and skin targeting of surfactant-free lecithin-based coenzyme Q10-loaded lipid nanocapsules (CoQ10-LNCs). The smaller particle size of CoQ10-LNCs was achieved by high pressure and a lower ratio of CoQ10/GTCC (Caprylic/capric triglyceride); however, the zeta potential of CoQ10-LNCs was above /- 60 mV/ with no distinct difference among them at different ratios of CoQ10/GTCC. Both the crystallisation point and the index decreased with the decreasing ratio of CoQ10/GTCC and smaller particle size; interestingly, the supercooled state of CoQ10-LNCs was observed at particle size below about 200 nm, as verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in one heating-cooling cycle. The lecithin monolayer sphere structure of CoQ10-LNCs was investigated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The skin penetration results revealed that the distribution of Nile red-loaded CoQ10-LNCs depended on the ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC; moreover, epidermal targeting and superficial dermal targeting were achieved by the CoQ10-LNCs application. The highest fluorescence response was observed at a ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC of 1:1. These observations suggest that lecithin-based LNCs could be used as a promising topical delivery vehicle for lipophilic compounds.

  20. Characterisation and Skin Distribution of Lecithin-Based Coenzyme Q10-Loaded Lipid Nanocapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zemin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the inner lipid ratio on the physicochemical properties and skin targeting of surfactant-free lecithin-based coenzyme Q10-loaded lipid nanocapsules (CoQ10-LNCs. The smaller particle size of CoQ10-LNCs was achieved by high pressure and a lower ratio of CoQ10/GTCC (Caprylic/capric triglyceride; however, the zeta potential of CoQ10-LNCs was above /− 60 mV/ with no distinct difference among them at different ratios of CoQ10/GTCC. Both the crystallisation point and the index decreased with the decreasing ratio of CoQ10/GTCC and smaller particle size; interestingly, the supercooled state of CoQ10-LNCs was observed at particle size below about 200 nm, as verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC in one heating–cooling cycle. The lecithin monolayer sphere structure of CoQ10-LNCs was investigated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM. The skin penetration results revealed that the distribution of Nile red-loaded CoQ10-LNCs depended on the ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC; moreover, epidermal targeting and superficial dermal targeting were achieved by the CoQ10-LNCs application. The highest fluorescence response was observed at a ratio of inner CoQ10/GTCC of 1:1. These observations suggest that lecithin-based LNCs could be used as a promising topical delivery vehicle for lipophilic compounds.

  1. Serum Levels of Coenzyme Q10 in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kasai

    Full Text Available The COQ2 gene encodes an essential enzyme for biogenesis, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10. Recessive mutations in this gene have recently been identified in families with multiple system atrophy (MSA. Moreover, specific heterozygous variants in the COQ2 gene have also been reported to confer susceptibility to sporadic MSA in Japanese cohorts. These findings have suggested the potential usefulness of CoQ10 as a blood-based biomarker for diagnosing MSA. This study measured serum levels of CoQ10 in 18 patients with MSA, 20 patients with Parkinson's disease and 18 control participants. Although differences in total CoQ10 (i.e., total levels of serum CoQ10 and its reduced form among the three groups were not significant, total CoQ10 level corrected by serum cholesterol was significantly lower in the MSA group than in the Control group. Our findings suggest that serum CoQ10 can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of MSA and to provide supportive evidence for the hypothesis that decreased levels of CoQ10 in brain tissue lead to an increased risk of MSA.

  2. Concentrations in beef and lamb of taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchas, R W; Rutherfurd, S M; Pearce, P D; Vather, R; Wilkinson, B H P

    2004-03-01

    Levels of taurine, carnosine, coenzyme Q(10), and creatine were measured in beef liver and several muscles of beef and lamb and in cooked and uncooked meat. The amino acid taurine has numerous biological functions, the dipeptide carnosine is a buffer as well as an antioxidant, coenzyme Q(10) is also an antioxidant present within mitochondria, and creatine along with creatine phosphate is involved with energy metabolism in muscle. Large differences were shown for all compounds between beef cheek muscle (predominantly red fibres) and beef semitendinosus muscle (mainly white fibres), with cheek muscle containing 9.9 times as much taurine, and 3.2 times as much coenzyme Q(10), but only 65% as much creatine and 9% as much carnosine. Levels in lamb relative to beef semitendinosus muscles were higher for taurine but slightly lower for carnosine, coenzyme Q(10) and creatine. Values for all the compounds varied significantly between eight lamb muscles, possibly due in part to differences in the proportion of muscle fibre types. Slow cooking (90 min at 70 °C) of lamb longissimus and semimembranosus muscles led to significant reductions in the content of taurine, carnosine, and creatine (Plamb, but that these levels vary between muscles, between animals, and with cooking.

  3. Effects of dietary coenzyme Q10 supplementation on hepatic mitochondrial function and the activities of respiratory chain-related enzymes in ascitic broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, A L; Guo, Y M

    2005-10-01

    1. One hundred and sixty 1-d-old Arbor Acre male broiler chicks were fed with maize-soybean based diets for 6 weeks in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment. The factors were CoQ10 supplementation (0 or 40 mg/kg) and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge (LPS or saline). 2. CoQ10 was supplemented from d 1. From d 18, the chickens received three weekly i.p. injections of LPS (1.0 mg/kg BW) or an equivalent amount of sterile saline as control. From d 10 on, all chickens were exposed to low ambient temperature (12 to 15 degrees C) to induce ascites. 3. The blood packed cell volume and ascites heart index of broiler chickens were reduced by dietary CoQ10 supplementation. Mitochondrial State 3 and State 4 respiration, respiratory control ratio and phosphate oxygen ratio were not changed, but H+/site stoichiometry of complex II + III was elevated by dietary CoQ10 supplementation. 4. Cytochrome c oxidase and H+-ATPase activity were increased by CoQ10 supplementation, whereas NADH cytochrome c reductase and succinate cytochrome c reductase were not influenced. Mitochondrial anti-ROS capability was increased and malondialdehyde content was decreased by CoQ10 supplementation. 5. The work suggested that dietary CoQ10 supplementation could reduce broiler chickens' susceptibility to ascites, which might be the result of improving hepatic mitochondrial function, some respiratory chain-related enzymes activities and mitochondrial antioxidative capability.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly and decreased melarsoprol-induced reactive encephalopathy in mice infected with Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nyabuga Nyariki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the modulatory effects of coenzyme Q10 on experimental trypanosome infections in mice and evaluate the risk of occurrence and severity of melarsoprol-induced post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE. Methods: Female Swiss white mice were orally administered with 200 mg/kg of coenzyme Q10 after which they were intraperitoneally inoculated with Trypanasoma brucei rhodesiense (T. b. rhodesiense. The resultant infection was allowed to develop and simulate all phases of human African trypanosomiasis and PTRE. Parasitaemia development, packed cell volume, haematological and pathological changes were determined. Results: A histological study in the brain tissue of T. b. rhodesiense infected mice demonstrated neuroinflammatory pathology which was highly amplified in the PTRE-induced groups. A prominent reduction in the severity of the neuroinflammatory response was detected when coenzyme-Q10 was administered. Furthermore, the mean tissue weight of spleen to body ratio in coenzyme Q10 supplemented group was significantly (P<0.05 different compared to un-supplemented groups, and clearly indicated that coenzyme Q10 prevented full blown splenomegaly pathogenesis by T. b. rhodesiense. A significant (P<0.05 increase in hemoglobin levels and red blood cells was observed in coenzyme Q10 mice compared to those infected and un-supplemented with coenzyme Q10. Conclusions: The capacity of coenzyme Q10 to alter the pathogenesis of T. b. rhodesiense infection in mice and following treatment with melarsoprol, may find application by rendering humans and animals less susceptible to deleterious effects of trypanosome infection such as splenomegaly and melarsoprol-induced PTRE and neurotoxicity.

  5. Design, optimization and characterization of coenzyme Q10- and D-panthenyl triacetate-loaded liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çelik B

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Burak Çelik,1 Ali Asram Sağıroğlu,1 Samet Özdemir2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Bezmialem Vakif University, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is a lipid-soluble molecule found naturally in many eukaryotic cells and is essential for electron transport chain and energy generation in mitochondria. D-Panthenyl triacetate (PTA is an oil-soluble derivative of D-panthenol, which is essential for coenzyme A synthesis in the epithelium. Liposomal formulations that encapsulate both ingredients were prepared and optimized by applying response surface methodology for increased stability and skin penetration. The optimum formulation comprised 4.17 mg CoQ10, 4.22 mg PTA and 13.95 mg cholesterol per 100 mg of soy phosphatidylcholine. The encapsulation efficiency of the optimized formulation for CoQ10 and PTA was found to be 90.89%±3.61% and 87.84%±4.61%, respectively. Narrow size distribution was achieved with an average size of 161.6±3.6 nm, while a spherical and uniform shape was confirmed via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Cumulative release of 90.93% for PTA and 24.41% for CoQ10 was achieved after 24 hours of in vitro release study in sink conditions. Physical stability tests indicated that the optimized liposomes were suitable for storage at 4°C for at least 60 days. The results suggest that the optimized liposomal formulation would be a promising delivery system for both ingredients in various topical applications. Keywords: coenzyme Q10, D-panthenyl triacetate, liposomes, response surface methodology, stability

  6. Coenzyme Q10 Status as a Determinant of Muscular Strength in Two Independent Cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Fischer

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with sarcopenia, which is a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is involved in several important functions that are related to bioenergetics and protection against oxidative damage; however, the role of CoQ10 as a determinant of muscular strength is not well documented. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the determinants of muscular strength by examining hand grip force in relation to CoQ10 status, gender, age and body mass index (BMI in two independent cohorts (n = 334, n = 967. Furthermore, peak flow as a function of respiratory muscle force was assessed. Spearman's correlation revealed a significant positive association between CoQ10/cholesterol level and hand grip in the basic study population (p<0.01 as well as in the validation population (p<0.001. In the latter, we also found a negative correlation with the CoQ10 redox state (p<0.01, which represents a lower percentage of the reduced form of CoQ10 (ubiquinol in subjects who exhibit a lower muscular strength. Furthermore, the age of the subjects showed a negative correlation with hand grip (p<0.001, whereas BMI was positively correlated with hand grip (p<0.01, although only in the normal weight subgroup (BMI <25 kg/m2. Analysis of the covariance (ANCOVA with hand grip as the dependent variable revealed CoQ10/cholesterol as a determinant of muscular strength and gender as the strongest effector of hand grip. In conclusion, our data suggest that both a low CoQ10/cholesterol level and a low percentage of the reduced form of CoQ10 could be an indicator of an increased risk of sarcopenia in humans due to their negative associations to upper body muscle strength, peak flow and muscle mass.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 does not prevent oral dyskinesias induced by long-term haloperidol treatment of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    OA, Andreassen; Weber, Christine; HA, Jorgensen

    1999-01-01

    dyskinesias in rats, a putative analogue to human TD, could be prevented by the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Rats received 16 weeks of treatment with haloperidol decanoate (HAL) IM alone or together with orally administered CoQ10, and the behavior was recorded during and after treatment. HAL...

  8. Modeling of process parameters for enhanced production of coenzyme Q10 from Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumaran, Palanisamy Athiyaman; Meenakshisundaram, Sankaranarayanan

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) plays an indispensable role in ATP generation through oxidative phosphorylation and helps in scavenging superoxides generated during electron transfer reactions. It finds extensive applications specifically related to oxidative damage and metabolic dysfunctions. This article reports the use of a statistical approach to optimize the concentration of key variables for the enhanced production of CoQ10 by Rhodotorula glutinis in a lab-scale fermenter. The culture conditions that promote optimum growth and CoQ10 production were optimized and the interaction of significant variables para-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB, 819.34 mg/L) and soybean oil (7.78% [v/v]) was studied using response surface methodology (RSM). CoQ10 production increased considerably from 10 mg/L (in control) to 39.2 mg/L in batch mode with RSM-optimized precursor concentration. In the fed-batch mode, PHB and soybean oil feeding strategy enhanced CoQ10 production to 78.2 mg/L.

  9. Border between natural product and drug: Comparison of the related benzoquinones idebenone and coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Gueven

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 is a ubiquitous component of cellular membranes and belongs to the class of benzoquinones that mainly differ with regards to the length and composition of their hydrophobic tail. The characteristic quinone group can accept electrons from various biological sources and is converted by a one electron transfer to the unstable semiquinone or by a two electron transfer to the more stable hydroquinone. This feature makes CoQ10 the bona fide cellular electron transfer molecule within the mitochondrial respiratory chain and also makes it a potent cellular antioxidant. These activities serve as justification for its popular use as food supplement. Another quinone with similarities to the naturally occurring CoQ10 is idebenone, which shares its quinone moiety with CoQ10, but at the same time differs from CoQ10 by the presence of a much shorter, less lipophilic tail. However, despite its similarity to CoQ10, idebenone cannot be isolated from any natural sources but instead was synthesized and selected as a pharmacologically active compound in the 1980s by Takeda Pharmaceuticals purely based on its pharmacological properties. Several recent clinical trials demonstrated some therapeutic efficacy of idebenone in different indications and as a consequence, many practitioners question if the freely available CoQ10 could not be used instead. Here, we describe the molecular and pharmacological features of both molecules that arise from their structural differences to answer the question if idebenone is merely a CoQ10 analogue as frequently perpetuated in the literature or a pharmaceutical drug with entirely different features.

  10. Coenzyme Q10 plus Multivitamin Treatment Prevents Cisplatin Ototoxicity in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Astolfi

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (Cpt is known to induce a high level of oxidative stress, resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species damaging the inner ear and causing hearing loss at high frequencies. Studies on animal models show that antioxidants may lower Cpt-induced ototoxicity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ototoxic effects of two different protocols of Cpt administration in a Sprague-Dawley rat model, and to test in the same model the synergic protective effects of a solution of coenzyme Q10 terclatrate and Acuval 400®, a multivitamin supplement containing antioxidant agents and minerals (Acu-Qter. The Cpt was administered intraperitoneally in a single dose (14 mg/kg or in three daily doses (4.6 mg/kg/day to rats orally treated or untreated with Acu-Qter for 5 days. The auditory function was assessed by measuring auditory brainstem responses from 2 to 32 kHz at day 0 and 5 days after treatment. Similar hearing threshold and body weight alterations were observed in both Cpt administration protocols, but mortality reduced to zero when Cpt was administered in three daily doses. The Acu-Qter treatment was able to prevent and completely neutralize ototoxicity in rats treated with three daily Cpt doses, supporting the synergic protective effects of coenzyme Q terclatrate and Acuval 400® against Cpt-induced oxidative stress. The administration protocol involving three Cpt doses is more similar to common human chemotherapy protocols, therefore it appears more useful for long-term preclinical studies on ototoxicity prevention.

  11. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ya Tsai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM or high glucose (25 mM enviroment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) enviroment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM) for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients. PMID:26682233

  13. Bioavailability enhancement of coenzyme Q10: an extensive review of patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Sarwar; Javed, Shamama; Kohli, Kanchan

    2010-11-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a major antioxidant principle found in human body which plays a vital role in maintaining several biochemical pathways of body. It acts as a potential mediator in transferring electrons in oxidoreductive reactions of electron transport chain. Chemically, it is a basic quinone containing moiety having a large and high molecular weight structure. Deficiency of this in body leads to several potential disorders like dysfunctions in cellular energetics, neurological degeneration, higher oxidative stress induced damage, breast cancer etc. The high molecular weight and lipophilicity of CoQ10 makes it poorly water soluble and consequently leads to low systemic availability. Several advancements have been made to enhance the bioavailability of CoQ10 using various approaches like size reduction, solubility enhancement (by solid dispersion, prodrug, complexation, ionization) and use of novel drug carriers such as liposomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions and self-emulsifying system. The primary objective of the present review is to assemble patents representing the various approaches used for enhancement of CoQ10 bioavailability.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia V Schottlaender

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases.Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37 as well as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n = 7, dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20, corticobasal degeneration (n = 15 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 18 patients were used as comparison groups. CoQ10 was measured in cerebellar and frontal cortex tissue by high performance liquid chromatography.We detected a statistically significant decrease (by 3-5% in the level of CoQ10 in the cerebellum of MSA cases (P = 0.001, specifically in OPCA (P = 0.001 and mixed cases (P = 0.005, when compared to controls as well as to other neurodegenerative diseases [dementia with Lewy bodies (P<0.001, idiopathic Parkinson's disease (P<0.001, corticobasal degeneration (P<0.001, and cerebellar ataxia (P = 0.001].Our results suggest that a perturbation in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of MSA but the mechanism behind this finding remains to be elucidated.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 partially restores pathological alterations in a macrophage model of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Villanueva-Paz, Marina; de Lavera, Isabel; Álvarez-Córdoba, Mónica; Luzón-Hidalgo, Raquel; Suárez-Rivero, Juan M; Tiscornia, Gustavo; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2017-02-06

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase). In GD, partial or complete loss of GCase activity causes the accumulation of the glycolipids glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and glucosylsphingosine in the lysosomes of macrophages. In this manuscript, we investigated the effects of glycolipids accumulation on lysosomal and mitochondrial function, inflammasome activation and efferocytosis capacity in a THP-1 macrophage model of Gaucher disease. In addition, the beneficial effects of coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ) supplementation on cellular alterations were evaluated. Chemically-induced Gaucher macrophages were developed by differentiateing THP-1 monocytes to macrophages by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and then inhibiting intracellular GCase with conduritol B-epoxide (CBE), a specific irreversible inhibitor of GCase activity, and supplementing the medium with exogenous GlcCer. This cell model accumulated up to 16-fold more GlcCer compared with control THP-1 cells. Chemically-induced Gaucher macrophages showed impaired autophagy flux associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, inflammasome activation and impaired efferocytosis. All abnormalities were partially restored by supplementation with CoQ. These data suggest that targeting mitochondria function and oxidative stress by CoQ can ameliorate the pathological phenotype of Gaucher cells. Chemically-induced Gaucher macrophages provide cellular models that can be used to investigate disease pathogenesis and explore new therapeutics for GD.

  16. Addition of omega-3 fatty acid and coenzyme Q10 to statin therapy in patients with combined dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Štefan; Šajty, Matej; Pekárová, Tímea; Mughees, Adil; Štefanič, Peter; Katz, Matan; Spišáková, Katarína; Pella, Jozef; Pella, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Statins represent a group of drugs that are currently indicated in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Their administration can be associated with side effects and the insufficient reduction of triacylglyceride (TAG) levels. This study aimed to assess the effect of the triple combination of statins with omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on parameters associated with atherogenesis and statin side effects. In this pilot randomized double-blind trial, 105 subjects who met the criteria of combined dislipidemia and elevated TAG levels were randomly divided into three groups. In the control group, unaltered statin therapy was indicated. In the second and third groups, omega-3 PUFA 2.52 g/day (Zennix fa Pleuran) and omega-3 PUFA 2.52 g+CoQ10 200 mg/day (Pharma Nord ApS) were added, res//. At the end of the 3-month period (±1 week), all patients were evaluated. Significant reduction of hepatic enzymes activity, systolic blood preasure, inflammatory markers and TAG levels were detected in both groups in comparison to the control group. Activity of SOD and GPx increased significantly after additive therapy. Coenzyme Q10 addition significantly reduced most of the abovementioned parameters (systolic blood preasure, total cholesterol, LDL, hsCRP, IL-6, SOD) in comparison with the statin+omega-3 PUFA group. The intensity of statin adverse effects were significantly reduced in the group with the addition of CoQ10. The results of this pilot study suggest the possible beneficial effects of triple combination on the lipid and non-lipid parameters related to atherogenesis and side effects of statin treatment.

  17. New evidences of neurotoxicity of aroclor 1254 in mice brain: potential of coenzyme q10 in abating the detrimental outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Majumdar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The present subacute study was designed to evaluate the effect of coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10 in the 28 days aroclor 1254 exposure induced oxidative stress in mice brain. Methods Biochemical estimations of brain lipid peroxidation (LPO, reduced glutathione (GSH, and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and acetyl cholinesterase (AChE, and histopathological investigations of brain tissue were carried out. Results Oral exposure of aroclor 1254 (5 mg/kg led to significant decrease in levels of GSH, and activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AChE, and increase in LPO. These aberrations were restored by CoQ10 (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [IP]. This protection offered was comparable to that of L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, IP which served as a reference standard. Conclusions Aroclor 1254 exposure hampers the activities of various antioxidant enzymes and induces oxidative stress in the brains of Swiss albino mice. Supplementation of CoQ10 abrogates these deleterious effects of aroclor 1254. CoQ10 also apparently enhanced acetyl cholinesterase activity which reflects its influence on the cholinergic system.

  18. Preparation, characterization and in silico modeling of biodegradable nanoparticles containing cyclosporine A and coenzyme Q10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankola, D D; Ravi Kumar, M N V [Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom); Durbin, E W [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Buxton, G A [Department of Sciences, Robert Morris University, 6001 University Boulevard, Moon Township, PA 15108 (United States); Schaefer, J; Bakowsky, U, E-mail: mnvrkumar@strath.ac.uk [Department of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmacy, Philipps Universitt, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2010-02-10

    Combination therapy will soon become a reality, particularly for those patients requiring poly-therapy to treat co-existing disease states. This becomes all the more important with the increasing cost, time and complexity of the drug discovery process prompting one to look at new delivery systems to increase the efficacy, safety and patient compliance of existing drugs. Along this line, we attempted to design nano-scale systems for simultaneous encapsulation of cyclosporine A (CsA) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and model their encapsulation and release kinetics. The in vitro characterization of the co-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the surfactant nature, concentration, external phase volume, droplet size reduction method and drug loading concentration can all influence the overall performance of the nanoparticles. The semi-quantitative solubility study indicates the strong influence of CoQ10 on CsA entrapment which was thought to be due to an increase in the lipophilicity of the overall system. The in vitro dissolution profile indicates the influence of CoQ10 on CsA release (64%) to that of individual particles of CsA, where the release is faster and higher (86%) on 18th day. The attempts to model the encapsulation and release kinetics were successful, offering a possibility to use such models leading to high throughput screening of drugs and their nature, alone or in combination for a particular polymer, if chi-parameters are understood.

  19. Rosuvastatin lowers coenzyme Q10 levels, but not mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthesis, in children with familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avis, Hans J.; Hargreaves, Ian P.; Ruiter, Jos P. N.; Land, John M.; Wanders, Ronald J.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether statin therapy affects coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) status in children with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Samples were obtained at baseline (treatment naïve) and after dose titration with rosuvastatin, aiming for a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 110

  20. Coenzyme Q10 as a treatment for fatigue and depression in multiple sclerosis patients: A double blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoobar, Meisam; Dehghan, Parvin; Khalili, Mohammad; Azimi, Amirreza; Seifar, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of central nervous system which is accompanied with disability and negative life style changes such as fatigue and depression. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on fatigue and depression in patients with MS. We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of CoQ10 supplement (500 mg/day) vs. placebo for 12 weeks. Fatigue symptoms were quantified by means of fatigue severity scale (FSS) and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depressive symptoms. A significant decrease of FSS was observed in CoQ10 group during the intervention (P = 0.001) and significant increase of FSS change was observed within placebo group (P = 0.001). Repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant time-by-treatment interaction for FSS (baseline 41.5 ± 15.6 vs. endpoint 45 ± 13.6; F1,45 = 55.23, P multiple sclerosis.

  1. Comparative evaluation of coenzyme Q10-based gel and 0.8% hyaluronic acid gel in treatment of chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anti-inflammatory and immune enhancing effects of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and hyaluronic acid are well established in medical literature. The present study was undertaken to evaluate their role in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty sites in 24 patients with clinically confirmed periodontitis were included in the study. A split-mouth design was used for intrasulcular application of CoQ10as adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP, 0.8% hyaluronic acid as adjunct to SRP and SRP alone. Clinical parameters such as plaque index (PI, gingival color change index (GCCI, Eastman interdental bleeding index (EIBI, pocket depth (PD, and clinical attachment level (CAL were recorded. All the clinical parameters PI, EIBI, GCCI, PD, and CAL were recorded at baseline before SRP. Only PI, EIBI, and GCCI were recorded at 1st and 2nd week. Twenty-one days post 2nd week, i.e., 6th week all the clinical parameters were recorded again. Results: Intragroup analysis of all the clinical parameters showed clinical significant results between baseline and 6th week. However, on intergroup analysis, the results were not significant. Conclusion: The local application of CoQ10and hyaluronic acid gel in conjunction with SRP may have a beneficial effect on periodontal health in patients with chronic periodontitis.

  2. Coenzyme Q10, α-Tocopherol, and Oxidative Stress Could Be Important Metabolic Biomarkers of Male Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gvozdjáková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, decreased antioxidant capacity, and impaired sperm mitochondrial function are the main factors contributing to male infertility. The goal of the present study was to assess the effect of the per os treatment with Carni-Q-Nol (440 mg L-carnitine fumarate + 30 mg ubiquinol + 75 IU vitamin E + 12 mg vitamin C in each softsule in infertile men on sperm parameters, concentration of antioxidants (coenzyme Q10,  CoQ10-TOTAL, γ, and α-tocopherols, and oxidative stress in blood plasma and seminal fluid. Forty infertile men were supplemented daily with two or three Carni-Q-Nol softsules. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, improved sperm density was observed (by 48.9% and 80.9%, resp. and after 3-month treatment the sperm pathology decreased by 25.8%. Concentrations of CoQ10-TOTAL (ubiquinone + ubiquinol and α-tocopherol were significantly increased and the oxidative stress was decreased. In conclusion, the effect of supplementary therapy with Carni-Q-Nol showed benefits on sperm function in men, resulting in 45% pregnancies of their women. We assume that assessment of oxidative stress, CoQ10-TOTAL, and α-tocopherol in blood plasma and seminal fluid could be important metabolic biomarkers in both diagnosis and treatment of male infertility.

  3. Treatment of cyclic vomiting syndrome with co-enzyme Q10 and amitriptyline, a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Amy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS, which is defined by recurrent stereotypical episodes of nausea and vomiting, is a relatively-common disabling condition that is associated with migraine headache and mitochondrial dysfunction. Co-enzyme Q10 (Co-Q is a nutritional supplement that has demonstrated efficacy in pediatric and adult migraine. It is increasingly used in CVS despite the complete lack of studies to demonstrate its value in treatment Methods Using an Internet-based survey filled out by subjects with CVS or their parents, the efficacy, tolerability and subject satisfaction in CVS prophylaxis were queried. Subjects taking Co-Q (22 subjects were compared against those taking amitriptyline (162 subjects, which is the general standard-of-care. Results Subjects/parents reported similar levels of efficacy for a variety of episode parameters (frequency, duration, number of emesis, nausea severity. There was a 50% reduction in at least one of those four parameters in 72% of subjects treated with amitriptyline and 68% of subjects treated Co-Q. However, while no side effects were reported on Co-Q, 50% of subjects on amitriptyline reported side effects (P = 5 × 10-7, resulting in 21% discontinuing treatment (P = 0.007. Subjects/parents considered the benefits to outweigh the risks of treatment in 47% of cases on amitriptyline and 77% of cases on Co-Q (P = 0.008. Conclusion Our data suggest that the natural food supplement Co-Q is potentially efficacious and tolerable in the treatment of CVS, and should be considered as an option in CVS prophylaxis. Our data would likely be helpful in the design of a double-blind clinical trial.

  4. Interaction of coenzyme Q10 with the intestinal drug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Shirou; Ochiai, Akiko; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2008-08-27

    In clinical trials, patients usually take many kinds of drugs at the same time. Thus, drug-drug interactions can often directly affect the therapeutic safety and efficacy of many drugs. Oral delivery is the most desirable means of drug administration. Changes in the activity of drug transporters may substantially influence the absorption of administered drugs from the intestine. However, there have been a few studies on food-drug interactions involving transporters. It is important to be aware of the potential of food-drug interactions and to act in order to prevent undesirable and harmful clinical consequences. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is very widely consumed by humans as a food supplement because of its recognition by the public as an important nutrient in supporting human health. Since intestinal efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the major factors in drug-drug interactions, we focused on this transporter. We report here for the first time that CoQ10, which is widely used as a food supplement, affects the transport activity of P-gp.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of coenzyme Q10 for fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Margaret M; Cooke, Marie; Lewis-Peel, Helen J; Lea, Rodney A; Moyle, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    To determine if coenzyme Q(10) alleviates fatigue in the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Coenzyme Q(10) has been shown to boost muscle energy metabolism in post-polio subjects but it does not promote muscle strength, endurance or function in polio survivors with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. However, the collective increased energy metabolism might contribute to a reduction in post-polio fatigue. Polio survivors from the Australian post-polio networks in Queensland and New South Wales who attribute a moderate to high level of fatigue to their diagnosed late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Those with fatigue-associated comorbidities of diabetes, anaemia, hypothyroidism and fibromyalgia were excluded. Participants were assigned (1:1), with stratification of those who use energy-saving mobility aids, to receive 100 mg coenzyme Q(10) or matching placebo daily for 60 days. Participants and investigators were blinded to group allocation. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue as the primary outcome and the Fatigue Severity Scale as secondary outcome. Of 103 participants, 54 were assigned to receive coenzyme Q(10) and 49 to receive the placebo. The difference in the mean score reductions between the two groups was not statistically significant for either fatigue measure. Oral supplementation with coenzyme Q(10) was safe and well-tolerated. A daily dose of 100 mg coenzyme Q(10) for 60 days does not alleviate the fatigue of the late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. The registration number for the clinical trial is ACTRN 12612000552886. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of inhibiting CoQ10 biosynthesis with 4-nitrobenzoate in human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina M Quinzii

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q(10 (CoQ(10 is a potent lipophilic antioxidant in cell membranes and a carrier of electrons in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. We previously characterized the effects of varying severities of CoQ(10 deficiency on ROS production and mitochondrial bioenergetics in cells harboring genetic defects of CoQ(10 biosynthesis. We observed a unimodal distribution of ROS production with CoQ(10 deficiency: cells with <20% of CoQ(10 and 50-70% of CoQ(10 did not generate excess ROS while cells with 30-45% of CoQ(10 showed increased ROS production and lipid peroxidation. Because our previous studies were limited to a small number of mutant cell lines with heterogeneous molecular defects, here, we treated 5 control and 2 mildly CoQ(10 deficient fibroblasts with varying doses of 4-nitrobenzoate (4-NB, an analog of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HB and inhibitor of 4-para-hydroxybenzoate:polyprenyl transferase (COQ2 to induce a range of CoQ(10 deficiencies. Our results support the concept that the degree of CoQ(10 deficiency in cells dictates the extent of ATP synthesis defects and ROS production and that 40-50% residual CoQ(10 produces maximal oxidative stress and cell death.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 and pro-inflammatory markers in children with Down syndrome: clinical and biochemical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushira E. Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α levels in young children with Down syndrome may be used as biomarkers reflecting the neurodegenerative process in them. Coenzyme Q10 might have a role as a good supplement in young children with Down syndrome to ameliorate the neurological symptoms.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 and pro-inflammatory markers in children with Down syndrome: clinical and biochemical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Moushira E; El-Bassyouni, Hala T; Tosson, Angie M S; Youness, Eman; Hussein, Jihan

    Evidence of oxidative stress was reported in individuals with Down syndrome. There is a growing interest in the contribution of the immune system in Down syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the coenzyme Q10 and selected pro-inflammatory markers such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α in children with Down syndrome. Eighty-six children (5-8 years of age) were enrolled in this case-control study from two public institutions. At the time of sampling, the patients and controls suffered from no acute or chronic illnesses and received no therapies or supplements. The levels of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, coenzyme Q10, fasting blood glucose, and intelligence quotient were measured. Forty-three young Down syndrome children and forty-three controls were included over a period of eight months (January-August 2014). Compared with the control group, the Down syndrome patients showed significant increase in interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α (p=0.002), while coenzyme Q10 was significantly decreased (p=0.002). Also, body mass index and fasting blood glucose were significantly increased in patients. There was a significantly positive correlation between coenzyme Q10 and intelligence quotient levels, as well as between interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. Interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α levels in young children with Down syndrome may be used as biomarkers reflecting the neurodegenerative process in them. Coenzyme Q10 might have a role as a good supplement in young children with Down syndrome to ameliorate the neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 and pro-inflammatory markers in children with Down syndrome: clinical and biochemical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushira E. Zaki

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: Evidence of oxidative stress was reported in individuals with Down syndrome. There is a growing interest in the contribution of the immune system in Down syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the coenzyme Q10 and selected pro-inflammatory markers such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α in children with Down syndrome. Methods: Eighty-six children (5-8 years of age were enrolled in this case-control study from two public institutions. At the time of sampling, the patients and controls suffered from no acute or chronic illnesses and received no therapies or supplements. The levels of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, coenzyme Q10, fasting blood glucose, and intelligence quotient were measured. Results: Forty-three young Down syndrome children and forty-three controls were included over a period of eight months (January-August 2014. Compared with the control group, the Down syndrome patients showed significant increase in interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α (p = 0.002, while coenzyme Q10 was significantly decreased (p = 0.002. Also, body mass index and fasting blood glucose were significantly increased in patients. There was a significantly positive correlation between coenzyme Q10 and intelligence quotient levels, as well as between interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. Conclusion: Interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α levels in young children with Down syndrome may be used as biomarkers reflecting the neurodegenerative process in them. Coenzyme Q10 might have a role as a good supplement in young children with Down syndrome to ameliorate the neurological symptoms.

  10. Activity of coenzyme Q 10 (Q-Ter multicomposite) on recovery time in noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffa, Paola; Cambi, Jacopo; Mezzedimi, Chiara; Passali, Desiderio; Bellussi, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    A potential consequence of exposure to noise is a temporary reduction in auditory sensitivity known as temporary threshold shift (TTS), which mainly depends on the intensity and duration of exposure to the noise. Recovery time is related to the amount of initial hearing loss, and the most recovery takes place during the first 15 min following exposure. This study evaluated the efficacy in otoprotection against noise-induced hearing loss of an orally administrated food supplement containing coenzyme Q 10 -Ter. This water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q 10 shows better bioavailability than the native form and has been found to have a protective effect on outer hair cells after exposure to noise in animal models. Thirty volunteers were enrolled, and the right ear of each subject was exposed to a narrow-band noise centered at 3 kHz for 10 min at the intensity of 90 dB HL. In the 30 subjects enrolled, TTS was evaluated after 2, 15, and 30 min and the recovery time was recorded in each subject. The longest recovery time was 45 min. Among the 18 subjects who underwent a second test after treatment with Q-Ter, the mean recovery time was 31.43 min. The results of the present study show that 30 days' treatment with Q-Ter can aid faster recovery after exposure to noise (P < 0.0001). The reduction in the recovery time following treatment can be explained by Q-Ter-mediated improvement of the outer hair cells' response to oxidative stress.

  11. Water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 formulation (Q-ter) promotes outer hair cell survival in a guinea pig model of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetoni, Anna Rita; Piacentini, Roberto; Fiorita, Antonella; Paludetti, Gaetano; Troiani, Diana

    2009-02-27

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is a powerful source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) also in noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) and anti-oxidants and free-radicals scavengers have been shown to attenuate the damage. Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) or ubiquinone has a bioenergetic role as a component of the mithocondrial respiratory chain, it inhibits mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, inducing ATP production and it is involved in ROS removal and prevention of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. However the therapeutic application of CoQ(10) is limited by the lack of solubility and poor bio- availability, therefore it is a challenge to improve its water solubility in order to ameliorate the efficacy in tissues and fluids. This study was conducted in a model of acoustic trauma in the guinea pig where the effectiveness of CoQ(10) was compared with a soluble formulation of CoQ(10) (multicomposite CoQ(10) Terclatrate, Q-ter) given intraperitoneally 1 h before and once daily for 3 days after pure tone noise exposure (6 kHz for 1 h at 120 dB SPL). Functional and morphological studies were carried out by measuring auditory brainstem responses, scanning electron microscopy for hair cell loss count, active caspase 3 staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP labelling assay in order to identify initial signs of apoptosis. Treatments decreased active caspase 3 expression and the number of apoptotic cells, but animals injected with Q-ter showed a greater degree of activity in preventing apoptosis and thus in improving hearing. These data confirm that solubility of Coenzyme Q(10) improves the ability of CoQ(10) in preventing oxidative injuries that result from mitochondrial dysfunction.

  12. Efficient Lewis Acid Ionic Liquid-Catalyzed Synthesis of the Key Intermediate of Coenzyme Q10 under Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An efficient synthesis of a valuable intermediate of coenzyme Q10 by microwave-assisted Lewis acidic ionic liquid (IL-catalyzed Friedel-Crafts alkylation is reported. The acidity of six [Etpy]BF4-based ionic liquids was characterized by means of the FT-IR technique using acetonitrile as a molecular probe. The catalytic activities of these ionic liquids were correlated with their Lewis acidity. With increasing Lewis acid strength of the ionic liquids, their catalytic activity in the Friedel-Crafts reaction increased, except for [Etpy]BF4-AlCl3. The effects of the reaction system, the molar fraction of Lewis acid in the Lewis acid ILs and heating techniques were also investigated. Among the six Lewis acid ionic liquids tested [Etpy]BF4-ZnCl2 showed the best catalytic activity, with a yield of 89% after a very short reaction time (150 seconds. This procedure has the advantages of higher efficiency, better reusability of ILs, energy conservation and eco-friendliness. The method has practical value for preparation of CoQ10 on an industrial scale.

  13. Prophylactic role of combined treatment with coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E against radiation injury in male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussien, E.M.; Darwish, M.M.; Ali, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    The present work aims at investigating effects of whole body gamma irradiation of male albino rats at successive fractionated dose levels up to 8 Gy and the possible protection or curative control of these effects through the oral administration of Coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10) (200 mg/ kg body wt) and vitamin E (100 mg/ kg body wt) injected i.p 24 h before exposure of animals to each increment of gamma irradiation. The parameters of the study have been combined haematological values, including evaluation of different blood cells, erythrocyte counts (RBC), haemoglobin concentration (Hb), haematocrit percentage (Ht) and leucocyte counts (WBC), as well as certain serum biochemical parameters including transaminases AST and ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities known to be related to liver functional status. Besides body and particular organs, wt as well as serum Na + and K + levels have been also evaluated. The results obtained confirmed in general, significant decrease in whole body and organs wt, haematological disorders in form of lowering of RBC, WBC, Hb and Ht, as well as elevated AST, ALT and ALP activities in irradiated rats in both studied time intervals. A significant increase in the level of K + associated with a decrease in the level of Na + was also recorded in the serum of irradiated rats. As simultaneous administration of Co Q10 and vitamin E prior to irradiation prevented pathological changes of analyzed parameters, the results of this study confirmed efficient protection with use of these antioxidants against the health hazards induced by gamma radiation exposure

  14. Functional characterization of human COQ4, a gene required for Coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarin, Alberto; Jimenez-Ortega, Jose Carlos; Trevisson, Eva; Pertegato, Vanessa; Doimo, Mara; Ferrero-Gomez, Maria Lara; Abbadi, Sara; Artuch, Rafael; Quinzii, Catarina; Hirano, Michio; Basso, Giuseppe; Ocana, Carlos Santos; Navas, Placido; Salviati, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    Defects in genes involved in coenzyme Q (CoQ) biosynthesis cause primary CoQ deficiency, a severe multisystem disorders presenting as progressive encephalomyopathy and nephropathy. The COQ4 gene encodes an essential factor for biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have identified and cloned its human ortholog, COQ4, which is located on chromosome 9q34.13, and is transcribed into a 795 base-pair open reading frame, encoding a 265 amino acid (aa) protein (Isoform 1) with a predicted N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence. It shares 39% identity and 55% similarity with the yeast protein. Coq4 protein has no known enzymatic function, but may be a core component of multisubunit complex required for CoQ biosynthesis. The human transcript is detected in Northern blots as a ∼1.4 kb single band and is expressed ubiquitously, but at high levels in liver, lung, and pancreas. Transcription initiates at multiple sites, located 333-23 nucleotides upstream of the ATG. A second group of transcripts originating inside intron 1 of the gene encodes a 241 aa protein, which lacks the mitochondrial targeting sequence (isoform 2). Expression of GFP-fusion proteins in HeLa cells confirmed that only isoform 1 is targeted to mitochondria. The functional significance of the second isoform is unknown. Human COQ4 isoform 1, expressed from a multicopy plasmid, efficiently restores both growth in glycerol, and CoQ content in COQ4 null yeast strains. Human COQ4 is an interesting candidate gene for patients with isolated CoQ 10 deficiency

  15. Inhibition of liver fibrosis by solubilized coenzyme Q10: Role of Nrf2 activation in inhibiting transforming growth factor-β1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hoo-Kyun; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Lim, Sung Chul; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kwak, Mi Kyong; Kang, Keon Wook

    2009-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an endogenous antioxidant, is important in oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. It has anti-diabetic and anti-cardiovascular disease effects, but its ability to protect against liver fibrosis has not been studied. Here, we assessed the ability of solubilized CoQ10 to improve dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrogenesis in mice. DMN treatments for 3 weeks produced a marked liver fibrosis as assessed by histopathological examination and tissue 4-hydroxyproline content. Solubilized CoQ10 (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly inhibited both the increases in fibrosis score and 4-hydroxyproline content induced by DMN. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses revealed that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited increases in the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) mRNA and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein by DMN. Interestingly, hepatic glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione S-transferase A2 (GSTA2) were up-regulated in mice treated with CoQ10. Solubilized CoQ10 also up-regulated antioxidant enzymes such as catalytic subunits of GCL and GSTA2 via activating NF-E2 related factor2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) in H4IIE hepatoma cells. Moreover, CoQ10's inhibition of α-SMA and TGF-β1 expressions disappeared in Nrf2-null MEF cells. In contrast, Nrf2 overexpression significantly decreased the basal expression levels of α-SMA and TGF-β1 in Nrf2-null MEF cells. These results demonstrated that solubilized CoQ10 inhibited DMN-induced liver fibrosis through suppression of TGF-β1 expression via Nrf2/ARE activation.

  16. Nanoencapsulation of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate protects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Natháli S; Barbieri, Allanna V; Camponogara, Camila; Mattiazzi, Juliane; Brum, Evelyne S; Marchiori, Marila C L; Oliveira, Sara M; Cruz, Letícia

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of producing semisolid formulations based on nanocapsule suspensions containing the association of the coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate by adding gellan gum (2%) to the suspensions. Furthermore, we studied their application as an alternative for the treatment of inflammation induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. For this, an animal model of injury induced by UVB-radiation was employed. All semisolids presented pH close to 5.5, drug content above 95% and mean diameter on the nanometric range, after redispersion in water. Besides, the semisolids presented non-Newtonian flow with pseudoplastic behavior and suitable spreadability factor values. The results also showed that the semisolid containing coenzyme Q10-loaded nanocapsules with higher vitamin E acetate concentration reduced in 73±8% the UVB radiation-induced ear edema. Moreover, all formulations tested were able to reduce inflammation parameters evaluated through MPO activity and histological procedure on injured tissue and the semisolids containing the nanoencapsulated coenzyme Q10 reduced oxidative parameters assessment through the non-protein thiols levels and lipid peroxidation. This way, the semisolids based on nanocapsules may be considered a promising approach for the treatment and prevention of skin inflammation diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic Rescue of Mitochondrial and Skeletal Muscle Impairment in an Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Model of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Moya, Damià; Santos-Ocaña, Carlos; Castaño, Julio; Garrabou, Gloria; Rodríguez-Gómez, José A; Ruiz-Bonilla, Vanesa; Bueno, Clara; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Prieto, Cristina; Moren-Nuñez, Constanza; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J; Victoria Cascajo, Maria; Velasco, Iván; Canals, Josep Maria; Montero, Raquel; Yubero, Delia; Jou, Cristina; López-Barneo, José; Cardellach, Francesc; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Artuch, Rafael; Navas, Plácido; Menendez, Pablo

    2017-07-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) plays a crucial role in mitochondria as an electron carrier within the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and is an essential antioxidant. Mutations in genes responsible for CoQ 10 biosynthesis (COQ genes) cause primary CoQ 10 deficiency, a rare and heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with no clear genotype-phenotype association, mainly affecting tissues with high-energy demand including brain and skeletal muscle (SkM). Here, we report a four-year-old girl diagnosed with minor mental retardation and lethal rhabdomyolysis harboring a heterozygous mutation (c.483G > C (E161D)) in COQ4. The patient's fibroblasts showed a decrease in [CoQ 10 ], CoQ 10 biosynthesis, MRC activity affecting complexes I/II + III, and respiration defects. Bona fide induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) lines carrying the COQ4 mutation (CQ4-iPSCs) were generated, characterized and genetically edited using the CRISPR-Cas9 system (CQ4 ed -iPSCs). Extensive differentiation and metabolic assays of control-iPSCs, CQ4-iPSCs and CQ4 ed -iPSCs demonstrated a genotype association, reproducing the disease phenotype. The COQ4 mutation in iPSC was associated with CoQ 10 deficiency, metabolic dysfunction, and respiration defects. iPSC differentiation into SkM was compromised, and the resulting SkM also displayed respiration defects. Remarkably, iPSC differentiation in dopaminergic or motor neurons was unaffected. This study offers an unprecedented iPSC model recapitulating CoQ 10 deficiency-associated functional and metabolic phenotypes caused by COQ4 mutation. Stem Cells 2017;35:1687-1703. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  18. The use of coenzyme Q0 as a template in the development of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of coenzyme Q10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Mario; Flor, Sabrina; Martinefski, Manuela; Lucangioli, Silvia; Tripodi, Valeria

    2014-01-07

    In this work, a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for use as a solid phase extraction sorbent was developed for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in liver extract. CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and a powerful antioxidant agent found in low concentrations in biological samples. This fact and its high hydrophobicity make the analysis of CoQ10 technically challenging. Accordingly, a MIP was synthesised using coenzyme Q0 as the template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, acetonitrile as the porogen, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and benzoyl peroxide as the initiator. Various parameters affecting the polymer preparation and extraction efficiency were evaluated. Morphological characterisation of the MIP and its proper comparison with C18 as a sorbent in solid phase extraction were performed. The optimal conditions for the molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) consisted of 400 μL of sample mixed with 30 mg of MIP and 600 μL of water to reach the optimum solution loading. The loading was followed by a washing step consisting of 1 mL of a 1-propanol solution (1-propanol:water, 30:70,v/v) and elution with 1 mL of 1-propanol. After clean-up, the CoQ10 in the samples was analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The extraction recoveries were higher than 73.7% with good precision (3.6-8.3%). The limits of detection and quantification were 2.4 and 7.5 μg g(-1), respectively, and a linear range between 7.5 and 150 μg g(-1) of tissue was achieved. The new MISPE procedure provided a successful clean-up for the determination of CoQ10 in a complex matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Water-Soluble Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits Nuclear Translocation of Apoptosis Inducing Factor and Cell Death Caused by Mitochondrial Complex I Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haining Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the study were to explore the mechanism of rotenone-induced cell damage and to examine the protective effects of water-soluble Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 on the toxic effects of rotenone. Murine hippocampal HT22 cells were cultured with mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone. Water-soluble CoQ10 was added to the culture media 3 h prior to the rotenone incubation. Cell viability was determined by alamar blue, reactive oxygen species (ROS production by dihydroethidine (DHE and mitochondrial membrane potential by tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM. Cytochrome c, caspase-9 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF were measured using Western blotting after 24 h rotenone incubation. Rotenone caused more than 50% of cell death, increased ROS production, AIF nuclear translocation and reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, but failed to cause mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase-9 activation. Pretreatment with water-soluble CoQ10 enhanced cell viability, decreased ROS production, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented AIF nuclear translocation. The results suggest that rotenone activates a mitochondria-initiated, caspase-independent cell death pathway. Water-soluble CoQ10 reduces ROS accumulation, prevents the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibits AIF translocation and subsequent cell death.

