WorldWideScience

Sample records for coefficient numerical experiments

  1. Observation and Numerical Experiments for Drag Coefficient Under Typhoon Wind Forcing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Huiqiu; ZHOU Liangming; LI Shuiqing; WANG Zhifeng

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study on drag coefficients under typhoon wind forcing based on observations and numerical experiments.The friction velocity and wind speed are measured at a marine observation platform in the South China Sea.Three typhoons:SOULIK (2013),TRAMI (2013) and FITOW (2013) are observed at a buoy station in the northeast sea area of Pingtan Island.A new parameterization is formulated for the wind drag coefficient as a function of wind speed.It is found that the drag coefficient (Ca) increases linearly with the slope of 0.083× 10-3 for wind speed less than 24 m s-1.To investigate the drag coefficient under higher wind conditions,three numerical experiments are implemented for these three typhoons using SWAN wave model.The wind input data are objective reanalysis datasets,which are assimilated with many sources and provided every six hours with the resolution of 0.125° ×0.125°.The numerical simulation results show a good agreement with wave observation data under typhoon wind forcing.The results indicate that the drag coefficient levels off with the linear slope of 0.012× 10-3 for higher wind speeds (less than 34 m s-1) and the new parameterization improvese the simulation accuracy compared with the Wu (1982) default used in SWAN.

  2. Intercomparison of diffusion coefficient derived from the through-diffusion experiment using different numerical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chih-Lung Chen; Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan; Tsing-Hai Wang; Shi-Ping Teng; Ching-Hor Lee

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion is a dominant mechanism regulating the transport of released nuclides. The through-diffusion method is typically applied to determine the diffusion coefficients (D). Depending on the design of the experiment, the concentrations in the source term [i.e., inlet reservoir (IR)] or the end term [i.e., outlet reservoir (OR)] can be fixed or vary. The combinations involve four distinct models (i.e., the CC-CC model, CC-VC model, VC-CC model, and the VC-VC model). Studies discussing the VC-CC model are scant. An analytical method considering the decay effect is required to accurately interpret the radioactive nuclide diffusion experiment results. Therefore, we developed a CC-CC model and a CC-VC model with a decay effect and the simplified formulas of these two models to determine the diffusion coefficient (i.e., the CC-CC method and CC-VC method). We also proposed two simplified methods using the VC-VC model to determine the diffusion coefficient straightforwardly based upon the concentration variation in IR and OR. More importantly, the best advantage of proposed method over others is that one can derive three diffusion coefficients based on one run of experiment. In addition, applying our CC-VC method to those data reported from Radiochemica Acta 96:111-117, 2008; and J Contam Hydrol 35:55-65, 1998, derived comparable diffusion coefficient lying in the identical order of magnitude. Furthermore, we proposed a formula to determine the conceptual critical time (Tc), which is particularly beneficial for the selection of using CC-VC or VC-VC method. Based on our proposed method, it becomes possible to calculate diffusion coefficient from a through-diffusion experiment in a shorter period of time. (author)

  3. Experiments and numerical simulations of flow field and heat transfer coefficients inside an autoclave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamlouch, T.; Roux, S.; Bailleul, J.-L.; Lefèvre, N.; Sobotka, V.

    2017-10-01

    Today's aerospace industrial first priority is the quality improvement of the composite material parts with the reduction of the manufacturing time in order to increase their quality/cost ratio. A fabrication method that could meet these specifications especially for large parts is the autoclave curing process. In fact the autoclave molding ensures the thermal control of the composite parts during the whole curing cycle. However the geometry of the tools as well as their positioning in the autoclave induce non uniform and complex flows around composite parts. This heterogeneity implies non-uniform heat transfers which can directly impact on part quality. One of the main challenges is therefore to describe the flow field inside an autoclave as well as the convective heat transfer from the heated pressurized gas to the composite part and the mold. For this purpose, and given the technical issues associated with instrumentation and measurements in actual autoclaves, an autoclave model was designed and then manufactured based on similarity laws. This tool allows the measurement of the flow field around representative real industrial molds using the PIV technique and the characterization of the heat transfer thanks to thermal instrumentation. The experimental results are then compared with those derived from numerical simulations using a commercial RANS CFD code. This study aims at developing a semi-empirical approach for the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient around the parts and therefore predicts its thermal history during the process with a view of optimization.

  4. Sets of Fourier coefficients using numerical quadrature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyness, J. N.

    2001-01-01

    One approach to the calculation of Fourier trigonometric coefficients f(r) of a given function f(x) is to apply the trapezoidal quadrature rule to the integral representation f(r)=(line i ntegral)(sub 0)(sup 1) f(x)e(sup -2(pi)irx)dx. Some of the difficulties in this approach are discussed. A possible way of overcoming many of these is by means of a subtraction function. Thus, one sets f(x)= h(sub p-1)(x)+ g(sub p)(x), where h(sub -1)(x) is an algebraic polynomial of degree p-1, specified in such a way that the Fourier series of g(sub p)(x) converges more rapidly than that of f(x). To obtain the Fourier coefficients of f(x), one uses an analytic expression for those of h(sub p-1)(x) and numerical quadrature to approximately those of g(sub p)(x)

  5. The influence of numerical models on determining the drag coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobeš Josef

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with numerical modelling of body aerodynamic drag coefficient in the transition from laminar to turbulent flow regimes, where the selection of a suitable numerical model is problematic. On the basic problem of flow around a simple body – sphere selected computational models are tested. The values obtained by numerical simulations of drag coefficients of each model are compared with the graph of dependency of the drag coefficient vs. Reynolds number for a sphere. Next the dependency of Strouhal number vs. Reynolds number is evaluated, where the vortex shedding frequency values for given speed are obtained numerically and experimentally and then the values are compared for each numerical model and experiment. The aim is to specify trends for the selection of appropriate numerical model for flow around bodies problem in which the precise description of the flow field around the obstacle is used to define the acoustic noise source. Numerical modelling is performed by finite volume method using CFD code.

  6. Study for discharge coefficient of flow nozzles. Prediction by using numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Norio; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Arai, Kenji; Matsumoto, Masaaki

    2008-01-01

    In nuclear plant, as water feeding into reactor have much effect on thermal power of plant, it is important to measure accurately the flow rate of water. Flow nozzle is on of typical differential pressure type flow meters and the discharge coefficient is used to calculate the flow rate. This coefficient is given by actual experiment and theory. We studied the theoretical assumption of the discharge coefficient curve using numerical simulation and evaluated the effect of flow nozzle configuration on the coefficient numerically and experimentally. As the result, numerical simulation can predict the discharge coefficient of theoretical curve within 0.3%. And we found that the throat length and throat tapping location of flow nozzle have much effect on the coefficient. (author)

  7. Numerical solution for identification of feedback coefficients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebizuka, Yoshie; Sakai, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Quasilinearization technique was studied to determine the Kinetic parameters of nuclear reactors. The method of solution was generalized to the determination of the parameters contained in a nonlinear system with nonlinear boundary conditions. A computer program, SNR-3, was developed to solve the resulting nonlinear two-point boundary value equations with generalized boundary conditions. In this paper, the problem formulation and the method of solution are explained for a general type of time dependent problem. A flow chart shows the procedure of numerical solution. The method was then applied to the determination of the critical factor and the reactivity feedback coefficients of reactors to investigate the accuracy and the applicability of the present method. The results showed that the present method was considerably successful, but that the random observation error effected the results of the identification. (Aoki, K.)

  8. Local diffusion coefficient determination: Mediterranean Sea experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacciola, D.; Borghini, M.; Cannarsa, S.

    1993-10-01

    The Mediterranean is a semi/enclosed basin characterized by the presence of channels and straits influencing the circulation, temperature and salinity fields. The tides generally have amplitudes of the order of 10 cm and velocities of few cm/s. Conversely, the wind forced circulation is very strong and can assume velocity values of 1 m/s at the sea surface. The temperature and salinity fields have a high temporal and spatial variability, because of many mixing processes existing in the sea. For example, the waters coming from the Provencal basin meet those waters coming from the Tyrrhenian Sea in the eastern Ligurian Sea, creating meanders and eddies. Local runoff influences significantly the coastal circulation. This paper describes diffusion experiments carried out in this complex environment. The experimental apparatus for the detection of the fluorescine released at sea was composed by two Turner mod. 450 fluorometres. During the experiments, temperature and salinity vertical profiles were measured by using a CTD; meteorological data were acquired on a dinghy. The positioning was obtained by means of a Motorola system, having a precision of about 1 meter. The experiments were carried out under different stratification and wind conditions. From data analysis it was found that the horizontal diffusion coefficient does not depend on time or boundary conditions. The role of stratification is important with regard to vertical displacement of the dye. However, its role with regard to vertical diffusion cannot be assessed with the actual experimental apparatus

  9. Application of numerical inverse method in calculation of composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuanrong; Chen, Weimin; Zhong, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The previously developed numerical inverse method was applied to determine the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in single-phase finite diffusion couples. The numerical inverse method was first validated in a fictitious binary finite diffusion couple by pre-assuming four standard...... sets of interdiffusion coefficients. After that, the numerical inverse method was then adopted in a ternary Al-Cu-Ni finite diffusion couple. Based on the measured composition profiles, the ternary interdiffusion coefficients along the entire diffusion path of the target ternary diffusion couple were...... obtained by using the numerical inverse approach. The comprehensive comparisons between the computations and the experiments indicate that the numerical inverse method is also applicable to high-throughput determination of the composition-dependent interdiffusion coefficients in finite diffusion couples....

  10. Numerical study of effects of accommodation coefficients on slip phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Jae; Kwon, Oh Joon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    An unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes solver employing a Maxwell slip boundary condition was developed. The present flow solver was applied to the simulation of flows around an axisymmetric hollow cylinder in a Mach 10.4 free stream, known as Calspan-UB Research Center (CUBRC) Run 14 case, and the velocity slip and the temperature jump on the cylinder surface were investigated. The effect of tangential momentum and thermal accommodation coefficients used in the Maxwell condition was also investigated by adjusting their values. The results show that the reverse flow region is developed on the body surface due to the interaction between the shock and the boundary layer. Also, the shock impingement makes pressure high. The flow properties on the surface agree well with the experimental data, and the velocity slip and the temperature jump vary consistently with the local Knudsen number change. The accommodation coefficients affect the slip phenomena and the size of the flow region. The slip phenomena become larger when both tangential momentum and thermal accommodation coefficients are decreased. However, the range of the reverse flow region decreases when the momentum accommodation coefficient is decreased. The characteristics of the momentum and thermal accommodation coefficients also are overlapped when they are altered together.

  11. Numerical studies on divertor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, N.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Tanaka, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Shoji, T.; Sugihara, M.

    1988-04-01

    Numerical analysis on the divertor experiments such as JFT-2M tokamak is made by use of the two-dimensional time-dependent simulation code. The plasma in the scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor region is solved for the given particle and heat sources from the main plasma, Γ p and Q T . Effect of the direction of the toroidal magnetic field is studied. It is found that the heat flux which is proportional to b vector x ∇T i has influences on the divertor plasmas, but has a small effect on the parameters on the midplane in the framework of the fluid model. Parameter survey on Γ p and Q T is made. The transient response of the SOL/divertor plasma to the sudden change of Γ p and Q T is studied. Time delay in the SOL and divertor region is calculated. (author)

  12. Friction Experiments for Dynamical Coefficient Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Arnoux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study, including three experimental devices, is presented in order to investigate dry friction phenomena in a wide range of sliding speeds for the steel on steel contact. A ballistic setup, with an air gun launch, allows to estimate the friction coefficient between 20 m/s and 80 m/s. Tests are completed by an adaptation of the sensor on a hydraulic tensile machine (0.01 m/s to 3 m/s and a pin-on-disk tribometer mounted on a CNC lathe (1 to 30 m/s. The interactions at the asperity scale are characterized by a white light interferometer surface analysis.

  13. Numerical computing of elastic homogenized coefficients for periodic fibrous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman S.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The homogenization theory in linear elasticity is applied to a periodic array of cylindrical inclusions in rectangular pattern extending to infinity in the inclusions axial direction, such that the deformation of tissue along this last direction is negligible. In the plane of deformation, the homogenization scheme is based on the average strain energy whereas in the third direction it is based on the average normal stress along this direction. Namely, these average quantities have to be the same on a Repeating Unit Cell (RUC of heterogeneous and homogenized media when using a special form of boundary conditions forming by a periodic part and an affine part of displacement. It exists an infinity of RUCs generating the considered array. The computing procedure is tested with different choices of RUC to control that the results of the homogenization process are independent of the kind of RUC we employ. Then, the dependence of the homogenized coefficients on the microstructure can be studied. For instance, a special anisotropy and the role of the inclusion volume are investigated. In the second part of this work, mechanical traction tests are simulated. We consider two kinds of loading, applying a density of force or imposing a displacement. We test five samples of periodic array containing one, four, sixteen, sixty-four and one hundred of RUCs. The evolution of mean stresses, strains and energy with the numbers of inclusions is studied. Evolutions depend on the kind of loading, but not their limits, which could be predicted by simulating traction test of the homogenized medium.

  14. Classification of coefficients of variation in experiments with commercial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE Faria Filho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining a specific classification of coefficients of variation in experiments with commercial layers. Coefficients of variation were collected from papers published in Brazilian journals between 2000 and 2009 for performance, internal egg quality, and eggshell quality parameters. The coefficients of variation of each parameter were classified as low, intermediate, high, and very high according to the ratio between the median and the pseudo-sigma. It was concluded that the parameters used in experiments with commercial layers have a specific classification of coefficients of variation, and that this must be considered to evaluate experimental accuracy.

  15. Numerical experiments with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Enrique.

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks are highly idealized models which, in spite of their simplicity, reproduce some key features of the real brain. In this paper, they are introduced at a level adequate for an undergraduate computational physics course. Some relevant magnitudes are defined and evaluated numerically for the Hopfield model and a short term memory model. (Author)

  16. Numerical experiments with rubble piles : equilibrium shapes and spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Elankumaran, Pradeep; Sanderson, Robyn E.

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical experiments investigating the shape and spin limits of self-gravitating "perfect" rubble piles that consist of identical, smooth, rigid, spherical particles with configurable normal coefficient of restitution and no sliding friction. Such constructs are currently employed in a

  17. Time's arrow: A numerical experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, G. Richard

    1994-04-01

    The dependence of time's arrow on initial conditions is illustrated by a numerical example in which plane waves produced by an initial pressure pulse are followed as they are multiply reflected at internal interfaces of a layered medium. Wave interactions at interfaces are shown to be analogous to the retarded and advanced waves of point sources. The model is linear and the calculation is exact and demonstrably time reversible; nevertheless the results show most of the features expected of a macroscopically irreversible system, including the approach to the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, ergodicity, and concomitant entropy increase.

  18. Experimental and numerical characterization of wind-induced pressure coefficients on nuclear buildings and chimney exhausts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricciardi, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.ricciardi@irsn.fr; Gélain, Thomas; Soares, Sandrine

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Experiments on scale models of nuclear buildings and chimney exhausts were performed. • Pressure coefficient fields on buildings are shown for various wind directions. • Evolution of pressure coefficient vs U/W ratio is given for various chimney exhausts. • RANS simulations using SST k–ω turbulence model were performed on most studied cases. • A good agreement is overall observed, with Root Mean Square Deviation lower than 0.15. - Abstract: Wind creates pressure effects on different surfaces of buildings according to their exposure to the wind, in particular at external communications. In nuclear facilities, these effects can change contamination transfers inside the building and can even lead to contamination release into the environment, especially in damaged (ventilation stopped) or accidental situations. The diversity of geometries of facilities requires the use of a validated code for predicting pressure coefficients, which characterize the wind effect on the building walls and the interaction between the wind and chimney exhaust. The first aim of a research program launched by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), was therefore to acquire experimental data of the mean pressure coefficients for different geometries of buildings and chimneys through wind tunnel tests and then to validate a CFD code (ANSYS CFX) from these experimental results. The simulations were performed using a steady RANS approach and a two-equation SST k–ω turbulence model. After a mesh sensitivity study for one configuration of building and chimney, a comparison was carried out between the numerical and experimental values for other studied configurations. This comparison was generally satisfactory, averaged over all measurement points, with values of Root Mean Square Deviations lower than 0.15 for most cases.

  19. Numerical simulation of hypersonic flight experiment vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yukimitsu; Yoshioka, Minako; 山本 行光; 吉岡 美菜子

    1994-01-01

    Hypersonic aerodynamic characteristics of Hypersonic FLight EXperiment (HYFLEX vehicle were investigated by numerical simulations using Navier-Stokes CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code of NAL. Numerical results were compared with experimental data obtained at Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at NAL. In order to investigate real flight aerodynamic characteristics. numerical calculations corresponding to the flight conditions suffering from maximum aero thermodynamic heating were also made and the d...

  20. Estimation of water diffusion coefficient into polycarbonate at different temperatures using numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H. [Process Modelling Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Nils Koppels Allé, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-06-08

    Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Mass transport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture and temperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, it is shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model.

  1. Estimation of Water Diffusion Coefficient into Polycarbonate at Different Temperatures Using Numerical Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shojaee Nasirabadi, Parizad; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    ) is widely used in the electronics industry. Thus, in this work the water diffusion coefficient into PC is investigated. Furthermore, numerical methods used for estimation of the diffusion coefficient and their assumptions are discussed. 1D and 3D numerical solutions are compared and based on this, itis......Nowadays, many electronic systems are exposed to harsh conditions of relative humidity and temperature. Masstransport properties of electronic packaging materials are needed in order to investigate the influence of moisture andtemperature on reliability of electronic devices. Polycarbonate (PC...... shown how the estimated value can be different depending on the choice of dimensionality in the model....

  2. Theoretical stability in coefficient inverse problems for general hyperbolic equations with numerical reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Yikan; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we investigate the determination of the spatial component in the time-dependent second order coefficient of a hyperbolic equation from both theoretical and numerical aspects. By the Carleman estimates for general hyperbolic operators and an auxiliary Carleman estimate, we establish local Hölder stability with either partial boundary or interior measurements under certain geometrical conditions. For numerical reconstruction, we minimize a Tikhonov functional which penalizes the gradient of the unknown function. Based on the resulting variational equation, we design an iteration method which is updated by solving a Poisson equation at each step. One-dimensional prototype examples illustrate the numerical performance of the proposed iteration.

  3. The plasma focus - numerical experiments leading technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, S.H.; Lee, S.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments on the plasma focus are now used routinely to assist design and provide reference points for diagnostics. More importantly guidance has been given regarding the implementation of technology for new generations of plasma focus devices. For example intensive series of experiments have shown that it is of no use to reduce static bank inductance L0 below certain values because of the consistent loading effects of the plasma focus dynamics on the capacitor bank. Thus whilst it was thought that the PF1000 could receive major benefits by reducing its bank inductance L 0 , numerical experiments have shown to the contrary that its present L 0 of 30 nH is already optimum and that reducing L 0 would be a very expensive fruitless exercise. This knowledge gained from numerical experiments now acts as a general valuable guideline to all high performance (ie low inductance) plasma focus devices not to unnecessarily attempt to further lower the static inductance L 0 . The numerical experiments also show that the deterioration of the yield scaling law (e.g. the fusion neutron yield scaling with storage energy) is inevitable again due to the consistent loading effect of the plasma focus, which becomes more and more dominant as capacitor bank impedance reduces with increasing capacitance C 0 as storage energy is increased. This line of thinking has led to the suggestion of using higher voltages (as an alternative to increasing C 0 ) and to seeding of Deuterium with noble gases in order to enhance compression through thermodynamic mechanisms and through radiation cooling effects of strong line radiation. Circuit manipulation e.g. to enhance focus pinch compression by current-stepping is also being numerically experimented upon. Ultimately however systems have to be built, guided by numerical experiments, so that the predicted technology may be proven and realized. (author)

  4. A numerical model for boiling heat transfer coefficient of zeotropic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza Vicencio, Rodrigo; Caviedes Aedo, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    Zeotropic mixtures never have the same liquid and vapor composition in the liquid-vapor equilibrium. Also, the bubble and the dew point are separated; this gap is called glide temperature (Tglide). Those characteristics have made these mixtures suitable for cryogenics Joule-Thomson (JT) refrigeration cycles. Zeotropic mixtures as working fluid in JT cycles improve their performance in an order of magnitude. Optimization of JT cycles have earned substantial importance for cryogenics applications (e.g, gas liquefaction, cryosurgery probes, cooling of infrared sensors, cryopreservation, and biomedical samples). Heat exchangers design on those cycles is a critical point; consequently, heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop of two-phase zeotropic mixtures are relevant. In this work, it will be applied a methodology in order to calculate the local convective heat transfer coefficients based on the law of the wall approach for turbulent flows. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of zeotropic mixtures in a heated horizontal tube are investigated numerically. The temperature profile and heat transfer coefficient for zeotropic mixtures of different bulk compositions are analysed. The numerical model has been developed and locally applied in a fully developed, constant temperature wall, and two-phase annular flow in a duct. Numerical results have been obtained using this model taking into account continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Local heat transfer coefficient results are compared with available experimental data published by Barraza et al. (2016), and they have shown good agreement.

  5. Some Experiences with Numerical Modelling of Overflows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Nielsen, L.; Jensen, B.

    2007-01-01

    across the edge of the overflow. To ensure critical flow across the edge, the upstream flow must be subcritical whereas the downstream flow is either supercritical or a free jet. Experimentally overflows are well studied. Based on laboratory experiments and Froude number scaling, numerous accurate...

  6. Numerical Study of Tire Hydroplaning Based on Power Spectrum of Asphalt Pavement and Kinetic Friction Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Shengze Zhu; Xiuyu Liu; Qingqing Cao; Xiaoming Huang

    2017-01-01

    Hydroplaning is a driving phenomenon threating vehicle’s control stability and safety. It happens when tire rolls on wet pavement with high speed that hydrodynamic force uplifts the tire. Accurate numerical simulation to reveal the mechanism of hydroplaning and evaluate the function of relevant factors in this process is significant. In order to describe the friction behaviors of tire-pavement interaction, kinetic friction coefficient curve of tire rubber and asphalt pavement was obtained by ...

  7. Moisture Transfer in Concrete: Numerical Determination of the Capillary Conductivity Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Elie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We numerically investigated moisture transfer in buildings made of concrete. We considered three types of concrete: normal concrete, pumice concrete and cellular concrete. We present the results of a 1-D liquid water flow in such materials. We evaluated the moisture distribution in building materials using the Runge-Kutta fourth-and-fifth-order method. The DOPRI5 code was used as an integrator. The model calculated the resulting moisture content and other moisture-dependent physical parameters. The moisture curves were plotted. The dampness data obtained was utilized for the numerical computation of the coefficient of the capillary conductivity of moisture. Different profiles of this coefficient are represented. Calculations were performed for four different values of the outdoor temperature: -5°C, 0°C, 5°C and 10°C. We determined that the curves corresponding to small time intervals of wetting are associated with great amplitudes of the capillary conductivity . The amplitudes of the coefficient of the capillary conductivity decrease as the time interval increases. High outdoor temperatures induce high amplitudes of the coefficient of the capillary conductivity.

  8. Interpretation of diffusion coefficients in nanostructured materials from random walk numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anta, Juan A; Mora-Seró, Iván; Dittrich, Thomas; Bisquert, Juan

    2008-08-14

    We make use of the numerical simulation random walk (RWNS) method to compute the "jump" diffusion coefficient of electrons in nanostructured materials via mean-square displacement. First, a summary of analytical results is given that relates the diffusion coefficient obtained from RWNS to those in the multiple-trapping (MT) and hopping models. Simulations are performed in a three-dimensional lattice of trap sites with energies distributed according to an exponential distribution and with a step-function distribution centered at the Fermi level. It is observed that once the stationary state is reached, the ensemble of particles follow Fermi-Dirac statistics with a well-defined Fermi level. In this stationary situation the diffusion coefficient obeys the theoretical predictions so that RWNS effectively reproduces the MT model. Mobilities can be also computed when an electrical bias is applied and they are observed to comply with the Einstein relation when compared with steady-state diffusion coefficients. The evolution of the system towards the stationary situation is also studied. When the diffusion coefficients are monitored along simulation time a transition from anomalous to trap-limited transport is observed. The nature of this transition is discussed in terms of the evolution of electron distribution and the Fermi level. All these results will facilitate the use of RW simulation and related methods to interpret steady-state as well as transient experimental techniques.

  9. Quantification of numerical aperture-dependence of the OCT attenuation coefficient (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Liliana M.; Bloemen, Paul R.; Almasian, Mitra; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-03-01

    Despite the improvements in early cancer diagnosis, adequate diagnostic tools for early staging of bladder cancer tumors are lacking [1]. MEMS-probes based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) provide cross-sectional imaging with a high-spatial resolution at a high-imaging speed, improving visualization of cancerous tissue [2-3]. Additionally, studies show that the measurement of localized attenuation coefficient allows discrimination between healthy and cancerous tissue [4]. We have designed a new miniaturized MEMS-probe based on OCT that will optimize early diagnosis by improving functional visualization of suspicious lesions in bladder. During the optical design phase of the probe, we have studied the effect of the numerical aperture (NA) on the OCT signal attenuation. For this study, we have employed an InnerVision Santec OCT system with several numerical apertures (25mm, 40mm, 60mm, 100mm, 150mm and 200mm using achromatic lenses). The change in attenuation coefficient was studied using 15 dilutions of intralipid ranging between 6*10-5 volume% and 20 volume%. We obtained the attenuation coefficient from the OCT images at several fixed positions of the focuses using established OCT models (e.g. single scattering with known confocal point spread function (PSF) [5] and multiple scattering using the Extended Huygens Fresnel model [6]). As a result, a non-linear increase of the scattering coefficient as a function of intralipid concentration (due to dependent scattering) was obtained for all numerical apertures. For all intralipid samples, the measured attenuation coefficient decreased with a decrease in NA. Our results suggest a non-negligible influence of the NA on the measured attenuation coefficient. [1] Khochikar MV. Rationale for an early detection program for bladder cancer. Indian J Urol 2011 Apr-Jun; 27(2): 218-225. [2] Sun J and Xie H. Review Article MEMS-Based Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography. IJO 2011, Article ID 825629, 12 pages. doi:10

  10. Analysis and implementation issues for the numerical approximation of parabolic equations with random coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Nobile, Fabio; Tempone, Raul

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of numerically approximating statistical moments of the solution of a time- dependent linear parabolic partial differential equation (PDE), whose coefficients and/or forcing terms are spatially correlated random fields. The stochastic coefficients of the PDE are approximated by truncated Karhunen-Loève expansions driven by a finite number of uncorrelated random variables. After approxi- mating the stochastic coefficients, the original stochastic PDE turns into a new deterministic parametric PDE of the same type, the dimension of the parameter set being equal to the number of random variables introduced. After proving that the solution of the parametric PDE problem is analytic with respect to the parameters, we consider global polynomial approximations based on tensor product, total degree or sparse polynomial spaces and constructed by either a Stochastic Galerkin or a Stochastic Collocation approach. We derive convergence rates for the different cases and present numerical results that show how these approaches are a valid alternative to the more traditional Monte Carlo Method for this class of problems. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analysis and implementation issues for the numerical approximation of parabolic equations with random coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Nobile, Fabio

    2009-11-05

    We consider the problem of numerically approximating statistical moments of the solution of a time- dependent linear parabolic partial differential equation (PDE), whose coefficients and/or forcing terms are spatially correlated random fields. The stochastic coefficients of the PDE are approximated by truncated Karhunen-Loève expansions driven by a finite number of uncorrelated random variables. After approxi- mating the stochastic coefficients, the original stochastic PDE turns into a new deterministic parametric PDE of the same type, the dimension of the parameter set being equal to the number of random variables introduced. After proving that the solution of the parametric PDE problem is analytic with respect to the parameters, we consider global polynomial approximations based on tensor product, total degree or sparse polynomial spaces and constructed by either a Stochastic Galerkin or a Stochastic Collocation approach. We derive convergence rates for the different cases and present numerical results that show how these approaches are a valid alternative to the more traditional Monte Carlo Method for this class of problems. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Numerical simulation of transmission coefficient using c-number Langevin equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debashis; Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2003-12-01

    We numerically implement the reactive flux formalism on the basis of a recently proposed c-number Langevin equation [Barik et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 680 (2003); Banerjee et al., Phys. Rev. E 65, 021109 (2002)] to calculate transmission coefficient. The Kramers' turnover, the T2 enhancement of the rate at low temperatures and other related features of temporal behavior of the transmission coefficient over a range of temperature down to absolute zero, noise correlation, and friction are examined for a double well potential and compared with other known results. This simple method is based on canonical quantization and Wigner quasiclassical phase space function and takes care of quantum effects due to the system order by order.

  13. Numerical evaluation of Auger recombination coefficients in relaxed and strained germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Stefano [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary' s Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Bertazzi, Francesco; Goano, Michele [Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); IEIIT-CNR, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-05-23

    The potential applications of germanium and its alloys in infrared silicon-based photonics have led to a renewed interest in their optical properties. In this letter, we report on the numerical determination of Auger coefficients at T = 300 K for relaxed and biaxially strained germanium. We use a Green's function based model that takes into account all relevant direct and phonon-assisted processes and perform calculations up to a strain level corresponding to the transition from indirect to direct energy gap. We have considered excess carrier concentrations ranging from 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} to 5 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. For use in device level simulations, we also provide fitting formulas for the calculated electron and hole Auger coefficients as functions of carrier density.

  14. Experiments and Numerical Simulations of Electrodynamic Tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iki, Kentaro; Kawamoto, Satomi; Takahashi, Ayaka; Ishimoto, Tomori; Yanagida, Atsushi; Toda, Susumu

    As an effective means of suppressing space debris growth, the Aerospace Research and Development Directorate of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been investigating an active space debris removal system that employs highly efficient electrodynamic tether (EDT) technology for orbital transfer. This study investigates tether deployment dynamics by means of on-ground experiments and numerical simulations of an electrodynamic tether system. Some key parameters used in the numerical simulations, such as the elastic modulus and damping ratio of the tether, the spring constant of the coiling of the tether, and deployment friction, must be estimated, and various experiments are conducted to determine these values. As a result, the following values were obtained: The elastic modulus of the tether was 40 GPa, and the damping ratio of the tether was 0.02. The spring constant and the damping ratio of the tether coiling were 10-4 N/m and 0.025 respectively. The deployment friction was 0.038ν + 0.005 N. In numerical simulations using a multiple mass tether model, tethers with lengths of several kilometers are deployed and the attitude dynamics of satellites attached to the end of the tether and tether libration are calculated. As a result, the simulations confirmed successful deployment of the tether with a length of 500 m using the electrodynamic tether system.

  15. Numerical determination of lateral loss coefficients for subchannel analysis in nuclear fuel bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sin Kim; Goon-Cherl Park [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-01

    An accurate prediction of cross-flow based on detailed knowledge of the velocity field in subchannels of a nuclear fuel assembly is of importance in nuclear fuel performance analysis. In this study, the low-Reynolds number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model has been adopted in two adjacent subchannels with cross-flow. The secondary flow is estimated accurately by the anisotropic algebraic Reynolds stress model. This model was numerically calculated by the finite element method and has been verified successfully through comparison with existing experimental data. Finally, with the numerical analysis of the velocity field in such subchannel domain, an analytical correlation of the lateral loss coefficient is obtained to predict the cross-flow rate in subchannel analysis codes. The correlation is expressed as a function of the ratio of the lateral flow velocity to the donor subchannel axial velocity, recipient channel Reynolds number and pitch-to-diameter.

  16. Interpretation of biological-rate coefficients derived from radionuclide content, radionuclide concentration and specific activity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderploeg, H.A.; Booth, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Rigorous expressions are derived for the biological-rate coefficients (BRCs) determined from time-dependent measurements of three different dependent variables of radionuclide tracer experiments. These variables, which apply to a single organism, are radionuclide content, radionuclide concentration and specific activity. The BRCs derived from these variables have different mathematical expressions and, for high growth rates, their numerical values can be quite different. The precise mathematical expressions for the BRCs are presented here to aid modelers in selecting the correct parameters for their models and to aid experiments in interpreting their results. The usefulness of these three variables in quantifying elemental uptakes and losses by organisms is discussed. (U.K.)

  17. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  18. Activity Coefficients of Acetone-Chloroform Solutions: An Undergraduate Experiment. Undergraduate Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozog, J. Z.; Morrison, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information, laboratory procedures, and results of an undergraduate experiment in which activity coefficients for a two-component liquid-vapor system are determined. Working in pairs, students can perform the experiment with 10 solutions in a given three-hour laboratory period. (Author/JN)

  19. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for numerical modeling of groundwater solute transport in heterogeneous formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2017-09-15

    Most recent research on hydrodynamic dispersion in porous media has focused on whole-domain dispersion while other research is largely on laboratory-scale dispersion. This work focuses on the contribution of a single block in a numerical model to dispersion. Variability of fluid velocity and concentration within a block is not resolved and the combined spreading effect is approximated using resolved quantities and macroscopic parameters. This applies whether the formation is modeled as homogeneous or discretized into homogeneous blocks but the emphasis here being on the latter. The process of dispersion is typically described through the Fickian model, i.e., the dispersive flux is proportional to the gradient of the resolved concentration, commonly with the Scheidegger parameterization, which is a particular way to compute the dispersion coefficients utilizing dispersivity coefficients. Although such parameterization is by far the most commonly used in solute transport applications, its validity has been questioned. Here, our goal is to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and mass transfer limitations on block-scale longitudinal dispersion and to evaluate under which conditions the Scheidegger parameterization is valid. We compute the relaxation time or memory of the system; changes in time with periods larger than the relaxation time are gradually leading to a condition of local equilibrium under which dispersion is Fickian. The method we use requires the solution of a steady-state advection-dispersion equation, and thus is computationally efficient, and applicable to any heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity K field without requiring statistical or structural assumptions. The method was validated by comparing with other approaches such as the moment analysis and the first order perturbation method. We investigate the impact of heterogeneity, both in degree and structure, on the longitudinal dispersion coefficient and then discuss the role of local dispersion

  20. Numerical Study of Tire Hydroplaning Based on Power Spectrum of Asphalt Pavement and Kinetic Friction Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengze Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroplaning is a driving phenomenon threating vehicle’s control stability and safety. It happens when tire rolls on wet pavement with high speed that hydrodynamic force uplifts the tire. Accurate numerical simulation to reveal the mechanism of hydroplaning and evaluate the function of relevant factors in this process is significant. In order to describe the friction behaviors of tire-pavement interaction, kinetic friction coefficient curve of tire rubber and asphalt pavement was obtained by combining pavement surface power spectrum and complex modulus of tread rubber through Persson’s friction theory. Finite element model of tire-fluid-pavement was established in ABAQUS, which was composed of a 225-40-R18 radial tire and three types of asphalt pavement covered with water film. Mechanical responses and physical behaviors of tire-pavement interaction were observed and compared with NASA equation to validate the applicability and accuracy of this model. Then contact force at tire-pavement interface and critical hydroplaning speed influenced by tire inflation pressure, water film thickness, and pavement types were investigated. The results show higher tire inflation pressure, thinner water film, and more abundant macrotexture enhancing hydroplaning speed. The results could be applied to predict hydroplaning speed on different asphalt pavement and improve pavement skid resistance design.

  1. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching

  2. Large scale experiments as a tool for numerical model development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Jens; Hansen, Erik Asp; Fuchs, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Experimental modelling is an important tool for study of hydrodynamic phenomena. The applicability of experiments can be expanded by the use of numerical models and experiments are important for documentation of the validity of numerical tools. In other cases numerical tools can be applied...

  3. Numerical convergence of the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity obtained with Thomas-Fermi-Dirac molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.; Zérah, G.

    2012-06-01

    Computations of the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity in warm dense matter are presented with an emphasis on obtaining numerical convergence and a careful evaluation of the standard deviation. The transport coefficients are computed with the Green-Kubo relation and orbital-free molecular dynamics at the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac level. The numerical parameters are varied until the Green-Kubo integral is equal to a constant in the t→+∞ limit; the transport coefficients are deduced from this constant and not by extrapolation of the Green-Kubo integral. The latter method, which gives rise to an unknown error, is tested for the computation of viscosity; it appears that it should be used with caution. In the large domain of coupling constant considered, both the self-diffusion coefficient and viscosity turn out to be well approximated by simple analytical laws using a single effective atomic number calculated in the average-atom model.

  4. Experimental determination of surface heat transfer coefficient in a dry ice-ethanol cooling bath using a numerical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    BACKGROUND: Dry ice-ethanol bath (-78 degree C) have been widely used in low temperature biological research to attain rapid cooling of samples below freezing temperature. The prediction of cooling rates of biological samples immersed in dry ice-ethanol bath is of practical interest in cryopreservation. The cooling rate can be obtained using mathematical models representing the heat conduction equation in transient state. Additionally, at the solid cryogenic-fluid interface, the knowledge of the surface heat transfer coefficient (h) is necessary for the convective boundary condition in order to correctly establish the mathematical problem. The study was to apply numerical modeling to obtain the surface heat transfer coefficient of a dry ice-ethanol bath. A numerical finite element solution of heat conduction equation was used to obtain surface heat transfer coefficients from measured temperatures at the center of polytetrafluoroethylene and polymethylmetacrylate cylinders immersed in a dry ice-ethanol cooling bath. The numerical model considered the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties of plastic materials used. A negative linear relationship is observed between cylinder diameter and heat transfer coefficient in the liquid bath, the calculated h values were 308, 135 and 62.5 W/(m 2 K) for PMMA 1.3, PTFE 2.59 and 3.14 cm in diameter, respectively. The calculated heat transfer coefficients were consistent among several replicates; h in dry ice-ethanol showed an inverse relationship with cylinder diameter.

  5. Numerical experiments on unstructured PIC stability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, David Minot

    2011-04-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) is a method for plasmas simulation. Particles are pushed with Verlet time integration. Fields are modeled using finite differences on a tensor product mesh (cells). The Unstructured PIC methods studied here use instead finite element discretizations on unstructured (simplicial) meshes. PIC is constrained by stability limits (upper bounds) on mesh and time step sizes. Numerical evidence (2D) and analysis will be presented showing that similar bounds constrain unstructured PIC.

  6. Measured and numerically partitioned phytoplankton spectral absorption coefficients in inland waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, M.; Van Dijk, M.A.; Zhu, G.; Gong, Z.; Li, Y.M.; Qin, B.