  20. A randomized clinical trial of high-dosage coenzyme Q10 in early Parkinson disease: no evidence of benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, M Flint; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Henchcliffe, Claire; Galpern, Wendy R; Haas, Richard; Juncos, Jorge L; Nutt, John G; Voss, Tiffini Smith; Ravina, Bernard; Shults, Clifford M; Helles, Karen; Snively, Victoria; Lew, Mark F; Griebner, Brian; Watts, Arthur; Gao, Shan; Pourcher, Emmanuelle; Bond, Louisette; Kompoliti, Katie; Agarwal, Pinky; Sia, Cherissa; Jog, Mandar; Cole, Linda; Sultana, Munira; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Deeley, Cheryl; Waters, Cheryl H; Figueroa, Angel; Arkun, Ani; Brodsky, Matthew; Ondo, William G; Hunter, Christine B; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Palao, Alicia; Miyasaki, Janis M; So, Julie; Tetrud, James; Reys, Liza; Smith, Katharine; Singer, Carlos; Blenke, Anita; Russell, David S; Cotto, Candace; Friedman, Joseph H; Lannon, Margaret; Zhang, Lin; Drasby, Edward; Kumar, Rajeev; Subramanian, Thyagarajan; Ford, Donna Stuppy; Grimes, David A; Cote, Diane; Conway, Jennifer; Siderowf, Andrew D; Evatt, Marian Leslie; Sommerfeld, Barbara; Lieberman, Abraham N; Okun, Michael S; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Merritt, Stacy; Swartz, Camille Louise; Martin, W R Wayne; King, Pamela; Stover, Natividad; Guthrie, Stephanie; Watts, Ray L; Ahmed, Anwar; Fernandez, Hubert H; Winters, Adrienna; Mari, Zoltan; Dawson, Ted M; Dunlop, Becky; Feigin, Andrew S; Shannon, Barbara; Nirenberg, Melissa Jill; Ogg, Mattson; Ellias, Samuel A; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Frei, Karen; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan; Glazman, Sofya; Mayer, Thomas; Hauser, Robert A; Pahwa, Rajesh; Langhammer, April; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Derwent, Lorelei; Sethi, Kapil D; Farrow, Buff; Prakash, Rajan; Litvan, Irene; Robinson, Annette; Sahay, Alok; Gartner, Maureen; Hinson, Vanessa K; Markind, Samuel; Pelikan, Melisa; Perlmutter, Joel S; Hartlein, Johanna; Molho, Eric; Evans, Sharon; Adler, Charles H; Duffy, Amy; Lind, Marlene; Elmer, Lawrence; Davis, Kathy; Spears, Julia; Wilson, Stephanie; Leehey, Maureen A; Hermanowicz, Neal; Niswonger, Shari; Shill, Holly A; Obradov, Sanja; Rajput, Alex; Cowper, Marilyn; Lessig, Stephanie; Song, David; Fontaine, Deborah; Zadikoff, Cindy; Williams, Karen; Blindauer, Karen A; Bergholte, Jo; Propsom, Clara Schindler; Stacy, Mark A; Field, Joanne; Mihaila, Dragos; Chilton, Mark; Uc, Ergun Y; Sieren, Jeri; Simon, David K; Kraics, Lauren; Silver, Althea; Boyd, James T; Hamill, Robert W; Ingvoldstad, Christopher; Young, Jennifer; Thomas, Karen; Kostyk, Sandra K; Wojcieszek, Joanne; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; Panisset, Michel; Beland, Monica; Reich, Stephen G; Cines, Michelle; Zappala, Nancy; Rivest, Jean; Zweig, Richard; Lumina, L Pepper; Hilliard, Colette Lynn; Grill, Stephen; Kellermann, Marye; Tuite, Paul; Rolandelli, Susan; Kang, Un Jung; Young, Joan; Rao, Jayaraman; Cook, Maureen M; Severt, Lawrence; Boyar, Karyn

    2014-05-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant that supports mitochondrial function, has been shown in preclinical Parkinson disease (PD) models to reduce the loss of dopamine neurons, and was safe and well tolerated in early-phase human studies. A previous phase II study suggested possible clinical benefit. To examine whether CoQ10 could slow disease progression in early PD. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial at 67 North American sites consisting of participants 30 years of age or older who received a diagnosis of PD within 5 years and who had the following inclusion criteria: the presence of a rest tremor, bradykinesia, and rigidity; a modified Hoehn and Yahr stage of 2.5 or less; and no anticipated need for dopaminergic therapy within 3 months. Exclusion criteria included the use of any PD medication within 60 days, the use of any symptomatic PD medication for more than 90 days, atypical or drug-induced parkinsonism, a Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) rest tremor score of 3 or greater for any limb, a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 25 or less, a history of stroke, the use of certain supplements, and substantial recent exposure to CoQ10. Of 696 participants screened, 78 were found to be ineligible, and 18 declined participation. The remaining 600 participants were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 1200 mg/d of CoQ10, or 2400 mg/d of CoQ10; all participants received 1200 IU/d of vitamin E. Participants were observed for 16 months or until a disability requiring dopaminergic treatment. The prospectively defined primary outcome measure was the change in total UPDRS score (Parts I-III) from baseline to final visit. The study was powered to detect a 3-point difference between an active treatment and placebo. The baseline characteristics of the participants were well balanced, the mean age was 62.5 years, 66% of participants were male, and the mean baseline total UPDRS score was 22.7. A total of 267 participants

  1. Pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 improves ovarian response and embryo quality in low-prognosis young women with decreased ovarian reserve: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangying; Nisenblat, Victoria; Lu, Cuiling; Li, Rong; Qiao, Jie; Zhen, Xiumei; Wang, Shuyu

    2018-03-27

    Management of women with reduced ovarian reserve or poor ovarian response (POR) to stimulation is one of the major challenges in reproductive medicine. The primary causes of POR remain elusive and oxidative stress was proposed as one of the important contributors. It has been suggested that focus on the specific subpopulations within heterogeneous group of poor responders could assist in evaluating optimal management strategies for these patients. This study investigated the effect of anti-oxidant treatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on ovarian response and embryo quality in young low-prognosis patients with POR. This prospective, randomized controlled study included 186 consecutive patients with POR stratified according to the POSEIDON classification group 3 (age reserve parameters). The participants were randomized to the CoQ10 pre-treatment for 60 days preceding IVF-ICSI cycle or no pre-treatment. The number of high quality embryos was a primary outcome measure. A total of 169 participants were evaluated (76 treated with CoQ10 and 93 controls); 17 women were excluded due to low compliance with CoQ10 administration. The baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were comparable between the groups. CoQ10 pretreatment resulted in significantly lower gonadotrophin requirements and higher peak E2 levels. Women in CoQ10 group had increased number of retrieved oocytes (4, IQR 2-5), higher fertilization rate (67.49%) and more high-quality embryos (1, IQR 0-2); p reserve in IVF-ICSI cycles. Further work is required to determine whether there is an effect on clinical treatment endpoints.

  2. Compound Heterozygous Inheritance of Mutations in Coenzyme Q8A Results in Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia and Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency in a Female Sib-Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Whitford, Whitney; Swan, Brendan; Taylor, Juliet; Love, Donald R; Hill, Rosamund; Molyneux, Sarah; George, Peter M; Mackay, Richard; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2017-11-21

    Autosomal recessive ataxias are characterised by a fundamental loss in coordination of gait with associated atrophy of the cerebellum. There is significant clinical and genetic heterogeneity amongst inherited ataxias; however, an early molecular diagnosis is essential with low-risk treatments available for some of these conditions. We describe two female siblings who presented early in life with unsteady gait and cerebellar atrophy. Whole exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous inheritance of two pathogenic mutations (p.Leu277Pro, c.1506+1G>A) in the coenzyme Q8A gene (COQ8A), a gene central to biosynthesis of coenzyme Q (CoQ). The paternally derived p.Leu277Pro mutation is predicted to disrupt a conserved motif in the substrate-binding pocket of the protein, resulting in inhibition of CoQ 10 production. The maternal c.1506+1G>A mutation destroys a canonical splice donor site in exon 12 affecting transcript processing and subsequent protein translation. Mutations in this gene can result in primary coenzyme Q 10 deficiency type 4, which is characterized by childhood onset of cerebellar ataxia and exercise intolerance, both of which were observed in this sib-pair. Muscle biopsies revealed unequivocally low levels of CoQ 10, and the siblings were subsequently established on a therapeutic dose of CoQ 10 with distinct clinical evidence of improvement after 1 year of treatment. This case emphasises the importance of an early and accurate molecular diagnosis for suspected inherited ataxias, particularly given the availability of approved treatments for some subtypes.

  3. ADCK3, an ancestral kinase, is mutated in a form of recessive ataxia associated with coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Tazir, Meriem; López, Luis Carlos; Quinzii, Catarina M; Assoum, Mirna; Drouot, Nathalie; Busso, Cleverson; Makri, Samira; Ali-Pacha, Lamia; Benhassine, Traki; Anheim, Mathieu; Lynch, David R; Thibault, Christelle; Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Tranchant, Christine; Poch, Olivier; DiMauro, Salvatore; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Barros, Mario H; Hirano, Michio; Koenig, Michel

    2008-03-01

    Muscle coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10) or ubiquinone) deficiency has been identified in more than 20 patients with presumed autosomal-recessive ataxia. However, mutations in genes required for CoQ(10) biosynthetic pathway have been identified only in patients with infantile-onset multisystemic diseases or isolated nephropathy. Our SNP-based genome-wide scan in a large consanguineous family revealed a locus for autosomal-recessive ataxia at chromosome 1q41. The causative mutation is a homozygous splice-site mutation in the aarF-domain-containing kinase 3 gene (ADCK3). Five additional mutations in ADCK3 were found in three patients with sporadic ataxia, including one known to have CoQ(10) deficiency in muscle. All of the patients have childhood-onset cerebellar ataxia with slow progression, and three of six have mildly elevated lactate levels. ADCK3 is a mitochondrial protein homologous to the yeast COQ8 and the bacterial UbiB proteins, which are required for CoQ biosynthesis. Three out of four patients tested showed a low endogenous pool of CoQ(10) in their fibroblasts or lymphoblasts, and two out of three patients showed impaired ubiquinone synthesis, strongly suggesting that ADCK3 is also involved in CoQ(10) biosynthesis. The deleterious nature of the three identified missense changes was confirmed by the introduction of them at the corresponding positions of the yeast COQ8 gene. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis shows that ADCK3 belongs to the family of atypical kinases, which includes phosphoinositide and choline kinases, suggesting that ADCK3 plays an indirect regulatory role in ubiquinone biosynthesis possibly as part of a feedback loop that regulates ATP production.

  4. High serum coenzyme Q10, positively correlated with age, selenium and cholesterol in Inuit of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Mortensen, S.A.; Rhode, M.

    1999-01-01

    impact. From a health survey we chose the subpopulation from the most remote area, where the traditional Greenlandic diet with high intake of sea mammals and fish predominates. The mean (SD) of S-CoQ10 in males was 1.495 (0.529) nmol/ml and 1.421 (0.629) nmol/ml in females, significantly higher (p ....001) compared to a Danish population. In a linear multiple regression model the S-CoQ10 level is significantly positively associated with age and S-selenium in males, and S-total cholesterol in females. The high level of CoQ10 in Greenlanders probably reflects diet, since no bioaccumulation takes place...

  5. Water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation (Q-TER(®)) in the treatment of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, Angelo; Mora, Renzo; Dellepiane, Massimo; Manini, Giorgio; Santomauro, Valentina; Barettini, Luciano; Guastini, Luca

    2010-10-01

    These preliminary data are encouraging for a larger clinical trial to collect additional evidence on the effect of Q-TER(®) in preventing the development of hearing loss in subjects with presbycusis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency and applicability of a water-soluble formulation of CoQ10 (Q-TER(®)) in subjects with presbycusis. A total of 60 patients with presbycusis were included and divided into three numerically equal groups. Group A underwent therapy with Q-TER(®), 160 mg, once a day for 30 days; group B underwent therapy with vitamin E (50 mg), once a day for 30 days; group C received placebo, once a day for 30 days. Before and at the end of the treatment, all patients underwent pure tone audiometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions, otoacoustic products of distortion, auditory brainstem response, and speech audiometry. Compared with group B, at the end of the treatment in group A the liminar tonal audiometry showed a significant improvement of the air and bone thresholds at the 1000 (14/20 vs 9/20), 2000 (14/20 vs 7/20), 4000 (15/20 vs 6/20), and 8000 Hz (13/20 vs 5/20). We found no significant differences in the other parameters and in group C.

  6. Targeting Oxidative Stress, Cytokines and Serotonin Interactions Via Indoleamine 2, 3 Dioxygenase by Coenzyme Q10: Role in Suppressing Depressive Like Behavior in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelezz, Sally A; Hendawy, Nevien; Magdy, Yosra

    2017-06-01

    Depression is a major health problem in which oxidative stress and inflammation are inextricably connected in its pathophysiology. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an important anti-oxidant compound with anti-inflammatory and neuro-protective properties. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that CoQ10 by its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials can alleviate depressive- like behavior by restoring the balance of the tryptophan catabolites kynurenine/serotonin toward the serotonin pathway by down-regulation of hippocampal indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO-1). Depressive-like behavior was induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) protocol including food or water deprivation, cage tilting, reversed light cycle etc. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups; Control, CUMS, CUMS and CoQ10 (50,100 and 200 mg/kg/day i.p. respectively) groups. CoQ10 effects on different behavioral and biochemical tests were analyzed. CoQ10 showed significant antidepressant efficacy, as evidenced by significantly decreased stress induced changes to forced swimming challenge and open field test, as well as attenuating raised corticosterone level and adrenal glands weight. The anti-oxidant effect of CoQ10 was exhibited by its ability to significantly reduce hippocampal elevated malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal levels and elevate the reduced glutathione and catalase levels. CoQ10 significantly reduced different pro-inflammatory cytokines levels including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. It suppressed hippocampal IDO-1 and subsequent production of kynurenine and enhanced the hippocampal contents of tryptophan and serotonin. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CoQ10 was able to attenuate the elevated microglial CD68 and elevate the astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein compared to CUMS group. CoQ10 exhibited antidepressant-like effects on rats exposed to CUMS. This could be attributed to its ability to reduce

  7. Reduced mitochondrial coenzyme Q10 levels in HepG2 cells treated with high-dose simvastatin: A possible role in statin-induced hepatotoxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavintharan, S.; Ong, C.N.; Jeyaseelan, K.; Sivakumar, M.; Lim, S.C.; Sum, C.F.

    2007-01-01

    Lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is well achieved by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins inhibit the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a precursor for cholesterol and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ 10 ). In HepG2 cells, simvastatin decreased mitochondrial CoQ 10 levels, and at higher concentrations was associated with a moderately higher degree of cell death, increased DNA oxidative damage and a reduction in ATP synthesis. Supplementation of CoQ 10 , reduced cell death and DNA oxidative stress, and increased ATP synthesis. It is suggested that CoQ 10 deficiency plays an important role in statin-induced hepatopathy, and that CoQ 10 supplementation protects HepG2 cells from this complication

  8. Efficacy of eyedrops containing cross-linked hyaluronic acid and coenzyme Q10 in treating patients with mild to moderate dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postorino, Elisa I; Rania, Laura; Aragona, Emanuela; Mannucci, Carmen; Alibrandi, Angela; Calapai, Gioacchino; Puzzolo, Domenico; Aragona, Pasquale

    2018-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a common condition causing substantial burden. A randomized, controlled, single-masked study was performed in 40 patients with mild to moderate DED to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a collyrium based on crosslinked hyaluronic acid (XLHA) with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). Enrolled subjects were divided into 2 groups: group A, treated with XLHA + CoQ10; and group B, treated with hyaluronic acid (HA). Eyedrops were administered 4 times daily for 3 months. The Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, tear break-up time (TBUT), corneal and conjunctival staining, and meibomian gland assessment (MGD) were evaluated; furthermore, corneal aesthesiometry, in vivo corneal confocal microscopy, visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and fundus examination were performed. At the end of treatment, OSDI score significantly decreased in groups A and B (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively); the decrease was significantly higher in group A. Corneal staining decreased in both groups, with lower scores in group A. The MGD was significantly ameliorated in group A patients. No differences were found for corneal aesthesiometry or TBUT. Epithelial cell reflectivity was significantly reduced only in group A. For keratocytes and stromal matrix parameters, there was a significant improvement in group A. No changes were found for visual acuity, IOP, or fundus examination. The XLHA + CoQ10 treatment showed greater effectiveness in DED compared to HA alone, probably due to the longer permanency on ocular surface and the antioxidant activity of CoQ10. Therefore, XLHA + CoQ10 eyedrops could represent a new possibility in dry eye treatment.

  9. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Hippocampal Neurons against Ischemia/ Reperfusion Injury via Modulation of BAX/Bcl-2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zamani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preliminary studies have con.rmed reduction in cell death following treatment with antioxidants. According to this .nding we study the relationship between consumption of CoQ10 and expression of Bax and Bcl2 in hippocampus following ischemia/reperfusion as proteins involved in cell programmed death or apoptosis. Methods: We studied the protective role of CoQ10 against ischemia-reperfusion. Experimental design includes four groups:  intact, ischemic control, sham control and treatment group with CoQ10. The mice were pre-treated with CoQ10 for a week, then ischemia was induced by common carotid artery ligation and following the reduction in in.ammation (a week the mice was treated with CoQ10.  Nissl staining was applied for counting the necrotic cells of hippocampus and the western blot was performed to measure the Bax and Bcl2 expression.Results: Cell death was signi.cantly lower when mice were treated with CoQ10. Bax expression was signi.cantly high in the ischemic group but low in the treatment group, and the bcl2 expression was lower in the ischemic group than the treatment and the vehicle groups.Discussion: Ischemia for 15 minutes induced cell death in hippocampus with more potent effect on CA1. CoQ10 intake signi.cantly reduced cell death and prevented the expression of Bax while inducing an increase in expression of bcl2.

  10. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Hippocampal Neurons Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Modulation of BAX/Bcl-2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zamani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Preliminary studies confirmed reduction in cell death following treatment with antioxidants. According to this finding we study the relationship between consumption of CoQ10 and expression of bax and bcl2 in hippocampus following ischemia/reperfusion as proteins involved in cell programmed death or apoptosis.Material & methods : We studied the protective role of CoQ10 against Ischemia-Reperfusion. Experimental design includes four groups: intact, ischemic control, sham control and treatment groups with CoQ10. The mice treated with CoQ10 as Pre - Treatment for a week. Then, ischemia induced by common carotid artery ligation and following the reduction in inflammation (a week the mice post-treated with CoQ10.Nissl staining applied to counting necrotic cells of hippocampus and the western blotting performed to measurement the bax and bcl2 expression.Results :. Cell death was significantly lower when mice treated with CoQ10. Bax expression was significantly high in ischemic group but in treatment group was less and reversely the bcl2 expression in ischemic group was lower than treatment and vehicle groups.Conclusion : Ischemia for 15 minutes induced cell death in hippocampus with more potent effect on CA1. CoQ10 intake significantly reduced cell death and prevented the expression of bax while inducing an increase in expression of bcl2.

  11. Preparation and in vitro-in vivo evaluation of Witepsol H35 based self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of coenzyme Q(10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepal, Pushp R; Han, Hyo-Kyung; Choi, Hoo-Kyun

    2010-02-19

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) was formulated into self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) to overcome low bioavailability attributed to hydrophobic nature of the drug. Screening of oil phase, surfactants and co-surfactants were performed to select Witepsol H35, Solutol HS15 and Lauroglycol FCC, respectively. Ternary phase diagrams were drawn to identify nanoemulsifying region followed by optimization of SNEDDS formulation. The optimized formulation, CoQ(10), Witepsol H35, Solutol HS15 and Lauroglycol FCC in the weight ratio of 1:0.7:4:2, respectively, emulsified readily at 37 degrees C with mean emulsion droplet size of 32.4 nm. The stability test of the optimized formulation in pH 1.2 and 6.8 buffers confirmed no pH effect on emulsion droplet size. In vitro dissolution (emulsification) test and in vivo animal study of the formulation elucidated the complete emulsification of drug and improved oral bioavailability of poorly soluble CoQ(10). 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. LC/MS/MS analysis of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q10 content in lyophilized royal jelly, beebread and drone homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniewicka, Marta; Karpinska, Agnieszka; Kijewska, Marta; Turkowicz, Monika Joanna; Karpinska, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    This study shows the results of application liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for assay of the content of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q 10 in bee products of animal origin, i.e. royal jelly, beebread and drone homogenate. The biological matrix was removed using extraction with n-hexane. It was found that drone homogenate is a rich source of coenzyme Q 10 . It contains only 8 ± 1 µg/g of α-tocopherol and 20 ± 2 µg/g of coenzyme Q 10 . The contents of assayed compounds in royal jelly were 16 ± 3 and 8 ± 0.2 µg/g of α-tocopherol and coenzyme Q 10 , respectively. Beebread appeared to be the richest of α-tocopherol. Its level was 80 ± 30 µg/g, while the level of coenzyme Q 10 was only 11.5 ± 0.3 µg/g. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Self-Nanoemulsifying Drug Delivery System of Coenzyme (Q10) with Improved Dissolution, Bioavailability, and Protective Efficiency on Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Abeer; Hassanin, Lobna; Zaki, Nashwah

    2017-07-01

    The aim of our investigation is to develop and characterize self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS) of CoQ 10 to improve its water solubility, dissolution rate, and bioavailability, and then evaluate its biochemical and physiological effect on liver cirrhosis in rats compared with CoQ 10 powder. SNEDDS are isotropic and thermodynamically stable mixture of oil, surfactant, co-surfactant, and drug that form an oil/water nanoemulsion when added to aqueous phases with soft agitation. Upon administration, self-nanoemulsifying system becomes in contact with gastrointestinal fluid and forms o/w nanoemulsion by the aid of gastrointestinal motility. When the nanoemulsion is formed in the gastrointestinal tract, it presents the drug in a solubilized form inside small nano-sized droplets that provide a large surface area for enhancing the drug release and absorption. Solubility of CoQ 10 in various oils, surfactants, and co-surfactants were studied to identify the components of SNEDDS; pseudo-ternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the efficient self-emulsifying regions. CoQ 10 -loaded SNEDDS were prepared using isopropyl myristate as oil; Cremophor El, Labrasol, or Tween80 as surfactant; and Transcutol as co-surfactant. The amount of CoQ 10 in each vehicle was 3%. The formulations that passed thermostability evaluation test were assessed for particle size analysis, morphological characterization, refractive index, zeta potential, viscosity, electroconductivity, drug release profile, as well as ex vivo permeability. Pharmacokinetics and hepatoprotective efficiency of the optimized SNEDDS of CoQ 10 compared with CoQ 10 suspension were performed. Results showed that all optimized formulae have the ability to form a good and stable nanoemulsion when diluted with water; the mean droplet size of all formulae was in the nanometric range (11.7-13.5 nm) with optimum polydispersity index values (0.2-0.21). All formulae showed negative zeta potential (-11.3 to -17

  14. Alcohol depletes coenzyme-Q10 associated with increased TNF-alpha secretion to induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Nandakumar, Krishna S.; Patki, Pralhad S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ethanol induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells in absence of lipogenesis. ► Ethanol inhibited HMG-CoA reductase activity. ► Ethanol induced HMG-CoA reductase inhibition is due to decreased cell viability. ► Incubation with mevalonate could not increase the cholesterol. ► Cytotoxicity brought about by CoQ10 depletion and increased TNF-alpha. -- Abstract: Alcohol consumption has been implicated to cause severe hepatic steatosis which is mediated by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity and CYP 450 2E1 expression. In this context, the effect of ethanol was studied for its influence on lipogenesis in HepG2 cell which is deficient of ADH and does not express CYP 450 2E1. The results showed that ethanol at 100 mM concentration caused 40% cytotoxicity at 72 h as determined by MTT assay. The incorporation of labeled [2- 14 C] acetate into triacylglycerol and phospholipid was increased by 40% and 26% respectively upon 24 h incubation, whereas incorporation of labeled [2- 14 C] acetate into cholesterol was not significantly increased. Further, ethanol inhibited HMG-CoA reductase which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis. It was observed that, HMG-CoA reductase inhibition was brought about by ethanol as a consequence of decreased cell viability, since incubation of HepG2 cells with mevalonate could not increase the cholesterol content and increase the cell viability. Addition of ethanol significantly increased TNF-alpha secretion and depleted mitochondrial coenzyme-Q 10 which is detrimental for cell viability. But vitamin E (10 mM) could partially restore coenzyme-Q 10 and glutathione content with decreased TNF-alpha secretion in ethanol treated cells. Further, lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzyme activities remained unaffected. Ethanol decreased glutathione content while, GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly higher compared to other groups showing cellular pro-oxidant and antioxidant balance remained

  15. Microglial inhibitory mechanism of Coenzyme Q10 against Aβ (1-42 induced cognitive dysfunctions: possible behavioral, biochemical, cellular and histopathological alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti eSingh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a debilitating disease with complex pathophysiology. Amyloid beta (Aβ (1-42 is a reliable model of AD that recapitulates many aspects of human AD. Objective: The present study has been designed to investigate the neuroprotective potential of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and its modulation with minocycline (microglial inhibitor against Aβ (1-42 induced cognitive dysfunction in rats. Method: Intrahippocampal (i.h. Aβ (1-42 (1µg/µl; 4µl/site were administered followed by drug treatment with galantamine (2 mg/kg, CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg, minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg and their combinations for a period of 21 days. Various neurobehavioral parameters followed by biochemical, acetylcholinesterase (AChE level, proinflammatory markers (TNF-α, mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes (I-IV and histopathological examinations were assessed.Results: Aβ (1-42 administration significantly impaired cognitive performance in Morris water maze (MWM performance test, causes oxidative stress, raised AChE level, caused neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction and histopathological alterations as compared to sham treatment. Treatment with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg and minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg alone for 21days significantly improved cognitive performance as evidenced by reduced transfer latency and increased time spent in target quadrant (TSTQ, reduced AChE activity, oxidative damage (reduced LPO, nitrite level and restored SOD, catalase and GHS levels, TNF-α level, restored mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complex (I, II, III, IV activities and histopathological alterations as compared to control (Aβ (1-42 treated animals group. Further, combination of minocycline (50 and 100 mg/kg with CoQ10 (20 and 40 mg/kg significantly modulate the protective effect of CoQ10 as compared to their effect alone. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the neuroprotective effect of CoQ10 could be due to its microglia inhibitory

  16. Promotion of growth by Coenzyme Q10 is linked to gene expression in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alexandra; Niklowitz, Petra; Menke, Thomas; Döring, Frank

    2014-10-03

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, ubiquinone) is an essential component of the respiratory chain, a cofactor of pyrimidine biosynthesis and acts as an antioxidant in extra mitochondrial membranes. More recently CoQ has been identified as a modulator of apoptosis, inflammation and gene expression. CoQ deficient Caenorhabditis elegans clk-1 mutants show several phenotypes including a delayed postembryonic growth. Using wild type and two clk-1 mutants, here we established an experimental set-up to study the consequences of endogenous CoQ deficiency or exogenous CoQ supply on gene expression and growth. We found that a deficiency of endogenous CoQ synthesis down-regulates a cluster of genes that are important for growth (i.e., RNA polymerase II, eukaryotic initiation factor) and up-regulates oxidation reactions (i.e., cytochrome P450, superoxide dismutase) and protein interactions (i.e., F-Box proteins). Exogenous CoQ supply partially restores the expression of these genes as well as the growth retardation of CoQ deficient clk-1 mutants. On the other hand exogenous CoQ supply does not alter the expression of a further sub-set of genes. These genes are involved in metabolism (i.e., succinate dehydrogenase complex), cell signalling or synthesis of lectins. Thus, our work provides a comprehensive overview of genes which can be modulated in their expression by endogenous or exogenous CoQ. As growth retardation in CoQ deficiency is linked to the gene expression profile we suggest that CoQ promotes growth via gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduced Cardiovascular Mortality 10 Years after Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 for Four Years: Follow-Up Results of a Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial in Elderly Citizens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Alehagen

    Full Text Available Selenium and coenzyme Q10 are important antioxidants in the body. As the intake of selenium is low in Europe, and the endogenous production of coenzyme Q10 decreases as age increases, an intervention trial using selenium and coenzyme Q10 for four years was performed. As previously reported, the intervention was accompanied by reduced cardiovascular mortality. The objective of the present study was to analyze cardiovascular mortality for up to 10 years after intervention, to evaluate if mortality differed in subgroups differentiated by gender, diabetes, ischemic heart disease (IHD, and functional class.Four-hundred forty-three healthy elderly individuals were included from a rural municipality in Sweden. All cardiovascular mortality was registered, and no participant was lost to the follow-up. Based on death certificates and autopsy results mortality was registered.Significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality could be seen in those on selenium and coenzyme Q10 intervention. A multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated a reduced cardiovascular mortality risk in the active treatment group (HR: 0.51; 95%CI 0.36-0.74; P = 0.0003. The reduced mortality could be seen to persist during the 10-year period. Subgroup analysis showed positive effects in both genders. An equally positive risk reduction could be seen in those with ischemic heart disease (HR: 0.51; 95%CI 0.27-0.97; P = 0.04, but also in the different functional classes.In a 10-year follow-up of a group of healthy elderly participants given four years of intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10, significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality was observed. The protective action was not confined to the intervention period, but persisted during the follow-up period. The mechanism explaining the persistency remains to be elucidated. Since this was a small study, the observations should be regarded as hypothesis-generating.

  18. Coenzyme Q10 Inhibits the Aging of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by D-Galactose through Akt/mTOR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences indicate that reactive oxygen species are the main factor promoting stem cell aging. Recent studies have demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 plays a positive role in organ and cellular aging. However, the potential for CoQ10 to protect stem cell aging has not been fully evaluated, and the mechanisms of cell senescence inhibited by CoQ10 are still poorly understood. Our previous study had indicated that D-galactose (D-gal can remarkably induce mesenchymal stem cell (MSC aging through promoting intracellular ROS generation. In this study, we showed that CoQ10 could significantly inhibit MSC aging induced by D-gal. Moreover, in the CoQ10 group, the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR was clearly reduced compared with that in the D-gal group. However, after Akt activating by CA-Akt plasmid, the senescence-cell number in the CoQ10 group was significantly higher than that in the control group. These results indicated that CoQ10 could inhibit D-gal-induced MSC aging through the Akt/mTOR signaling.

  19. Coenzyme Q10 (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIH). NIH is the federal government’s center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent ... NCCIH) are sponsoring a number of clinical trials (research studies) at medical centers to test CAM therapies for use in cancer. Conventional approaches to cancer ...

  20. Coenzyme Q10 quantification in muscle, fibroblasts and cerebrospinal fluid by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry using a novel deuterated internal standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberley, Kate E C; Hargreaves, Iain P; Chaiwatanasirikul, Korn-Anong; Heales, Simon J R; Land, John M; Rahman, Shamima; Mills, Kevin; Eaton, Simon

    2013-05-15

    Neurological dysfunction is common in primary coenzyme Q10 (2,3-dimethoxy, 5-methyl, 6-polyisoprene parabenzoquinone; CoQ10 ; ubiquinone) deficiencies, the most readily treatable subgroup of mitochondrial disorders. Therapeutic benefit from CoQ10 supplementation has also been noted in other neurodegenerative diseases. CoQ10 can be measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in plasma, muscle or leucocytes; however, there is no reliable method to quantify CoQ10 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Additionally, many methods use CoQ9 , an endogenous ubiquinone in humans, as an internal standard. Deuterated CoQ10 (d6 -CoQ10 ) was synthesised by a novel, simple, method. Total CoQ10 was measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) using d6 -CoQ10 as internal standard and 5 mM methylamine as an ion-pairing reagent. Chromatography was performed using a Hypsersil GOLD C4 column (150 × 3 mm, 3 µm). CoQ10 levels were linear over a concentration range of 0-200 nM (R(2) = 0.9995). The lower limit of detection was 2 nM. The inter-assay coefficient of variation (CV) was 3.6% (10 nM) and 4.3% (20 nM), and intra-assay CV 3.4% (10 nM) and 3.6% (20 nM). Reference ranges were established for CoQ10 in CSF (5.7-8.7 nM; n = 17), fibroblasts (57.0-121.6 pmol/mg; n = 50) and muscle (187.3-430.1 pmol/mg; n = 15). Use of d6 -CoQ10 internal standard has enabled the development of a sensitive LC/MS/MS method to accurately determine total CoQ10 levels. Clinical applications of CSF CoQ10 determination include identification of patients with cerebral CoQ10 deficiency, and monitoring CSF CoQ10 levels following supplementation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Regulation of the oxidative balance with coenzyme Q10 sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to radiation and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontiñán-Rubio, Javier; Santiago-Mora, Raquel María; Nieva-Velasco, Consuelo María; Ferrín, Gustavo; Martínez-González, Alicia; Gómez, María Victoria; Moreno, María; Ariza, Julia; Lozano, Eva; Arjona-Gutiérrez, Jacinto; Gil-Agudo, Antonio; De la Mata, Manuel; Pesic, Milica; Peinado, Juan Ramón; Villalba, José M; Pérez-Romasanta, Luis; Pérez-García, Víctor M; Alcaín, Francisco J; Durán-Prado, Mario

    2018-05-18

    To investigate how the modulation of the oxidative balance affects cytotoxic therapies in glioblastoma, in vitro. Human glioblastoma U251 and T98 cells and normal astrocytes C8D1A were loaded with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ). Mitochondrial superoxide ion (O 2 - ) and H 2 O 2 were measured by fluorescence microscopy. OXPHOS performance was assessed in U251 cells with an oxytherm Clark-type electrode. Radio- and chemotherapy cytotoxicity was assessed by immunostaining of γH2AX (24 h), annexin V and nuclei morphology, at short (72 h) and long (15 d) time. Hif-1α, SOD1, SOD2 and NQO1 were determined by immunolabeling. Catalase activity was measured by classic enzymatic assay. Glutathione levels and total antioxidant capacity were quantified using commercial kits. CoQ did not affect oxygen consumption but reduced the level of O 2 - and H 2 O 2 while shifted to a pro-oxidant cell status mainly due to a decrease in catalase activity and SOD2 level. Hif-1α was dampened, echoed by a decrease lactate and several key metabolites involved in glutathione synthesis. CoQ-treated cells were twofold more sensitive than control to radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in short and long-term clonogenic assays, potentiating TMZ-induced cytotoxicity, without affecting non-transformed astrocytes. CoQ acts as sensitizer for cytotoxic therapies, disarming GBM cells, but not normal astrocytes, against further pro-oxidant injuries, being potentially useful in clinical practice for this fatal pathology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Coenzyme Q10: Can It Prevent Statin Side Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization and proceeds from Web advertising help support our mission. Mayo Clinic does not ...

  3. Paraquat induces oxidative stress, neuronal loss in substantia nigra region and Parkinsonism in adult rats: Neuroprotection and amelioration of symptoms by water-soluble formulation of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar TS

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease, for which currently there is no cure, develops as a result of progressive loss of dopamine neurons in the brain; thus, identification of any potential therapeutic intervention for disease management is of a great importance. Results Here we report that prophylactic application of water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 could effectively offset the effects of environmental neurotoxin paraquat, believed to be a contributing factor in the development of familial PD. In this study we utilized a model of paraquat-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult rats that received three weekly intra-peritoneal injections of the herbicide paraquat. Histological and biochemical analyses of rat brains revealed increased levels of oxidative stress markers and a loss of approximately 65% of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra region. The paraquat-exposed rats also displayed impaired balancing skills on a slowly rotating drum (rotorod evidenced by their reduced spontaneity in gait performance. In contrast, paraquat exposed rats receiving a water-soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10 in their drinking water prior to and during the paraquat treatment neither developed neurodegeneration nor reduced rotorod performance and were indistinguishable from the control paraquat-untreated rats. Conclusion Our data confirmed that paraquat-induced neurotoxicity represents a convenient rat model of Parkinsonian neurodegeneration suitable for mechanistic and neuroprotective studies. This is the first preclinical evaluation of a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 formulation showing the evidence of prophylactic neuroprotection at clinically relevant doses.

  4. Age-Related Loss in Bone Mineral Density of Rats Fed Lifelong on a Fish Oil-Based Diet Is Avoided by Coenzyme Q10 Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Varela-López

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During aging, bone mass declines increasing osteoporosis and fracture risks. Oxidative stress has been related to this bone loss, making dietary compounds with antioxidant properties a promising weapon. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on diets with fish oil as unique fat source, supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, to evaluate the potential of adding this molecule to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA-based diet for bone mineral density (BMD preservation. BMD was evaluated in the femur. Serum osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, ostroprotegerin, parathyroid hormone, urinary F2-isoprostanes, and lymphocytes DNA strand breaks were also measured. BMD was lower in aged rats fed a diet without CoQ10 respect than their younger counterparts, whereas older animals receiving CoQ10 showed the highest BMD. F2-isoprostanes and DNA strand breaks showed that oxidative stress was higher during aging. Supplementation with CoQ10 prevented oxidative damage to lipid and DNA, in young and old animals, respectively. Reduced oxidative stress associated to CoQ10 supplementation of this n-3 PUFA-rich diet might explain the higher BMD found in aged rats in this group of animals.

  5. High serum coenzyme Q10, positively correlated with age, selenium and cholesterol, in Inuit of Greenland. A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H S; Mortensen, S A; Rohde, M

    1999-01-01

    .001) compared to a Danish population. In a linear multiple regression model the S-CoQ10 level is significantly positively associated with age and S-selenium in males, and S-total cholesterol in females. The high level of CoQ10 in Greenlanders probably reflects diet, since no bioaccumulation takes place...

  6. Treatment of CoQ(10 deficient fibroblasts with ubiquinone, CoQ analogs, and vitamin C: time- and compound-dependent effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C López

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q(10 (CoQ(10 and its analogs are used therapeutically by virtue of their functions as electron carriers, antioxidant compounds, or both. However, published studies suggest that different ubiquinone analogs may produce divergent effects on oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress.To test these concepts, we have evaluated the effects of CoQ(10, coenzyme Q(2 (CoQ(2, idebenone, and vitamin C on bioenergetics and oxidative stress in human skin fibroblasts with primary CoQ(10 deficiency. A final concentration of 5 microM of each compound was chosen to approximate the plasma concentration of CoQ(10 of patients treated with oral ubiquinone. CoQ(10 supplementation for one week but not for 24 hours doubled ATP levels and ATP/ADP ratio in CoQ(10 deficient fibroblasts therein normalizing the bioenergetics status of the cells. Other compounds did not affect cellular bioenergetics. In COQ2 mutant fibroblasts, increased superoxide anion production and oxidative stress-induced cell death were normalized by all supplements.THESE RESULTS INDICATE THAT: 1 pharmacokinetics of CoQ(10 in reaching the mitochondrial respiratory chain is delayed; 2 short-tail ubiquinone analogs cannot replace CoQ(10 in the mitochondrial respiratory chain under conditions of CoQ(10 deficiency; and 3 oxidative stress and cell death can be counteracted by administration of lipophilic or hydrophilic antioxidants. The results of our in vitro experiments suggest that primary CoQ(10 deficiencies should be treated with CoQ(10 supplementation but not with short-tail ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone or CoQ(2. Complementary administration of antioxidants with high bioavailability should be considered if oxidative stress is present.

  7. The Combination of Physical Exercise with Muscle-Directed Antioxidants to Counteract Sarcopenia: A Biomedical Rationale for Pleiotropic Treatment with Creatine and Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Guescini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia represents an increasing public health risk due to the rapid aging of the world’s population. It is characterized by both low muscle mass and function and is associated with mobility disorders, increased risk of falls and fractures, loss of independence, disabilities, and increased risk of death. Despite the urgency of the problem, the development of treatments for sarcopenia has lagged. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and decreased antioxidant (AO defences seem to be important factors contributing to muscle impairment. Studies have been conducted to verify whether physical exercise and/or AOs could prevent and/or delay sarcopenia through a normalization of the etiologically relevant ROS imbalance. Despite the strong rationale, the results obtained were contradictory, particularly with regard to the effects of the tested AOs. A possible explanation might be that not all the agents included in the general heading of “AOs” could fulfill the requisites to counteract the complex series of events causing/accelerating sarcopenia: the combination of the muscle-directed antioxidants creatine and coenzyme Q10 with physical exercise as a biomedical rationale for pleiotropic prevention and/or treatment of sarcopenia is discussed.

  8. Characterization of oat beta-glucan and coenzyme Q10-loaded beta-glucan powders generated by the pressurized gas-expanded liquid (PGX) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nian; Couto, Ricardo; Seifried, Bernhard; Moquin, Paul; Delgado, Luis; Temelli, Feral

    2018-04-01

    The physicochemical properties of the oat beta-glucan powder (BG) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)-loaded BG powder (L-BG) produced by the pressurized gas-expanded liquid (PGX) technology were studied. Helium ion microscope, differential scanning calorimeter, X-ray diffractometer, AutoSorb iQ and rheometer were used to determine the particle morphology, thermal properties, crystallinity, surface area and viscosity, respectively. Both BG (7.7μm) and L-BG (6.1μm) were produced as micrometer-scale particles, while CoQ10 nanoparticles (92nm) were adsorbed on the porous structure of L-BG. CoQ10 was successfully loaded onto BG using the PGX process via adsorptive precipitation mainly in its amorphous form. Viscosity of BG and L-BG solutions (0.15%, 0.2%, 0.3% w/v) displayed Newtonian behavior with increasing shear rate but decreased with temperature. Detailed characterization of the physicochemical properties of combination ingredients like L-BG will lead to the development of novel functional food and natural health product applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced antitumor efficacy and counterfeited cardiotoxicity of combinatorial oral therapy using Doxorubicin- and Coenzyme Q10-liquid crystalline nanoparticles in comparison with intravenous Adriamycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swarnakar, Nitin K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    and strong synergism for combination at 1:10 dose ratio owing to higher cellular uptake, nuclear colocalization, higher apoptotic index and 8-OHdG levels. The prophylactic antitumor efficacy of the CoQ10-LCNPs was also established using tumor induction and progression studies. Finally, therapeutic antitumor......, with Dox-induced-cardiotoxicity was completely counterfeited in combination. In nutshell, LCNPs pose great potential in improving the therapeutic efficacy of drugs by oral route of administration. FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR: This study describes the use of liquid crystalline nanoparticles containing coenzyme...

  10. Pilot study of safety and efficacy of polyprenols in combination with coenzyme Q10 in patients with statin-induced myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkovskis, Gustavs; Saripo, Vita; Sokolova, Emma; Upite, Dana; Vanaga, Ilona; Kletnieks, Ugis; Erglis, Andrejs

    2016-01-01

    Statin-induced myopathy (SIM) has been partially attributed to deficiency of dolichol and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). We aimed to test the safety and efficacy of plant polyprenols in combination with CoQ10 for alleviation of SIM. In an open-label, one-center prospective pilot study patients with SIM received conifer-tree needle polyprenols (4mg/day) and CoQ10 (100mg/day) for 8 weeks. Symptoms and safety were evaluated according to symptom severity score (0-10), creatine kinase (CK) levels, exercise test, dynamometry, complete blood count, clinical biochemistry and electrocardiography. Of the 14 patients, 11 completed the study per protocol. Two patients withdrew consent due to travels abroad, and it was discontinued for one patient with stage 3 chronic kidney disease due to asymptomatic elevations of liver enzymes at week 4. No safety parameters changed significantly in per protocol group. Non-significant increase of CK levels was observed (P=0.231). Muscle pain (n=10) and weakness (n=7) scores improved significantly (PMuscle pain completely disappeared in 2 patients, weakness resolved in 3 patients and cramps disappeared in two patients. Four patients assessed improvement strong enough to consider increase of statin dose. No changes were observed in exercise test or dynamometry. Conifer-tree polyprenols in combination with CoQ10 may be generally safe in patients with SIM, but caution should be exercised in patients with glomerular filtration rate <60mL/min and routine monitoring of the liver enzymes and CK is advocated in all patients. The observed efficacy provides the rationale for a larger, double-blind controlled study with polyprenols. Copyright © 2016 The Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Modulatory role of Co-enzyme Q10 on methionine and choline deficient diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Dalia O; Ahmed, Rania F; Amin, Mohamed M

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the hepato-protective and neuro-protective activity of Co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in albino rats induced by methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet. Rats were fed an MCD diet for 8 weeks to induce non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. CoQ10 (10 mg/(kg·day) -1 ) was orally administered for 2 consecutive weeks. Twenty-four hours after the last dose of the drug, the behavioral test, namely the activity cage test, was performed and the activity counts were recorded. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total/direct bilirubin, and albumin were valued to assess liver function. Moreover, hepatic cytokines interleukin-6 as well as its modulator nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells were determined. In addition, brain biomarkers, viz ammonia, nitric oxide, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), were measured as they are reliable indices to assess brain damage. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of brain proliferating cell nuclear antigen in brain and liver tissues were also evaluated. Results revealed that MCD-induced NASH showed impairment in the liver functions with an increase in the liver inflammatory markers. Moreover, NASH resulted in pronounced brain dysfunction as evidenced by hyper-locomotor activity, a decrease in the BDNF level, as well as an increase in the brain nitric oxide and ammonia contents. Oral treatment of MCD-diet-fed rats with CoQ10 for 14 days showed a marked improvement in all the assigned parameters. Finally, it can be concluded that CoQ10 has a hepatoprotective and neuroprotective role in MCD-diet-induced NASH in rats.

  12. Obesity-induced oocyte mitochondrial defects are partially prevented and rescued by supplementation with co-enzyme Q10 in a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, C.E.; Boudoures, A.; Zhang, W.; Drury, A.; Moley, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does supplementation with co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) improve the oocyte mitochondrial abnormalities associated with obesity in mice? SUMMARY ANSWER In an obese mouse model, CoQ10 improves the mitochondrial function of oocytes. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Obesity impairs oocyte quality. Oocytes from mice fed a high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) diet have abnormalities in mitochondrial distribution and function and in meiotic progression. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Mice were randomly assigned to a normal, chow diet or an isocaloric HF/HS diet for 12 weeks. After 6 weeks on the diet, half of the mice receiving a normal diet and half of the mice receiving a HF/HS diet were randomly assigned to receive CoQ10 supplementation injections for the remaining 6 weeks. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Dietary intervention was initiated on C57Bl6 female mice at 4 weeks of age, CoQ10 versus vehicle injections were assigned at 10 weeks, and assays were conducted at 16 weeks of age. Mice were super-ovulated, and oocytes were collected and stained to assess mitochondrial distribution, quantify reactive oxygen species (ROS), assess meiotic spindle formation, and measure metabolites. In vitro fertilization was performed, and blastocyst embryos were transferred into control mice. Oocyte number, fertilization rate, blastulation rate and implantation rate were compared between the four cohorts. Bivariate statistics were performed appropriately. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE HF/HS mice weighed significantly more than normal diet mice (29 versus 22 g, P< 0.001). CoQ10 supplementation did not influence weight. Levels of ATP, citrate, and phosphocreatine were lower and ROS levels were higher in HF/HS mice than in controls (P< 0.001). CoQ10 supplementation significantly increased the levels of metabolites and decreased ROS levels in oocytes from normal diet mice but not in oocytes from HF/HS mice. However, CoQ10 completely prevented the mitochondrial distribution abnormalities

  13. Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly with Low Selenium Status. A Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jan; Aaseth, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium is needed by all living cells in order to ensure the optimal function of several enzyme systems. However, the selenium content in the soil in Europe is generally low. Previous reports indicate that a dietary supplement of selenium could reduce cardiovascular disease but mainly in populations in low selenium areas. The objective of this secondary analysis of a previous randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial from our group was to determine whether the effects on cardiovascular mortality of supplementation with a fixed dose of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined during a four-year intervention were dependent on the basal level of selenium. Methods In 668 healthy elderly individuals from a municipality in Sweden, serum selenium concentration was measured. Of these, 219 individuals received daily supplementation with selenium (200 μg Se as selenized yeast) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg) combined for four years. The remaining participants (n = 449) received either placebo (n = 222) or no treatment (n = 227). All cardiovascular mortality was registered. No participant was lost during a median follow-up of 5.2 years. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, all mortality was registered. Findings The mean serum selenium concentration among participants at baseline was low, 67.1 μg/L. Based on the distribution of selenium concentration at baseline, the supplemented group was divided into three groups; 85 μg/L (45 and 90 percentiles) and the remaining participants were distributed accordingly. Among the non-treated participants, lower cardiovascular mortality was found in the high selenium group as compared with the low selenium group (13.0% vs. 24.1%; P = 0.04). In the group with the lowest selenium basal concentration, those receiving placebo or no supplementation had a mortality of 24.1%, while mortality was 12.1% in the group receiving the active substance, which was an absolute risk reduction of 12%. In the middle selenium concentration

  14. Generation, genome edition and characterization of iPSC lines from a patient with coenzyme Q10 deficiency harboring a heterozygous mutation in COQ4 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damià Romero-Moya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the generation, CRISPR/Cas9-edition and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines from a patient with coenzyme Q10 deficiency harboring the heterozygous mutation c.483G > C in the COQ4 gene. iPSCs were generated using non-integrative Sendai Viruses containing the reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and C-MYC. The iPSC lines carried the c.483G > C COQ4 mutation, silenced the OKSM expression and were mycoplasma-free. They were bona fide pluripotent cells as characterized by morphology, immunophenotype/gene expression for pluripotent-associated markers/genes, NANOG and OCT4 promoter demethylation, karyotype and teratoma formation. The COQ4 mutation was CRISPR/Cas9 edited resulting in isogenic, diploid and off-target free COQ4-corrected iPSCs.

  15. Amelioration of Behavioural, Biochemical, and Neurophysiological Deficits by Combination of Monosodium Glutamate with Resveratrol/Alpha-Lipoic Acid/Coenzyme Q10 in Rat Model of Cisplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naini Bhadri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II (CDDP is a cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent with dose-dependent peripheral neuropathy as a foremost side effect characterised by ataxia, pain, and sensory impairment. Cumulative drug therapy of CDDP is known to produce severe oxidative damage. It mainly targets and accumulates in dorsal root ganglia that in turn cause damage resulting in secondary nerve fibre axonopathy. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of the combination of monosodium glutamate (MSG with three individual antioxidants, that is, resveratrol, alpha-lipoic acid (ALA, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, in cisplatin (2 mg/kg i.p. twice weekly induced peripheral neuropathy in rats. After 8 weeks of treatment the degree of neuroprotection was determined by measuring behavioral and electrophysiological properties and sciatic nerve lipid peroxidation, as well as glutathione and catalase levels. The results suggested that pretreatment with the combination of MSG (500 mg/kg/day po with resveratrol (10 mg/kg/day i.p. or ALA (20 mg/kg/day i.p. or CoQ10 (10 mg/kg weekly thrice i.p. exhibited neuroprotective effect. The maximum neuroprotection of MSG was observed in the combination with resveratrol.

  16. Increase in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 after supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10. A prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial among elderly Swedish citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Peter; Aaseth, Jan; Alexander, Jan; Brismar, Kerstin

    2017-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-1(IGF-1) has a multitude of effects besides cell growth and metabolism. Reports also indicate anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects. The concentrations of IGF-1 decrease with age and during inflammation. As selenium and coenzyme Q10 are involved in both the antioxidative defense and the inflammatory response, the present study aimed to examine the effects of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 on concentrations of IGF-1 and its binding protein IGFBP-1 in a population showing reduced cardiovascular mortality following such supplementation. Methods 215 elderly individuals were included and given the intervention for four years. A clinical examination was performed and blood samples were taken at the start and after 48 months. Evaluations of IGF-1, the age adjusted IGF-1 SD score and IGFBP-1 were performed using group mean values, and repeated measures of variance. Findings After supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, applying group mean evaluations, significantly higher IGF-1 and IGF-1 SD scores could be seen in the active treatment group, whereas a decrease in concentration could be seen of the same biomarkers in the placebo group. Applying the repeated measures of variance evaluations, the same significant increase in concentrations of IGF-1 (F = 68; P>0.0001), IGF-1 SD score (F = 29; PIGF-1 as one of the mechanistic effects of the intervention. Conclusion Supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 over four years resulted in increased levels of IGF-1 and the postprandial IGFBP-1, and an increase in the age-corrected IGF-1 SD score, compared with placebo. The effects could be part of the mechanistic explanation behind the surprisingly positive clinical effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality reported earlier. However, as the effects of IGF-1 are complex, more research on the result of intervention with selenium and coenzyme Q10 is needed. PMID:28609475

  17. The effect of CoQ10 and vitamin E on serum total sialic acid, lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-13

    Jun 13, 2011 ... This study was designed to evaluate the effect of CoQ10 and vitamin E on serum total sialic acid (TSA), lipid bound sialic acid (LSA) and some elements in rat administered doxorubicin (DXR). Cu levels were increased in the group treated with DXR + vitamin E in comparison with DXR (p<0.05) and CoQ10 ...

  18. The effect of CoQ 10 and vitamin E on serum total sialic acid, lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of CoQ10 and vitamin E on serum total sialic acid (TSA), lipid bound sialic acid (LSA) and some elements in rat administered doxorubicin (DXR). Cu levels were increased in the group treated with DXR + vitamin E in comparison with DXR (p<0.05) and CoQ10 groups (p ...

  19. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Fernández, José M. García; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N’-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  20. Efficiency of emulsifier-free emulsions and emulsions containing rapeseed lecithin as delivery systems for vectorization and release of coenzyme Q10: physico-chemical properties and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaci, M; Arab-Tehrany, E; Dostert, G; Desjardins, I; Velot, E; Desobry, S

    2016-11-01

    To improve the encapsulation and release of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), emulsifier-free-emulsions were developed with a new emulsification process using high-frequency ultrasound (HFU) at 1.7MHz. Nano-emulsions containing CoQ10 were prepared with or without rapeseed lecithin as an emulsifier. The emulsions prepared with HFU were compared with an emulsion of CoQ10 containing emulsifier prepared with the same emulsification technique as well as with emulsions prepared with low-frequency ultrasound coupled with high-pressure homogenization (LFU+HPH). The physico-chemical properties of the emulsions were determined by average droplet size measurement with nano-droplet tracking analysis, droplet surface charge with ζ potential measurement, surface tension and rheological behaviour. Emulsions made by LFU+HPH with an emulsifier showed lower droplet sizes due to cavitation generated by the HFU process. Surface tension results showed that there was no significant difference between emulsions containing lecithin emulsifier regardless of the preparation process or the inclusion of CoQ10. In vitro biocompatibility tests were performed on human mesenchymal stem cells in order to show the cytotoxicity of various formulations and the efficiency of CoQ10-loaded emulsions. In vitro tests proved that the vectors were not toxic. Furthermore, CoQ10 facilitated a high rate of cell proliferation and metabolic activity especially when in an emulsifier-free formulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coenzyme Q10 instilled as eye drops on the cornea reaches the retina and protects retinal layers from apoptosis in a mouse model of kainate-induced retinal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulli, Matteo; Witort, Ewa; Papucci, Laura; Torre, Eugenio; Schipani, Christian; Bergamini, Christian; Dal Monte, Massimo; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2012-12-17

    To evaluate if coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from apoptosis and, when instilled as eye drops on the cornea, if it can reach the retina and exert its antiapoptotic activity in this area in a mouse model of kainate (KA)-induced retinal damage. Rat primary or cultured RGCs were subjected to glutamate (50 μM) or chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A, 200 μM) or serum withdrawal (FBS, 0.5%) in the presence or absence of CoQ10 (10 μM). Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses. Apoptosis was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and mitochondrion depolarization tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester analysis. CoQ10 transfer to the retina following its instillation as eye drops on the cornea was quantified by HPLC. Retinal protection by CoQ10 (10 μM) eye drops instilled on the cornea was then evaluated in a mouse model of KA-induced excitotoxic retinal cell apoptosis by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistofluorescence, caspase 3/7 activity assays, and quantification of inhibition of RGC loss. CoQ10 significantly increased viable cells by preventing RGC apoptosis. Furthermore, when topically applied as eye drops to the cornea, it reached the retina, thus substantially increasing local CoQ10 concentration and protecting retinal layers from apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 eye drops to protect retinal cells from apoptosis in the mouse model of KA-induced retinal damage suggests that topical CoQ10 may be evaluated in designing therapies for treating apoptosis-driven retinopathies.

  2. Levels of sP-selectin and hs-CRP Decrease with Dietary Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Combined: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas L.; Svensson, Erland

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Inflammation and oxidative stress are central in many disease states. The major anti-oxidative enzymes contain selenium. The selenium intake in Europe is low, and supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, important anti-oxidants, was evaluated in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate response on the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, and sP-selectin, and their possible impact on cardiovascular mortality. Subjects/Methods 437 elderly individuals were included in the study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood samples were drawn. The intervention time was 48 months, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. The effects on inflammation/atherosclerosis were evaluated through analyses of CRP and sP-selectin. Evaluations of the effect of the intervention was performed using repeated measures of variance. All mortality was registered, and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan-Meier plots. Results The placebo group showed a CRP level of 4.8 ng/mL at the start, and 5.1 ng/mL at the study end. The active supplementation group showed a CRP level of 4.1 ng/mL at the start, and 2.1 ng/mL at the study end. SP-selectin exhibited a level of 56.6 mg/mL at the start in the placebo group and 72.3 mg/mL at the study end, and in the active group the corresponding figures were 55.9 mg/mL and 58.0 mg/mL. A significantly smaller increase was demonstrated through repeated measurements of the two biomarkers in those on active supplementation. Active supplementation showed an effect on the CRP and sP-selectin levels, irrespective of the biomarker levels. Reduced cardiovascular mortality was demonstrated in both those with high and low levels of CRP and sP-selectin in the active supplementation group. Conclusion CRP and sP-selectin showed significant changes reflecting effects on inflammation and atherosclerosis in those given selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. A reduced cardiovascular mortality could

  3. Levels of sP-selectin and hs-CRP Decrease with Dietary Intervention with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Combined: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Alehagen

    Full Text Available Inflammation and oxidative stress are central in many disease states. The major anti-oxidative enzymes contain selenium. The selenium intake in Europe is low, and supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10, important anti-oxidants, was evaluated in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate response on the inflammatory biomarkers C-reactive protein, and sP-selectin, and their possible impact on cardiovascular mortality.437 elderly individuals were included in the study. Clinical examination, echocardiography, electrocardiography and blood samples were drawn. The intervention time was 48 months, and median follow-up was 5.2 years. The effects on inflammation/atherosclerosis were evaluated through analyses of CRP and sP-selectin. Evaluations of the effect of the intervention was performed using repeated measures of variance. All mortality was registered, and endpoints of mortality were assessed by Kaplan-Meier plots.The placebo group showed a CRP level of 4.8 ng/mL at the start, and 5.1 ng/mL at the study end. The active supplementation group showed a CRP level of 4.1 ng/mL at the start, and 2.1 ng/mL at the study end. SP-selectin exhibited a level of 56.6 mg/mL at the start in the placebo group and 72.3 mg/mL at the study end, and in the active group the corresponding figures were 55.9 mg/mL and 58.0 mg/mL. A significantly smaller increase was demonstrated through repeated measurements of the two biomarkers in those on active supplementation. Active supplementation showed an effect on the CRP and sP-selectin levels, irrespective of the biomarker levels. Reduced cardiovascular mortality was demonstrated in both those with high and low levels of CRP and sP-selectin in the active supplementation group.CRP and sP-selectin showed significant changes reflecting effects on inflammation and atherosclerosis in those given selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. A reduced cardiovascular mortality could be demonstrated in the active group

  4. Low-cost and disposable sensors for the simultaneous determination of coenzyme Q10 and α-lipoic acid using manganese (IV) oxide-modified screen-printed graphene electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenkitamorn, Kanokwan; Chaiyo, Sudkate; Chailapakul, Orawon; Siangproh, Weena

    2018-04-03

    In this work, for the first time, manganese (IV) oxide-modified screen-printed graphene electrodes (MnO 2 /SPGEs) were developed for the simultaneous electrochemical detection of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and α-lipoic acid (ALA). This sensor exhibits attractive benefits such as simplicity, low production costs, and disposability. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the analyte and investigate the capacitance and electroactive surface area of the unmodified and modified electrode surfaces. The electrochemical behavior of CoQ10 and ALA on MnO 2 /SPGEs was also discussed. Additionally, square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was used for the quantitative determination of CoQ10 and ALA. Under optimal conditions, the obtained signals are linear in the concentration range from 2.0 to 75.0 μg mL -1 for CoQ10 and 0.3-25.0 μg mL -1 for ALA. The low limits of detection (LODs) were found to be 0.56 μg mL -1 and 0.088 μg mL -1 for CoQ10 and ALA, respectively. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility and applicability of the MnO 2 /SPGE sensor through simultaneous measurements of CoQ10 and ALA in dietary supplements. The sensor provides high accuracy measurements, exhibiting its high potential for practical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nedsat koenzym Q10 kan være årsag til statinassocieret myopati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Pareek, Manan; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2011-01-01

    Statin treatment can cause muscular side effects. It has been suggested that the mechanism is reduced synthesis of coenzyme Q10 (coQ10) and a subsequent dysfunction of the respiratory chain. A literature review resulted in insufficient evidence supporting this theory. It is uncertain whether...... intramuscular levels of coQ10 and mitochondrial function are affected by statin therapy and whether the symptoms of myopathy can be alleviated with coQ10 supplementation. Nevertheless, due to a favourable safety profile, coQ10 can be tested in patients whose muscular symptoms cannot be managed otherwise....

  6. Determination of a method for extraction of coenzyme Q10 in human plasma: optimization of the use of surfactants and other variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cristina Ferreiro-Barros

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish a routine for the extraction of the total levelsof CoQ10 in human plasma through the Ultra High Performance LiquidChromatography (UHPLC. Methods: Two extraction protocolswere tested: a methanol: hexane and b 1-propanol. The followingparameters were analyzed: extraction temperature (19ºC and 4ºC,extraction tubes (glass and polypropylene, and surfactants (SDS,Triton X-100, Tween-20 at different concentrations, i.e., 1%,3%, 5% and 10%. Results: The results showed that the methodof extraction of CoQ10 in a sample of human plasma at 4ºC, usingsolvents methanol: hexane (85:15, v/v in the presence of surfactantTween-20 at 3% and polypropylene tubes showed better efficiencyand reproducibility when compared to the method with 1-propanol.Conclusion: By the analyses performed, it was possible to observethat the addition of the surfactant Tween-20 promoted an increasein the recovery of CoQ10 by the methanol:hexane extraction method.This method showed good reproducibility, with a low coefficient ofvariation and high sensitivity, since CoQ10 was detected in samplesof plasma of a control individual using a UV-type detector. The useof UHPLC equipment allowed a total analysis with total run time of3.5 minutes, enabling the rapid achievement of results, consideredmandatory for laboratory routines.

  7. Pilot study of safety and efficacy of polyprenols in combination with coenzyme Q10 in patients with statin-induced myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavs Latkovskis

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Conifer-tree polyprenols in combination with CoQ10 may be generally safe in patients with SIM, but caution should be exercised in patients with glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min and routine monitoring of the liver enzymes and CK is advocated in all patients. The observed efficacy provides the rationale for a larger, double-blind controlled study with polyprenols.

  8. Evaluation of Co-Q10 anti-gingivitis effect on plaque induced gingivitis: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deficiency of Co-Q10 has been found to be responsible for periodontal destruction; therefore, this study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-gingivitis effect of Co-Q10 on plaque induced gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects with plaque induced gingivitis were enrolled in a split mouth randomized controlled trial. For each subject, scaling was randomly performed for any two quadrants, followed by the topical application of Co-Q10 randomly in a previously scaled and as an unscaled quadrant for a period of 28 days. Four treatment options were planned: option A: scaling only; option B: Co-Q10 along with scaling; option C: Co-Q10. Results: Marked reduction in gingival, bleeding, and plaque scores were recorded at the sites where C0-Q10 was applied. Mean±S.D of aforementioned periodontal parameters at 28th day showed significant reduction for option A, B, and C when compared with baseline. Conclusion: Promising results were obtained after the solitary application of Co-Q10 as well as when it was used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for treatment of plaque induced gingivitis.

  9. Oxidative stress correlates with headache symptoms in fibromyalgia: coenzyme Q₁₀ effect on clinical improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Mario D; Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; De Miguel, Manuel; Sánchez-Alcázar, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs) and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), visual analogues scales (VAS), and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ(10), catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. We found decreased CoQ(10), catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P headache parameters were observed (r  = -0.59, P headache symptoms (P stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM.

  10. Oxidative stress correlates with headache symptoms in fibromyalgia: coenzyme Q₁₀ effect on clinical improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D Cordero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia (FM is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and a wide spectrum of symptoms such as allodynia, debilitating fatigue, joint stiffness and migraine. Recent studies have shown some evidences demonstrating that oxidative stress is associated to clinical symptoms in FM of fibromyalgia. We examined oxidative stress and bioenergetic status in blood mononuclear cells (BMCs and its association to headache symptoms in FM patients. The effects of oral coenzyme Q(10 (CoQ(10 supplementation on biochemical markers and clinical improvement were also evaluated. METHODS: We studied 20 FM patients and 15 healthy controls. Clinical parameters were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ, visual analogues scales (VAS, and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring CoQ(10, catalase and lipid peroxidation (LPO levels in BMCs. Bioenergetic status was assessed by measuring ATP levels in BMCs. RESULTS: We found decreased CoQ(10, catalase and ATP levels in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively We also found increased level of LPO in BMCs from FM patients as compared to normal control (P < 0.001. Significant negative correlations between CoQ(10 or catalase levels in BMCs and headache parameters were observed (r  = -0.59, P < 0.05; r  =  -0.68, P < 0.05, respectively. Furthermore, LPO levels showed a significant positive correlation with HIT-6 (r = 0.33, P<0.05. Oral CoQ(10 supplementation restored biochemical parameters and induced a significant improvement in clinical and headache symptoms (P < 0.001. DISCUSSION: The results of this study suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the headache symptoms associated with FM. CoQ10 supplementation should be examined in a larger placebo controlled trial as a possible treatment in FM.

  11. Influence of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) on the physical properties of the Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream and the in vivo skin hydration effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeike, Jana; Schwabe, Kay; Müller, Rainer H

    2010-08-30

    Cutanvoa Nanorepair Q10 cream, the first NLC containing cosmetical product introduced to the market in October 2005, was compared to an identical o/w cream without NLC with regards to particle size, melting behaviour, rheological properties and the in vivo effect on skin hydration. The consistency, the spreadability on the skin and the subjective feeling of increase in skin hydration were evaluated using a standardized questionnaire, and compared to hydration data measured. Furthermore, it was shown by epicutaneous patch test that Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream has no irritating effects on the skin. By laser diffraction (LD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements it could be shown that NLC are physically stable in Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream. After 7 days application of Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream and NLC negative control cream an increase in skin hydration could be objectively confirmed by measurements in vivo. From day 28 on the skin hydration measured in the test areas of Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream was significantly higher than the skin hydration in the test areas of the NLC negative control cream (p=0.05). The subjective feeling of increase in skin hydration was also rated from the volunteers as superior for Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream. The rheological properties of Cutanova Nanorepair Q10 cream contributed to a better subjective impression of consistency and spreadability on the skin than found for NLC negative control cream. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CoQ10 Augments Rosuvastatin Neuroprotective Effect in a Model of Global Ischemia via Inhibition of NF-κB/JNK3/Bax and Activation of Akt/FOXO3A/Bim Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Abd El-Aal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Statins were reported to lower the Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 content upon their inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase enzyme and both are known to possess neuroprotective potentials; therefore, the aim is to assess the possible use of CoQ10 as an adds-on therapy to rosuvastatin to improve its effect using global I/R model. Rats were allocated into sham, I/R, rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg, CoQ10 (10 mg/kg and their combination. Drugs were administered orally for 7 days before I/R. Pretreatment with rosuvastatin and/or CoQ10 inhibited the hippocampal content of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, and boosted glutathione and superoxide dismutase. They also opposed the upregulation of gp91phox, and p47phox subunits of NADPH oxidase. Meanwhile, both agents reduced content/expression of TNF-α, iNOS, NF-κBp65, ICAM-1, and MPO. Besides, all regimens abated cytochrome c, caspase-3 and Bax, but increased Bcl-2 in favor of cell survival. On the molecular level, they increased p-Akt and its downstream target p-FOXO3A, with the inhibition of the nuclear content of FOXO3A to downregulate the expression of Bim, a pro-apoptotic gene. Additionally, both treatments downregulate the JNK3/c-Jun signaling pathway. The effect of the combination regimen overrides that of either treatment alone. These effects were reflected on the alleviation of the hippocampal damage in CA1 region inflicted by I/R. Together, these findings accentuate the neuroprotective potentials of both treatments against global I/R by virtue of their rigorous multi-pronged actions, including suppression of hippocampal oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis with the involvement of the Akt/FOXO3A/Bim and JNK3/c-Jun/Bax signaling pathways. The study also nominates CoQ10 as an adds-on therapy with statins.

  13. Impact of Chemical Analogs of 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid on Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: From Inhibition to Bypass of Coenzyme Q Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Pierrel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q is a lipid that participates to important physiological functions. Coenzyme Q is synthesized in multiple steps from the precursor 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Mutations in enzymes that participate to coenzyme Q biosynthesis result in primary coenzyme Q deficiency, a type of mitochondrial disease. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation of patients is the classical treatment but it shows limited efficacy in some cases. The molecular understanding of the coenzyme Q biosynthetic pathway allowed the design of experiments to bypass deficient biosynthetic steps with analogs of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. These molecules provide the defective chemical group and can reactivate endogenous coenzyme Q biosynthesis as demonstrated recently in yeast, mammalian cell cultures, and mouse models of primary coenzyme Q deficiency. This mini review presents how the chemical properties of various analogs of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid dictate the effect of the molecules on CoQ biosynthesis and how the reactivation of endogenous coenzyme Q biosynthesis may achieve better results than exogenous CoQ10 supplementation.

  14. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  15. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X

    2016-02-02

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study.

  16. Inhibition of Coenzyme Qs Accumulation in Engineered Escherichia coli by High Concentration of Farnesyl Diphosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Samoudi, Mojtaba; Omid Yeganeh, Negar; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Hajhosseini, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an isoprenoid component used widely in nutraceutical industries. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a responsible enzyme for biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a key precursor for CoQs production. This research involved investigating the effect of FPPS over-expression on CoQs production in engineered CoQ 10 -producing Escherichia coli (E. coli). Methods: Two CoQ 10 -producing strains, as referred to E. coli Ba and E. coli Br, were transform...

  17. Effects of a therapeutic lifestyle change diet and supplementation with Q10 plus L-carnitine on quality of life in patients with myocardial infarction: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Sharifi

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Both TLC diet and supplementation with Q10 and L- carnitine had a positive effect on the physical and emotional subscales of MacNew questionnaire and may improve post-MI prognosis. Based on the results, combination of Q10 plus L-carnitine and TLC die can be a potential intervention for improving QoL and secondary prevention.

  18. CoQ10 and L-carnitine for statin myalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNicolantonio, James J

    2012-10-01

    Statins are a standard of care in many clinical settings such as acute myocardial infarction and for patients having or at risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease. This is based on a plethora of data showing reductions in CV events and mortality. The CV benefit of statins can be partly explained by their ability to inhibit of HMG-CoA reductase, which subsequently lowers cholesterol and decreases the formation of mevalonate. However, the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway decreases the formation of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) within the body. It has been a long-standing theory that statin-associated muscle pain (myalgia) is caused, or at least partly contributed by, a reduction in CoQ10 levels in muscle mitochondria. One of the main side effects of statins is myalgia, which causes the patient to either stop their statin or significantly reduce the dose of their statin. The question of whether CoQ10 can help treat statin myopathy is a common one encountered by clinicians in current day practice.

  19. Immunomodulatory effects of L-carnitine and q10 in mouse spleen exposed to low-frequency high-intensity magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafa, Hossam M.M.; Abd-Allah, Adel R.A.; El-Mahdy, Mohamad A.; Ramadan, Laila A.; Hamada, Farid M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the current study, we have investigated the bioeffects of repeated exposure to low-frequency (50 Hz) high-intensity (20 mT; 200 G) electromagnetic field (EMF) on some immune parameters in mice. The animals were exposed to EMF daily for 30 min three times per week for 2 weeks. We also studied the possible immunomodulatory effects of two anti-radical substances known to have non-specific immunostimulant effects namely, L-carnitine (200 mg/kg body weight i.p.) and Q10 (200 mg/kg body weight, p.o.). Both drugs were given 1 h prior to each EMF exposure. Immune endpoints included total body weight, spleen/body weight ratio, splenocytes viability, total and differential white blood cell (WBCs; lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils) counts, as well as the lymphocyte proliferation induced by the mitogens; phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin-A (Con-A) and lipoploysaccharide (LPS). Magnetic field decreased splenocyte viability, WBCs count, as well as mitogens-induced lymphocyte proliferation. L-carnitine, but not Q10 could ameliorate the adverse effects of EMF on the vast majority of the immune parameters tested, suggesting a possible immunoprotective role of L-carnitine under the current experimental conditions

  20. Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency and Type 2C Muscle Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, evaluated retrospectively clinical, laboratory, and muscle histochemistry and oxidative enzyme characteristics in 49 children with suspected mitochondrial disorders.

  1. HYPOLIPIDEMIC EFFECT OF CURCUMIN OR CO-ENZYME Q1-0 AND THEIR MIXTURE ON OBESE RATS FED A HIGH CHOLESTEROL DIET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHAHIN, M.I.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, hyperlipidemia was induced in the rats by feeding diet enriched with cholesterol for two weeks. After 2 weeks of induction of hypercholesterolemia in rats and in comparison to normal rats, the results showed that incorporation of extra cholesterol in diet led to significant increases in serum cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, leptin and MDA levels. On the other hand, total serum triiodothyronine (T3), liver glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were decreased significantly in cholesterol fed rats. The concentration of TBARS in the liver was elevated.All previous parameters were corrected after the hypercholesterolemic rats were treated with curcumin or co-enzyme Q 1 -0 or a mixture of them dependent on the time of treatment. These findings are consistent with the concept that curcumin and co-enzyme Q 10 are antioxidant agents. The underlying mechanisms of these effects were discussed

  2. Comprehensive behavioral testing in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease shows no benefit from CoQ10 or minocycline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B Menalled

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the effects of coenzyme Q10 and minocycline on mouse models of Huntington's disease have produced conflicting results regarding their efficacy in behavioral tests. Using our recently published best practices for husbandry and testing for mouse models of Huntington's disease, we report that neither coenzyme Q10 nor minocycline had significant beneficial effects on measures of motor function, general health (open field, rotarod, grip strength, rearing-climbing, body weight and survival in the R6/2 mouse model. The higher doses of minocycline, on the contrary, reduced survival. We were thus unable to confirm the previously reported benefits for these two drugs, and we discuss potential reasons for these discrepancies, such as the effects of husbandry and nutrition.

  3. Novel recessive mutations in COQ4 cause severe infantile cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy associated with CoQ10 deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sondheimer, Neal; Hewson, Stacy; Cameron, Jessie M.; Somers, Gino R.; Broadbent, Jane Dunning; Ziosi, Marcello; Quinzii, Catarina Maria; Naini, Ali B.

    2017-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) or ubiquinone is one of the two electron carriers in the mitochondrial respiratory chain which has an essential role in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Defects in CoQ10 synthesis are usually associated with the impaired function of CoQ10–dependent complexes I, II and III. The recessively transmitted CoQ10 deficiency has been associated with a number of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous groups of disorders manifesting at variable age of onset. The infa...

  4. Various endocrine disorders in children with t(13;14(q10;q10 Robertsonian translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Ho Choi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose45,XY,t(13;14(q10;q10 karyotype can suggest infertility associated with more or less severe oligospermia in male adults. In addition, 45,XX,t(13;14(q10;q10 karyotype carries reproductive risks such as miscarriage or infertility in female adults. However, reports on the phenotype of this karyotype in children are very rare. This study was done to observe various phenotypes of this karyotype in children.MethodsBetween January 2007 and December 2012, children diagnosed with 45,XY,t(13;14(q10;q10 or 45,XX,t(13;14(q10;q10 karyotype by chromosome analysis were analyzed retrospectively.ResultsEight children (5 boys and 3 girls were diagnosed with 45,XY,t(13;14(q10;q10 or 45,XX,t(13;14(q10;q10 karyotype. They ranged in age from 5 years and 6 months to 12 years and 4 months. The phenotypes of the study patients consisted of 1 hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, 1 precocious puberty, 3 early puberty, 2 growth hormone deficiency (GHD (partial and 1 idiopathic short stature. As shown here t(13;14(q10;q10 Robertsonian translocation shows a wide range of phenotypes.ConclusionIt can be said that t(13;14(q10;q10 Robertsonian translocation shows various phenotypes from GHD to precocious puberty in children. Further large-scale studies are necessary.

  5. No Effects of Antioxidant Supplementation in Triathletes on Maximal Oxygen Uptake, 31P-NMRS Detected Muscle Energy Metabolism and Muscle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.N.; Mizuno, M.; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    1999-01-01

    Antioxidative vitamins, coenzyme Q 10 electrical stimulation, isometric exercise, low frequency fatigue......Antioxidative vitamins, coenzyme Q 10 electrical stimulation, isometric exercise, low frequency fatigue...

  6. Novel formulation and evaluation of a Q10-loaded solid lipid nanoparticle cream: in vitro and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farboud ES

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Effat Sadat Farboud, Saman Ahmad Nasrollahi, Zahra TabbakhiDepartment of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 were formulated by a high-pressure homogenization method. The best formulation of SLN dispersion consisted of 13% lipid (cetyl palmitate or stearic acid, 8% surfactant (Tween 80 or Tego Care 450, and water. Stability tests, particle size analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, and release study were conducted to find the best formulation. A simple cream of CoQ10 and a cream containing CoQ10-loaded SLNs were prepared and compared on volunteers aged 20–30 years. SLNs with particle size between 50 nm and100 nm exhibited the most suitable stability. In vitro release profiles of CoQ10 from simple cream, SLN alone, and CoQ10-loaded SLN cream showed prolonged release for SLNs compared with the simple cream, whereas there was no significant difference between SLN alone and SLN in cream. In vitro release studies also demonstrated that CoQ10-loaded SLN and SLN cream possessed a biphasic release pattern in comparison with simple cream. In vivo skin hydration and elasticity studies on 25 volunteers suggested good dermal penetration and useful activity of Q10 on skin as a hydratant and antiwrinkle cream.Keywords: coenzyme Q10, SLN, release study 

  7. Validated HPLC method for the quantitative determination of CoQ(10) in dog plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Liu, Chunling; Xu, Pingwei; Lin, Lin; Pan, Cheng; Wang, Linglan; Xu, Haiyan

    2011-09-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10) ) is a naturally occurring compound located in all membranes throughout the cell. A rapid and sensitive HPLC method was developed to determine the concentration of CoQ(10) in dog plasma using a surrogate matrix. Chromatographic separation was carried out on a Diamonsil C(18) column with the UV detector set at 275 nm. Methanol-2-propanol (40:60, v/v) was used as a mobile phase delivered at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Calibrators were prepared using blank plasma-K(2) HPO(4) buffer (50 mm, pH 8.0)-saline (1:3:6, v/v/v) as surrogate matrix. It was shown that the surrogate matrix had similar properties to dog plasma for CoQ(10) in extraction, freeze-thaw and stability. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 0.10-100 µg/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions were within 13.3% in terms of relative standard deviation (RSD%) and the accuracy was within ±7.5% in terms of relative error. This simple and reproducible HPLC method with less plasma volume (0.4 mL) and adequate sensitivity was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies of CoQ(10) in dogs and an investigation of the effect of CoQ(10) formulation on CoQ(10) baseline levels. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. CoQ10 plasmatic levels in breast-fed infants compared to formula-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagnoni, G; Giuffrè, B; Lista, G; Mosca, F; Marini, A

    2004-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 has been recognized as an important antioxidant factor besides its main role in bioenergetic metabolism. CoQ10 tissue levels depend both on exogenous dietetic intake and on endogenous biosynthesis, as this compound can be partly synthesized in human cells. Q10 plasma levels reflect the tissue content of the coenzyme and can be used to evaluate the presence of this compound in the human organism. Aim of the study was to measure CoQ10 plasmatic levels in a newborn breast-fed population and to compare them to CoQ10 levels in a newborn formula-fed population in order to verify whether changes in CoQ10 plasmatic contents could be related to a different dietetic intakes. We measured CoQ10 plasmatic levels in 25 healthy term neonates with different dietetic intakes: 15 breast-fed and 10 bottle-fed with a common infant formula. These infants were evaluated prospectively during the first month of life. The analyses were performed on the mothers' blood samples and cord blood samples at the time of delivery, then on infants at 4 and 28 days of age. Our results showed markedly reduced Q10 levels in cord blood samples compared to maternal Q10 plasmatic levels at the time of delivery, suggesting placental impermeability towards this molecule or increased fetal utilization during labor and delivery. At 4 days of age Q10 levels had increased in both groups of neonates, but significantly more in breast-fed infants compared to formula-fed babies (p <0.05). At 4 weeks of age no significant changes occurred in breast-fed infants, while values increased significantly in formula-fed infants (p <0.05). The content of Q10 in breast milk samples was lower than in infant formula. The results of this study show that CoQ10 plasmatic levels are at least partly influenced by the exogenous dietetic supply.

  9. 7Q10 flows for SRS streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1996-01-01

    The Environmental Transport Group of the Environmental Technology Section was requested to predict the seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) for the SRS streams based on historical stream flow records. Most of the historical flow records for the SRS streams include reactor coolant water discharged from the reactors and process water released from the process facilities. The most straight forward way to estimate the stream daily natural flow is to subtract the measured upstream reactor and/or facility daily effluents from the measured downstream daily flow. Unfortunately, this method does not always work, as indicated by the fact that sometimes the measured downstream volumetric flow rates are lower than the reactor effluent volumetric flow rates. For those cases that cannot be analyzed with the simple subtracting method, an alternative method was used to estimate the stream natural flows by statistically separating reactor coolant and process water flow data. The correlation between the calculated 7Q10 flows and the watershed areas for Four Mile Branch and Pen Branch agrees with that calculated by the USGS for Upper Three Runs and Lower Three Runs Creeks. The agreement between these two independent calculations lends confidence to the 7Q10 flow calculations presented in this report

  10. Novel recessive mutations in COQ4 cause severe infantile cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy associated with CoQ10 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Sondheimer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 or ubiquinone is one of the two electron carriers in the mitochondrial respiratory chain which has an essential role in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Defects in CoQ10 synthesis are usually associated with the impaired function of CoQ10–dependent complexes I, II and III. The recessively transmitted CoQ10 deficiency has been associated with a number of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous groups of disorders manifesting at variable age of onset. The infantile, multisystemic presentation is usually caused by mutations in genes directly involved in CoQ10 biosynthesis. To date, mutations in COQ1 (PDSS1 and PDSS2, COQ2, COQ4, COQ6, COQ7, COQ8A/ADCK3, COQ8B/ADCK4, and COQ9 genes have been identified in patients with primary form of CoQ10 deficiency. Here we report novel mutations in the COQ4 gene, which were identified in an infant with profound mitochondrial disease presenting with perinatal seizures, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe muscle CoQ10 deficiency.

  11. Novel recessive mutations in COQ4 cause severe infantile cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy associated with CoQ10 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondheimer, Neal; Hewson, Stacy; Cameron, Jessie M; Somers, Gino R; Broadbent, Jane Dunning; Ziosi, Marcello; Quinzii, Catarina Maria; Naini, Ali B

    2017-09-01

    Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) or ubiquinone is one of the two electron carriers in the mitochondrial respiratory chain which has an essential role in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Defects in CoQ 10 synthesis are usually associated with the impaired function of CoQ 10 -dependent complexes I, II and III. The recessively transmitted CoQ 10 deficiency has been associated with a number of phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous groups of disorders manifesting at variable age of onset. The infantile, multisystemic presentation is usually caused by mutations in genes directly involved in CoQ 10 biosynthesis. To date, mutations in COQ1 ( PDSS1 and PDSS2 ), COQ2 , COQ4 , COQ6 , COQ7 , COQ8A / ADCK3 , COQ8B/ADCK4 , and COQ9 genes have been identified in patients with primary form of CoQ 10 deficiency. Here we report novel mutations in the COQ4 gene, which were identified in an infant with profound mitochondrial disease presenting with perinatal seizures, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and severe muscle CoQ 10 deficiency.

  12. Inhibition of Coenzyme Qs Accumulation in Engineered Escherichia coli by High Concentration of Farnesyl Diphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoudi, Mojtaba; Omid Yeganeh, Negar; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Shariati, Parvin; Hajhosseini, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ 10 ) is an isoprenoid component used widely in nutraceutical industries. Farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) is a responsible enzyme for biosynthesis of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), a key precursor for CoQs production. This research involved investigating the effect of FPPS over-expression on CoQs production in engineered CoQ 10 -producing Escherichia coli (E. coli). Methods: Two CoQ 10 -producing strains, as referred to E. coli Ba and E. coli Br, were transformed by the encoding gene for FPPS (ispA) under the control of either the trc or P BAD promoters. Results: Over-expression of ispA under the control of P BAD promoter led to a relative increase in CoQ 10 production only in recombinant E. coli Br although induction by arabinose resulted in partial reduction of CoQ 10 production in both recombinant E. coli Ba and E. coli Br strains. Over-expression of ispA under the control of stronger trc promoter, however, led to a severe decrease in CoQ 10 production in both recombinant E. coli Ba and E. coli Br strains, as reflected by reductions from 629±40 to 30±13 and 564±28 to 80±14 μg/g Dried Cell Weight (DCW), respectively. The results showed high level of FPP reduces endogenous CoQ 8 production as well and that CoQs are produced in a complimentary manner, as the increase in production of one decreases the production of the other. Conclusion: The reduction in CoQ 10 production can be a result of Dds inhibition by high FPP concentration. Therefore, more effort is needed to verify the role of intermediate metabolite concentration and to optimize production of CoQ 10 . PMID:26306151

  13. 76 FR 57746 - Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ...] Conference on the International Conference on Harmonisation Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System: A Practical Approach to Effective Life- Cycle Implementation of Systems and Processes for Pharmaceutical Manufacturing... ``Pharmaceutical Quality System (ICH Q10) Conference: A Practical Approach to Effective Life- Cycle Implementation...

  14. CoQ10 Deficiency May Indicate Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cr(VI Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiali Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the toxic mechanism of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI and search for an antidote for Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity, a study of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Cr(VI and cell survival by recovering mitochondrial function was performed. In the present study, we found that the gene expression of electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH was strongly downregulated by Cr(VI exposure. The levels of coenzyme 10 (CoQ10 and mitochondrial biogenesis presented by mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA copy number were also significantly reduced after Cr(VI exposure. The subsequent, Cr(VI-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis were characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD and ATP production, increased methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA content, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP opening, increased Ca2+ levels, Cyt c release, decreased Bcl-2 expression, and significantly elevated Bax expression. The Cr(VI-induced deleterious changes were attenuated by pretreatment with CoQ10 in L-02 hepatocytes. These data suggest that Cr(VI induces CoQ10 deficiency in L-02 hepatocytes, indicating that this deficiency may be a biomarker of mitochondrial dysfunction in Cr(VI poisoning and that exogenous administration of CoQ10 may restore mitochondrial function and protect the liver from Cr(VI exposure.

  15. Effekt og sikkerhed af kosttilskud indeholdende Q10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, O.K; Diamant, B; Holm, L

    1997-01-01

    The literature concerning the importance of Q10 for health and disease has been reviewed. Dietary intake together with normal in vivo synthesisseems to fulfil the body's demands for Q10 in younger, healthy individuals. The importance of Q10 in general well-being has not been investigated incontro...

  16. Molecular rational for riboflavin and CoQ10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelius, Nanna

    2013-01-01

    A new PhD project from Health, Aarhus University, shows that there is a molecular rationale for riboflavin and CoQ10 treatment in patients with Riboflavin Responsive Multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency. The project was carried out by Nanna Cornelius, a molecular biologist who defended her......-QO) protein. High dosis Riboflavin treatment nearly normalizes the clinical and biochemical symptoms of these patients. Until now, no studies have investigated the molecular effect of riboflavin in the patients. However, in her recently completed PhD project, Nanna Cornelius shows that riboflavin has...

  17. Significance of Ubiad1 for Epidermal Keratinocytes Involves More Than CoQ10 Synthesis: Implications for Skin Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Labarrade

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The significance of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 as an anti-oxidant barrier of the skin, as well as a key component in anti-aging strategies for skin care products, has been firmly established. Biosynthesis of CoQ10 in the mitochondria is well known, but there is only limited information on the non-mitochondrial synthesis of CoQ10 in the skin. Recent findings in zebrafish identified that a tumor suppressor, Ubiad1, is also a key enzyme in the non-mitochondrial synthesis of CoQ10. The purpose of this study was to investigate expression of Ubiad1 in human skin, and its implication in the skin’s cutaneous response to oxidative stress. We observed Ubiad1 localization in the epidermis, particularly a subcellular localization in the Golgi apparatus. Ubiad1 modulation by a pentapeptide was associated with an observed reduction in ROS/RNS stresses (−44%/−19% respectively, lipid peroxidation (−25% and preservation of membrane fluidity under stress conditions. Electron microscopy of keratinocytes revealed a significant degree of stimulation of the Golgi complex, as well as significantly improved mitochondrial morphology. Given the importance of CoQ10 in mitigating the visible signs of skin aging, our findings identify Ubiad1 as an essential component of the defensive barriers of the epidermis.

  18. Probing Reversible Chemistry in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase with Kinetic Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  19. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase from methanogenic archaea: isotope effects on label exchange and ethane formation with the homologous substrate ethyl-coenzyme M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2013-10-09

    Ethyl-coenzyme M (CH3CH2-S-CH2CH2-SO3(-), Et-S-CoM) serves as a homologous substrate for the enzyme methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) resulting in the product ethane instead of methane. The catalytic reaction proceeds via an intermediate that already contains all six C-H bonds of the product. Because product release occurs after a second, rate-limiting step, many cycles of intermediate formation and reconversion to substrate occur before a substantial amount of ethane is released. In deuterated buffer, the intermediate becomes labeled, and C-H activation in the back reaction rapidly leads to labeled Et-S-CoM, which enables intermediate formation to be detected. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of this pre-equilibrium. (2)H- and (13)C-labeled isotopologues of Et-S-CoM were used as the substrates, and the time course of each isotopologue was followed by NMR spectroscopy. A kinetic simulation including kinetic isotope effects allowed determination of the primary and α- and β-secondary isotope effects for intermediate formation and for the C-H/C-D bond activation in the ethane-containing intermediate. The values obtained are in accordance with those found for the native substrate Me-S-CoM (see preceding publication, Scheller, S.; Goenrich, M.; Thauer, R. K.; Jaun, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2013, 135, DOI: 10.1021/ja406485z) and thus imply the same catalytic mechanism for both substrates. The experiment by Floss and co-workers, demonstrating a net inversion of configuration to chiral ethane with CH3CDT-S-CoM as the substrate, is compatible with the observed rapid isotope exchange if the isotope effects measured here are taken into account.

  20. Self-reported adherence and biomarker levels of CoQ10 and alpha-tocopherol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitolins MZ

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mara Z Vitolins,1 L Douglas Case,1 Stephen R Rapp,2 Mark O Lively,3 Edward G Shaw,4 Michelle J Naughton,5 Jeffrey Giguere,6 Glenn J Lesser7 1Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 3Department of Biochemistry, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 4Department of Internal Medicine-Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 5Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 6Greenville Community Oncology Research Program of the Carolinas, Greenville, SC, USA; 7Department of Internal Medicine-Hematology and Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Purpose: Women with breast cancer were randomized to receive coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 plus Vitamin E or placebo in a clinical trial. The objective of this evaluation is to examine the association between participant self-reported adherence to the study supplements and changes in plasma biomarker levels.Patients and methods: Correlation coefficients quantified the association between changes in alpha-tocopherol and CoQ10 levels and the association between self-reported adherence and changes in biomarkers. Participants were categorized by self-reported adherence; Kruskal–Wallis tests compared changes in alpha-tocopherol and CoQ10 levels between self-reported adherence groups.Results: Women (N=155 provided baseline and post-treatment biomarkers; 147 completed at least one diary. While changes in alpha-tocopherol and CoQ10 levels were moderately correlated, correlations ranged from 0.40 to 0.48, association between self-reported adherence and plasma alpha-tocopherol or CoQ10 levels was weak; correlations ranged from 0.10 to 0.29 at weeks 8, 16, and 24. Some participants with high self-reported adherence actually

  1. A first case of primary amenorrhea with i(X(qter---q10::---qter, rob(13;14(q10;q10, inv(9(p13q33 karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Korgaonkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary amenorrhea (PA refers to the absence of menarche by the age of 16-18 years although secondary sexual characters are developed. PA occurs in 1-3% of women in the reproductive age group. Various factors such as anatomical, genetic and hormonal factors reported to influence PA. We report triple chromosomal abnormalities of rob(13;14(q10;q10,inv(9(p13q33, i(Xq(qter---q10::---qter in a case of PA and short stature. Though proband has multiple chromosome aberrations, genotypic effect of only i(Xq is evident as proband has PA and short stature. The rob(13;14 and inv(9, which are paternally derived may have role in later reproductive age. Therefore, chromosomal analysis is essential in such cases for the accurate diagnosis and management of the disease.

  2. Sperm FISH analysis of a 44,X,der(Y),t(Y;15)(q12;q10)pat,rob(13;14)(q10;q10)mat complex chromosome rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferfouri, F; Boitrelle, F; Clement, P; Molina Gomes, D; Selva, J; Vialard, F

    2014-06-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCR) with two independent chromosome rearrangements are rare. Although CCRs lead to high unbalanced gamete rates, data on meiotic segregation in this context are scarce. A male patient was referred to our clinic as part of a family screening programme prompted by the observation of a 44,X,der(Y),t(Y;15)(q12;q10)pat,rob(13;14)(q10;q10)mat karyotype in his brother. Karyotyping identified the same CCR. Sperm FISH (with locus-specific probes for the segments involved in the translocations and nine chromosomes not involved in both rearrangements) was used to investigate the rearrangements meiotic segregation products and establish whether or not an inter-chromosomal effect was present. Sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation was also evaluated. For rob(13;14) and der(Y), the proportions of unbalanced products were, respectively, 26.4% and 60.6%. Overall, 70.3% of the meiotic segregation products were unbalanced. No evidence of an inter-chromosomal effect was found, and the sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation rate was similar to our laboratory's normal cut-off value. In view of previously published sperm FISH analyses of Robertsonian translocations (and even though the mechanism is still unknown), we hypothesise that cosegregation of der(Y) and rob(13;14) could modify rob(13;14) meiotic segregation. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Examining intentions to use CoQ10 amongst breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gina Jarman; Shriver, Brent J; Arnett, Dennis B

    2006-01-01

    To determine factors that influence breast cancer patients' intentions to supplement with CoQ10. A survey based upon the expanded rational expectations intentions model was completed by breast cancer outpatients (N=160). A significantly positive relationship existed between referent other (the influence specific people have in terms of an individual's behavior) and subjective norm (subject's perception of how people view a behavior). Beliefs, referent other, attitude, and subjective norm did have a significant effect on intention to use CoQ10. Health practitioners may address supplementation with breast cancer patients with a better understanding of what factors impact supplement use.