    2009-01-01

    Total particulate, tripton and phytoplankton absorption coefficients were measured for eutrophic (Lake Taihu), meso-eutrophic (Lake Tianmuhu) and mesotrophic waters (the Three Gorges Reservoir) in China using the quantitative filter technique. Meanwhile, tripton and phytoplankton absorption

  7. Numerical study on over reading coefficient in wet steam flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xuesong; Yuan Dewen; Yan Xiao; Peng Xingjian

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated the flow process of wet steam in Venturi under interested conditions with CFD simulation software. The effect of pressure, mass flow rate, throat radius on over reading factor was analyzed. This paper aims to improve the wet steam over reading model and the prediction accuracy in wet steam. The results prove that the mass flow has a small effect on over reading coefficient, while the effect that throat radius has on over reading coefficient increases as the pressure rises. (authors)

  8. An axisymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M; Hiratsuka, T; Ito, K; Finsterle, S

    2011-04-25

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an

  9. An asixymmetric diffusion experiment for the determination of diffusion and sorption coefficients of rock samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, M.; Hiratsuka, T.; Ito, K.; Finsterle, S.

    2011-02-01

    Diffusion anisotropy is a critical property in predicting migration of substances in sedimentary formations with very low permeability. The diffusion anisotropy of sedimentary rocks has been evaluated mainly from laboratory diffusion experiments, in which the directional diffusivities are separately estimated by through-diffusion experiments using different rock samples, or concurrently by in-diffusion experiments in which only the tracer profile in a rock block is measured. To estimate the diffusion anisotropy from a single rock sample, this study proposes an axisymmetric diffusion test, in which tracer diffuses between a cylindrical rock sample and a surrounding solution reservoir. The tracer diffusion between the sample and reservoir can be monitored from the reservoir tracer concentrations, and the tracer profile could also be obtained after dismantling the sample. Semi-analytical solutions are derived for tracer concentrations in both the reservoir and sample, accounting for an anisotropic diffusion tensor of rank two as well as the dilution effects from sampling and replacement of reservoir solution. The transient and steady-state analyses were examined experimentally and numerically for different experimental configurations, but without the need for tracer profiling. These experimental configurations are tested for in- and out-diffusion experiments using Koetoi and Wakkanai mudstones and Shirahama sandstone, and are scrutinized by a numerical approach to identify favorable conditions for parameter estimation. The analysis reveals the difficulty in estimating diffusion anisotropy; test configurations are proposed for enhanced identifiability of diffusion anisotropy. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the axisymmetric diffusion test is efficient in obtaining the sorption parameter from both steady-state and transient data, and in determining the effective diffusion coefficient if isotropic diffusion is assumed. Moreover, measuring reservoir concentrations in an

  10. Internal conversion coefficients of high multipole transitions: Experiment and theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerl, J.; Vijay Sai, K.; Sainath, M.; Gowrishankar, R.; Venkataramaniah, K.

    2008-01-01

    A compilation of the available experimental internal conversion coefficients (ICCs), α T , α K , α L , and ratios K/L and K/LM of high multipole (L > 2) transitions for a number of elements in the range 21 ≤ Z ≤ 94 is presented. Our listing of experimental data includes 194 data sets on 110 E3 transitions, 10 data sets on 6 E4 transitions, 11 data sets on 7 E5 transitions, 38 data sets on 21 M3 transitions, and 132 data sets on 68 M4 transitions. Data with less than 10% experimental uncertainty have been selected for comparison with the theoretical values of Hager and Seltzer [R.S. Hager, E.C. Seltzer, Nucl. Data Tables A 4 (1968) 1], Rosel et al. [F. Roesel, H.M. Fries, K. Alder, H.C. Pauli, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21 (1978) 91], and BRICC. The relative percentage deviations (%Δ) have been calculated for each of the above theories and the averages (%Δ-bar) are estimated. The Band et al. [I.M. Band, M.B. Trzhaskovskaya, C.W. Nestor Jr., P.O. Tikkanen, S. Raman, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 81 (2002) 1] tables, using the BRICC interpolation code, are seen to give theoretical ICCs closest to experimental values

  11. Mechanical Interaction in Pressurized Pipe Systems: Experiments and Numerical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Simão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interaction between the unsteady flow occurrence and the resulting vibration of the pipe are analyzed based on experiments and numerical models. Waterhammer, structural dynamic and fluid–structure interaction (FSI are the main subjects dealt with in this study. Firstly, a 1D model is developed based on the method of characteristics (MOC using specific damping coefficients for initial components associated with rheological pipe material behavior, structural and fluid deformation, and type of anchored structural supports. Secondly a 3D coupled complex model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD, using a Finite Element Method (FEM, is also applied to predict and distinguish the FSI events. Herein, a specific hydrodynamic model of viscosity to replicate the operation of a valve was also developed to minimize the number of mesh elements and the complexity of the system. The importance of integrated analysis of fluid–structure interaction, especially in non-rigidity anchored pipe systems, is equally emphasized. The developed models are validated through experimental tests.

  12. Implementing Families of Implicit Chebyshev Methods with Exact Coefficients for the Numerical Integration of First- and Second-Order Differential Equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Jason

    2002-01-01

    A method is presented for the generation of exact numerical coefficients found in two families of implicit Chebyshev methods for the numerical integration of first- and second-order ordinary differential equations...

  13. Numerical estimation on balance coefficients of central difference averaging method for quench detection of the KSTAR PF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Sub; An, Seok Chan; Ko, Tae Kuk; Chu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A quench detection system of KSTAR Poloidal Field (PF) coils is inevitable for stable operation because normal zone generates overheating during quench occurrence. Recently, new voltage quench detection method, combination of Central Difference Averaging (CDA) and Mutual Inductance Compensation (MIK) for compensating mutual inductive voltage more effectively than conventional voltage detection method, has been suggested and studied. For better performance of mutual induction cancellation by adjacent coils of CDA+MIK method for KSTAR coil system, balance coefficients of CDA must be estimated and adjusted preferentially. In this paper, the balance coefficients of CDA for KSTAR PF coils were numerically estimated. The estimated result was adopted and tested by using simulation. The CDA method adopting balance coefficients effectively eliminated mutual inductive voltage, and also it is expected to improve performance of CDA+MIK method for quench detection of KSTAR PF coils

  14. Numerical calculation of wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients in gas-fluidized beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.A.M.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, W.P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A computer model for a hot gas-fluidized bed has been developed. The theoretical description is based on a two-fluid model (TFM) approach in which both phases are considered to be continuous and fully interpenetrating. Local wall-to-bed heat-transfer coefficients have been calculated by the

  15. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for numerical modeling of groundwater solute transport in heterogeneous formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2018-01-01

    Most recent research on hydrodynamic dispersion in porous media has focused on whole-domain dispersion while other research is largely on laboratory-scale dispersion. This work focuses on the contribution of a single block in a numerical model to dispersion. Variability of fluid velocity and conc...

  16. Numerical approximations of stochastic differential equations with non-globally Lipschitz continuous coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Hutzenthaler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in the literature have a superlinearly growing nonlinearity in their drift or diffusion coefficient. Unfortunately, moments of the computationally efficient Euler-Maruyama approximation method diverge for these SDEs in finite time. This article develops a general theory based on rare events for studying integrability properties such as moment bounds for discrete-time stochastic processes. Using this approach, the authors establish moment bounds for fully and partially drift-implicit Euler methods and for a class of new explicit approximation method

  17. Stochastic spectral Galerkin and collocation methods for PDEs with random coefficients: A numerical comparison

    KAUST Repository

    Bäck, Joakim

    2010-09-17

    Much attention has recently been devoted to the development of Stochastic Galerkin (SG) and Stochastic Collocation (SC) methods for uncertainty quantification. An open and relevant research topic is the comparison of these two methods. By introducing a suitable generalization of the classical sparse grid SC method, we are able to compare SG and SC on the same underlying multivariate polynomial space in terms of accuracy vs. computational work. The approximation spaces considered here include isotropic and anisotropic versions of Tensor Product (TP), Total Degree (TD), Hyperbolic Cross (HC) and Smolyak (SM) polynomials. Numerical results for linear elliptic SPDEs indicate a slight computational work advantage of isotropic SC over SG, with SC-SM and SG-TD being the best choices of approximation spaces for each method. Finally, numerical results corroborate the optimality of the theoretical estimate of anisotropy ratios introduced by the authors in a previous work for the construction of anisotropic approximation spaces. © 2011 Springer.

  18. A Numerical Approach to Estimate the Ballistic Coefficient of Space Debris from TLE Orbital Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkeliunas, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    theoretical simulations, even few continuous mode 10 kW ground-based lasers, focused by 1.5 m telescopes with adaptive optics, were enough to prevent significant amount of the debris collisions. Simulations were done by propagating all space objects in LEO by 1 year into the future and checking whether the probability of collision was high. For those space objects different ground-based lasers were used to divert them, afterwards collision probabilities were reevaluated. However, the actual accuracy of the LightForce software, which has been developed at NASA AmesResearch Center, depends on the veracity of the input parameters, one of which is the objects ballistic coefficient. It is a measure of bodys ability to overcome air resistance, which has a significant impact on the debris in LEO, and thus it is responsible for the shape of the trajectory of the debris. Having the exact values of the ballistic coefficient would make significantly better collision predictions, unfortunately, we do not know what are the values for most of the objects.In this research, we were working with part of LightForce code, which estimates the ballistic coefficient from ephemerides. Previously used method gave highly inaccurate values, when compared to known objects, and it needed to be changed. The goal of this work was to try out a different method of estimating the ballistic coefficient and to check whether or not it gives noticeable improvements.

  19. Numerical analysis of gas puff modulation experiment on JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Keisuke; Sakasai, Akira

    1992-03-01

    In tokamak transport physics, source modulation experiments are one of the most effective methods. For an analysis of these modulation experiments, a simple numerical method was developed to solve the general transport equations. This method was applied to gas puff modulation experiments on JT-60U. From the comparison between the measured and calculated density perturbations, it was found that the particle diffusion coefficient is about 0.8 m 2 /sec in the edge region and 0.1-0.2 m 2 /sec in the central region. (author)

  20. A numerical study of one-dimensional replicating patterns in reaction-diffusion systems with non-linear diffusion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, J. C.; Carmen, A. del

    1998-01-01

    A numerical study of the dynamics of pattern evolution in reaction-diffusion systems is performed, although limited to one spatial dimension. The diffusion coefficients are nonlinear, based on powers of the scalar variables. The system keeps the dynamics of previous studies in the literature, but the presence of nonlinear diffusion generates a field of strong nonlinear interactions due to the presence of receding travelling waves. This field is limited by the plane of symmetry of the space domain and the last born outgoing travelling wave. These effects are discussed. (author). 10 refs., 7 figs

  1. Soil remediation by heat injection: Experiments and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betz, C.; Emmert, M.; Faerber, A. [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    In order to understand physical processes of thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction methods in porous media the isothermal, multiphase formulation for the numerical model MUFTE will be extended by a non-isothermal, multiphase-multicomponent formulation. In order to verify the numerical model, comparison with analytical solutions for well defined problems will be carried out. To identify relevant processes and their interactions, the results of the simulation will be compared with well controlled experiments with sophisticated measurement equipment in three different scales. The aim is to compare the different numerical solution techniques namely Finite Element versus Integral Finite Difference technique as implemented in MUFTE and TOUGH2 [9] respectively.

  2. On a numerical method for solving integro-differential equations with variable coefficients with applications in finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, O.; Rodochenko, V.

    2018-03-01

    We propose a new general numerical method aimed to solve integro-differential equations with variable coefficients. The problem under consideration arises in finance where in the context of pricing barrier options in a wide class of stochastic volatility models with jumps. To handle the effect of the correlation between the price and the variance, we use a suitable substitution for processes. Then we construct a Markov-chain approximation for the variation process on small time intervals and apply a maturity randomization technique. The result is a system of boundary problems for integro-differential equations with constant coefficients on the line in each vertex of the chain. We solve the arising problems using a numerical Wiener-Hopf factorization method. The approximate formulae for the factors are efficiently implemented by means of the Fast Fourier Transform. Finally, we use a recurrent procedure that moves backwards in time on the variance tree. We demonstrate the convergence of the method using Monte-Carlo simulations and compare our results with the results obtained by the Wiener-Hopf method with closed-form expressions of the factors.

  3. Three-dimensional transport coefficient model and prediction-correction numerical method for thermal margin analysis of PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.

    1981-01-01

    Combustion Engineering Inc. designs its modern PWR reactor cores using open-core thermal-hydraulic methods where the mass, momentum and energy equations are solved in three dimensions (one axial and two lateral directions). The resultant fluid properties are used to compute the minimum Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) which ultimately sets the power capability of the core. The on-line digital monitoring and protection systems require a small fast-running algorithm of the design code. This paper presents two techniques used in the development of the on-line DNB algorithm. First, a three-dimensional transport coefficient model is introduced to radially group the flow subchannel into channels for the thermal-hydraulic fluid properties calculation. Conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for this channels are derived using transport coefficients to modify the calculation of the radial transport of enthalpy and momentum. Second, a simplified, non-iterative numerical method, called the prediction-correction method, is applied together with the transport coefficient model to reduce the computer execution time in the determination of fluid properties. Comparison of the algorithm and the design thermal-hydraulic code shows agreement to within 0.65% equivalent power at a 95/95 confidence/probability level for all normal operating conditions of the PWR core. This algorithm accuracy is achieved with 1/800th of the computer processing time of its parent design code. (orig.)

  4. Sintering equation: determination of its coefficients by experiments - using multiple regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windelberg, D.

    1999-01-01

    Sintering is a method for volume-compression (or volume-contraction) of powdered or grained material applying high temperature (less than the melting point of the material). Maekipirtti tried to find an equation which describes the process of sintering by its main parameters sintering time, sintering temperature and volume contracting. Such equation is called a sintering equation. It also contains some coefficients which characterise the behaviour of the material during the process of sintering. These coefficients have to be determined by experiments. Here we show that some linear regressions will produce wrong coefficients, but multiple regression results in an useful sintering equation. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of GPU-Based Numerous Particles Simulation and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Wook; Jun, Chul Woong; Sohn, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jae Wook

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of numerous grains interacting with each other can be easily observed. In this study, this dynamic behavior was analyzed based on the contact between numerous grains. The discrete element method was used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of each particle and the neighboring-cell algorithm was employed for detecting their contact. The Hertzian and tangential sliding friction contact models were used for calculating the contact force acting between the particles. A GPU-based parallel program was developed for conducting the computer simulation and calculating the numerous contacts. The dam break experiment was performed to verify the simulation results. The reliability of the program was verified by comparing the results of the simulation with those of the experiment

  6. Agglomeration processes in carbonaceous dusty plasmas, experiments and numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dap, S; Hugon, R; De Poucques, L; Bougdira, J; Lacroix, D; Patisson, F

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with carbon dust agglomeration in radio frequency acetylene/argon plasma. Two studies, an experimental and a numerical one, were carried out to model dust formation mechanisms. Firstly, in situ transmission spectroscopy of dust clouds in the visible range was performed in order to observe the main features of the agglomeration process of the produced carbonaceous dust. Secondly, numerical simulation tools dedicated to understanding the achieved experiments were developed. A first model was used for the discretization of the continuous population balance equations that characterize the dust agglomeration process. The second model is based on a Monte Carlo ray-tracing code coupled to a Mie theory calculation of dust absorption and scattering parameters. These two simulation tools were used together in order to numerically predict the light transmissivity through a dusty plasma and make comparisons with experiments.

  7. Numerical experiments using deflation with the HISQ action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christine; DeTar, Carleton; McNeile, Craig; Vaquero, Alejandro

    2018-03-01

    We report on numerical experiments using deflation to compute quark propagators for the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action. The method is tested on HISQ gauge configurations, generated by the MILC collaboration, with lattice spacings of 0.15 fm, with a range of volumes, and sea quark masses down to the physical quark mass.

  8. Modeling and experiments for the time-dependent diffusion coefficient during methane desorption from coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Wu, Li; Hong-Lai, Xue; Cheng, Guan; Wen-biao, Liu

    2018-04-01

    Statistical analysis shows that in the coal matrix, the diffusion coefficient for methane is time-varying, and its integral satisfies the formula μt κ /(1 + β κ ). Therefore, a so-called dynamic diffusion coefficient model (DDC model) is developed. To verify the suitability and accuracy of the DDC model, a series of gas diffusion experiments were conducted using coal particles of different sizes. The results show that the experimental data can be accurately described by the DDC and bidisperse models, but the fit to the DDC model is slightly better. For all coal samples, as time increases, the effective diffusion coefficient first shows a sudden drop, followed by a gradual decrease before stabilizing at longer times. The effective diffusion coefficient has a negative relationship with the size of the coal particle. Finally, the relationship between the constants of the DDC model and the effective diffusion coefficient is discussed. The constant α (μ/R 2 ) denotes the effective coefficient at the initial time, and the constants κ and β control the attenuation characteristic of the effective diffusion coefficient.

  9. Determination of trapping parameters and the chemical diffusion coefficient from hydrogen permeation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, J.; Mori, G.; Prethaler, A.; Fischer, F.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A modeling study for diffusion of hydrogen with traps is presented. • Introduction of a new chemical diffusion coefficient. • Density of traps and average depth of traps can be determined. • Lattice diffusion and sub-surface concentration of atomic hydrogen can be determined. - Abstract: An improved diffusion theory accounting for trapping effects is applied to evaluation of hydrogen permeation experiments performed for pure iron and pearlitic and martensitic steels. The trapping parameters as molar volume and depth of traps are determined by fitting experiments by simulations based on the theory. The concentration-dependent chemical diffusion coefficient of hydrogen is extracted indicating that the trapping effect on diffusion in pure iron and pearlitic steel is negligible. However, it is significant for martensitic steel, for which the chemical diffusion coefficient cannot be considered as concentration-independent as it is established in current standards

  10. Numerical modeling of the 2017 active seismic infrasound balloon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Komjathy, A.; Garcia, R.; Cutts, J. A.; Pauken, M.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Mimoun, D.; Jackson, J. M.; Lai, V. H.; Kedar, S.; Levillain, E.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a numerical tool to propagate acoustic and gravity waves in a coupled solid-fluid medium with topography. It is a hybrid method between a continuous Galerkin and a discontinuous Galerkin method that accounts for non-linear atmospheric waves, visco-elastic waves and topography. We apply this method to a recent experiment that took place in the Nevada desert to study acoustic waves from seismic events. This experiment, developed by JPL and its partners, wants to demonstrate the viability of a new approach to probe seismic-induced acoustic waves from a balloon platform. To the best of our knowledge, this could be the only way, for planetary missions, to perform tomography when one faces challenging surface conditions, with high pressure and temperature (e.g. Venus), and thus when it is impossible to use conventional electronics routinely employed on Earth. To fully demonstrate the effectiveness of such a technique one should also be able to reconstruct the observed signals from numerical modeling. To model the seismic hammer experiment and the subsequent acoustic wave propagation, we rely on a subsurface seismic model constructed from the seismometers measurements during the 2017 Nevada experiment and an atmospheric model built from meteorological data. The source is considered as a Gaussian point source located at the surface. Comparison between the numerical modeling and the experimental data could help future mission designs and provide great insights into the planet's interior structure.

  11. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  12. Time delay systems theory, numerics, applications, and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ersal, Tulga; Orosz, Gábor

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects contributions related to selected presentations from the 12th IFAC Workshop on Time Delay Systems, Ann Arbor, June 28-30, 2015. The included papers present novel techniques and new results of delayed dynamical systems. The topical spectrum covers control theory, numerical analysis, engineering and biological applications as well as experiments and case studies. The target audience primarily comprises research experts in the field of time delay systems, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students alike. .

  13. Problems with Discontinuous Diffusion/Dispersion Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ferraris

    2012-01-01

    accurate on smooth solutions and based on a special numerical treatment of the diffusion/dispersion coefficients that makes its application possible also when such coefficients are discontinuous. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence of the numerical approximation and show a good behavior on a set of benchmark problems in two space dimensions.

  14. Tritium release experiments with CATS and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Kenzo; Wajima, Takaaki; Hara, Keisuke; Wada, Kohei; Takeishi, Toshiharu; Shinozaki, Yohei; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Katekari, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    In D-T fusion power plants, large amounts of tritium would be handled. Tritium is the radioisotope of protium, and is easily taken into the human body, and thus the behavior of tritium accidentally released in fusion power plants should be studied for the safety design and radioprotection of workers. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of tritium released into large rooms with objectives, since complex flow fields should exist in such rooms and they could influence the ventilation of the air containing released tritium. Thus, tritium release experiments were conducted using Caisson Assembly for Tritium Safety Study (CATS) in TPL/JAEA. Some data were taken for tritium behavior in the ventilated area and response of tritium monitors. In the experiments, approximately 17 GBq of tritium was released into Caisson with the total volume of 12 m 3 , and the room was ventilated at the rate of 12 m 3 /h after release of tritium. It was found that placement of an objective in the vessel substantially affects decontamination efficiency. With regard to an experimental result, numerical calculation was performed and the experimental result and the result of numerical calculation were compared, which indicates that experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical calculation. However, further R and D needs to be carried out for quantitative reproduction of the experimental results.

  15. Tritium release experiments with CATS and numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, Kenzo, E-mail: kenzo@gipc.akita-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Sciences, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Wajima, Takaaki; Hara, Keisuke; Wada, Kohei [Faculty of Engineering and Resource Sciences, Akita University, Tegata-gakuen-cho 1-1, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Takeishi, Toshiharu; Shinozaki, Yohei; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Katekari, Kenichi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Iwai, Yasunori; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    In D-T fusion power plants, large amounts of tritium would be handled. Tritium is the radioisotope of protium, and is easily taken into the human body, and thus the behavior of tritium accidentally released in fusion power plants should be studied for the safety design and radioprotection of workers. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of tritium released into large rooms with objectives, since complex flow fields should exist in such rooms and they could influence the ventilation of the air containing released tritium. Thus, tritium release experiments were conducted using Caisson Assembly for Tritium Safety Study (CATS) in TPL/JAEA. Some data were taken for tritium behavior in the ventilated area and response of tritium monitors. In the experiments, approximately 17 GBq of tritium was released into Caisson with the total volume of 12 m{sup 3}, and the room was ventilated at the rate of 12 m{sup 3}/h after release of tritium. It was found that placement of an objective in the vessel substantially affects decontamination efficiency. With regard to an experimental result, numerical calculation was performed and the experimental result and the result of numerical calculation were compared, which indicates that experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by numerical calculation. However, further R and D needs to be carried out for quantitative reproduction of the experimental results.

  16. An experiment for Shuttle aerodynamic force coefficient determination from inflight dynamical and atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, H. R.; Blanchard, R. C.; Walberg, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    A two-phase experiment is proposed which utilizes the Shuttle Orbiter and its unique series of repeated entries into the earth's atmosphere as an airborne in situ aerodynamic testing laboratory. The objective of the experiment is to determine static aerodynamic force coefficients, first of the orbiter, and later of various entry configurations throughout the high speed flight regime, including the transition from free molecule to continuum fluid flow. The objective will be accomplished through analysis of inflight measurements from both shuttle-borne and shuttle-launched instrumented packages. Results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of such an experiment.

  17. Estimating the Diffusion Coefficients of Sugars Using Diffusion Experiments in Agar-Gel and Computer Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Atsuyama, Kenji; Ekino, Keisuke; Shin, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    The isolation of useful microbes is one of the traditional approaches for the lead generation in drug discovery. As an effective technique for microbe isolation, we recently developed a multidimensional diffusion-based gradient culture system of microbes. In order to enhance the utility of the system, it is favorable to have diffusion coefficients of nutrients such as sugars in the culture medium beforehand. We have, therefore, built a simple and convenient experimental system that uses agar-gel to observe diffusion. Next, we performed computer simulations-based on random-walk concepts-of the experimental diffusion system and derived correlation formulas that relate observable diffusion data to diffusion coefficients. Finally, we applied these correlation formulas to our experimentally-determined diffusion data to estimate the diffusion coefficients of sugars. Our values for these coefficients agree reasonably well with values published in the literature. The effectiveness of our simple technique, which has elucidated the diffusion coefficients of some molecules which are rarely reported (e.g., galactose, trehalose, and glycerol) is demonstrated by the strong correspondence between the literature values and those obtained in our experiments.

  18. New method of processing heat treatment experiments with numerical simulation support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, T.; Moravec, J.; Novakova, I.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, benefits of combining modern software for numerical simulations of welding processes with laboratory research was described. Proposed new method of processing heat treatment experiments leading to obtaining relevant input data for numerical simulations of heat treatment of large parts was presented. It is now possible, by using experiments on small tested samples, to simulate cooling conditions comparable with cooling of bigger parts. Results from this method of testing makes current boundary conditions during real cooling process more accurate, but also can be used for improvement of software databases and optimization of a computational models. The point is to precise the computation of temperature fields for large scale hardening parts based on new method of temperature dependence determination of the heat transfer coefficient into hardening media for the particular material, defined maximal thickness of processed part and cooling conditions. In the paper we will also present an example of the comparison standard and modified (according to newly suggested methodology) heat transfer coefficient data’s and theirs influence on the simulation results. It shows how even the small changes influence mainly on distribution of temperature, metallurgical phases, hardness and stresses distribution. By this experiment it is also possible to obtain not only input data and data enabling optimization of computational model but at the same time also verification data. The greatest advantage of described method is independence of used cooling media type.

  19. Numerical Experiments Providing New Insights into Plasma Focus Fusion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent extensive and systematic numerical experiments have uncovered new insights into plasma focus fusion devices including the following: (1 a plasma current limitation effect, as device static inductance is reduced towards very small values; (2 scaling laws of neutron yield and soft x-ray yield as functions of storage energies and currents; (3 a global scaling law for neutron yield as a function of storage energy combining experimental and numerical data showing that scaling deterioration has probably been interpreted as neutron ‘saturation’; and (4 a fundamental cause of neutron ‘saturation’. The ground-breaking insights thus gained may completely change the directions of plasma focus fusion research.

  20. Numerical solution of a coefficient inverse problem with multi-frequency experimental raw data by a globally convergent algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh-Liem; Klibanov, Michael V.; Nguyen, Loc H.; Kolesov, Aleksandr E.; Fiddy, Michael A.; Liu, Hui

    2017-09-01

    We analyze in this paper the performance of a newly developed globally convergent numerical method for a coefficient inverse problem for the case of multi-frequency experimental backscatter data associated to a single incident wave. These data were collected using a microwave scattering facility at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. The challenges for the inverse problem under the consideration are not only from its high nonlinearity and severe ill-posedness but also from the facts that the amount of the measured data is minimal and that these raw data are contaminated by a significant amount of noise, due to a non-ideal experimental setup. This setup is motivated by our target application in detecting and identifying explosives. We show in this paper how the raw data can be preprocessed and successfully inverted using our inversion method. More precisely, we are able to reconstruct the dielectric constants and the locations of the scattering objects with a good accuracy, without using any advanced a priori knowledge of their physical and geometrical properties.

  1. Combined numerical and experimental determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient between an AlCrN-coated Vanadis 4 tool and Rhenus oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Üstünyagiz, Esmeray; Nielsen, Chris V.; Tiedje, Niels S.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Regardless of the field of application, the reliability of numerical simulations depends on correct description of boundary conditions. In thermal simulation, determination of heat transfer coefficients is important because it varies with material properties and process conditions....... This paper shows a combined experimental and numerical analysis applied for determination of the heat transfer coefficient between an AlCrN-coated Vanadis 4 tool and Rhenus LA722086 oil in an unloaded condition, i.e. without the tool being in contact with a workpiece. It is found that the heat transfer...... coefficient in unloaded conditions at 80°C oil temperature is 0.1 kW/(m2∙K) between the selected stamping tool and mineral oil. A sensitivity analysis of the numerical model was performed to verify the effects of mesh discretization, temperature measurement location and tool geometry. Among these parameters...

  2. A study on experiment and numerical simulation of heat exchanger in heating furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. C. Lv

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, air preheater is used the research object and its heat transfer law is studied by experiment and numerical simulation. The experimental data showed that with the increases of inlet air velocity, the comprehensive heat transfer coefficient and heat transfer efficiency increase, but the temperature efficiency decreases and the resistance loss on the air side increases. The numerical simulation results showed that the larger the diameter of the tube, the better the heat transfer effect. When horizontal spacing in the range of 290 - 305 mm and longitudinal spacing is 70 - 90 mm, the heat transfer effect is best. The optimized heat exchanger structure is that diameter is 60 mm, horizontal spacing is 300 mm, longitudinal spacing is 90 mm. As the inlet air flow rate increases, the heat transfer efficiency increases, but the temperature efficiency decreases and the resistance loss on the air side increases.

  3. Numerical modeling of NI-monitored 3D infiltration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir; Snehota, Michal; Sacha, Jan; Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that the temporal changes of saturated hydraulic conductivity caused by the occurrence of air phase discontinuities often play an important role in water flow and solute transport experiments. In the present study, a series of infiltration-outflow experiments was conducted to test several working hypotheses about the mechanism of air phase trapping. The experiments were performed on a porous sample with artificial internal structure, using three sandy materials with contrasting hydraulic properties. The sample was axially symmetric with continuous preferential pathways and separate porous matrix blocks (the sample was 3.4 cm in diameter and 8.8 cm high). The infiltration experiments were monitored by neutron imaging (NI). The NI data were then used to quantify the water content of the selected sample regions. The flow regime in the sample was studied using a three-dimensional model based on Richards' equation. The equation was solved by the finite element method. The results of the numerical simulations of the infiltration experiments were compared with the measured outflow rates and with the spatial distribution of water content determined by NI. The research was supported by the Czech Science Foundation Project No. 14-03691S.

  4. Numerical experiment on finite element method for matching data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Shinji; Kumakura, Toshimasa; Yoshimura, Koichi.

    1993-03-01

    Numerical experiments are presented on the finite element method by Pletzer-Dewar for matching data of an ordinary differential equation with regular singular points by using model equation. Matching data play an important role in nonideal MHD stability analysis of a magnetically confined plasma. In the Pletzer-Dewar method, the Frobenius series for the 'big solution', the fundamental solution which is not square-integrable at the regular singular point, is prescribed. The experiments include studies of the convergence rate of the matching data obtained by the finite element method and of the effect on the results of computation by truncating the Frobenius series at finite terms. It is shown from the present study that the finite element method is an effective method for obtaining the matching data with high accuracy. (author)

  5. Experimental and Numerical Study on Effects of Airflow and Aqueous Ammonium Temperature on Ammonia Mass Transfer Coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Nielsen, Peter V.; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    greatly along the airflow direction on the emission surface. The average mass transfer coefficient increases with higher velocity and turbulence intensity. However, the mass transfer coefficient estimated by CFD simulation is consistently larger than the calculated one by the method using dissociation...... constant and Henry's constant models. In addition, the results show that the liquid-air temperature difference has little impact on the simulated mass transfer coefficient by CFD modeling, whereas the mass transfer coefficient increases with higher liquid temperature using the other method under...... the conditions that the liquid temperature is lower than the air temperature. Although there are differences of mass transfer coefficients between these two methods, the mass transfer coefficients determined by these two methods are significantly related....

  6. Density Modulation Experiments to Determine Particle Transport Coefficients on HT-7 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jie Yinxian; Gao Xiang; Tanaka, K; Sakamoto, R; Toi, K; Liu Haiqing; Gao Li; Asif, M; Liu Jin; Xu Qiang; Tong Xingde; Cheng Yongfei

    2006-01-01

    The particle diffusion coefficient and the convection velocity were studied based on the density modulation using D 2 gas puffing on the HT-7 tokamak. The density was measured by a five-channel FIR interferometer. The density modulation amplitude was 10% of the central chord averaged background density and the modulation frequency was 10 Hz in the experiments. The particle diffusion coefficient (D) and the convection velocity (V) were obtained for different background plasmas with the central chord averaged density e > = 1.5x10 19 m -3 and 3.0x10 19 m -3 respectively. It was observed that the influence of density modulation on the main plasma parameters was very weak. This technology is expected to be useful for the analysis of LHW and IBW heated plasmas on HT-7 tokamak in the near future

  7. Are distribution coefficients measured from batch experiments meaningful for quantifying retention in compacted material?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutelard, F.; Charles, Y.; Page, J. [CEA/DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR batiment 450, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: To quantify the ability of a clayey material to act as a barrier for radionuclides migration, reliable data on retention properties must be available. The most common method for determining the distribution coefficient, quantifying the radionuclide adsorption, is the batch technique applied to powdered solid. Are these data meaningful for highly compacted minerals? This question is still under debate in literature [1,2]. The aim of the present study is to compare distribution coefficient (KD) value for Cs and Ni onto compacted and dispersed for both Bentonite MX80 and Callovo-Oxfordian clayey material in a simulated site water. Firstly, classical batch sorption experiments are carried on dispersed materials pre-conditioned with the simulated site water at pH 7.3. Radiotracer {sup 137}Cs and {sup 58}Ni are used to investigate the constant-pH isotherm sorption. The bottleneck for measuring distribution coefficient onto highly compacted material lies in a careful monitoring of chemical conditions because they are driven by diffusion processes. For this study, we have chosen to use in-diffusion experiments [3]. Sample size is optimized to reach for high retention level (300 mL/g) the steady state in a reasonable time (3 to 6 month). In order to describe the response surface of compacted distribution coefficient on bentonite MX80, a 2 variables Doehlert matrix has been chosen. In this experimental design, the two variables are density and dispersed distribution coefficient. Bentonite is pre-conditioning before compaction to a density ranging from 1.2 to 1.85 kg/l. The pellet is confined in a cylindrical stainless steel filter (150 {mu}L) closed to both ends. The cell is placed in a tightly closed bottle containing the working solution. After a re-equilibration period (at least 3 weeks), {sup 133}Cs and {sup 59}Ni stable isotope are introduced for monitoring the KD level (between 150 mL/g to 330 mL/g). Radiotracer {sup 137}Cs and {sup 58

  8. Are distribution coefficients measured from batch experiments meaningful for quantifying retention in compacted material?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutelard, F.; Charles, Y.; Page, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: To quantify the ability of a clayey material to act as a barrier for radionuclides migration, reliable data on retention properties must be available. The most common method for determining the distribution coefficient, quantifying the radionuclide adsorption, is the batch technique applied to powdered solid. Are these data meaningful for highly compacted minerals? This question is still under debate in literature [1,2]. The aim of the present study is to compare distribution coefficient (KD) value for Cs and Ni onto compacted and dispersed for both Bentonite MX80 and Callovo-Oxfordian clayey material in a simulated site water. Firstly, classical batch sorption experiments are carried on dispersed materials pre-conditioned with the simulated site water at pH 7.3. Radiotracer 137 Cs and 58 Ni are used to investigate the constant-pH isotherm sorption. The bottleneck for measuring distribution coefficient onto highly compacted material lies in a careful monitoring of chemical conditions because they are driven by diffusion processes. For this study, we have chosen to use in-diffusion experiments [3]. Sample size is optimized to reach for high retention level (300 mL/g) the steady state in a reasonable time (3 to 6 month). In order to describe the response surface of compacted distribution coefficient on bentonite MX80, a 2 variables Doehlert matrix has been chosen. In this experimental design, the two variables are density and dispersed distribution coefficient. Bentonite is pre-conditioning before compaction to a density ranging from 1.2 to 1.85 kg/l. The pellet is confined in a cylindrical stainless steel filter (150 μL) closed to both ends. The cell is placed in a tightly closed bottle containing the working solution. After a re-equilibration period (at least 3 weeks), 133 Cs and 59 Ni stable isotope are introduced for monitoring the KD level (between 150 mL/g to 330 mL/g). Radiotracer 137 Cs and 58 Ni are used to quantify the

  9. Estimation of saturation activities for activation experiments in CHARM and CSBF using Fluence Conversion Coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, Helene Chloe; Iliopoulou, Elpida; CERN. Geneva. HSE Department

    2017-01-01

    As summer student at CERN, I have been working in the Radiation Protection group for 10 weeks. I worked with the \\textsc{Fluka} Monte Carlo simulation code, using Fluence Conversion Coefficients method to perform simulations to estimate the saturation activities for activation experiments in the \\textsc{CSBF} and the \\textsc{Charm} facility in the East Experimental Area. The provided results will be used to plan a Monte Carlo benchmark in the \\textsc{CSBF} during a beam period at the end of August 2017.

  10. Interpretation of ponded infiltration data using numerical experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohnal Michal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ponded infiltration experiment is a simple test used for in-situ determination of soil hydraulic properties, particularly saturated hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity. It is known that infiltration process in natural soils is strongly affected by presence of macropores, soil layering, initial and experimental conditions etc. As a result, infiltration record encompasses a complex of mutually compensating effects that are difficult to separate from each other. Determination of sorptivity and saturated hydraulic conductivity from such infiltration data is complicated. In the present study we use numerical simulation to examine the impact of selected experimental conditions and soil profile properties on the ponded infiltration experiment results, specifically in terms of the hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity evaluation. The effect of following factors was considered: depth of ponding, ring insertion depth, initial soil water content, presence of preferential pathways, hydraulic conductivity anisotropy, soil layering, surface layer retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity, and presence of soil pipes or stones under the infiltration ring. Results were compared with a large database of infiltration curves measured at the experimental site Liz (Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic. Reasonably good agreement between simulated and observed infiltration curves was achieved by combining several of factors tested. Moreover, the ring insertion effect was recognized as one of the major causes of uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters.

  11. Experimental evaluation of the drag coefficient for smooth spheres by free fall experiments in old mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto, J. A.; Dueñas-Molina, J.; de Dios, J.

    2005-05-01

    Mines of Linares, Jaén, Spain, have been exploited from the age of the Phoenicians, Carthaginians and Romans. These silver and lead mines reached their maximum splendour at the end of the 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. Nevertheless, all the mining works finished in the 1970s and the diverse machinery was sold. Only the shafts remain since then which has now permitted carrying out interesting free fall experiments using smooth spheres of both cork and cast iron. The experiments were facilitated by the fact that the tubular shape of the shafts provides excellent transmission of sound, which made feasible the recording of the impact sound of the spheres with water at the bottom of the shafts at distances of up to 200 m. By using these experimental data, we have carried out an evaluation of the drag coefficient for the movement of smooth spheres through the air in the laminar regime with Reynolds number in the interval 103 to 2 × 105. This evaluation was in excellent agreement with the literature data. From the theoretical point of view, the analysis of the free fall movement includes a variety of concepts such as Newton's second law, the drag force, Archimedes principle and the velocity of sound, which makes these experiments very attractive for both physics teachers and physics students at university level. Finally, an easy experiment is proposed in this paper which has permitted an approximate evaluation of the drag coefficient for smooth spheres to be carried out in a laboratory environment.

  12. Numerical Experiments Based on the Catastrophe Model of Solar Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X. Y.; Ziegler, U.; Mei, Z. X.; Wu, N.; Lin, J.