  4. Free radical scavenging activity of coenzyme Q measured by a chemiluminescent assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battino, Maurizio; Ferri, Elida; Girotti, Stefano; Lenaz, Giorgio

    1991-01-01

    Involvement of coenzyme Q (CoQ) in anti-oxydant activities, in addition to its major redox role, has frequently been suggested in recent years. In order to elucidate if CoQ could really be engaged in scavenging free radicals produced endogenously in a biological system, an experimental system was developed in which beef heart mitochondria in the presence of a saturating NADH concentration and of rotenone produce free radicals. The presence of oxygen-reactive forms was easily detected by a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence process. The chemi-luminescence assay showed that short-chain CoQ homologues can act as pro-oxidants, enhancing free radical effects, while exogenous coenzyme Q 10 could scavenge free radicals, especially at very low concentration. In this system, exogenous CoQ 10 was more effective than α-tocopherol at the same concentration in scavenging free radicals. The molecular mechanism that leads to this activity is still unclear, but these results are of biochemical importance because they indicate that CoQ may act as an anti=oxidant in situations mimicking physiopathological conditions. This direct chemiluminescent method is promising for studies of biochemical processes which involve active oxygen species. (author). 24 refs.; 4 figs

  5. Is Co Q10 really valuable in shielding statin induced myopathy-an exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor, M.; Waheed, A.; Muhammad, I; Bakhtiar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to scrutinize the shielding effects of Co enzyme Q10 (Co Q10) supplementation in statin associated muscular adverse effects in rabbits. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Pharmacology dept Army Medical College Rawalpindi from Jan 2012 to Jun 2012. Material and Methods: Twenty two healthy rabbits were taken and divided into four equal groups randomly with six in each batch. The two groups (G1 and G2) were given toxic doses of simvastatin (60mg/kg/day) with and without Co Q10 (5mg/kg/day) orally for 14 days and rest of two groups (G3 and G4) were kept on therapeutic doses (1mg/kg/day) of simvastatin with and without Co Q10 (5mg/kg/day) orally for 90 days. Blood samples were drawn and serum creatinine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed before and after the drug therapy. Histopathological examination was done to observe the inflammatory changes under light microscope. The results were analyzed by applying paired 't' test, independent 't' test and ANOVA test for biochemical markers and 'Chi-Square test' for histopathological findings. The p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The biochemical markers went up sharply (G1. CK=28899.5 +- 874.09 IU/L and LDH = 4694.33 +- 352 IU/L) and (G2. CK = 29191.33 +- 3019.79 IU/L and LDH = 4334.83 +- 143.44 IU/L) as compared to baseline values. They were given toxic doses of simvastatin with and without Co Q10. Histopathological examination of muscular tissue also revealed gross inflammatory changes in these groups. However histopathological examination of groups who were given therapeutic doses of simvastatin with and without Co Q10 for 90 days showed mild to moderate inflammatory changes but serum CK and LDH remained in the normal ranges in these groups. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Co Q10 supplementation could not produce any beneficial effects on the statin induced muscular adverse

  6. Spermicidal and contraceptive properties of azauirachtin-A on rats and the possible amelioration effects of some antioxidants on their sexual efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebashy, M.I.A.; Mazen, G.M.A.; Amer, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to evaluate the spermicidal properties of azadirachtin-A to immobilize (in male) and kill (in female) spermatozoa of rats. Also, the ability of coenzyme Q10 or taurine or their mixture to improve anti-fertility action of azadirachtin-A and to ameliorate perturbation in fertility of normal rats. The obtained results revealed that normal sperms, testosterone, testis and ovary GSH and GPx, estradiol and progesterone were declined significantly in azadirachtin-A rats. On the other hand, azadirachtin-A caused significant elevation in the total number of abnormal sperm, sperm malformed head or tail, head and tail and serum lipid peroxidation (malonaldehyde) in comparison to the normal control rats. The administration of coenzyme Q10 or taurine led to correction in all previous parameters and the maximum ameliorating effects were exhibited in the rats treated with the mixture of coenzyme Q10 and taurine depending on certain mechanisms

  7. Supplementation with α-lipoic acid, CoQ10, and vitamin E augments running performance and mitochondrial function in female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkan Abadi

    Full Text Available Antioxidant supplements are widely consumed by the general public; however, their effects of on exercise performance are controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an antioxidant cocktail (α-lipoic acid, vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 on exercise performance, muscle function and training adaptations in mice. C57Bl/J6 mice were placed on antioxidant supplement or placebo-control diets (n = 36/group and divided into trained (8 wks treadmill running (n = 12/group and untrained groups (n = 24/group. Antioxidant supplementation had no effect on the running performance of trained mice nor did it affect training adaptations; however, untrained female mice that received antioxidants performed significantly better than placebo-control mice (p ≤ 0.05. Furthermore, antioxidant-supplemented females (untrained showed elevated respiratory capacity in freshly excised muscle fibers (quadriceps femoris (p ≤ 0.05, reduced oxidative damage to muscle proteins (p ≤ 0.05, and increased expression of mitochondrial proteins (p ≤ 0.05 compared to placebo-controls. These changes were attributed to increased expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α (p ≤ 0.05 via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK (p ≤ 0.05 by antioxidant supplementation. Overall, these results indicate that this antioxidant supplement exerts gender specific effects; augmenting performance and mitochondrial function in untrained females, but does not attenuate training adaptations.

  8. Patients with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency have impaired oxidation of fat during exercise but no effect of L-carnitine supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K L; Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear to what extent skeletal muscle is affected in patients with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD). l-Carnitine is commonly used as a supplement in patients with MCADD, although its beneficial effect has not been verified.......It is not clear to what extent skeletal muscle is affected in patients with medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD). l-Carnitine is commonly used as a supplement in patients with MCADD, although its beneficial effect has not been verified....

  9. Calcium binding and transport by coenzyme Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogeski, Ivan; Gulaboski, Rubin; Kappl, Reinhard; Mirceski, Valentin; Stefova, Marina; Petreska, Jasmina; Hoth, Markus

    2011-06-22

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is one of the essential components of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) with the primary function to transfer electrons along and protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). The concomitant proton gradient across the IMM is essential for the process of oxidative phosphorylation and consequently ATP production. Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) monoxygenase enzymes are known to induce structural changes in a variety of compounds and are expressed in the IMM. However, it is unknown if CYP450 interacts with CoQ10 and how such an interaction would affect mitochondrial function. Using voltammetry, UV-vis spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), fluorescence microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), we show that both CoQ10 and its analogue CoQ1, when exposed to CYP450 or alkaline media, undergo structural changes through a complex reaction pathway and form quinone structures with distinct properties. Hereby, one or both methoxy groups at positions 2 and 3 on the quinone ring are replaced by hydroxyl groups in a time-dependent manner. In comparison with the native forms, the electrochemically reduced forms of the new hydroxylated CoQs have higher antioxidative potential and are also now able to bind and transport Ca(2+) across artificial biomimetic membranes. Our results open new perspectives on the physiological importance of CoQ10 and its analogues, not only as electron and proton transporters, but also as potential regulators of mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox homeostasis.

  10. Effects of aeration on formation and localization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.; Jahnke, L.

    1979-01-01

    Previous studies on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that two different forms of the enzyme acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS) are present, depending on the conditions under which the cells are grown. The paper evaluates the usefulness of a method designed to assay both synthetases simultaneously in yeast homogenates. The data presented confirm the possibility of simultaneous detection and estimation of the amount of both ACSs of S. cerevisiae in crude homogenates of this strain, making possible the study of physiological factors involved in the formation of these isoenzymes. One important factor for specifying which of the two enzymes is found in these yeast cells is the presence or absence of oxygen in their environment. Aeration not only affects the ratio of the two ACSs but also appears to affect the cellular distribution of these enzymes. Most of the data presented suggest the possibility that the nonaerobic ACS may serve as a precursor to the aerobic form.

  11. Simvastatin effects on skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Stride, Nis; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Glucose tolerance and skeletal muscle coenzyme Q(10) (Q(10)) content, mitochondrial density, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity were measured in simvastatin-treated patients (n = 10) and in well-matched control subjects (n = 9)....

  12. Novel solid self-emulsifying drug delivery system of coenzyme Q₁₀ with improved photochemical and pharmacokinetic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Satomi; Uchida, Atushi; Kuriyama, Kazuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Seto, Yoshiki; Kato, Masashi; Hatanaka, Junya; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Shizuo

    2012-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to develop a solid self-emulsifying drug delivery system of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS) with high photostability and oral bioavailability. The CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS was prepared by spray-drying an emulsion preconcentrate containing CoQ(10), medium-chain triglyceride, sucrose ester of fatty acid, and hydroxypropyl cellulose, and its physicochemical, photochemical, and pharmacokinetic properties were evaluated. The CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS powder with a diameter of ca. 15 μm was obtained by spray-drying, in which the CoQ(10) was mostly amorphized. The CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS exhibited immediate self-emulsification when introduced to aqueous media under gentle agitation, forming uniform fine droplets with a mean diameter of ca. 280 nm. There was marked generation of reactive oxygen species, in particular superoxide, from CoQ(10) exposed to simulated sunlight (250W/m(2)), suggesting potent photoreactivity. Nano-emulsified solution of CoQ(10) under light exposure underwent photodegradation with 22-fold higher degradation kinetics than crystalline CoQ(10), although the CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS was less photoreactive. After the oral administration of CoQ(10)/s-SEDDS (100 mg-CoQ(10)/kg) in rats, enhanced exposure of CoQ(10) was observed with increases in both C(max) and AUC of ca. 5-fold in comparison with those of orally administered crystalline CoQ(10). From the improved physicochemical and pharmacokinetic data, the s-SEDDS approach upon spray-drying might be a suitable dosage option for enhancing nutraceutical and pharmaceutical values of CoQ(10). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Missionary Ethics in Q 10:2−12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter T. Roth

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Elements of the mission discourse of the Synoptic Gospels are found in Mark 6:6b−13; Matthew 9:35−10:15; Luke 9:1−6 and Luke 10:1−20. Similarities and differences in these accounts have led many New Testament scholars to posit the presence of a mission discourse in Q. This discourse, along with the parable that introduces it (Q 10:2, provides insight into how Q conceives of ‘mission’ as well as the ethical principles and precepts that are part of Jesus’ missional charge in this document. Through an intertextual approach to Q, with particular emphasis on narrative structure and imagery, this paper considered the interplay of mission and ethics in this early Christian text.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 prevents accelerated cardiac aging in a rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth★

    OpenAIRE

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L.; Blackmore, Heather L.; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S.; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; McConnell, Josie M.; Hargreaves, Iain P.; Giussani, Dino A.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies in human and animals have demonstrated that nutritionally induced low birth-weight followed by rapid postnatal growth increases the risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms underlying such nutritional programming are not clearly defined, increased oxidative-stress leading to accelerated cellular aging has been proposed to play an important role. Using an established rodent model of low birth-weight and catch-up growth, we show here that post-weani...

  15. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-08

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "Q10 Pharmaceutical Quality System." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance describes a model for an effective quality management system for the pharmaceutical industry, referred to as the Pharmaceutical Quality System. The guidance is intended to provide a comprehensive approach to an effective pharmaceutical quality system that is based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) concepts, includes applicable good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations and complements ICH guidances on "Q8 Pharmaceutical Development" and "Q9 Quality Risk Management."

  16. Increased oxidative stress in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the effect of edaravone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Midori; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Yoshino, Hiide

    2016-05-01

    Compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 55), patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (n = 26) showed increased oxidative stress as indicated by a significantly increased percentage of oxidized coenzyme Q10 (%CoQ10) in total plasma coenzyme Q10, a significantly decreased level of plasma uric acid, and a significantly decreased percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids in total plasma free fatty acids (FFA). Therefore, the efficacy of edaravone, a radical scavenger, in these ALS patients was examined. Among 26 ALS patients, 17 received edaravone (30 mg/day, one to four times a week) for at least 3 months, and 13 continued for 6 months. Changes in revised ALS functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) were significantly smaller in these patients than in edaravone-untreated ALS patients (n = 19). Edaravone administration significantly reduced excursions of more than one standard deviation from the mean for plasma FFA levels and the contents of palmitoleic and oleic acids, plasma markers of tissue oxidative damage, in the satisfactory progress group (ΔALSFRS-R ≥ 0) as compared to the ingravescent group (ΔALSFRS-R Edaravone treatment increased plasma uric acid, suggesting that it is an effective scavenger of peroxynitrite. However, edaravone administration did not decrease %CoQ10. Therefore, combined treatment with agents such as coenzyme Q10 may further reduce oxidative stress in ALS patients.

  17. Glycophospholipid Formulation with NADH and CoQ10 Significantly Reduces Intractable Fatigue in Western Blot-Positive ‘Chronic Lyme Disease’ Patients: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth L. Nicolson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: An open label 8-week preliminary study was conducted in a small number of patients to determine if a combination oral supplement containing a mixture of phosphoglycolipids, coenzyme Q10 and microencapsulated NADH and other nutrients could affect fatigue levels in long-term, Western blot-positive, multi-symptom ‘chronic Lyme disease’ patients (also called ‘post-treatment Lyme disease’ or ‘post Lyme syndrome’ with intractable fatigue. Methods: The subjects in this study were 6 males (mean age = 45.1 ± 12.4 years and 10 females (mean age = 54.6 ± 7.4 years with ‘chronic Lyme disease’ (determined by multiple symptoms and positive Western blot analysis that had been symptomatic with chronic fatigue for an average of 12.7 ± 6.6 years. They had been seen by multiple physicians (13.3 ± 7.6 and had used many other remedies, supplements and drugs (14.4 ± 7.4 without fatigue relief. Fatigue was monitored at 0, 7, 30 and 60 days using a validated instrument, the Piper Fatigue Scale.Results: Patients in this preliminary study responded to the combination test supplement, showing a 26% reduction in overall fatigue by the end of the 8-week trial (p< 0.0003. Analysis of subcategories of fatigue indicated that there were significant improvements in the ability to complete tasks and activities as well as significant improvements in mood and cognitive abilities. Regression analysis of the data indicated that reductions in fatigue were consistent and occurred with a high degree of confidence (R2= 0.998. Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(3:35-47 Conclusions: The combination supplement was a safe and effective method to significantly reduce intractable fatigue in long-term patients with Western blot-positive ‘chronic Lyme disease.’

  18. The influence of the known radioprotective compounds on the metabolism of red blood cells. Pt. 1. Effect of crysteamine on the cellular level of the intermediates and coenzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmiel, J.; Kopczynski, Z.; Rybczynska, M.

    1976-01-01

    Cysteamine added to the human blood smples in the final concentration of 6.5 x 10 -3 M, 1,9 x 10 -2 M and 3,8 x 10 -2 M exerts a significant effect on the metabolism of erythrocytes. The chromatographic determination of carbohydrate intermediates and coenzymes in red blood cells indicates that in lower concentration of the drug the rate of anaerobic metabolism of glucose is increased. Higher concentration of cysteamine (3.8 x 10 -3 M) enhances aerobic catabolism of glucose in pentose shunt. (author)

  19. The effect of alterations in total coenzyme A on metabolic pathways in the liver and heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, C.A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The first set of experiments involved in vitro experiments using primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. A range of conditions were developed which resulted in cell cultures with variations in total CoA over a range of 1.3 to 2.9 nmol/mg protein with identical hormonal activation which simulated metabolic stress. Elevations of total CoA levels above that of controls due to preincubation with cyanamide plus pantothenate were correlated with diminished rates of total ketone body production, 3-hydroxybutyrate production and ratios of 3 hydroxybutyrate/acetoactetate with palmitate as substrate. In contrast, cells with elevated total CoA levels had higher rates of [ 14 C] CO 2 production from radioactive palmitate which implied greater flux of acetyl CoA units into the TCA cycle and less to the pathway of ketogenesis. The second set of experiments were designed to alter total CoA levels in vivo by maintaining rats on a chronic ethanol diet with or without pantothenate-supplementation. The effect of alterations of CoA on mitochondrial metabolism was evaluated by measuring substrate oxidation rates in liver and heat mitochondria as well as ketone body production with palmitoyl-1-carnitine as substrate

  20. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L.; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I.; Ramírez-Tortosa, M. Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J.; Quiles, José L.

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  1. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián González-Alonso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources.

  2. Effects of direct-to-consumer advertising of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme a reductase inhibitors on attainment of LDL-C goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, W David; Kleit, Andrew N; Nietert, Paul J; Ornstein, Steven

    2006-12-01

    Although highly controversial, directto-consumer (DTC) television advertising for prescription drugs is an established practice in the US health care industry. While the US Food and Drug Administration is currently reexamining its regulatory stance, little evidence exists regarding the impact of DTC advertising on patient health outcomes. The objective of this research was to study the relationship between heavy television promotion of 3 major hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors ("statins") and the frequency with which patients are able to attain low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) blood-level goals after treatment with any statin. We used logistic regression to determine achievement of LDL-C goals at 6 months after statin treatment, using electronic medical record extract data from patients from geographically dispersed primary care practices in the United States. We identified LDL-C blood levels as being at or less than goal, as defined by risk-adjusted guidelines published by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute from the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) data. A total of 50,741 patients, identified from 88 practices, were diagnosed with hyperlipidemia and had begun therapy with any statin medication during the 1998-2004 time period. In addition, total dollars spent each month on television advertising at the national and local levels for atorvastatin, pravastatin, and simvastatin were obtained. DTC advertising data were merged by local media market where the physician practice was located and by the month in which the patient was first prescribed a statin. The models were run for all patients who initiated therapy, and also on a subsample of patients who continued to receive prescriptions for the drugs for at least 6 months. Logistic regressions were used to predict the likelihood that each patient attained the ATP III LDL-C blood-level goals as a function of DTC advertising and other factors. High levels of national DTC

  3. Coenzyme Q Metabolism Is Disturbed in High Fat Diet-Induced Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Botham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is believed to be a major contributory factor in the development of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the most common liver disorder worldwide. In this study, the effects of high fat diet-induced NAFLD on Coenzyme Q (CoQ metabolism and plasma oxidative stress markers in rats were investigated. Rats were fed a standard low fat diet (control or a high fat diet (57% metabolizable energy as fat for 18 weeks. The concentrations of total (reduced + oxidized CoQ9 were increased by > 2 fold in the plasma of animals fed the high fat diet, while those of total CoQ10 were unchanged. Reduced CoQ levels were raised, but oxidized CoQ levels were not, thus the proportion in the reduced form was increased by about 75%. A higher percentage of plasma CoQ9 as compared to CoQ10 was in the reduced form in both control and high fat fed rats. Plasma protein thiol (SH levels were decreased in the high fat-fed rats as compared to the control group, but concentrations of lipid hydroperoxides and low density lipoprotein (LDL conjugated dienes were unchanged. These results indicate that high fat diet-induced NAFLD in rats is associated with altered CoQ metabolism and increased protein, but not lipid, oxidative stress.

  4. An Assay of Bax and Bcl2 Expression in Mice Hippocampus Following Ischemia-Reperfusion Treatment with CoQ10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Hassanshahi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preliminary studies confirmed reduction of cell death following treatment with antioxidants. According to this finding we investigated the relationship between consumption of CoQ10 and expression of bax and bcl2 in hippocampus ischemia that this expression related to cell programmed death.Material and Methods: We studied the protective role of CoQ10 against ischemia-reperfusion. Experimental design includes four groups: intact (N=7, ischemic control (N=7, sham control (N=7 and treatment groups with CoQ10 (N=7. The mice (treatment group treated with CoQ10 as Pre-Treatment for a week. Then, ischemia induced by common carotid artery ligation and following the reduction in inflammation (a week the treatment group post-treated with CoQ10 for a week. Nissl staining applied to counting necrotic cells of hippocampus and the western blotting performed to measurement the bax and bcl2 expression. Tunnel kit was used to quantify apoptotic cell death while to short term memory scale, we apply Y-maze.Results: Cell death was significantly lower when mice treated with CoQ10. Bax expression was significantly high in ischemic group but in treatment group was less and reversely the bcl2 expression in ischemic group was lower than treatment and vehicle groups. The memory test results were consistent with cell death results. Conclusion: Ischemia for 15 minutes induced cell death in hippocampus with more potent effect on CA1. CoQ10 intake significantly reduced cell death and decreased memory loss. with prevent of expression of bax and increase in expression of bcl2.

  5. Does a General Temperature-Dependent Q10 Model of Soil Respiration Exist at Biome and Global Scale?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua CHEN; Han-Qin TIAN

    2005-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR) is commonly modeled by a Q10 (an indicator of temperature sensitivity)function in ecosystem models. Q10is usually treated as a constant of 2 in these models, although Q10 value of SR often decreases with increasing temperatures. It remains unclear whether a general temperaturedependent Q10 model of SR exists at biome and global scale. In this paper, we have compiled the long-term Q10 data of 38 SR studies ranging from the Boreal, Temperate, to Tropical/Subtropical biome on four continents.Our analysis indicated that the general temperature-dependent biome Q10 models of SR existed, especially in the Boreal and Temperate biomes. A single-exponential model was better than a simple linear model in fitting the average Q10 values at the biome scale. Average soil temperature is a better predictor of Q10 value than average air temperature in these models, especially in the Boreal biome. Soil temperature alone could explain about 50% of the Q10 variations in both the Boreal and Temperate biome single-exponential Q10 model. Q10 value of SR decreased with increasing soil temperature but at quite different rates among the three biome Q10 models. The k values (Q10 decay rate constants) were 0.09, 0.07, and 0.02/℃ in the Boreal, Temperate, and Tropical/Subtropical biome, respectively, suggesting that Q10 value is the most sensitive to soil temperature change in the Boreal biome, the second in the Temperate biome, and the least sensitive in the Tropical/Subtropical biome. This also indirectly confirms that acclimation of SR in many soil warming experiments probably occurs. The k value in the "global" single-exponential Q10 model which combined both the Boreal and Temperate biome data set was 0.08/℃. However, the global general temperature-dependent Q10model developed using the data sets of the three biomes is not adequate for predicting Q10 values of SR globally.The existence of the general temperature-dependent Q10 models of SR in the Boreal and

  6. Seasonal Changes of Coefficient Q10 in CO2 Flux from Soil Under Spruce Stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 15 (2002), s. 43-48. ISBN 80-7157-297-7 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/00/0485 Grant - others:EVK2(XE) CT-1999-00032 Keywords : soil CO2 efflux * Norway spruce * Q10 * respiration * soil Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Temperature-related changes in respiration and Q10 coefficient of Guava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bron Ilana Urbano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Guava (Psidium guajava L. is a tropical fruit that presents fast post-harvest ripening; therefore it is a very perishable product. Inappropriate storage temperature and retail practices can accelerate fruit quality loss. The objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory activity (RA, the ethylene production (EP and Q10 of guava fruit at different storage temperatures. 'Paluma' guava fruits were harvested at maturity stage 1 (dark-green skin and stored at either 1, 11, 21, 31 or 41ºC; RA and EP were determined after 12, 36, 84 and 156 h of storage. RA and EP rates at 1 and 11ºC were the lowest - 0.16 and 0.43 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.003 and 0.019 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, respectively. When guavas were stored at 21ºC, a gradual increase occurred in RA and EP, reaching 2.24 mmol CO2 kg-1 h-1 and 0.20 µmol C2H4 kg-1 h-1, after 156 h of storage. The highest RA and EP were recorded for guavas stored at 31ºC. In spite of high RA, guavas stored at 41ºC presented EP similar to guavas stored at 11ºC, an indicator of heat-stress injury. Considering the 1-11ºC range, the mean Q10 value was around 3.0; the Q10 value almost duplicated at 11-21ºC range (5.9. At 21-31ºC and 31-41ºC, Q10 was 1.5 and 0.8, respectively. Knowing Q10, respiratory variation and ripening behavior in response to different temperatures, fruit storage and retail conditions can be optimized to reduce quality losses.

  8. Effect of Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) storage on L-arginine production in recombinant Corynebacterium crenatum using coenzyme regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meijuan; Qin, Jingru; Rao, Zhiming; You, Hengyi; Zhang, Xian; Yang, Taowei; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-19

    Corynebacterium crenatum SYPA 5 is the industrial strain for L-arginine production. Poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a kind of biopolymer stored as bacterial reserve materials for carbon and energy. The introduction of the PHB synthesis pathway into several strains can regulate the global metabolic pathway. In addition, both the pathways of PHB and L-arginine biosynthesis in the cells are NADPH-dependent. NAD kinase could upregulate the NADPH concentration in the bacteria. Thus, it is interesting to investigate how both PHB and NAD kinase affect the L-arginine biosynthesis in C. crenatum SYPA 5. C. crenatum P1 containing PHB synthesis pathway was constructed and cultivated in batch fermentation for 96 h. The enzyme activities of the key enzymes were enhanced comparing to the control strain C. crenatum SYPA 5. More PHB was found in C. crenatum P1, up to 12.7 % of the dry cell weight. Higher growth level and enhanced glucose consumptions were also observed in C. crenatum P1. With respect to the yield of L-arginine, it was 38.54 ± 0.81 g/L, increasing by 20.6 %, comparing to the control under the influence of PHB accumulation. For more NADPH supply, C. crenatum P2 was constructed with overexpression of NAD kinase based on C. crenatum P1. The NADPH concentration was increased in C. crenatum P2 comparing to the control. PHB content reached 15.7 % and 41.11 ± 1.21 g/L L-arginine was obtained in C. crenatum P2, increased by 28.6 %. The transcription levels of key L-arginine synthesis genes, argB, argC, argD and argJ in recombinant C. crenatum increased 1.9-3.0 times compared with the parent strain. Accumulation of PHB by introducing PHB synthesis pathway, together with up-regulation of coenzyme level by overexpressing NAD kinase, enables the recombinant C. crenatum to serve as high-efficiency cell factories in the long-time L-arginine fermentation. Furthermore, batch cultivation of the engineered C. crenatum revealed that it could accumulate both extracellular L

  9. Dependence of the Q10 values on the depth of the soil temperature measuring point

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Acosta, Manuel; Marek, Michal V.; Kutsch, W.; Janouš, Dalibor

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 292, - (2007), s. 171-179 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD526/03/H036; GA MŽP SM/640/18/03 Grant - others:EU(XE) GOCE-CT-2003-505572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : respiration * soil * temperature * Q10 * Norway spruce * grassland Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.821, year: 2007

  10. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    to BP000. Increase in xylose concentration from 10 to 50 g/L resulted in acceleration of substrate uptake by BP10001 (0.05 - 0.14 g/g CDW/h and reduction of the xylitol yield (0.28 g/g - 0.15 g/g. In mixed substrate batches, xylose was taken up at low glucose concentrations (qxylose that had an initial value of 0.30 ± 0.04 g/g CDW/h and decreased gradually with time. It gave product yields of 0.38 g ethanol/g total sugar and 0.19 g xylitol/g xylose. The effect of glucose on xylose utilization appears to result from the enhanced flux of carbon through glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway under low-glucose reaction conditions. Conclusions Relative improvements in the distribution of fermentation products from xylose that can be directly related to a change in the coenzyme preference of xylose reductase from NADPH in BP000 to NADH in BP10001 increase in response to an increase in the initial concentration of the pentose substrate from 10 to 50 g/L. An inverse relationship between xylose uptake rate and xylitol yield for BP10001 implies that xylitol by-product formation is controlled not only by coenzyme regeneration during two-step oxidoreductive conversion of xylose into xylulose. Although xylose is not detectably utilized at glucose concentrations greater than 4 g/L, the presence of a low residual glucose concentration (qglucose may be useful for optimizing qxylose in processes designed for co-fermentation of glucose and xylose.

  11. Photoionization of oxidized coenzyme Q in microemulsion: laser flash photolysis study in biomembrane-like system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Mei; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Dongmei; Sun, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shi-Long

    2013-01-01

    Photoexcitation to generate triplet state has been proved to be the main photoreaction in homogeneous system for many benzoquinone derivatives, including oxidized coenzyme Q (CoQ) and its analogs. In the present study, microemulsion of CoQ, a heterogeneous system, is employed to mimic the distribution of CoQ in biomembrane. The photochemistry of CoQ(10) in microemulsion and cyclohexane is investigated and compared using laser flash photolysis and results show that CoQ(10) undergoes photoionization via a monophotonic process to generate radical cation of CoQ(10) in microemulsion and photoexcitation to generate excited triplet state in cyclohexane. Meanwhile, photoreactions of duroquinone (DQ) and CoQ(0) in microemulsion are also investigated to analyze the influence of molecular structure on the photochemistry of benzoquinone derivatives in microemulsion. Results suggest that photoexcitation, which is followed by excited state-involved hydrogen-abstraction reaction, is the main photoreaction for DQ and CoQ(0) in microemulsion. However, photoexcited CoQ(0) also leads to the formation of hydrated electrons. The isoprenoid side chain-involved high resonance stabilization is proposed to explain the difference in photoreactions of CoQ(0) and CoQ(10) in microemulsion. Considering that microemulsion is close to biomembrane system, its photoionization in microemulsion may be helpful to understand the real photochemistry of biological quinones in biomembrane system. © 2012 Tongji University. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  12. European consumer attitudes on the associated health benefits of neutraceutical-containing processed meats using Co-enzyme Q10 as a sample functional ingredient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian D; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hamill, Ruth; Kerry, Joseph P

    2014-06-01

    This study accumulated European consumer attitudes towards processed meats and their use as a functional food. A survey was set up using an online web-application to gather information on consumer perception of processed meats as well as neutraceutical-containing processed meats. 548 responses were obtained and statistical analysis was carried out using a statistical software package. Data was summarized as frequencies for each question and statistical differences analyzed using the Chi-Square statistical test with a significance level of 5% (Pconsumer attitudes towards processed meat indicate that they are unhealthy products. Most believe that processed meats contain large quantities of harmful chemicals, fat and salt. Consumers were found to be very pro-bioactive compounds in yogurt style products but unsure of their feelings in meat based products, which is likely due to the lack of familiarity to these products. Many of the respondents were willing to consume meat based functional foods but were not willing to pay more for them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microemulsions based on a sunflower lecithin-Tween 20 blend have high capacity for dissolving peppermint oil and stabilizing coenzyme Q10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huaiqiong; Guan, Yongguang; Zhong, Qixin

    2015-01-28

    The objectives of the present study were to improve the capability of microemulsions to dissolve peppermint oil by blending sunflower lecithin with Tween 20 and to study the possibility of codelivering lipophilic bioactive compounds. The oil loading in microemulsions with 20% (w/w) Tween 20 increased from 3% (w/w) to 20% (w/w) upon gradual supplementation of 6% (w/w) lecithin. All microemulsions had particles of lecithin. Therefore, natural surfactant lecithin can reduce the use of synthetic Tween 20 to dissolve peppermint oil and protect the degradation of dissolved lipophilic bioactive components in transparent products.

  14. Constraining the Q10 of respiration in water-limited environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A.; Ryan, M. G.; Xu, C.; Grossiord, C.; Michaletz, S. T.; McDowell, N. G.

    2016-12-01

    If the current rate of greenhouse emissions remains constant over the next few decades, projections of climate change forecast increased atmospheric temperatures by a least 1.1°C by the end of the century. Warmer temperatures are expected to largely influence the exchange of energy, carbon and water between plants and the atmosphere. Several studies support that terrestrial ecosystems currently act as a major carbon sink, however warmer temperatures may amplify respiration processes and shift terrestrial ecosystems from a sink to a source of carbon in the future. Most Earth System Models incorporate the temperature dependence of plant respiration (Q10) to estimate and predict respiration processes and associated carbon fluxes. Using a temperature and precipitation manipulation experiment in natural conditions, we present evidence that this parameter is poorly constrained especially in water-limited environments. We discuss the utility of the Q10 framework and suggest improvements for this parameter along with trait-based approaches to better resolve models.

  15. Altered bacterial metabolism, not coenzyme Q content, is responsible for the lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans fed an Escherichia coli diet lacking coenzyme Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ryoichi; Lunceford, Adam L; Bixler, Tarra; Dang, Peter; Lee, Wendy; Furukawa, Satoru; Larsen, Pamela L; Clarke, Catherine F

    2008-06-01

    Coenzyme Q(n) is a fully substituted benzoquinone containing a polyisoprene tail of distinct numbers (n) of isoprene groups. Caenorhabditis elegans fed Escherichia coli devoid of Q(8) have a significant lifespan extension when compared to C. elegans fed a standard 'Q-replete'E. coli diet. Here we examine possible mechanisms for the lifespan extension caused by the Q-less E. coli diet. A bioassay for Q uptake shows that a water-soluble formulation of Q(10) is effectively taken up by both clk-1 mutant and wild-type nematodes, but does not reverse lifespan extension mediated by the Q-less E. coli diet, indicating that lifespan extension is not due to the absence of dietary Q per se. The enhanced longevity mediated by the Q-less E. coli diet cannot be attributed to dietary restriction, different Qn isoforms, reduced pathogenesis or slowed growth of the Q-less E. coli, and in fact requires E. coli viability. Q-less E. coli have defects in respiratory metabolism. C. elegans fed Q-replete E. coli mutants with similarly impaired respiratory metabolism due to defects in complex V also show a pronounced lifespan extension, although not as dramatic as those fed the respiratory deficient Q-less E. coli diet. The data suggest that feeding respiratory incompetent E. coli, whether Q-less or Q-replete, produces a robust life extension in wild-type C. elegans. We believe that the fermentation-based metabolism of the E. coli diet is an important parameter of C. elegans longevity.

  16. Coenzyme metabolism in rat liver transketolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbach, Z.V.; Kubyshin, V.L.; Maglysh, S.S.; Zabrodskaya, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the results of kinetic investigations, two binding sites for hydroxythiamine diphosphate were determined in apotransketolase, with sharply differing values of K/sub i/: (7-22) x 10 -9 and (13.0-19.7) x 10 -8 M. A study was made of the turnover rate of thiamine diphosphate in holotransketolase in rat liver tissue by a radioisotope method, using [ 14 C] thiamine as the labeled precursor. The half-substitution time and rate constant of degradation of the coenzyme in transketolase are close in absolute values to the analogous indices for the protein portion of the enzyme and constitute 153 h and 0.108 day -1 , respectively. Rat liver transketolase exists in vivo in the form of a substituted α-carbanion. Replacement of thiamine diphosphate by hydroxythiamine diphosphate in the holoenzyme has no effect on the formation of the intermediate α-carbanion form of the enzyme

  17. Markkinointimixin hyödyntäminen UniQ10ue - kosmetiikkasarjan kanssa : business to business -markkinointiviestintä

    OpenAIRE

    Mattsson, Ida-Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Kehittämistyössä toimeksiantajana on Hoitolatukku, joka maahantuo ja myy kauneusalan ammattilaisten tarvikkeita, laitteita sekä tuotteita. Hoitolatukun uutuus kosmetiikkasarja UniQ10ue tuotiin maahan kesän 2015 alussa ja se kaipaa lisää tunnettuutta sekä myynnin kasvua. Kehittämistyössä saatiin toimeksiantajalta vapaat kädet suunnitella ja toteuttaa erilaisia toimia UniQ10ue – kosmetiikkasarjalle. Kehittämistyössä sovelletaan markkinointimixiä ja perehdytään erityisesti markkinointiviesti...

  18. NQO1-dependent redox cycling of idebenone: effects on cellular redox potential and energy levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman H Haefeli

    Full Text Available Short-chain quinones are described as potent antioxidants and in the case of idebenone have already been under clinical investigation for the treatment of neuromuscular disorders. Due to their analogy to coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, a long-chain quinone, they are widely regarded as a substitute for CoQ10. However, apart from their antioxidant function, this provides no clear rationale for their use in disorders with normal CoQ10 levels. Using recombinant NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO enzymes, we observed that contrary to CoQ10 short-chain quinones such as idebenone are good substrates for both NQO1 and NQO2. Furthermore, the reduction of short-chain quinones by NQOs enabled an antimycin A-sensitive transfer of electrons from cytosolic NAD(PH to the mitochondrial respiratory chain in both human hepatoma cells (HepG2 and freshly isolated mouse hepatocytes. Consistent with the substrate selectivity of NQOs, both idebenone and CoQ1, but not CoQ10, partially restored cellular ATP levels under conditions of impaired complex I function. The observed cytosolic-mitochondrial shuttling of idebenone and CoQ1 was also associated with reduced lactate production by cybrid cells from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS patients. Thus, the observed activities separate the effectiveness of short-chain quinones from the related long-chain CoQ10 and provide the rationale for the use of short-chain quinones such as idebenone for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders.

  19. Kaempferol increases levels of coenzyme Q in kidney cells and serves as a biosynthetic ring precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Del-Río, Lucía; Nag, Anish; Gutiérrez Casado, Elena; Ariza, Julia; Awad, Agape M; Joseph, Akil I; Kwon, Ohyun; Verdin, Eric; de Cabo, Rafael; Schneider, Claus; Torres, Jorge Z; Burón, María I; Clarke, Catherine F; Villalba, José M

    2017-09-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is a lipid-soluble antioxidant essential in cellular physiology. Patients with Q deficiencies, with few exceptions, seldom respond to treatment. Current therapies rely on dietary supplementation with Q 10 , but due to its highly lipophilic nature, Q 10 is difficult to absorb by tissues and cells. Plant polyphenols, present in the human diet, are redox active and modulate numerous cellular pathways. In the present study, we tested whether treatment with polyphenols affected the content or biosynthesis of Q. Mouse kidney proximal tubule epithelial (Tkpts) cells and human embryonic kidney cells 293 (HEK 293) were treated with several types of polyphenols, and kaempferol produced the largest increase in Q levels. Experiments with stable isotope 13 C-labeled kaempferol demonstrated a previously unrecognized role of kaempferol as an aromatic ring precursor in Q biosynthesis. Investigations of the structure-function relationship of related flavonols showed the importance of two hydroxyl groups, located at C3 of the C ring and C4' of the B ring, both present in kaempferol, as important determinants of kaempferol as a Q biosynthetic precursor. Concurrently, through a mechanism not related to the enhancement of Q biosynthesis, kaempferol also augmented mitochondrial localization of Sirt3. The role of kaempferol as a precursor that increases Q levels, combined with its ability to upregulate Sirt3, identify kaempferol as a potential candidate in the design of interventions aimed on increasing endogenous Q biosynthesis, particularly in kidney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 31 CFR 30.10 - Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP recipient to comply with section 111(b)(3)(D) of EESA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Q-10: What actions are necessary for....10 Section 30.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.10 Q-10: What actions are necessary for a TARP...

  1. Invariant-mass distributions for the pp{yields}pp{eta} reaction at Q=10 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskal, P.; Czerwinski, E.; Klaja, J.; Klaja, P.; Krzemien, W. [Jagellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Research Center Juelich, Nuclear Physics Institute, Juelich (Germany); Czyzykiewicz, R. [Jagellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Gil, D.; Jarczyk, L.; Kamys, B.; Silarski, M.; Smyrski, J.; Zdebik, J.; Zielinski, M.J. [Jagellonian University, Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Wuestner, P. [Research Center Juelich, Nuclear Physics Institute, Juelich (Germany); Khoukaz, A.; Taeschner, A.; Zipper, W. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, IKP, Muenster (Germany); Siemaszko, M. [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Wolke, M. [SE-751 05 Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Proton-proton and proton-{eta} invariant-mass distributions and the total cross-section for the pp{yields}pp{eta} reaction have been determined near the threshold at an excess energy of Q=10 MeV. The experiment has been conducted using the COSY-11 detector setup and the cooler synchrotron COSY. The determined invariant-mass spectra reveal significant enhancements in the region of low proton-proton relative momenta, similarly as observed previously at higher excess energies of Q=15.5 MeV and Q=40 MeV. (orig.)

  2. Using the Q10 model to simulate E. coli survival in cowpats on grazing lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbiological quality of surface waters can be affected by microbial load in runoff from grazing lands. This effect, with other factors, depends on the survival of microorganisms in animal waste deposited on pastures. Since temperature is a leading environmental parameter affec...

  3. Enabling ICH Q10 Implementation--Part 1. Striving for Excellence by Embracing ICH Q8 and ICH Q9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calnan, Nuala; O'Donnell, Kevin; Greene, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article is the first in a series of articles that will focus on understanding the implementation essentials necessary to deliver operational excellence through a International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) Q10-based pharmaceutical quality system (PQS). The authors examine why, despite the fact that the ICH Q10 guideline has been with us since 2008, the transformation of the traditional Quality Management Systems QMS in use within the pharmaceutical industry is a work in progress for only a few forward-thinking organisations. Unfortunately, this transformation remains a mere aspiration for the majority of organisations. We explore the apparent lack of progress by the pharmaceutical sector in adopting six sigma and related quality management techniques to ensure the availability of high-quality medicines worldwide. The authors propose that the desired progress can be delivered through two key shifts in our current practices; by embodying the principles of operational excellence in every aspect of our business and by learning how to unlock the scientific and tacit knowledge within our organisations. It has been ten years since The Wall Street Journal revealed the pharmaceutical industry's "little secret" comparing the perceived level of manufacturing expertise in the industry as lagging far behind those of potato-chip and laundry-soap makers. Would you consider the quality and manufacturing strategies in place today in your organisation to be more efficient and scientifically based than those of 2003? If so, what evidence exists for you to draw any conclusion regarding enhanced performance? Do your current practices drive innovation and facilitate continual improvement and if so, how? Ultimately, can you confidently affirm that patient-related risks associated with the product(s) manufactured by your organisation have been reduced due to the quality assurance program now applied

  4. Neuroprotective effects of the antiparkinson drug Mucuna pruriens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, Bala V; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Hare, Theodore A

    2004-09-01

    Mucuna pruriens possesses significantly higher antiparkinson activity compared with levodopa in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease. The present study evaluated the neurorestorative effect of Mucuna pruriens cotyledon powder on the nigrostriatal tract of 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Mucuna pruriens cotyledon powder significantly increased the brain mitochondrial complex-I activity but did not affect the total monoamine oxidase activity (in vitro). Unlike synthetic levodopa treatment, Mucuna pruriens cotyledon powder treatment significantly restored the endogenous levodopa, dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin content in the substantia nigra. Nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and coenzyme Q-10, that are shown to have a therapeutic benefit in Parkinson's disease, were present in the Mucuna pruriens cotyledon powder. Earlier studies showed that Mucuna pruriens treatment controls the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. This additional finding of a neurorestorative benefit by Mucuna pruriens cotyledon powder on the degenerating dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra may be due to increased complex-I activity and the presence of NADH and coenzyme Q-10. Copyright (c) 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Functional conservation of coenzyme Q biosynthetic genes among yeasts, plants, and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Hayashi

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q (CoQ is an essential factor for aerobic growth and oxidative phosphorylation in the electron transport system. The biosynthetic pathway for CoQ has been proposed mainly from biochemical and genetic analyses of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae; however, the biosynthetic pathway in higher eukaryotes has been explored in only a limited number of studies. We previously reported the roles of several genes involved in CoQ synthesis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we expand these findings by identifying ten genes (dps1, dlp1, ppt1, and coq3-9 that are required for CoQ synthesis. CoQ10-deficient S. pombe coq deletion strains were generated and characterized. All mutant fission yeast strains were sensitive to oxidative stress, produced a large amount of sulfide, required an antioxidant to grow on minimal medium, and did not survive at the stationary phase. To compare the biosynthetic pathway of CoQ in fission yeast with that in higher eukaryotes, the ability of CoQ biosynthetic genes from humans and plants (Arabidopsis thaliana to functionally complement the S. pombe coq deletion strains was determined. With the exception of COQ9, expression of all other human and plant COQ genes recovered CoQ10 production by the fission yeast coq deletion strains, although the addition of a mitochondrial targeting sequence was required for human COQ3 and COQ7, as well as A. thaliana COQ6. In summary, this study describes the functional conservation of CoQ biosynthetic genes between yeasts, humans, and plants.

  6. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  7. Evaluation of the antioxidant effect of a new functional food enriched with Sideritis euboea in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouroliakou, Maria; Kastanidou, Olympia; Stathopoulou, Maria; Vourli, Georgia

    2009-10-01

    Sideritis euboea is a Greek plant that is traditionally consumed as a beverage (mountain tea). From in vitro studies, its extract has shown antioxidant and estrogenic activities. In our study we used S. euboea as an enriching food factor in order to produce a new functional food, a jelly dessert, in order to explore its antioxidant effects if consumed on a daily basis by healthy subjects. In this placebo-controlled clinical trial, 63 subjects were recruited for a 1-month nutritional intervention. Twelve subjects were excluded. The remaining 51 subjects were randomly classified in the intervention group (daily consumption of the jelly containing 0.3 g of S. euboea extract) or the placebo group (daily consumption of the same jelly without the enrichment). Vitamins C, A, and E, glutathione, coenzyme Q10, total nitrites, nitrates, total nitrogen oxide, nitrites/nitrates ratio, and total antioxidant status were measured in blood samples before and after the intervention. After the intervention, free glutathione and coenzyme Q10 increased, and nitrites decreased significantly in both groups. The other antioxidant markers were not altered. No statistical significant differences were observed between the two groups. The daily consumption of the functional food, for 30 days, had no effects on the antioxidant status of healthy volunteers.

  8. Coenzyme protection of lactic dehydrogenase against inactivation by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the radiation sensitivities of the ternary complexes, oxamate-LDH-NADH and pyruvate-LDH-NAD with those of free LDH molecules and the intermediate binary complexes LDH-NAD and LDH-NADH. The enzyme solutions were 60 Co γirradiated and the rate of pyruvate reduction then measured. At doses of more than 10 krad the coenzymes afforded considerable protection to LDH against inactivation, and the dose-effect curves deviated from the curve for the unprotected enzyme, implying very specific protection. Coenzyme protection for a 30 krad dose at various concentrations of NAD and NADH reached a saturation level at about 4.0 x 10 -4 M for both NAD and NADH; protection by pyruvate alone was slight in comparison. Pyruvate and NAD (or oxamate and NADH) together at 1.0 x 10 -3 M protected the enzyme in a cooperative way. The results suggest that the major events of protection occur on the substrate and coenzyme binding sites, and support the view that coenzyme binding protects the enzyme by altering its conformation. (U.K.)

  9. Co-C Dissociation of Adenosylcobalamin (Coenzyme B-12): Role of Dispersion, Induction Effects, Solvent Polarity, and Relativistic and Thermal Corrections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2014-01-01

    for dispersion, relativistic effects, solvent polarity, basis set superposition error, and thermal and vibrational effects were investigated, totaling more than SSO single-point energies for the large model. The results show immense variability depending on method, including solvation, functional type...

  10. Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara De Luca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, development and research of nutraceuticals based on marine collagen peptides (MCPs have been growing due to their high homology with human collagens, safety, bioavailability through gut, and numerous bioactivities. The major concern regarding safety of MCPs intake relates to increased risk of oxidative stress connected with collagen synthesis (likewise in fibrosis and to ROS production by MCPs-stimulated phagocytes. In this clinical-laboratory study, fish skin MCPs combined with plant-derived skin-targeting antioxidants (AO (coenzyme Q10 + grape-skin extract + luteolin + selenium were administered to volunteers (n=41. Skin properties (moisture, elasticity, sebum production, and biological age and ultrasonic markers (epidermal/dermal thickness and acoustic density were measured thrice (2 months before treatment and before and after cessation of 2-month oral intake. The supplementation remarkably improved skin elasticity, sebum production, and dermal ultrasonic markers. Metabolic data showed significant increase of plasma hydroxyproline and ATP storage in erythrocytes. Redox parameters, GSH/coenzyme Q10 content, and GPx/GST activities were unchanged, while NO and MDA were moderately increased within, however, normal range of values. Conclusions. A combination of MCPs with skin-targeting AOs could be effective and safe supplement to improve skin properties without risk of oxidative damage.

  11. Skin Antiageing and Systemic Redox Effects of Supplementation with Marine Collagen Peptides and Plant-Derived Antioxidants: A Single-Blind Case-Control Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Chiara; Mikhal'chik, Elena V.; Suprun, Maxim V.; Papacharalambous, Michael; Truhanov, Arseniy I.; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, development and research of nutraceuticals based on marine collagen peptides (MCPs) have been growing due to their high homology with human collagens, safety, bioavailability through gut, and numerous bioactivities. The major concern regarding safety of MCPs intake relates to increased risk of oxidative stress connected with collagen synthesis (likewise in fibrosis) and to ROS production by MCPs-stimulated phagocytes. In this clinical-laboratory study, fish skin MCPs combined with plant-derived skin-targeting antioxidants (AO) (coenzyme Q10 + grape-skin extract + luteolin + selenium) were administered to volunteers (n = 41). Skin properties (moisture, elasticity, sebum production, and biological age) and ultrasonic markers (epidermal/dermal thickness and acoustic density) were measured thrice (2 months before treatment and before and after cessation of 2-month oral intake). The supplementation remarkably improved skin elasticity, sebum production, and dermal ultrasonic markers. Metabolic data showed significant increase of plasma hydroxyproline and ATP storage in erythrocytes. Redox parameters, GSH/coenzyme Q10 content, and GPx/GST activities were unchanged, while NO and MDA were moderately increased within, however, normal range of values. Conclusions. A combination of MCPs with skin-targeting AOs could be effective and safe supplement to improve skin properties without risk of oxidative damage. PMID:26904164

  12. Efeito da coenzima Q10 nos danos oxidativos induzidos pela L-tiroxina no músculo sóleo de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Barreiro de Freitas Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: os músculoesqueléticos são tecidos dinâmicos que podem alterar suas características fenotípicas proporcionando melhor adaptação funcional com estímulos variados. A L-tiroxina é um hormônio produzido pela glândula tireoide e tem sido utilizada como modelo experimental para estimulação de estresse oxidativo no músculo esquelético. A coenzima Q10 é uma provitamina lipossolúvel sintetizada endogenamente e naturalmente encontrada em alimentos como carne vermelha, peixes, cereais, brócolis e espinafre. Apresenta propriedade antioxidante e tem potencial no tratamento de doenças degenerativas e neuromusculares. OBJETIVO: avaliar o efeito protetor da coenzima Q10 no músculo sóleo de ratos frente aos danos oxidativos provocados pela L-tiroxina. MÉTODOS: os ratos foram distribuídos em quatro grupos de seis animais cada: Grupo 1 controle; Grupo 2 coenzima Q10; Grupo 3 L-tiroxina e Grupo 4 coenzima Q10 e L-tiroxina. Após a eutanásia, o sangue dos animais foi colhido e foi analisada a atividade sérica das enzimas creatina quinase CK e aspartato aminotransferase AST. No homogenato do músculo sóleo foram avaliados fatores relacionados ao estresse oxidativo. RESULTADOS: a coenzima Q10 protegeu o músculo sóleo dos danos provocados pela L-tiroxina e favoreceu a manutenção da atividade das enzimas antioxidantes glutationa redutase e glutationa peroxidase, da concentração de glutationa reduzida e oxidada, além de evitar a lipoperoxidação. CONCLUSÃO: os resultados indicam que a coenzima Q10 protege o músculo sóleo de ratos dos danos oxidativos provocados pela L-tiroxina.

  13. Comparative analysis of minor bioactive constituents (CoQ10, tocopherols and phenolic compounds) in Arbequina extra virgin olive oils from Brazil and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Thays H.; López, Luis Carlos; Pereira, J.A.; Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; Seiquer, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    There is currently an emerging production of olive oil in Brazil but it is still poorly characterized. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of minor bioactive constituents (CoQ 10 tocopherols and phenolic compounds) in extra virgin olive oil from different regions of Brazil and Spain, of Arbequina cultivar. Significant variations (P < 0.05) in the concentration of the compounds analyzed were observed among oils from the different growing areas, not only between Spanish and Bra...

  14. Effects of Antioxidants and Vitamins on the Proliferation of Human Diploid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaziza Dаnlybaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Microelements, essential nutrients that are needed in small amounts including minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron and other vitamins (A, B, C, and etc., are macronutrients necessary for a healthy life. The role of micronutrients in vivo is well known, and there are several publications that have examined the effects of micronutrients on genomic stability. Furthermore, a number of vitamins and microelements are substrates and/or cofactors in metabolic pathways, which regulate DNA synthesis and/or repair and gene expression. A deficiency in such nutrients may result in disruption of genomic integrity and alterations in DNA methylation patterns, linking cellular nutrition with change in gene expression. For example, lack of vitamin C is known to cause increased DNA oxidation and chromosomal damage. Vitamin A, as well as other micronutrients, have a protective effect, whereas higher concentrations are associated with increased DNA damage. Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 and dihydroquercetin are used in therapy as antioxidant compounds and electron carriers, which reduce lipid peroxidation of cell membranes. However, previous studies indicate that various ubiquinone analogs may cause a divergent effect on oxidative stress and oxidative phosphorylation. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of vitamins A and C, coenzyme Q10, and dihydroquercetin on the proliferative potential of cultured human embryonic diploid fibroblasts (M-22. Methods: In the first series of experiments, nontoxic concentrations of vitamins for the cells were identified using MTT assay. Results: Vitamins A and C, dihydroquercetin of 1µM, and coenzyme Q10 of 5µM were nontoxic for human skin fibroblasts. In the second series of experiments, cell cultivation was carried out with nontoxic concentrations. A vitamin C concentration of 1µM for 7 consecutive passages increased the proliferation index (PI compared to the control. Thus, the average PI in the

  15. Radioprotection of DNA molecule by oxido-reduction's coenzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araos, M.S.; Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Toha, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The radio protective action of respiratory coenzymes on DNA-water solutions is studied after irradiation with a 60 Co source. Coenzymes were used separately or in mixtures of their oxidized and reduced forms. The dose relative factor (DRF) values evaluated by uv absorbancy measurements of DNA damage were high: 18.03 for the (NAD-FAD-quinone) mixture (a respiratory chain model); 14.91 for (quinone-hydroquinone) mixtures; 14.46 for quinone; 14.27 for hydroquinone; 12.49 for FAD; 7.21 for the (NAD-NADH) mixture; 6.48 for NADH and 3.79 for NAD. No parallelism was found between the DNA coenzymes strong interactions and their protective action, performed by overcoming the indirect radiation damage. Besides, uv irradiation studies give no support to protection through direct energy transfer processes from excited DNA to coenzymes. The high efficiency of the mixtures of oxidized-reduced respiratory coenzymes is discussed in terms of simultaneous and equivalent trapping of recombinable radicals. The high tolerance of these protectors in living cells is emphasized. (author)

  16. Effect of certain antioxidants on cerebral ischemia induced in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the possible roles of vitamin E, coenzyme-Q 10 and rutin in ameliorating the biochemical changes in the brain and serum induced by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in rats exposed to whole body gamma radiation. Induction of I/R increased the brain oxidative stress as manifested by a marked increase in its content of MDA accompanied by depletion of its GSH content, and a compensatory elevation in the cytosolic activities of GPx and GR enzymes. In addition, it caused a significant rise in brain cytosolic activity of LDH and cytosolic Ca 2+ level. Furthermore, I/R provoked a remarkable inflammatory response reflected by the observed significant increment in serum levels of the pro inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-Iβ. Moreover, induction of I/R in fractionally or single irradiated rats resulted in a further increase in brain oxidative stress and cytosolic LDH activity, disturbed brain Ca 2+ homeostasis, as well as an exaggerated inflammatory reaction. Concomitant to radiation, daily administration of each of vitamin E, coenzyme-Q 10 and rutin to irradiated rats before induction of I/R, was effective in alleviating the brain oxidative stress (represented by a decrease in the increment of brain MDA concentration and the restoration of its GSH level). Moreover, each of these antioxidants caused a significant attenuation of the compensatory rise of the cytosolic activities of GPx and GR enzymes. Antioxidants were, also; able to partially correct the metabolic disturbances induced in brain by I/R and radiation, that correction was reflected by lowering of the cytosolic LDH activity and Ca 2+ level. Administration of each of vitamin E and rutin revealed a potent ant inflammatory action of these antioxidants, while coenzyme-Q 10 had no significant effect on serum levels of TNF-α and IL-Iβ. Finally, the present study justifies the use of antioxidants in hope to alleviate or minimize the various deleterious effects of

  17. Coenzyme Q supplementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Sharp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a fundamental abnormality in the vascular endothelium and smooth muscle of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Because coenzyme Q (CoQ is essential for mitochondrial function and efficient oxygen utilization as the electron carrier in the inner mitochondrial membrane, we hypothesized that CoQ would improve mitochondrial function and benefit PAH patients. To test this, oxidized and reduced levels of CoQ, cardiac function by echocardiogram, mitochondrial functions of heme synthesis and cellular metabolism were evaluated in PAH patients (N=8 in comparison to healthy controls (N=7, at baseline and after 12 weeks oral CoQ supplementation. CoQ levels were similar among PAH and control individuals, and increased in all subjects with CoQ supplementation. PAH patients had higher CoQ levels than controls with supplementation, and a tendency to a higher reduced-to-oxidized CoQ ratio. Cardiac parameters improved with CoQ supplementation, although 6-minute walk distances and BNP levels did not significantly change. Consistent with improved mitochondrial synthetic function, hemoglobin increased and red cell distribution width (RDW decreased in PAH patients with CoQ, while hemoglobin declined slightly and RDW did not change in healthy controls. In contrast, metabolic and redox parameters, including lactate, pyruvate and reduced or oxidized gluthathione, did not change in PAH patients with CoQ. In summary, CoQ improved hemoglobin and red cell maturation in PAH, but longer studies and/or higher doses with a randomized placebo-controlled controlled design are necessary to evaluate the clinical benefit of this simple nutritional supplement.

  18. Primary coenzyme Q deficiency in Pdss2 mutant mice causes isolated renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Peng

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q (CoQ is an essential electron carrier in the respiratory chain whose deficiency has been implicated in a wide variety of human mitochondrial disease manifestations. Its multi-step biosynthesis involves production of polyisoprenoid diphosphate in a reaction that requires the enzymes be encoded by PDSS1 and PDSS2. Homozygous mutations in either of these genes, in humans, lead to severe neuromuscular disease, with nephrotic syndrome seen in PDSS2 deficiency. We now show that a presumed autoimmune kidney disease in mice with the missense Pdss2(kd/kd genotype can be attributed to a mitochondrial CoQ biosynthetic defect. Levels of CoQ9 and CoQ10 in kidney homogenates from B6.Pdss2(kd/kd mutants were significantly lower than those in B6 control mice. Disease manifestations originate specifically in glomerular podocytes, as renal disease is seen in Podocin/cre,Pdss2(loxP/loxP knockout mice but not in conditional knockouts targeted to renal tubular epithelium, monocytes, or hepatocytes. Liver-conditional B6.Alb/cre,Pdss2(loxP/loxP knockout mice have no overt disease despite demonstration that their livers have undetectable CoQ9 levels, impaired respiratory capacity, and significantly altered intermediary metabolism as evidenced by transcriptional profiling and amino acid quantitation. These data suggest that disease manifestations of CoQ deficiency relate to tissue-specific respiratory capacity thresholds, with glomerular podocytes displaying the greatest sensitivity to Pdss2 impairment.

  19. Pro-oxidant mitochondrial matrix-targeted ubiquinone MitoQ10 acts as anti-oxidant at retarded electron transport or proton pumping within Complex I

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Ježek, Jan; Ježek, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 41, 8-9 (2009), s. 1697-1707 ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR7917; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/07/0105; GA ČR(CZ) GP303/05/P100; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : oxidative stress * MitoQ10 * Complex I Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.887, year: 2009

  20. VIDA ÚTIL DE LA HUMITA PRECOCIDA, POR MÉTODOS FÍSICO Y QUÍMICO MEDIANTE FACTOR DE ACELERACIÓN Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Bienvenido Zambrano Velásquez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la presente investigación fue estimar la vida útil de la humita en función a la temperatura de almacenamiento con la aplicación de conservante (ácido ascórbico y el factor de aceleración Q10. Se estudió el almacenamiento de la humita a 0 y 10°C (A, con dos métodos de aplicación de ácido ascórbico (aplicación directa e inmersión (B. La unidad experimental fue de 100 g. Para el experimento se aplicó un diseño completamente al azar con tres réplicas. Se evaluaron parámetros sensoriales como: sabor, olor, color, textura; químicos: pH, acidez y microbiológicos mohos y levaduras (UFC, vida útil mediante la ecuación de regresión lineal planteada por Labuza y el factor de aceleración Q10. En el análisis sensorial el tratamiento A1B2 presentó los mejores resultados. El número de UFC.g-1 tanto en mohos y levaduras, no superó los límites permitidos por la norma INEN de 50x103 UFC.g-1 (In=10.81 a excepción A2B1. En el pH los tratamientos A1B2 y A1B1 presentaron los mayores promedios cercanos al neutro. Los días de vida útil fueron 5.5, 0.9, 2.61 para los tratamientos A1B1, A1B2 y A2B1 respectivamente; y el valor Q10 que se obtuvo fue de 2.1. El mayor tiempo de vida útil se obtuvo a 0°C con aplicación directa del conservante. El factor Q10 permitió establecer que el cambio de temperatura en 10°C, acelera 2.1 veces las reacciones de deterioro.

  1. Premature ovarian failure, short stature, and Hashimoto's disease in an 18-year-old adolescent girl with 46, X, i(X)(q10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiang; Zhang, Qiao; Gao, Feng; Chen, Lu-Lu

    2018-04-22

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous condition affecting girls and women. We detected a previously healthy 18-year-old adolescent girl, presented with amenorrhea over six months, as well as circulating levels of estradiol lower decreased and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) increased. She was 138 cm tall. Results of laboratory tests and/or ultrasound investigations showed 46, X, i(X)(q10) karyotype and Hashimoto's disease. This case suggests that pubertal onset and progression, as well as karyotype analysis, should be evaluated in girls with Hashimoto's disease and short stature.

  2. The DIRT on Q10: In situ depletion of labile-inputs does not increase temperature sensitivity in a laboratory incubation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, L. L.; Lajtha, K.; Bowden, R.; Johnson, B. R.; Bridgham, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The decomposition of soil organic matter is expected to increase with global warming and has been commonly described by kinetic models with at least two pools with differing turnover times. Pools characterized by rapid turnover are thought to consist of labile substrates. Meanwhile, slower turnover is attributed, in part, to greater chemical complexity and a necessarily higher activation energy which should in turn lead to a higher sensitivity (Q10) to temperature and a proportionally larger response to warming. Experimental tests of the relative Q10 of these pools have been inconclusive and contradictory in part due the fact that all pools are decomposing simultaneously and soils kept under differing conditions over long periods of time diverge in more than the Q10 response making them less comparable over time. We present here a test of the temperature response on soils from a 20 yr litter manipulation experiment incubated under an experimental regime that minimizes divergence among the soils. We hypothesize that 1) if exclusion of inputs has depleted labile substrates and 2) the remaining carbon is more chemically complex, then the input exclusion treatments should show a higher Q10 compared to the ambient or increased input treatments. The soils are taken from the Detritus Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) plots in the Bousson Forest, Pennsylvania, US. The DIRT treatments consist of litter and root exclusion (no inputs = NI), no roots (NR), no litter (NL), double litter (DL), and ambient conditions (C). Soils were incubated at 25oC for 525 days. Periodically, replicate sets were rotated into 15oC, 35oC or remained at 25oC for 24 hr. The headspace CO2 concentration was measured before and after the 24 hr temperature treatments, and then all replicate sets were returned to 25oC. Twenty years of input exclusion decreased respiration rate, with NI DIRT treatments, despite the clear differences in their carbon pools. Similar studies have examined the temperature

  3. Active-site-directed inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase by 3-chloropropionyl coenzyme A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miziorko, H.M.; Behnke, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    3-Chloropropionyl coenzyme A (3-chloropropionyl-CoA) irreversibly inhibits avian liver 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMG-CoA synthase). Enzyme inactivation follows pseudo-first-order kinetics and is retarded in the presence of substrates, suggesting that covalent labeling occurs at the active site. A typical rate saturation effect is observed when inactivation kinetics are measured as a function of 3-chloropropionyl-CoA concentration. These data indicate a Ki = 15 microM for the inhibitor and a limiting kinact = 0.31 min-1. [1- 14 C]-3-Chloropropionyl-CoA binds covalently to the enzyme with a stoichiometry (0.7 per site) similar to that measured for acetylation of the enzyme by acetyl-CoA. While the acetylated enzyme formed upon incubation of HMG-CoA synthase with acetyl-CoA is labile to performic acid oxidation, the adduct formed upon 3-chloropropionyl-CoA inactivation is stable to such treatment. Therefore, such an adduct cannot solely involve a thio ester linkage. Exhaustive Pronase digestion of [ 14 C]-3-chloropropionyl-CoA-labeled enzyme produces a radioactive compound which cochromatographs with authentic carboxyethylcysteine using reverse-phase/ion-pairing high-pressure liquid chromatography and both silica and cellulose thin-layer chromatography systems. This suggests that enzyme inactivation is due to alkylation of an active-site cysteine residue

  4. Potential administration of lipoic acid and coenzyme Q against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential administration of lipoic acid and coenzyme Q against adipogensis: target for weight reduction. ... prevents its accumulation in visceral tissues. Further studies should be carried out to examine the mechanistic signals of these nutrients that helps in weight = management. Keywords: lipolysis, obesity, lipoic acid, Co-Q ...

  5. Regulation of autophagy by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) is a major integrator of the nutritional status at the crossroads of fat, sugar, and protein catabolism. Here we show that nutrient starvation causes rapid depletion of AcCoA. AcCoA depletion entailed the commensurate reduction in the overall acetylation of cytoplasmic p...

  6. Very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Degtyareva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a case of a baby with a severe infant form of very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency, a very rare genetic disorder. The basis for the disease is a disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. Accumulation of acyl-CoA-derived fatty acids causes a toxic effect on the myocardium and cardiac conduction system, liver, skeletal muscles, and other organs. The development of hypoglycemia is typical. Treatment in the acute period involves the immediately ceased delivery of long-chain triglycerides, the provision of the body with medium-chain triglycerides, and the correction of glycemia. In our observation the baby was born at term with a satisfactory condition in a family with a poor history (the first baby had suddenly died at the age of 3,5 months. The disease manifested itself as bradyarrhythmia and cardiac arrest on day 2 of life. The clinical symptom complex also included hepatomegalia, hypoglycemic episodes, lactate acidosis, and elevated blood levels of cytolytic enzymes and creatine phosphokinase. The diagnosis was suspected on the basis of the high blood values of acylcarnitines (primarily C14:1 and verified by a molecular genetic examination. Syndrome therapy and dietotherapy resulted in the abolishment of the abnormality. At the age of 2 years of life, the infant’s physical, motor, mental, and speech development corresponded to his age although he had mild right-sided hemiparesis. Thus, timely therapy determines the favorable prognosis of the disease even in its severe infant forms. 

  7. Substitution of arginine for histidine-47 in the coenzyme binding site of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, R.M.; Plapp, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular modeling of alcohol dehydrogenases suggests that His-47 in the yeast enzyme (His-44 in the protein sequence, corresponding to Arg-47 in the horse liver enzyme) binds the pyrophosphate of the NAD coenzyme. His-47 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoenzyme I was substituted with an arginine by a directed mutation. Steady-state kinetic results at pH 7.3 and 30 degree C of the mutant and wild-type enzymes were consistent with an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism. The substitution decreased dissociation constants by 4-fold for NAD + and 2-fold for NADH while turnover numbers were decreased by 4-fold for ethanol oxidation and 6-fold for acetaldehyde reduction. The magnitudes of these effects are smaller than those found for the same mutation in the human liver β enzyme, suggesting that other amino acid residues in the active site modulate the effects of the substitution. The pH dependencies of dissociation constants and other kinetic constants were similar in the two yeast enzymes. Thus, it appears that His-47 is not solely responsible for a pK value near 7 that controls activity and coenzyme binding rates in the wild-type enzyme. The small substrate deuterium isotope effect above pH 7 and the single exponential phase of NADH production during the transient oxidation of ethanol by the Arg-47 enzyme suggest that the mutation makes an isomerization of the enzyme-NAD + complex limiting for turnover with ethanol

  8. Thermophilic archaea activate butane via alkyl-coenzyme M formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laso-Pérez, Rafael; Wegener, Gunter; Knittel, Katrin; Widdel, Friedrich; Harding, Katie J; Krukenberg, Viola; Meier, Dimitri V; Richter, Michael; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Riedel, Dietmar; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Adrian, Lorenz; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J; Musat, Florin

    2016-11-17

    The anaerobic formation and oxidation of methane involve unique enzymatic mechanisms and cofactors, all of which are believed to be specific for C 1 -compounds. Here we show that an anaerobic thermophilic enrichment culture composed of dense consortia of archaea and bacteria apparently uses partly similar pathways to oxidize the C 4 hydrocarbon butane. The archaea, proposed genus 'Candidatus Syntrophoarchaeum', show the characteristic autofluorescence of methanogens, and contain highly expressed genes encoding enzymes similar to methyl-coenzyme M reductase. We detect butyl-coenzyme M, indicating archaeal butane activation analogous to the first step in anaerobic methane oxidation. In addition, Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum expresses the genes encoding β-oxidation enzymes, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and reversible C 1 methanogenesis enzymes. This allows for the complete oxidation of butane. Reducing equivalents are seemingly channelled to HotSeep-1, a thermophilic sulfate-reducing partner bacterium known from the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Genes encoding 16S rRNA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase similar to those identifying Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum were repeatedly retrieved from marine subsurface sediments, suggesting that the presented activation mechanism is naturally widespread in the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain hydrocarbons.

  9. Autotrophic acetyl coenzyme A biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, J.; Whitman, W.B.

    1988-01-01

    To detect autotrophic CO 2 assimilation in cell extracts of Methanococcus maripaludis, lactate dehydrogenase and NADH were added to convert pyruvate formed from autotropically synthesized acetyl coenzyme A to lactate. The lactate produced was determined spectrophotometrically. When CO 2 fixation was pulled in the direction of lactate synthesis, CO 2 reduction to methane was inhibited. Bromoethanesulfonate (BES), a potent inhibitor of methanogenesis, enhanced lactate synthesis, and methyl coenzyme M inhibited it in the absence of BES. Lactate synthesis was dependent on CO 2 and H 2 , but H 2 + CO 2 -independent synthesis was also observed. In cell extracts, the rate of lactate synthesis was about 1.2 nmol min -1 mg of protein -1 . When BES was added, the rate of lactate synthesis increased to 2.1 nmol min -1 mg of protein -1 . Because acetyl coenzyme A did not stimulate lactate synthesis, pyruvate synthase may have been the limiting activity in these assays. Radiolabel from 14 CO 2 was incorporated into lactate. The percentages of radiolabel in the C-1, C-2, and C-3 positions of lactate were 73, 33, and 11%, respectively. Both carbon monoxide and formaldehyde stimulated lactate synthesis. 14 CH 2 O was specifically incorporated into the C-3 of lactate, and 14 CO was incorporated into the C-1 and C-2 positions. Low concentrations of cyanide also inhibited autotrophic growth, CO dehydrogenase activity, and autotrophic lactate synthesis. These observations are in agreement with the acetogenic pathway of autotrophic CO 2 assimilation

  10. Ultraviyole a ışığının oluşturduğu oksidatif koenszim q10 ve alfa lipoik asit’in koruyucu etkisi

    OpenAIRE

    Yüksel, Mehtap

    2013-01-01

    UVA ışınlarına maruz kalan hücrelerde oluşan reaktif oksijen ürünleri (ROS) lipid, protein ve nükleik asitlerde hasar oluşturabilirler. Antioksidanlar bu hasardan koruma ve iyileştirmede yararlı olabilirler. Bu çalışmada UVA ışınına maruz bıraktığımız sıçanların deri, kan ve karaciğerinde MDA, GSH ve KAT düzeylerini tespit ederken diğer yandan da bu parametreler üzerinde CoQ10 ve ALA’nın etkisini inceledik. Bunun için sıçanlar kontrol, UVA, UVA+mısır yağı, UVA+CoQ10, UVA+ALA ve UVA+CoQ10+ALA ...

  11. LDL-cholesterol lowering effect of a new dietary supplement: an open label, controlled, randomized, cross-over clinical trial in patients with mild-to-moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, S; Ceccarini, G; Pelosini, C; Jaccheri, R; Vitti, J; Fierabracci, P; Salvetti, G; Airoldi, G; Minale, M; Saponati, G; Santini, F

    2018-05-24

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and requires specific intervention through an adequate lifestyle (diet and physical exercise) and, if necessary, an appropriate drug treatment. Lipid-lowering drugs, although generally efficacious, may sometimes cause adverse events. A growing attention has been devoted to the correction of dyslipidemias through the use of dietary supplements. The aim of this study was to assess the lipid-lowering activity and safety of a dietary supplement containing monacolin K, L-arginine, coenzyme Q10 and ascorbic acid, named Argicolina (A), compared to a commercially available product containing monacolin K and coenzyme Q10, Normolip 5 (N). This was a single center, controlled, randomized, open-label, cross-over clinical study enrolling 20 Caucasian outpatients aged 18-75 years with serum LDL-C between 130 and 180 mg/dL. Patients assumed two different dietary supplements (A and N) both containing monacolin K 10 mg for 8 weeks each, separated by a 4-week wash-out period. Evaluated parameters were: Total cholesterol (Tot-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), fasting blood glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinekinase, gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase, brachial arterial pressure and heart rate, measured at the start and at the end of each treatment period. Safety was monitored through the study. LDL-C decreased by 23.3% during treatment with N (p ascorbic acid also produces a significant reduction of triglycerides without significant effects on HDL. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT03425630 .

  12. Pheochromocytoma as a rare cause of hypertension in a 46 X, i(X)(q10) turner syndrome: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ji Yeon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kim, Young Keum; Kim, Tae Hwa; Kim, Eun Heui; Lee, Min Jin; Kim, Jong Ho; Jeon, Yun Kyung; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, In Joo

    2018-05-10

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) presents the most serious health problems and contributes to the increased mortality in young women with Turner syndrome. Arterial hypertension in Turner syndrome patients is significantly more prevalent than that in a general age-matched control group. The aetiology of hypertension in Turner syndrome varies, even in the absence of cardiac anomalies and obvious structural renal abnormalities. Pheochromocytoma is an extremely rare cause among various etiologies for hypertension in patients with Turner syndrome. Here, we reported a pheochromocytoma as a rare cause of hypertension in Turner syndrome patient. A 21-year-old woman who has diagnosed with Turner syndrome with a karyotype of 46,X,i(X)(q10) visited for hypertension and mild headache. Transthoracic echography (TTE) showed no definite persistent ductus arteriosus shunt flow and cardiac valve abnormalities. Considering other important secondary causes like pheochromocytoma, hormonal studies were performed and the results showed increased serum norepinephrine, serum normetanephrine, and 24 h urine norepinephrine. We performed an abdominal computed tomography (CT) to confirm the location of pheochromocytoma. Abdominal CT showed a 1.9 cm right adrenal mass. I-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed a right adrenal uptake. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and confirmed a pheochromocytoma. After surgery, blood pressure was within normal ranges and postoperative course was uneventful, and no recurrence developed via biochemical tests and abdominal CT until 24 months. Our case and previous literatures suggest that hypertension caused by pheochromocytoma which is a rare but important and potentially lethal cause of hypertension in Turner syndrome. This case underlines the importance of early detection of pheochromocytoma in Turner syndrome. Clinicians should keep in mind that pheochromocytoma can be a cause of hypertension in patients with Turner syndrome.

  13. Coenzyme O*U1*UO, Alpha-Tocopherol and Free Cholesterol in HDL and LDL Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Kurt; Theorell, Henning; Karlsson, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Farmakologi, Alpha-tocopherol, Coenzyme Q*U1*U0, free cholesterol, LDL, Antioxidants, Lipoproteins, HDL......Farmakologi, Alpha-tocopherol, Coenzyme Q*U1*U0, free cholesterol, LDL, Antioxidants, Lipoproteins, HDL...

  14. Bioavailability of four oral Coenzyme Q formulations in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, M.; Mortensen, S.A.; Rassing, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    The bioavailability of four different Coenzyme Q (CoQ) formulations was compared in ten healthy volunteers in a four-way randomised cross-over trial. The included formulations were: A hard gelatine capsule containing 100 mg of CoQ and 400 mg of Emcompress. Three soft gelatine capsules containing......Q (Bioquinon has the highest bioavailability. A difference in basic AUC and AUC after p.o.administration of CoQ was observed with respect to sex. A characteristic two peak-pattern was observed at the concentration-time profile....

  15. Synthetic biology for engineering acetyl coenzyme a metabolism in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used cell factory for the production of fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The use of this cell factory for cost-efficient production of novel fuels and chemicals requires high yields and low by-product production. Many industrially interesting...... chemicals are biosynthesized from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which serves as a central precursor metabolite in yeast. To ensure high yields in production of these chemicals, it is necessary to engineer the central carbon metabolism so that ethanol production is minimized (or eliminated) and acetyl...

  16. The complete coenzyme B12 biosynthesis gene cluster of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1098

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos F.; Vera, J.L.; Heijden, van der R.; Valdez, G.F.; Vos, de W.M.; Sesma, F.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2008-01-01

    The coenzyme B12 production pathway in Lactobacillus reuteri has been deduced using a combination of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches. The coenzyme B12 gene cluster of Lb. reuteri CRL1098 has the unique feature of clustering together the cbi, cob and hem genes. It consists of 29

  17. Effect of a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic statin on cardiac salvage after ST-elevated acute myocardial infarction - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitose, Tadasuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sakamoto, Kenji; Shimomura, Hideki; Yamashita, Takuro; Hokamaki, Jun; Tsunoda, Ryusuke; Shiraishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Ogawa, Hisao

    2014-11-01

    Early statin therapy after acute coronary syndrome reduces atherothrombotic vascular events. This study aimed to compare the effects of hydrophilic and hydrophobic statins on myocardial salvage and left ventricular (LV) function in patients with ST-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). Seventy-five STEMI patients who had received emergency reperfusion therapy were enrolled and randomized into the hydrophilic statin group (rosuvastatin; 5 mg/day, n = 38) and hydrophobic statin group (atorvastatin; 10 mg/day, n = 37) for 6 months. LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10) levels were measured at baseline and the end of treatment. The myocardial salvage index was assessed by single photon emission computed tomography with (123-)I-β-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (ischemic area-at-risk at onset of STEMI: AAR) and (201-)thallium scintigraphy (area-at-infarction at 6 months: AAI) [myocardial salvage index = (AAR-AAI) × 100/AAR (%)]. Onset-to-balloon time and maximum creatine phosphokinase levels were comparable between the groups. After 6 months, rosuvastatin (-37.6% ± 17.2%) and atorvastatin (-32.4% ± 22.4%) equally reduced low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (p = 0.28). However, rosuvastatin (+3.1% ± 5.9%, p < 0.05), but not atorvastatin (+1.6% ± 5.7%, p = 0.15), improved LVEF. Rosuvastatin reduced BNP levels compared with atorvastatin (-53.3% ± 48.8% versus -13.8% ± 82.9%, p < 0.05). The myocardial salvage index was significantly higher in the rosuvastatin group than the atorvastatin group (78.6% ± 29.1% versus 52.5% ± 38.0%, p < 0.05). CoQ10/LDL-C levels at 6 months were increased in the rosuvastatin group (+23.5%, p < 0.01) and percent changes in CoQ10/LDL-C were correlated with the myocardial salvage index (r = 0.56, p < 0.01). Rosuvastatin shows better beneficial effects on myocardial salvage than atorvastatin in STEMI patients, including long-term cardiac function, associated with

  18. The effects of 2 weeks of statin treatment on mitochondrial respiratory capacity in middle-aged males: the LIFESTAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asping, Magnus; Stride, Nis; Søgaard, Ditte; Dohlmann, Tine Lovsø; Helge, Jørn W; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen

    2017-06-01

    Statins are used to lower cholesterol in plasma and are one of the most used drugs in the world. Many statin users experience muscle pain, but the mechanisms are unknown at the moment. Many studies have hypothesized that mitochondrial function could be involved in these side effects. The aim of the study was to investigate mitochondrial function after 2 weeks of treatment with simvastatin (S; n = 10) or pravastatin (P; n = 10) in healthy middle-aged participants. Mitochondrial respiratory capacity and substrate sensitivity were measured in permeabilized muscle fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS) activity), antioxidant content, as well as coenzyme Q 10 concentration (Q 10 ) were determined. Fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured, and whole body maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2max ) was determined. No differences were seen in mitochondrial respiratory capacity although a tendency was observed for a reduction when complex IV respiration was analyzed in both S (229 (169; 289 (95% confidence interval)) vs. 179 (146; 211) pmol/s/mg, respectively; P = 0.062) and P (214 (143; 285) vs. 162 (104; 220) pmol/s/mg, respectively; P = 0.053) after treatment. A tendency (1.64 (1.28; 2.00) vs. 1.28 (0.99; 1.58) mM, respectively; P = 0.092) for an increased mitochondrial substrate sensitivity (complex I-linked substrate; glutamate) was seen only in S after treatment. No differences were seen in Q 10 , CS activity, or antioxidant content after treatment. Fasting glucose and insulin as well as VO 2max were not changed after treatment. Two weeks of statin (S or P) treatment have no major effect on mitochondrial function. The tendency for an increased mitochondrial substrate sensitivity after simvastatin treatment could be an early indication of the negative effects linked to statin treatment.

  19. A de novo NADPH generation pathway for improving lysine production of Corynebacterium glutamicum by rational design of the coenzyme specificity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Engineering the cofactor availability is a common strategy of metabolic engineering to improve the production of many industrially important compounds. In this work, a de novo NADPH generation pathway is proposed by altering the coenzyme specificity of a native NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to NADP, which consequently has the potential to produce additional NADPH in the glycolytic pathway. Specifically, the coenzyme specificity of GAPDH of Corynebacterium glutamicum is systematically manipulated by rational protein design and the effect of the manipulation for cellular metabolism and lysine production is evaluated. By a combinatorial modification of four key residues within the coenzyme binding sites, different GAPDH mutants with varied coenzyme specificity were constructed. While increasing the catalytic efficiency of GAPDH towards NADP enhanced lysine production in all of the tested mutants, the most significant improvement of lysine production (~60%) was achieved with the mutant showing similar preference towards both NAD and NADP. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that there was no significant change of flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway and the increased lysine yield was mainly attributed to the NADPH generated by the mutated GAPDH. The present study highlights the importance of protein engineering as a key strategy in de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired products. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [The isozymes of stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase and insulin activity in the light of phylogenetic theory of pathology. Oleic fatty acid and realization of biologic functions of trophology and locomotion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The formation of function of isozymes of stearil-coenzymeA-desaturases occured at the different stages of phylogeny under realization of biologic function of trophology (stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase 1) and biologic function of locomotion, insulin system (stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase 2) billions years later. The stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase 1 transforms in C 18:1 oleic fatty acid only exogenous C 16:0 palmitinic saturated fatty acid. The stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase 2 transforms only endogenic palmitinic saturated fatty acid, synthesized form glucose. The biologic role of insulin is in energy support of biologic function of locomotion. Insulin through expressing stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase 2 transforms energetically non-optimal palmitinic variation of metabolism of substrates into highly effective oleic variation for cells' groundwork of energy (saturated fatty acid and mono fatty acid). The surplus of palmitinic saturated fatty acid in food is enabled in pathogenesis of resistance to insulin and derangement of synthesis of hormone by beta-cells of islets. The resistance to insulin and diabetes mellitus are primarily the derangement of metabolism of saturated fatty acids with mono fatty acids, energy problems of organism and only afterwards the derangement of metabolism of carbohydrates. It is desirable to restrict food intake of exogenous palmitinic saturated fatty acid. The reasons are low expression of independent of insulin stearil-coenzymeA-desaturase 2, marked lipotoxicity of polar form of palmitinic saturated fatty acid and synthesis of non-optimal palmitinic triglycerides instead of physiologic and more energetically more effective oleic triglycerides.

  1. Interdependence of coenzyme-induced conformational work and binding potential in yeast alcohol and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenases: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Weck, Z.; Pande, J.; Kaegi, J.H.R.

    1987-01-01

    Binding of NAD coenzymes to yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and porcine heart lactate dehydrogenase (PHLDH) was studied by hydrogen-deuterium exchange with the infrared technique. Conformational changes in the enzymes specific to the coenzymes and their fragments were observed, and the pH dependence of the exchange reaction shows that it conforms to the EX-2 scheme. In both YADH and PHLDH the magnitude of the conformational change as measured by exchange retardation is considerably larger for the NAD + than for NADH. Studies with coenzyme fragments like ADP-ribose, ADP, and AMP also highlight the lack of rigorous correlation between structural features such as charge and size and their influence on exchange behavior. Ternary complexes such as YADH-NAD + -pyrazole, PHLDH-NAD + -oxalate, and PHLDH-NADH-oxamate, which mimic the transition state, have a significantly more pronounced effect on exchange rates than the corresponding binary complexes. The outstanding feature of this study is the demonstration that in the binary enzyme-coenzyme complexes the more loosely bound NAD + is more effective in retarding exchange than the more firmly bound NADH. These differences are attributed to the unequal structural constraints exerted by the two coenzymes upon the enzymes, which translate to unequal expenditure of transconformational work in the formation of the two complexes. The opposing variation in the free energy of binding and the transconformational work expended can be viewed as an unequal partitioning of the net free energy gain resulting from the protein-ligand interaction into a binding term and that required for conformational change

  2. Protein Engineering for Nicotinamide Coenzyme Specificity in Oxidoreductases: Attempts and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chánique, Andrea M; Parra, Loreto P

    2018-01-01

    Oxidoreductases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze an extensive range of chemical reactions with great specificity, efficiency, and selectivity. Most oxidoreductases are nicotinamide cofactor-dependent enzymes with a strong preference for NADP or NAD. Because these coenzymes differ in stability, bioavailability and costs, the enzyme preference for a specific coenzyme is an important issue for practical applications. Different approaches for the manipulation of coenzyme specificity have been reported, with different degrees of success. Here we present various attempts for the switching of nicotinamide coenzyme preference in oxidoreductases by protein engineering. This review covers 103 enzyme engineering studies from 82 articles and evaluates the accomplishments in terms of coenzyme specificity and catalytic efficiency compared to wild type enzymes of different classes. We analyzed different protein engineering strategies and related them with the degree of success in inverting the cofactor specificity. In general, catalytic activity is compromised when coenzyme specificity is reversed, however when switching from NAD to NADP, better results are obtained. In most of the cases, rational strategies were used, predominantly with loop exchange generating the best results. In general, the tendency of removing acidic residues and incorporating basic residues is the strategy of choice when trying to change specificity from NAD to NADP, and vice versa . Computational strategies and algorithms are also covered as helpful tools to guide protein engineering strategies. This mini review aims to give a general introduction to the topic, giving an overview of tools and information to work in protein engineering for the reversal of coenzyme specificity.

  3. Sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate monohydrate (coenzyme M sodium salt monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Mayr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The 2-thioethanesulfonate anion is the smallest known coenzyme in nature (HS–CoM and plays a key role in methanogenesis by anaerobic archaea, as well as in the oxidation of alkenes by Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria. The title compound, Na+·C2H5O3S2−·H2O, is the Na+ salt of HS–CoM crystallized as the monohydrate. Six O atoms form a distorted octahedral coordination geometry around the Na atom, at distances in the range 2.312 (4–2.517 (3 Å. Two O atoms of the sulfonate group, one O atom of each of three other symmetry-related sulfonate groups plus the water O atom form the coordination environment of the Na+ ion. This arrangement forms Na–O–Na layers in the crystal structure, parallel to (100.

  4. Synthesis of carbon-14-labeled sodium palmoxirate and its coenzyme A ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaner, L.E.; Hoerr, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    Synthetic procedures for the preparation of carbon-14-labeled sodium palmoxirate (TDGA), labeled either in the carboxyl position or in the tetradecyl hydrocarbon chain, are described. In addition, the synthesis of the coenzyme A ester of TDGA-14C with a specific activity of 51 mCi/mmol is reported. The coenzyme A ester was prepared by formation of the acyl chloride with oxalyl chloride followed by reaction with coenzyme A (CoA) in a borate-buffered tetrahydrofuran solution. Purification methods and analytical and stability data are reported for the compounds.

  5. Level of coenzyme A and the activity of certain dehydrogenases under chronic low dose X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkasova, L A; Novik, V A; Tsychun, G F [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziologii

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term x ray irradiation (cumulative dose 50 R) on: the content of co-enzyme A (KoA) in the brain and liver, the activity of a number of oxydizing reducing enzymes in the brain mitochondria and heart muscle, and the blood glucocorticoid content. It was established that the metabolism of brain and liver KoA is quite stable, the enzymes of the brain tricarbonic acids and pyruvate-dehydrogenase cycle are labile.

  6. Arg279 is the key regulator of coenzyme selectivity in the flavin-dependent ornithine monooxygenase SidA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Reeder; Franceschini, Stefano; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Ellerbrock, Jacob; Romero, Elvira; Echandi, Maria Paulina; Martin Del Campo, Julia S; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Siderophore A (SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the NAD(P)H- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of ornithine in the biosynthesis of siderophores in Aspergillus fumigatus and is essential for virulence. SidA can utilize both NADPH or NADH for activity; however, the enzyme is selective for NADPH. Structural analysis shows that R279 interacts with the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. To probe the role of electrostatic interactions in coenzyme selectivity, R279 was mutated to both an alanine and a glutamate. The mutant proteins were active but highly uncoupled, oxidizing NADPH and producing hydrogen peroxide instead of hydroxylated ornithine. For wtSidA, the catalytic efficiency was 6-fold higher with NADPH as compared to NADH. For the R279A mutant the catalytic efficiency was the same with both coenyzmes, while for the R279E mutant the catalytic efficiency was 5-fold higher with NADH. The effects are mainly due to an increase in the KD values, as no major changes on the kcat or flavin reduction values were observed. Thus, the absence of a positive charge leads to no coenzyme selectivity while introduction of a negative charge leads to preference for NADH. Flavin fluorescence studies suggest altered interaction between the flavin and NADP⁺ in the mutant enzymes. The effects are caused by different binding modes of the coenzyme upon removal of the positive charge at position 279, as no major conformational changes were observed in the structure for R279A. The results indicate that the positive charge at position 279 is critical for tight binding of NADPH and efficient hydroxylation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitor Cytotoxicity: Depletion of the Coenzyme-A Pool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuhajda, Francis

    2003-01-01

    .... In light of recent data that showed a marked increase in malonyl-CoA following FAS inhibition, this grant was focused on coenzyme-A depletion as a key mechanism of action leading to cytotoxicity...

  8. Micronutrient special issue: Coenzyme Q{sub 10} requirements for DNA damage prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelzer, Constance, E-mail: schmelzer@fbn-dummerstorf.de [Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), Nutritional Physiology, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196 Dummerstorf (Germany); Doering, Frank [University of Kiel, Institute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, Molecular Prevention, Heinrich-Hecht-Platz 10, 24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) is an essential component for electron transport in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and serves as cofactor in several biological processes. The reduced form of CoQ{sub 10} (ubiquinol, Q{sub 10}H{sub 2}) is an effective antioxidant in biological membranes. During the last years, particular interest has been grown on molecular effects of CoQ{sub 10} supplementation on mechanisms related to DNA damage prevention. This review describes recent advances in our understanding about the impact of CoQ{sub 10} on genomic stability in cells, animals and humans. With regard to several in vitro and in vivo studies, CoQ{sub 10} provides protective effects on several markers of oxidative DNA damage and genomic stability. In comparison to the number of studies reporting preventive effects of CoQ{sub 10} on oxidative stress biomarkers, CoQ{sub 10} intervention studies in humans with a direct focus on markers of DNA damage are limited. Thus, more well-designed studies in healthy and disease populations with long-term follow up results are needed to substantiate the reported beneficial effects of CoQ{sub 10} on prevention of DNA damage.

  9. Determination of hydrophobic coenzyme a esters and other lipids using a biosensor comprising a modified coenzyme a- and acyl-coa binding protein (acbp)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    , food and feed preparations, tissue extracts, acyl-CoA synthetase reaction media and various laboratory conditions using a modified Coenzyme A- and acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is provided. Furthermore the invention relates to a construct comprising a peptide and a signal moiety for performing...

  10. The glossyhead1 allele of acc1 reveals a principal role for multidomain acetyl-coenzyme a carboxylase in the biosynthesis of cuticular waxes by Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Shiyou

    2011-09-23

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C 20:0 or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. A conserved START domain coenzyme Q-binding polypeptide is required for efficient Q biosynthesis, respiratory electron transport, and antioxidant function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Christopher M; Hill, Shauna; Morvaridi, Susan; Saiki, Ryoichi; Johnson, Jarrett S; Liau, Wei-Siang; Hirano, Kathleen; Kawashima, Tadashi; Ji, Ziming; Loo, Joseph A; Shepherd, Jennifer N; Clarke, Catherine F

    2013-04-01

    Coenzyme Qn (ubiquinone or Qn) is a redox active lipid composed of a fully substituted benzoquinone ring and a polyisoprenoid tail of n isoprene units. Saccharomyces cerevisiae coq1-coq9 mutants have defects in Q biosynthesis, lack Q6, are respiratory defective, and sensitive to stress imposed by polyunsaturated fatty acids. The hallmark phenotype of the Q-less yeast coq mutants is that respiration in isolated mitochondria can be rescued by the addition of Q2, a soluble Q analog. Yeast coq10 mutants share each of these phenotypes, with the surprising exception that they continue to produce Q6. Structure determination of the Caulobacter crescentus Coq10 homolog (CC1736) revealed a steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain, a hydrophobic tunnel known to bind specific lipids in other START domain family members. Here we show that purified CC1736 binds Q2, Q3, Q10, or demethoxy-Q3 in an equimolar ratio, but fails to bind 3-farnesyl-4-hydroxybenzoic acid, a farnesylated analog of an early Q-intermediate. Over-expression of C. crescentus CC1736 or COQ8 restores respiratory electron transport and antioxidant function of Q6 in the yeast coq10 null mutant. Studies with stable isotope ring precursors of Q reveal that early Q-biosynthetic intermediates accumulate in the coq10 mutant and de novo Q-biosynthesis is less efficient than in the wild-type yeast or rescued coq10 mutant. The results suggest that the Coq10 polypeptide:Q (protein:ligand) complex may serve essential functions in facilitating de novo Q biosynthesis and in delivering newly synthesized Q to one or more complexes of the respiratory electron transport chain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineered Production of Short-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Esters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink-Koutsoubelis, Nicolas; Loechner, Anne C.; Lechner, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-coenzyme A esters serve as intermediate compounds in fatty acid biosynthesis, and the production of polyketides, biopolymers and other value-added chemicals. S. cerevisiae is a model organism that has been utilized for the biosynthesis of such biologically and economically valuable...... compounds. However, its limited repertoire of short-chain acyl-CoAs effectively prevents its application as a production host for a plethora of natural products. Therefore, we introduced biosynthetic metabolic pathways to five different acyl-CoA esters into S. cerevisiae. Our engineered strains provide......-CoA at 0.5 μM; and isovaleryl-CoA, n-butyryl-CoA, and n-hexanoyl-CoA at 6 μM each. The acyl-CoAs produced in this study are common building blocks of secondary metabolites and will enable the engineered production of a variety of natural products in S. cerevisiae. By providing this toolbox of acyl...