    2017-11-01

    On the basis of the catastrophe model developed by Isenberg et al., we use the NIRVANA code to perform the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) numerical experiments to look into various behaviors of the coronal magnetic configuration that includes a current-carrying flux rope used to model the prominence levitating in the corona. These behaviors include the evolution in equilibrium heights of the flux rope versus the change in the background magnetic field, the corresponding internal equilibrium of the flux rope, dynamic properties of the flux rope after the system loses equilibrium, as well as the impact of the referential radius on the equilibrium heights of the flux rope. In our calculations, an empirical model of the coronal density distribution given by Sittler & Guhathakurta is used, and the physical diffusion is included. Our experiments show that the deviation of simulations in the equilibrium heights from the theoretical results exists, but is not apparent, and the evolutionary features of the two results are similar. If the flux rope is initially locate at the stable branch of the theoretical equilibrium curve, the flux rope will quickly reach the equilibrium position in the simulation after several rounds of oscillations as a result of the self-adjustment of the system; and the flux rope lose the equilibrium if the initial location of the flux rope is set at the critical point on the theoretical equilibrium curve. Correspondingly, the internal equilibrium of the flux rope can be reached as well, and the deviation from the theoretical results is somewhat apparent since the approximation of the small radius of the flux rope is lifted in our experiments, but such deviation does not affect the global equilibrium in the system. The impact of the referential radius on the equilibrium heights of the flux rope is consistent with the prediction of the theory. Our calculations indicate that the motion of the flux rope after the loss of equilibrium is consistent with which

  13. Numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection into liquid metal coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usov, E V; Lobanov, P D; Pribaturin, N A; Mosunova, N A; Chuhno, V I; Kutlimetov, A E

    2016-01-01

    Presented paper contains results of a numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection in water and liquid metal which have been performed at the Institute of Thermophysics Russian Academy of Science (IT RAS). Obtained experimental data are very important to predict processes that take place in the BREST-type reactor during the hypothetical accident with damage of the steam generator tubes, and may be used as a benchmark to validate thermo-hydraulic codes. Detailed description of models to simulate transport of gas phase in a vertical liquid column is presented in a current paper. Two-fluid model with closing relation for wall friction and interface friction coefficients was used to simulate processes which take place in a liquid during injection of gaseous phase. It has being shown that proposed models allow obtaining a good agreement between experimental data and calculation results. (paper)

  14. A Numerical Procedure for Flow Distribution and Pressure Drops for U and Z Type Configurations Plate Heat Exchangers with Variable Coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López, R; Lecuona, A; Ventas, R; Vereda, C

    2012-01-01

    In Plate Heat Exchangers it is important to determine the flow distribution and pressure drops, because they affect directly the performance of a heat exchanger. This work proposes an incompressible, one-dimensional, steady state, discrete model allowing for variable overall momentum coefficients to determine these magnitudes. The model consists on a modified version of the Bajura and Jones model for dividing and combining flow manifolds. The numerical procedure is based on the finite differences approximation approach proposed by Datta and Majumdar. A linear overall momentum coefficient distribution is used in the dividing manifold, but the model is not limited to linear distributions. Comparisons are made with experimental, numerical and analytical data, yielding good results.

  15. Classification of the coefficients of variation of parameters evaluated in Japanese quail experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DHV Leal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to design a classification range of the coefficients of variation (CV of traits used in experiments with eggtype Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica. The journal Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia was systematically reviewed, using the key word 'quail' during the period of January, 2000 to 2010. The CV of feed intake (g/bird/d, egg production (%/bird/d, egg weight (g, egg mass (g/bird/d, feed conversion ratio per dozen eggs (g/dozen, feed conversion ratio per egg mass (g/g, and egg specific gravity (g/mL were collected. For each parameter, CV were classified using the following median (MD and pseudo-sigma (PS ratio as follows: low (CV MD + 2PS. According to the results, it was concluded that each parameter has a specific classification range that should be taken into account when evaluating experimental precision.

  16. A novel inverse numerical modeling method for the estimation of water and salt mass transfer coefficients during ultrasonic assisted-osmotic dehydration of cucumber cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hosein; Karimi, Farzaneh; Labbafi, Mohsen; Fathi, Morteza

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the moisture and salt diffusivity during ultrasonic assisted-osmotic dehydration of cucumbers. Experimental measurements of moisture and salt concentration versus time were carried out and an inverse numerical method was performed by coupling a CFD package (OpenFOAM) with a parameter estimation software (DAKOTA) to determine mass transfer coefficients. A good agreement between experimental and numerical results was observed. Mass transfer coefficients were from 3.5 × 10 -9 to 7 × 10 -9  m/s for water and from 4.8 × 10 -9  m/s to 7.4 × 10 -9  m/s for salt at different conditions (diffusion coefficients of around 3.5 × 10 -12 -11.5 × 10 -12  m 2 /s for water and 5 × 10 -12  m/s-12 × 10 -12  m 2 /s for salt). Ultrasound irradiation could increase the mass transfer coefficient. The values obtained by this method were closer to the actual data. The inverse simulation method can be an accurate technique to study the mass transfer phenomena during food processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The application of computational thermodynamics and a numerical model for the determination of surface tension and Gibbs-Thomson coefficient of aluminum based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacome, Paulo A.D.; Landim, Mariana C.; Garcia, Amauri; Furtado, Alexandre F.; Ferreira, Ivaldo L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Surface tension and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient are computed for Al-based alloys. → Butler's scheme and ThermoCalc are used to compute the thermophysical properties. → Predictive cell/dendrite growth models depend on accurate thermophysical properties. → Mechanical properties can be related to the microstructural cell/dendrite spacing. - Abstract: In this paper, a solution for Butler's formulation is presented permitting the surface tension and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient of Al-based binary alloys to be determined. The importance of Gibbs-Thomson coefficient for binary alloys is related to the reliability of predictions furnished by predictive cellular and dendritic growth models and of numerical computations of solidification thermal variables, which will be strongly dependent on the thermophysical properties assumed for the calculations. A numerical model based on Powell hybrid algorithm and a finite difference Jacobian approximation was coupled to a specific interface of a computational thermodynamics software in order to assess the excess Gibbs energy of the liquid phase, permitting the surface tension and Gibbs-Thomson coefficient for Al-Fe, Al-Ni, Al-Cu and Al-Si hypoeutectic alloys to be calculated. The computed results are presented as a function of the alloy composition.

  18. The application of computational thermodynamics and a numerical model for the determination of surface tension and Gibbs-Thomson coefficient of aluminum based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacome, Paulo A.D.; Landim, Mariana C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluminense Federal University, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Amauri, E-mail: amaurig@fem.unicamp.br [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, PO Box 6122, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Furtado, Alexandre F.; Ferreira, Ivaldo L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fluminense Federal University, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-20

    Highlights: {yields} Surface tension and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient are computed for Al-based alloys. {yields} Butler's scheme and ThermoCalc are used to compute the thermophysical properties. {yields} Predictive cell/dendrite growth models depend on accurate thermophysical properties. {yields} Mechanical properties can be related to the microstructural cell/dendrite spacing. - Abstract: In this paper, a solution for Butler's formulation is presented permitting the surface tension and the Gibbs-Thomson coefficient of Al-based binary alloys to be determined. The importance of Gibbs-Thomson coefficient for binary alloys is related to the reliability of predictions furnished by predictive cellular and dendritic growth models and of numerical computations of solidification thermal variables, which will be strongly dependent on the thermophysical properties assumed for the calculations. A numerical model based on Powell hybrid algorithm and a finite difference Jacobian approximation was coupled to a specific interface of a computational thermodynamics software in order to assess the excess Gibbs energy of the liquid phase, permitting the surface tension and Gibbs-Thomson coefficient for Al-Fe, Al-Ni, Al-Cu and Al-Si hypoeutectic alloys to be calculated. The computed results are presented as a function of the alloy composition.

  19. Field experiment determinations of distribution coefficients of actinide elements in alkaline lake environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Li, Y.H.; Anderson, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide concentrations of a number of elements (Am, Pu, U, Pa, Th, Ac, Ra, Po, Pb, Cs, and Sr) have been measured in the water and sediments of a group of alkaline lakes in the western USA. These data demonstrate greatly enhanced soluble phase concentrations of elements with oxidation states of III, IV, V, and VI as the result of carbonate complexing. Dissolved concentrations of isotopes of U, Pa, and Th in a lake with pH = 10 and a total inorganic carbon concentration of 4 x 10 -1 moles/1 were greater than those in sea water (pH = 8, ΣCO 2 = 2 x 10 -3 moles/1) by order of magnitude for 233 U, 238 U (--10 2 ), 231 Pa, 228 Th, 230 Th (--10 3 ) and 22 Th (--10 5 ). Concentrations of fallout /sup 239,240/Pu in the more alkaline lakes were equivalent to effective distribution coefficients of --10 3 , about a factor of 10 2 lower than in most other natural lakes, rivers, estuaries and coastal marine waters. Measurements of radionuclides in natural systems are essential for assessment of the likely fate of radionuclides which may be released from high level waste repositories to ground water. Laboratory-scale experiments using tracer additions of radionuclides to mixtures of water and sediment yielded distribution coefficients which were significantly different from those derived from field measurements (10 1 -10 2 lower for Po and Pu). Order of magnitude calculations from thermodynamic data of expected maximum U and Th concentrations, limited by pure phase solubilities, suggest that carbonate complexing can enhance solubility by many orders of magnitude in natural waters, even at relatively low carbonate ion concentrations

  20. Nucleation and solidification of thin walled ductile iron - Experiments and numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron has been performed based on experiments and numerical simulation. The experiments were based on temperature and microstructure examination. Results of the experiments have been compared with a 1-D numerical solidification model...

  1. The quasi-harmonic ultrasonic polar scan for material characterization: experiment and numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemans, Mathias; Martens, Arvid; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Degrieck, Joris; Pyl, Lincy; Zastavnik, Filip; Sol, Hugo; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2015-04-01

    Conventionally, the ultrasonic polar scan (UPS) records the amplitude or time-of-flight in transmission using short ultrasonic pulses for a wide range of incidence angles, resulting in a fingerprint of the critical bulk wave angles of the material at the insonified spot. Here, we investigate the use of quasi-harmonic ultrasound (bursts) in a polar scan experiment, both experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the nature of the fingerprint drastically changes, and reveals the positions of the leaky Lamb angles. To compare with experiments, both plane wave and bounded beam simulations have been performed based on the recursive stiffness matrix method. Whereas the plane wave computations yield a pure Lamb wave angle fingerprint, this is no longer valid for the more realistic case of a bounded beam. The experimental recordings are fully supported by the bounded beam simulations. To complement the traditional amplitude measurement, experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to record, predict and analyze the phase of the transmitted ultrasonic beam. This results in the conceptual introduction of the 'phase polar scan', exposing even more intriguing and detailed patterns. In fact, the combination of the amplitude and the phase polar scan provides the complete knowledge about the complex transmission coefficient for every possible angle of incidence. This comprehensive information will be very valuable for inverse modeling of the local elasticity tensor based on a single UPS experiment. Finally, the UPS method has been applied for the detection of an artificial delamination. Compared to the pulsed UPS, the quasi-harmonic UPS (both the amplitude and phase recording) shows a superior sensitivity to the presence of a delamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical experiment with modelled return echo of a satellite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have simulated the return echo of a satellite altimeter from a rough ocean surface using an analytical formula and have studied its sensitivity with respect to various oceanic and altimeter parameters. Our numerical expcriment shows that for normally observed significant wave heights (SWFI) the effect of ...

  3. Numerical study of the influence of flow blockage on the aerodynamic coefficients of models in low-speed wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, V. T.; Kalugin, V. T.; Lapygin, V. I.; Khlupnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    With the use of ANSYS Fluent software and ANSYS ICEM CFD calculation grid generator, the flows past a wing airfoil, an infinite cylinder, and 3D blunted bodies located in the open and closed test sections of low-speed wind tunnels were calculated. The mathematical model of the flows included the Reynolds equations and the SST model of turbulence. It was found that the ratios between the aerodynamic coefficients in the test section and in the free (unbounded) stream could be fairly well approximated with a piecewise-linear function of the blockage factor, whose value weakly depended on the angle of attack. The calculated data and data gained in the analysis of previously reported experimental studies proved to be in a good agreement. The impact of the extension of the closed test section on the airfoil lift force is analyzed.

  4. Taylor bubbles at high viscosity ratios: experiments and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewakandamby, Buddhika; Hasan, Abbas; Azzopardi, Barry; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The Taylor bubble is a single long bubble which nearly fills the entire cross section of a liquid-filled circular tube, often occurring in gas-liquid slug flows in many industrial applications, particularly oil and gas production. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional Taylor bubble rising in highly viscous silicone oil in a vertical pipe. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is adopted here which can modify and adapt anisotropic unstructured meshes to better represent the underlying physics of bubble rising and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a `volume of fluid'-type method for the interface-capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Experimental results for the Taylor bubble shape and rise velocity are presented, together with numerical results for the dynamics of the bubbles. A comparison of the simulation predictions with experimental data available in the literature is also presented to demonstrate the capabilities of our numerical method. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  5. Lie group analysis, numerical and non-traveling wave solutions for the (2+1)-dimensional diffusion—advection equation with variable coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, R. K.; Jiwari, Ram

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the variable-coefficient diffusion—advection (DA) equation, which arises in modeling various physical phenomena, is studied by the Lie symmetry approach. The similarity reductions are derived by determining the complete sets of point symmetries of this equation, and then exact and numerical solutions are reported for the reduced second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Further, an extended (G'/G)-expansion method is applied to the DA equation to construct some new non-traveling wave solutions

  6. Estimation of Knudsen diffusion coefficients from tracer experiments conducted with a binary gas system and a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Kashihara, Ayumi

    2018-03-01

    A previous study has reported that Knudsen diffusion coefficients obtained by tracer experiments conducted with a binary gas system and a porous medium are consistently smaller than those obtained by permeability experiments conducted with a single-gas system and a porous medium. To date, however, that study is the only one in which tracer experiments have been conducted with a binary gas system. Therefore, to confirm this difference in Knudsen diffusion coefficients, we used a method we had developed previously to conduct tracer experiments with a binary carbon dioxide-nitrogen gas system and five porous media with permeability coefficients ranging from 10-13 to 10-11 m2. The results showed that the Knudsen diffusion coefficient of N2 (DN2) (cm2/s) was related to the effective permeability coefficient ke (m2) as DN2 = 7.39 × 107ke0.767. Thus, the Knudsen diffusion coefficients of N2 obtained by our tracer experiments were consistently 1/27 of those obtained by permeability experiments conducted with many porous media and air by other researchers. By using an inversion simulation to fit the advection-diffusion equation to the distribution of concentrations at observation points calculated by mathematically solving the equation, we confirmed that the method used to obtain the Knudsen diffusion coefficient in this study yielded accurate values. Moreover, because the Knudsen diffusion coefficient did not differ when columns with two different lengths, 900 and 1500 mm, were used, this column property did not influence the flow of gas in the column. The equation of the dusty gas model already includes obstruction factors for Knudsen diffusion and molecular diffusion, which relate to medium heterogeneity and tortuosity and depend only on the structure of the porous medium. Furthermore, there is no need to take account of any additional correction factor for molecular diffusion except the obstruction factor because molecular diffusion is only treated in a multicomponent

  7. Diffusion and solubility coefficients determined by permeation and immersion experiments for organic solvents in HDPE geomembrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Wang, Ping; Wang, Ya-Ting

    2007-04-02

    The chemical resistance of eight organic solvents in high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane has been investigated using the ASTM F739 permeation method and the immersion test at different temperatures. The diffusion of the experimental organic solvents in HDPE geomembrane was non-Fickian kinetic, and the solubility coefficients can be consistent with the solubility parameter theory. The diffusion coefficients and solubility coefficients determined by the ASTM F739 method were significantly correlated to the immersion tests (pHDPE as barriers in the field.

  8. Inverse problem of Ocean Acoustic Tomography (OAT) - A numerical experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Mahadevan, R.; Murty, C.S.

    Acoustic model simulation experiments related to the forward and inverse aspects of ocean tomography have been taken up with a view to estimate the vertical sound speed field by inverting the travel time data. Two methods of inversion have been...

  9. Numerical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boumaza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transient convection heat transfer is of fundamental interest in many industrial and environmental situations, as well as in electronic devices and security of energy systems. Transient fluid flow problems are among the more difficult to analyze and yet are very often encountered in modern day technology. The main objective of this research project is to carry out a theoretical and numerical analysis of transient convective heat transfer in vertical flows, when the thermal field is due to different kinds of variation, in time and space of some boundary conditions, such as wall temperature or wall heat flux. This is achieved by the development of a mathematical model and its resolution by suitable numerical methods, as well as performing various sensitivity analyses. These objectives are achieved through a theoretical investigation of the effects of wall and fluid axial conduction, physical properties and heat capacity of the pipe wall on the transient downward mixed convection in a circular duct experiencing a sudden change in the applied heat flux on the outside surface of a central zone.

  10. An Algorithm for the Numerical Solution of the Pseudo Compressible Navier-stokes Equations Based on the Experimenting Fields Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Amin, Mohamed F. El

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the experimenting fields approach is applied to the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible viscous flow. In this work, the solution is sought for both the pressure and velocity fields in the same time. Apparently, the correct velocity and pressure fields satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. In this technique a set of predefined fields are introduced to the governing equations and the residues are calculated. The flow according to these fields will not satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. However, the residues are used to construct the matrix of coefficients. Although, in this setup it seems trivial constructing the global matrix of coefficients, in other setups it can be quite involved. This technique separates the solver routine from the physics routines and therefore makes easy the coding and debugging procedures. We compare with few examples that demonstrate the capability of this technique.

  11. An Algorithm for the Numerical Solution of the Pseudo Compressible Navier-stokes Equations Based on the Experimenting Fields Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the experimenting fields approach is applied to the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible viscous flow. In this work, the solution is sought for both the pressure and velocity fields in the same time. Apparently, the correct velocity and pressure fields satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. In this technique a set of predefined fields are introduced to the governing equations and the residues are calculated. The flow according to these fields will not satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions. However, the residues are used to construct the matrix of coefficients. Although, in this setup it seems trivial constructing the global matrix of coefficients, in other setups it can be quite involved. This technique separates the solver routine from the physics routines and therefore makes easy the coding and debugging procedures. We compare with few examples that demonstrate the capability of this technique.

  12. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  13. Interpretation of ponded infiltration data using numerical experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnal, M.; Vogel, T.; Dušek, J.; Votrubová, J.; Tesař, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2016), s. 289-299 ISSN 0042-790X Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : ponded infiltration experiment * two-parameter infiltration equation * three-dimensional axisymmetric dualcontinuum model * preferential flow Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.654, year: 2016

  14. Numerical experiments on 2D strongly coupled complex plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Lujing; Ivlev, A V; Thomas, H M; Morfill, G E

    2010-01-01

    The Brownian Dynamics simulation method is briefly reviewed at first and then applied to study some non-equilibrium phenomena in strongly coupled complex plasmas, such as heat transfer processes, shock wave excitation/propagation and particle trapping, by directly mimicking the real experiments.

  15. Accurate Determination of Tunneling-Affected Rate Coefficients: Theory Assessing Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Junxiang; Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua; Xie, Daiqian

    2017-07-20

    The thermal rate coefficients of a prototypical bimolecular reaction are determined on an accurate ab initio potential energy surface (PES) using ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). It is shown that quantum effects such as tunneling and zero-point energy (ZPE) are of critical importance for the HCl + OH reaction at low temperatures, while the heavier deuterium substitution renders tunneling less facile in the DCl + OH reaction. The calculated RPMD rate coefficients are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the HCl + OH reaction in the entire temperature range of 200-1000 K, confirming the accuracy of the PES. On the other hand, the RPMD rate coefficients for the DCl + OH reaction agree with some, but not all, experimental values. The self-consistency of the theoretical results thus allows a quality assessment of the experimental data.

  16. Numerical simulation and experiment on multilayer stagger-split die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Li, Mingzhe; Han, Qigang; Yang, Yunfei; Wang, Bolong; Sui, Zhou

    2013-05-01

    A novel ultra-high pressure device, multilayer stagger-split die, has been constructed based on the principle of "dividing dies before cracking." Multilayer stagger-split die includes an encircling ring and multilayer assemblages, and the mating surfaces of the multilayer assemblages are mutually staggered between adjacent layers. In this paper, we investigated the stressing features of this structure through finite element techniques, and the results were compared with those of the belt type die and single split die. The contrast experiments were also carried out to test the bearing pressure performance of multilayer stagger-split die. It is concluded that the stress distributions are reasonable and the materials are utilized effectively for multilayer stagger-split die. And experiments indicate that the multilayer stagger-split die can bear the greatest pressure.

  17. Computational techniques for inelastic analysis and numerical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    A number of formulations have been proposed for inelastic analysis, particularly for the thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis of nuclear reactor components. In the elastic-plastic regime, which principally concerns with the time independent behavior, the numerical techniques based on the finite element method have been well exploited and computations have become a routine work. With respect to the problems in which the time dependent behavior is significant, it is desirable to incorporate a procedure which is workable on the mechanical model formulation as well as the method of equation of state proposed so far. A computer program should also take into account the strain-dependent and/or time-dependent micro-structural changes which often occur during the operation of structural components at the increasingly high temperature for a long period of time. Special considerations are crucial if the analysis is to be extended to large strain regime where geometric nonlinearities predominate. The present paper introduces a rational updated formulation and a computer program under development by taking into account the various requisites stated above. (Auth.)

  18. Numerical analysis of two experiments related to thermal fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieder, Ulrich; Errante, Paolo [DEN-STMF, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Universite Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-06-15

    Jets in cross flow are of fundamental industrial importance and play an important role in validating turbulence models. Two jet configurations related to thermal fatigue phenomena are investigated: • T-junction of circular tubes where a heated jet discharges into a cold main flow and • Rectangular jet marked by a scalar discharging into a main flow in a rectangular channel. The T-junction configuration is a classical test case for thermal fatigue phenomena. The Vattenfall T-junction experiment was already subject of an OECD/NEA benchmark. A LES modelling and calculation strategy is developed and validated on this data. The rectangular-jet configuration is important for basic physical understanding and modelling and has been analyzed experimentally at CEA. The experimental work was focused on turbulent mixing between a slightly heated rectangular jet which is injected perpendicularly into the cold main flow of a rectangular channel. These experiments are analyzed for the first time with LES. The overall results show a good agreement between the experimental data and the CFD calculation. Mean values of velocity and temperature are well captured by both RANS calculation and LES. The range of critical frequencies and their amplitudes, however, are only captured by LES.

  19. Investigation of the Buckling-Reactivity Conversion Coefficient using SRAC and MVP codes for UO2 Lattices in TCA experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Dai Dien

    2008-01-01

    Benchmark experiments for International Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE) Project carried out at TCA, the temperature effects on reactivity were studied for light water moderated and reflected UO 2 cores with/without soluble poisons. The buckling coefficient method using the measured critical water levels was proposed by Suzaki et al. The temperature dependence of buckling coefficient of reactivity and its variance by the core configurations of the benchmark experiments was investigated using SRAC and MVP calculations. From the calculations by SRAC as well as by MVP it is seen that the K-value can be taken as an average value only for each core with temperature changes which are considered as perturbation parameter. The difference between our calculations and benchmark results which uses constant K-value for all cores proves that the results depend on K-value and it play important role in defining reactivity effect using the water level worth method. (author)

  20. Isotopic fractionation of gases during its migration: experiments and 2D numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, S.; Prinzhofer, A.

    2003-04-01

    Several works have been developed in the last decade on the experimental isotope fractionation of gases during migration (Prinzhofer et al., 1997 and Zhang &Krooss, 2001 among others). We add to these results new experiments on diffusion of CO_2, which becomes currently a crucial subject for environmental purpose. Our experiments showed that transport by diffusion of CO_2 through a water saturated shale induces a significant and systematic carbon isotopic fractionation with heavier (13C enriched) CO_2 migrating first. In all experiments, significant isotope fractionation was found but still remains without quantitative interpretation. To interpret these data, we developed a 2D numerical model at the pore scale. The general principle of this model is the study of transport by water solubilization/diffusion of gas in a capillary saturated with water with two different media : a mobile zone representing free water and a immobile zone representing bounded water. The model takes also into account solubilization coefficients of gas in water, as well as the migration distance and the volume of upstream and downstream reservoirs. Using our numerical model, we could reproduce the evolution of isotopic fractionations and the velocity of CO_2 migration versus the production factor F (proportion of diffused gas). We determined some physical parameters of the porous medium (bentonite) which are not directly measurable at the present time. Furthermore, we used these parameters to reproduce the curves of isotopic fractionation obtained by Pernaton (1998) on methane migration with the same porous rock. We used also a modified version of this model with infinite reservoirs to reproduce the curves of isotopic fractionation of Zhang &Krooss (2001). Application of this model to geological scale is under progress, in order to implement it into sedimentary basins modelling. REFERENCES: Zhang T. and Krooss M. (2001). Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, Vol. 65, No.16, pp. 2723-2742. Pernaton E

  1. Numerical modeling of the plasma ring acceleration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling of the LLNL RACE experiment and its many applications has necessitated the development and use of a wide array of computational tools. The two-dimensional MHD code, HAM, has been used to model the formation of a compact torus plasma ring in a magnetized coaxial gun and its subsequent acceleration by an additional applied toroidal field. Features included in the 2-D calculations are self-consistent models for (1) the time-dependent poloidal field produced by a capacitor bank discharge through a solenoid field coil (located either inside the gun inner electrode or outside the outer gun electrode) and the associated diffusion of magnetic flux through neighboring conductors, (2) gas flow into the gun annular region from a simulated puffed gas valve plenum, (3) formation and motion of a current sheet produced by J x B forces resulting from discharge of the gun capacitor bank through the plasma load between the coaxial gun electrodes, (4) the subsequent stretching and reconnection of the poloidal field lines to form a compact torus plasma ring, and (5) finally the discharge of the accelerator capacitor bank producing an additional toroidal field for acceleration of the plasma ring. The code has been extended to include various models for gas breakdown, plasma anomalous resistivity, and mass entrainment from ablation of electrode material

  2. Measurements of elliptic flow and higher-order Fourier coefficients with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We report the measurements of collective harmonic flow coefficients $v_n$ for $n=2-6$ in Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector. They are extracted via an event plane method based on the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter over a broad range in $p_T$, $eta$ and centrality. The $v_n$ coefficients are found to change weakly within $|eta|<2.5$ and all with the same qualitative trend as a function of $p_T$: all rise up to 3-4 GeV, and then fall towards higher $p_T$. The high statistical precision of the $v_2$ term, allow us to clearly determine its trend out to 20 GeV for a broad centrality classes. The same harmonic flow coefficients are also obtained via a Fourier analysis of the two-particle $Deltaphi-Deltaeta$ correlation with a large $Deltaeta$ gap. A detailed comparison with the event plane method allow us to determine the regions of the two-particle phase space (in $p_T$ and $Deltaeta$ and centrality), in which the collective phenomena play a dominating role. The physics implications ...

  3. Experiment of flow regime map and local condensing heat transfer coefficients inside three dimensional inner microfin tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Xin, Ming Dao

    1999-03-01

    This paper developed a new type of three dimensional inner microfin tube. The experimental results of the flow patterns for the horizontal condensation inside these tubes are reported in the paper. The flow patterns for the horizontal condensation inside the new made tubes are divided into annular flow, stratified flow and intermittent flow within the test conditions. The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients for the different flow patterns have been systematically carried out. The experiments of the local heat transfer coefficients changing with the vapor dryness fraction have also been carried out. As compared with the heat transfer coefficients of the two dimensional inner microfin tubes, those of the three dimensional inner microfin tubes increase 47-127% for the annular flow region, 38-183% for the stratified flow and 15-75% for the intermittent flow, respectively. The enhancement factor of the local heat transfer coefficients is from 1.8-6.9 for the vapor dryness fraction from 0.05 to 1.

  4. Numerical search for a Phi4 breather mode and study of the Phi4, sine-Gordon, and Kdv equations with adibatic coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingate, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Two major problems are studied in this thesis. The first is a numerical search for a stable oscillating mode in the Phi4 equation similar to the one that is known for the sine-Gordon equation. Starting with a widely separated soliton and anti-soliton traveling toward each other, it is observed, after a long period of time (t = 2800), that the solitons form a quasistable oscillating state. An interesting, previously unknown structure in the interaction depending on the initial velocity and initial separation is found and studied in detail. The second topic covered here is a study of the phi4, KdV and sine-Gordon equations when the coefficients vary slowly with time. A general first order solution is found for the wave equation with a non-linear potential and is applied to the phi4 and sine-Gordon potentials. In doing this it is found that the conservation of momentum is equivalent order by order to the secular conditions. Deficiencies in existing calculations for the KdV equation are pointed out through the use of adiabatic invariants and numerical calculations

  5. Plutonium-239 sorption and transport on/in unsaturated sediments. Comparison of batch and column experiments for determining sorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinchuan Xie; Jiachun Lu; Xiaohua Zhou; Xuhui Wang; Mei Li; Lili Du; Yueheng Liu; Guoqing Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Sorption (distribution) coefficients of plutonium were most often derived by static batch experiments. However, it is not clear how unsaturated flow conditions including moisture content and pore water velocity change the sorption coefficients. Transport experiments of plutonium through the unsaturated sediments packed into the columns were then performed in order to determine the sorption coefficients (column-K ds ). Static batch experiments were also conducted to obtain batch-K ds and then compare the differences between batch-K ds and column-K ds . The results show that unsaturated flow conditions had no significant effect on column-K ds , and the average column-K d value was 1.74 ± 0.02 m 3 /kg. By comparison, batch-K d values spanned several orders of magnitude, regardless of the specified liquid-solid conditions. Moreover, the batch-K d (22.7 m 3 /kg) at the standard L/S (4 mL/g) recommended by ASTM D 4319 was over an order of magnitude larger than the average column-K d . (author)

  6. Measuring the flexoelectric coefficient of bulk barium titanate from a shock wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taotao; Deng, Qian; Liang, Xu; Shen, Shengping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of polarization introduced by shock waves is experimentally studied. Although this phenomenon has been reported previously in the community of physics, this is the first time to link it to flexoelectricity, the coupling between electric polarization and strain gradients in dielectrics. As the shock waves propagate in a dielectric material, electric polarization is thought to be induced by the strain gradient at the shock front. First, we control the first-order hydrogen gas gun to impact and generate shock waves in unpolarized bulk barium titanate (BT) samples. Then, a high-precision oscilloscope is used to measure the voltage generated by the flexoelectric effect. Based on experimental results, strain elastic wave theory, and flexoelectric theory, a longitudinal flexoelectric coefficient of the bulk BT sample is calculated to be μ 11 = 17.33 × 10 - 6 C/m, which is in accord with the published transverse flexoelectric coefficient. This method effectively suppresses the majority of drawbacks in the quasi-static and low frequency dynamic techniques and provides more reliable results of flexoelectric behaviors.

  7. Measuring the coefficient of restitution and more: a simple experiment to promote students’ critical thinking and autonomous work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.; Vegas, Jesús; Llamas, César

    2017-09-01

    A simple experiment on the determination of the coefficient of restitution of different materials is taken as the basis of an extendable work that can be done by students in an autonomous way. On the whole, the work described in this paper would involve concepts of kinematics, materials science, air drag and buoyancy, and would help students to think of physics as a whole subject instead of a set of, more or less, isolated parts. The experiment can be done either in teaching laboratories or as an autonomous work by students at home. Students’ smartphones and cheap balls of different materials are the only experimental materials required to do the experiment. The proposed work also permits the students to analyse the limitations of a physical model used in the experiment by analysing the approximations considered in it, and then enhancing their critical thinking.

  8. CO2 release experiment in the shallow subsurface at the Brackenridge Field Laboratory and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Romanak, K.; Hovorka, S.

    2009-12-01

    Soil gas monitoring is one cost-effective approach to detect CO2 leak at geological sequestration sites. Therefore understanding CO2 gas transport in soil zones is important for detection of CO2 leaks. A field experiment of a small CO2 release was conducted at the Brackenridge Field Laboratory, the University of Texas at Austin. The field site consists of one injection well, two sensor wells and one gas station well (Figure 1). The injection well was completed with a PVC pipe to a depth of 1.1 m below surface. CO2 sensors were deployed in sensor wells about 42 cm from the injection well at depths of 1.1 m having no subsurface PVC pipes but only a PVC protector cap at the surface. The gas monitoring station about 72 cm away from the injection well contains 3 copper tubes each set at different depths in sand pack isolated with bentonite clay. The CO2 release experiment started on March 4, 2009. A total 36.76 liters of CO2 were injected at 1 m depth at a rate of 100 ml/minute for 6 hours. Subsurface CO2 gas concentrations (before, during, and after the injection) were continuously monitored in sensor wells. Real-time CO2 concentrations were monitored at the gas station using an SRI 8610 gas chromatograph (GC) fitted with flame ionization detector (FID) and a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). A numerical model was constructed to simulate CO2 release experiments. The model takes into account CO2 diffusion and dissolution in pore water. Air in the pore space is assumed stagnant. Model domain consists of four soil layers and one atmospheric layer. The groundwater table is about 2.4 meters below ground surface. The model was calibrated with respect to diffusion coefficient (transport parameter) and the injection rate (mass parameter). Model results fit well with CO2 measurements at the sensor wells and the gas station. However, the calibrated injection rate underestimates measured injection rate.

  9. Theoretical and numerical investigations of TAP experiments. New approaches for variable pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senechal, U.; Breitkopf, C. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik

    2011-07-01

    Temporal analysis of products (TAP) is a valuable tool for characterization of porous catalytic structures. Established TAP-modeling requires a spatially constant diffusion coefficient and neglect convective flows, which is only valid in Knudsen diffusion regime. Therefore in experiments, the number of molecules per pulse must be chosen accordingly. New approaches for variable process conditions are highly required. Thus, a new theoretical model is developed for estimating the number of molecules per pulse to meet these requirements under any conditions and at any time. The void volume is calculated as the biggest sphere fitting between three pellets. The total number of pulsed molecules is assumed to fill the first void volume at the inlet immediately. Molecule numbers from these calculations can be understood as maximum possible molecules at any time in the reactor to be in Knudsen diffusion regime, i.e., above the Knudsen number of 2. Moreover, a new methodology for generating a full three-dimensional geometrical representation of beds is presented and used for numerical simulations to investigate spatial effects. Based on a freely available open-source game physics engine library (BULLET), beds of arbitrary-sized pellets can be generated and transformed to CFD-usable geometry. In CFD-software (ANSYS CFX registered) a transient diffusive transport equation with time-dependent inlet boundary conditions is solved. Three different pellet diameters were investigated with 1e18 molecules per pulse, which is higher than the limit from the theoretical calculation. Spatial and temporal distributions of transported species show regions inside the reactor, where non-Knudsen conditions exist. From this results, the distance from inlet can be calculated where the theoretical pressure limit (Knudsen number equals 2) is obtained, i.e., from this point to the end of the reactor Knudsen regime can be assumed. Due to linear dependency of pressure and concentration (assuming ideal

  10. Calibration of a turbidity meter for making estimates of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Management of water resources such as a reservoir requires using analytical models which describe such parameters as the suspended sediment field. To select or develop an appropriate model requires making many measurements to describe the distribution of this parameter in the water column. One potential method for making those measurements expeditiously is to measure light transmission or turbidity and relate that parameter to total suspended solids concentrations. An instrument which may be used for this purpose was calibrated by generating curves of transmission measurements plotted against measured values of total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients. Results of these experiments indicate that field measurements made with this instrument using curves generated in this study should correlate with total suspended solids concentrations and beam attenuation coefficients in the water column within 20 percent.

  11. The mathematical modeling of the experiment on the determination of correlation coefficients in neutron beta-decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Klyushnikov, G. N.

    2018-05-01

    An experiment on the measurement of the ratio of the axial coupling constant to the vector one is under development. The main idea of the experiment is to measure the values of A and B in the same setup. An additional measurement of the polarization is not necessary. The accuracy achieved to date in measuring λ is 2 × 10-3. It is expected that in the experiment the accuracy will be of the order of 10-4. Some particular problems of mathematical modeling concerning the experiment on the measurement of the ratio of the axial coupling constant to the vector one are considered. The force lines for the given tabular field of a magnetic trap are studied. The dependences of the longitudinal and transverse field non-uniformity coefficients on the coordinates are regarded. A special computational algorithm based on the law of a charged particle motion along a local magnetic force line is performed for the calculation of the electrons and protons motion time as well as for the evaluation of the total number of electrons colliding with the detector surface. The average values of the cosines of the angles with the coefficients of a, A and B have been estimated.

  12. Validation of a numerical FSI simulation of an aortic BMHV by in vitro PIV experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerel, S; Claessens, T; Degroote, J; Segers, P; Vierendeels, J

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a validation of a recently developed fluid-structure interaction (FSI) coupling algorithm to simulate numerically the dynamics of an aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) is performed. This validation is done by comparing the numerical simulation results with in vitro experiments. For the in vitro experiments, the leaflet kinematics and flow fields are obtained via the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Subsequently, the same case is numerically simulated by the coupling algorithm and the resulting leaflet kinematics and flow fields are obtained. Finally, the results are compared, revealing great similarity in leaflet motion and flow fields between the numerical simulation and the experimental test. Therefore, it is concluded that the developed algorithm is able to capture very accurately all the major leaflet kinematics and dynamics and can be used to study and optimize the design of BMHVs. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical analysis of experiments modeling LWR sump cooling by natural convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    An optional sump cooling concept for the European pressurized water reactor EPR was investigated at the Research Center Karlsruhe. This concept foresees to utilize single phase natural convection in water to remove the decay heat from the core melt. The natural convection was investigated by the SUCOS-2D and -3D scaled experiments. A numerical investigation and interpretation of these experiments was performed by means of the computer code FLUTAN. In this paper, the numerical investigation of SUCOS-3D is summarized. Following the results of the former 2d experiments and the numerical analysis of both experiments, an unexpected temperature distribution is found in this 3d experiment. Basing on the experimental data it had to be postulated that one of the horizontal coolers was slightly tilled against the main flow direction. Additional numerical investigations show that a slope of only one percent would explain the experimental flow field. Conclusions are also drawn on the limits of scalability and transferability of the experimental results to a reactor sump. A detailed transformation will only be possible by applying well validated CFD-codes and experienced code users. As the flow in the reactor sump will be turbulent and this flow is strongly three-dimensional and time-dependent, only the method of Large Eddy Simulation is considered of being an adequate tool for reliable trans formation of the gained experience to analyses for the reactor sump at 1:1 scales. (author)

  14. Semi-Numerical Studies of the Three-Meter Spherical Couette Experiment Utilizing Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Sarah; Rojas, Ruben; Perevalov, Artur; Lathrop, Daniel; Ide, Kayo; Schaeffer, Nathanael

    2017-11-01

    The model of the Earth's magnetic field has been investigated in recent years through experiments and numerical models. At the University of Maryland, experimental studies are implemented in a three-meter spherical Couette device filled with liquid sodium. The inner and outer spheres of this apparatus mimic the planet's inner core and core-mantle boundary, respectively. These experiments incorporate high velocity flows with Reynolds numbers 108 . In spherical Couette geometry, the numerical scheme applied to this work features finite difference methods in the radial direction and pseudospectral spherical harmonic transforms elsewhere. Adding to the numerical model, data assimilation integrates the experimental outer-layer magnetic field measurements. This semi-numerical model can then be compared to the experimental results as well as forecasting magnetic field changes. Data assimilation makes it possible to get estimates of internal motions of the three-meter experiment that would otherwise be intrusive or impossible to obtain in experiments or too computationally expensive with a purely numerical code. If we can provide accurate models of the three-meter device, it is possible to attempt to model the geomagnetic field. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF Grant No. EAR1417148 & DGE1322106.

  15. Semi-Numerical Studies of the Three-Meter Spherical Couette Experiment Utilizing Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, S. C.; Rojas, R.; Perevalov, A.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2017-12-01

    The model of the Earth's magnetic field has been investigated in recent years through experiments and numerical models. At the University of Maryland, experimental studies are implemented in a three-meter spherical Couette device filled with liquid sodium. The inner and outer spheres of this apparatus mimic the planet's inner core and core-mantle boundary, respectively. These experiments incorporate high velocity flows with Reynolds numbers 108. In spherical Couette geometry, the numerical scheme applied to this work features finite difference methods in the radial direction and pseudospectral spherical harmonic transforms elsewhere [Schaeffer, N. G3 (2013)]. Adding to the numerical model, data assimilation integrates the experimental outer-layer magnetic field measurements. This semi-numerical model can then be compared to the experimental results as well as forecasting magnetic field changes. Data assimilation makes it possible to get estimates of internal motions of the three-meter experiment that would otherwise be intrusive or impossible to obtain in experiments or too computationally expensive with a purely numerical code. If we can provide accurate models of the three-meter device, it is possible to attempt to model the geomagnetic field. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NSF Grant No. EAR1417148 & DGE1322106.

  16. Constraints on the rheology of the partially molten mantle from numerical models of laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, J. F.; Alisic Jewell, L.; Rhebergen, S.; Katz, R. F.; Wells, G. N.

    2015-12-01

    One of the fundamental components in any dynamical model of melt transport is the rheology of partially molten rock. This rheology is poorly understood, and one way in which a better understanding can be obtained is by comparing the results of laboratory deformation experiments to numerical models. Here we present a comparison between numerical models and the laboratory setup of Qi et al. 2013 (EPSL), where a cylinder of partially molten rock containing rigid spherical inclusions was placed under torsion. We have replicated this setup in a finite element model which solves the partial differential equations describing the mechanical process of compaction. These computationally-demanding 3D simulations are only possible due to the recent development of a new preconditioning method for the equations of magma dynamics. The experiments show a distinct pattern of melt-rich and melt-depleted regions around the inclusions. In our numerical models, the pattern of melt varies with key rheological parameters, such as the ratio of bulk to shear viscosity, and the porosity- and strain-rate-dependence of the shear viscosity. These observed melt patterns therefore have the potential to constrain rheological properties. While there are many similarities between the experiments and the numerical models, there are also important differences, which highlight the need for better models of the physics of two-phase mantle/magma dynamics. In particular, the laboratory experiments display more pervasive melt-rich bands than is seen in our numerics.

  17. The effect of high-resolution orography on numerical modelling of atmospheric flow: a preliminary experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarani, C.; Tampieri, F.; Tibaldi, S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of increasing the resolution of the topography in models of numerical weather prediction is assessed. Different numerical experiments have been performed, referring to a case of cyclogenesis in the lee of the Alps. From the comparison, it appears that the lower atmospheric levels are better described by the model with higherresolution topography; comparable horizontal resolution runs with smoother topography appear to be less satisfactory in this respect. It turns out also that the vertical propagation of the signal due to the front-mountain interaction is faster in the high-resolution experiment

  18. Numerical simulation studies of the LBNL heavy-ion beam combiner experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawley, W.M.; Seidl, P.; Haber, I.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy drivers. A major area of interest, both theoretically and experimentally, is the resultant transverse phase space dilution during the beam merging process. Currently, a prototype combining experiment is underway at LBNL and we have employed a variety of numerical descriptions to aid in both the initial design of the experiment data. These range from simple envelope codes to detailed 2- and 3-D PIC simulations. We compare the predictions of the different numerical models to each other and to experimental data at different longitudinal positions

  19. Distribution coefficients for radionuclides in aquatic environments. Volume 2. Dialysis experiments in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, T.H.; Nevissi, A.E.; Schell, W.R.

    1981-05-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to obtain new information that can be used to predict the fate of radionuclides that may enter the aquatic environment from nuclear power plants, waste storage facilities or fuel reprocessing plants. Important parameters for determining fate are the distribution of radionuclides between the soluble and particulate phases and the partitioning of radionuclides among various suspended particulates. This report presents the results of dialysis experiments that were used to study the distribution of radionuclides among suspended sediments, phytoplankton, organic detritus, and filtered sea water. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium distribution of (59)Fe, (60)Co, (65)Zn, (106)Ru, (137)Cs, (207)Bi, (238)Pu, and (241)Am in marine system. Diffusion across the dialysis membranes depends upon the physico-chemical form of the radionuclides, proceeding quite rapidly for ionic species of (137)Cs and (60)Co but much more slowly for radionuclides which occur primarily as colloids and solid precipitates such as (59)Fe, (207)Bi, and (241)Am. All the radionuclides adsorb to suspended particulates although the amount of adsorption depends upon the specific types and concentration of particulates in the system and the selected radionuclide. High affinity of some radionuclides - e.g., (106)Ru and (241)Am - for detritus and phytoplankton suggests that suspended organics may significantly affect the eventual fate of those radionuclides in marine ecosystems

  20. Numerical experiments to investigate the accuracy of broad-band moment magnitude, Mwp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the accuracy of broad-band moment magnitude, Mwp. We conduct these experiments by measuring Mwp from synthetic seismograms and comparing the resulting values to the moment magnitudes used in the calculation of synthetic seismograms. In the numerical experiments using point sources, we have found that there is a significant dependence of Mwp on focal mechanisms, and that depths phases have a large impact on Mwp estimates, especially for large shallow earthquakes. Numerical experiments using line sources suggest that the effects of source finiteness and rupture propagation on Mwp estimates are on the order of 0.2 magnitude units for vertical fault planes with pure dip-slip mechanisms and 45° dipping fault planes with pure dip-slip (thrust) mechanisms, but that the dependence is small for strike-slip events on a vertical fault plane. Numerical experiments for huge thrust faulting earthquakes on a fault plane with a shallow dip angle suggest that the Mwp estimates do not saturate in the moment magnitude range between 8 and 9, although they are underestimates. Our results are consistent with previous studies that compared Mwp estimates to moment magnitudes calculated from seismic moment tensors obtained by analyses of observed data.

  1. Design and implementation of new design of numerical experiments for non linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazut, St.

    2007-03-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of the construction of surrogate models in numerical simulation. Whenever numerical experiments are costly, the simulation model is complex and difficult to use. It is important then to select the numerical experiments as efficiently as possible in order to minimize their number. In statistics, the selection of experiments is known as optimal experimental design. In the context of numerical simulation where no measurement uncertainty is present, we describe an alternative approach based on statistical learning theory and re-sampling techniques. The surrogate models are constructed using neural networks and the generalization error is estimated by leave-one-out, cross-validation and bootstrap. It is shown that the bootstrap can control the over-fitting and extend the concept of leverage for non linear in their parameters surrogate models. The thesis describes an iterative method called LDR for Learner Disagreement from experiment Re-sampling, based on active learning using several surrogate models constructed on bootstrap samples. The method consists in adding new experiments where the predictors constructed from bootstrap samples disagree most. We compare the LDR method with other methods of experimental design such as D-optimal selection. (author)

  2. Direct numerical simulation of the thermal dehydration reaction in a TGA experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, S.; Gaeini, M.; Zondag, H.A.; van Steenhoven, A.A.; Rindt, C.C.M.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents a detailed mathematical model of the coupled mass and heat transfer processes in salt hydrate grains in a TGA experiment. The purpose of developing this numerical model is to get a more fundamental understanding of the influence of parameters like particle size, nucleation rate

  3. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erradi, L.; Chetaine, A.; Chakir, E.; Kharchaf, A.; Elbardouni, T.; Elkhoukhi, T.

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work, we have analysed the main French experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC): CREOLE and MISTRAL experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APOLLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO 2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/C degrees which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges: an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/C degrees is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3 ± 2 pcm/C degrees is obtained for temperatures higher than 250 C degrees. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO 2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. This analysis shows for the UO 2 lattices, a maximum experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,7 pcm/C degrees, which is below the target accuracy for this type of lattices. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in a light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the ENDF/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment-calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/C degrees. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 248 C degrees) and -1,2 pcm/C degrees (for a range of temperatures going from 20 to 80 C degrees). This result, in particular the tendency which has the error to decrease when the

  4. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface

  5. Dynamics of fault slip near the stability transition combining laboratory and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele Veedu, D.; Giorgetti, C.; Scuderi, M. M.; Barbot, S.; Marone, C.; Collettini, C.

    2017-12-01

    Frictional stability controls the seismogenic potential of faults. Laboratory (1) and theoretical (2) studies document and predict the conditions under which fault slip is seismic or aseismic. However, the full gamut of fault slip behavior near the stable/unstable boundary is still poorly known. Here, we combine insight from laboratory and numerical experiments to identify the wide spectrum of frictional instabilities around that transition, including slow-slip events, period-multiplying events, and chaos. We present a synoptic picture of the dynamics of fault slip in a bifurcation diagram obtained from a series of laboratory and numerical experiments. We compare the laboratory observations with spring-slider and finite-fault numerical models. In the laboratory, we vary the stiffness of the system by modulating the stress field around the experimental fault. In the numerical experiments, we vary the characteristic weakening distance to explore a range of critical nucleation sizes. Contrarily to previously found (3), complex fault dynamics can be obtained with a rate-and-state constitutive law with a single state variable. While the dynamics of fault slip is complicated on large faults by the presence of morphological and rheological heterogeneities, the range of instabilities identified in the laboratory is reminiscent of the variety of slow and fast earthquakes found along subduction zones (4). The accord between laboratory data and theoretical models affords more realistic predictions of fault behavior at slow slip speeds. (1) Scuderi et al., (2016), (2) Ruina (1983), (3) Gu & Wong (1994), (4) Obara & Kato (2016)

  6. Numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium argon plasma in a shock-tube experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    A code developed for the numerical modeling of nonequilibrium radiative plasmas is applied to the simulation of the propagation of strong ionizing shock waves in argon gas. The simulations attempt to reproduce a series of shock-tube experiments which will be used to validate the numerical models and procedures. The ability to perform unsteady simulations makes it possible to observe some fluctuations in the shock propagation, coupled to the kinetic processes. A coupling mechanism by pressure waves, reminiscent of oscillation mechanisms observed in detonation waves, is described. The effect of upper atomic levels is also briefly discussed.

  7. Determination of transport and reaction swarm coefficients from the analysis of complex transient pulses from the pulsed Townsend experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekstein, A; De Urquijo, J; Rodríguez-Luna, J C; Juárez, A M; Ducasse, O

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper the interpretation and analysis of transient pulses from a pulsed Townsend experiment by solving the continuity equations of the charged carriers (electrons and ions) involved in the avalanche. The set of second order partial differential equations is solved by SIMAV, a simulator designed specifically for the pulsed Townsend avalanche. Complex situations involving processes such as electron detachment, ion-molecule reactions, Penning ionization and secondary electron emission from ion impact at the cathode, virtually impossible to solve analytically, are discussed here to illustrate the capability of the simulator to help explain the various reaction processes involved in the avalanche, and also to derive some of the transport and reaction coefficients.

  8. Investigation of the physical and numerical foundations of two-fluid representation of sodium boiling with applications to LMFBR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1983-03-01

    This work involves the development of physical models for the constitutive relations of a two-fluid, three-dimensional sodium boiling code, THERMIT-6S. The code is equipped with a fluid conduction model, a fuel pin model, and a subassembly wall model suitable for stimulating LMFBR transient events. Mathematically rigorous derivations of time-volume averaged conservation equations are used to establish the differential equations of THERMIT-6S. These equations are then discretized in a manner identical to the original THERMIT code. A virtual mass term is incorporated in THERMIT-6S to solve the ill-posed problem. Based on a simplified flow regime, namely cocurrent annular flow, constitutive relations for two-phase flow of sodium are derived. The wall heat transfer coefficient is based on momentum-heat transfer analogy and a logarithmic law for liquid film velocity distribution. A broad literature review is given for two-phase friction factors. It is concluded that entrainment can account for some of the discrepancies in the literature. Mass and energy exchanges are modelled by generalization of the turbulent flux concept. Interfacial drag coefficients are derived for annular flows with entrainment. Code assessment is performed by simulating three experiments for low flow-high power accidents and one experiment for low flow/low power accidents in the LMFBR. While the numerical results for pre-dryout are in good agreement with the data, those for post-dryout reveal the need for improvement of the physical models. The benefits of two-dimensional non-equilibrium representation of sodium boiling are studied

  9. Numerical investigation of two interacting parallel thruster-plumes and comparison to experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, Martin; Holz, André; Ziegenhagen, Stefan; Hannemann, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Clusters of orbital thrusters are an attractive option to achieve graduated thrust levels and increased redundancy with available hardware, but the heavily under-expanded plumes of chemical attitude control thrusters placed in close proximity will interact, leading to a local amplification of downstream fluxes and of back-flow onto the spacecraft. The interaction of two similar, parallel, axi-symmetric cold-gas model thrusters has recently been studied in the DLR High-Vacuum Plume Test Facility STG under space-like vacuum conditions, employing a Patterson-type impact pressure probe with slot orifice. We reproduce a selection of these experiments numerically, and emphasise that a comparison of numerical results to the measured data is not straight-forward. The signal of the probe used in the experiments must be interpreted according to the degree of rarefaction and local flow Mach number, and both vary dramatically thoughout the flow-field. We present a procedure to reconstruct the probe signal by post-processing the numerically obtained flow-field data and show that agreement to the experimental results is then improved. Features of the investigated cold-gas thruster plume interaction are discussed on the basis of the numerical results.

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of experiments on the reactivity temperature coefficient for UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakir, E.; Erradi, L.; Bardouni, T El.; Khoukhi, T El.; Boukhal, H.; Meroun, O.; Bakkari, B El

    2007-01-01

    Full text: In a previous work, we have analysed the main french experiments available on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) : CREAOLE and Mistral experiments. In these experiments, the RTC has been measured in both UO2 and UO2-PuO2 PWR type lattices. Our calculations, using APPOLO2 code with CEA93 library based on JEF2.2 evaluation, have shown that the calculation error in UO2 lattices is less than 1 pcm/Deg C which is considered as the target accuracy. On the other hand the calculation error in the MOX lattices is more significant in both low and high temperature ranges : an average error of -2 ± 0.5 pcm/Deg C is observed in low temperatures and an error of +3±2 pcm/Deg C is obtained for temperature higher than 250Deg C. In the present work, we analysed additional experimental benchmarks on the RTC of UO2 and MOX light water moderated lattices. To analyze these benchmarks and with the aim of minimizing uncertainties related to modelling of the experimental set up, we chose the Monte Carlo Method which has the advantage of taking into account in the most exact manner the geometry of the experimental configurations. Thus we have used the code MCNP5, for its recognized power and its availability. This analysis shows for the UO2 lattices, an average experiment-calculation deviation of about 0,5 pcm/Deg C, which is largely below the target accuracy for this type of lattices, that we estimate at approximately 1 pcm/Deg C. For the KAMINI experiment, which relates to the measurement of the RTC in light water moderated lattice using U-233 as fuel our analysis shows that the Endf/B6 library gives the best result, with an experiment -calculation deviation of the order of -0,16 pcm/Deg C. The analysis of the benchmarks using MOX fuel made it possible to highlight a discrepancy between experiment and calculation on the RTC of about -0.7pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to 248 Deg C) and -1.2 pcm/Deg C ( for a range of temperature going from 20 to

  11. Hydraulic experiment on flow and topography change in harbor due to tsunami and its numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Naoki; Ikeno, Masaaki; Sakakiyama, Tsutomu; Matsuyama, Masafumi; Takao, Makoto; Mukohara, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Numerical model of topography change is important to examine collapse of the harbor facilities by sand transport due to tsunami. Problems for evaluation of sand transport due to tsunami with topography change model are in precision of the numerical model and topography change data. Therefore, we installed the harbor in large-scaled wave tank and carried out experiment about tsunami flow and topography change to get those detailed data. For results provided by experimental test, we applied the topography change model of Ikeno et al. (2009a) and evaluated it about the reproduction characteristics. As a result, it was confirmed that reproduction of an experiment improved by using new pickup rate formula proposed by Ikeno et al. (2009a). (author)

  12. Model experiment and numerical simulation of drop impact response of multilayer-combinational container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Ruoze; Zhong Weizhou; Wan Qiang; Huang Xicheng; Zhang Fangju

    2015-01-01

    The drop impact process of multilayer-combinational container was simulated experimentally using a gas gun, and the normal impact and oblique impact of scaled models were tested. The experiments of scaled models were simulated numerically, and the stress distribution and plastic deformation in the tested structures during collision process were obtained. The results were compared with the experiment data. It was shown that the impact work mainly converted into plastic work due to the plastic deformation of the cushion wood and the plastic hinge in the buckled steel shell. The plastic deformation mainly happened at the collided end of the scaled models, and there was no plastic deformation found far from the collided end. The compressive stress-strain curve of the wood in texture direction can be used to simulate numerically the drop impact process of multilayer-combinational container. (authors)

  13. Integrated Numerical Experiments (INEX) and the Free-Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; McKee, J.; Ostic, J.; Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B.D.

    1990-01-01

    The strong coupling of subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, and optics, greatly complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL), even at the conceptual level. To address the strong coupling character of the FEL the concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was proposed. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostics. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. The INEX approach has been applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. Despite the success of INEX, the approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies because of the significant manpower and computational requirements. On the other hand, INEX provides a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, and optics models can be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from INEX, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific trade-off or design study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. Because FELPPC provides a detailed design, a good estimate for the FEL mass, cost, and size can be made from a piece-part count of the FEL. FELPPC requires significant accelerator and FEL expertise to operate. The code can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations

  14. Absence of visual experience modifies the neural basis of numerical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjlia, Shipra; Lane, Connor; Feigenson, Lisa; Bedny, Marina

    2016-10-04

    In humans, the ability to reason about mathematical quantities depends on a frontoparietal network that includes the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). How do nature and nurture give rise to the neurobiology of numerical cognition? We asked how visual experience shapes the neural basis of numerical thinking by studying numerical cognition in congenitally blind individuals. Blind (n = 17) and blindfolded sighted (n = 19) participants solved math equations that varied in difficulty (e.g., 27 - 12 = x vs. 7 - 2 = x), and performed a control sentence comprehension task while undergoing fMRI. Whole-cortex analyses revealed that in both blind and sighted participants, the IPS and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices were more active during the math task than the language task, and activity in the IPS increased parametrically with equation difficulty. Thus, the classic frontoparietal number network is preserved in the total absence of visual experience. However, surprisingly, blind but not sighted individuals additionally recruited a subset of early visual areas during symbolic math calculation. The functional profile of these "visual" regions was identical to that of the IPS in blind but not sighted individuals. Furthermore, in blindness, number-responsive visual cortices exhibited increased functional connectivity with prefrontal and IPS regions that process numbers. We conclude that the frontoparietal number network develops independently of visual experience. In blindness, this number network colonizes parts of deafferented visual cortex. These results suggest that human cortex is highly functionally flexible early in life, and point to frontoparietal input as a mechanism of cross-modal plasticity in blindness.

  15. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  16. Nuclear models, experiments and data libraries needed for numerical simulation of accelerator-driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauge, E.; Bersillon, O.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the transparencies of the speech concerning the nuclear models, experiments and data libraries needed for numerical simulation of Accelerator-Driven Systems. The first part concerning the nuclear models defines the spallation process, the corresponding models (intra-nuclear cascade, statistical model, Fermi breakup, fission, transport, decay and macroscopic aspects) and the code systems. The second part devoted to the experiments presents the angular measurements, the integral measurements, the residual nuclei and the energy deposition. In the last part, dealing with the data libraries, the author details the fundamental quantities as the reaction cross-section, the low energy transport databases and the decay libraries. (A.L.B.)

  17. Numerical Study of the influence of a ribbon geometry of experiment on measuring particle angular distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The values and nature of systematic errors in small-angle particle scattering experiments using ribbon-like beams are investigated by numerical simulation. As shown, the extent of the influence of a ribbon geometry of experiment on the result of measurement is significantly dependent on the shape of the measured angular distribution in an elementary act of interaction. The algorithm of experimental material treatment, obtained in measuring the widths at half maximum of the angular differential cross sections of secondary particles, is presented using an example of specific distributions and certain experimental setup. (author). 12 refs., 7 figs

  18. Numerical simulation of CALIBAN reactivity perturbation experiments using neptunium-237 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, Philippe; Mechitoua, Boukhmes

    2003-01-01

    In order to contribute to the validation of nuclear data used in critical mass computation, reactivity perturbation experiments using 237 Np samples have been performed at CEA-Valduc using the fast pulsed reactor CALIBAN operated in continuous mode. In this paper we report these experiments together with the numerical calculations. The calculations were carried out using PANDA, a S N code developed at CEA-Bruyeres-le-Chatel for classic criticality and stochastic neutronics applications and with MCNP4C which is a commonly used Monte Carlo code. A good agreement was found between experimental and deterministic results. (author)

  19. Development and successful operation of the enhanced-interlink system of experiment data and numerical simulation in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, M.; Suzuki, C.; Suzuki, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Seki, R.; Ida, K.

    2014-10-01

    The enhanced-interlink system of experiment data and numerical simulation has been developed, and successfully operated routinely in the Large Helical Device (LHD). This system consists of analyzed diagnostic data, real-time coordinate mapping, and automatic data processing. It has enabled automated data handling/transferring between experiment and numerical simulation, to extensively perform experiment analyses. It can be considered as one of the prototypes for a seamless data-centric approach for integrating experiment data and numerical simulation/modellings in fusion experiments. Utilizing this system, experimental analyses by numerical simulations have extensively progressed. The authors believe this data-centric approach for integrating experiment data and numerical simulation/modellings will contribute to not only the LHD but to other plasma fusion projects including DEMO reactor in the future. (author)

  20. Numerical investigation of multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement with ultra-precision for linear expansion coefficient of metal based on oscillating mirror modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan-Chao; Wang Chun-Hui; Qu Yang; Gao Long; Cong Hai-Fang; Yang Yan-Ling; Gao Jie; Wang Ao-You

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement for metal linear expansion coefficient. Based on the Doppler effect and heterodyne technology, the information is loaded of length variation to the frequency difference of the multi-beam laser heterodyne signal by the frequency modulation of the oscillating mirror, this method can obtain many values of length variation caused by temperature variation after the multi-beam laser heterodyne signal demodulation simultaneously. Processing these values by weighted-average, it can obtain length variation accurately, and eventually obtain the value of linear expansion coefficient of metal by the calculation. This novel method is used to simulate measurement for linear expansion coefficient of metal rod under different temperatures by MATLAB, the obtained result shows that the relative measurement error of this method is just 0.4%. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  1. Numerical investigation of multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement with ultra-precision for linear expansion coefficient of metal based on oscillating mirror modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Chao; Wang, Chun-Hui; Qu, Yang; Gao, Long; Cong, Hai-Fang; Yang, Yan-Ling; Gao, Jie; Wang, Ao-You

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of multi-beam laser heterodyne measurement for metal linear expansion coefficient. Based on the Doppler effect and heterodyne technology, the information is loaded of length variation to the frequency difference of the multi-beam laser heterodyne signal by the frequency modulation of the oscillating mirror, this method can obtain many values of length variation caused by temperature variation after the multi-beam laser heterodyne signal demodulation simultaneously. Processing these values by weighted-average, it can obtain length variation accurately, and eventually obtain the value of linear expansion coefficient of metal by the calculation. This novel method is used to simulate measurement for linear expansion coefficient of metal rod under different temperatures by MATLAB, the obtained result shows that the relative measurement error of this method is just 0.4%.

  2. Coevolution of bed surface patchiness and channel morphology: 2. Numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peter A.; McDonald, Richard R.; Nelson, Jonathan M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2015-01-01

    In gravel bed rivers, bed topography and the bed surface grain size distribution evolve simultaneously, but it is not clear how feedbacks between topography and grain sorting affect channel morphology. In this, the second of a pair of papers examining interactions between bed topography and bed surface sorting in gravel bed rivers, we use a two-dimensional morphodynamic model to perform numerical experiments designed to explore the coevolution of both free and forced bars and bed surface patches. Model runs were carried out on a computational grid simulating a 200 m long, 2.75 m wide, straight, rectangular channel, with an initially flat bed at a slope of 0.0137. Over five numerical experiments, we varied (a) whether an obstruction was present, (b) whether the sediment was a gravel mixture or a single size, and (c) whether the bed surface grain size feeds back on the hydraulic roughness field. Experiments with channel obstructions developed a train of alternate bars that became stationary and were connected to the obstruction. Freely migrating alternate bars formed in the experiments without channel obstructions. Simulations incorporating roughness feedbacks between the bed surface and flow field produced flatter, broader, and longer bars than simulations using constant roughness or uniform sediment. Our findings suggest that patches are not simply a by-product of bed topography, but they interact with the evolving bed and influence morphologic evolution.

  3. Chaotic advection at large Péclet number: Electromagnetically driven experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, Aldo; Meunier, Patrice; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We present a combination of experiment, theory, and modelling on laminar mixing at large Péclet number. The flow is produced by oscillating electromagnetic forces in a thin electrolytic fluid layer, leading to oscillating dipoles, quadrupoles, octopoles, and disordered flows. The numerical simulations are based on the Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) which was recently introduced (P. Meunier and E. Villermaux, “The diffusive strip method for scalar mixing in two-dimensions,” J. Fluid Mech. 662, 134–172 (2010)) to solve the advection-diffusion problem by combining Lagrangian techniques and theoretical modelling of the diffusion. Numerical simulations obtained with the DSM are in reasonable agreement with quantitative dye visualization experiments of the scalar fields. A theoretical model based on log-normal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of stretching factors, characteristic of homogeneous turbulence in the Batchelor regime, allows to predict the PDFs of scalar in agreement with numerical and experimental results. This model also indicates that the PDFs of scalar are asymptotically close to log-normal at late stages, except for the large concentration levels which correspond to low stretching factors

  4. Numerical experiment designs. Study of vibratory behaviour of PWR'S control rod clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosselut, D.; Soulier, B.; Regnier, G.

    1997-01-01

    The application of Experiment Design method to Finite Element Model (FEM) calculations is an original way of performing parametric studies. It has been used at EDF to simulate on a large parametric domain the vibrations of PWR's control rod cluster and to analyse the rod wear process. In the first part the FEM and the location of excitation sources are described. The calculated values are: rod displacement in the guiding cards, shock forces on the guiding cards and the wear power produced. In the second part, the computed Experiment Domain is described. This method approaches the response surface by a second degree polynomial. The retained model is composed for every parameters of all linear, quadratic and interaction terms (26 coefficients). In all, 34 polynomials have been built to approach the effective shock forces and the mean wear power at each of the 17 guiding points. In the third part the building of the computer Experiment Design is detailed: by Doehlert design adaptation to take into account a qualitative parameter, design optimization by adding four well chosen experiments and finally, design extension by passing from 4 to 6 parameters. In the last part, all the information deduced from application of this method are presented. The influence of parameters on calculated effective shock forces has been determined along rods and response surface have been easily approximated. The systematism and closeness of Experiment Design technique is underlined. Easy simulation of all the response domain by polynomial approach allows comparison with experimental results. (authors)

  5. A method for solving the KDV equation and some numerical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Jinjiang.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, by means of difference method for discretization of space partial derivatives of KDV equation, an initial value problem in ordinary differential equations of large dimensions is produced. By using this ordinary differential equations the existence and the uniqueness of the solution of the KDV equation and the conservation of scheme are proved. This ordinary differential equation can be solved by using implicit Runge-Kutta methods, so a new method for finding the numerical solution of the KDV equation is presented. Numerical experiments not only describe in detail the procedure of two solitons collision, soliton reflex and soliton produce, but also show that this method is very effective. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs

  6. Numerical simulation of MH growth/dissociation by hot water injection on the Lab. experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temma, N.; Sakamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Pawar, R.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2005-12-01

    Methane Hydrate (MH) is considered to be one of the new-generation energy resources. Aiming to develop the method of extraction of methane gas from MH, laboratory experiments have been performed in order to grasp the MH property in the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba in Japan. In this paper, we present the results of the numerical simulation of experiment using by the hot water injection. In this calculation, FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer) code is used. This code is developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In this experiment, temperature, pressure and cumulative gas production were measured. From these data, we suppose that MH growth/dissociation occurred by the flow of the hot water. And we make the model of the growth/dissociation. As this model consist of many parameters, it is difficult to determine parameters. Thus, we use PEST (Parameter ESTimation ) in order to determine parameters for the model of the MH growth/ dissociation. We use temperature data of experiment, as observed data. We make two observed data sets at the beginning and later term of experiment. At the results of PEST, we obtain two sets of parameters to get good match the observed data. We think that these sets indicate both the maximum and the minimum values of the MH growth/dissociation model. And, on this range, we continue to calculate until we get the good match. Finally, we obtain the numerical model of the experiment. Also, we conducted the sensitive analysis for the MH growth/ dissociation using this model.

  7. Comparison of numerical simulations to experiments for atomization in a jet nebulizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  8. Comparison of numerical simulations to experiments for atomization in a jet nebulizer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lelong

    Full Text Available The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined

  9. "Physically-based" numerical experiment to determine the dominant hillslope processes during floods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Eric; Esclaffer, Thomas; Dangla, Patrick; Payrastre, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    To study the dynamics of hillslope responses during flood event, a fully coupled "physically-based" model for the combined numerical simulation of surface runoff and underground flows has been developed. A particular attention has been given to the selection of appropriate numerical schemes for the modelling of both processes and of their coupling. Surprisingly, the most difficult question to solve, from a numerical point of view, was not related to the coupling of two processes with contrasted kinetics such as surface and underground flows, but to the high gradient infiltration fronts appearing in soils, source of numerical diffusion, instabilities and sometimes divergence. The model being elaborated, it has been successfully tested against results of high quality experiments conducted on a laboratory sandy slope in the early eighties, which is still considered as a reference hillslope experimental setting (Abdul & Guilham). The model appeared able to accurately simulate the pore pressure distributions observed in this 1.5 meter deep and wide laboratory hillslope, as well as its outflow hydrograph shapes and the measured respective contributions of direct runoff and groundwater to these outflow hydrographs. Based on this great success, the same model has been used to simulate the response of a theoretical 100-meter wide and 10% sloped hillslope, with a 2 meter deep pervious soil and impervious bedrock. Three rain events have been tested: a 100 millimeter rainfall event over 10 days, over 1 day or over one hour. The simulated responses are hydrologically not realistic and especially the fast component of the response, that is generally observed in the real-world and explains flood events, is almost absent of the simulated response. Thinking a little about the whole problem, the simulation results appears totally logical according to the proposed model. The simulated response, in fact a recession hydrograph, corresponds to a piston flow of a relatively uniformly

  10. Analyses of internal tides generation and propagation over a Gaussian ridge in laboratory and numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossmann, Yvan; Paci, Alexandre; Auclair, Francis; Floor, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    Internal tides are suggested to play a major role in the sustaining of the global oceanic circulation [1][5]. Although the exact origin of the energy conversions occurring in stratified fluids is questioned [2], it is clear that the diapycnal energy transfers provided by the energy cascade of internal gravity waves generated at tidal frequencies in regions of steep bathymetry is strongly linked to the general circulation energy balance. Therefore a precise quantification of the energy supply by internal waves is a crucial step in forecasting climate, since it improves our understanding of the underlying physical processes. We focus on an academic case of internal waves generated over an oceanic ridge in a linearly stratified fluid. In order to accurately quantify the diapycnal energy transfers caused by internal waves dynamics, we adopt a complementary approach involving both laboratory and numerical experiments. The laboratory experiments are conducted in a 4m long tank of the CNRM-GAME fluid mechanics laboratory, well known for its large stratified water flume (e.g. Knigge et al [3]). The horizontal oscillation at precisely controlled frequency of a Gaussian ridge immersed in a linearly stratified fluid generates internal gravity waves. The ridge of e-folding width 3.6 cm is 10 cm high and spans 50 cm. We use PIV and Synthetic Schlieren measurement techniques, to retrieve the high resolution velocity and stratification anomaly fields in the 2D vertical plane across the ridge. These experiments allow us to get access to real and exhaustive measurements of a wide range of internal waves regimes by varying the precisely controlled experimental parameters. To complete this work, we carry out some direct numerical simulations with the same parameters (forcing amplitude and frequency, initial stratification, boundary conditions) as the laboratory experiments. The model used is a non-hydrostatic version of the numerical model Symphonie [4]. Our purpose is not only to

  11. On the granular fingering instability: controlled triggering in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie; Tsang, Jonny; Arran, Matthew; Jin, Binbin; Johnsen, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    When a mixture of small, smooth particles and larger, coarse particles is released on a rough inclined plane, the initial uniform front may break up in distinct fingers which elongate over time. This fingering instability is sensitive to the unique arrangement of individual particles and is driven by granular segregation (Pouliquen et al., 1997). Variability in initial conditions create significant limitations for consistent experimental and numerical validation of newly developed theoretical models (Baker et al., 2016) for finger formation. We present an experimental study using a novel tool that sets the initial fingering width of the instability. By changing this trigger width between experiments, we explore the response of the avalanche breakup to perturbations of different widths. Discrete particle simulations (using MercuryDPM, Thornton et al., 2012) are conducted under a similar setting, reproducing the variable finger width, allowing validation between experiments and numerical simulations. A good agreement between simulations and experiments is obtained, and ongoing theoretical work is briefly introduced. NMV acknowledges the Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship.

  12. Experiments and numerical simulations of fluctuating thermal stratification in a branch pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio; Sasaki, Toru [Inst. of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Hamatani, Daisuke [Kobe Univ. (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Many pipes branch off from the main pipe in plants. When the main flow in the main pipe is hotter than a branch pipe that branches off downward, the hot water penetrates into the branch pipe with the cavity flow that is induced by the main flow and causes thermal stratification. If the interface of the stratification fluctuates in an occluded branch pipe, thermal fatigue may occur in pipe wall. Some experiments and numerical simulations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism of this fluctuating thermal stratification. The vortex structures were observed in the experiments of straight or bent branch pipes. When the main flow was heated and the thermal stratification interface was at the elbow, a ''burst'' phenomenon occurred in the interface in connection with large heat fluctuation. The effects of pipe shape on the length of penetration were investigated in order to modify simulation conditions. The vortex structures and the fluctuating thermal stratification at elbow in the numerical simulation showed good agreement with experiments. (author)

  13. Groundwater flow through a natural fracture. Flow experiments and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Erik [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept of Geology

    1997-09-01

    Groundwater flow and transport play an important role not only for groundwater exploration but also in environmental engineering problems. This report considers how the hydraulic properties of fractures in crystalline rock depend on the fracture aperture geometry. Different numerical models are discussed and a FDM computer code for two- and three- dimensional flow-modelling has been developed. Different relations between the cells in the model are tested and compared with results in the literature. A laboratory experimental work has been done to carry out flow experiments and aperture measurements on the same specimen of a natural fracture. The drilled core sample had fractures parallel to the core axis and was placed inside a biaxial cell during the experiments. The water pressure gradient and the compression stress were varied during the experiments and also a tracer test was done. After the flow experiments, the aperture distribution for a certain compression was measured by injecting an epoxy resin into the fracture. The thickness of the resin layer was then studied in saw cut sections of the sample. The results from the experiments were used to validate numerical and analytical models, based on aperture distribution, for flow and transport simulations. In the disturbed zone around a drift both water and air are present in the fractures. The gas will go to the most wide part of the fracture because the capillarity and the conductivity decrease. The dependence of the effective conductivity on the variance of the conductivity and the effect of extinction of highly conductive cells has also been studied. A discussion of how gas in fractures around a drift can cause a skin effect is modelled and an example is given of what a saturation depending on the magnitude of the flow causes. 25 refs, 17 tabs, 43 figs.

  14. Groundwater flow through a natural fracture. Flow experiments and numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Erik

    1997-09-01

    Groundwater flow and transport play an important role not only for groundwater exploration but also in environmental engineering problems. This report considers how the hydraulic properties of fractures in crystalline rock depend on the fracture aperture geometry. Different numerical models are discussed and a FDM computer code for two- and three- dimensional flow-modelling has been developed. Different relations between the cells in the model are tested and compared with results in the literature. A laboratory experimental work has been done to carry out flow experiments and aperture measurements on the same specimen of a natural fracture. The drilled core sample had fractures parallel to the core axis and was placed inside a biaxial cell during the experiments. The water pressure gradient and the compression stress were varied during the experiments and also a tracer test was done. After the flow experiments, the aperture distribution for a certain compression was measured by injecting an epoxy resin into the fracture. The thickness of the resin layer was then studied in saw cut sections of the sample. The results from the experiments were used to validate numerical and analytical models, based on aperture distribution, for flow and transport simulations. In the disturbed zone around a drift both water and air are present in the fractures. The gas will go to the most wide part of the fracture because the capillarity and the conductivity decrease. The dependence of the effective conductivity on the variance of the conductivity and the effect of extinction of highly conductive cells has also been studied. A discussion of how gas in fractures around a drift can cause a skin effect is modelled and an example is given of what a saturation depending on the magnitude of the flow causes

  15. Phase transitions and dynamic entropy in small two-dimensional systems: Experiment and numerical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koss, K. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; Statsenko, K. B.; Vasiliev, M. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The results of experimental and numerical analysis are presented for phase transitions in strongly nonequilibrium small systems of strongly interacting Brownian particles. The dynamic entropy method is applied to analysis of the state of these systems. Experiments are carried out with kinetic heating of the structures of micron-size particles in a laboratory rf discharge plasma. Three phase states of these small systems are observed: crystalline, liquid, and transient. The mechanism of phase transitions in cluster structures of strongly interacting particles is described.