  13. Reduction and Methyl Transfer Kinetics of the Alpha Subunit from Acetyl-Coenzyme A Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangshi Tan; Christopher Sewell; Qingwu Yang; Paul A. Lindahl

    2003-01-15

    OAK-B135 Stopped-flow was used to evaluate the methylation and reduction kinetics of the isolated alpha subunit of acetyl-Coenzyme A synthase from Moorella thermoacetica. This catalytically active subunit contains a novel Ni-X-Fe4S4 cluster and a putative unidentified n =2 redox site called D. The D-site must be reduced for a methyl group to transfer from a corrinoid-iron-sulfur protein, a key step in the catalytic synthesis of acetyl-CoA. The Fe4S4 component of this cluster is also redox active, raising the possibility that it is the D-site or a portion thereof. Results presented demonstrate that the D-site reduces far faster than the Fe4S4 component, effectively eliminating this possibility. Rather, this component may alter catalytically important properties of the Ni center. The D-site is reduced through a pathway that probably does not involve the Fe4S4 component of this active-site cluster.

  14. Bioavailability assessment of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor utilizing pulsatile drug delivery system: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ehab I

    2016-09-01

    Chronotherapy or pulsatile drug delivery system could be achieved by increasing drug plasma concentration exactly at the time of disease incidence. Cholesterol synthesis shows a circadian rhythm being high at late night and early in the morning. Simvastatin (SIM) inhibits hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is responsible for cholesterol synthesis. In this study, SIM lipid-based formulation filled in gelatin capsules and coated with aqueous Eudragit® S100 dispersion was prepared for chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The pharmacokinetic parameters of SIM capsules were studied in human volunteers after a single oral dose and compared with that of Zocor® tablets as a reference in a randomized cross-over study. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC 0-∞ , C max , T max , t 1/2 and elimination rate constant were determined from plasma concentration-time profile for both formulations. The tested formulation had the ability to delay drug absorption and provide higher drug concentrations from 3 up to 10 h after oral administration compared to that of commercial tablets. The data in this study revealed that the prepared formulation could be effective in chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Moreover, the tested formulation was found to enhance SIM bioavailability by 29% over the reference tablets.

  15. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  16. Synthesis of coenzyme A and nicotineamide-adenine dinucleotide labelled with tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, G.V.; Zverkov, Yu.B.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Isotopic exchange in solution with tritium water and with gaseous tritium and solid-phase reaction of isotopic exchange of NAD with tritium were investigated. For synthesis of labelled with tritium coenzyme A solid-phase reaction of isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium was used. It was determined that 98% of tritium was contained in nicotineamide part of molecule of NAD. In the case of coenzyme A studying of intramolecular distribution of tritium demonstrated that 90% of tritium were localized in adenine fragment [ru

  17. Modeling the reactions catalyzed by coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandala, Gregory M; Smith, David M; Radom, Leo

    2010-05-18

    Enzymes accelerate chemical reactions with an exceptional selectivity that makes life itself possible. Understanding the factors responsible for this efficient catalysis is of utmost importance in our quest to harness the tremendous power of enzymes. Computational chemistry has emerged as an important adjunct to experimental chemistry and biochemistry in this regard, because it provides detailed insights into the relationship between structure and function in a systematic and straightforward manner. In this Account, we highlight our recent high-level theoretical investigations toward this end in studying the radical-based reactions catalyzed by enzymes dependent on coenzyme B(12) (or adenosylcobalamin, AdoCbl). In addition to their fundamental position in biology, the AdoCbl-dependent enzymes represent a valuable framework within which to understand Nature's method of efficiently handling high-energy species to execute very specific reactions. The AdoCbl-mediated reactions are characterized by the interchange of a hydrogen atom and a functional group on adjacent carbon atoms. Our calculations are consistent with the conclusion that the main role of AdoCbl is to provide a source of radicals, thus moving the 1,2-rearrangements onto the radical potential energy surface. Our studies also show that the radical rearrangement step is facilitated by partial proton transfer involving the substrate. Specifically, we observe that the energy requirements for radical rearrangement are reduced dramatically with appropriate partial protonation or partial deprotonation or sometimes (synergistically) both. Such interactions are particularly relevant to enzyme catalysis, because it is likely that the local amino acid environment in the active site of an enzyme can function in this capacity through hydrogen bonding. Finally, our calculations indicate that the intervention of a very stable radical along the reaction pathway may inactivate the enzyme, demonstrating that sustained

  18. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-(2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy)androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy(/sup 3/H)anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy[ 3 H]anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Effect of perioperative fetal intrauterine hypoxia on maternal oxidative stress injury after cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Hong Zou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of perioperative fetal intrauterine hypoxia on maternal oxidative stress injury after cesarean section. Methods: 37 puerperae receiving cesarean section for fetal intrauterine hypoxia between May 2014 and December 2016 were selected as hypoxia group and 40 puerperae receiving cesarean section during the same period and without complications during pregnancy or fetal intrauterine hypoxia were selected as control group. Umbilical arterial blood was collected after delivery of placenta for blood gas analysis, and the placenta tissue and serum samples were collected to test the content of oxidative stress products and antioxidants. Results: Umbilical arterial blood gas analysis parameters pH value as well as PO2, HCO3 - and BE content of hypoxia group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05; NADPH, reactive oxide species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS content in placenta tissue of hypoxia group were significantly higher than those of control group (P <0.05 while glutathione S-transferase (GST, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, Trx, vitamin C (VitC, VitE and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 content were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05; serum malondialdehyde (MDA and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α content of hypoxia group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Perioperative fetal intrauterine hypoxia can lead to maternal oxidative stress injury after cesarean section and increase the generation of free radicals and the consumption of antioxidants.

  1. A coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade for the efficient synthesis of vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-10-13

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavor compounds in the world as well as a promising versatile building block. The biotechnological production of vanillin from plant-derived ferulic acid has attracted much attention as a new alternative to chemical synthesis. One limitation of the known metabolic pathway to vanillin is its requirement for expensive coenzymes. Here, we developed a novel route to vanillin from ferulic acid that does not require any coenzymes. This artificial pathway consists of a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase and a coenzyme-independent oxygenase. When Escherichia coli cells harboring the decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade were incubated with ferulic acid, the cells efficiently synthesized vanillin (8.0 mM, 1.2 g L(-1) ) via 4-vinylguaiacol in one pot, without the generation of any detectable aromatic by-products. The efficient method described here might be applicable to the synthesis of other high-value chemicals from plant-derived aromatics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A possible prebiotic synthesis of pantetheine, a precursor to coenzyme A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, A. D.; Newton, G. L.; Miller, S. L.

    1995-01-01

    The involvement of coenzyme A in many enzyme reactions suggests that it acted in this capacity very early in the development of life on Earth. Particularly relevant in this regard is its role in the activation of amino acids and hydroxy acids in the biosynthesis of some peptide antibiotics--a mechanism of peptide synthesis that forms the basis for the proposal that a thioester world could have preceded the RNA world. The components of coenzyme A have been shown to be probable prebiotic compounds: beta-alanine, pantoyl lactone and cysteamine and possibly adenosine. We show here that the pantetheine moiety of coenzyme A (which also occurs in a number of enzymes) can be synthesized in yields of several per cent by heating pantoyl lactone, beta-alanine and cysteamine at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C. These components are extremely soluble and so would have been preferentially concentrated in evaporating bodies of water, for example on beaches and at lagoon margins. Our results show that amide bonds can be formed at temperatures as low as 40 degrees C, and provide circumstantial support for the suggestion that pantetheine and coenzyme A were important in the earliest metabolic systems.

  3. Induction of Cytosolic Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Pea Leaves by Ultraviolet-B Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Tomokazu, Konishi; Takahiro, Kamoi; Ryuichi, Matsuno; Yukiko, Sasaki; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University:(Present)Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Biotechnology Institute, Akita Prefectural College of Agriculture; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University:(Present)Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology, School of Agricultural Sciences, Nagoya University

    1996-01-01

    Levels of subunits of two acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases were high in small leaves of Pisum sativum, decreased with growth, and remained constant in fully expanded leaves. Irradiation of fully expanded leaves induced the cytosolic isozyme only. This result suggests a key role for the cytosolic enzyme in protection against UV-B.

  4. Coenzyme Q blocks biochemical but not receptor-mediated apoptosis by increasing mitochondrial antioxidant protection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alleva, R.; Tomasetti, M.; Anděra, Ladislav; Gellert, N.; Borghi, B.; Weber, C.; Murphy, M. P.; Neužil, J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 503, č. 1 (2001), s. 46-50 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/99/0350 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : coenzyme Q * apoptosis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2001

  5. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands. D Sudarshan Reddy N Ravi Kumar Reddy V Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic and Analytical ...

  6. Selected biomarkers as predictive tools in testing efficacy of melatonin and coenzyme Q on propionic acid - induced neurotoxicity in rodent model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Mashael; Al-Ayadhi, Laila; El-Ansary, Afaf

    2014-02-25

    Exposures to environmental toxins are now thought to contribute to the development of autism spectrum disorder. Propionic acid (PA) found as a metabolic product of gut bacteria has been reported to mimic/mediate the neurotoxic effects of autism. Results from animal studies may guide investigations on human populations toward identifying environmental contaminants that produce or drugs that protect from neurotoxicity. Forty-eight young male Western Albino rats were used in the present study. They were grouped into six equal groups 8 rats each. The first group received a neurotoxic dose of buffered PA (250 mg/Kg body weight/day for 3 consecutive days). The second group received only phosphate buffered saline (control group). The third and fourth groups were intoxicated with PA as described above followed by treatment with either coenzyme Q (4.5 mg/kg body weight) or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) for one week (therapeutically treated groups). The fifth and sixth groups were administered both compounds for one week prior to PA (protected groups). Heat shock protein70 (Hsp70), Gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and interferon γ-inducible protein 16 together with Comet DNA assay were measured in brain tissues of the six studied groups. The obtained data showed that PA caused multiple signs of brain toxicity revealed in depletion of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine, are which important neurotransmitters that reflect brain function, interferon γ-inducible protein 16 and oxytocin. A high significant increase in tail length, tail DNA% damage and tail moment was reported indicating the genotoxic effect of PA. Administration of melatonin or coenzyme Q showed both protective and therapeutic effects on PA-treated rats demonstrated in a remarkable amelioration of most of the measured parameters. In conclusion, melatonin and coenzyme Q have potential protective and restorative effects against PA-induced brain injury, confirmed by improvement in

  7. A STD-NMR Study of the Interaction of the Anabaena Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase with the Coenzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara V. Antonini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ via its flavin FAD cofactor. To get further insights in the architecture of the transient complexes produced during the hydride transfer event between the enzyme and the NADP+ coenzyme we have applied NMR spectroscopy using Saturation Transfer Difference (STD techniques to analyze the interaction between FNRox and the oxidized state of its NADP+ coenzyme. We have found that STD NMR, together with the use of selected mutations on FNR and of the non-FNR reacting coenzyme analogue NAD+, are appropriate tools to provide further information about the the interaction epitope.

  8. Evidence against translational repression by the carboxyltransferase component of Escherichia coli acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander C; Cronan, John E

    2014-11-01

    In Escherichia coli, synthesis of the malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) required for membrane lipid synthesis is catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a large complex composed of four subunits. The subunit proteins are needed in a defined stoichiometry, and it remains unclear how such production is achieved since the proteins are encoded at three different loci. Meades and coworkers (G. Meades, Jr., B. K. Benson, A. Grove, and G. L. Waldrop, Nucleic Acids Res. 38:1217-1227, 2010, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkp1079) reported that coordinated production of the AccA and AccD subunits is due to a translational repression mechanism exerted by the proteins themselves. The AccA and AccD subunits form the carboxyltransferase (CT) heterotetramer that catalyzes the second partial reaction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Meades et al. reported that CT tetramers bind the central portions of the accA and accD mRNAs and block their translation in vitro. However, long mRNA molecules (500 to 600 bases) were required for CT binding, but such long mRNA molecules devoid of ribosomes seemed unlikely to exist in vivo. This, plus problematical aspects of the data reported by Meades and coworkers, led us to perform in vivo experiments to test CT tetramer-mediated translational repression of the accA and accD mRNAs. We report that increased levels of CT tetramer have no detectable effect on translation of the CT subunit mRNAs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Decreased hepatic contents of coenzyme A molecular species in mice after subchronic mild social defeat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshifumi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Hagiya, Yuki; Chohnan, Shigeru; Toyoda, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Social stress may precipitate psychiatric disorders such as depression, which is related to the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. We have evaluated the effects of social stress on central and peripheral metabolism using a model of depression in mice. In the present study, we focused on coenzyme A (CoA) molecular species [i.e. non-esterified CoA (CoASH), acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA] which play important roles in numerous metabolic pathways, and we analyzed changes in expression of these molecules in the hypothalamus and liver of adult male mice (C57BL/6J) subjected to 10 days of subchronic mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) with ICR mice as aggressors. Mice (n = 12) exposed to showed hyperphagia- and polydipsia-like symptoms and increased body weight gain compared with control mice which were not affected by exposure to ICR mice (n = 12). To elucidate the underlying metabolic features in the sCSDS model, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and CoASH tissue levels were analyzed using the acyl-CoA cycling method. The levels of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, which decreases feeding behavior, were not influenced by sCSDS. However, sCSDS reduced levels of acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and total CoA (sum of the three CoA molecular species) in the liver. Hence, hyperphagia-like symptoms in sCSDS mice evidently occurred independently of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA, but might consequently lead to down-regulation of hepatic CoA via altered expression of nudix hydrolase 7. Future studies should investigate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the down-regulation of liver CoA pools in sCSDS mice.

  10. Altered fatty acid metabolism and reduced stearoyl-coenzyme a desaturase activity in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Perez, N; Schiavi, E; Frei, R; Ferstl, R; Wawrzyniak, P; Smolinska, S; Sokolowska, M; Sievi, N A; Kohler, M; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Michalovich, D; Simpson, K D; Hessel, E M; Jutel, M; Martin-Fontecha, M; Palomares, O; Akdis, C A; O'Mahony, L

    2017-11-01

    Fatty acids and lipid mediator signaling play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma, yet this area remains largely underexplored. The aims of this study were (i) to examine fatty acid levels and their metabolism in obese and nonobese asthma patients and (ii) to determine the functional effects of altered fatty acid metabolism in experimental models. Medium- and long-chain fatty acid levels were quantified in serum from 161 human volunteers by LC/MS. Changes in stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD) expression and activity were evaluated in the ovalbumin (OVA) and house dust mite (HDM) murine models. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells from asthma patients and controls were evaluated for SCD expression and activity. The serum desaturation index (an indirect measure of SCD) was significantly reduced in nonobese asthma patients and in the OVA murine model. SCD1 gene expression was significantly reduced within the lungs following OVA or HDM challenge. Inhibition of SCD in mice promoted airway hyper-responsiveness. SCD1 expression was suppressed in bronchial epithelial cells from asthma patients. IL-4 and IL-13 reduced epithelial cell SCD1 expression. Inhibition of SCD reduced surfactant protein C expression and suppressed rhinovirus-induced IP-10 secretion, which was associated with increased viral titers. This is the first study to demonstrate decreased fatty acid desaturase activity in humans with asthma. Experimental models in mice and human epithelial cells suggest that inhibition of desaturase activity leads to airway hyper-responsiveness and reduced antiviral defense. SCD may represent a new target for therapeutic intervention in asthma patients. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yufeng

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is the most common movement disorder. Extrapyramidal motor symptoms stem from the degeneration of the dopaminergic pathways in patient brain. Current treatments for PD are symptomatic, alleviating disease symptoms without reversing or retarding disease progression. Although the cause of PD remains unknown, several pathogenic factors have been identified, which cause dopaminergic neuron (DN death in the substantia nigra (SN. These include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and excitotoxicity. Manipulation of these factors may allow the development of disease-modifying treatment strategies to slow neuronal death. Inhibition of DJ-1A, the Drosophila homologue of the familial PD gene DJ-1, leads to oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and DN loss, making fly DJ-1A model an excellent in vivo system to test for compounds with therapeutic potential. Results In the present study, a Drosophila DJ-1A model of PD was used to test potential neuroprotective drugs. The drugs applied are the Chinese herb celastrol, the antibiotic minocycline, the bioenergetic amine coenzyme Q10 (coQ10, and the glutamate antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulphamoylbenzo[f]-quinoxaline (NBQX. All of these drugs target pathogenic processes implicated in PD, thus constitute mechanism-based treatment strategies. We show that celastrol and minocycline, both having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, confer potent dopaminergic neuroprotection in Drosophila DJ-1A model, while coQ10 shows no protective effect. NBQX exerts differential effects on cell survival and brain dopamine content: it protects against DN loss but fails to restore brain dopamine level. Conclusion The present study further validates Drosophila as a valuable model for preclinical testing of drugs with therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. The lower cost and amenability to high throughput testing make Drosophila PD

  12. Effects of complete water fasting and regeneration diet on kidney function, oxidative stress and antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojto, V; Gvozdjakova, A; Kucharska, J; Rausova, Z; Vancova, O; Valuch, J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the influence of 11-days complete water fasting (WF) and regeneration diet (RD) on renal function, body weight, blood pressure and oxidative stress. Therapeutic WF is considered a healing method. Ten volunteers drank only water for 11 days, followed by RD for the next 11 days. Data on body weight, blood pressure, kidney functions, antioxidants, lipid peroxidation, cholesterols, triacylglycerols and selected biochemical parameters were obtained. WF increased uric acid and creatinine and decreased glomerular filtration rate. After RD, the parameters were comparable to baseline values. Urea was not affected. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS) decreased and maintained stable after RD. Fasting decreased α-tocopherol and increased γ-tocopherol, no significant changes were found after RD. Coenzyme Q10 decreased after RD. HDL-cholesterol decreased in WF. Total- and LDL-cholesterol decreased after RD. Other biochemical parameters were within the range of reference values. The effect of the complete fasting on kidney function was manifested by hyperuricemia. Renal function was slightly decreased, however maintained within the reference values. After RD, it returned to baseline values. The positive effect of the complete water fasting was in the reduction of oxidative stress, body weight and blood pressure (Tab. 3, Ref. 25).

  13. Enzymic Dehalogenation of 4-Chlorobenzoyl Coenzyme A in Acinetobacter sp. Strain 4-CB1

    OpenAIRE

    Copley, Shelley D.; Crooks, Gwen P.

    1992-01-01

    4-Chlorobenzoate degradation in cell extracts of Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 occurs by initial synthesis of 4-chlorobenzoyl coenzyme A (4-chlorobenzoyl CoA) from 4-chlorobenzoate, CoA, and ATP. 4-Chlorobenzoyl CoA is dehalogenated to 4-hydroxybenzoyl CoA. Following the dehalogenation reaction, 4-hydroxybenzoyl CoA is hydrolyzed to 4-hydroxybenzoate and CoA. Possible roles for the CoA moiety in the dehalogenation reaction are discussed.

  14. Enzymic Dehalogenation of 4-Chlorobenzoyl Coenzyme A in Acinetobacter sp. Strain 4-CB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Shelley D.; Crooks, Gwen P.

    1992-01-01

    4-Chlorobenzoate degradation in cell extracts of Acinetobacter sp. strain 4-CB1 occurs by initial synthesis of 4-chlorobenzoyl coenzyme A (4-chlorobenzoyl CoA) from 4-chlorobenzoate, CoA, and ATP. 4-Chlorobenzoyl CoA is dehalogenated to 4-hydroxybenzoyl CoA. Following the dehalogenation reaction, 4-hydroxybenzoyl CoA is hydrolyzed to 4-hydroxybenzoate and CoA. Possible roles for the CoA moiety in the dehalogenation reaction are discussed. PMID:16348702

  15. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. ► Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. ► Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. ► Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  16. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jian@cfs.bioment.umaryland.edu [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Fu, Yi [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Li, Ge [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Richard Y. [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Microbiology-Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  17. Plasma Ubiquinone, Alpha-Tocopherol and Cholesterol in Man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Edlund, Per Olof

    1992-01-01

    Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle......Farmakologi, Coenzyme Q10, free cholesterol, vitamin E, antioxidants, Alpha-Tocopherol, vitamin Q, plasma, LDL-particle...

  18. Effect of Some Antioxidants on the Physical Fitness of Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, M.I.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been paid for searching of natural antioxidants and their evaluation in either medicinal practice or as food raw materials. The aim of the present research is to assess the effect of several well-known products used as antioxidants, on body weight, haemopoesis, endocrine system and lipid profile in normal albino rats. Thirty male adult albino rats were equally arranged into 5 groups, the first group was served as control and the others received special treatments where taurine (2% in drinking water), tryptophan (100 mg/kg b.w. orally), hawthorn extract (50 mg/100 g b.w. orally) and coenzyme Q10 (50 mg/kg b.w. orally) were given for two months. Body weight was regularly recorded twice a week and at the end of the experiment, the rats were decapitated. Red blood cell count (RBCs), hemoglobin (Hb) content, reticulocytic count, white blood cell count (WBCs) and glutathione (GSH) concentration were estimated in blood, while, triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxin (T 4 ), Testosterone, and corticosterone hormones besides lipid profile were estimated in the serum. The results denoted that although there is a slight improvement in the parameters tested, it does not deserve the coast of the regular use of these antioxidants and further investigations still needed

  19. Effects of a new combination of nutraceuticals with Morus alba on lipid profile, insulin sensitivity and endotelial function in dyslipidemic subjects. A cross-over, randomized, double-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarco, Valentina; Izzo, Raffaele; Stabile, Eugenio; Rozza, Francesco; Santoro, Mario; Manzi, Maria Virginia; Serino, Federica; Schiattarella, Gabriele Giacomo; Esposito, Giovanni; Trimarco, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Nutraceuticals (NUT) are forms of compounds with biological activity commonly used to improve health in dosage largely exceeding those obtainable in food. We compared, in a double blind randomized cross-over trial, the effects of two NUT combinations on the control of glico-lipidic metabolism in patients with hypercholesterolemia not on statins. At study start patients were given dietary counseling and received placebo for 2 weeks. After this run-in period, patients were randomized: (1) Combination A [Policosanol, Red yeast rice (Monakolin K 3 mg), Berberine 500 mg, Astaxantine, Folic Acid and Coenzyme Q10] for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of Combination B [Red yeast rice (Monakolin K 3.3 mg), Berberine 531.25 mg and leaf extract of Morus alba]; (2) Combination B for 4 weeks followed by 4 weeks of Combination A. Combination B reduced LDL cholesterol below 130 mg/dl in 56.5 % of the patients, and Cambination A only in 21.7 % of them (p ≤ 0.027). Both treatments reduced plasma levels of triglycerides, total and LDL cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol (all p Morus alba extract improves the effect on plasma cholesterol and on glucose metabolism of the NUT Combination. These effects may allow the speculation of a more marked improvement in cardiovascular prognosis.

  20. Effect of a plant sterol, fish oil and B vitamin combination on cardiovascular risk factors in hypercholesterolemic children and adolescents: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garaiova Iveta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors can predict clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis in adulthood. In this pilot study with hypercholesterolemic children and adolescents, we investigated the effects of a combination of plant sterols, fish oil and B vitamins on the levels of four independent risk factors for CVD; LDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, C-reactive protein and homocysteine. Methods Twenty five participants (mean age 16 y, BMI 23 kg/m2 received daily for a period of 16 weeks an emulsified preparation comprising plant sterols esters (1300 mg, fish oil (providing 1000 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and vitamins B12 (50 μg, B6 (2.5 mg, folic acid (800 μg and coenzyme Q10 (3 mg. Atherogenic and inflammatory risk factors, plasma lipophilic vitamins, provitamins and fatty acids were measured at baseline, week 8 and 16. Results The serum total cholesterol, LDL- cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, subfractions LDL-2, IDL-1, IDL-2 and plasma homocysteine levels were significantly reduced at the end of the intervention period (pp Conclusions Daily intake of a combination of plant sterols, fish oil and B vitamins may modulate the lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic children and adolescents. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89549017

  1. Thermodynamic and Structure Guided Design of Statin Based Inhibitors of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarver, Ronald W.; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D.; Caspers, Nicole L.; Dunbar, James B.; Harris, Melissa S.; Hutchings, Richard H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Larsen, Scott D.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Bainbridge, Graeme (Pfizer)

    2008-10-02

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2--7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a {Delta}H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  2. Downregulation of monocytic differentiation via modulation of CD147 by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manda V Sasidhar

    Full Text Available CD147 is an activation induced glycoprotein that promotes the secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and is upregulated during the differentiation of macrophages. Interestingly, some of the molecular functions of CD147 rely on its glycosylation status: the highly glycosylated forms of CD147 induce MMPs whereas the lowly glycosylated forms inhibit MMP activation. Statins are hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that block the synthesis of mevalonate, thereby inhibiting all mevalonate-dependent pathways, including isoprenylation, N-glycosylation and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we investigated the role of statins in the inhibition of macrophage differentiation and the associated process of MMP secretion through modulation of CD147. We observed that differentiation of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 to a macrophage phenotype led to upregulation of CD147 and CD14 and that this effect was inhibited by statins. At the molecular level, statins altered CD147 expression, structure and function by inhibiting isoprenylation and N-glycosylation. In addition, statins induced a shift of CD147 from its highly glycosylated form to its lowly glycosylated form. This shift in N-glycosylation status was accompanied by a decrease in the production and functional activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In conclusion, these findings describe a novel molecular mechanism of immune regulation by statins, making them interesting candidates for autoimmune disease therapy.

  3. Downregulation of monocytic differentiation via modulation of CD147 by 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidhar, Manda V; Chevooru, Sai Krishnaveni; Eickelberg, Oliver; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Neuhaus, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    CD147 is an activation induced glycoprotein that promotes the secretion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and is upregulated during the differentiation of macrophages. Interestingly, some of the molecular functions of CD147 rely on its glycosylation status: the highly glycosylated forms of CD147 induce MMPs whereas the lowly glycosylated forms inhibit MMP activation. Statins are hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that block the synthesis of mevalonate, thereby inhibiting all mevalonate-dependent pathways, including isoprenylation, N-glycosylation and cholesterol synthesis. In this study, we investigated the role of statins in the inhibition of macrophage differentiation and the associated process of MMP secretion through modulation of CD147. We observed that differentiation of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 to a macrophage phenotype led to upregulation of CD147 and CD14 and that this effect was inhibited by statins. At the molecular level, statins altered CD147 expression, structure and function by inhibiting isoprenylation and N-glycosylation. In addition, statins induced a shift of CD147 from its highly glycosylated form to its lowly glycosylated form. This shift in N-glycosylation status was accompanied by a decrease in the production and functional activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. In conclusion, these findings describe a novel molecular mechanism of immune regulation by statins, making them interesting candidates for autoimmune disease therapy.

  4. Activation of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase is involved in Taxol-induced ovarian cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Ji, Fang; DI, Wen; Chen, Hongduo; Wan, Yinsheng

    2011-05-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) is an attractive target for research into the treatment of a variety of human diseases, including diabetes, obesity and cancer. Mounting evidence suggests that the inhibition of ACC induced of cancer cell apoptosis. However, whether the inhibition of ACC regulates apoptosis in CaOV3 cancer cells has yet to be addressed. This study investigated the cytotoxic mechanism of action of ACC inhibition. Results showed that 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA), an ACC inhibitor, enhanced Taxol-induced CaOV3 human ovarian cancer cell apoptosis. Notably, when TOFA was administered as a monotherapy, it induced CaOV3 cell apoptosis. Pre-treatment with the EGFR inhibitor PD153035 was found to markedly enhance ACC phosphorylation, whereas AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator AICAR was found to marginally enhance ACC phosphorylation. Taken together, the data showed ACC is a potential novel molecular target of Taxol. Additionally, ACC inhibition partially contributed to the cytotoxic effect of Taxol in ovarian cancer cells.

  5. ROLE OF METABOLIC THERAPY IN TREATMENT OF MYOCARDIUM DYSTROPHY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Frolenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present research was studying of influence of co-enzyme Q10 (Kudesan on cardiovascular system in children with myocardial dystrophy (MCD. Patients were divided on two comparable groups (n = 20 and n = 28 according to clinical symptoms of MCD, changes on electrocardiogram (ECG and results of echocardiography. Patients received non-drug means (massage, physical training in treatment regimen, psycho- and reflexotherapy and vasoactive, nootropic and sedative medications; patients from 2nd group were additionally treated with co-enzyme Q10 during 4 weeks. It was shown that inclusion of co-enzyme Q10 in complex treatment of MCD resulted in beneficial effect on self-feeling of child, favored to disappearance of repolarization disorders on ECG and increase of ejectional fraction. Thus, using of co-enzyme Q10 in complex treatment of children with MCD is reasonable. Key words: children, myocardial dystrophy, co-enzyme Q10, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(5:18-23

  6. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  7. Characterization of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzyme of human small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramine, Yasushi; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2011-06-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) enzyme plays a significant role in dietary triacylglycerol (TAG) absorption in the small intestine. However, the characteristics of human intestinal DGAT enzyme have not been examined in detail. The aim of our study was to characterize the human intestinal DGAT enzyme by examining acyl-CoA specificity, temperature dependency, and selectivity for 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) or 1,3-DAG. We detected DGAT activity of human intestinal microsome and found that the acyl-CoA specificity and temperature dependency of intestinal DGAT coincided with those of recombinant human DGAT1. To elucidate the selectivity of human intestinal DGAT to 1,2-DAG or 1,3-DAG, we conducted acyl-coenzyme A:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase assays using 1- or 2-monoacylglycerol (MAG) as substrates. When 2-MAG was used as acyl acceptor, both 1,2-DAG and TAG were generated; however, when 1-MAG was used, 1,3-DAG was predominantly observed and little TAG was detected. These findings suggest that human small intestinal DGAT, which is mainly encoded by DGAT1, utilizes 1,2-DAG as the substrate to form TAG. This study will contribute to understand the lipid absorption profile in the small intestine.

  8. Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency with adult onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smelt, A H; Poorthuis, B J; Onkenhout, W

    1998-01-01

    Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a severe disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation in infants. We report adult onset of attacks of painful rhabdomyolysis. Gas chromatography identified strongly elevated levels of tetradecenoic acid, 14:1(n-9), tetrade......Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a severe disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation in infants. We report adult onset of attacks of painful rhabdomyolysis. Gas chromatography identified strongly elevated levels of tetradecenoic acid, 14:1(n-9......), tetradecadienoic acid, 14:2(n-6), and hexadecadienoic acid, 16:2(n-6). Palmitoyl-CoA and behenoyl-CoA dehydrogenase in fibroblasts were deficient. Muscle VLCAD activity was very low. DNA analysis revealed compound heterozygosity for two missense mutations in the VLCAD gene. The relatively mild clinical course may...... be due to residual enzyme activity as a consequence of the two missense mutations. Treatment with L-carnitine and medium chain triglycerides in the diet did not reduce the attacks of rhabdomyolysis....

  9. Conserved residues and their role in the structure, function, and stability of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Poulsen, K; Andersen, K V

    1999-01-01

    In the family of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins, a subset of 26 sequence sites are identical in all eukaryotes and conserved throughout evolution of the eukaryotic kingdoms. In the context of the bovine protein, the importance of these 26 sequence positions for structure, function, stability...

  10. Rotational barriers of 1,3-substitute pyridines and benzenes as models for the NAD+/NADH coenzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhommerig, S.A.M.; Meier, R.J.; Sluyterman, L.A.A.E.; Meijer, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The NAD+/NADH coenzyme is involved in many enzyme-catalysed oxidation-reduction reactions. In order to obtain better insight in the catalytic mechanism of NAD+/NADH dependent dehydrogenases, conformational studies of 1,3-substituted pyridines and benzenes were carried out, using ab initio,

  11. Clinical presentation and outcome in a series of 32 patients with 2-methylacetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase (MAT) deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünert, Sarah Catharina; Schmitt, Robert Niklas; Schlatter, Sonja Marina; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Balci, Mehmet Cihan; Berg, Volker; Çoker, Mahmut; Das, Anibh M; Demirkol, Mübeccel; Derks, Terry G J; Gökçay, Gülden; Uçar, Sema Kalkan; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Christoph Korenke, G.; Lotz-Havla, Amelie Sophia; Schlune, Andrea; Staufner, Christian; Tran, Christel; Visser, Gepke; Schwab, Karl Otfried; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Sass, Jörn Oliver

    2-methylacetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase (MAT) deficiency, also known as beta-ketothiolase deficiency, is an inborn error of ketone body utilization and isoleucine catabolism. It is caused by mutations in the ACAT1 gene and may present with metabolic ketoacidosis. In order to obtain a more

  12. Synthesis, solution and crystal structure of the coenzyme B(12) analogue Co(β)-2'-fluoro-2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Miriam; Wurst, Klaus; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Crystal structure analyses have helped to decipher the mode of binding of coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl) in the active site of AdoCbl-dependent enzymes. However, the question of how such enzymes perform their radical reactions is still incompletely answered. A pioneering study by Gruber and Kratky of AdoCbl-dependent glutamate mutase (GLM) laid out a path for the movement of the catalytically active 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, in which H-bonds between the protein and the 2'- and 3'-OH groups of the protein bound AdoCbl would play a decisive role. Studies with correspondingly modified coenzyme B12-analogues are of interest to gain insights into cofactor binding and enzyme mechanism. Here we report the preparation of Coβ-2'-fluoro-2',5'-dideoxyadenosylcobalamin (2'FAdoCbl), which lacks the 2'-OH group critical for the interaction in enzymes. 2'FAdoCbl was prepared by alkylation of cob(I)alamin, obtained from the electrochemical reduction of aquocobalamin. Spectroscopic data and a single crystal X-ray analysis of 2'FAdoCbl established its structure, which was very similar to that one of coenzyme B12. 2'FAdoCbl is a (19)F NMR active mimic of coenzyme B12 that may help to gain insights into binding interactions of coenzyme B12 with AdoCbl-dependent enzymes, proteins of B12 transport and of AdoCbl-biosynthesis, as well as with B12-riboswitches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. How Chain Length and Charge Affect Surfactant Denaturation of Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    maltoside (DDM). The aim has been to determine how surfactant chain length and micellar charge affect the denaturation mechanism. ACBP denatures in two steps irrespective of surfactant chain length, but with increasing chain length, the potency of the denaturant rises more rapidly than the critical micelle......Using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, equilibria and kinetics of unfolding of acyl coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) have been investigated in sodium alkyl sulfate surfactants of different chain length (8-16 carbon atoms) and with different proportions of the nonionic surfactant dodecyl...... constants increases linearly with denaturant concentration below the cmc but declines at higher concentrations. Both shortening chain length and decreasing micellar charge reduce the overall kinetics of unfolding and makes the dependence of unfolding rate constants on surfactant concentration more complex...

  14. Factors affecting the palmitoyl-coenzyme A desaturase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.; Volkmann, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The activity and stability of the palmitoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was influenced by several factors. Cells, grown nonaerobically and then incubated with glucose, either in air or under N2, showed a marked increase in desaturase activity. Cycloheximide, added during such incubations, prevented the increase in activity, suggesting de novo synthesis. The stability of the desaturase from cells grown nonaerobically was affected by subsequent treatment of the cells; enzyme from freshly harvested cells, or from cells that were then shaken under nitrogen, readily lost activity upon washing or during density gradient analysis, whereas aerated cells, in the presence or absence of glucose, yielded stable enzyme preparations. The loss of activity in nonaerobic preparations could be reversed by adding soluble supernatant from these homogenates and could be prevented by growing the cells in the presence of palmitoleic acid and ergosterol, but not with several other lipids tested.

  15. Fulminant lipid storage myopathy due to multiple acyl-coenzyme a dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Charles H; Felice, Kevin J; Silvers, David; Wu, Qian

    2015-08-01

    The lipid storage myopathies, primary carnitine deficiency, neutral lipid storage disease, and multiple acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), are progressive disorders that cause permanent weakness. These disorders of fatty acid metabolism and intracellular triglyceride degradation cause marked fat deposition and damage to muscle cells. We describe a rapidly progressive myopathy in a previously healthy 33-year-old woman. Over 4 months, she developed a proximal and axial myopathy associated with diffuse myalgia and dysphagia, ultimately leading to respiratory failure and death. Muscle biopsy showed massive accumulation of lipid. Plasma acylcarnitine and urine organic acid analysis was consistent with MADD. This was confirmed by molecular genetic testing, which revealed 2 pathogenic mutations in the ETFDH gene. This report illustrates a late-onset case of MADD and reviews the differential diagnosis and evaluation of patients with proximal myopathy and excessive accumulation of lipid on muscle biopsy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acyl coenzyme A thioesterase 7 regulates neuronal fatty acid metabolism to prevent neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jessica M; Wong, G William; Wolfgang, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Numerous neurological diseases are associated with dysregulated lipid metabolism; however, the basic metabolic control of fatty acid metabolism in neurons remains enigmatic. Here we have shown that neurons have abundant expression and activity of the long-chain cytoplasmic acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) thioesterase 7 (ACOT7) to regulate lipid retention and metabolism. Unbiased and targeted metabolomic analysis of fasted mice with a conditional knockout of ACOT7 in the nervous system, Acot7(N-/-), revealed increased fatty acid flux into multiple long-chain acyl-CoA-dependent pathways. The alterations in brain fatty acid metabolism were concomitant with a loss of lean mass, hypermetabolism, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and behavioral hyperexcitability in Acot7(N-/-) mice. These failures in adaptive energy metabolism are common in neurodegenerative diseases. In agreement, Acot7(N-/-) mice exhibit neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. These data show that ACOT7 counterregulates fatty acid metabolism in neurons and protects against neurotoxicity.

  17. Sensitive non-radioactive determination of aminotransferase stereospecificity for C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomrit, Juntratip; Summpunn, Pijug; Meevootisom, Vithaya; Wiyakrutta, Suthep

    2011-02-25

    A sensitive non-radioactive method for determination of the stereospecificity of the C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzymes (pyridoxal phosphate, PLP; and pyridoxamine phosphate, PMP) of aminotransferases has been developed. Aminotransferase of unknown stereospecificity in its PLP form was incubated in (2)H(2)O with a substrate amino acid resulted in PMP labeled with deuterium at C-4' in the pro-S or pro-R configuration according to the stereospecificity of the aminotransferase tested. The [4'-(2)H]PMP was isolated from the enzyme protein and divided into two portions. The first portion was incubated in aqueous buffer with apo-aspartate aminotransferase (a reference si-face specific enzyme), and the other was incubated with apo-branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (a reference re-face specific enzyme) in the presence of a substrate 2-oxo acid. The (2)H at C-4' is retained with the PLP if the aminotransferase in question transfers C-4' hydrogen on the opposite face of the coenzyme compared with the reference aminotransferase, but the (2)H is removed if the test and reference aminotransferases catalyze hydrogen transfer on the same face. PLP formed in the final reactions was analyzed by LC-MS/MS for the presence or absence of (2)H. The method was highly sensitive that for the aminotransferase with ca. 50 kDa subunit molecular weight, only 2mg of the enzyme was sufficient for the whole test. With this method, the use of radioactive substances could be avoided without compromising the sensitivity of the assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. TD-DFT Insight into Photodissociation of Co-C Bond in Coenzyme B12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Michal Kozlowski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin B12, and continues to be a topic of active research interest. The mechanism of Co-C bond cleavage in AdoCbl, and the corresponding enzymatic reactions are however, not well understood at the molecular level. In this work, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT has been applied to investigate the photodissociation of coenzyme B12. To reduce computational cost, while retaining the major spectroscopic features of AdoCbl, a truncated model based on ribosylcobalamin (RibCbl was used to simulate Co-C photodissociation. Equilibrium geometries of RibCbl were obtained by optimization at the DFT/BP86/TZVP level of theory, and low-lying excited states were calculated by TD-DFT using the same functional and basis set. The calculated singlet states, and absorption spectra were simulated in both the gas phase, and water, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM. Both spectra were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and potential energy curves based on vertical excitations were plotted to explore the nature of Co-C bond dissociation. It was found that a repulsive 3(σCo-C → σ*Co-C triplet state became dissociative at large Co-C bond distance, similar to a previous observation for methylcobalamin (MeCbl. Furthermore, potential energy surfaces (PESs obtained as a function of both Co-CRib and Co-NIm distances, identify the S1 state as a key intermediate generated during photoexcitation of RibCbl, attributed to a mixture of a MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer and a σ bonding-ligand charge transfer (SBLCT states.

  19. Screening of effective pharmacological treatments for MELAS syndrome using yeasts, fibroblasts and cybrid models of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D; Moñino, Irene Domínguez; Pereira-Arenas, Sheila; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana V; Cotán, David; De la Mata, Mario; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; De Miguel, Manuel; Bautista Lorite, Juan; Rivas Infante, Eloy; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Navas, Plácido; Jackson, Sandra; Francisci, Silvia; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2012-11-01

    MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) is a mitochondrial disease most usually caused by point mutations in tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Approximately 80% of cases of MELAS syndrome are associated with a m.3243A > G mutation in the MT-TL1 gene, which encodes the mitochondrial tRNALeu (UUR). Currently, no effective treatments are available for this chronic progressive disorder. Treatment strategies in MELAS and other mitochondrial diseases consist of several drugs that diminish the deleterious effects of the abnormal respiratory chain function, reduce the presence of toxic agents or correct deficiencies in essential cofactors. We evaluated the effectiveness of some common pharmacological agents that have been utilized in the treatment of MELAS, in yeast, fibroblast and cybrid models of the disease. The yeast model harbouring the A14G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) gene, which is equivalent to the A3243G mutation in humans, was used in the initial screening. Next, the most effective drugs that were able to rescue the respiratory deficiency in MELAS yeast mutants were tested in fibroblasts and cybrid models of MELAS disease. According to our results, supplementation with riboflavin or coenzyme Q(10) effectively reversed the respiratory defect in MELAS yeast and improved the pathologic alterations in MELAS fibroblast and cybrid cell models. Our results indicate that cell models have great potential for screening and validating the effects of novel drug candidates for MELAS treatment and presumably also for other diseases with mitochondrial impairment. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Contrasting effects of elevated CO2 and warming on temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a Chinese paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaozhi; Wang, Bingyu; Wang, Jinyang; Pan, Genxing; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-10-01

    Climate changes including elevated CO2 and temperature have been known to affect soil carbon (C) storage, while the effects of climate changes on the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) are unclear. A 365-day laboratory incubation was used to investigate the temperature sensitivity for decomposition of labile (Q 10-L) and recalcitrant (Q 10-R) SOMs by comparing the time required to decompose a given amount of C at 25 and 35 °C. Soils were collected from a paddy field that was subjected to four treatments: ambient CO2 and temperature, elevated CO2 (500 μmol/mol), enhanced temperature (+2 °C), and their combination. The results showed that the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition increased with increasing SOM recalcitrance in this paddy soil (Q 10-L = 2.21 ± 0.16 vs. Q 10-R = 2.78 ± 0.42; mean ± SD). Elevated CO2 and enhanced temperature showed contrasting effects on the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. Elevated CO2 stimulated Q 10-R but had no effect on Q 10-L; in contrast, enhanced temperature increased Q 10-L but had no effect on Q 10-R. Furthermore, the elevated CO2 combined with enhanced temperature treatment significantly increased Q 10-L and Q 10-R by 18.9 and 10.2 %, respectively, compared to the ambient conditions. Results suggested that the responses of SOM to temperature, especially for the recalcitrant SOM pool, were altered by climate changes. The greatly enhanced temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition by elevated CO2 and temperature indicates that more CO2 will be released to the atmosphere and losses of soil C may be even greater than that previously expected in paddy field.

  1. Nutraceuticals with a clinically detectable blood pressure‐lowering effect: a review of available randomized clinical trials and their meta‐analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2016-01-01

    AIMS The aim of the present study was to review and comment on the available evidence on nutraceuticals with a clinically demonstrable blood pressure (BP)‐lowering effect. METHODS We reviewed studies published in the English language from 1990 to 2015 on dietary supplements or nutraceuticals claiming to show an effect on human BP. An initial list of possibly effective agents and studies was obtained from the online reference, the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database. Using PubMed, we searched agents identified from this list using the MeSH terms ‘hypertension’, ‘blood pressure’, ‘dietary supplement’ and ‘nutraceuticals’, alone and in combination. We then focused our attention on meta‐analyses and randomized clinical trials. RESULTS Beyond the well‐known effects on BP of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diet, a large number of studies have investigated the possible BP‐lowering effect of different dietary supplements and nutraceuticals, most of which are antioxidant agents with a high tolerability and safety profile. In particular, a relatively large body of evidence supports the use of potassium, magnesium, L‐arginine, vitamin C, cocoa flavonoids, beetroot juice, coenzyme Q10, controlled‐release melatonin and aged garlic extract. The antihypertensive effect of all these nutraceuticals seems to be dose related and the overall tolerability is good. CONCLUSION Some nutraceuticals might have a positive impact on BP in humans. Further clinical research is needed, to identify from the available active nutraceuticals those with the best cost‐effectiveness and risk–benefit ratio for widespread and long‐term use in the general population with a low‐added cardiovascular risk related to uncomplicated hypertension. PMID:26852373

  2. Nutraceuticals with a clinically detectable blood pressure-lowering effect: a review of available randomized clinical trials and their meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Claudio; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to review and comment on the available evidence on nutraceuticals with a clinically demonstrable blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect. We reviewed studies published in the English language from 1990 to 2015 on dietary supplements or nutraceuticals claiming to show an effect on human BP. An initial list of possibly effective agents and studies was obtained from the online reference, the Natural Medicine Comprehensive Database. Using PubMed, we searched agents identified from this list using the MeSH terms 'hypertension', 'blood pressure', 'dietary supplement' and 'nutraceuticals', alone and in combination. We then focused our attention on meta-analyses and randomized clinical trials. Beyond the well-known effects on BP of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diet, a large number of studies have investigated the possible BP-lowering effect of different dietary supplements and nutraceuticals, most of which are antioxidant agents with a high tolerability and safety profile. In particular, a relatively large body of evidence supports the use of potassium, magnesium, L-arginine, vitamin C, cocoa flavonoids, beetroot juice, coenzyme Q10, controlled-release melatonin and aged garlic extract. The antihypertensive effect of all these nutraceuticals seems to be dose related and the overall tolerability is good. Some nutraceuticals might have a positive impact on BP in humans. Further clinical research is needed, to identify from the available active nutraceuticals those with the best cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit ratio for widespread and long-term use in the general population with a low-added cardiovascular risk related to uncomplicated hypertension. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. The role of ubiquinone supplementation on osteogenesis of nonvascularized autogenous bone graft

    OpenAIRE

    Taufiqurrahman, Irham; Harijadi, Achmad; Simanjuntak, Roberto M.; D, Coen Pramono; Istiati, Istiati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ubiquinone is one of food supplement which is known have positive effect in wound healing. However the study to evaluate the possible role of ubiquinone in bone healing in autogenous bone grafting after mandibular resection has not been studied. An in vitro study is required to evaluate whether ubiquinone or coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10) has a positive effect on osteogenesis. Viability test of CoQ10 and a model of osteogenic-induced and hypoxic-condition mesenchymal stem cell culture were...

  4. High-Throughput Screening of Coenzyme Preference Change of Thermophilic 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase from NADP(+) to NAD(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; Zhong, Chao; Kim, Jae Eung; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2016-09-02

    Coenzyme engineering that changes NAD(P) selectivity of redox enzymes is an important tool in metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, and biocatalysis. Here we developed a high throughput screening method to identify mutants of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica with reversed coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). Colonies of a 6PGDH mutant library growing on the agar plates were treated by heat to minimize the background noise, that is, the deactivation of intracellular dehydrogenases, degradation of inherent NAD(P)H, and disruption of cell membrane. The melted agarose solution containing a redox dye tetranitroblue tetrazolium (TNBT), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), NAD(+), and 6-phosphogluconate was carefully poured on colonies, forming a second semi-solid layer. More active 6PGDH mutants were examined via an enzyme-linked TNBT-PMS colorimetric assay. Positive mutants were recovered by direct extraction of plasmid from dead cell colonies followed by plasmid transformation into E. coli TOP10. By utilizing this double-layer screening method, six positive mutants were obtained from two-round saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant 6PGDH A30D/R31I/T32I exhibited a 4,278-fold reversal of coenzyme selectivity from NADP(+) to NAD(+). This screening method could be widely used to detect numerous redox enzymes, particularly for thermophilic ones, which can generate NAD(P)H reacted with the redox dye TNBT.

  5. Expression of the Acyl-Coenzyme A: Cholesterol Acyltransferase GFP Fusion Protein in Sf21 Insect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani, H. K.; Richmond, R. C.; Chang, T. Y.; Chang, C. C. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The enzyme acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is an important contributor to the pathological expression of plaque leading to artherosclerosis n a major health problem. Adequate knowledge of the structure of this protein will enable pharmaceutical companies to design drugs specific to the enzyme. ACAT is a membrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum.t The protein has never been purified to homogeneity.T.Y. Chang's laboratory at Dartmouth College provided a 4-kb cDNA clone (K1) coding for a structural gene of the protein. We have modified the gene sequence and inserted the cDNA into the BioGreen His Baculovirus transfer vector. This was successfully expressed in Sf2l insect cells as a GFP-labeled ACAT protein. The advantage to this ACAT-GFP fusion protein (abbreviated GCAT) is that one can easily monitor its expression as a function of GFP excitation at 395 nm and emission at 509 nm. Moreover, the fusion protein GCAT can be detected on Western blots with the use of commercially available GFP antibodies. Antibodies against ACAT are not readily available. The presence of the 6xHis tag in the transfer vector facilitates purification of the recombinant protein since 6xHis fusion proteins bind with high affinity to Ni-NTA agarose. Obtaining highly pure protein in large quantities is essential for subsequent crystallization. The purified GCAT fusion protein can readily be cleaved into distinct GFP and ACAT proteins in the presence of thrombin. Thrombin digests the 6xHis tag linking the two protein sequences. Preliminary experiments have indicated that both GCAT and ACAT are expressed as functional proteins. The ultimate aim is to obtain large quantities of the ACAT protein in pure and functional form appropriate for protein crystal growth. Determining protein structure is the key to the design and development of effective drugs. X-ray analysis requires large homogeneous crystals that are difficult to obtain in the gravity environment of earth

  6. Coenzyme B12 synthesis as a baseline to study metabolite contribution of animal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Antoine; Braham, Sherazade

    2017-07-01

    Microbial communities thrive in a number of environments. Exploration of their microbiomes - their global genome - may reveal metabolic features that contribute to the development and welfare of their hosts, or chemical cleansing of environments. Yet we often lack final demonstration of their causal role in features of interest. The reason is that we do not have proper baselines that we could use to monitor how microbiota cope with key metabolites in the hosting environment. Here, focusing on animal gut microbiota, we describe the fate of cobalamins - metabolites of the B12 coenzyme family - that are essential for animals but synthesized only by prokaryotes. Microbiota produce the vitamin used in a variety of animals (and in algae). Coprophagy plays a role in its management. For coprophobic man, preliminary observations suggest that the gut microbial production of vitamin B12 plays only a limited role. By contrast, the vitamin is key for structuring microbiota. This implies that it is freely available in the environment. This can only result from lysis of the microbes that make it. A consequence for biotechnology applications is that, if valuable for their host, B12-producing microbes should be sensitive to bacteriophages and colicins, or make spores. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Cofilin/Twinstar phosphorylation levels increase in response to impaired coenzyme a metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Siudeja

    Full Text Available Coenzyme A (CoA is a pantothenic acid-derived metabolite essential for many fundamental cellular processes including energy, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Pantothenate kinase (PANK, which catalyses the first step in the conversion of pantothenic acid to CoA, has been associated with a rare neurodegenerative disorder PKAN. However, the consequences of impaired PANK activity are poorly understood. Here we use Drosophila and human neuronal cell cultures to show how PANK deficiency leads to abnormalities in F-actin organization. Cells with reduced PANK activity are characterized by abnormally high levels of phosphorylated cofilin, a conserved actin filament severing protein. The increased levels of phospho-cofilin coincide with morphological changes of PANK-deficient Drosophila S2 cells and human neuronal SHSY-5Y cells. The latter exhibit also markedly reduced ability to form neurites in culture--a process that is strongly dependent on actin remodeling. Our results reveal a novel and conserved link between a metabolic biosynthesis pathway, and regulation of cellular actin dynamics.

  8. The TIP30 protein complex, arachidonic acid and coenzyme A are required for vesicle membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengliang Zhang

    Full Text Available Efficient membrane fusion has been successfully mimicked in vitro using artificial membranes and a number of cellular proteins that are currently known to participate in membrane fusion. However, these proteins are not sufficient to promote efficient fusion between biological membranes, indicating that critical fusogenic factors remain unidentified. We have recently identified a TIP30 protein complex containing TIP30, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 4 (ACSL4 and Endophilin B1 (Endo B1 that promotes the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles, which transport endosomal acidification enzymes vacuolar (H⁺-ATPases (V-ATPases to the early endosomes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the TIP30 protein complex facilitates the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles in vitro. Fusion of the two vesicles also depends on arachidonic acid, coenzyme A and the synthesis of arachidonyl-CoA by ACSL4. Moreover, the TIP30 complex is able to transfer arachidonyl groups onto phosphatidic acid (PA, producing a new lipid species that is capable of inducing close contact between membranes. Together, our data suggest that the TIP30 complex facilitates biological membrane fusion through modification of PA on membranes.

  9. Dependence of Brown Adipose Tissue Function on CD36-Mediated Coenzyme Q Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney M. Anderson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ. While cells synthesize CoQ mostly endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function are not well understood. Here, we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective nonshivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis.

  10. Concerted elevation of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity through independent stimulation of mRNA expression of DGAT1 and DGAT2 by carbohydrate and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegalla, Rupalie L; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Cheng, Dong

    2002-11-01

    Glucose and insulin are anabolic signals which upregulate the transcriptions of a series of lipogenic enzymes to convert excess carbohydrate into triglycerides for efficient energy storage. These enzymes include ATP-citrate lyase (ACL), acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (G3PA). Acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) is important to synthesize fatty acids into triglycerides. Two DGATs from different gene families have recently been identified. In the current study, we report that glucose preferentially enhances DGAT1 mRNA expression, whereas insulin specifically increases the level of DGAT2 mRNA. Treatment of adipocytes with glucose and insulin together results in higher DGAT activity in the membrane than cells treated with either of the agents alone, indicating that glucose and insulin have additive effect on DGAT activation. In mice treated with fast/refeeding protocol, DGAT2 mRNA decreased upon fasting and was replenished upon refeeding in adipose tissue and liver. This pattern of change was not observed for DGAT1. Inasmuch as DGAT1 mRNA is less abundant in liver, we suggest that DGAT1 is more involved in fat absorption in the intestine and in basal level triglyceride synthesis in adipose tissue where it is more highly expressed. In contrast, DGAT2 is more likely to play important roles in assembly of de novo synthesized fatty acids into VLDL particles in the liver.

  11. A Large Scale Formal Synthesis of CoQ10: Highly Stereoselective Friedel-Crafts Allylation Reaction of Tetramethoxytoluene with (E)-4-Chloro-2-methyl-1-phenylsulfonyl-2-butene in the Presence of Montmorillonite K-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Who; Lee, Hee Bong; Kim, Bong Chan; Sadaiah, Kadivendi; Lee, Kyuwoong; Shin, Hyunik

    2013-01-01

    We disclosed that MK-10 is a highly effective catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts reaction of 6 and 7 in terms of yield and of stereoselectivity. Although there are numerous applications of clays in Friedel-Crafts reaction, there is very limited example which demonstrated its effect on the stereoselectivity. In that context, our result is significant and further expansion in this direction is highly envisioned. Ubiquinone, as its name represents, exists ubiquitously in human body, particularly in the heart. It mediates the electron transfer process in mitochondria and also exerts strong antioxidant effect in its reduced form. In clinical trial, it showed beneficial effect on heart-related diseases such as myocardial infarction, angina, and other related symptoms to cause decreased mortality compared to the placebo group

  12. TetR Family Transcriptional Regulator PccD Negatively Controls Propionyl Coenzyme A Assimilation in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Wang, Miaomiao; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2017-10-15

    Propanol stimulates erythromycin biosynthesis by increasing the supply of propionyl coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA), a starter unit of erythromycin production in Saccharopolyspora erythraea Propionyl-CoA is assimilated via propionyl-CoA carboxylase to methylmalonyl-CoA, an extender unit of erythromycin. We found that the addition of n -propanol or propionate caused a 4- to 16-fold increase in the transcriptional levels of the SACE_3398-3400 locus encoding propionyl-CoA carboxylase, a key enzyme in propionate metabolism. The regulator PccD was proved to be directly involved in the transcription regulation of the SACE_3398-3400 locus by EMSA and DNase I footprint analysis. The transcriptional levels of SACE_3398-3400 were upregulated 15- to 37-fold in the pccD gene deletion strain (Δ pccD ) and downregulated 3-fold in the pccD overexpression strain (WT/pIB- pccD ), indicating that PccD was a negative transcriptional regulator of SACE_3398-3400. The Δ pccD strain has a higher growth rate than that of the wild-type strain (WT) on Evans medium with propionate as the sole carbon source, whereas the growth of the WT/pIB- pccD strain was repressed. As a possible metabolite of propionate metabolism, methylmalonic acid was identified as an effector molecule of PccD and repressed its regulatory activity. A higher level of erythromycin in the Δ pccD strain was observed compared with that in the wild-type strain. Our study reveals a regulatory mechanism in propionate metabolism and suggests new possibilities for designing metabolic engineering to increase erythromycin yield. IMPORTANCE Our work has identified the novel regulator PccD that controls the expression of the gene for propionyl-CoA carboxylase, a key enzyme in propionyl-CoA assimilation in S. erythraea PccD represses the generation of methylmalonyl-CoA through carboxylation of propionyl-CoA and reveals an effect on biosynthesis of erythromycin. This finding provides novel insight into propionyl-CoA assimilation, and

  13. Ubiquinol treatment for TBI in male rats: Effects on mitochondrial integrity, injury severity, and neurometabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Janet D; Gupte, Raeesa; Thimmesch, Amanda; Shen, Qiuhua; Hiebert, John B; Brooks, William M; Clancy, Richard L; Diaz, Francisco J; Harris, Janna L

    2018-06-01

    Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is significant secondary damage to cerebral tissue from increased free radicals and impaired mitochondrial function. This imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the effectiveness of cellular antioxidant defenses is termed oxidative stress. Often there are insufficient antioxidants to scavenge ROS, leading to alterations in cerebral structure and function. Attenuating oxidative stress following a TBI by administering an antioxidant may decrease secondary brain injury, and currently many drugs and supplements are being investigated. We explored an over-the-counter supplement called ubiquinol (reduced form of coenzyme Q10), a potent antioxidant naturally produced in brain mitochondria. We administered intra-arterial ubiquinol to rats to determine if it would reduce mitochondrial damage, apoptosis, and severity of a contusive TBI. Adult male F344 rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) Saline-TBI, (2) ubiquinol 30 minutes before TBI (UB-PreTBI), or (3) ubiquinol 30 minutes after TBI (UB-PostTBI). We found when ubiquinol was administered before or after TBI, rats had an acute reduction in brain mitochondrial damage, apoptosis, and two serum biomarkers of TBI severity, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1). However, in vivo neurometabolic assessment with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy did not show attenuated injury-induced changes. These findings are the first to show that ubiquinol preserves mitochondria and reduces cellular injury severity after TBI, and support further study of ubiquinol as a promising adjunct therapy for TBI. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effect of ubiquinol supplementation on biochemical and oxidative stress indexes after intense exercise in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Patrick; Silvestri, Sonia; Galeazzi, Roberta; Antonicelli, Roberto; Marcheggiani, Fabio; Cirilli, Ilenia; Bacchetti, Tiziana; Tiano, Luca

    2018-12-01

    Physical exercise significantly impacts the biochemistry of the organism. Ubiquinone is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and ubiquinol, its reduced and active form, is an emerging molecule in sport nutrition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ubiquinol supplementation on biochemical and oxidative stress indexes after an intense bout of exercise. 21 male young athletes (26 + 5 years of age) were randomized in two groups according to a double blind cross-over study, either supplemented with ubiquinol (200 mg/day) or placebo for 1 month. Blood was withdrawn before and after a single bout of intense exercise (40 min run at 85% maxHR). Physical performance, hematochemical parameters, ubiquinone/ubiquinol plasma content, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, paraoxonase activity and oxidative DNA damage were analyzed. A single bout of intense exercise produced a significant increase in most hematochemical indexes, in particular CK and Mb while, on the contrary, normalized coenzyme Q 10 plasma content decreased significantly in all subjects. Ubiquinol supplementation prevented exercise-induced CoQ deprivation and decrease in paraoxonase activity. Moreover at a cellular level, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ubiquinol supplementation was associated with a significant decrease in cytosolic ROS while mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative DNA damage remained unchanged. Data highlights a very rapid dynamic of CoQ depletion following intense exercise underlying an increased demand by the organism. Ubiquinol supplementation minimized exercise-induced depletion and enhanced plasma and cellular antioxidant levels but it was not able to improve physical performance indexes or markers of muscular damage.

  15. R- –Lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine optimal combinations in MPP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitochondrial insufficiency and oxidative damage contribute to the etiopathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there is a dearth of information on the protective activities against PD of mitochondrial nutrients, safe for coenzyme Q10. In the present study, the PD protective effects of two mitochondrial nutrients, ...

  16. Dependence of mitochondrial coenzyme A uptake on the membrane electrical gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahiliani, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) transport was studied in isolated rat heart mitochondria. Uptake of CoA was assayed by determining [3H]CoA associated with mitochondria under various conditions. Various oxidizable substrates including alpha-ketoglutarate, succinate, or malate stimulated CoA uptake. The membrane proton (delta pH) and electrical (delta psi) gradients, which dissipated with time in the absence of substrate, were maintained at their initial levels throughout the incubation in the presence of substrate. Addition of phosphate caused a concentration-dependent decrease of both delta pH and CoA uptake. Nigericin also dissipated the proton gradient and prevented CoA uptake. Valinomycin also prevented CoA uptake into mitochondria. Although the proton gradient was unaffected, the electrical gradient was completely abolished in the presence of valinomycin. Addition of 5 mM phosphate 10 min after the start of incubation prevented further uptake of CoA into mitochondria. A rapid dissipation of the proton gradient upon addition of phosphate was observed. Addition of nigericin or valinomycin 10 min after the start of incubation also resulted in no further uptake of CoA into with mitochondria; valinomycin caused an apparent efflux of CoA from mitochondria. Uptake was found to be sensitive to external pH displaying a pH optimum at pHext 8.0. Although nigericin significantly inhibited CoA uptake over the pHext range of 6.75-8, maximal transport was observed around pHext 8.0-8.25. Valinomycin, on the other hand, abolished transport over the entire pH range. The results suggest that mitochondrial CoA transport is determined by the membrane electrical gradient. The apparent dependence of CoA uptake on an intact membrane pH gradient is probably the result of modulation of CoA transport by matrix pH

  17. Inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and risk of fracture among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K A; Andrade, S E; Boles, M; Buist, D S; Chase, G A; Donahue, J G; Goodman, M J; Gurwitz, J H; LaCroix, A Z; Platt, R

    2000-06-24

    Inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (statins) increase new bone formation in rodents and in human cells in vitro. Statin use is associated with increased bone mineral density of the femoral neck. We undertook a population-based case-control study at six health-maintenance organisations in the USA to investigate further the relation between statin use and fracture risk among older women. We investigated women aged 60 years or older. Exposure, outcome, and confounder information was obtained from automated claims and pharmacy data from October, 1994, to September, 1997. Cases had an incident diagnosis of non-pathological fracture of the hip, humerus, distal tibia, wrist, or vertebrae between October, 1996, and September, 1997. Controls had no fracture during this period. We excluded women with records of dispensing of drugs to treat osteoporosis. There were 928 cases and 2747 controls. Compared with women who had no record of statin dispensing during the previous 2 years, women with 13 or more statin dispensings during this period had a decreased risk of non-pathological fracture (odds ratio 0.48 [95% CI 0.27-0.83]) after adjustment for age, number of hospital admissions during the previous year, chronic disease score, and use of non-statin lipid-lowering drugs. No association was found between fracture risk and fewer than 13 dispensings of statins or between fracture risk and use of non-statin lipid-lowering drugs. Statins seem to be protective against non-pathological fracture among older women. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that statins increase bone mineral density in human beings and thereby decrease the risk of osteoporotic fractures.

  18. Electron addition to alkyl cobalamins, coenzyme B12 and vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.N.R.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of dilute solutions of methyl and ethyl cobalamins and coenzyme B 12 in dilute solutions (D 2 O+CD 3 OD) to 60 Co #betta#-rays at 77 K gave a single broad feature in the free-spin region assigned to electron-capture species with the excess electron largely confined to a π* corrin orbital. On warming above 77 K the methyl derivative gave a novel species with spectral features characteristic of an unpaired electron in the Co(dsub(x 2 -y 2 )) orbital. The other two substrates gave spectra due to Cosup(II)Bsub(12r) both on warming and after photolyses with visible light. The acetyl derivative gave an electron-capture species whose e.s.r. spectrum was characteristic of an electron in the Co(dsub(z 2 )) orbital, which on warming above 77 K changed to the normal Cosup(II)Bsub(12r) spectrum. The cyano derivative (vitamin B 12 ) gave electron addition into the Co(dsub(z 2 )) orbital, as evidenced by the large hyperfine coupling to 13 C from 13 CN ligands. On annealing, cyanide ions were lost irreversibly, Bsub(12r) being detected by e.s.r. spectroscopy. In contrast, the dicyano derivative on electron addition at 77 K gave a species containing only one 13 CN ligand. Hence in this case one CN - ligand was lost at 77 K, with no return of the dimethylbenzimidazole ligand. These results are discussed in terms of a new mechanism for electron-addition to alkyl cobalamins. (author)

  19. Protective effect of anti-oxidants on endothelial function in young Korean-Asians compared to Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Jongeun; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Berk, Lee; Daher, Noha; Lohman, Everett; Moss, Abigail; Cavalcanti, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Previous studies show that Asians have an impaired blood flow response (BFR) to occlusion after a single high fat (HF) meal. The mechanism is believed to be the presence and susceptibility to high free radicals in their blood. The free radical concentration after a HF meal has not been examined in Asians. Further the BFR to heat after a single HF meal in Koreans has not been measured. Material/Methods This study evaluated postprandial endothelial function by measuring the BFR to vascular occlusion and local heat before and after a HF meal and the interventional effects of anti-oxidant vitamins on improving endothelial function in young Korean-Asians (K) compared to Caucasians (C) with these assessments. Ten C and ten K participated in the study (mean age 25.3±3.6 years old). BFR to vascular occlusion and local heat and oxidative stress were assessed after a single low fat (LF) and HF meal at 2 hours compared to baseline. After administration of vitamins (1000 mg of vitamin C, 800 IU of vitamin E, and 300 mg of Coenzyme Q-10) for 14 days, the same measurements were made. Results This study showed that the skin BFR to vascular occlusion and local heat following a HF meal significantly decreased and free radicals significantly increased at 2 hours compared to baseline in K (pvitamins were given, the BFR to vascular occlusion and local heat before and after HF meal were not significantly different in K and C. Conclusions These findings suggest that even a single HF meal can reduce endothelial response to stress through an oxidative stress mechanism but can be blocked by antioxidants, probably through scavenging free radicals in K. Since endothelial function improved even before a HF meal in K, endothelial damage from an Americanized diet may be reduced in K by antioxidants. PMID:22847195

  20. Lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles of CoQ10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swarnakar, Nitin K; Thanki, Kaushik; Jain, Sanyog

    2014-01-01

    . The developed formulations were also found to be stable in simulated gastrointestinal fluids for the stipulated period of time. The in vitro drug release studies revealed a bimodal sustained release drug profile with Higuchi type release kinetics as the best fit release model for both the formulations. The best...

  1. Analysis of hydroxycinnamic acid degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum reveals a coenzyme A-dependent, beta-oxidative deacetylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Nesme, Xavier; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl-CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)-CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials.

  2. Bioinspired Design of Alcohol Dehydrogenase@nano TiO2 Microreactors for Sustainable Cycling of NAD+/NADH Coenzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The bioinspired design and construction of enzyme@capsule microreactors with specific cell-like functionality has generated tremendous interest in recent years. Inspired by their fascinating complexity, scientists have endeavored to understand the essential aspects of a natural cell and create biomimicking microreactors so as to immobilize enzymes within the hierarchical structure of a microcapsule. In this study, simultaneous encapsulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH was achieved during the preparation of microcapsules by the Pickering emulsion method using amphiphilic modified TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs as building blocks for assembling the photocatalytic microcapsule membrane. The ADH@TiO2 NP microreactors exhibited dual catalytic functions, i.e., spatially confined enzymatic catalysis and the membrane-associated photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. The sustainable cycling of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD coenzyme between NADH and NAD+ was realized by enzymatic regeneration of NADH from NAD+ reduction, and was provided in a form that enabled further photocatalytic oxidation to NAD+ under visible light. This bioinspired ADH@TiO2 NP microreactor allowed the linking of a semiconductor mineral-based inorganic photosystem to enzymatic reactions. This is a first step toward the realization of sustainable biological cycling of NAD+/NADH coenzyme in synthetic functional microsystems operating under visible light irradiation.

  3. Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: Evidence for a Substrate Access Channel in the FAD-Dependent Monooxygenase Coq6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coq6 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q, a polyisoprenylated benzoquinone lipid essential to the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase is proposed to hydroxylate the benzene ring of coenzyme Q (ubiquinone precursor at position C5. We show here through biochemical studies that Coq6 is a flavoprotein using FAD as a cofactor. Homology models of the Coq6-FAD complex are constructed and studied through molecular dynamics and substrate docking calculations of 3-hexaprenyl-4-hydroxyphenol (4-HP6, a bulky hydrophobic model substrate. We identify a putative access channel for Coq6 in a wild type model and propose in silico mutations positioned at its entrance capable of partially (G248R and L382E single mutations or completely (a G248R-L382E double-mutation blocking access to the channel for the substrate. Further in vivo assays support the computational predictions, thus explaining the decreased activities or inactivation of the mutated enzymes. This work provides the first detailed structural information of an important and highly conserved enzyme of ubiquinone biosynthesis.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liping; Feng, Lingling; Zhou, Li; Gui, Jie; Wan, Jian; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2010-01-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae has been cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Class II 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductases are potential targets for novel antibiotic development. In order to obtain a precise structural model for use in virtual screening and inhibitor design, HMG-CoA reductase of Streptococcus pneumoniae was cloned, overexpressed and purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity chromatography. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete data set was collected from a single frozen crystal on a home X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution and belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 773.4836, b = 90.3055, c = 160.5592 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. Assuming the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content was estimated to be 54.1% (V M = 2.68 Å 3 Da −1 )

  5. Modification of the Host Cell Lipid Metabolism Induced by Hypolipidemic Drugs Targeting the Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Impairs West Nile Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Casas, Josefina; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus transmitted by the bite of mosquitoes that causes meningitis and encephalitis in humans, horses, and birds. Several studies have highlighted that flavivirus infection is highly dependent on cellular lipids for virus replication and infectious particle biogenesis. The first steps of lipid synthesis involve the carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to malonyl-CoA that is catalyzed by the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). This makes ACC a key enzyme of lipid synthesis that is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic target for different disorders, including cancers, obesity, diabetes, and viral infections. We have analyzed the effect of the ACC inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) on infection by WNV. Lipidomic analysis of TOFA-treated cells confirmed that this drug reduced the cellular content of multiple lipids, including those directly implicated in the flavivirus life cycle (glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol). Treatment with TOFA significantly inhibited the multiplication of WNV in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the antiviral effect of this drug showed that the inhibitory effect was related to a reduction of viral replication. Furthermore, treatment with another ACC inhibitor, 3,3,14,14-tetramethylhexadecanedioic acid (MEDICA 16), also inhibited WNV infection. Interestingly, TOFA and MEDICA 16 also reduced the multiplication of Usutu virus (USUV), a WNV-related flavivirus. These results point to the ACC as a druggable cellular target suitable for antiviral development against WNV and other flaviviruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Properties of latent and thiol-activated rat hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and regulation of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, I; Shechter, I

    1983-10-15

    The effect of the thiols glutathione (GSH), dithiothreitol (DTT), and dithioerythritol (DTE) on the conversion of an inactive, latent form (El) of rat liver 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, EC 1.1.1.34) to a catalyticaly active form (Ea) is examined. Latent hepatic microsomal HMG-CoA reductase is activated to a similar degree of activation by DTT and DTE and to a lower extent by GSH. All three thiols affect both Km and Vmax values of the enzyme toward HMG-CoA and NADPH. Studies of the effect of DTT on the affinity binding of HMG-CoA reductase to agarose-hexane-HMG-CoA (AG-HMG-CoA) resin shows that thiols are necessary for the binding of the enzyme to the resin. Removal of DTT from AG-HMG-CoA-bound soluble Ea (active enzyme) does not cause dissociation of the enzyme from the resin at low salt concentrations. Substitution of DTT by NADPH does not promote binding of soluble El (latent enzyme) to AG-HMG-CoA. The enzymatic activity of Ea in the presence of DTT and GSH indicates that these thiols compete for the same binding site on the enzyme. Diethylene glycol disulfide (ESSE) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) inhibit the activity of Ea. ESSE is more effective for the inhibition of Ea than GSSG, causing a higher degree of maximal inhibition and affecting the enzymatic activity at lower concentrations. A method is described for the rapid conversion of soluble purified Ea to El using gel-filtration chromatography on Bio-Gel P-4 columns. These combined results point to the importance of the thiol/disulfide ratio for the modulation of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity.

  7. Genetic Basis for Correction of Very‐Long‐Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Deficiency by Bezafibrate in Patient Fibroblasts: Toward a Genotype‐Based Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gobin‐Limballe, S.; Djouadi, F.; Aubey, F.

    2007-01-01

    Very‐long‐chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is an inborn mitochondrial fatty‐acid β‐oxidation (FAO) defect associated with a broad mutational spectrum, with phenotypes ranging from fatal cardiopathy in infancy to adolescent‐onset myopathy, and for which there is no established...

  8. SLC1 and SLC4 encode partially redundant acyl-coenzyme A 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferases of budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benghezal, Mohammed; Roubaty, Carole; Veepuri, Vijayanath

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid is the intermediate, from which all glycerophospholipids are synthesized. In yeast, it is generated from lysophosphatidic acid, which is acylated by Slc1p, an sn-2-specific, acyl-coenzyme A-dependent 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase. Deletion of SLC1 is not lethal...

  9. 3-Methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase deficiency in Amish/Mennonite adults identified by detection of increased acylcarnitines in blood spots of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, K M; Bennett, M J; Naylor, E W; Morton, D H

    1998-03-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl coenzyme A carboxylase (MCC) deficiency was documented in four adult women from the Amish/Mennonite population of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Metabolic and enzymatic investigations in these individuals were instituted after the detection of abnormal acylcarnitine profiles in blood spots obtained from their newborn children, in whom MCC activity was normal.

  10. A single nucleotide polymorphism within the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase beta gene is associated with proteinuria in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Shiro; Kobayashi, Masa-aki; Araki, Shin-ichi

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that genetic susceptibility plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. A large-scale genotyping analysis of gene-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes identified the gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A ca...

  11. Health promoting effects of phytonutrients found in palm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, R; Selvaduray, K R; Nesaretnam, K; Radhakrishnan, A K

    2010-08-01

    The oil palm tree, Elaeis guineesis, is the source of palm oil, otherwise known as the "tropical golden oil". To date, Malaysia and Indonesia are the leading producers of palm oil. Palm oil is widely used for domestic cooking in Malaysia. Palm oil is a rich source of phytonutrients such as tocotrienols, tocopherol, carotene, phytosterols, squalene, coenzyme Q10, polyphenols, and phospholipids. Although the phytonutrients constitute only about 1% of its weight in crude palm oil, these are the main constituents through which palm oil exhibits its nutritional properties. Among the major health promoting properties shown to be associated with the various types of phytonutrients present in palm oil are anti-cancer, cardio-protection and anti-angiogenesis, cholesterol inhibition, brain development and neuro protective properties, antioxidative defence mechanisms, provitamin A activity and anti-diabetes.

  12. Elucidation of the mechanism of atorvastatin-induced myopathy in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ganainy, Samar O; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Abdallah, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; El-Khatib, Aiman S

    2016-06-01

    Myopathy is among the well documented and the most disturbing adverse effects of statins. The underlying mechanism is still unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction related to coenzyme Q10 decline is one of the proposed theories. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of atorvastatin-induced myopathy in rats. In addition, the mechanism of the coenzyme Q10 protection was investigated with special focus of mitochondrial alterations. Sprague-Dawely rats were treated orally either with atorvastatin (100mg/kg) or atorvastatin and coenzyme Q10 (100mg/kg). Myopathy was assessed by measuring serum creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels together with examination of necrosis in type IIB fiber muscles. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evaluated by measuring muscle lactate/pyruvate ratio, ATP level, pAkt as well as mitochondrial ultrastructure examination. Atorvastatin treatment resulted in a rise in both CK (2X) and myoglobin (6X) level with graded degrees of muscle necrosis. Biochemical determinations showed prominent increase in lactate/pyruvate ratio and a decline in both ATP (>80%) and pAkt (>50%) levels. Ultrastructure examination showed mitochondrial swelling with disrupted organelle membrane. Co-treatment with coenzyme Q10 induced reduction in muscle necrosis as well as in CK and myoglobin levels. In addition, coenzyme Q10 improved all mitochondrial dysfunction parameters including mitochondrial swelling and disruption. These results presented a model for atorvastatin-induced myopathy in rats and proved that mitochondrial dysfunction is the main contributor in statin-myopathy pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for beta-lactam acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongzhen; Ding, Yi; Bartlam, Mark; Sun, Fei; Le, Yi; Qin, Xincheng; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Rongguang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Liu, Jinyuan; Zhao, Nanming; Rao, Zihe

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55A resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic "V" shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  14. Crystal structure of tabtoxin resistance protein complexed with acetyl coenzyme A reveals the mechanism for {beta}-lactam acetylation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, H.; Ding, Y.; Bartlam, M.; Sun, F.; Le, Y.; Qin, X.; Tang, H.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Liu, J.; Zhao, N.; Rao, Z.; Biosciences Division; Tsinghua Univ.; Chinese Academy of Science

    2003-01-31

    Tabtoxin resistance protein (TTR) is an enzyme that renders tabtoxin-producing pathogens, such as Pseudomonas syringae, tolerant to their own phytotoxins. Here, we report the crystal structure of TTR complexed with its natural cofactor, acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA), to 1.55 {angstrom} resolution. The binary complex forms a characteristic 'V' shape for substrate binding and contains the four motifs conserved in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily, which also includes the histone acetyltransferases (HATs). A single-step mechanism is proposed to explain the function of three conserved residues, Glu92, Asp130 and Tyr141, in catalyzing the acetyl group transfer to its substrate. We also report that TTR possesses HAT activity and suggest an evolutionary relationship between TTR and other GNAT members.

  15. Effects of Soil Moisture on the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Heterotrophic Respiration: A Laboratory Incubation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity - WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming’s impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. PMID:24647610

  16. High-yield production of vanillin from ferulic acid by a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase two-stage process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-05-25

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor and fragrance compounds in foods and cosmetics. Recently, we demonstrated that vanillin could be produced from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol in a coenzyme-independent manner using the decarboxylase Fdc and the oxygenase Cso2. In this study, we investigated a new two-pot bioprocess for vanillin production using the whole-cell catalyst of Escherichia coli expressing Fdc in the first stage and that of E. coli expressing Cso2 in the second stage. We first optimized the second-step Cso2 reaction from 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin, a rate-determining step for the production of vanillin. Addition of FeCl2 to the cultivation medium enhanced the activity of the resulting E. coli cells expressing Cso2, an iron protein belonging to the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family. Furthermore, a butyl acetate-water biphasic system was effective in improving the production of vanillin. Under the optimized conditions, we attempted to produce vanillin from ferulic acid by a two-pot bioprocess on a flask scale. In the first stage, E. coli cells expressing Fdc rapidly decarboxylated ferulic acid and completely converted 75 mM of this substrate to 4-vinylguaiacol within 2 h at pH 9.0. After the first-stage reaction, cells were removed from the reaction mixture by centrifugation, and the pH of the resulting supernatant was adjusted to 10.5, the optimal pH for Cso2. This solution was subjected to the second-stage reaction. In the second stage, E. coli cells expressing Cso2 efficiently oxidized 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. The concentration of vanillin reached 52 mM (7.8 g L(-1)) in 24 h, which is the highest level attained to date for the biotechnological production of vanillin using recombinant cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NEW MEAT PRODUCTS WITH IMMUNOMODULATORY EFFECT CREATION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kaltovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New meat products with immunomodulatory effect creation method reflecting differential characteristics of technological stages of manufacture of those types of meat products, including issues on the selection of primary and secondary raw materials, guidelines for development of formulations and production technologies, legislative requirements towards its labeling, etc, has been developed for the first time. A list of prospective meat raw materials for the manufacture of products with immunomodulatory effect was established: beef, pork, rabbit meat, broiler chicken meat, turkey, veal, ostrich meat, which have high content of protein (14,3– 21,7%, low content of fat (1,2–16,1%, excluding pork (33,3%, high levels of minimum amino-acid score (90,0–104,0%, protein quality indicator(0,91–1,64, essential amino acid index (1,16-1,25, coefficient of utility of amino acid content (0,72–0,86 and close to optimum fatty acid content, and also contain a great number of vitamins and minerals which play a significant role for immunity improvement. It was determined that the following functional ingredients are recommended to use: amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, threonine, arginine, tryptophan, lysine, histidin, phenylalanyl, vitamins and provitamins (C,E, beta-carotene, B vitamins(Bc, B12, PP, etc., P(bioflavonoid complex, H, K, minerals (calcium, magnesium, iron, cuprum, zinc, manganese, selenium, polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6, pseudo-vitamins (L-carnitin, coenzyme Q10, polysaccharides and peptides naturally occurring(squalen, B-Carotene, ginger, shiitake mushrooms, probiotics and prebiotics, glutathione, indole and lycopienes, bioflavonoids, L-arginine, N-acetylcysteine, gel from seaweed «Lamifaren». The use of the developed meat products with immunomodulatory effect creation method by process engineers of meat processing factories will allow them to form a single scientifically grounded approach during the

  18. Thermophilic Coenzyme B12-Dependent Acyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Mutase from Kyrpidia tusciae DSM 2912 Preferentially Catalyzes Isomerization of (R)-3-Hydroxybutyryl-CoA and 2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichler, Maria-Teresa; Kurteva-Yaneva, Nadya; Przybylski, Denise; Schuster, Judith; Müller, Roland H; Harms, Hauke; Rohwerder, Thore

    2015-07-01

    The recent discovery of a coenzyme B12-dependent acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) mutase isomerizing 3-hydroxybutyryl- and 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA in the mesophilic bacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108 (N. Yaneva, J. Schuster, F. Schäfer, V. Lede, D. Przybylski, T. Paproth, H. Harms, R. H. Müller, and T. Rohwerder, J Biol Chem 287:15502-15511, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M111.314690) could pave the way for a complete biosynthesis route to the building block chemical 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid from renewable carbon. However, the enzyme catalyzes only the conversion of the stereoisomer (S)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA at reasonable rates, which seriously hampers an efficient combination of mutase and well-established bacterial poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) overflow metabolism. Here, we characterize a new 2-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA mutase found in the thermophilic knallgas bacterium Kyrpidia tusciae DSM 2912. Reconstituted mutase subunits revealed highest activity at 55°C. Surprisingly, already at 30°C, isomerization of (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was about 7,000 times more efficient than with the mutase from strain L108. The most striking structural difference between the two mutases, likely determining stereospecificity, is a replacement of active-site residue Asp found in strain L108 at position 117 with Val in the enzyme from strain DSM 2912, resulting in a reversed polarity at this binding site. Overall sequence comparison indicates that both enzymes descended from different prokaryotic thermophilic methylmalonyl-CoA mutases. Concomitant expression of PHB enzymes delivering (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA (beta-ketothiolase PhaA and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase PhaB from Cupriavidus necator) with the new mutase in Escherichia coli JM109 and BL21 strains incubated on gluconic acid at 37°C led to the production of 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid at maximal titers of 0.7 mM. Measures to improve production in E. coli, such as coexpression of the chaperone MeaH and repression of

  19. Mangiferin treatment inhibits hepatic expression of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 in fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive rats: a link to amelioration of fatty liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xiaomang; Li, Danyang; Chen, Dilong; Zhou, Liang [Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 China (China); Chonan, Ritsu [Koei Kogyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, 101-0063 Japan (Japan); Yamahara, Johji [Pharmafood Institute, Kyoto, 602-8136 Japan (Japan); Wang, Jianwei, E-mail: wangjianwei1968@gmail.com [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 China (China); Li, Yuhao, E-mail: yuhao@sitcm.edu.au [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences/Sydney Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Mangiferin, a xanthone glucoside, and its associated traditional herbs have been demonstrated to improve abnormalities of lipid metabolism. However, its underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. This study investigated the anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin in fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)s that have a mutation in sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1. The results showed that co-administration of mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 7 weeks dramatically diminished fructose-induced increases in hepatic triglyceride content and Oil Red O-stained area in SHRs. However, blood pressure, fructose and chow intakes, white adipose tissue weight and metabolic parameters (plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acids) were unaffected by mangiferin treatment. Mechanistically, mangiferin treatment suppressed acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)-2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in the liver. In contrast, mangiferin treatment was without effect on hepatic mRNA and/or protein expression of SREBP-1/1c, carbohydrate response element binding protein, liver pyruvate kinase, fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, DGAT-1, monoacyglycerol acyltransferase-2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and acyl-CoA oxidase. Collectively, our results suggest that mangiferin treatment ameliorates fatty liver in fructose-fed SHRs by inhibiting hepatic DGAT-2 that catalyzes the final step in triglyceride biosynthesis. The anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin may occur independently of the hepatic signals associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. - Highlights: • We investigated the anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin (MA) in fructose-fed SHR. • MA (15 mg/kg/day for 7 weeks) ameliorated fructose-induced fatty liver in

  20. Mangiferin treatment inhibits hepatic expression of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 in fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive rats: a link to amelioration of fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Xiaomang; Li, Danyang; Chen, Dilong; Zhou, Liang; Chonan, Ritsu; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2014-01-01

    Mangiferin, a xanthone glucoside, and its associated traditional herbs have been demonstrated to improve abnormalities of lipid metabolism. However, its underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. This study investigated the anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin in fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)s that have a mutation in sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1. The results showed that co-administration of mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 7 weeks dramatically diminished fructose-induced increases in hepatic triglyceride content and Oil Red O-stained area in SHRs. However, blood pressure, fructose and chow intakes, white adipose tissue weight and metabolic parameters (plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acids) were unaffected by mangiferin treatment. Mechanistically, mangiferin treatment suppressed acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)-2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in the liver. In contrast, mangiferin treatment was without effect on hepatic mRNA and/or protein expression of SREBP-1/1c, carbohydrate response element binding protein, liver pyruvate kinase, fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, DGAT-1, monoacyglycerol acyltransferase-2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and acyl-CoA oxidase. Collectively, our results suggest that mangiferin treatment ameliorates fatty liver in fructose-fed SHRs by inhibiting hepatic DGAT-2 that catalyzes the final step in triglyceride biosynthesis. The anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin may occur independently of the hepatic signals associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. - Highlights: • We investigated the anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin (MA) in fructose-fed SHR. • MA (15 mg/kg/day for 7 weeks) ameliorated fructose-induced fatty liver in

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of PaaAC, the main component of the hydroxylase of the Escherichia coli phenylacetyl-coenzyme A oxygenase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, Andrey M.; Ajamian, Eunice; Zhang, Linhua; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2010-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the PaaAC complex is reported. This is the main component of the E. coliphenylacetyl-coenzyme A oxygenase complex. The Escherichia coli paa operon encodes enzymes of the phenylacetic acid-utilization pathway that metabolizes phenylacetate in the form of a coenzyme A (CoA) derivative. The phenylacetyl-coenzyme A oxygenase complex, which has been postulated to contain five components designated PaaABCDE, catalyzes ring hydroxylation of phenylacetyl-CoA. The PaaAC subcomplex shows low sequence similarity to other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) and forms a separate branch on the phylogenetic tree. PaaAC, which catalyzes the hydroxylation reaction, was purified and crystallized in the absence of a bound ligand as well as in complexes with CoA, 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA and the true substrate phenylacetyl-CoA. Crystals of the ligand-free enzyme belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and diffracted to 2.65 Å resolution, whereas complexes with CoA and its derivatives crystallized in space group P4 1 2 1 2 and diffracted to ∼2.0 Å resolution. PaaAC represents the first crystallized BMM hydroxylase that utilizes a CoA-linked substrate

  2. Effects of dissolved oxygen concentration on photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: Pollutants removal, cell growth and pigments production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Anqi; Zhang, Guangming; Wang, Hangyao

    2017-10-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment. This study set different DO levels and detected the pollutants removal, PSB growth and pigments production. Results showed that DO significantly influenced the performances of PSB wastewater treatment process. The highest COD (93%) and NH 3 -N removal (83%) was achieved under DO of 4-8mg/L, but DO of 2-4mg/L was recommended considering the aeration cost. PSB biomass reached 1645mg/L under DO of 4-8mg/L with satisfying co-enzyme Q10 content. The biomass yield was relatively stable at all DO levels. For bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoids, DO>1mg/L could satisfy their production. On the other hand, DOpigments production occurred at 24h; biomass reached peak at 48h; and the optimal time for pollutants removal was 72h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Using human genetics to predict the effects and side-effects of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: 'Genetic proxies' are increasingly being used to predict the effects of drugs. We present an up-to-date overview of the use of human genetics to predict effects and adverse effects of lipid-targeting drugs. RECENT FINDINGS: LDL cholesterol lowering variants in HMG-Coenzyme A re...

  4. Identification and characterization of an archaeal ketopantoate reductase and its involvement in regulation of coenzyme A biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Hiroya; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-10-01

    Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes is regulated primarily by feedback inhibition towards pantothenate kinase (PanK). As most archaea utilize a modified route for CoA biosynthesis and do not harbour PanK, the mechanisms governing regulation of CoA biosynthesis are unknown. Here we performed genetic and biochemical studies on the ketopantoate reductase (KPR) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. KPR catalyses the second step in CoA biosynthesis, the reduction of 2-oxopantoate to pantoate. Gene disruption of TK1968, whose product was 20-29% identical to previously characterized KPRs from bacteria/eukaryotes, resulted in a strain with growth defects that were complemented by addition of pantoate. The TK1968 protein (Tk-KPR) displayed reductase activity specific for 2-oxopantoate and preferred NADH as the electron donor, distinct to the bacterial/eukaryotic NADPH-dependent enzymes. Tk-KPR activity decreased dramatically in the presence of CoA and KPR activity in cell-free extracts was also inhibited by CoA. Kinetic studies indicated that CoA inhibits KPR by competing with NADH. Inhibition of ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase, the first enzyme of the pathway, by CoA was not observed. Our results suggest that CoA biosynthesis in T. kodakarensis is regulated by feedback inhibition of KPR, providing a feasible regulation mechanism of CoA biosynthesis in archaea. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Affinity labeling and resonance energy transfer studies of the reduced coenzyme regulatory site of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lark, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase was studied by affinity labeling and resonance energy transfer. The enzyme uses the 2', 3'-dialdehyde derivative of NADPH (oNADPH) in the reductive amination of α-ketoglutarate. A 300 min enzyme incubation with 250 μM oNADPH at pH 8.0 leads to a covalent incorporation of 1 mol oNADPH/mol enzyme subunit. Similar rate constants are measured when assaying the change in inhibition by 600 μM NADH or by 1 μM GTP, suggesting that inhibition loss at the two regulatory sites results from oNADPH reaction at one location. oNADPH-modified enzyme is still 93% inhibited by saturating GTP concentrations. The presence of 5 mM NADS(P)H plus 200 μM GTP prevents the kinetic changes and reduces the incorporation of oNADPH. oNADPH is concluded to modify the reduced coenzyme regulatory site, and GTP affects the binding of ligands to this site. The linkage between glutamate dehydrogenase and [ 14 C]oNADPH proved too labile to allow isolation of a radioactive modified peptide. Three corrections in the amino acid sequence were made after sequencing peptides. Resonance energy transfer was used to measure the distance between sites on the enzyme

  6. Modeling human Coenzyme A synthase mutation in yeast reveals altered mitochondrial function, lipid content and iron metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Ceccatelli Berti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in nuclear genes associated with defective coenzyme A biosynthesis have been identified as responsible for some forms of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA, namely PKAN and CoPAN. PKAN are defined by mutations in PANK2, encoding the pantothenate kinase 2 enzyme, that account for about 50% of cases of NBIA, whereas mutations in CoA synthase COASY have been recently reported as the second inborn error of CoA synthesis leading to CoPAN. As reported previously, yeast cells expressing the pathogenic mutation exhibited a temperature-sensitive growth defect in the absence of pantothenate and a reduced CoA content. Additional characterization revealed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, higher iron content, increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced amount of lipid droplets, thus partially recapitulating the phenotypes found in patients and establishing yeast as a potential model to clarify the pathogenesis underlying PKAN and CoPAN diseases.

  7. Chromatin-remodeling SWI/SNF complex regulates coenzyme Q6 synthesis and a metabolic shift to respiration in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Agape M; Venkataramanan, Srivats; Nag, Anish; Galivanche, Anoop Raj; Bradley, Michelle C; Neves, Lauren T; Douglass, Stephen; Clarke, Catherine F; Johnson, Tracy L

    2017-09-08

    Despite its relatively streamlined genome, there are many important examples of regulated RNA splicing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Here, we report a role for the chromatin remodeler SWI/SNF in respiration, partially via the regulation of splicing. We find that a nutrient-dependent decrease in Snf2 leads to an increase in splicing of the PTC7 transcript. The spliced PTC7 transcript encodes a mitochondrial phosphatase regulator of biosynthesis of coenzyme Q 6 (ubiquinone or CoQ 6 ) and a mitochondrial redox-active lipid essential for electron and proton transport in respiration. Increased splicing of PTC7 increases CoQ 6 levels. The increase in PTC7 splicing occurs at least in part due to down-regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression, leading to the redistribution of spliceosomes from this abundant class of intron-containing RNAs to otherwise poorly spliced transcripts. In contrast, a protein encoded by the nonspliced isoform of PTC7 represses CoQ 6 biosynthesis. Taken together, these findings uncover a link between Snf2 expression and the splicing of PTC7 and establish a previously unknown role for the SWI/SNF complex in the transition of yeast cells from fermentative to respiratory modes of metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Ratiometric colorimetric determination of coenzyme A using gold nanoparticles and a binuclear uranyl complex as optical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Rurong; Liao, Lifu; Li, Shijun; Yang, Yanyan; Xiao, Xilin; Nie, Changming

    2016-01-01

    We describe a ratiometric colorimetric method for the determination of coenzyme A (CoA) by using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and bis-uranyl-bis-sulfosalophen (BUBSS) as optical probes. BUBSS is a binuclear uranyl complex and formed through the chelating reaction of two uranyl ions with bis-sulfosalophen. CoA is captured by the AuNPs via the thiol group and this leads to the formation of CoA-AuNPs. In a second step, BUBSS binds two CoA-AuNPs through a coordination reaction between the uranyl ions in BUBSS and the phosphate groups in CoA-AuNPs. This causes the CoA-AuNPs to aggregate and results in a color change from wine red to blue. A ratiometric colorimetric assay was established for CoA based on the ratiometric measurement of absorbance changes at 650 and 525 nm. Their ratio is linearly related to the concentration of CoA in the 0 to 1.2 μmol⋅L -1 range, with a 6 nmol⋅ L- 1 detection limit under optimal conditions. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CoA in spiked liver samples with recoveries between 99.4 and 102.6 %. (author)

  9. Anesthetic agents in patients with very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redshaw, Charlotte; Stewart, Catherine

    2014-11-01

    Very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrongenase deficiency (VLCADD) is a rare disorder of fatty acid metabolism that renders sufferers susceptible to hypoglycemia, liver failure, cardiomyopathy, and rhabdomyolysis. The literature about the management of these patients is hugely conflicting, suggesting that both propofol and volatile anesthesia should be avoided. We have reviewed the literature and have concluded that the source papers do not support the statements that volatile anesthetic agents are unsafe. The reports on rhabdomyolysis secondary to anesthesia appear to be due to inadequate supply of carbohydrate not volatile agents. Catabolism must be avoided with minimal fasting, glucose infusions based on age and weight, and attenuation of emotional and physical stress. General anesthesia appears to be protective of stress-induced catabolism and may offer benefits in children and anxious patients over regional anesthesia. Propofol has not been demonstrated to be harmful in VLCADD but is presented in an emulsion containing very long-chain fatty acids which can cause organ lipidosis and itself can inhibit mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism. It is therefore not recommended. Suxamethonium-induced myalgia may mimic symptoms of rhabdomyolysis and cause raised CK therefore should be avoided. Opioids, NSAIDS, regional anesthesia, and local anesthetic techniques have all been used without complication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Overexpressing 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR in the lactococcal mevalonate pathway for heterologous plant sesquiterpene production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelene Ai-Lian Song

    Full Text Available Isoprenoids are a large and diverse group of metabolites with interesting properties such as flavour, fragrance and therapeutic properties. They are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate pathway or the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP pathway. While plants are the richest source of isoprenoids, they are not the most efficient producers. Escherichia coli and yeasts have been extensively studied as heterologous hosts for plant isoprenoids production. In the current study, we describe the usage of the food grade Lactococcus lactis as a potential heterologous host for the production of sesquiterpenes from a local herbaceous Malaysian plant, Persicaria minor (synonym Polygonum minus. A sesquiterpene synthase gene from P. minor was successfully cloned and expressed in L. lactis. The expressed protein was identified to be a β-sesquiphellandrene synthase as it was demonstrated to be functional in producing β-sesquiphellandrene at 85.4% of the total sesquiterpenes produced based on in vitro enzymatic assays. The recombinant L. lactis strain developed in this study was also capable of producing β-sesquiphellandrene in vivo without exogenous substrates supplementation. In addition, overexpression of the strain's endogenous 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR, an established rate-limiting enzyme in the eukaryotic mevalonate pathway, increased the production level of β-sesquiphellandrene by 1.25-1.60 fold. The highest amount achieved was 33 nM at 2 h post-induction.