  16. Influence of strain gradients on lattice rotation in nano-indentation experiments: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Demiral, Murat

    2014-07-01

    In this paper the texture evolution in nano-indentation experiments was investigated numerically. To achieve this, a three-dimensional implicit finite-element model incorporating a strain-gradient crystal-plasticity theory was developed to represent accurately the deformation of a body-centred cubic metallic material. A hardening model was implemented to account for strain hardening of the involved slip systems. The surface topography around indents in different crystallographic orientations was compared to corresponding lattice rotations. The influence of strain gradients on the prediction of lattice rotations in nano-indentation was critically assessed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V..

  17. Short-crested waves in deep water: a numerical investigation of recent laboratory experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Madsen, Per A.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical study of quasi-steady, doubly-periodic monochromatic short-crested wave patterns in deep water is conducted using a high-order Boussinesq-type model. Simulations using linear wavemaker conditions in the nonlinear model are initially used to approximate conditions from recent laboratory...... experiments. The computed patterns share many features with those observed in wavetanks, including bending (both frontwards and backwards) of the wave crests, dipping at the crest centerlines, and a pronounced long modulation in the direction of propagation. A new and simple explanation for these features...

  18. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-01-01

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  19. Influence of strain gradients on lattice rotation in nano-indentation experiments: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Demiral, Murat; Roy, Anish; El Sayed, Tamer S.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the texture evolution in nano-indentation experiments was investigated numerically. To achieve this, a three-dimensional implicit finite-element model incorporating a strain-gradient crystal-plasticity theory was developed to represent accurately the deformation of a body-centred cubic metallic material. A hardening model was implemented to account for strain hardening of the involved slip systems. The surface topography around indents in different crystallographic orientations was compared to corresponding lattice rotations. The influence of strain gradients on the prediction of lattice rotations in nano-indentation was critically assessed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V..

  20. Numerical Simulation Applications in the Design of EGS Collab Experiment 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Henry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); White, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Fu, Pengcheng [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Ghassemi, Ahmad [University of Oklahoma; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory; Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2018-02-14

    The United States Department of Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is funding a collaborative investigation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) processes at the meso-scale. This study, referred to as the EGS Collab project, is a unique opportunity for scientists and engineers to investigate the creation of fracture networks and circulation of fluids across those networks under in-situ stress conditions. The EGS Collab project is envisioned to comprise three experiments and the site for the first experiment is on the 4850 Level (4,850 feet below ground surface) in phyllite of the Precambrian Poorman formation, at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, located at the former Homestake Gold Mine, in Lead, South Dakota. Principal objectives of the project are to develop a number of intermediate-scale field sites and to conduct well-controlled in situ experiments focused on rock fracture behavior and permeability enhancement. Data generated during these experiments will be compared against predictions of a suite of computer codes specifically designed to solve problems involving coupled thermal, hydrological, geomechanical, and geochemical processes. Comparisons between experimental and numerical simulation results will provide code developers with direction for improvements and verification of process models, build confidence in the suite of available numerical tools, and ultimately identify critical future development needs for the geothermal modeling community. Moreover, conducting thorough comparisons of models, modelling approaches, measurement approaches and measured data, via the EGS Collab project, will serve to identify techniques that are most likely to succeed at the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE), the GTO's flagship EGS research effort. As noted, outcomes from the EGS Collab project experiments will serve as benchmarks for computer code verification, but numerical simulation additionally plays an essential

  1. Phase Change Materials-Assisted Heat Flux Reduction: Experiment and Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein J. Akeiber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCM in the construction industry became attractive because of several interesting attributes, such as thermo-physical parameters, open air atmospheric condition usage, cost and the duty structure requirement. Thermal performance optimization of PCMs in terms of proficient storage of a large amount of heat or cold in a finite volume remains a challenging task. Implementation of PCMs in buildings to achieve thermal comfort for a specific climatic condition in Iraq is our main focus. From this standpoint, the present paper reports the experimental and numerical results on the lowering of heat flux inside a residential building using PCM, which is composed of oil (40% and wax (60%. This PCM (paraffin, being plentiful and cost-effective, is extracted locally from waste petroleum products in Iraq. Experiments are performed with two rooms of identical internal dimensions in the presence and absence of PCM. A two-dimensional numerical transient heat transfer model is developed and solved using the finite difference method. A relatively simple geometry is chosen to initially verify the numerical solution procedure by incorporating in the computer program two-dimensional elliptic flows. It is demonstrated that the heat flux inside the room containing PCM is remarkably lower than the one devoid of PCM.

  2. Numerical simulation and experiment of high-intensity current pulsed impact on the structure body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mintang; Yan Ping; Yuan Weiqun; Sun Yaohong; Sun Lianhua; Zhou Yuan; Liu Chuanpu

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the characteristics of the impulse force formed by pulse current of electromagnetic rail propulsion system, and to explore effective ways to improve the support structure of rails, a set of impulse force test system was designed, and the work-related test situation was numerically simulated. Several impulse force waveforms formed by different pulse current waveforms were achieved by using an armature as a source of impulse force in this test system, and two curves of waveform were comparatively analyzed. The armature existing in the environment of coupling fields including electric field and magnetic field and force field was carried out numerical calculation by using the software of ANSYS, and the coupling force field was emphatically analyzed to calculate the electromagnetic driving force and the electromagnetic clamping force acting on the armature, and the structure stress and deformation was also analyzed. The results showed that the curves of electromagnetic driving force computed by numerical simulation and the curves of impulse force obtained by experiment were basically the same, and the value of peak points' error was increasing along with the increase of pulse current, but the curves still showed some common characteristics. This verified that the test method we used in this paper was proper to capture the impulse force, and the method of calculation was also feasible and effective. (authors)

  3. Numerical experiments on the atmospheric response to cold Equatorial Pacific conditions ('La Nina') during northern summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, H. von; Schriever, D.; Arpe, K.; Branstator, G.W.; Legnani, R.; Ulbrich, U.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of cold conditions in the central and eastern Equatorial Pacific during Northern Summer is examined in a series of numerical experiments with the low resolution (T21) atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM2. Anomalous sea surface temperatures (SST) as observed in June 1988 were prescribed and the effect on the global circulation is examined. In the model atmosphere, the anomalous cold water in the Equatorial Pacific excites a strong and stable response over the tropical Central and East Pacific. From here stationary Rossby waves radiate into both hemispheres. The Northern Hemisphere wave train is weak and affects only the Northeast Pacific area; the Southern Hemisphere wave train arches from the Central Pacific over the southern tip of South America to the South Atlantic. This response is not only present in the basic anomaly experiment with the T21 GCM but also in experiments with SST anomalies confined to the tropics and with an envelope-formulation of the SST anomalies, in experiments with a linear model, and in high resolution (T42) model experiments. The model output is also compared to the actually observed atmospheric state in June 1988. (orig./KW)

  4. New set of convective heat transfer coefficients established for pools and validated against CLARA experiments for application to corium pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, B., E-mail: benedicte.michel@irsn.fr

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A new set of 2D convective heat transfer correlations is proposed. • It takes into account different horizontal and lateral superficial velocities. • It is based on previously established correlations. • It is validated against recent CLARA experiments. • It has to be implemented in a 0D MCCI (molten core concrete interaction) code. - Abstract: During an hypothetical Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) or Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident with core meltdown and vessel failure, corium would fall directly on the concrete reactor pit basemat if no water is present. The high temperature of the corium pool maintained by the residual power would lead to the erosion of the concrete walls and basemat of this reactor pit. The thermal decomposition of concrete will lead to the release of a significant amount of gases that will modify the corium pool thermal hydraulics. In particular, it will affect heat transfers between the corium pool and the concrete which determine the reactor pit ablation kinetics. A new set of convective heat transfer coefficients in a pool with different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities is modeled and validated against the recent CLARA experimental program. 155 tests of this program, in two size configurations and a high range of investigated viscosity, have been used to validate the model. Then, a method to define different lateral and horizontal superficial gas velocities in a 0D code is proposed together with a discussion about the possible viscosity in the reactor case when the pool is semi-solid. This model is going to be implemented in the 0D ASTEC/MEDICIS code in order to determine the impact of the convective heat transfer in the concrete ablation by corium.

  5. Evaluation of the tripolar electrode stimulation method by numerical analysis and animal experiments for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, S; Sakajiri, M; Ifukube, T; Matsushima, J

    1997-01-01

    We have proposed the Tripolar Electrode Stimulation Method (TESM) which may enable us to narrow the stimulation region and to move continuously the stimulation site for the cochlear implants. We evaluated whether or not TESM works according to a theory based on numerical analysis using the auditory nerve fiber model. In this simulation, the sum of the excited model fibers were compared with the compound actions potentials obtained from animal experiments. As a result, this experiment showed that TESM could narrow a stimulation region by controlling the sum of the currents emitted from the electrodes on both sides, and continuously move a stimulation site by changing the ratio of the currents emitted from the electrodes on both sides.

  6. Tyre-road friction coefficient estimation based on tyre sensors and lateral tyre deflection: modelling, simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sanghyun; Erdogan, Gurkan; Hedrick, Karl; Borrelli, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    The estimation of the tyre-road friction coefficient is fundamental for vehicle control systems. Tyre sensors enable the friction coefficient estimation based on signals extracted directly from tyres. This paper presents a tyre-road friction coefficient estimation algorithm based on tyre lateral deflection obtained from lateral acceleration. The lateral acceleration is measured by wireless three-dimensional accelerometers embedded inside the tyres. The proposed algorithm first determines the contact patch using a radial acceleration profile. Then, the portion of the lateral acceleration profile, only inside the tyre-road contact patch, is used to estimate the friction coefficient through a tyre brush model and a simple tyre model. The proposed strategy accounts for orientation-variation of accelerometer body frame during tyre rotation. The effectiveness and performance of the algorithm are demonstrated through finite element model simulations and experimental tests with small tyre slip angles on different road surface conditions.

  7. Deposition By Turbidity Currents In Intraslope Diapiric Minibasins: Results Of 1-D Experiments And Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, M.; Toniolo, H.; Parker, G.

    2001-12-01

    The slope of the continental margin of the northern Gulf of Mexico is riddled with small basins resulting from salt tectonics. Each such minibasin is the result of local subsidence due to salt withdrawal, and is isolated from neighboring basins by ridges formed due to compensational uplift. The minibasins are gradually filled by turbidity currents, which are active at low sea stand. Experiments in a 1-D minibasin reveal that a turbidity current flowing into a deep minibasin must undergo a hydraulic jump and form a muddy pond. This pond may not spill out of the basin even with continuous inflow. The reason for this is the detrainment of water across the settling interface that forms at the top of the muddy pond. Results of both experiments and numerical modeling of the flow and the evolution of the deposit are presented. The numerical model is the first of its kind to capture both the hydraulic jump and the effect of detrainment in ponded turbidity currents.

  8. Numerical experiment on variance biases and Monte Carlo neutronics analysis with thermal hydraulic feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyung, Jin Shim; Beom, Seok Han; Chang, Hyo Kim

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) power method based on the fixed number of fission sites at the beginning of each cycle is known to cause biases in the variances of the k-eigenvalue (keff) and the fission reaction rate estimates. Because of the biases, the apparent variances of keff and the fission reaction rate estimates from a single MC run tend to be smaller or larger than the real variances of the corresponding quantities, depending on the degree of the inter-generational correlation of the sample. We demonstrate this through a numerical experiment involving 100 independent MC runs for the neutronics analysis of a 17 x 17 fuel assembly of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). We also demonstrate through the numerical experiment that Gelbard and Prael's batch method and Ueki et al's covariance estimation method enable one to estimate the approximate real variances of keff and the fission reaction rate estimates from a single MC run. We then show that the use of the approximate real variances from the two-bias predicting methods instead of the apparent variances provides an efficient MC power iteration scheme that is required in the MC neutronics analysis of a real system to determine the pin power distribution consistent with the thermal hydraulic (TH) conditions of individual pins of the system. (authors)

  9. Local mechanical properties of LFT injection molded parts: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, F.; Soete, K.; Bonte, H.; Debrabandere, E.

    2014-05-01

    In predictive engineering for polymer processes, the proper prediction of material microstructure from known processing conditions and constituent material properties is a critical step forward properly predicting bulk properties in the finished composite. Operating within the context of long-fiber thermoplastics (LFT, length Autodesk Simulation Moldflow Insight 2014 software has been used. In this software, a fiber breakage algorithm for the polymer flow inside the mold is available. Using well known micro mechanic formulas allow to combine the local fiber length with the local orientation into local mechanical properties. Different experiments were performed using a commercially available glass fiber filled compound to compare the measured data with the numerical simulation results. In this investigation, tensile tests and 3 point bending tests are considered. To characterize the fiber length distribution of the polymer melt entering the mold (necessary for the numerical simulations), air shots were performed. For those air shots, similar homogenization conditions were used as during the injection molding tests. The fiber length distribution is characterized using automated optical method on samples for which the matrix material is burned away. Using the appropriate settings for the different experiments, good predictions of the local mechanical properties are obtained.

  10. A Lie-admissible method of integration of Fokker-Planck equations with non-linear coefficients (exact and numerical solutions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fronteau, J.; Combis, P.

    1984-08-01

    A Lagrangian method is introduced for the integration of non-linear Fokker-Planck equations. Examples of exact solutions obtained in this way are given, and also the explicit scheme used for the computation of numerical solutions. The method is, in addition, shown to be of a Lie-admissible type

  11. Statistical characteristics of falling-film flows: A synergistic approach at the crossroads of direct numerical simulations and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charogiannis, Alexandros; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.; Kalliadasis, Serafim; Markides, Christos N.

    2017-12-01

    We scrutinize the statistical characteristics of liquid films flowing over an inclined planar surface based on film height and velocity measurements that are recovered simultaneously by application of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), respectively. Our experiments are complemented by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of liquid films simulated for different conditions so as to expand the parameter space of our investigation. Our statistical analysis builds upon a Reynolds-like decomposition of the time-varying flow rate that was presented in our previous research effort on falling films in [Charogiannis et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 014002 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.014002], and which reveals that the dimensionless ratio of the unsteady term to the mean flow rate increases linearly with the product of the coefficients of variation of the film height and bulk velocity, as well as with the ratio of the Nusselt height to the mean film height, both at the same upstream PLIF/PTV measurement location. Based on relations that are derived to describe these results, a methodology for predicting the mass-transfer capability (through the mean and standard deviation of the bulk flow speed) of these flows is developed in terms of the mean and standard deviation of the film thickness and the mean flow rate, which are considerably easier to obtain experimentally than velocity profiles. The errors associated with these predictions are estimated at ≈1.5 % and 8% respectively in the experiments and at <1 % and <2 % respectively in the DNSs. Beyond the generation of these relations for the prediction of important film flow characteristics based on simple flow information, the data provided can be used to design improved heat- and mass-transfer equipment reactors or other process operation units which exploit film flows, but also to develop and validate multiphase flow models in other physical and technological settings.

  12. A desiccant-enhanced evaporative air conditioner: Numerical model and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Jason; Kozubal, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied a new process combining liquid desiccants and evaporative cooling. ► We modeled the process using a finite-difference numerical model. ► We measured the performance of the process with experimental prototypes. ► Results show agreement between model and experiment of ±10%. ► Results add confidence to previous modeled energy savings estimates of 40–85%. - Abstract: This article presents modeling and experimental results on a recently proposed liquid desiccant air conditioner, which consists of two stages: a liquid desiccant dehumidifier and an indirect evaporative cooler. Each stage is a stack of channel pairs, where a channel pair is a process air channel separated from an exhaust air channel with a thin plastic plate. In the first stage, a liquid desiccant film, which lines the process air channels, removes moisture from the air through a porous hydrophobic membrane. An evaporating water film wets the surface of the exhaust channels and transfers the enthalpy of vaporization from the liquid desiccant into an exhaust airstream, cooling the desiccant and enabling lower outlet humidity. The second stage is a counterflow indirect evaporative cooler that siphons off and uses a portion of the cool-dry air exiting the second stage as the evaporative sink. The objectives of this article are to (1) present fluid-thermal numerical models for each stage, (2) present experimental results of prototypes for each stage, and (3) compare the modeled and experimental results. Several experiments were performed on the prototypes over a range of inlet temperatures and humidities, process and exhaust air flow rates, and desiccant concentrations and flow rates. The model predicts the experiments within ±10%.

  13. Ring-fault activity at subsiding calderas studied from analogue experiments and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. K.; Ruch, J.; Vasyura-Bathke, H.; Jonsson, S.

    2017-12-01

    Several subsiding calderas, such as the ones in the Galápagos archipelago and the Axial seamount in the Pacific Ocean have shown a complex but similar ground deformation pattern, composed of a broad deflation signal affecting the entire volcanic edifice and of a localized subsidence signal focused within the caldera. However, it is still debated how deep processes at subsiding calderas, including magmatic pressure changes, source locations and ring-faulting, relate to this observed surface deformation pattern. We combine analogue sandbox experiments with numerical modeling to study processes involved from initial subsidence to later collapse of calderas. The sandbox apparatus is composed of a motor driven subsiding half-piston connected to the bottom of a glass box. During the experiments the observation is done by five digital cameras photographing from various perspectives. We use Photoscan, a photogrammetry software and PIVLab, a time-resolved digital image correlation tool, to retrieve time-series of digital elevation models and velocity fields from acquired photographs. This setup allows tracking the processes acting both at depth and at the surface, and to assess their relative importance as the subsidence evolves to a collapse. We also use the Boundary Element Method to build a numerical model of the experiment setup, which comprises contracting sill-like source in interaction with a ring-fault in elastic half-space. We then compare our results from these two approaches with the examples observed in nature. Our preliminary experimental and numerical results show that at the initial stage of magmatic withdrawal, when the ring-fault is not yet well formed, broad and smooth deflation dominates at the surface. As the withdrawal increases, narrower subsidence bowl develops accompanied by the upward propagation of the ring-faulting. This indicates that the broad deflation, affecting the entire volcano edifice, is primarily driven by the contraction of the

  14. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  15. Estimating temperature reactivity coefficients by experimental procedures combined with isothermal temperature coefficient measurements and dynamic identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masashi; Aoki, Yukinori; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Yamasaki, Masatoshi; Hanayama, Yasushi

    2006-01-01

    A method to evaluate the moderator coefficient (MTC) and the Doppler coefficient through experimental procedures performed during reactor physics tests of PWR power plants is proposed. This method combines isothermal temperature coefficient (ITC) measurement experiments and reactor power transient experiments at low power conditions for dynamic identification. In the dynamic identification, either one of temperature coefficients can be determined in such a way that frequency response characteristics of the reactivity change observed by a digital reactivity meter is reproduced from measured data of neutron count rate and the average coolant temperature. The other unknown coefficient can also be determined by subtracting the coefficient obtained from the dynamic identification from ITC. As the proposed method can directly estimate the Doppler coefficient, the applicability of the conventional core design codes to predict the Doppler coefficient can be verified for new types of fuels such as mixed oxide fuels. The digital simulation study was carried out to show the feasibility of the proposed method. The numerical analysis showed that the MTC and the Doppler coefficient can be estimated accurately and even if there are uncertainties in the parameters of the reactor kinetics model, the accuracies of the estimated values are not seriously impaired. (author)

  16. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Coasts are crucial areas for living, economy, recreation, transportation, and various sectors of industry. Many of them are exposed to high-energy wave events. With regard to the ongoing population growth in low-elevation coastal areas, the urgent need for developing suitable management measures, especially for hazards like tsunamis, becomes obvious. These measures require supporting tools which allow an exact estimation of impact parameters like inundation height, inundation area, and wave energy. Focussing on tsunamis, geological archives can provide essential information on frequency and magnitude on a longer time scale in order to support coastal hazard management. While fine-grained deposits may quickly be altered after deposition, multi-ton coarse clasts (boulders) may represent an information source on past tsunami events with a much higher preservation potential. Applying numerical hydrodynamic coupled boulder transport models (BTM) is a commonly used approach to analyse characteristics (e.g. wave height, flow velocity) of the corresponding tsunami. Correct computations of tsunamis and the induced boulder transport can provide essential event-specific information, including wave heights, runup and direction. Although several valuable numerical models for tsunami-induced boulder transport exist (e. g. Goto et al., 2007; Imamura et al., 2008), some important basic aspects of both tsunami hydrodynamics and corresponding boulder transport have not yet been entirely understood. Therefore, our project aims at these questions in four crucial aspects of boulder transport by a tsunami: (i) influence of sediment load, (ii) influence of complex boulder shapes other than idealized rectangular shapes, (iii) momentum transfers between multiple boulders, and (iv) influence of non-uniform bathymetries and topographies both on tsunami and boulder. The investigation of these aspects in physical experiments and the correct implementation of an advanced model is an urgent need

  17. Experiments and Numerical Simulations of Dike Erosion due to a Wave Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Evangelista

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dike erosion is a crucial issue in coastal and fluvial flood risk management. These defense structures appear vulnerable to extreme hydrological events, whose potential occurrence risk seems to be recently increased due to climate change. Their design and reinforcement is, however, a complex task, and although numerical models are very powerful nowadays, real processes cannot be accurately predicted; therefore, physical models constitute a useful tool to investigate different features under controlled conditions. This paper presents some laboratory experimental results of erosion of a sand dike produced by the impact of a dam break wave. Experiments have been conducted in the Water Engineering Laboratory at the University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Italy, in a rectangular channel: here, the sudden opening of a gate forming the reservoir generates the wave impacting the dike, made in turn of two different, almost uniform sands. The physical evidence proves that the erosion process is strongly unsteady and significantly different from a gradual overtopping and highlights the importance of apparent cohesion for the fine sand dike. The experimental results have also been compared against the ones obtained through the numerical integration of a two-phase model, which shows the reasonable predictive capability of the temporal free surface and dike profile evolution.

  18. Numerical Forecasting Experiment of the Wave Energy Resource in the China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wei Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The short-term forecasting of wave energy is important to provide guidance for the electric power operation and power transmission system and to enhance the efficiency of energy capture and conversion. This study produced a numerical forecasting experiment of the China Sea wave energy using WAVEWATCH-III (WW3, the latest version 4.18 wave model driven by T213 (WW3-T213 and T639 (WW3-T639 wind data separately. Then the WW3-T213 and WW3-T639 were verified and compared to build a short-term wave energy forecasting structure suited for the China Sea. Considering the value of wave power density (WPD, “wave energy rose,” daily and weekly total storage and effective storage of wave energy, this study also designed a series of short-term wave energy forecasting productions. Results show that both the WW3-T213 and WW3-T639 exhibit a good skill on the numerical forecasting of the China Sea WPD, while the result of WW3-T639 is much better. Judging from WPD and daily and weekly total storage and effective storage of wave energy, great wave energy caused by cold airs was found. As there are relatively frequent cold airs in winter, early spring, and later autumn in the China Sea and the surrounding waters, abundant wave energy ensues.

  19. Proof of concept of an artificial muscle: theoretical model, numerical model, and hardware experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeufle, D F B; Günther, M; Blickhan, R; Schmitt, S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from basic physical components. It was shown that a contractile element CE consisting of a mechanical energy source (active element AE), a parallel damper element (PDE), and a serial element (SE) exhibits operating points with hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. In this paper, the contraction dynamics of this CE concept were analyzed in a numerical simulation of quick release experiments against different loads. A hyperbolic force-velocity relation was found. The results correspond to measurements of the contraction dynamics of a technical prototype. Deviations from the theoretical prediction could partly be explained by the low stiffness of the SE, which was modeled analog to the metal spring in the hardware prototype. The numerical model and hardware prototype together, are a proof of this CE concept and can be seen as a well-founded starting point for the development of Hill-type artificial muscles. This opens up new vistas for the technical realization of natural movements with rehabilitation devices. © 2011 IEEE

  20. Numerical analysis and experiment research on fluid orbital performance of vane type propellant management device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q; Li, Y; Pan, H L; Liu, J T; Zhuang, B T

    2015-01-01

    Vane type propellant management device (PMD) is one of the key components of the vane-type surface tension tank (STT), and its fluid orbital performance directly determines the STT's success or failure. In present paper, numerical analysis and microgravity experiment study on fluid orbital performance of a vane type PMD were carried out. By using two-phase flow model of volume of fluid (VOF), fluid flow characteristics in the tank with the vane type PMD were numerically calculated, and the rules of fluid transfer and distribution were gotten. A abbreviate model test system of the vane type PMD is established and microgravity drop tower tests were performed, then fluid management and transmission rules of the vane type PMD were obtained under microgravity environment. The analysis and tests results show that the vane type PMD has good and initiative fluid orbital management ability and meets the demands of fluid orbital extrusion in the vane type STT. The results offer valuable guidance for the design and optimization of the new generation of vane type PMD, and also provide a new approach for fluid management and control in space environment

  1. A numerical tool for reproducing driver behaviour: experiments and predictive simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casucci, M; Marchitto, M; Cacciabue, P C

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the simulation tool called SDDRIVE (Simple Simulation of Driver performance), which is the numerical computerised implementation of the theoretical architecture describing Driver-Vehicle-Environment (DVE) interactions, contained in Cacciabue and Carsten [Cacciabue, P.C., Carsten, O. A simple model of driver behaviour to sustain design and safety assessment of automated systems in automotive environments, 2010]. Following a brief description of the basic algorithms that simulate the performance of drivers, the paper presents and discusses a set of experiments carried out in a Virtual Reality full scale simulator for validating the simulation. Then the predictive potentiality of the tool is shown by discussing two case studies of DVE interactions, performed in the presence of different driver attitudes in similar traffic conditions.

  2. Experiment and Lattice Boltzmann numerical study on nanofluids flow in a micromodel as porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi Isfahani, A. H.; Afrand, Masoud

    2017-10-01

    Al2O3 nanofluids flow has been studied in etched glass micromodel which is idealization of porous media by using a pseudo 2D Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). The predictions were compared with experimental results. Pressure drop / flow rate relations have been measured for pure water and Al2O3 nanofluids. Because the size of Al2O3 nanoparticles is tiny enough to permit through the pore throats of the micromodel, blockage does not occur and the permeability is independent of the nanofluid volume fraction. Therefore, the nanofluid behaves as a single phase fluid, and a single phase LBM is able to simulate the results of this experiment. Although the flow in micromodels is 3D, we showed that 2D LBM can be used provided an effective viscous drag force, representing the effect of the third dimension, is considered. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is seen between the numerical and experimental results.

  3. The intraclass correlation coefficient applied for evaluation of data correction, labeling methods and rectal biopsy sampling in DNA microarray experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellis, E.P.M.; Franssen-Hal, van N.L.W.; Burema, J.; Keijer, J.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) can be used as a relatively simple statistical measure to assess methodological and biological variation in DNA microarray analysis. The ICC is a measure that determines the reproducibility of a variable, which can easily be calculated from

  4. Recirculation System for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations: Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Detwiler, R. L.; Serajian, V.; Bruno, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought and have the potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. In particular, hot permeable sedimentary formations provide many advantages over traditional geothermal recovery and enhanced geothermal systems in low permeability crystalline formations. These include: (1) eliminating the need for hydraulic fracturing, (2) significant reduction in risk for induced seismicity, (3) reducing the need for surface wastewater disposal, (4) contributing to decreases in greenhouse gases, and (5) potential use for CO2 sequestration. Advances in horizontal drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock these geothermal resources. Here, we present experimental results from a laboratory scale circulation system and numerical simulations aimed at quantifying the heat transfer capacity of sedimentary rocks. Our experiments consist of fluid flow through a saturated and pressurized sedimentary disc of 23-cm diameter and 3.8-cm thickness heated along its circumference at a constant temperature. Injection and production ports are 7.6-cm apart in the center of the disc. We used DI de-aired water and mineral oil as working fluids and explored temperatures from 20 to 150 oC and flow rates from 2 to 30 ml/min. We performed experiments on sandstone samples (Castlegate and Kirby) with different porosity, permeability and thermal conductivity to evaluate the effect of hydraulic and thermal properties on the heat transfer capacity of sediments. The producing fluid temperature followed an exponential form with time scale transients between 15 and 45 min. Steady state outflow temperatures varied between 60% and 95% of the set boundary temperature, higher percentages were observed for lower temperatures and flow rates. We used the flow and heat transport simulator TOUGH2 to develop a numerical model of our laboratory setting. Given

  5. Theoretical and Numerical Approaches for Determining the Reflection and Transmission Coefficients of OPEFB-PCL Composites at X-Band Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ahmad F; Abbas, Zulkifly; Obaiys, Suzan J; Ibrahim, Norazowa; Hashim, Mansor; Khaleel, Haider

    2015-01-01

    Bio-composites of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibres and polycaprolactones (PCL) with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared and characterized. The composites produced from these materials are low in density, inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and possess good dielectric characteristics. The magnitudes of the reflection and transmission coefficients of OPEFB fibre-reinforced PCL composites with different percentages of filler were measured using a rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in the X-band frequency range. In contrast to the effective medium theory, which states that polymer-based composites with a high dielectric constant can be obtained by doping a filler with a high dielectric constant into a host material with a low dielectric constant, this paper demonstrates that the use of a low filler percentage (12.2%OPEFB) and a high matrix percentage (87.8%PCL) provides excellent results for the dielectric constant and loss factor, whereas 63.8% filler material with 36.2% host material results in lower values for both the dielectric constant and loss factor. The open-ended probe technique (OEC), connected with the Agilent vector network analyzer (VNA), is used to determine the dielectric properties of the materials under investigation. The comparative approach indicates that the mean relative error of FEM is smaller than that of NRW in terms of the corresponding S21 magnitude. The present calculation of the matrix/filler percentages endorses the exact amounts of substrate utilized in various physics applications.

  6. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  7. Subsampled Numerical Experiments as a Guide for Field Deployment of Thermistor Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Justin; Stastna, Marek

    2017-11-01

    Thermistor chains are a standard tool for recording temperature profiles in geophysical flows. Density values can be inferred from readings and the resulting density field analyzed for the passage of internal waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz billows, and other dynamic events. The number and spacing of the thermistors, both on and between chains, determines which events can be identified in the dataset. We examine the effect of changing these variables by subsampling a set of numerical experiments to simulate thermistor chain locations. A pseudo spectral method was used to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations under the Boussinesq approximation. The resulting flows are a set of high resolution seiches where the depth was held constant across experiments, and the length was varied. Sampling a known, commonly occurring flow with relatively simple geometry allows for a clear analysis of the effects of thermistor placement in the capture of dynamic events. We will discuss three dimensional deployment strategies, as well as EOF and DMD analyses if there is time. Funded by a Grant from the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  8. Strain Localization and Weakening Processes in Viscously Deforming Rocks: Numerical Modeling Based on Laboratory Torsion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehmann, M.; Brune, S.; Nardini, L.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Strain localization is an ubiquitous process in earth materials observed over a broad range of scales in space and time. Localized deformation and the formation of shear zones and faults typically involves material softening by various processes, like shear heating and grain size reduction. Numerical modeling enables us to study the complex physical and chemical weakening processes by separating the effect of individual parameters and boundary conditions. Using simple piece-wise linear functions for the parametrization of weakening processes allows studying a system at a chosen (lower) level of complexity (e.g. Cyprych et al., 2016). In this study, we utilize a finite element model to test two weakening laws that reduce the strength of the material depending on either the I) amount of accumulated strain or II) deformational work. Our 2D Cartesian models are benchmarked to single inclusion torsion experiments performed at elevated temperatures of 900 °C and pressures of up to 400 MPa (Rybacki et al., 2014). The experiments were performed on Carrara marble samples containing a weak Solnhofen limestone inclusion at a maximum strain rate of 2.0*10-4 s-1. Our models are designed to reproduce shear deformation of a hollow cylinder equivalent to the laboratory setup, such that material leaving one side of the model in shear direction enters again on the opposite side using periodic boundary conditions. Similar to the laboratory tests, we applied constant strain rate and constant stress boundary conditions.We use our model to investigate the time-dependent distribution of stress and strain and the effect of different parameters. For instance, inclusion rotation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscosity ratio between matrix and inclusion and stronger ductile weakening increases the localization rate while decreasing shear zone width. The most suitable weakening law for representation of ductile rock is determined by combining the results of parameter tests with

  9. Single-experiment simultaneous-measurement of elemental mass-attenuation coefficients of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen for 0.123-1.33 MeV gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teli, M.T.; Nathuram, R.; Mahajan, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    As it is inconvenient to use elements like hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in pure forms for measurement of their gamma mass-attenuation coefficients, the measurements are to be done indirectly, by using compounds of the elements or a mixture of them. We give here a simple method of measuring the total mass-attenuation coefficients μ/ρ of the elements in a compound simultaneously and in a single experiment through the measurements of the μ/ρ values of the concerned compounds and using the mixture rule. The method is applied for the measurement of μ/ρ of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen by using acetone, ethanol and 1-propanol. Our results (for E γ =0.123-1.33 MeV) are seen to be in better agreement with the theoretical values of Hubbell and Seltzer (1995) [Hubbell J.H. and Seltzer S.M. (1995). Tables of X-ray mass attenuation coefficients and mass energy-absorption coefficients 1 keV to 20 MeV for elements Z=1 to 92 and 48 additional substances of dosimetric interest. NISTIR 5632] as compared to the results of El-Kateb and Abdul-Hamid (1991) [El-Kateb, A.H., Abdul-Hamid, A.S., 1991. Photon attenuation coefficient study of some materials containing hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Appl. Rad. Isot. 42, 303-307

  10. A combination method of the theory and experiment in determination of cutting force coefficients in ball-end mill processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chou Kao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the cutting force calculation of ball-end mill processing was modeled mathematically. All derivations of cutting forces were directly based on the tangential, radial, and axial cutting force components. In the developed mathematical model of cutting forces, the relationship of average cutting force and the feed per flute was characterized as a linear function. The cutting force coefficient model was formulated by a function of average cutting force and other parameters such as cutter geometry, cutting conditions, and so on. An experimental method was proposed based on the stable milling condition to estimate the cutting force coefficients for ball-end mill. This method could be applied for each pair of tool and workpiece. The developed cutting force model has been successfully verified experimentally with very promising results.

  11. Theoretical and Numerical Approaches for Determining the Reflection and Transmission Coefficients of OPEFB-PCL Composites at X-Band Frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad F Ahmad

    Full Text Available Bio-composites of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB fibres and polycaprolactones (PCL with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared and characterized. The composites produced from these materials are low in density, inexpensive, environmentally friendly, and possess good dielectric characteristics. The magnitudes of the reflection and transmission coefficients of OPEFB fibre-reinforced PCL composites with different percentages of filler were measured using a rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA in the X-band frequency range. In contrast to the effective medium theory, which states that polymer-based composites with a high dielectric constant can be obtained by doping a filler with a high dielectric constant into a host material with a low dielectric constant, this paper demonstrates that the use of a low filler percentage (12.2%OPEFB and a high matrix percentage (87.8%PCL provides excellent results for the dielectric constant and loss factor, whereas 63.8% filler material with 36.2% host material results in lower values for both the dielectric constant and loss factor. The open-ended probe technique (OEC, connected with the Agilent vector network analyzer (VNA, is used to determine the dielectric properties of the materials under investigation. The comparative approach indicates that the mean relative error of FEM is smaller than that of NRW in terms of the corresponding S21 magnitude. The present calculation of the matrix/filler percentages endorses the exact amounts of substrate utilized in various physics applications.

  12. On the discrepancies between theoretical and measured below-cloud particle scavenging coefficients for rain – a numerical investigation using a detailed one-dimensional cloud microphysics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Existing theoretical formulations for the size-resolved scavenging coefficient Λ(d for atmospheric aerosol particles scavenged by rain predict values lower by one to two orders of magnitude than those estimated from field measurements of particle-concentration changes for particles smaller than 3 μm in diameter. Vertical turbulence is not accounted for in the theoretical formulations of Λ(d but does contribute to the field-derived estimates of Λ(d due to its influence on the overall concentration changes of aerosol particles in the layers undergoing impaction scavenging. A detailed one-dimensional cloud microphysics model has been used to simulate rain production and below-cloud particle scavenging, and to quantify the contribution of turbulent diffusion to the overall Λ(d values calculated from particle concentration changes. The relative contribution of vertical diffusion to below-cloud scavenging is found to be largest for submicron particles under weak precipitation conditions. The discrepancies between theoretical and field-derived Λ(d values can largely be explained by the contribution of vertical diffusion to below-cloud particle scavenging for all particles larger than 0.01 μm in diameter for which field data are available. The results presented here suggest that the current theoretical framework for Λ(d can provide a reasonable approximation of below-cloud aerosol particle scavenging by rain in size-resolved aerosol transport models if vertical diffusion is also considered by the models.

  13. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient in free neutron decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, B; Bateman, F; Bauder, W K; Byrne, J; Byron, W A; Chen, W; Darius, G; DeAngelis, C; Dewey, M S; Gentile, T R; Hassan, M T; Jones, G L; Komives, A; Laptev, A; Mendenhall, M P; Nico, J S; Noid, G; Park, H; Stephenson, E J; Stern, I; Stockton, K J S; Trull, C; Wietfeldt, F E; Yerozolimsky, B G

    2017-08-01

    We describe an apparatus used to measure the electron-antineutrino angular correlation coefficient in free neutron decay. The apparatus employs a novel measurement technique in which the angular correlation is converted into a proton time-of-flight asymmetry that is counted directly, avoiding the need for proton spectroscopy. Details of the method, apparatus, detectors, data acquisition, and data reduction scheme are presented, along with a discussion of the important systematic effects.

  14. Numerical study of the evaporation process and parameter estimation analysis of an evaporation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schneider-Zapp

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation is an important process in soil-atmosphere interaction. The determination of hydraulic properties is one of the crucial parts in the simulation of water transport in porous media. Schneider et al. (2006 developed a new evaporation method to improve the estimation of hydraulic properties in the dry range. In this study we used numerical simulations of the experiment to study the physical dynamics in more detail, to optimise the boundary conditions and to choose the optimal combination of measurements. The physical analysis exposed, in accordance to experimental findings in the literature, two different evaporation regimes: (i a soil-atmosphere boundary layer dominated regime (regime I close to saturation and (ii a hydraulically dominated regime (regime II. During this second regime a drying front (interface between unsaturated and dry zone with very steep gradients forms which penetrates deeper into the soil as time passes. The sensitivity analysis showed that the result is especially sensitive at the transition between the two regimes. By changing the boundary conditions it is possible to force the system to switch between the two regimes, e.g. from II back to I. Based on this findings a multistep experiment was developed. The response surfaces for all parameter combinations are flat and have a unique, localised minimum. Best parameter estimates are obtained if the evaporation flux and a potential measurement in 2 cm depth are used as target variables. Parameter estimation from simulated experiments with realistic measurement errors with a two-stage Monte-Carlo Levenberg-Marquardt procedure and manual rejection of obvious misfits lead to acceptable results for three different soil textures.

  15. Experiment and numerical simulation of welding induced damage: stainless steel 15-5PH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study is the prediction of damage and residual stresses induced by hot processing which leads to phase transformation in martensitic stainless steel. This study firstly concerns the modelling of the damage of material induced by a complex history of thermo-elastoplastic multiphase in heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of welding. In this work, a two-scale mode of elastoplastic damage multiphase was developed in the framework of thermodynamics of irreversible process. The constitutive equations are coupling with ductile damage, elasto-plasticity, phase transformation, and transformation plasticity. Besides, a damage equation was proposed based on the Lemaitre's damage model in the framework of continuum damage mechanics. The experiments of 15-5PH were implemented for the identification of phase transformation, transformation plasticity and damage models. Tensile tests of round specimens were used to identify the parameters of damage model as well as mechanical behaviours at various temperatures. Tests of flat notched specimen were designed to provide the validation of damage model and strain localization using three dimensional image correlation technologies. In addition, microscopic analysis was performed to provide microstructure characterization of 15-5PH and to discover the damage mechanism. Finally the numerical simulation was performed in the code CAST3M of CEA. On the one hand, numerical verification of the flat notched plates was implemented and compared with experimental results. On the other hand, we used the two-scale model including phase transformation, transformation plasticity and damage to simulate the level of residual stresses of a disk made of 15-5PH metal heated by laser. The internal variables, such as strain, stress, damage, were successfully traced in the simulation of two-scale model. The simulation results showed the transformation plasticity changes the level of residual stresses and should not be negligible; damage decreases

  16. A numerical study of HCCI combustion of PRF mixtures compared with PCCI experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wijngaarden, B.

    2008-09-15

    For automotive applications engines that produce less soot and NOx are desired. For that reason the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) principle is investigated all over the world, including the technical universities of Berlin (TUB) and Eindhoven. HCCI combines a homogeneous charge, as in an Otto engine with the autoignition principle of a Diesel engine. Auto-ignition and almost instantaneous combustion of a homogeneous charge leads to almost zero soot emissions, lower temperatures and thereby much lower NOx emissions. Auto-ignition timing however, depends on the fuel and its chemistry, which is very sensitive to the applied conditions, being pressure, temperature, equivalence ratio ({phi}), dilution with EGR and engine speed. To study this systematically a 0D model with PRF fuels is used (Primary Reference Fuels are n-heptane, iso-octane and mixtures). A 0D model is chosen because it excludes complex fluid dynamics and thereby allows the use of detailed combustion mechanisms, describing the (PRF) chemistry. Furthermore the model has a multi zone possibility to evaluate in-homogeneities of the charge. PRF fuels are used because n-heptane (CN=55) auto-ignites like a diesel and iso-octane (ON=100) approaches gasoline. For the PRF chemistry three combustion mechanisms were selected, of which two were validated showing a great difference in predicted ignition delay and sensitivity to changes. Furthermore the model was validated with a PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) experiment. Extensive comparisons with PCCI experiments from the TUB showed that when the moment of injection was used to launch the chemistry in the model, only the Soyhan mechanism predicted the ignition close to the experimental ignition moment. Furthermore a 7 zone model was able to approach the experimental CO and NOX emissions. Finally none of the mechanisms was able to predict a pressure profile similar to the experiments. More zones and or a better mechanism could improve

  17. Evaluation of a numerical model's ability to predict bed load transport observed in braided river experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javernick, Luke; Redolfi, Marco; Bertoldi, Walter

    2018-05-01

    New data collection techniques offer numerical modelers the ability to gather and utilize high quality data sets with high spatial and temporal resolution. Such data sets are currently needed for calibration, verification, and to fuel future model development, particularly morphological simulations. This study explores the use of high quality spatial and temporal data sets of observed bed load transport in braided river flume experiments to evaluate the ability of a two-dimensional model, Delft3D, to predict bed load transport. This study uses a fixed bed model configuration and examines the model's shear stress calculations, which are the foundation to predict the sediment fluxes necessary for morphological simulations. The evaluation is conducted for three flow rates, and model setup used highly accurate Structure-from-Motion (SfM) topography and discharge boundary conditions. The model was hydraulically calibrated using bed roughness, and performance was evaluated based on depth and inundation agreement. Model bed load performance was evaluated in terms of critical shear stress exceedance area compared to maps of observed bed mobility in a flume. Following the standard hydraulic calibration, bed load performance was tested for sensitivity to horizontal eddy viscosity parameterization and bed morphology updating. Simulations produced depth errors equal to the SfM inherent errors, inundation agreement of 77-85%, and critical shear stress exceedance in agreement with 49-68% of the observed active area. This study provides insight into the ability of physically based, two-dimensional simulations to accurately predict bed load as well as the effects of horizontal eddy viscosity and bed updating. Further, this study highlights how using high spatial and temporal data to capture the physical processes at work during flume experiments can help to improve morphological modeling.

  18. Analysis of the Source Physics Experiment SPE4 Prime Using State-Of Parallel Numerical Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, O.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.; Glenn, L.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes a methodology used for large scale modeling of wave propagation from underground chemical explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) fractured granitic rock. We show that the discrete natures of rock masses as well as the spatial variability of the fabric of rock properties are very important to understand ground motions induced by underground explosions. In order to build a credible conceptual model of the subsurface we integrated the geological, geomechanical and geophysical characterizations conducted during recent test at the NNSS as well as historical data from the characterization during the underground nuclear test conducted at the NNSS. Because detailed site characterization is limited, expensive and, in some instances, impossible we have numerically investigated the effects of the characterization gaps on the overall response of the system. We performed several computational studies to identify the key important geologic features specific to fractured media mainly the joints characterized at the NNSS. We have also explored common key features to both geological environments such as saturation and topography and assess which characteristics affect the most the ground motion in the near-field and in the far-field. Stochastic representation of these features based on the field characterizations has been implemented into LLNL's Geodyn-L hydrocode. Simulations were used to guide site characterization efforts in order to provide the essential data to the modeling community. We validate our computational results by comparing the measured and computed ground motion at various ranges for the recently executed SPE4 prime experiment. We have also conducted a comparative study between SPE4 prime and previous experiments SPE1 and SPE3 to assess similarities and differences and draw conclusions on designing SPE5.

  19. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  20. Numerical experiment for nonlinear full-wave tomography. 3; Hisenkei full wave tomography no suchi jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, T [Dia Consultants Company, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Nonlinear full-wave tomography (FWT) is under investigation to improve the estimation accuracy of Vp/Vs distributions. Full-wave tomography is one of the underground structure exploration methods mainly using Tarantola`s nonlinear local optimization method (LOM). Numerical experiment for FWT was carried out assuming relatively weak nonlinear underground structure. In the case of inversion by local optimization method, adequate preconditioning is important. Utilization of geological information is also effective in estimating low-frequency components of a model. As far as data are obtained under proper observation arrangement, even in actual field, precise estimation of Vp/Vs distributions is possible by FWT using explosion in a hole as wave source. In full-wave tomography, selection of observation arrangement is essential for both Vp and Vs. However, the proper arrangement is different between Vp and Vs. Approach to different analyses for Vp and Vs is also necessary by using only proper data for Vp and Vs among obtained data sets. 4 figs.

  1. Physical Experiment and Numerical Simulation of the Artificial Recharge Effect on Groundwater Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the efficiency of utilizing water resources in arid areas, the mechanism of artificial recharge effecting on groundwater reservoir was analyzed in this research. Based on a generalized groundwater reservoir in a two-dimensional sand tank model, different scenarios of the infiltration basin location and recharge intensity are designed to study how to improve the efficiency of groundwater reservoir artificial recharge. The effective storage capacity and the effective storage rate are taken as the main parameters to analyze the relation between recharge water volume and storage capacity. By combining with groundwater flow system theory, FEFLOW (Finite Element subsurface FLOW system is adopted to set up the groundwater numerical model. It is used to verify the experiment results and to make deep analysis on the rule of water table fluctuations and groundwater movement in the aquifer. Based on the model, different scenarios are designed to examine the combined effect of recharge intensity and intermittent periods. The research results show that: the distance between infiltration basin and pumping well should be shortened appropriately, but not too close; increasing recharge intensity helps to enlarge the effective storage capacity, but it can also reduce the effective storage rate, which goes against the purpose of effective utilization of water resources; and, the recharge intensity and recharge duration should be given full consideration by the actual requirements when we take the approach of intermittent recharge to make a reasonable choice.

  2. Numerical-experiment investigation of coalescence of gaseous protogalactic fragments in triple systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiseleva, L.G.; Orlov, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    The numerical-experiment approach in the framework of the general gravitational three-body problem has been used to investigate the dynamical evolution of triple systems of gaseous protogalactic fragments. The masses of the fragments are equal, the initial velocities zero. The initial positions were specified by uniform scanning in the region D of all possible initial configurations. Calculations were continued until the first two-body encounter of the fragments. Different values of the fragment radii at this times were considered, namely, r in the interval [0.001, 0.1]d, where d is the mean diameter of the system. It is shown that for such r the pair of gaseous fragments coalesces in the majority of cases (from 50.2% for r = 0.001d to 96.7% for r = 0.1d). The mean specific angular momentum of their relative motion, which becomes spin angular momentum of the coalescence product, is (0.8 +- 1.0)/centered dot/10 29 /root/μl cm 2 sec for the most probable value r = 10l kpc (the masses of the fragments are 5/centered dot/10 10 μM/circled dot/; l and μ are scale factors), this agreeing in order of magnitude with the specific angular momenta of disk galaxies if l, μ /approximately/ 1. For each value of r, a continuous zone of initial configurations corresponding to coalescences is identified in the region D

  3. Numerical studies and metric development for validation of magnetohydrodynamic models on the HIT-SI experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, C., E-mail: hansec@uw.edu [PSI-Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Victor, B.; Morgan, K.; Hossack, A.; Sutherland, D. [HIT-SI Group, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Jarboe, T.; Nelson, B. A. [HIT-SI Group, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); PSI-Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Marklin, G. [PSI-Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We present application of three scalar metrics derived from the Biorthogonal Decomposition (BD) technique to evaluate the level of agreement between macroscopic plasma dynamics in different data sets. BD decomposes large data sets, as produced by distributed diagnostic arrays, into principal mode structures without assumptions on spatial or temporal structure. These metrics have been applied to validation of the Hall-MHD model using experimental data from the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection experiment. Each metric provides a measure of correlation between mode structures extracted from experimental data and simulations for an array of 192 surface-mounted magnetic probes. Numerical validation studies have been performed using the NIMROD code, where the injectors are modeled as boundary conditions on the flux conserver, and the PSI-TET code, where the entire plasma volume is treated. Initial results from a comprehensive validation study of high performance operation with different injector frequencies are presented, illustrating application of the BD method. Using a simplified (constant, uniform density and temperature) Hall-MHD model, simulation results agree with experimental observation for two of the three defined metrics when the injectors are driven with a frequency of 14.5 kHz.

  4. Dynamics of Soil Water Evaporation during Soil Drying: Laboratory Experiment and Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3. PMID:24489492

  5. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  6. Experiments and correlations of pressure loss coefficients for hexagonal arranged rod bundles (P/D > 1.02) with helical wire spacers in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.; Yonekawa, S.; Hoffmann, H.

    1987-05-01

    Advanced pressurized water reactors as well as sodium cooled fast reactors, in their breeding and absorber elements, use tightly packed rod bundles with hexagonally arranged rods. Helical wires or helical fins serve as spacers. The pressure loss coefficients of twelve bundles with helical wires were determined systematically in water experiments. High measuring accuracy was achieved by very precise fabrication of the bundles and the shroud as well as by investigations of the proper measuring techniques. The results show a dependency of the loss coefficients on the Reynolds number and on the P/D and H/D ratios of the bundles. These results together with available systematic experimental results of investigations at P/D > 1.1 were used to develop a correlation to determine the pressure loss coefficients of tightly and widely packed hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wire spacers. These correlations were used to recalculate and compare results of pressure loss investigations found in the literature; good agreement was demonstrated. Hence, calculation methods exist for a broad range of applications to determine the pressure loss coefficients of hexagonally arranged rod bundles with helical wires for spacers. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Science-Based Approach for Advancing Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy: Integrating Numerical Simulations with Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.

    2011-12-01

    experimentally in the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory Main Channel. The experiments and simulations are compared with each other and shown to be in very good agreement both in terms of the mean flow and the turbulence statistics. The results are analyzed to study the structure of turbulence in the wake of the turbine and also identify the effects of turbulent fluctuations in the approach flow on the power produced by the turbine. Overall our results make a strong case that high-resolution numerical modeling, validated with detailed laboratory measurements, is a viable tool for assessing and optimizing the performance of MHK devices.

  8. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  9. LHCb: Numerical Analysis of Machine Background in the LHCb Experiment for the Early and Nominal Operation of LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Lieng, M H; Corti, G; Talanov, V

    2010-01-01

    We consider the formation of machine background induced by proton losses in the long straight section of the LHCb experiment at LHC. Both sources showering from the tertiary collimators located in the LHCb insertion region as well as local beam-gas interaction are taken into account. We present the procedure for, and results of, numerical studies of such background for various conditions. Additionally expected impact and on the experiment and signal characteristics are discussed.

  10. Comparison of inter-diffusion coefficients for Ni/Cu thin films determined from classical heating analysis and linear temperature ramping analysis by means of profile reconstruction and a numerical solution of Fick's law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, H.D.; Terblans, J.J.; Swart, H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Classical inter-diffusion studies assume a constant time of annealing when samples are annealed in a furnace. It is assumed that the sample temperature reaches the annealing temperature immediately after insertion, while the sample temperature immediately drops to room temperature after removal, the annealing time being taken as the time between insertion and removal. Using the above assumption, the diffusion coefficient can be calculated in a number of ways. In reality, the sample temperature does not immediately reach the annealing temperature; instead it rises at a rate governed by several heat transfer mechanisms, depending on the annealing procedure. For short annealing times, the sample temperature may not attain the annealing temperature, while for extended annealing times the sample temperature may reach the annealing temperature only for a fraction of the annealing time. To eliminate the effect of heat transfer mechanisms, a linear temperature ramping regime is proposed. Used in conjunction with a suitable profile reconstructing technique and a numerical solution of Fick's second law, the inter-diffusion parameters obtained from a linear ramping of Ni/Cu thin film samples can be compared to those obtained from calculations performed with the so-called Mixing-Roughness-Information model or any other suitable method used to determine classical diffusion coefficients.

  11. Intuitional experiment and numerical analysis of flow characteristics affected by flow accelerated corrosion in elbow pipe system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung Joon [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Hoon, E-mail: kimkh@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seochun 1, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Wall-thinning erosion of pipelines in plants leads to fatal accidents unexpectedly. • Flow Acceleration Corrosion (FAC) is a main reason of wall-thinning. • For industrial safety, it is necessary to verify the tendency of FAC. • We focused on local wall thinning by FAC with intuitional visualization experiment and numerical analysis in elbow pipe.

  12. SAS Code for Calculating Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and Effect Size Benchmarks for Site-Randomized Education Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Paul R.; Harrison, George M.; Lawton, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    When evaluators plan site-randomized experiments, they must conduct the appropriate statistical power analyses. These analyses are most likely to be valid when they are based on data from the jurisdictions in which the studies are to be conducted. In this method note, we provide software code, in the form of a SAS macro, for producing statistical…

  13. Initial Experience of 3-Tesla Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Characterizing Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, A.; Dvorak, R.; Rohrer, S.; Mukherji, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: With the increased clinical use of 3-Tesla (3T) magnets, it becomes important to identify the potential applications of advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging in head and neck pathologies. Purpose: To establish the 3T apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for normal neck structures, and to examine the utility of ADC values in distinguishing head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) from normal neck anatomy. Material and Methods: 3T diffusion-weighted imaging was performed on 10 normal volunteers and 10 patients with known HNSCC. In the volunteers, mean ADC was calculated in the parotid gland, submandibular gland, base of the tongue, pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, paraspinal muscles, true vocal cord, thyroid gland, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and lymph nodes. The mean tumor ADC value was calculated from the 10 patients with HNSCC and compared with the normal ADC values from various neck structures. Results: The mean ADC value measured in the HNSCC was 1.101 (±0.214)x10 -3 mm 2 /s. This was significantly lower than ADC values of paraspinal muscles, pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, thyroid gland, and base of the tongue (P=0.0006, 0.0002, 0.0001, 0.001, and 0.002, respectively). The tumor ADC values were not significantly different from ADC values of parotid and submandibular glands (P=0.057 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusion: 3T ADC values show potential for distinguishing HNSCC from normal extracranial head and neck structures

  14. Initial Experience of 3-Tesla Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Values in Characterizing Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, A.; Dvorak, R.; Rohrer, S.; Mukherji, S.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    2008-11-15

    Background: With the increased clinical use of 3-Tesla (3T) magnets, it becomes important to identify the potential applications of advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging in head and neck pathologies. Purpose: To establish the 3T apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for normal neck structures, and to examine the utility of ADC values in distinguishing head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) from normal neck anatomy. Material and Methods: 3T diffusion-weighted imaging was performed on 10 normal volunteers and 10 patients with known HNSCC. In the volunteers, mean ADC was calculated in the parotid gland, submandibular gland, base of the tongue, pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, paraspinal muscles, true vocal cord, thyroid gland, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and lymph nodes. The mean tumor ADC value was calculated from the 10 patients with HNSCC and compared with the normal ADC values from various neck structures. Results: The mean ADC value measured in the HNSCC was 1.101 (+-0.214)x10-3mm2/s. This was significantly lower than ADC values of paraspinal muscles, pterygoid muscle, masseter muscle, thyroid gland, and base of the tongue (P=0.0006, 0.0002, 0.0001, 0.001, and 0.002, respectively). The tumor ADC values were not significantly different from ADC values of parotid and submandibular glands (P=0.057 and 0.14, respectively). Conclusion: 3T ADC values show potential for distinguishing HNSCC from normal extracranial head and neck structures

  15. Experiments Using a Ground-Based Electrostatic Levitator and Numerical Modeling of Melt Convection for the Iron-Cobalt System in Support of Space Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghyun; SanSoucie, Michael P.

    2017-08-01

    Materials research is being conducted using an electromagnetic levitator installed in the International Space Station. Various metallic alloys were tested to elucidate unknown links among the structures, processes, and properties. To accomplish the mission of these space experiments, several ground-based activities have been carried out. This article presents some of our ground-based supporting experiments and numerical modeling efforts. Mass evaporation of Fe50Co50, one of flight compositions, was predicted numerically and validated by the tests using an electrostatic levitator (ESL). The density of various compositions within the Fe-Co system was measured with ESL. These results are being served as reference data for the space experiments. The convection inside a electromagnetically-levitated droplet was also modeled to predict the flow status, shear rate, and convection velocity under various process parameters, which is essential information for designing and analyzing the space experiments of some flight compositions influenced by convection.

  16. Variation in aerodynamic coefficients with altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Shahid

    Full Text Available Precise aerodynamics performance prediction plays key role for a flying vehicle to get its mission completed within desired accuracy. Aerodynamic coefficients for same Mach number can be different at different altitude due to difference in Reynolds number. Prediction of these aerodynamics coefficients can be made through experiments, analytical solution or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Advancements in computational power have generated the concept of using CFD as a virtual Wind Tunnel (WT, hence aerodynamic performance prediction in present study is based upon CFD (numerical test rig. Simulations at different altitudes for a range of Mach numbers with zero angle of attack are performed to predict axial force coefficient behavior with altitude (Reynolds number. Similar simulations for a fixed Mach number ‘3’ and a range of angle of attacks are also carried out to envisage the variation in normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude (Reynolds number. Results clearly depict that the axial force coefficient is a function of altitude (Reynolds number and increase as altitude increases, especially for subsonic region. Variation in axial force coefficient with altitude (Reynolds number slightly increases for larger values of angle of attacks. Normal force and pitching moment coefficients do not depend on altitude (Reynolds number at smaller values of angle of attacks but show slight decrease as altitude increases. Present study suggests that variation of normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude can be neglected but the variation of axial force coefficient with altitude should be considered for vehicle fly in dense atmosphere. It is recommended to continue this study to more complex configurations for various Mach numbers with side slip and real gas effects. Keywords: Mach number, Reynolds number, Blunt body, Altitude effect, Angle of attacks

  17. Variation in aerodynamic coefficients with altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Faiza; Hussain, Mukkarum; Baig, Mirza Mehmood; Haq, Ihtram ul

    Precise aerodynamics performance prediction plays key role for a flying vehicle to get its mission completed within desired accuracy. Aerodynamic coefficients for same Mach number can be different at different altitude due to difference in Reynolds number. Prediction of these aerodynamics coefficients can be made through experiments, analytical solution or Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Advancements in computational power have generated the concept of using CFD as a virtual Wind Tunnel (WT), hence aerodynamic performance prediction in present study is based upon CFD (numerical test rig). Simulations at different altitudes for a range of Mach numbers with zero angle of attack are performed to predict axial force coefficient behavior with altitude (Reynolds number). Similar simulations for a fixed Mach number '3' and a range of angle of attacks are also carried out to envisage the variation in normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude (Reynolds number). Results clearly depict that the axial force coefficient is a function of altitude (Reynolds number) and increase as altitude increases, especially for subsonic region. Variation in axial force coefficient with altitude (Reynolds number) slightly increases for larger values of angle of attacks. Normal force and pitching moment coefficients do not depend on altitude (Reynolds number) at smaller values of angle of attacks but show slight decrease as altitude increases. Present study suggests that variation of normal force and pitching moment coefficients with altitude can be neglected but the variation of axial force coefficient with altitude should be considered for vehicle fly in dense atmosphere. It is recommended to continue this study to more complex configurations for various Mach numbers with side slip and real gas effects.

  18. The Spatial Relationship between Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Standardized Uptake Value of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Has a Crucial Influence on the Numeric Correlation of Both Parameters in PET/MRI of Lung Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Alexander W; Stieltjes, Bram; Weikert, Thomas; Gatidis, Sergios; Wiese, Mark; Klarhöfer, Markus; Wild, Damian; Lardinois, Didier; Bremerich, Jens; Sommer, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC min ) derived from diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of FDG-PET are markers of aggressiveness in lung cancer. The numeric correlation of the two parameters has been extensively studied, but their spatial interplay is not well understood. After FDG-PET and DW-MRI coregistration, values and location of ADC min - and SUV max -voxels were analyzed. The upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for registration accuracy of sequential PET/MRI was 12 mm, and the mean distance ( D ) between ADC min - and SUV max -voxels was 14.0 mm (average of two readers). Spatial mismatch ( D > 12 mm) between ADC min and SUV max was found in 9/25 patients. A considerable number of mismatch cases (65%) was also seen in a control group that underwent simultaneous PET/MRI. In the entire patient cohort, no statistically significant correlation between SUV max and ADC min was seen, while a moderate negative linear relationship ( r = -0.5) between SUV max and ADC min was observed in tumors with a spatial match ( D ≤ 12 mm). In conclusion, spatial mismatch between ADC min and SUV max is found in a considerable percentage of patients. The spatial connection of the two parameters SUV max and ADC min has a crucial influence on their numeric correlation.

  19. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; Van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment to measure photoemission with the predictions of three different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and TIGER) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. The Monte Carlo codes TIGER and TIGERP can calculate the net photon-induced electron emission but accurate results may require that statistical error be minimized. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. The authors find that all of the codes substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. However, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, the codes overpredict relative to measurements

  20. Benchmarking numerical codes for tracer transport with the aid of laboratory-scale experiments in 2D heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Fadji Hassane; Ackerer, Philippe; Younes, Anis; Guadagnini, Alberto; Berkowitz, Brian

    2017-06-07

    We present a combined experimental and numerical modeling study that addresses two principal questions: (i) is any particular Eulerian-based method used to solve the classical advection-dispersion equation (ADE) clearly superior (relative to the others), in terms of yielding solutions that reproduce BTCs of the kind that are typically sampled at the outlet of a laboratory cell? and (ii) in the presence of matches of comparable quality against such BTCs, do any of these methods render different (or similar) numerical BTCs at locations within the domain? To address these questions, we obtained measurements from carefully controlled laboratory experiments, and employ them as a reference against which numerical results are benchmarked and compared. The experiments measure solute transport breakthrough curves (BTCs) through a square domain containing various configurations of coarse, medium, and fine quartz sand. The approaches to solve the ADE involve Eulerian-Lagrangian and Eulerian (finite volume, finite elements, mixed and discontinuous finite elements) numerical methods. Model calibration is not examined; permeability and porosity of each sand were determined previously through separate, standard laboratory tests, while dispersivities are assigned values proportional to mean grain size. We find that the spatial discretization of the flow field is of critical importance, due to the non-uniformity of the domain. Although simulated BTCs at the system outlet are observed to be very similar for these various numerical methods, computed local (point-wise, inside the domain) BTCs can be very different. We find that none of the numerical methods is able to fully reproduce the measured BTCs. The impact of model parameter uncertainty on the calculated BTCs is characterized through a set of numerical Monte Carlo simulations; in cases where the impact is significant, assessment of simulation matches to the experimental data can be ambiguous. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. Spatial correlations and probability density function of the phase difference in a developed speckle-field: numerical and natural experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysina, N Yu; Maksimova, L A; Ryabukho, V P; Gorbatenko, B B

    2015-01-01

    Investigated are statistical properties of the phase difference of oscillations in speckle-fields at two points in the far-field diffraction region, with different shapes of the scatterer aperture. Statistical and spatial nonuniformity of the probability density function of the field phase difference is established. Numerical experiments show that, for the speckle-fields with an oscillating alternating-sign transverse correlation function, a significant nonuniformity of the probability density function of the phase difference in the correlation region of the field complex amplitude, with the most probable values 0 and p, is observed. A natural statistical interference experiment using Young diagrams has confirmed the results of numerical experiments. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  3. A comparison of experiment, CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, and QUICKE2 net electron emission coefficients for various bremsstrahlung spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, W.P.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Snowden, D.P.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Beale, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work compares a carefully designed experiment with the predictions of four different codes (CEPXS/ONETRAN, TIGERP, TIGER and QUICKE2) for the complex bremsstrahlung spectra typical of very intense pulsed power x-ray generators. Accurate calculation of net photon-induced electron emission yields at material interfaces using Monte Carlo codes can be particularly difficult if the forward and reverse partial yields are of similar magnitudes. In such a circumstance, the statistical error in the Monte Carlo solution (TIGER or TIGERP) must be kept to a minimum to accurately resolve the difference. CEPXS/ONETRAN is a new deterministic coupled electron/photon transport code that is faster than Monte Carlo and is not subject to statistical error. QUICKE2 evaluates an analytical approximation and is also much less expensive to run than the Monte Carlo codes. The comparison of net yields is a sensitive test of the relative accuracy and efficiency of these various codes. We find that all of the codes except QUICKE2 substantially agree with the experiments for the forward net yields. Howver, for reverse net yields from high-Z materials, all the codes overpredict relative to measurements

  4. Rate Coefficient for the (4)Heμ + CH4 Reaction at 500 K: Comparison between Theory and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneau, Donald J; Fleming, Donald G; Li, Yongle; Li, Jun; Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-03-03

    The rate constant for the H atom abstraction reaction from methane by the muonic helium atom, Heμ + CH4 → HeμH + CH3, is reported at 500 K and compared with theory, providing an important test of both the potential energy surface (PES) and reaction rate theory for the prototypical polyatomic CH5 reaction system. The theory used to characterize this reaction includes both variational transition-state (CVT/μOMT) theory (VTST) and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) calculations on a recently developed PES, which are compared as well with earlier calculations on different PESs for the H, D, and Mu + CH4 reactions, the latter, in particular, providing for a variation in atomic mass by a factor of 36. Though rigorous quantum calculations have been carried out for the H + CH4 reaction, these have not yet been extended to the isotopologues of this reaction (in contrast to H3), so it is important to provide tests of less rigorous theories in comparison with kinetic isotope effects measured by experiment. In this regard, the agreement between the VTST and RPMD calculations and experiment for the rate constant of the Heμ + CH4 reaction at 500 K is excellent, within 10% in both cases, which overlaps with experimental error.

  5. Numerical models and experiment of air flow in a simulation box for optical wireless communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latal Jan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors focused on real measurements of mechanical turbulence generated by ventilators in the simulation box for Optical Wireless Communications. The mechanical turbulences disturb the optical beam that propagates along the central axis of the simulation box. The aim of authors is to show the effect of mechanical turbulence on optical beams at different heights in the simulation box. In the Ansys Fluent, we created numerical models which were then compared with real measurements. Authors compared the real and numerical models according to statistical methods.

  6. Transverse heat transfer coefficient in the dual channel ITER TF CICCs Part II. Analysis of transient temperature responses observed during a heat slug propagation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Monika; Herzog, Robert; Malinowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    A heat slug propagation experiment in the final design dual channel ITER TF CICC was performed in the SULTAN test facility at EPFL-CRPP in Villigen PSI. We analyzed the data resulting from this experiment to determine the equivalent transverse heat transfer coefficient hBC between the bundle and the central channel of this cable. In the data analysis we used methods based on the analytical solutions of a problem of transient heat transfer in a dual-channel cable, similar to Renard et al. (2006) and Bottura et al. (2006). The observed experimental and other limits related to these methods are identified and possible modifications proposed. One result from our analysis is that the hBC values obtained with different methods differ by up to a factor of 2. We have also observed that the uncertainties of hBC in both methods considered are much larger than those reported earlier.

  7. Numerical experiments on the determination of unsteady state temperature distribution in domains of complicated boundary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laura, P.A.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper compares analytical and finite element results for an unsteady heat-conduction problem in simply and doubly connected plates of regular polygonal shape. A numerical solution is obtained by means of the powerful finite element method and the results are shown to agree with an approximate conformal mapping-variational technique previously developed by the first author and coworkers. (Auth.)

  8. Validation of Vibro-Impact Force Models by Numerical Simulation, Perturbation Methods and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza Reboucas, Geraldo Francisco; Santos, Ilmar; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2017-01-01

    The frequency response of a single degree of freedom vibro-impact oscillator is analyzed using Harmonic Linearization, Averaging and Numeric Simulation, considering three different impact force models: one given by a piecewise-linear function (Kelvin-Voigt model), another by a high-order power...

  9. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology Using Sand Tank Experiments and Comsol Multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-01-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains,…

  10. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  11. Wettability effect on capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 at pore-scale: micromodel experiment and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, R.; Wan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wettability of reservoir minerals along pore surfaces plays a controlling role in capillary trapping of supercritical (sc) CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. The mechanisms controlling scCO2 residual trapping are still not fully understood. We studied the effect of pore surface wettability on CO2 residual saturation at the pore-scale using engineered high pressure and high temperature micromodel (transparent pore networks) experiments and numerical modeling. Through chemical treatment of the micromodel pore surfaces, water-wet, intermediate-wet, and CO2-wet micromodels can be obtained. Both drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted at 8.5 MPa and 45 °C with controlled flow rate. Dynamic images of fluid-fluid displacement processes were recorded using a microscope with a CCD camera. Residual saturations were determined by analysis of late stage imbibition images of flow path structures. We performed direct numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework for the primary drainage and the followed imbibition for the micromodel experiments with different contact angles. The numerical simulations agreed well with our experimental observations. We found that more scCO2 can be trapped within the CO2-wet micromodel whereas lower residual scCO2 saturation occurred within the water-wet micromodels in both our experiments and the numerical simulations. These results provide direct and consistent evidence of the effect of wettability, and have important implications for scCO2 trapping in geologic carbon sequestration.

  12. WEC-SIM Phase 1 Validation Testing -- Numerical Modeling of Experiments: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehl, Kelley; Michelen, Carlos; Bosma, Bret; Yu, Yi-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    The Wave Energy Converter Simulator (WEC-Sim) is an open-source code jointly developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It is used to model wave energy converters subjected to operational and extreme waves. In order for the WEC-Sim code to be beneficial to the wave energy community, code verification and physical model validation is necessary. This paper describes numerical modeling of the wave tank testing for the 1:33-scale experimental testing of the floating oscillating surge wave energy converter. The comparison between WEC-Sim and the Phase 1 experimental data set serves as code validation. This paper is a follow-up to the WEC-Sim paper on experimental testing, and describes the WEC-Sim numerical simulations for the floating oscillating surge wave energy converter.

  13. On the hydrodynamics of archer fish jumping out of the water: Integrating experiments with numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Angelidis, Dionysios; Mendelson, Leah; Techet, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    Evolution has enabled fish to develop a range of thrust producing mechanisms to allow skillful movement and give them the ability to catch prey or avoid danger. Several experimental and numerical studies have been performed to investigate how complex maneuvers are executed and develop bioinspired strategies for aquatic robot design. We will discuss recent numerical advances toward the development of a computational framework for performing turbulent, two-phase flow, fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) simulations to investigate the dynamics of aquatic jumpers. We will also discuss the integration of such numerics with high-speed imaging and particle image velocimetry data to reconstruct anatomic fish models and prescribe realistic kinematics of fish motion. The capabilities of our method will be illustrated by applying it to simulate the motion of a small scale archer fish jumping out of the water to capture prey. We will discuss the rich vortex dynamics emerging during the hovering, rapid upward and gliding phases. The simulations will elucidate the thrust production mechanisms by the movement of the pectoral and anal fins and we will show that the fins significantly contribute to the rapid acceleration.

  14. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wojcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm 2 , duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between the

  15. A numerical experiment that provides new results regarding the inception of separation in the flow around a circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamataris, Nikolaos; Liakos, Anastasios

    2015-11-01

    The exact value of the Reynolds number regarding the inception of separation in the flow around a circular cylinder is still a matter of research. This work connects the inception of separation with the calculation of a positive pressure gradient around the circumference of the cylinder. The hypothesis is that inception of separation occurs when the pressure gradient becomes positive around the circumference. From the most cited laboratory experiments that have dealt with that subject of inception of separation only Thom has measured the pressure gradient there at very low Reynolds numbers (up to Re=3.5). For this reason, the experimental conditions of his tunnel are simulated in a new numerical experiment. The full Navier Stokes equations in both two and three dimensions are solved with a home made code that utilizes Galerkin finite elements. In the two dimensional numerical experiment, inception of separation is observed at Re=4.3, which is the lowest Reynolds number where inception has been reported computationally. Currently, the three dimensional experiment is under way, in order to compare if there are effects of three dimensional theory of separation in the conditions of Thom's experiments.

  16. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs

  17. Cohort Coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Cohorts are the aggregate of individuals who experience the same event within the same time interval. Cohorts can be based on people born in a given year, for example in 1940 or within a span of years, e.g. born in 1940-1944. The year of birth is here the defining event for cohorts. The health di...... differs between cohorts. This article focuses on the protective and detrimental cohort effect in relation to the risk of death from apoplexy. A dummy variable method is recommended to describe the changing cohort effect over a century....

  18. Numerical resolution of a bi-temperature MHD model with a general Ohm's law: Roe solver - Front-tracking - Nonlinear transport equations with discontinuous coefficients. Simulation of a Plasma Opening Switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brassier, Stephane

    1998-01-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations represent the coupling between fluid dynamics equations and Maxwell's equations. We consider here a new MHD model with two temperatures. A Roe scheme is first constructed in the one dimensional case, for a multi-species model and a general equation of state. The multidimensional case is treated thanks to the Powell approach. The notion of Roe-Powell matrix, generalization of the notion of Roe matrix for multidimensional MHD, allows us to develop an original scheme on a curvilinear grid. We focus on a second part on the modelling of a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). A front-tracking method is first set up, in order to correctly handle the deformation of the front between the vacuum and the plasma. Besides, by taking into account a general Ohm's law, we have to deal with the Hall effect, which leads to nonlinear transport equations with discontinuous coefficients. Several numerical schemes are proposed and tested on a variety of test cases. This work has allowed us to construct an industrial MHD code, intended to handle complex flows and in particular to correctly simulate the behaviour of the POS. (author) [fr

  19. Acoustic resonances in microfluidic chips: full-image micro-PIV experiments and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagsäter, S M; Jensen, T Glasdam; Bruus, H; Kutter, J P

    2007-10-01

    We show that full-image micro-PIV analysis in combination with images of transient particle motion is a powerful tool for experimental studies of acoustic radiation forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic chambers under piezo-actuation in the MHz range. The measured steady-state motion of both large 5 microm and small 1 microm particles can be understood in terms of the acoustic eigenmodes or standing ultra-sound waves in the given experimental microsystems. This interpretation is supported by numerical solutions of the corresponding acoustic wave equation.

  20. Numerical analysis of biological clogging in two-dimensional sand box experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildsgaard, J.; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional models for biological clogging and sorptive tracer transport were used to study the progress of clogging in a sand box experiment. The sand box had been inoculated with a strip of bacteria and exposed to a continuous injection of nitrate and acetate. Brilliant Blue was regularly...... injected during the clogging experiment and digital images of the tracer movement had been converted to concentration maps using an image analysis. The calibration of the models to the Brilliant Blue observations shows that Brilliant Blue has a solid biomass dependent sorption that is not compliant...... with the assumed linear constant Kd behaviour. It is demonstrated that the dimensionality of sand box experiments in comparison to column experiments results in a much lower reduction in hydraulic conductivity Žfactor of 100. and that the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the sand box decreased only slightly. However...

  1. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu; Bao, Kai

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  2. An Experimenting Field Approach for the Numerical Solution of Multiphase Flow in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-07-14

    In this work, we apply the experimenting pressure field technique to the problem of the flow of two or more immiscible phases in porous media. In this technique, a set of predefined pressure fields are introduced to the governing partial differential equations. This implies that the velocity vector field and the divergence at each cell of the solution mesh can be determined. However, since none of these fields is the true pressure field entailed by the boundary conditions and/or the source terms, the divergence at each cell will not be the correct one. Rather the residue which is the difference between the true divergence and the calculated one is obtained. These fields are designed such that these residuals are used to construct the matrix of coefficients of the pressure equation and the right-hand side. The experimenting pressure fields are generated in the solver routine and are fed to the different routines, which may be called physics routines, which return to the solver the elements of the matrix of coefficients. Therefore, this methodology separates the solver routines from the physics routines and therefore results in simpler, easy to construct, maintain, and update algorithms.