  11. STATINS AND MYOPATHY: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Drapkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of statin therapy is considered. In particular the reasons of a complication such as myopathy are discussed in detail. The molecular mechanisms of statin myopathy , as well as its risk factors are presented. The role of coenzyme Q10 in the myopathy development and coenzyme Q10 application for the prevention of this complication are considered. 

  12. Muscle Fibre Types, Ubiquinone Content and Exercise Capacity in Hypertension and Effort Angina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Folkers, Karl

    1991-01-01

    Farmakologi, hypertension, IHD, skeletal muscle fibre composition, muscle coenzyme Q10, ischaemic heart disease, effort angina, muscle fibre lesion, muscle ubiquinone......Farmakologi, hypertension, IHD, skeletal muscle fibre composition, muscle coenzyme Q10, ischaemic heart disease, effort angina, muscle fibre lesion, muscle ubiquinone...

  13. Regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression by Zingiber officinale in the liver of high-fat diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammi, Srinivas; Kim, Moon S; Gavande, Navnath S; Li, George Q; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2010-05-01

    Zingiber officinale has been used to control lipid disorders and reported to possess remarkable cholesterol-lowering activity in experimental hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the effect of a characterized and standardized extract of Zingiber officinale on the hepatic lipid levels as well as on the hepatic mRNA and protein expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was investigated in a high-fat diet-fed rat model. Rats were treated with an ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (400 mg/kg) extract along with a high-fat diet for 6 weeks. The extract of Zingiber officinale significantly decreased hepatic triglyceride and tended to decrease hepatic cholesterol levels when administered over 6 weeks to the rats fed a high-fat diet. We found that in parallel, the extract up-regulated both LDL receptor mRNA and protein level and down-regulated HMG-CoA reductase protein expression in the liver of these rats. The metabolic control of body lipid homeostasis is in part due to enhanced cholesterol biosynthesis and reduced expression of LDL receptor sites following long-term consumption of high-fat diets. The present results show restoration of transcriptional and post-transcriptional changes in low-density lipoprotein and HMG CoA reductase by Zingiber officinale administration with a high-fat diet and provide a rational explanation for the effect of ginger in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia.

  14. Electron addition to alkyl cobalamins, coenzyme B/sub 12/ and vitamin B/sub 12/. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, D N.R.; Symons, M C.R. [Leicester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Chemistry

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of dilute solutions of methyl and ethyl cobalamins and coenzyme B/sub 12/ in dilute solutions (D/sub 2/O+CD/sub 3/OD) to /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays at 77 K gave a single broad feature in the free-spin region assigned to electron-capture species with the excess electron largely confined to a ..pi..* corrin orbital. On warming above 77 K the methyl derivative gave a novel species with spectral features characteristic of an unpaired electron in the Co(dsub(x/sup 2/-y/sup 2/)) orbital. The other two substrates gave spectra due to Cosup(II)Bsub(12r) both on warming and after photolyses with visible light. The acetyl derivative gave an electron-capture species whose e.s.r. spectrum was characteristic of an electron in the Co(dsub(z/sup 2/)) orbital, which on warming above 77 K changed to the normal Cosup(II)Bsub(12r) spectrum. The cyano derivative (vitamin B/sub 12/) gave electron addition into the Co(dsub(z/sup 2/)) orbital, as evidenced by the large hyperfine coupling to /sup 13/C from /sup 13/CN ligands. On annealing, cyanide ions were lost irreversibly, Bsub(12r) being detected by e.s.r. spectroscopy. In contrast, the dicyano derivative on electron addition at 77 K gave a species containing only one /sup 13/CN ligand. Hence in this case one CN/sup -/ ligand was lost at 77 K, with no return of the dimethylbenzimidazole ligand. These results are discussed in terms of a new mechanism for electron-addition to alkyl cobalamins.

  15. Characterization of Benzoyl Coenzyme A Biosynthesis Genes in the Enterocin-Producing Bacterium “Streptomyces maritimus”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Longkuan; Moore, Bradley S.

    2003-01-01

    The novel benzoyl coenzyme A (benzoyl-CoA) biosynthesis pathway in “Streptomyces maritimus” was investigated through a series of target-directed mutations. Genes involved in benzoyl-CoA formation were disrupted through single-crossover homologous recombination, and the resulting mutants were analyzed for their ability to biosynthesize the benzoyl-CoA-primed polyketide antibiotic enterocin. Inactivation of the unique phenylalanine ammonia-lyase-encoding gene encP was previously shown to be absolutely required for benzoyl-CoA formation in “S. maritimus”. The fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes encH, -I, and -J, on the other hand, are necessary but not required. In each case, the yield of benzoyl-CoA-primed enterocin dropped below wild-type levels. We attribute the reduced benzoyl-CoA formation in these specific mutants to functional substitution and cross-talk between the products of genes encH, -I, and -J and the enzyme homologues of primary metabolism. Disruption of the benzoate-CoA ligase encN gene did not perturb enterocin production, however, demonstrating that encN is extraneous and that benzoic acid is not a pathway intermediate. EncN rather serves as a substitute pathway for utilizing exogenous benzoic acid. These experiments provide further support that benzoyl-CoA is formed in a novel bacterial pathway that resembles the eukaryotic assembly of benzoyl-CoA from phenylalanine via a β-oxidative path. PMID:12511484

  16. Role of Feedback Regulation of Pantothenate Kinase (CoaA) in Control of Coenzyme A Levels in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Charles O.; Park, Hee-Won; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (CoaA) is a key regulator of coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis in Escherichia coli, and its activity is controlled by feedback inhibition by CoA and its thioesters. The importance of feedback inhibition in the control of the intracellular CoA levels was tested by constructing three site-directed mutants of CoaA that were predicted to be feedback resistant based on the crystal structure of the CoaA-CoA binary complex. CoaA[R106A], CoaA[H177Q], and CoaA[F247V] were purified and shown to retain significant catalytic activity and be refractory to inhibition by CoA. CoaA[R106A] retained 50% of the catalytic activity of CoaA, whereas the CoaA[H177Q] and CoaA[F247V] mutants were less active. The importance of feedback control of CoaA to the intracellular CoA levels was assessed by expressing either CoaA or CoaA[R106A] in strain ANS3 [coaA15(Ts) panD2]. Cells expressing CoaA[R106A] had significantly higher levels of phosphorylated pantothenate-derived metabolites and CoA in vivo and excreted significantly more 4′-phosphopantetheine into the medium compared to cells expressing the wild-type protein. These data illustrate the key role of feedback regulation of pantothenate kinase in the control of intracellular CoA levels. PMID:12754240

  17. Regulation of lipolytic activity by long-chain acyl-coenzyme A in islets and adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Liping; Deeney, Jude T; Nolan, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    -cells. The mechanisms by which lipolysis is regulated in different tissues is, therefore, of considerable interest. Here, the effects of long-chain acyl-CoA esters (LC-CoA) on lipase activity in islets and adipocytes were compared. Palmitoyl-CoA (Pal-CoA, 1-10 microM) stimulated lipase activity in islets from both....... The inhibitory effect of LC-CoA on adipocyte HSL was dependent on phosphorylation and enhanced by acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP). In contrast, the stimulatory effect on islet lipase activity was blocked by ACBP, presumably due to binding and sequestration of LC-CoA. These data suggest the following intertissue...

  18. Ketogenesis in rat-liver mitochondria: Stimulation by palmityl-coenzyme A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaartjes, W.J.; Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1972-01-01

    It is well-known that the movement of adenine nucleotides (AdN) across the inner mitochondrial membrane is markedly decreased both by unsaturated and by saturated long-chain fatty acids. A similar effect is displayed by palmityl-CoA as demonstrated recently with isolated mitochondria of rat

  19. Synthesis of ethyl [14CH3]methylmalonyl thioglycolate as a possible substrate analogue of [14CH3]methylmalonyl coenzyme-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, I.; Kovacs, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ethyl methylmalonyl thioglycolate is a potential substrate analogue of methylmalonyl-coenzyme-A (methylmalonyl-CoA) in the investigation of propionic acid metabolism. To prove this hypothesis, the tracer ethyl [ 14 CH 3 ] methylmalonyl thioglycolate was synthesized via methyl-Meldrum's acid to carry out the biochemical examinations. The method described can also be used to synthesize [ 14 CH 3 ] methylmalonyl-CoA by transesterification of active labelled methylmalonyl thiophenyl ester. This latter intermediate is chemically stable when stored at room temperature, and the unstable [ 14 CH 3 ]methylmalonyl-CoA can be prepared in one step just preceeding the biochemical experiments. (author)

  20. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Two Genes for the Biotin Carboxylase and Carboxyltransferase Subunits of Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Myxococcus xanthus

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yoshio; Miyake, Rina; Tokumasu, Yushi; Sato, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a DNA fragment from a genomic library of Myxococcus xanthus using an oligonucleotide probe representing conserved regions of biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylases. The fragment contained two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), designated the accB and accA genes, capable of encoding a 538-amino-acid protein of 58.1 kDa and a 573-amino-acid protein of 61.5 kDa, respectively. The protein (AccA) encoded by the accA gene was strikingly similar t...

  1. Radioprotection on nucleated and anucleated erythrocytes by oxide-reduction coenzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, M.; Tomicic, I.; Rojo, I.

    1981-01-01

    The protective effects of NAD, FAD and quinone and mixtures of these compounds were studied on gamma irradiated rabbit and chicken erythrocytes. The dose relative factor (DRF 37) was evaluated by visible absorbancy measurements of liberated hemoglobin. The DRF 37 obtained on rabbit erythrocytes were: NAD+FAD+quinone mixture: 11,1; NAD+ quinone mixture: 6,1; FAD+quinone mixture: 6,1; NAD: 1,6; FAD: 5,5; quinone: 5,1. The DRF 37 obtained with the mixture NAD+FAD+quinone on chicken erythrocytes was 3,9. The high efficiency of the radioprotective mixture NAD+FAD+ quinone is discussed. (author)

  2. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2015-01-01

    . Study-specific effect estimates per copy of each LDL-lowering allele were pooled by meta-analysis. These findings were compared with a meta-analysis of new-onset type 2 diabetes and bodyweight change data from randomised trials of statin drugs. The effects of statins in each randomised trial were...... gene, rs17238484 (for the main analysis) and rs12916 (for a subsidiary analysis) as proxies for HMGCR inhibition by statins. We examined associations of these variants with plasma lipid, glucose, and insulin concentrations; bodyweight; waist circumference; and prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes...... assessed using meta-analysis. FINDINGS: Data were available for up to 223 463 individuals from 43 genetic studies. Each additional rs17238484-G allele was associated with a mean 0·06 mmol/L (95% CI 0·05-0·07) lower LDL cholesterol and higher body weight (0·30 kg, 0·18-0·43), waist circumference (0·32 cm, 0...

  3. Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Respiration to Nitrogen Fertilization: Varying Effects between Growing and Non-Growing Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Rui; Li, Rujian; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization has a considerable effect on food production and carbon cycling in agro-ecosystems. However, the impacts of N fertilization rates on the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration (Q10) were controversial. Five N rates (N0, N45, N90, N135, and N180) were applied to a continuous winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crop on the semi-arid Loess Plateau, and the in situ soil respiration was monitored during five consecutive years from 2008 to 2013. During the growing season, the mean soil respiration rates increased with increasing N fertilization rates, peaking at 1.53 μmol m−2s−1 in the N135 treatment. A similar dynamic pattern was observed during the non-growing season, yet on average with 7.3% greater soil respiration rates than the growing season. In general for all the N fertilization treatments, the mean Q10 value during the non-growing season was significantly greater than that during the growing season. As N fertilization rates increased, the Q10 values did not change significantly in the growing season but significantly decreased in the non-growing season. Overall, N fertilization markedly influenced soil respirations and Q10 values, in particular posing distinct effects on the Q10 values between the growing and non-growing seasons. PMID:27992576

  4. Five Fatty Acyl-Coenzyme A Reductases Are Involved in the Biosynthesis of Primary Alcohols in Aegilops tauschii Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The diploid Aegilops tauschii is the D-genome donor to hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum and represents a potential source for genetic study in common wheat. The ubiquitous wax covering the aerial parts of plants plays an important role in protecting plants against non-stomatal water loss. Cuticular waxes are complex mixtures of very-long-chain fatty acids, alkanes, primary and/or secondary alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters, triterpenes, sterols, and flavonoids. In the present work, primary alcohols were identified as the major components of leaf cuticular wax in Ae. tauschii, with C26:0-OH being the dominant primary alcohol. Analysis by scanning electron microscope revealed that dense platelet-shaped wax crystals were deposited on leaf surfaces of Ae. tauschii. Ten putative wax biosynthetic genes encoding fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase (FAR were identified in the genome of Ae. tauschii. Five of these genes, Ae.tFAR1, Ae.tFAR2, Ae.tFAR3, Ae.tFAR4, and Ae.tFAR6, were found expressed in the leaf blades. Heterologous expression of the five Ae.tFARs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that Ae.tFAR1, Ae.tFAR2, Ae.tFAR3, Ae.tFAR4, and Ae.tFAR6 were predominantly responsible for the accumulation of C16:0, C18:0, C26:0, C24:0, and C28:0 primary alcohols, respectively. In addition, nine Ae.tFAR paralogous genes were located on D chromosome of wheat and the wheat nullisomic–tetrasomic lines with the loss of Ae.tFAR3 and Ae.tFAR4 paralogous genes had significantly reduced levels of primary alcohols in the leaf blades. Collectively, these data suggest that Ae.tFAR1, Ae.tFAR2, Ae.tFAR3, Ae.tFAR4, and Ae.tFAR6 encode alcohol-forming FARs involved in the biosynthesis of primary alcohols in the leaf blades of Ae. tauschii. The information obtained in Ae. tauschii enables us to better understand wax biosynthesis in common wheat.

  5. Epoxyalkane:Coenzyme M Transferase Gene Diversity and Distribution in Groundwater Samples from Chlorinated-Ethene-Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xikun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epoxyalkane:coenzyme M transferase (EaCoMT) plays a critical role in the aerobic biodegradation and assimilation of alkenes, including ethene, propene, and the toxic chloroethene vinyl chloride (VC). To improve our understanding of the diversity and distribution of EaCoMT genes in the environment, novel EaCoMT-specific terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and nested-PCR methods were developed and applied to groundwater samples from six different contaminated sites. T-RFLP analysis revealed 192 different EaCoMT T-RFs. Using clone libraries, we retrieved 139 EaCoMT gene sequences from these samples. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that a majority of the sequences (78.4%) grouped with EaCoMT genes found in VC- and ethene-assimilating Mycobacterium strains and Nocardioides sp. strain JS614. The four most-abundant T-RFs were also matched with EaCoMT clone sequences related to Mycobacterium and Nocardioides strains. The remaining EaCoMT sequences clustered within two emergent EaCoMT gene subgroups represented by sequences found in propene-assimilating Gordonia rubripertincta strain B-276 and Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2. EaCoMT gene abundance was positively correlated with VC and ethene concentrations at the sites studied. IMPORTANCE The EaCoMT gene plays a critical role in assimilation of short-chain alkenes, such as ethene, VC, and propene. An improved understanding of EaCoMT gene diversity and distribution is significant to the field of bioremediation in several ways. The expansion of the EaCoMT gene database and identification of incorrectly annotated EaCoMT genes currently in the database will facilitate improved design of environmental molecular diagnostic tools and high-throughput sequencing approaches for future bioremediation studies. Our results further suggest that potentially significant aerobic VC degraders in the environment are not well represented in pure culture. Future research should aim to isolate and

  6. Sesquiterpene Synthase-3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Synthase Fusion Protein Responsible for Hirsutene Biosynthesis in Stereum hirsutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Christopher M; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2018-06-01

    The wood-rotting mushroom Stereum hirsutum is a known producer of a large number of namesake hirsutenoids, many with important bioactivities. Hirsutenoids form a structurally diverse and distinct class of sesquiterpenoids. No genes involved in hirsutenoid biosynthesis have yet been identified or their enzymes characterized. Here, we describe the cloning and functional characterization of a hirsutene synthase as an unexpected fusion protein of a sesquiterpene synthase (STS) with a C-terminal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA) synthase (HMGS) domain. Both the full-length fusion protein and truncated STS domain are highly product-specific 1,11-cyclizing STS enzymes with kinetic properties typical of STSs. Complementation studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed that the HMGS domain is also functional in vivo Phylogenetic analysis shows that the hirsutene synthase domain does not form a clade with other previously characterized sesquiterpene synthases from Basidiomycota. Comparative gene structure analysis of this hirsutene synthase with characterized fungal enzymes reveals a significantly higher intron density, suggesting that this enzyme may be acquired by horizontal gene transfer. In contrast, the HMGS domain is clearly related to other fungal homologs. This STS-HMGS fusion protein is part of a biosynthetic gene cluster that includes P450s and oxidases that are expressed and could be cloned from cDNA. Finally, this unusual fusion of a terpene synthase to an HMGS domain, which is not generally recognized as a key regulatory enzyme of the mevalonate isoprenoid precursor pathway, led to the identification of additional HMGS duplications in many fungal genomes, including the localization of HMGSs in other predicted sesquiterpenoid biosynthetic gene clusters. IMPORTANCE Hirsutenoids represent a structurally diverse class of bioactive sesquiterpenoids isolated from fungi. Identification of their biosynthetic pathways will provide

  7. Role of Wax Ester Synthase/Acyl Coenzyme A:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase in Oleaginous Streptomyces sp. Strain G25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttig, Annika; Strittmatter, Carl Simon; Schauer, Jennifer; Hiessl, Sebastian; Daniel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recently, we isolated a novel Streptomyces strain which can accumulate extraordinarily large amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG) and consists of 64% fatty acids (dry weight) when cultivated with glucose and 50% fatty acids (dry weight) when cultivated with cellobiose. To identify putative gene products responsible for lipid storage and cellobiose utilization, we analyzed its draft genome sequence. A single gene encoding a wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) was identified and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme AtfG25 showed acyltransferase activity with C12- or C16-acyl-CoA, C12 to C18 alcohols, or dipalmitoyl glycerol. This acyltransferase exhibits 24% amino acid identity to the model enzyme AtfA from Acinetobacter baylyi but has high sequence similarities to WS/DGATs from other Streptomyces species. To investigate the impact of AtfG25 on lipid accumulation, the respective gene, atfG25, was inactivated in Streptomyces sp. strain G25. However, cells of the insertion mutant still exhibited DGAT activity and were able to store TAG, albeit in lower quantities and at lower rates than the wild-type strain. These findings clearly indicate that AtfG25 has an important, but not exclusive, role in TAG biosynthesis in the novel Streptomyces isolate and suggest the presence of alternative metabolic pathways for lipid accumulation which are discussed in the present study. IMPORTANCE A novel Streptomyces strain was isolated from desert soil, which represents an extreme environment with high temperatures, frequent drought, and nutrient scarcity. We believe that these harsh conditions promoted the development of the capacity for this strain to accumulate extraordinarily large amounts of lipids. In this study, we present the analysis of its draft genome sequence with a special focus on enzymes potentially involved in its lipid storage. Furthermore, the activity and importance of the detected

  8. Dissection of malonyl-coenzyme A reductase of Chloroflexus aurantiacus results in enzyme activity improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changshui Liu

    Full Text Available The formation of fusion protein in biosynthetic pathways usually improves metabolic efficiency either channeling intermediates and/or colocalizing enzymes. In the metabolic engineering of biochemical pathways, generating unnatural protein fusions between sequential biosynthetic enzymes is a useful method to increase system efficiency and product yield. Here, we reported a special case. The malonyl-CoA reductase (MCR of Chloroflexus aurantiacus catalyzes the conversion of malonyl-CoA to 3-hydroxypropionate (3HP, and is a key enzyme in microbial production of 3HP, an important platform chemical. Functional domain analysis revealed that the N-terminal region of MCR (MCR-N; amino acids 1-549 and the C-terminal region of MCR (MCR-C; amino acids 550-1219 were functionally distinct. The malonyl-CoA was reduced into free intermediate malonate semialdehyde with NADPH by MCR-C fragment, and further reduced to 3HP by MCR-N fragment. In this process, the initial reduction of malonyl-CoA was rate limiting. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the TGXXXG(AX(1-2G and YXXXK motifs were important for enzyme activities of both MCR-N and MCR-C fragments. Moreover, the enzyme activity increased when MCR was separated into two individual fragments. Kinetic analysis showed that MCR-C fragment had higher affinity for malonyl-CoA and 4-time higher K cat/K m value than MCR. Dissecting MCR into MCR-N and MCR-C fragments also had a positive effect on the 3HP production in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Our study showed the feasibility of protein dissection as a new strategy in biosynthetic systems.

  9. Systematic Analysis of the 4-Coumarate:Coenzyme A Ligase (4CL Related Genes and Expression Profiling during Fruit Development in the Chinese Pear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In plants, 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligases (4CLs, comprising some of the adenylate-forming enzymes, are key enzymes involved in regulating lignin metabolism and the biosynthesis of flavonoids and other secondary metabolites. Although several 4CL-related proteins were shown to play roles in secondary metabolism, no comprehensive study on 4CL-related genes in the pear and other Rosaceae species has been reported. In this study, we identified 4CL-related genes in the apple, peach, yangmei, and pear genomes using DNATOOLS software and inferred their evolutionary relationships using phylogenetic analysis, collinearity analysis, conserved motif analysis, and structure analysis. A total of 149 4CL-related genes in four Rosaceous species (pear, apple, peach, and yangmei were identified, with 30 members in the pear. We explored the functions of several 4CL and acyl-coenzyme A synthetase (ACS genes during the development of pear fruit by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. We found that duplication events had occurred in the 30 4CL-related genes in the pear. These duplicated 4CL-related genes are distributed unevenly across all pear chromosomes except chromosomes 4, 8, 11, and 12. The results of this study provide a basis for further investigation of both the functions and evolutionary history of 4CL-related genes.

  10. An Examination by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Putative Key Residues in the Determination of Coenzyme Specificity in Clostridial NAD+-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Griffin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence and structure comparisons of various glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH and other nicotinamide nucleotide-dependent dehydrogenases have potentially implicated certain residues in coenzyme binding and discrimination. We have mutated key residues in Clostridium symbiosum NAD+-specific GDH to investigate their contribution to specificity and to enhance acceptance of NADPH. Comparisons with E. coli NADPH-dependent GDH prompted design of mutants F238S, P262S, and F238S/P262S, which were purified and assessed at pH 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0. They showed markedly increased catalytic efficiency with NADPH, especially at pH 8.0 (∼170-fold for P262S and F238S/P262S with relatively small changes for NADH. A positive charge introduced through the D263K mutation also greatly increased catalytic efficiency with NADPH (over 100-fold at pH 8 and slightly decreased activity with NADH. At position 242, “P6” of the “core fingerprint,” where NAD+- and NADP+-dependent enzymes normally have Gly or Ala, respectively, clostridial GDH already has Ala. Replacement with Gly produced negligible shift in coenzyme specificity.

  11. Purification of a jojoba embryo fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase and expression of its cDNA in high erucic acid rapeseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, J G; Pollard, M R; Anderson, L; Hayes, T R; Lassner, M W

    2000-03-01

    The jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) plant produces esters of long-chain alcohols and fatty acids (waxes) as a seed lipid energy reserve. This is in contrast to the triglycerides found in seeds of other plants. We purified an alcohol-forming fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductase (FAR) from developing embryos and cloned the cDNA encoding the enzyme. Expression of a cDNA in Escherichia coli confers FAR activity upon those cells and results in the accumulation of fatty alcohols. The FAR sequence shows significant homology to an Arabidopsis protein of unknown function that is essential for pollen development. When the jojoba FAR cDNA is expressed in embryos of Brassica napus, long-chain alcohols can be detected in transmethylated seed oils. Resynthesis of the gene to reduce its A plus T content resulted in increased levels of alcohol production. In addition to free alcohols, novel wax esters were detected in the transgenic seed oils. In vitro assays revealed that B. napus embryos have an endogenous fatty acyl-coenzyme A: fatty alcohol acyl-transferase activity that could account for this wax synthesis. Thus, introduction of a single cDNA into B. napus results in a redirection of a portion of seed oil synthesis from triglycerides to waxes.

  12. Improved Xylitol Production from D-Arabitol by Enhancing the Coenzyme Regeneration Efficiency of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Zhang, Jinliang; Xu, Hong; Feng, Xiaohai

    2016-02-10

    Gluconobacter oxydans is used to produce xylitol from D-arabitol. This study aims to improve xylitol production by increasing the coenzyme regeneration efficiency of the pentose phosphate pathway in G. oxydans. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH) were overexpressed in G. oxydans. Real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays revealed that G6PDH/6PGDH activity and coenzyme regeneration efficiency increased in the recombinant G. oxydans strains. Approximately 29.3 g/L xylitol was obtained, with a yield of 73.2%, from 40 g/L d-arabitol in the batch biotransformation with the G. oxydans PZ strain. Moreover, the xylitol productivity (0.62 g/L/h) was 3.26-fold of the wild type strain (0.19 g/L/h). In repetitive batch biotransformation, the G. oxydans PZ cells were used for five cycles without incurring a significant loss in productivity. These results indicate that the recombinant G. oxydans PZ strain is economically feasible for xylitol production in industrial bioconversion.

  13. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D. (Unite de Recherches de Physiolopathologie Hepatique (INSERM U-24), Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France))

    1990-11-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid but not that of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)octanoic acid and (1-{sup 14}C)butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of ({sup 14}C)CO{sub 2} from (1-{sup 14}C)fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids.

  14. Stereoselective and nonstereoselective effects of ibuprofen enantiomers on mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freneaux, E.; Fromenty, B.; Berson, A.; Labbe, G.; Degott, C.; Letteron, P.; Larrey, D.; Pessayre, D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the R-(-) and S-(+)ibuprofen enantiomers were first studied in vitro with mouse liver mitochondria incubated in the presence of various concentrations of exogenous coenzyme A. In the presence of a low concentration of coenzyme A (2.5 microM), the R-(-)enantiomer (which forms an acylcoenzyme A) inhibited stereoselectively the beta oxidation of [1- 14 C]palmitic acid but not that of [1- 14 C]palmitoyl-L-carnitine (which can directly enter the mitochondria). In the presence, however, of a concentration of coenzyme A (50 microM) reproducing that present in liver cell cytosol, both enantiomers (2 mM) slightly inhibited the beta oxidation of [1- 14 C]palmitic acid and markedly inhibited the beta oxidation of [1- 14 C]octanoic acid and [1- 14 C]butyric acid. In vivo, both enantiomers (1 mmol.kg-1) similarly inhibited the formation of [ 14 C]CO 2 from [1- 14 C]fatty acids. Both enantiomers similarly decreased plasma ketone bodies. Both similarly increased hepatic triglycerides, and both produced mild microvesicular steatosis of the liver. We conclude that both ibuprofen enantiomers inhibit beta oxidation of fatty acids in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the R-(-)enantiomer may stereoselectively sequester coenzyme A; at low concentrations of coenzyme A in vitro, this may stereoselectively inhibit the mitochondrial uptake and beta oxidation of long chain fatty acids

  15. Different effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on sterol synthesis in various human cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Huisman, R.H.; Moshage, H.; Yap, S.H.; Cohen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    The three vastatins examined, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin, are equally strong inhibitors of the sterol synthesis in human hepatocytes in culture with IC50-values of 4.1, 8.0 and 2.0 nM, respectively. However, in the human extrahepatic cells: umbilical vascular endothelial cells, retinal

  16. Effect of climate warming on the annual terrestrial net ecosystem CO2 exchange globally in the boreal and temperate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Renduo; Cescatti, Alessandro; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Buchmann, Nina; Zhu, Juan; Chen, Guanhong; Moyano, Fernando; Pumpanen, Jukka; Hirano, Takashi; Takagi, Kentaro; Merbold, Lutz

    2017-06-08

    The net ecosystem CO 2 exchange is the result of the imbalance between the assimilation process (gross primary production, GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE). The aim of this study was to investigate temperature sensitivities of these processes and the effect of climate warming on the annual terrestrial net ecosystem CO 2 exchange globally in the boreal and temperate regions. A database of 403 site-years of ecosystem flux data at 101 sites in the world was collected and analyzed. Temperature sensitivities of rates of RE and GPP were quantified with Q 10 , defined as the increase of RE (or GPP) rates with a temperature rise of 10 °C. Results showed that on the annual time scale, the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of GPP (Q 10sG ) was higher than or equivalent to the intrinsic temperature sensitivity of RE (Q 10sR ). Q 10sG was negatively correlated to the mean annual temperature (MAT), whereas Q 10sR was independent of MAT. The analysis of the current temperature sensitivities and net ecosystem production suggested that temperature rise might enhance the CO 2 sink of terrestrial ecosystems both in the boreal and temperate regions. In addition, ecosystems in these regions with different plant functional types should sequester more CO 2 with climate warming.

  17. Fatal hepatic short-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: clinical, biochemical, and pathological studies on three subjects with this recently identified disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, M. J.; Spotswood, S. D.; Ross, K. F.; Comfort, S.; Koonce, R.; Boriack, R. L.; IJlst, L.; Wanders, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the clinical, biochemical, and pathological findings in three infants with hepatic short-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (SCHAD) deficiency, a recently recognized disorder of the mitochondrial oxidation of straight-chain fatty acids. Candidate subjects were

  18. Roles of the redox-active disulfide and histidine residues forming a catalytic dyad in reactions catalyzed by 2-ketopropyl coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Melissa A; Wampler, David A; Pandey, Arti S; Peters, John W; Ensign, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    NADPH:2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase (2-KPCC), an atypical member of the disulfide oxidoreductase (DSOR) family of enzymes, catalyzes the reductive cleavage and carboxylation of 2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M [2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate; 2-KPC] to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M (CoM) in the bacterial pathway of propylene metabolism. Structural studies of 2-KPCC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 have revealed a distinctive active-site architecture that includes a putative catalytic triad consisting of two histidine residues that are hydrogen bonded to an ordered water molecule proposed to stabilize enolacetone formed from dithiol-mediated 2-KPC thioether bond cleavage. Site-directed mutants of 2-KPCC were constructed to test the tenets of the mechanism proposed from studies of the native enzyme. Mutagenesis of the interchange thiol of 2-KPCC (C82A) abolished all redox-dependent reactions of 2-KPCC (2-KPC carboxylation or protonation). The air-oxidized C82A mutant, as well as wild-type 2-KPCC, exhibited the characteristic charge transfer absorbance seen in site-directed variants of other DSOR enzymes but with a pK(a) value for C87 (8.8) four units higher (i.e., four orders of magnitude less acidic) than that for the flavin thiol of canonical DSOR enzymes. The same higher pK(a) value was observed in native 2-KPCC when the interchange thiol was alkylated by the CoM analog 2-bromoethanesulfonate. Mutagenesis of the flavin thiol (C87A) also resulted in an inactive enzyme for steady-state redox-dependent reactions, but this variant catalyzed a single-turnover reaction producing a 0.8:1 ratio of product to enzyme. Mutagenesis of the histidine proximal to the ordered water (H137A) led to nearly complete loss of redox-dependent 2-KPCC reactions, while mutagenesis of the distal histidine (H84A) reduced these activities by 58 to 76%. A redox-independent reaction of 2-KPCC (acetoacetate decarboxylation) was not decreased for any of the

  19. Screening for negative effects of candidate ascidian antifoulant compounds on a target aquaculture species, Perna canaliculus Gmelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Patrick Louis; Heasman, Kevin; Hickey, Anthony; Mountfort, Douglas; Jeffs, Andrew; Kuhajek, Jeannie

    2013-01-01

    The natural chemical compounds radicicol, polygodial and ubiquinone-10 (Q10) have previously been identified as inhibitors of metamorphosis in ascidian larvae. Accordingly, they have potential as a specific remedy for the costly problem of fouling ascidians in bivalve aquaculture. In this study, these compounds were screened for their effects on the physiological health of an aquaculture species, the green-lipped mussel, Perna canaliculus Gmelin, at or above the 99% effective dose (IC(99)) in ascidians. Three physiological biomarkers of mussel health were screened: growth (increases in shell height and wet weight), condition (condition index) and mitochondrial respirational function (Complex I-mediated respiration, Complex II-mediated respiration, maximum uncoupled respiration, leak respiration, respiratory control ratios and phosphorylation system control ratios). While polygodial and Q10 had no effect on mussel growth or the condition index, radicicol retarded growth and decreased the condition index. Mitochondrial respirational function was unaffected by radicicol and polygodial. Conversely, Q10 enhanced Complex I-mediated respiration, highlighting the fundamental role of this compound in the electron transport system. The present study suggests that polygodial and Q10 do not negatively affect the physiological health of P. canaliculus at the IC(99) in ascidians, while radicicol is toxic. Moreover, Q10 is of benefit in biomedical settings as a cellular antioxidant and therefore may also benefit P. canaliculus. Accordingly, polygodial and Q10 should be progressed to the next stage of testing where possible negative effects on bivalves will be further explored, followed by development of application techniques and testing in a laboratory and aquaculture setting.

  20. Effects of poly-bioactive compounds on lipid profile and body weight in a moderately hypercholesterolemic population with low cardiovascular disease risk: a multicenter randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Solà

    Full Text Available A dietary supplement (AP, Armolipid Plus that combines red yeast rice extract, policosanol, berberine, folic acid, coenzyme Q10 and asthaxantine can have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarkers. The aim of this study was to assess whether the intake of AP, in combination with dietary recommendations, reduces serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c concentrations and other CVD biomarkers in patients with hypercholesterolemia. Eligible patients were recruited from the outpatient clinics of six Spanish hospitals Hospital Virgen del Rocío (Sevilla; Hospital San Jorge (Huesca; Hospital San Pedro (Logroño; Hospital Gregorio Marañón (Madrid, Hospital la Fe (Valencia and Hospital Universitari Sant Joan (Reus as recruiting and coordinating center. 102 participants (mean age ± SD; 50.91 ± 11.61; 32 men with low CVD, with mild-to-moderately elevated LDL-c (between 3.35 mmol/L and 4.88 mmol/L without hypolipemic therapy were randomized in a double-blind, parallel, controlled, multicenter trial commencing January 2012 and ending December 2012. Among the exclusion criteria were any concomitant chronic disease, triglycerides (TG >3.97 mmol/L, pregnant or lactating, and history of CVD. At 12 weeks, compared to placebo, AP reduced LDL-c by -6.9%, apolipoprotein (Apo B-100 by -6.6% and total cholesterol/HDL-c ratio by -5.5%, the ApoB/ApoA1 ratio by -8.6%, while increasing ApoA1 by +2.5% (p<0.05. AP consumption was associated with modest mean weight loss of -0.93 kg (95%CI: -1.74 to -0.12; P = 0.02 compared with control group while dietary composition remained unchanged in the AP group. The AP product was well tolerated. In conclusion, AP, combined with dietary recommendations, reduced LDL-c levels as well as total cholesterol/HDL-c and ApoB/ApoA1 ratios, while increasing Apo A1, all of which are improvements in CVD risk indicators. AP is a product which could benefit patients having moderate hyperlipidemia and excess body

  1. Synthesis of ethyl ( sup 14 CH sub 3 )methylmalonyl thioglycolate as a possible substrate analogue of ( sup 14 CH sub 3 )methylmalonyl coenzyme-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, I. (BIOGAL Pharmaceutical Works, Debrecen (Hungary)); Kovacs, Z. (Inst. of Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary))

    1991-11-01

    Ethyl methylmalonyl thioglycolate is a potential substrate analogue of methylmalonyl-coenzyme-A (methylmalonyl-CoA) in the investigation of propionic acid metabolism. To prove this hypothesis, the tracer ethyl ({sup 14}CH{sub 3}) methylmalonyl thioglycolate was synthesized via methyl-Meldrum's acid to carry out the biochemical examinations. The method described can also be used to synthesize ({sup 14}CH{sub 3}) methylmalonyl-CoA by transesterification of active labelled methylmalonyl thiophenyl ester. This latter intermediate is chemically stable when stored at room temperature, and the unstable ({sup 14}CH{sub 3})methylmalonyl-CoA can be prepared in one step just preceeding the biochemical experiments. (author).

  2. Sterol-induced Dislocation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase from Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes into the Cytosol through a Subcellular Compartment Resembling Lipid Droplets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Isamu Z.; Liu, Pingsheng; Zehmer, John K.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Jo, Youngah; Anderson, Richard G. W.; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-induced binding to Insigs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) allows for ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. This ubiquitination marks reductase for recognition by the ATPase VCP/p97, which mediates extraction and delivery of reductase from ER membranes to cytosolic 26 S proteasomes for degradation. Here, we report that reductase becomes dislocated from ER membranes into the cytosol of sterol-treated cells. This dislocation exhibits an absolute requirement for the actions of Insigs and VCP/p97. Reductase also appears in a buoyant fraction of sterol-treated cells that co-purifies with lipid droplets, cytosolic organelles traditionally regarded as storage depots for neutral lipids such as triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. Genetic, biochemical, and localization studies suggest a model in which reductase is dislodged into the cytosol from an ER subdomain closely associated with lipid droplets. PMID:20406816

  3. Effect of radiation therapy on small-cell lung cancer is reduced by ubiquinone intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, E L; Quistorff, B; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    radiation dose of 5 Gy, using a 300 kV therapeutic unit. The macroscopic growth pre- and posttreatment was analyzed according to a transformed Gompertz algorithm using the software program GROWTH. Treatment with Q10 or soy oil alone had no effect on tumor growth compared with untreated controls. Groups...

  4. Effective Suppression of Methane Emission by 2-Bromoethanesulfonate during Rice Cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waghmode, Tatoba R.; Haque, Md Mozammel; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2015-01-01

    2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) is a structural analogue of coenzyme M (Co-M) and potent inhibitor of methanogenesis. Several studies confirmed, BES can inhibit CH4 prodcution in rice soil, but the suppressing effectiveness of BES application on CH4 emission under rice cultivation has not been studied.

  5. Biochemistry of methyl-coenzyme M reductase: the nickel metalloenzyme that catalyzes the final step in synthesis and the first step in anaerobic oxidation of the greenhouse gas methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Methane, the major component of natural gas, has been in use in human civilization since ancient times as a source of fuel and light. Methanogens are responsible for synthesis of most of the methane found on Earth. The enzyme responsible for catalyzing the chemical step of methanogenesis is methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), a nickel enzyme that contains a tetrapyrrole cofactor called coenzyme F430, which can traverse the Ni(I), (II), and (III) oxidation states. MCR and methanogens are also involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. This review describes structural, kinetic, and computational studies aimed at elucidating the mechanism of MCR. Such studies are expected to impact the many ramifications of methane in our society and environment, including energy production and greenhouse gas warming.

  6. Gene structure and mutations of glutaryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase: impaired association of enzyme subunits that is due to an A421V substitution causes glutaric acidemia type I in the Amish.

    OpenAIRE

    Biery, B. J.; Stein, D. E.; Morton, D. H.; Goodman, S. I.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of the human glutaryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (GCD) gene was determined to contain 11 exons and to span approximately 7 kb. Fibroblast DNA from 64 unrelated glutaric acidemia type I (GA1) patients was screened for mutations by PCR amplification and analysis of SSCP. Fragments with altered electrophoretic mobility were subcloned and sequenced to detect mutations that caused GA1. This report describes the structure of the GCD gene, as well as point mutations and polymorphisms fou...

  7. Specific DNA Binding of a Potential Transcriptional Regulator, Inosine 5′-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase-Related Protein VII, to the Promoter Region of a Methyl Coenzyme M Reductase I-Encoding Operon Retrieved from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus Strain ΔH▿

    OpenAIRE

    Shinzato, Naoya; Enoki, Miho; Sato, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kohei; Matsui, Toru; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Two methyl coenzyme M reductases (MCRs) encoded by the mcr and mrt operons of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ΔH are expressed in response to H2 availability. In the present study, cis elements and trans-acting factors responsible for the gene expression of MCRs were investigated by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and affinity particle purification. A survey of their operator regions by EMSA with protein extracts from mrt-expressing cul...

  8. Three endoplasmic reticulum-associated fatty acyl-coenzyme a reductases were involved in the production of primary alcohols in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guaiqiang; Li, Chunlian; Xu, Feng; Li, Yang; Shi, Xue; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhonghua

    2018-03-05

    The cuticle covers the surface of the polysaccharide cell wall of leaf epidermal cells and forms an essential diffusion barrier between the plant and the environment. The cuticle is composed of cutin and wax. Cuticular wax plays an important role in the survival of plants by serving as the interface between plants and their biotic and abiotic environments, especially restricting nonstomatal water loss. Leaf cuticular waxes of hexaploid wheat at the seedling stage mainly consist of primary alcohols, aldehydes, fatty acids, alkane and esters. Primary alcohols account for more than 80% of the total wax load. Therefore, we cloned several genes encoding fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductases from wheat and analyzed their function in yeast and plants. We propose the potential use of these genes in wheat genetic breeding. We reported the cloning and characterization of three TaFARs, namely TaFAR6, TaFAR7 and TaFAR8, encoding fatty acyl-coenzyme A reductases (FAR) in wheat leaf cuticle. Expression analysis revealed that TaFAR6, TaFAR7 and TaFAR8 were expressed at the higher levels in the seedling leaf blades, and were expressed moderately or weakly in stamen, glumes, peduncle, flag leaf blade, sheath, spike, and pistil. The heterologous expression of three TaFARs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) led to the production of C24:0 and C26:0 primary alcohols. Transgenic expression of the three TaFARs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and rice (Oryza sativa) led to increased accumulation of C24:0-C30:0 primary alcohols. Transient expression of GFP protein-tagged TaFARs revealed that the three TaFAR proteins were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the site of wax biosynthesis. The three TaFAR genes were transcriptionally induced by drought, cold, heat, powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) infection, abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJa) treatments. These results indicated that wheat TaFAR6, TaFAR7 and TaFAR8 are involved in biosynthesis of very-long-chain primary

  9. Coupled Ferredoxin and Crotonyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Reduction with NADH Catalyzed by the Butyryl-CoA Dehydrogenase/Etf Complex from Clostridium kluyveri▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuli; Hinderberger, Julia; Seedorf, Henning; Zhang, Jin; Buckel, Wolfgang; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    2008-01-01

    Cell extracts of butyrate-forming clostridia have been shown to catalyze acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)- and ferredoxin-dependent formation of H2 from NADH. It has been proposed that these bacteria contain an NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase which is allosterically regulated by acetyl-CoA. We report here that ferredoxin reduction with NADH in cell extracts from Clostridium kluyveri is catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex and that the acetyl-CoA dependence previously observed is due to the fact that the cell extracts catalyze the reduction of acetyl-CoA with NADH via crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. The cytoplasmic butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex was purified and is shown to couple the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin (E0′ = −410 mV) with NADH (E0′ = −320 mV) to the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA (E0′ = −10 mV) with NADH. The stoichiometry of the fully coupled reaction is extrapolated to be as follows: 2 NADH + 1 oxidized ferredoxin + 1 crotonyl-CoA = 2 NAD+ + 1 ferredoxin reduced by two electrons + 1 butyryl-CoA. The implications of this finding for the energy metabolism of butyrate-forming anaerobes are discussed in the accompanying paper. PMID:17993531

  10. Coupled ferredoxin and crotonyl coenzyme A (CoA) reduction with NADH catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex from Clostridium kluyveri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuli; Hinderberger, Julia; Seedorf, Henning; Zhang, Jin; Buckel, Wolfgang; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2008-02-01

    Cell extracts of butyrate-forming clostridia have been shown to catalyze acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)- and ferredoxin-dependent formation of H2 from NADH. It has been proposed that these bacteria contain an NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase which is allosterically regulated by acetyl-CoA. We report here that ferredoxin reduction with NADH in cell extracts from Clostridium kluyveri is catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex and that the acetyl-CoA dependence previously observed is due to the fact that the cell extracts catalyze the reduction of acetyl-CoA with NADH via crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. The cytoplasmic butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex was purified and is shown to couple the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin (E0' = -410 mV) with NADH (E0' = -320 mV) to the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA (E0' = -10 mV) with NADH. The stoichiometry of the fully coupled reaction is extrapolated to be as follows: 2 NADH + 1 oxidized ferredoxin + 1 crotonyl-CoA = 2 NAD+ + 1 ferredoxin reduced by two electrons + 1 butyryl-CoA. The implications of this finding for the energy metabolism of butyrate-forming anaerobes are discussed in the accompanying paper.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the apo form and in complexes with coenzyme A and dephosphocoenzyme A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Smirnova, E. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the apo form and in complexes with coenzyme A (PPAT/CoA) and dephosphocoenzyme A (PPAT/dPCoA) were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method. The structures of PPAT Mt in the apo form and in complexes with ligands were solved based on the X-ray diffraction data collected from the grown crystals. The crystal structures were refined at 1.76, 1.59, and 1.59 Å resolution to Rf factors of 0.175, 0.159, and 0.157 and Rfree of 0.224, 0.208, and 0.206 for PPAT, PPAT/CoA, and PPAT/dPCoA, respectively. The atomic coordinates of the structures were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID: 3RFF, 3RHS, and 3RBA). In these structures, the ligand-binding sites were determined, the environment of these sites was characterized, and the conformational changes accompanying the ligand binding were analyzed.

  12. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); School of Biology and Food Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Guo, Kai [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fan, Chunfen [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Si, Shengli [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); and others

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was s