  3. In Situ Experiment and Numerical Model Validation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger in Shallow Hard Crystalline Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Janiszewski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and fast numerical modelling of the borehole heat exchanger (BHE is required for simulation of long-term thermal energy storage in rocks using boreholes. The goal of this study was to conduct an in situ experiment to validate the proposed numerical modelling approach. In the experiment, hot water was circulated for 21 days through a single U-tube BHE installed in an underground research tunnel located at a shallow depth in crystalline rock. The results of the simulations using the proposed model were validated against the measurements. The numerical model simulated the BHE’s behaviour accurately and compared well with two other modelling approaches from the literature. The model is capable of replicating the complex geometrical arrangement of the BHE and is considered to be more appropriate for simulations of BHE systems with complex geometries. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the proposed model have shown that low thermal conductivity, high density, and high heat capacity of rock are essential for maximising the storage efficiency of a borehole thermal energy storage system. Other characteristics of BHEs, such as a high thermal conductivity of the grout, a large radius of the pipe, and a large distance between the pipes, are also preferred for maximising efficiency.

  4. Predictions of steam generator soiling - experiment, calculation, numerical simulation; Vorhersage des Ansatzverhaltens in Dampferzeugern - Experiment, Berechnung und numerische Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W.; Hildebrand, V.; Ullrich, B.; Szilagyi, J.

    2000-07-01

    Power plant reliability depends to a large extent on steam generator operation. Investigations were therefore carried out for early detection of combustion chamber soiling at different operating conditions. Apart from CFD numerical simulations of the gaseous phase and particle tracks, both in the original and coupled with thermochemical calculations, emphasis was given to validations with measured values in the original plant, in combustion chamber models, and in experimental facilities. Three different fuels with different composition and behaviour were investigated, i.e. oil shales, mixed coal, and coal pretreated with sorption agents. Apart from the influence of the temperature and reaction conditions (oxygen concentration) in the vicinity of the particle, also different times of residue were investigated. [German] Die Betriebssicherheit von Kraftanlagen wird massgeblich von der Arbeitsweise der Dampferzeuger bestimmt. Ziel dieses Forschungskomplexes ist es, fruehzeitig Aussagen zum Ansatzverhalten im Feuerraum bei verschiedenen Betriebsbedingungen zu treffen. Neben der numerischen Simulation der Gasphase und der Partikelbahnen mit CFD-Codes im Original und der Kopplung mit thermochemischen Berechnungen stehen vor allem Validierungen mit Messwerten am Original, an Feuerraummodellen und Versuchsanlagen im Vordergrund der Arbeiten. Die hier vorgestellten Untersuchungen erfolgten an drei unterschiedlichen Brennstoffen, die sich sowohl in der Zusammensetzung als auch im Einsatz stark voneinander unterscheiden. Dies sind: Oelschiefer, Mischkohle und vorbehandelte Kohle mit Sorbent. Dabei werden neben den Einfluessen der Temperatur und der Reaktionsbedingung (Sauerstoffgehalt) in der Umgebung des Partikels auch verschiedene Verweilzeiten untersucht. (orig./AKF)

  5. Double-Exponentially Decayed Photoionization in CREI Effect: Numerical Experiment on 3D H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Li; Ting-Ying, Wang; Gui-Zhong, Zhang; Wang-Hua, Xiang; III, W. T. Hill

    2008-01-01

    On the platform of the 3D H 2 + system, we perform a numerical simulation of its photoionization rate under excitation of weak to intense laser intensities with varying pulse durations and wavelengths. A novel method is proposed for calculating the photoionization rate: a double exponential decay of ionization probability is best suited for fitting this rate. Confirmation of the well-documented charge-resonance-enhanced ionization (CREI) effect at medium laser intensity and finding of ionization saturation at high light intensity corroborate the robustness of the suggested double-exponential decay process. Surveying the spatial and temporal variations of electron wavefunctions uncovers a mechanism for the double-exponentially decayed photoionization probability as onset of electron ionization along extra degree of freedom. Henceforth, the new method makes clear the origins of peak features in photoionization rate versus internuclear separation. It is believed that this multi-exponentially decayed ionization mechanism is applicable to systems with more degrees of motion

  6. Graded-index fiber tip optical tweezers: numerical simulation and trapping experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuan; Ye, Ai-Yan; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Yao, Yao; Xiao, Song

    2013-07-01

    Optical fiber tweezers based on a graded-index multimode fiber (GIMMF) tip is proposed. Light propagation characteristics and gradient force distribution near the GIMMF tip are numerically investigated, which are further compared with that of optical fiber tips based on conventional single mode fibers. The simulated results indicated that by selecting optimal GIMMF length, the gradient force of the GIMMF tip tweezers is about 4 times higher than that of the SMF tip tweezers with a same shape. To prove the feasibility of such a new concept, optical trapping of yeast cells with a diameter of ~5 μm using the chemically-etched GIMMF tip is experimentally demonstrated and the trapping force is also calculated.

  7. Numerical simulation and experiments of precision bar cutting based on high speed and restrained state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.L.; Li, Y.T.; Liu, Z.Q.; Fu, J.H.; Ting, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    According to the disadvantages of conventional bar cutting technology such as low-cutting speed, inferior section quality, high-processing cost and so on, a kind of novel precision bar cutting technology has been proposed. The cutting mechanism has also been analyzed. Finite element numerical simulation of the bar cutting process under different working conditions has been carried out with DEFORM. The stress and strain fields at different cutting speed and the variation curves of the cutting force and appropriate cutting parameters have been obtained. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the cutting surface showed that the finite-element simulation result is correct and better cutting quality can be obtained with the developed bar cutting technology and equipment based on high speed and restrained state

  8. Numerical Analysis of a Pulse Detonation Cross Flow Heat Load Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew .; Hoke, John L.; Schauer, Fred

    2011-01-01

    A comparison between experimentally measured and numerically simulated, time-averaged, point heat transfer rates in a pulse detonation (PDE) engine is presented. The comparison includes measurements and calculations for heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow and to the tube wall itself using a novel spool design. Measurements are obtained at several locations and under several operating conditions. The measured and computed results are shown to be in substantial agreement, thereby validating the modeling approach. The model, which is based in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then used to interpret the results. A preheating of the incoming fuel charge is predicted, which results in increased volumetric flow and subsequent overfilling. The effect is validated with additional measurements.

  9. Experiment and numerical simulation on the characteristics of fluid–structure interactions of non-rigid airships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaocui Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluid–structure interaction is an important issue for non-rigid airships with inflated envelopes. In this study, a wind tunnel test is conducted, and a loosely coupled procedure is correspondingly established for numerical simulation based on computational fluid dynamics and nonlinear finite element analysis methods. The typical results of the numerical simulation and wind tunnel experiment, including the overall lift and deformation, are in good agreement with each other. The results obtained indicate that the effect of fluid–structure interaction is noticeable and should be considered for non-rigid airships. Flow-induced deformation can further intensify the upward lift force and pitching moment, which can lead to a large deformation. Under a wind speed of 15 m/s, the lift force of the non-rigid model is increased to approximately 60% compared with that of the rigid model under a high angle of attack.

  10. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogi, Y., E-mail: kogi@fit.ac.jp; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-0811 (Japan); Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5202 (Japan); Kuwahara, D. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  11. Properties of Traffic Risk Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tie-Qiao; Huang, Hai-Jun; Shang, Hua-Yan; Xue, Yu

    2009-10-01

    We use the model with the consideration of the traffic interruption probability (Physica A 387(2008)6845) to study the relationship between the traffic risk coefficient and the traffic interruption probability. The analytical and numerical results show that the traffic interruption probability will reduce the traffic risk coefficient and that the reduction is related to the density, which shows that this model can improve traffic security.

  12. Numerical Experiments of Counterflowiing Jet Effects on Supersonic Slender-Body Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Mullane, Michael; Cheng, Gary C.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the use of counterflowing jets can greatly reduce the drag and heat loads on blunt-body geometries, especially when the long penetration mode jet condition can be established. Previously, the authors had done some preliminary numerical studies to determine the ability to establish long penetration mode jets on a typical Mach 1.6 slender configuration, and study its impact on the boom signature. The results indicated that a jet with a longer penetration length was required to achieve any impact on the boom signature of a typical Mach 1.6 slender configuration. This paper focuses on an in-depth parametric study, done using the space-time conservation element solution element Navier-Stokes flow solver, for investigating the effect of various counterflowing jet conditions/configurations on two supersonic slender-body models (cone-cylinder and quartic body of revolution). The study is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the relationship between the shock penetration length and reduction of drag and boom signature for these two supersonic slender-body configurations. Different jet flow rates, Mach numbers, nozzle jet exit diameters and jet-to-base diameter ratios were examined. The results show the characteristics of a short-to-long-to-short penetration-mode pattern with the increase of jet mass flow rates, observed across various counterflowing jet nozzle configurations. Though the optimal shock penetration length for potential boom-signature mitigation is tied to the long penetration mode, it often results in a very unsteady flow and leads to large oscillations of surface pressure and drag. Furthermore, depending on the geometry of the slender body, longer jet penetration did not always result in maximum drag reduction. For the quartic geometry, the maximum drag reduction corresponds well to the longest shock penetration length, while this was not the case for the cone-cylinder-as the geometry was already optimized for

  13. Calibrating a numerical model's morphology using high-resolution spatial and temporal datasets from multithread channel flume experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javernick, L.; Bertoldi, W.; Redolfi, M.

    2017-12-01

    Accessing or acquiring high quality, low-cost topographic data has never been easier due to recent developments of the photogrammetric techniques of Structure-from-Motion (SfM). Researchers can acquire the necessary SfM imagery with various platforms, with the ability to capture millimetre resolution and accuracy, or large-scale areas with the help of unmanned platforms. Such datasets in combination with numerical modelling have opened up new opportunities to study river environments physical and ecological relationships. While numerical models overall predictive accuracy is most influenced by topography, proper model calibration requires hydraulic data and morphological data; however, rich hydraulic and morphological datasets remain scarce. This lack in field and laboratory data has limited model advancement through the inability to properly calibrate, assess sensitivity, and validate the models performance. However, new time-lapse imagery techniques have shown success in identifying instantaneous sediment transport in flume experiments and their ability to improve hydraulic model calibration. With new capabilities to capture high resolution spatial and temporal datasets of flume experiments, there is a need to further assess model performance. To address this demand, this research used braided river flume experiments and captured time-lapse observed sediment transport and repeat SfM elevation surveys to provide unprecedented spatial and temporal datasets. Through newly created metrics that quantified observed and modeled activation, deactivation, and bank erosion rates, the numerical model Delft3d was calibrated. This increased temporal data of both high-resolution time series and long-term temporal coverage provided significantly improved calibration routines that refined calibration parameterization. Model results show that there is a trade-off between achieving quantitative statistical and qualitative morphological representations. Specifically, statistical

  14. Laboratory Experiment and Numerical Analysis of a New Type of Solar Tower Efficiently Generating a Thermal Updraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ohya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new type of solar tower was developed through laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. The solar tower mainly consists of three components. The transparent collector area is an aboveground glass roof, with increasing height toward the center. Attached to the center of the inside of the collector is a vertical tower within which a wind turbine is mounted at the lower entry to the tower. When solar radiation heats the ground through the glass roof, ascending warm air is guided to the center and into the tower. A solar tower that can generate electricity using a simple structure that enables easy and less costly maintenance has considerable advantages. However, conversion efficiency from sunshine energy to mechanical turbine energy is very low. Aiming to improve this efficiency, the research project developed a diffuser-type tower instead of a cylindrical tower, and investigated a suitable diffuser shape for practical use. After changing the tower height and diffuser open angle, with a temperature difference between the ambient air aloft and within the collector, various diffuser tower shapes were tested by laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. As a result, it was found that a diffuser tower with a semi-open angle of 4° is an optimal shape, producing the fastest updraft at each temperature difference in both the laboratory experiments and numerical analyses. The relationships between thermal updraft speed and temperature difference and/or tower height were confirmed. It was found that the thermal updraft velocity is proportional to the square root of the tower height and/or temperature difference.

  15. Experiments and numerical studies on a Syngas-fired Ultra low NOx combustor

    KAUST Repository

    S, Krishna; Ravikrishna, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    Exhaust measurements of temperature and pollutants in a syngas-fired model trapped vortex combustor for stationary power generation applications are reported. The performance was further evaluated for configurations where mixing enhancement was obtained using struts in the mainstream flow. Mainstream premixing of fuel was also studied to investigate its effect on emissions. The exhaust temperature pattern factor was found to be poor for baseline cases, but improved with the introduction of struts. NO emissions were steadily below 3-ppm across various flow conditions, whereas CO emissions tended to increase with increasing Momentum Flux Ratios (MFRs) and mainstream fuel addition. Combustion efficiencies ~96% were observed for all conditions. The performance characteristics were found to be favourable at higher MFRs with low pattern factors and high combustion efficiencies. Numerical simulations employing RANS and LES with Presumed Probability Distribution Function (PPDF) model were also carried out. Mixture fraction profiles in the TVC cavity for non-reacting conditions show that LES simulations are able to capture the mean mixing field better than the RANS-based approach. This is attributed to the prediction of the jet decay rate and is reflected on the mean velocity magnitude fields, which reinforce this observation at different sections in the cavity. Both RANS and LES simulations show close agreement with the experimentally measured OH concentration, however, the RANS approach does not perform satisfactorily in capturing the trend of velocity magnitude. LES simulations clearly capture the trend observed in exhaust measurements which is primarily attributed to the flame stabilization mechanism.

  16. Experiment and numerical simulation of bubbly two-phase flow across horizontal and inclined rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, A.; Huda, K.; Yamada, Y.; Kataoka, I.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and numerical analyses were carried out on vertically upward air-water bubbly two-phase flow behavior in both horizontal and inclined rod bundles with either in-line or staggered array. The inclination angle of the rod bundle varied from 0 to 60 with respect to the horizontal. The measured phase distribution indicated non-uniform characteristics, particularly in the direction of the rod axis when the rods were inclined. The mechanisms for this non-uniform phase distribution is supposed to be due to: (1) Bubble segregation phenomenon which depends on the bubble size and shape: (2) bubble entrainment by the large scale secondary flow induced by the pressure gradient in the horizontal direction which crosses the rod bundle; (3) effects of bubble entrapment by vortices generated in the wake behind the rods which travel upward along the rod axis; and (4) effect of bubble entrainment by local flows sliding up along the front surface of the rods. The liquid velocity and turbulence distributions were also measured and discussed. In these speculations, the mechanisms for bubble bouncing at the curved rod surface and turbulence production induced by a bubble were discussed, based on visual observations. Finally, the bubble behaviors in vertically upward bubbly two-phase flow across horizontal rod bundle were analyzed based on a particle tracking method (one-way coupling). The predicted bubble trajectories clearly indicated the bubble entrapment by vortices in the wake region. (orig.)

  17. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr

    2016-01-08

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  18. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr; Lubineau, Gilles; Potluri, Prasad; Withers, Philip; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  19. Prestressed CFRP Strips with Gradient Anchorage for Structural Concrete Retrofitting: Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Michels

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the load carrying capacity of reinforced concrete (RC beams strengthened with externally bonded (EB carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP strips prestressed up to 0.6% in strain. At the strip ends, the innovative gradient anchorage is used instead of conventional mechanical fasteners. This method, based on the epoxy resin’s ability to rapidly cure under high temperatures, foresees a sector-wise heating followed by a gradual decrease of the initial prestress force towards the strip ends. The experimental investigation shows a promising structural behavior, resulting in high strip tensile strains, eventually almost reaching tensile failure of the composite strip. Additionally, ductility when considering deflection at steel yielding and at ultimate load is satisfying, too. From a practical point of view, it is demonstrated that premature strip grinding in the anchorage zone is not beneficial. In addition, a non-commercial 1D finite element code has been enlarged to an EB reinforcement with prestressed composite strips. A bilinear bond stress-slip relation obtained in earlier investigations is introduced as an additional failure criterion to the code. The numerical code is able to almost perfectly predict the overall structural behavior. Furthermore, the calculations are used for comparison purposes between an initially unstressed and a prestressed externally bonded composite reinforcement. The increase in cracking and yielding load, as well as differences in structural stiffness are apparent.

  20. Experiments and numerical studies on a Syngas-fired Ultra low NOx combustor

    KAUST Repository

    S, Krishna

    2017-06-06

    Exhaust measurements of temperature and pollutants in a syngas-fired model trapped vortex combustor for stationary power generation applications are reported. The performance was further evaluated for configurations where mixing enhancement was obtained using struts in the mainstream flow. Mainstream premixing of fuel was also studied to investigate its effect on emissions. The exhaust temperature pattern factor was found to be poor for baseline cases, but improved with the introduction of struts. NO emissions were steadily below 3-ppm across various flow conditions, whereas CO emissions tended to increase with increasing Momentum Flux Ratios (MFRs) and mainstream fuel addition. Combustion efficiencies ~96% were observed for all conditions. The performance characteristics were found to be favourable at higher MFRs with low pattern factors and high combustion efficiencies. Numerical simulations employing RANS and LES with Presumed Probability Distribution Function (PPDF) model were also carried out. Mixture fraction profiles in the TVC cavity for non-reacting conditions show that LES simulations are able to capture the mean mixing field better than the RANS-based approach. This is attributed to the prediction of the jet decay rate and is reflected on the mean velocity magnitude fields, which reinforce this observation at different sections in the cavity. Both RANS and LES simulations show close agreement with the experimentally measured OH concentration, however, the RANS approach does not perform satisfactorily in capturing the trend of velocity magnitude. LES simulations clearly capture the trend observed in exhaust measurements which is primarily attributed to the flame stabilization mechanism.

  1. Numerical simulation of 2D ablation profile in CCI-2 experiment by moving particle semi-implicit method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Penghui, E-mail: phchai@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Kondo, Masahiro; Erkan, Nejdet; Okamoto, Koji

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Multiphysics models were developed based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit method. • Mixing process, chemical reaction can be simulated in MCCI calculation. • CCI-2 experiment was simulated to validate the models. • Simulation and experimental results for sidewall ablation agree well. • Simulation results confirm the rapid erosion phenomenon observed in the experiment. - Abstract: Numerous experiments have been performed to explore the mechanisms of molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomena since the 1980s. However, previous experimental results show that uncertainties pertaining to several aspects such as the mixing process and crust behavior remain. To explore the mechanism governing such aspects, as well as to predict MCCI behavior in real severe accident events, a number of simulation codes have been developed for process calculations. However, uncertainties exist among the codes because of the use of different empirical models. In this study, a new computational code is developed using multiphysics models to simulate MCCI phenomena based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method. Momentum and energy equations are used to solve the velocity and temperature fields, and multiphysics models are developed on the basis of the basic MPS method. The CCI-2 experiment is simulated by applying the developed code. With respect to sidewall ablation, good agreement is observed between the simulation and experimental results. However, axial ablation is slower in the simulation, which is probably due to the underestimation of the enhancement effect of heat transfer provided by the moving bubbles at the bottom. In addition, the simulation results confirm the rapid erosion phenomenon observed in the experiment, which in the numerical simulation is explained by solutal convection provided by the liquid concrete at the corium/concrete interface. The results of the comparison of different model combinations show the effect of each

  2. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS OF WAVE-LIKE PHENOMENA CAUSED BY THE DISRUPTION OF AN UNSTABLE MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongjuan; Shen Chengcai; Lin Jun

    2009-01-01

    The origin of the Moreton wave observed in the chromosphere and the EIT wave observed in the corona during the eruption remains an active research subject. We investigate numerically in this work the evolutionary features of the magnetic configuration that includes a current-carrying flux rope, which is used to model the filament, after the loss of equilibrium in the system takes place in a catastrophic fashion. Rapid motions of the flux rope following the catastrophe invoke the velocity vortices behind the rope, and may also invoke slow- and fast-mode shocks in front of the rope. The velocity vortices at each side of the flux rope propagate roughly horizontally away from the area where they are produced, and both shocks expand toward the flank of the flux rope. The fast shock may eventually reach the bottom boundary and produce two echoes moving back into the corona, but the slow one and the vortices totally decay somewhere in the lower corona before arriving of the bottom boundary. The interaction of the fast shock with the boundary leads to disturbance that accounts for the Moreton wave observed in Hα, and the disturbance in the corona caused by the slow shock and the velocity vortices should account for the EIT wave whose speed is about 40% that of the Moreton wave. The implication of these results to the observed correlation of the type II radio burst to the fast- and the slow-mode shocks and that of EIT waves to coronal mass ejections and flares has also been discussed.

  3. The time-dependent simplified P2 equations: Asymptotic analyses and numerical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, U.; Miller, W.F. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Using an asymptotic expansion, the authors found that the modified time-dependent simplified P 2 (SP 2 ) equations are robust, high-order, asymptotic approximations to the time-dependent transport equation in a physical regime in which the conventional time-dependent diffusion equation is the leading-order approximation. Using diffusion limit analysis, they also asymptotically compared three competitive time-dependent equations (the telegrapher's equation, the time-dependent SP 2 equations, and the time-dependent simplified even-parity equation). As a result, they found that the time-dependent SP 2 equations contain higher-order asymptotic approximations to the time-dependent transport equation than the other competitive equations. The numerical results confirm that, in the vast majority of cases, the time-dependent SP 2 solutions are significantly more accurate than the time-dependent diffusion and the telegrapher's solutions. They have also shown that the time-dependent SP 2 equations have excellent characteristics such as rotational invariance (which means no ray effect), good diffusion limit behavior, guaranteed positivity in diffusive regimes, and significant accuracy, even in deep-penetration problems. Through computer-running-time tests, they have shown that the time-dependent SP 2 equations can be solved with significantly less computational effort than the conventionally used, time-dependent S N equations (for N > 2) and almost as fast as the time-dependent diffusion equation. From all these results, they conclude that the time-dependent SP 2 equations should be considered as an important competitor for an improved approximately transport equations solver. Such computationally efficient time-dependent transport models are important for problems requiring enhanced computational efficiency, such as neutronics/fluid-dynamics coupled problems that arise in the analyses of hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents

  4. Transient wave behaviour over an underwater sliding hump from experiments and analytical and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaghan, David P.; Nielsen, Peter [The University of Queensland, School of Civil Engineering, Brisbane (Australia); Ahmadi, Afshin [Kellogg Brown and Root Pty Ltd, Brisbane, QLD (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Flume measurements of a one-dimensional sliding hump starting from rest in quiescence fresh water indicate that when the hump travels at speed less than the shallow-water wave celerity, three waves emerge, travelling in two directions. One wave travels in the opposite direction to the sliding hump at approximately the shallow-water wave celerity (backward free wave). Another wave travels approximately in step with the hump (forced wave), and the remaining wave travels in the direction of the hump at approximately the shallow-water wave celerity (forward free wave). These experiments were completed for a range of sliding hump speed relative to the shallow-water wave celerity, up to unity of this ratio, to investigate possible derivation from solutions of the Euler equation with non-linear and non-hydrostatic terms being included or excluded. For the experimental arrangements tested, the forced waves were negative (depression or reduced water surface elevation) waves while the free waves were positive (bulges or increased water surface elevation). For experiments where the sliding hump travelled at less than 80% of the shallow-water wave celerity did not include transient behaviour measurements (i.e. when the three waves still overlapped). The three wave framework was partially supported by these measurements in that the separated forward and forced waves were compared to measurements. For the laboratory scale experiments, the forward free wave height was predicted reasonably by the long-wave equation (ignoring non-linear and non-hydrostatic terms) when the sliding hump speed was less than 80% of the shallow-water wave celerity. The forced wave depression magnitude required the Euler equations for all hump speed tested. The long-wave solution, while being valid in a limited parameter range, does predict the existence of the three waves as found in these experiments (forward travelling waves measured quantitatively while the backward travelling waves visually by video

  5. Numerical simulations for the study of a cosmic γ-ray imagery experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, C.

    1982-07-01

    Basic principles of imagery are reviewed and their applications to a γ-ray imagery device are explained. This device is based on a coded mask associated with a detector which is sensitive to the position of interaction of the γ-ray photons. A group of simulation programs is described. These programs are for use in evaluating the performance of such an experiment the sensitivity, the angular resolution, and that for different configurations. The influence of an inhomogeneous background noise on the detector has also been studied [fr

  6. CREOLE experiment study on the reactivity temperature coefficient with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the MCNP5 code and different neutron cross section evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaich, Y.; El Bardouni, T.; Erradi, L.; Chakir, E.; Boukhal, H.; Nacir, B.; El Younoussi, C.; El Bakkari, B.; Merroun, O.; Zoubair, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In the present work, we have analyzed the CREOLE experiment on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) by using the three-dimensional continuous energy code (MCNP5) and the last updated nuclear data evaluations. → Calculation-experiment discrepancies of the RTC were analyzed and the results have shown that the JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.1 evaluations give the most consistent values. → In order to specify the source of the relatively large discrepancy in the case of ENDF-BVII nuclear data evaluation, the k eff discrepancy between ENDF-BVII and JENDL3.3 was decomposed by using sensitivity and uncertainty analysis technique. - Abstract: In the present work, we analyze the CREOLE experiment on the reactivity temperature coefficient (RTC) by using the three-dimensional continuous energy code (MCNP5) and the last updated nuclear data evaluations. This experiment performed in the EOLE critical facility located at CEA/Cadarache, was mainly dedicated to the RTC studies for both UO 2 and UO 2 -PuO 2 PWR type lattices covering the whole temperature range from 20 deg. C to 300 deg. C. We have developed an accurate 3D model of the EOLE reactor by using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code which guarantees a high level of fidelity in the description of different configurations at various temperatures taking into account their consequence on neutron cross section data and all thermal expansion effects. In this case, the remaining error between calculation and experiment will be awarded mainly to uncertainties on nuclear data. Our own cross section library was constructed by using NJOY99.259 code with point-wise nuclear data based on ENDF-BVII, JEFF3.1 and JENDL3.3 evaluation files. The MCNP model was validated through the axial and radial fission rate measurements at room and hot temperatures. Calculation-experiment discrepancies of the RTC were analyzed and the results have shown that the JENDL3.3 and JEFF3.1 evaluations give the most consistent values; the discrepancy is

  7. Assessing the reduction of the hydrological connectivity of gully systems through vegetation restoration: field experiments and numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Molina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of degraded land in the Southern Ecuadorian Andes has led to alterations in the functioning of degraded catchments. Recovery of vegetation on areas affected by overgrazing, as well as the reforestation or afforestation of gully areas have given rise to modifications of hydrological connectivity within the catchments. Recent research has highlighted the ability of gully channels to trap sediment eroded from steep slopes, especially if vegetation is established along the gully bed. However, vegetation cover not only induces sediment deposition in the gully bed, but may also have a potential to reduce runoff water volume. The performance of gully beds in reducing the transfer of runoff was investigated by conducting controlled concentrated flow experiments in the field. Experimental field data for nine gullies were derived by pouring concentrated inflow into the upstream end and measuring the outflow at the downstream end of the channel. Two consecutive flow experiments per gully were carried out, so that data for dry and wet soil conditions were collected. The hydrological response to concentrated flow was estimated for each experiment by calculating its cumulative infiltration coefficient, IC (%. The results showed a great difference in IC between dry and wet soil conditions. The IC for wet soil conditions was on average 24%, whereas it was 60% for dry conditions. Gullies with more than 50% surface vegetation cover exhibit the highest cumulative infiltration coefficients (81% for dry runs, and 34% for wet runs, but runoff transmission losses were not as clearly related to vegetation cover as sediment storage as shown in Molina et al. (2009. The experimental field data of 16 experiments were used to calibrate a hydrological model developed by Fiener and Auerswald (2005 in order to simulate the transfer of concentrated flow along the gully beds. The calibrated model was able to simulate the transfer of runoff water

  8. Two-dimensional numerical experiments with DRIX-2D on two-phase-water-flows referring to the HDR-blowdown-experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moesinger, H.

    1979-08-01

    The computer program DRIX-2D has been developed from SOLA-DF. The essential elements of the program structure are described. In order to verify DRIX-2D an Edwards-Blowdown-Experiment is calculated and other numerical results are compared with steady state experiments and models. Numerical experiments on transient two-phase flow, occurring in the broken pipe of a PWR in the case of a hypothetic LOCA, are performed. The essential results of the two-dimensional calculations are: 1. The appearance of a radial profile of void-fraction, velocity, sound speed and mass flow-rate inside the blowdown nozzle. The reason for this is the flow contraction at the nozzle inlet leading to more vapour production in the vicinity of the pipe wall. 2. A comparison between modelling in axisymmetric and Cartesian coordinates and calculations with and without the core barrel show the following: a) The three-dimensional flow pattern at the nozzle inlet is poorly described using Cartesian coordinates. In consequence a considerable difference in pressure history results. b) The core barrel alters the reflection behaviour of the pressure waves oscillating in the blowdown-nozzle. Therefore, the core barrel should be modelled as a wall normal to the nozzle axis. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Numerical Simulation of a Tracer Experiment at the Wolsong Nuclear Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hyojoon; Kim, Eunhan; Park, Misun; Jeong, Haesun; Hwang, Wontae; Han, Moonhee

    2014-01-01

    By comparing the concentration of a tracer measured under weather conditions that are disadvantageous to the dilution of radioactive materials released from the Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant, with the concentration of a tracer calculated using an air Dispersion model, it is possible to evaluate the characteristics of the air concentrations of radioactive materials estimated with an air Dispersion model, which can then be used in an environmental impact analysis of radioactive materials. Therefore, a field Dispersion experiment has been carried out to figure out the behavioral characteristics of the tracer under weather conditions that are disadvantageous to the dilution of radioactive materials released from the Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant site in Korea. In addition, through a comparison of the tracer concentrations estimated by the Gaussian plume model with measurements, this study checked the degree of conservative estimation for the Gaussian plume at the Wolsong nuclear site in Korea. A tracer Dispersion experiment using an SF 6 trace was implemented to determine the Dispersion characteristics of radioactive materials at the Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant site in Korea. Based on meteorological data and the emission rate of the tracers, this study estimated the tracer concentrations using a Gaussian plume model, and then compared it with the measurement to check the conservative estimation of the Gaussian plume model. The measured concentrations of the tracer tends to be lower than the concentrations estimated by the Gaussian plume model overall

  10. Pulse heating tests on two reference Belgian clay formations. Laboratory experiments and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, A.; Romero, E.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.

    2012-01-01

    evolutions of temperature during the heating and cooling phases and Figures 1b and 1d the corresponding time evolutions of pore water pressures. The thermal response was simulated to calibrate by back-analysis some thermal properties (thermal conductivity of the soil, λ, and the convection coefficient, h, which controls thermal flux at the cell interface). The three-dimensional plots in Figure 2 show the difference between simulation results and experimental observations (ε) for the two clays. A slightly higher thermal conductivity was obtained for Ypresian clay, consistent with its higher quartz content. The data was further used to calibrate selected hydraulic parameters by analysing joint thermal and hydraulic results. Figure 3 displays the time evolutions of temperature and pore water pressure (experimental and simulated results) of Boom clay during heating and cooling paths. The water permeability values determined by back-analysis where in agreement with direct measurements performed with controlled-gradient tests. (authors)

  11. Numerically derived parametrisation of optimal RMP coil phase as a guide to experiments on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, D. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Li, L.; Kirk, A.; Dunne, M.; Dudson, B.; Piovesan, P.; Suttrop, W.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    Edge localised modes (ELMs) are a repetitive MHD instability, which may be mitigated or suppressed by the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In tokamaks which have an upper and lower set of RMP coils, the applied spectrum of the RMPs can be tuned for optimal ELM control, by introducing a toroidal phase difference {{Δ }}{{Φ }} between the upper and lower rows. The magnitude of the outermost resonant component of the RMP field | {b}{{res}}1| (other proposed criteria are discussed herein) has been shown experimentally to correlate with mitigated ELM frequency, and to be controllable by {{Δ }}{{Φ }} (Kirk et al 2013 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 043007). This suggests that ELM mitigation may be optimised by choosing {{Δ }}{{Φ }}={{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}, such that | {b}{{res}}1| is maximised. However it is currently impractical to compute {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} in advance of experiments. This motivates this computational study of the dependence of the optimal coil phase difference {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}, on global plasma parameters {β }N and q 95, in order to produce a simple parametrisation of {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}. In this work, a set of tokamak equilibria spanning a wide range of ({β }N, q 95) is produced, based on a reference equilibrium from an ASDEX Upgrade experiment. The MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681) is then used to compute {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} across this equilibrium set for toroidal mode numbers n = 1-4, both for the vacuum field and including the plasma response. The computational scan finds that for fixed plasma boundary shape, rotation profiles and toroidal mode number n, {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} is a smoothly varying function of ({β }N, q 95). A 2D quadratic function in ({β }N, q 95) is used to parametrise {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}, such that for given ({β }N, q 95) and n, an estimate of {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} may be made without requiring a plasma response computation. To quantify the uncertainty

  12. Estimating groundwater-ephemeral stream exchange in hyper-arid environments: Field experiments and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Pozdniakov, Sergey P.; Vasilevskiy, Peter Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Surface water infiltration from ephemeral dryland streams is particularly important in hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes in arid and semi-arid regions. However, streamflow transmission losses can vary significantly, partly due to spatiotemporal variations in streambed permeability. To extend our understanding of changes in streambed hydraulic properties, field investigations of streambed hydraulic conductivity were conducted in an ephemeral dryland stream in north-western China during high and low streamflow periods. Additionally, streamflow transmission losses were numerically estimated using combined stream and groundwater hydraulic head data and stream and streambed temperature data. An analysis of slug test data at two different river flow stages (one test was performed at a low river stage with clean water and the other at a high river stage with muddy water) suggested that sedimentation from fine-grained particles, i.e., physical clogging processes, likely led to a reduction in streambed hydraulic properties. To account for the effects of streambed clogging on changes in hydraulic properties, an iteratively increasing total hydraulic resistance during the slug test was considered to correct the estimation of streambed hydraulic conductivity. The stream and streambed temperature can also greatly influence the hydraulic properties of the streambed. One-dimensional coupled water and heat flux modelling with HYDRUS-1D was used to quantify the effects of seasonal changes in stream and streambed temperature on streamflow losses. During the period from 6 August 2014 to 4 June 2015, the total infiltration estimated using temperature-dependent hydraulic conductivity accounted for approximately 88% of that using temperature-independent hydraulic conductivity. Streambed clogging processes associated with fine particle settling/wash up cycles during flow events, and seasonal changes in streamflow temperature are two considerable factors that affect water

  13. Numerical modelling of ICRF physics experiments in the Alcator C-mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Boivin, R.L.; Brambilla, M.

    2001-01-01

    A full-wave spectral code (TORIC) has been used to simulate mode converted ion Bernstein wave (IBW) propagation and absorption for the first time at high poloidal mode number (-80< m<+80). Converged wave solutions for the mode converted wave are obtained in this limit and the predicted electron damping of the IBW is found to be consistent with experimental measurements from the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The TORIC code has also been coupled to a bounce-averaged Fokker Planck module FPPRF and the combined codes are now run within the transport analysis tool TRANSP. This model was used to analyze off-axis hydrogen minority heating experiments in C-Mod where an internal transport barrier was obtained. (author)

  14. Experiments and numerical modeling of fast flowing liquid metal thin films under spatially varying magnetic field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Manmeet Singh

    Innovative concepts using fast flowing thin films of liquid metals (like lithium) have been proposed for the protection of the divertor surface in magnetic fusion devices. However, concerns exist about the possibility of establishing the required flow of liquid metal thin films because of the presence of strong magnetic fields which can cause flow disrupting MHD effects. A plan is underway to design liquid lithium based divertor protection concepts for NSTX, a small spherical torus experiment at Princeton. Of these, a promising concept is the use of modularized fast flowing liquid lithium film zones, as the divertor (called the NSTX liquid surface module concept or NSTX LSM). The dynamic response of the liquid metal film flow in a spatially varying magnetic field configuration is still unknown and it is suspected that some unpredicted effects might be lurking. The primary goal of the research work being reported in this dissertation is to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the liquid metal film flow dynamics under spatially varying magnetic field conditions, typical of the divertor region of a magnetic fusion device. The liquid metal film flow dynamics have been studied through a synergic experimental and numerical modeling effort. The Magneto Thermofluid Omnibus Research (MTOR) facility at UCLA has been used to design several experiments to study the MHD interaction of liquid gallium films under a scaled NSTX outboard divertor magnetic field environment. A 3D multi-material, free surface MHD modeling capability is under development in collaboration with HyPerComp Inc., an SBIR vendor. This numerical code called HIMAG provides a unique capability to model the equations of incompressible MHD with a free surface. Some parts of this modeling capability have been developed in this research work, in the form of subroutines for HIMAG. Extensive code debugging and benchmarking exercise has also been carried out. Finally, HIMAG has been used to study the

  15. Multiphase flow experiments, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the water - gas - solute movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Ma, X.; Su, N.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water and solute into and through the vadose zone is, in essence, an issue of immiscible displacement in pore-space network of a soil. Therefore, multiphase flow and transport in porous media, referring to three medium: air, water, and the solute, pose one of the largest unresolved challenges for porous medium fluid seepage. However, this phenomenon has always been largely neglected. It is expected that a reliable analysis model of the multi-phase flow in soil can truly reflect the process of natural movement about the infiltration, which is impossible to be observed directly. In such cases, geophysical applications of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides the opportunity to measure the water movements into soils directly over a large scale from tiny pore to regional scale, accordingly enable it available both on the laboratory and on the field. In addition, the NMR provides useful information about the pore space properties. In this study, we proposed both laboratory and field experiments to measure the multi-phase flow parameters, together with optimize the model in computer programming based on the fractional partial differential equations (fPDE). In addition, we establish, for the first time, an infiltration model including solute flowing with water, which has huge influence on agriculture and soil environment pollution. Afterwards, with data collected from experiments, we simulate the model and analyze the spatial variability of parameters. Simulations are also conducted according to the model to evaluate the effects of airflow on water infiltration and other effects such as solute and absorption. It has significant meaning to oxygen irrigation aiming to higher crop yield, and shed more light into the dam slope stability. In summary, our framework is a first-time model added in solute to have a mathematic analysis with the fPDE and more instructive to agriculture activities.

  16. COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence': International Conference on Fundamentals, Experiments, Numeric and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Toschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Turbulent flows govern the transport of particulate matter in nature. For example, in atmospheric flows turbulence impacts the dynamics of aerosols, droplets, spores and of the living world by either chemo-attractant transport or transport of the insects themselves. In marine flows examples include the bubble dynamics that governs the uptake of oxygen and carbon dioxide at the ocean air interface, or the impact of turbulence on the life of phyto- and zoo-plankton, or the spread of pollutants in the oceans and estuaries. Turbulence is equally important for technology from process engineering in chemical and pharmaceutical industries to energy transport and energy generation. The COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence' has as the primary objective the support of the fundamental research on the statistical properties of particle transport in turbulent flows. The Action provides excellent opportunities for the exchange of ideas by bringing together scientists from different areas of research and applications, or different views on the problem. The COST Action MP0806 organizes several events annually. The conference held at the University of Potsdam from 16 to 18 March 2011 was the main meeting of the Action in 2011. In total 87 researchers from 18 countries (of which 12 were European) met and presented their work, discussed new ideas on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches, as well as on applications to various scientific domains. The conference attracted also a number of participants from outside the COST Action. The scientific presentations focused on inertial and finite-size particles, particle collisions, as well as advection and reaction in simple and complex flow geometries. Very interesting results were presented at the forefront of the field: the increasing computational power combined with novel numerical techniques now allows for the first time simulation of the dynamics of finites

  17. Numerical simulation of a liquid droplet combustion experiment focusing on ignition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Tajima, Yuji

    1999-11-01

    SPHINCS (Sodium Fire phenomenology IN multi-Cell System) computer program has been developed for the safety analysis of sodium fire accident in a Fast Breeder Reactor. The program can deal with spray combustion and pool surface combustion. In this report the authors investigate a single droplet combustion phenomena focusing on an ignition process. The spray combustion model of SPHINCS is as follows. The liquid droplet-burning rate after ignition is based on the D-square law and a diffusion flame assumption. Before the droplet is ignited, the burning rate is evaluated by mass flux of oxidizer gases. Forced convection effect that skews the sphere shape of the flame zone surrounding a droplet is taken into consideration. It enhances the burning rate. The chemical equilibrium theory is used to determine the resultant fraction of reaction products of Na-O 2 -H 2 O system. It is noted that users have to give an ignition temperature based on empirical evidences. According to this model, it is obvious that a smaller liquid droplet with higher initial temperature tends to burn more easily. What is observed in a recent experiment is that the smallest liquid droplet (2mm diameter) did not ignited of itself and larger droplets (3.7mm and 4.5mm diameter) burnt at 300degC initial temperature. The current model for liquid droplet combustion cannot predict the experimental results. Therefore, in the present study, a surface reaction model has been developed to predict the ignition process. The model has been used to analyze a combustion experiment of a stationary liquid droplet. The authors investigate the validity of the physical modeling of the liquid droplet combustion and surface reaction. It has been found, as the results, that the model can predict the influence of the initial temperature on the temperature lower limit for spontaneous ignition and ignition delay time. Also investigated is the influence of the moisture on the ignition phenomena. From the present study, it has

  18. Measurement and simulation of unmyelinated nerve electrostimulation: Lumbricus terrestris experiment and numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šarolić, A; Živković, Z; Reilly, J P

    2016-06-21

    The electrostimulation excitation threshold of a nerve depends on temporal and frequency parameters of the stimulus. These dependences were investigated in terms of: (1) strength-duration (SD) curve for a single monophasic rectangular pulse, and (2) frequency dependence of the excitation threshold for a continuous sinusoidal current. Experiments were performed on the single-axon measurement setup based on Lumbricus terrestris having unmyelinated nerve fibers. The simulations were performed using the well-established SENN model for a myelinated nerve. Although the unmyelinated experimental model differs from the myelinated simulation model, both refer to a single axon. Thus we hypothesized that the dependence on temporal and frequency parameters should be very similar. The comparison was made possible by normalizing each set of results to the SD time constant and the rheobase current of each model, yielding the curves that show the temporal and frequency dependencies regardless of the model differences. The results reasonably agree, suggesting that this experimental setup and method of comparison with SENN model can be used for further studies of waveform effect on nerve excitability, including unmyelinated neurons.

  19. Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory - Part II: Numerical Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Turinsky, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Use of adaptive simulation is intended to improve the fidelity and robustness of important core attribute predictions such as core power distribution, thermal margins, and core reactivity. Adaptive simulation utilizes a selected set of past and current reactor measurements of reactor observables, i.e., in-core instrumentation readings, to adapt the simulation in a meaningful way. The companion paper, ''Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory - Part I: Theory,'' describes in detail the theoretical background of the proposed adaptive techniques. This paper, Part II, demonstrates several computational experiments conducted to assess the fidelity and robustness of the proposed techniques. The intent is to check the ability of the adapted core simulator model to predict future core observables that are not included in the adaption or core observables that are recorded at core conditions that differ from those at which adaption is completed. Also, this paper demonstrates successful utilization of an efficient sensitivity analysis approach to calculate the sensitivity information required to perform the adaption for millions of input core parameters. Finally, this paper illustrates a useful application for adaptive simulation - reducing the inconsistencies between two different core simulator code systems, where the multitudes of input data to one code are adjusted to enhance the agreement between both codes for important core attributes, i.e., core reactivity and power distribution. Also demonstrated is the robustness of such an application

  20. The estimation of the load of non-point source nitrogen and phosphorus based on observation experiments and export coefficient method in Three Gorges Reservoir Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X. X.; Hu, B.; Xu, W. S.; Liu, J. G.; Zhang, P. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) was chosen to be the study area, the export coefficients of different land-use type were calculated through the observation experiments and literature consultation, and then the load of non-point source (NPS) nitrogen and phosphorus of different pollution sources such as farmland pollution sources, decentralized livestock and poultry breeding pollution sources and domestic pollution sources were estimated. The results show as follows: the pollution load of dry land is the main source of farmland pollution. The order of total nitrogen load of different pollution sources from high to low is livestock breeding pollution, domestic pollution, land use pollution, while the order of phosphorus load of different pollution sources from high to low is land use pollution, livestock breeding pollution, domestic pollution, Therefore, reasonable farmland management, effective control methods of dry land fertilization and sewage discharge of livestock breeding are the keys to the prevention and control of NPS nitrogen and phosphorus in TGRA.

  1. Numerical Simulations of Counter Current Flow Experiments Using a Morphology Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Höhne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the understanding of counter-current two-phase flows and to validate new physical models, CFD simulations of 1/3rd scale model of the hot leg of a German Konvoi PWR with rectangular cross section was performed. Selected counter-current flow limitation (CCFL experiments at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR were calculated with ANSYS CFX 12.1 using the multi-fluid Euler-Euler modeling approach. The transient calculations were carried out using a gas/liquid inhomogeneous multiphase flow model coupled with a SST turbulence model for each phase. In the simulation, the surface drag was approached by a new correlation inside the Algebraic Interfacial Area Density (AIAD model. The AIAD model allows the detection of the morphological form of the two phase flow and the corresponding switching via a blending function of each correlation from one object pair to another. As a result this model can distinguish between bubbles, droplets and the free surface using the local liquid phase volume fraction value. A comparison with the high-speed video observations shows a good qualitative agreement. The results indicated that quantitative agreement of the CCFL characteristics between calculation and experimental data was obtained. To validate the model and to study scaling effects CFD simulations of the CCFL phenomenon in a full scale PWR hot leg of the UPTF test facility were performed. Also these results indicated a good agreement between the calculation and experimental data. The final goal is to provide an easy usable AIAD framework for all ANSYS CFX users, with the possibility of the implementation of their own correlations.

  2. Numerical experiments on plasma focus for soft x-ray yield scaling laws derivation using Lee model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akel, M.

    2015-01-01

    The required plasma parameters of krypton and xenon at different temperatures were calculated, the x-ray emission properties of plasmas were studied, and based on the corona model the suitable temperature range for generating H-like and He-like ions (therefore soft x-ray emissions) of different gases plasma were found. The code is applied to characterize the plasma focus in different plasma focus devices, and for optimizing the nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon soft x-ray yields based on bank, tubes and operating parameters. It is found that t he soft x-ray yield increases with changing pressure until it reaches the maximum value for each plasma focus device. Keeping the bank parameters, operational voltage unchanged but systematically changing other parameters, numerical experiments were performed finding the optimum combination of Po, z0 and 'a' for the maximum soft x-ray yield. Thus we expect to increase the soft x-ray yield of plasma focus device several-fold from its present typical operation; without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and the operating pressure. The Lee model code was also used to run numerical experiments on plasma focus devices for optimizing soft x-ray yield with reducing Lo, varying z0 and 'a' to get engineering designs with maximum soft x-ray yield for these devices at different experimental conditions and gases. Numerical experiments showed the influence of the gas used in plasma focus and its propor ties on soft x-ray emission and its propor ties and then on its applications. Scaling laws for soft x-ray of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon plasma focus in terms of energy, peak discharge current and focus pinch current were found. Radiative cooling effects are studied indicating that radiative collapse may be observed for heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe) for pinch currents even below 100 k A. The results show that the line radiation emission and

  3. Numerical experiments on plasma focus for soft x-ray yield scaling laws derivation using Lee model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akel, M.

    2012-09-01

    The required plasma parameters of krypton and xenon at different temperatures were calculated, the x-ray emission properties of plasmas were studied, and based on the corona model the suitable temperature range for generating H-like and He-like ions (therefore soft x-ray emissions) of different gases plasma were found. The code is applied to characterize the plasma focus in different plasma focus devices, and for optimizing the nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon soft x-ray yields based on bank, tubes and operating parameters. It is found that the soft x-ray yield increases with changing pressure until it reaches the maximum value for each plasma focus device. Keeping the bank parameters, operational voltage unchanged but systematically changing other parameters, numerical experiments were performed finding the optimum combination of P o , Z o and 'a' for the maximum soft x-ray yield. Thus we expect to increase the soft x-ray yield of plasma focus device several-fold from its present typical operation; without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and the operating pressure. The Lee model code was also used to run numerical experiments on plasma focus devices for optimizing soft x-ray yield with reducing L o , varying L o and 'a' to get engineering designs with maximum soft x-ray yield for these devices at different experimental conditions and gases. Numerical experiments showed the influence of the gas used in plasma focus and its properties on soft x-ray emission and its properties and then on its applications. Scaling laws for soft x-ray of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon, krypton and xenon plasma focus, in terms of energy, peak discharge current and focus pinch current were found. Radiative cooling effects are studied indicating that radiative collapse may be observed for heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, Xe) for pinch currents even below 100 kA. The results show that the line radiation emission and tube voltages have

  4. The numerical comparison of fire combustion model and water-mist suppression with experiments by FDS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hsuennien; Ferng Yuhming; Shih Chunkuan; Hsu Wensheng

    2007-01-01

    FDS [1] code numerically solves a form of the Navier-Stokes equations appropriate for low-speed, thermally driven flow with an emphasis on smoke and heat transport from fires. FDS uses a mixture fraction combustion model. The mixture fraction is a conserved scalar quantity that is defined as the fraction of fuel gas at a given point in the flow field. The model assumes that combustion is mixing-controlled, and that the reaction of fuel and oxygen is infinitely fast. In FDS, Lagrangian particles are used to simulate smoke movement and sprinkling water-mist discharge. In order to evaluate the combustion model and water-mist suppression function of the code, FDS analyses are conducted to simulate two enclosure fire cases available in the literature. Comparisons with other combustion models are also made. For fires suppression by water-mist in FDS, parametric studies are performed to compare various water-mist injection characteristics for maximum suppression. Numerical results indicate that the flame suppression is closely related to characteristics of the water mist, such as droplet diameter, mist injection velocity, injection density. Our present investigations show that the combustion model and water-mist suppression in FDS can provide simulation results that are comparable with the experiments. (author)

  5. Static behavior of the weld in the joint of the steel support element using experiment and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejsa, M.; Brozovsky, J.; Mikolasek, D.; Parenica, P.; Koubova, L.

    2018-04-01

    The paper is focused on the numerical modeling of welded steel bearing elements using commercial software system ANSYS, which is based on the finite element method - FEM. It is important to check and compare the results of FEM analysis with the results of physical verification test, in which the real behavior of the bearing element can be observed. The results of the comparison can be used for calibration of the computational model. The article deals with the physical test of steel supporting elements, whose main purpose is obtaining of material, geometry and strength characteristics of the fillet and butt welds including heat affected zone in the basic material of welded steel bearing element. The pressure test was performed during the experiment, wherein the total load value and the corresponding deformation of the specimens under the load was monitored. Obtained data were used for the calibration of numerical models of test samples and they are necessary for further stress and strain analysis of steel supporting elements.

  6. Research on the flow field of undershot cross-flow water turbines using experiments and numerical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Y; Inagaki, T; Li, Y; Omiya, R; Hatano, K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a water turbine appropriate for low-head open channels in order to effectively utilize the unused hydropower energy of rivers and agricultural waterways. The application of the cross-flow runner to open channels as an undershot water turbine has come under consideration and, to this end, a significant simplification was attained by removing the casings. However, the flow field of undershot cross-flow water turbines possesses free surfaces. This means that with the variation in the rotational speed, the water depth around the runner will change and flow field itself is significantly altered. Thus it is necessary to clearly understand the flow fields with free surfaces in order to improve the performance of this turbine. In this research, the performance of this turbine and the flow field were studied through experiments and numerical analysis. The experimental results on the performance of this turbine and the flow field were consistent with the numerical analysis. In addition, the inlet and outlet regions at the first and second stages of this water turbine were clarified

  7. Experiment and numerical simulation on the performance of a kw-scale molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Yu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell stack was studied experimentally and computationally. Experimental data for fuel cell temperature was obtained when the stack was running under given operational conditions. A 3-D CFD numerical model was set up and used to simulate the central fuel cell in the stack. It includes the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, the ideal gas law and an empirical equation for cell voltage. The model was used to simulate the transient behavior of the fuel cell under the same operational conditions as those of the experiment. Simulation results show that the transient temperature and current and power densities reach their maximal values at the channel outlet. A comparison of the modeling results and the experimental data shows the good agreement.

  8. On the dynamics of droughts in northeast Brazil - Observations, theory and numerical experiments with a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. D.; Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    The establishment of a thermally direct local circulation which has its ascending branch at about 10 deg N and its descending branch over northeast Brazil and the adjoining oceanic region is proposed as a possible mechanism for the occurrence of severe droughts over this Brazilian region. The driving for this anomalous circulation is provided by enhanced moist convection due to the effect of warmer sea surface anomalies over the northern tropical Atlantic and cooling associated with colder sea surface temperature anomalies in the southern tropical Atlantic. A simple primitive equation model is used to calculate the frictionally-controlled and thermally-driven circulation due to a prescribed heating function in a resting atmosphere, and a series of numerical experiments are carried out to test the sensitivity of the Goddard Laboratory's model to prescribed sea surface temperature anomalies over the tropical Atlantic.

  9. Cs sorption to potential host rock of low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan: experiments and numerical fitting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Chen, Chin-Lung; Ou, Lu-Yen; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Chang, Fu-Lin; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2011-09-15

    A reliable performance assessment of radioactive waste repository depends on better knowledge of interactions between nuclides and geological substances. Numerical fitting of acquired experimental results by the surface complexation model enables us to interpret sorption behavior at molecular scale and thus to build a solid basis for simulation study. A lack of consensus on a standard set of assessment criteria (such as determination of sorption site concentration, reaction formula) during numerical fitting, on the other hand, makes lower case comparison between various studies difficult. In this study we explored the sorption of cesium to argillite by conducting experiments under different pH and solid/liquid ratio (s/l) with two specific initial Cs concentrations (100mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-4)mol/L and 0.01 mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-8)mol/L). After this, numerical fitting was performed, focusing on assessment criteria and their consequences. It was found that both ion exchange and electrostatic interactions governed Cs sorption on argillite. At higher initial Cs concentration the Cs sorption showed an increasing dependence on pH as the solid/liquid ratio was lowered. In contrast at trace Cs levels, the Cs sorption was neither s/l dependent nor pH sensitive. It is therefore proposed that ion exchange mechanism dominates Cs sorption when the concentration of surface sorption site exceeds that of Cs, whereas surface complexation is attributed to Cs uptake under alkaline environments. Numerical fitting was conducted using two different strategies to determine concentration of surface sorption sites: the clay model (based on the cation exchange capacity plus surface titration results) and the iron oxide model (where the concentration of sorption sites is proportional to the surface area of argillite). It was found that the clay model led to better fitting than the iron oxide model, which is attributed to more amenable sorption sites (two specific sorption sites along with larger site

  10. Numerical Methods for a Class of Differential Algebraic Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the study of some efficient numerical methods for the differential algebraic equations (DAEs. At first, we propose a finite algorithm to compute the Drazin inverse of the time varying DAEs. Numerical experiments are presented by Drazin inverse and Radau IIA method, which illustrate that the precision of the Drazin inverse method is higher than the Radau IIA method. Then, Drazin inverse, Radau IIA, and Padé approximation are applied to the constant coefficient DAEs, respectively. Numerical results demonstrate that the Padé approximation is powerful for solving constant coefficient DAEs.

  11. A numerical design and feasibility study of self-wastage experiment using simulant material in a sodium fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sung Hyun; Takata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A sodium-water reaction takes place when high-pressured water vapor leaks into sodium through a tiny defect on the surface of the heat transfer tube in a steam generator of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. The sodium-water reaction brings deterioration of the mechanical strength of the heat transfer tube at the initial leakage site. As a result, it damages the crack itself, which may eventually enlarge into a larger opening. This self-enlargement is called 'self-wastage phenomenon.' In this study, a simulant experiment was proposed to reproduce the self-enlargement of a crack and to evaluate the mechanism of the self-wastage. The damage on the surface of the crack was simulated by making the neutralization reaction with hydrochloric acid solution and sodium hydroxide solution. A numerical investigation was carried out to validate the feasibility of the approach and to determine experimental conditions. From the computation results, it is observed that when 5M HCl is injected into 5M of NaOH with 0.05 m/s inlet velocity, the temperature at the surface near the crack increased over 319.26 K. The computational results show that the self-wastage phenomenon is capable of being reproduced by the simulant experiment

  12. THERMAL RESPONSE OF A SOLAR-LIKE ATMOSPHERE TO AN ELECTRON BEAM FROM A HOT JUPITER: A NUMERICAL EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, P.-G.; Suzuki, Takeru K.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the thermal response of the atmosphere of a solar-type star to an electron beam injected from a hot Jupiter by performing a one-dimensional MHD numerical experiment with nonlinear wave dissipation, radiative cooling, and thermal conduction. In our experiment, the stellar atmosphere is non-rotating and is modeled as a one-dimensional open flux tube expanding super-radially from the stellar photosphere to the planet. An electron beam is assumed to be generated from the reconnection site of the planet's magnetosphere. The effects of the electron beam are then implemented in our simulation as dissipation of the beam momentum and energy at the base of the corona where the Coulomb collisions become effective. When the sufficient energy is supplied by the electron beam, a warm region forms in the chromosphere. This warm region greatly enhances the radiative fluxes corresponding to the temperature of the chromosphere and transition region. The warm region can also intermittently contribute to the radiative flux associated with the coronal temperature due to the thermal instability. However, owing to the small area of the heating spot, the total luminosity of the beam-induced chromospheric radiation is several orders of magnitude smaller than the observed Ca II emissions from HD 179949.

  13. Global atmospheric response to specific linear combinations of the main SST modes. Part I: numerical experiments and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Trzaska

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates through numerical experiments the controversial question of the impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO phenomena on climate according to large-scale and regional-scale interhemispheric thermal contrast. Eight experiments (two considering only inversed Atlantic thermal anomalies and six combining ENSO warm phase with large-scale interhemispheric contrast and Atlantic anomaly patterns were performed with the Météo-France atmospheric general circulation model. The definition of boundary conditions from observed composites and principal components is presented and preliminary results concerning the month of August, especially over West Africa and the equatorial Atlantic are discussed. Results are coherent with observations and show that interhemispheric and regional scale sea-surface-temperature anomaly (SST patterns could significantly modulate the impact of ENSO phenomena: the impact of warm-phase ENSO, relative to the atmospheric model intercomparison project (AMIP climatology, seems stronger when embedded in global and regional SSTA patterns representative of the post-1970 conditions [i.e. with temperatures warmer (colder than the long-term mean in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere]. Atlantic SSTAs may also play a significant role.

  14. Study on the thermal ignition of gasoline-air mixture in underground oil depots based on experiment and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yihong; Du, Yang; Jiang, Xingsheng; Wang, Dong; Liang, Jianjun

    2010-04-01

    The study on the special phenomenon, occurrence process and control mechanism of gasoline-air mixture thermal ignition in underground oil depots is of important academic and applied value for enriching scientific theories of explosion safety, developing protective technology against fire and decreasing the number of fire accidents. In this paper, the research on thermal ignition process of gasoline-air mixture in model underground oil depots tunnel has been carried out by using experiment and numerical simulation methods. The calculation result has been demonstrated by the experiment data. The five stages of thermal ignition course, which are slow oxidation stage, rapid oxidation stage, fire stage, flameout stage and quench stage, have been firstly defined and accurately descried. According to the magnitude order of concentration, the species have been divided into six categories, which lay the foundation for explosion-proof design based on the role of different species. The influence of space scale on thermal ignition in small-scale space has been found, and the mechanism for not easy to fire is that the wall reflection causes the reflux of fluids and changes the distribution of heat and mass, so that the progress of chemical reactions in the whole space are also changed. The novel mathematical model on the basis of unification chemical kinetics and thermodynamics established in this paper provides supplementary means for the analysis of process and mechanism of thermal ignition.

  15. A Numerical Design and Feasibility Study of Self-Wastage Experiment Using Simulant Material in a Sodium Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghyon Jang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A sodium–water reaction takes place when high-pressured water vapor leaks into sodium through a tiny defect on the surface of the heat transfer tube in a steam generator of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. The sodium–water reaction brings deterioration of the mechanical strength of the heat transfer tube at the initial leakage site. As a result, it damages the crack itself, which may eventually enlarge into a larger opening. This self-enlargement is called “self-wastage phenomenon.” In this study, a simulant experiment was proposed to reproduce the self-enlargement of a crack and to evaluate the mechanism of the self-wastage. The damage on the surface of the crack was simulated by making the neutralization reaction with hydrochloric acid solution and sodium hydroxide solution. A numerical investigation was carried out to validate the feasibility of the approach and to determine experimental conditions. From the computation results, it is observed that when 5M HCl is injected into 5M of NaOH with 0.05 m/s inlet velocity, the temperature at the surface near the crack increased over 319.26 K. The computational results show that the self-wastage phenomenon is capable of being reproduced by the simulant experiment.

  16. A numerical design and feasibility study of self-wastage experiment using simulant material in a sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Sung Hyun; Takata, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Akira [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    A sodium-water reaction takes place when high-pressured water vapor leaks into sodium through a tiny defect on the surface of the heat transfer tube in a steam generator of the sodium-cooled fast reactor. The sodium-water reaction brings deterioration of the mechanical strength of the heat transfer tube at the initial leakage site. As a result, it damages the crack itself, which may eventually enlarge into a larger opening. This self-enlargement is called 'self-wastage phenomenon.' In this study, a simulant experiment was proposed to reproduce the self-enlargement of a crack and to evaluate the mechanism of the self-wastage. The damage on the surface of the crack was simulated by making the neutralization reaction with hydrochloric acid solution and sodium hydroxide solution. A numerical investigation was carried out to validate the feasibility of the approach and to determine experimental conditions. From the computation results, it is observed that when 5M HCl is injected into 5M of NaOH with 0.05 m/s inlet velocity, the temperature at the surface near the crack increased over 319.26 K. The computational results show that the self-wastage phenomenon is capable of being reproduced by the simulant experiment.

  17. Understanding evapotranspiration trends and their driving mechanisms over the NLDAS domain based on numerical experiments using CLM4.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Dana; Wang, Guiling; Fu, Congsheng

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies documented a recent decline of the global terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) trend, of which the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Based on experiments using the Community Land Model version 4.5 driven with the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase-2 (NLDAS-2) forcing data, this study investigates the variation and changes of ET trends at the continental scale and the mechanisms underlying these changes. Simulations are conducted over the NLDAS domain including the contiguous U.S. and part of Mexico for the period of 1980-2014. Changes of ET trend are derived based on the two subperiods 1982-1997 and 1998-2008. The strongest signals of trend change, of either sign, are primarily located in dry regimes, where ET is limited by water rather than energy. Sensitivity experiments were performed to isolate the impact of some of the most influential factors on the changing ET trends. Results indicate that trends in wind speed and surface air temperature had negligible impact on the ET trend and its changes within the study domain, and the ET trend and its changes are dominated by changes in precipitation amount. Changes in precipitation characteristics including the frequency and intensity are suggested to have a secondary effect on the ET trend changes through modifying the partitioning of water between infiltration and runoff. These findings are further supported by correlation coefficients between ET and various driving factors. Results from this study may be region specific and therefore may not hold for ET trend changes over the rest of the globe.

  18. Ensemble Kalman Filter Assimilation of ERT Data for Numerical Modeling of Seawater Intrusion in a Laboratory Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Bouzaglou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers is a worldwide problem exacerbated by aquifer overexploitation and climate changes. To limit the deterioration of water quality caused by saline intrusion, research studies are needed to identify and assess the performance of possible countermeasures, e.g., underground barriers. Within this context, numerical models are fundamental to fully understand the process and for evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed solutions to contain the saltwater wedge; on the other hand, they are typically affected by uncertainty on hydrogeological parameters, as well as initial and boundary conditions. Data assimilation methods such as the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF represent promising tools that can reduce such uncertainties. Here, we present an application of the EnKF to the numerical modeling of a laboratory experiment where seawater intrusion was reproduced in a specifically designed sandbox and continuously monitored with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT. Combining EnKF and the SUTRA model for the simulation of density-dependent flow and transport in porous media, we assimilated the collected ERT data by means of joint and sequential assimilation approaches. In the joint approach, raw ERT data (electrical resistances are assimilated to update both salt concentration and soil parameters, without the need for an electrical inversion. In the sequential approach, we assimilated electrical conductivities computed from a previously performed electrical inversion. Within both approaches, we suggest dual-step update strategies to minimize the effects of spurious correlations in parameter estimation. The results show that, in both cases, ERT data assimilation can reduce the uncertainty not only on the system state in terms of salt concentration, but also on the most relevant soil parameters, i.e., saturated hydraulic conductivity and longitudinal dispersivity. However, the sequential approach is more prone to

  19. The impact of structural development on near bed flow dynamics in gravel bed rivers: coupling flume experiments with numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockelford, A.; Hardy, R. J.; Rice, S. P.; Powell, M.

    2017-12-01

    It is increasingly being recognised that gravel bed rivers develop a surface `texture' in response to changes in the flow and sediment regime. This textural response often takes the form of a bed structure which develops to ultimately stabilise the surface across a range of spatio-temporal scales and it is these topographical structures which determine the flow structures that develop over the river bed. However, our ability to measure and parameterise that structure in ways that are useful and meaningful for the prediction of flow dynamics, still remains inadequate; this paper uses a three dimensional numerical model to assess how the temporal development of structure influences the near bed flow dynamics. Using a suite of flume based experiments a unimodal grain size distribution (σg = 1.30, D50 = 8.8mm) was exposed to three different levels of constant bed shear that produced sediment transport conditions ranging from marginal transport to conditions approaching full mobility of all size fractions. Surface structuring characteristics were measured at a high spatio-temporal resolution such that the time evolution of the beds could be fully described. In total 54 surfaces were generated and run through a Reynolds averaged three dimensional numerical model with an Rng turbulence closure. The topography input included using an immersed boundary technique within a Cartesian framework. Discussion concentrates on the how the trajectory of structural evolution under the different treatments affects the near bed flow dynamics. Specifically links are made between how the scales of boundary topography influence the flow and discusses how the measured flow variability at any one point will contain both locally derived and upstream-inherited flow structures, according to the range of scales of bed topography present. Keywords: Graded, Sediment, Structure, Turbulence, Modelling

  20. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-01-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises from the physical beam. The growth rate of the film is evaluated from the measured time evolution and it is incorporated into the kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation. From a numerical simulation using the boundary condition, the condensation coefficient of water is uniquely deduced. The results show that, in a condition of weak condensation near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state, the condensation coefficient of water is almost equal to the evaporation coefficient estimated by molecular dynamics simulations near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state and it decreases as the system becomes a nonequilibrium state. The condensation coefficient of water is nearly identical with that of methanol [Mikami, S., Kobayashi, K., Ota, T., Fujikawa, S., Yano, T., Ichijo, M., 2006. Molecular gas dynamics approaches to interfacial phenomena accompanied with condensation. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 30, 795-800].

  1. Condensation coefficient of water in a weak condensation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Yamano, Daigo; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo

    2008-07-01

    The condensation coefficient of water at a vapor-liquid interface is determined by combining shock tube experiments and numerical simulations of the Gaussian-BGK Boltzmann equation. The time evolution in thickness of a liquid film, which is formed on the shock tube endwall behind the shock wave reflected at the endwall, is measured with an optical interferometer consisting of the physical beam and the reference one. The reference beam is utilized to eliminate systematic noises from the physical beam. The growth rate of the film is evaluated from the measured time evolution and it is incorporated into the kinetic boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation. From a numerical simulation using the boundary condition, the condensation coefficient of water is uniquely deduced. The results show that, in a condition of weak condensation near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state, the condensation coefficient of water is almost equal to the evaporation coefficient estimated by molecular dynamics simulations near a vapor-liquid equilibrium state and it decreases as the system becomes a nonequilibrium state. The condensation coefficient of water is nearly identical with that of methanol [Mikami, S., Kobayashi, K., Ota, T., Fujikawa, S., Yano, T., Ichijo, M., 2006. Molecular gas dynamics approaches to interfacial phenomena accompanied with condensation. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 30, 795-800].

  2. Comparison of upconing under vertical and horizontal wells in freshwater lenses: sand-box experiments and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, Leonard; Stefan, Loeffler; Houben, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lenses on islands and in inland areas are often the primary freshwater resource there. The fragile equilibrium between saline and fresh groundwater can be disrupted by excessive pumping, leading to an upward migration of the saline water underneath the well. Sand-box experiments were conducted to compare the upconing at vertical and horizontal wells pumping from a freshwater lens. Results were then compared to numerical simulations. To simulate the cross-section of an "infinite strip island", an acrylic box with a spacing of 5 cm was filled with coarse sand. After saturating the model with degassed saltwater from bottom to top, freshwater recharge was applied from above. By coloring the infiltrating freshwater with different tracer colors using uranine and indigotine we were able to visualize flow paths during pumping. A horizontal and a vertical well were placed at the left and right side of the symmetric island. Both had equal diameter, screen length, depth of placement, and distance to shore. Three increasing pumping rates were applied to each well successively and the electrical conductivity of the abstracted water was continuously measured using a through-flow cell. Results show that no saltwater entered the wells when pumping at the lowest rate. Still, slight saltwater upconing and a shift of the freshwater divide in the island were observed. At the second rate a clear saltwater breakthrough into the vertical well occurred, while the electrical conductivity remained nearly unchanged in the horizontal well. Applying the third (highest) abstraction rate to each of the wells saltwater entered both wells, exceeding drinking water standards in the vertical well. The described behavior indicates the advantage of horizontal over vertical wells on islands and in coastal zones prone to saltwater up-coning. Numerical simulations show similar patterns, even though deviations exist between the second and the third pumping rate, which are under and

  3. Detuned resonances of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an airfoil boundary layer: Experiment, theory, and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würz, W.; Sartorius, D.; Kloker, M.; Borodulin, V. I.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Smorodsky, B. V.

    2012-09-01

    Transition prediction in two-dimensional laminar boundary layers developing on airfoil sections at subsonic speeds and very low turbulence levels is still a challenge. The commonly used semi-empirical prediction tools are mainly based on linear stability theory and do not account for nonlinear effects present unavoidably starting with certain stages of transition. One reason is the lack of systematic investigations of the weakly nonlinear stages of transition, especially of the strongest interactions of the instability modes predominant in non-self-similar boundary layers. The present paper is devoted to the detailed experimental, numerical, and theoretical study of weakly nonlinear subharmonic resonances of Tollmien-Schlichting waves in an airfoil boundary layer, representing main candidates for the strongest mechanism of these initial nonlinear stages. The experimental approach is based on phase-locked hot-wire measurements under controlled disturbance conditions using a new disturbance source being capable to produce well-defined, complex wave compositions in a wide range of streamwise and spanwise wave numbers. The tests were performed in a low-turbulence wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of Re = 0.7 × 106. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) were utilized to provide a detailed comparison for the test cases. The results of weakly nonlinear theory (WNT) enabled a profound understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms observed in the experiments and DNS. The data obtained in experiment, DNS and WNT agree basically and provide a high degree of reliability of the results. Interactions occurring between components of various initial frequency-wavenumber spectra of instability waves are investigated by systematic variation of parameters. It is shown that frequency-detuned and spanwise-wavenumber-detuned subharmonic-type resonant interactions have an extremely large spectral width. Similar to results obtained for self-similar base flows it is found that the

  4. A Numerical Approach to Solving an Inverse Heat Conduction Problem Using the Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Min

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to provide a numerical algorithm involving the combined use of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and the Galerkin finite element method for estimating the diffusion coefficient in an inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP. In the present study, the functional form of the diffusion coefficient is unknown a priori. The unknown diffusion coefficient is approximated by the polynomial form and the present numerical algorithm is employed to find the solution. Numerical experiments are presented to show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Tuff Dissolution and Precipitation Experiments: Validation of Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Coupled-Process Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, P. F.; Kneafsey, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to evaluate THC effects on flow in fractured media, we performed a laboratory experiment and numerical simulations to investigate mineral dissolution and precipitation. To replicate mineral dissolution by condensate in fractured tuff, deionized water equilibrated with carbon dioxide was flowed for 1,500 hours through crushed Yucca Mountain tuff at 94° C. The reacted water was collected and sampled for major dissolved species, total alkalinity, electrical conductivity, and pH. The resulting steady-state fluid composition had a total dissolved solids content of about 140 mg/L; silica was the dominant dissolved constituent. A portion of the steady-state reacted water was flowed at 10.8 mL/hr into a 31.7-cm tall, 16.2-cm wide vertically oriented planar fracture with a hydraulic aperture of 31 microns in a block of welded Topopah Spring tuff that was maintained at 80° C at the top and 130° C at the bottom. The fracture began to seal within five days. A 1-D plug-flow model using the TOUGHREACT code developed at Berkeley Lab was used to simulate mineral dissolution, and a 2-D model was developed to simulate the flow of mineralized water through a planar fracture, where boiling conditions led to mineral precipitation. Predicted concentrations of the major dissolved constituents for the tuff dissolution were within a factor of 2 of the measured average steady-state compositions. The fracture-plugging simulations result in the precipitation of amorphous silica at the base of the boiling front, leading to a hundred-fold decrease in fracture permeability in less than 6 days, consistent with the laboratory experiment. These results help validate the use of the TOUGHREACT code for THC modeling of the Yucca Mountain system. The experiment and simulations indicate that boiling and concomitant precipitation of amorphous silica could cause significant reductions in fracture porosity and permeability on a local scale. The TOUGHREACT code will be used

  6. Laboratory and numerical experiments on water and energy fluxes during freezing and thawing in the unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holländer, Hartmut; Montasir Islam, Md.; Šimunek, Jirka

    2017-04-01

    Frozen soil has a major effect in many hydrologic processes, and its effects are difficult to predict. A prime example is flood forecasting during spring snowmelt within the Canadian Prairies. One key driver for the extent of flooding is the antecedent soil moisture and the possibility for water to infiltrate into frozen soils. Therefore, these situations are crucial for accurate flood prediction during every spring. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the water flow and heat transport within HYDRUS-1D version 4.16 and with Hansson's model, which is a detailed freezing/thawing module (Hansson et al., 2004), to predict the impact of frozen and partly frozen soil on infiltration. We developed a standardized data set of water flow and heat transport into (partial) frozen soil by laboratory experiments using fine sand. Temperature, soil moisture, and percolated water were observed at different freezing conditions as well as at thawing conditions. Significant variation in soil moisture was found between the top and the bottom of the soil column at the starting of the thawing period. However, with increasing temperature, the lower depth of the soil column showed higher moisture as the soil became enriched with moisture due to the release of heat by soil particles during the thawing cycle. We applied vadose zone modeling using the results from the laboratory experiments. The simulated water content by HYDRUS-1D 4.16 showed large errors compared to the observed data showing by negative Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency. Hansson's model was not able to predict soil water fluxes due to its unstable behavior (Šimunek et al., 2016). The soil temperature profile simulated using HYDRUS-1D 4.16 was not able to predict the release of latent heat during the phase change of water that was visible in Hansson's model. Hansson's model includes the energy gain/loss due to the phase change in the amount of latent energy stored in the modified heat transport equation. However, in

  7. A three-dimensional stratigraphic model for aggrading submarine channels based on laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, A. B.; Komatsu, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Paola, C.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents deliver clastic sediment from continental margins to the deep ocean, and are the main driver of landscape and stratigraphic evolution in many low-relief, submarine environments. The sedimentary architecture of turbidites—including the spatial organization of coarse and fine sediments—is closely related to the aggradation, scour, and lateral shifting of channels. Seismic stratigraphy indicates that submarine, meandering channels often aggrade rapidly relative to lateral shifting, and develop channel sand bodies with high vertical connectivity. In comparison, the stratigraphic architecture developed by submarine, braided is relatively uncertain. We present a new stratigraphic model for submarine braided channels that integrates predictions from laboratory experiments and flow modeling with constraints from sediment cores. In the laboratory experiments, a saline density current developed subaqueous channels in plastic sediment. The channels aggraded to form a deposit with a vertical scale of approximately five channel depths. We collected topography data during aggradation to (1) establish relative stratigraphic age, and (2) estimate the sorting patterns of a hypothetical grain size distribution. We applied a numerical flow model to each topographic surface and used modeled flow depth as a proxy for relative grain size. We then conditioned the resulting stratigraphic model to observed grain size distributions using sediment core data from the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. Using this stratigraphic model, we establish new, quantitative predictions for the two- and three-dimensional connectivity of coarse sediment as a function of fine-sediment fraction. Using this case study as an example, we will highlight outstanding challenges in relating the evolution of low-relief landscapes to the stratigraphic record.

  8. Drag coefficient Variability and Thermospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Kenneth

    Satellite drag coefficients depend upon a variety of factors: The shape of the satellite, its altitude, the eccentricity of its orbit, the temperature and mean molecular mass of the ambient atmosphere, and the time in the sunspot cycle. At altitudes where the mean free path of the atmospheric molecules is large compared to the dimensions of the satellite, the drag coefficients can be determined from the theory of free-molecule flow. The dependence on altitude is caused by the concentration of atomic oxygen which plays an important role by its ability to adsorb on the satellite surface and thereby affect the energy loss of molecules striking the surface. The eccentricity of the orbit determines the satellite velocity at perigee, and therefore the energy of the incident molecules relative to the energy of adsorption of atomic oxygen atoms on the surface. The temperature of the ambient atmosphere determines the extent to which the random thermal motion of the molecules influences the momentum transfer to the satellite. The time in the sunspot cycle affects the ambient temperature as well as the concentration of atomic oxygen at a particular altitude. Tables and graphs will be used to illustrate the variability of drag coefficients. Before there were any measurements of gas-surface interactions in orbit, Izakov and Cook independently made an excellent estimate that the drag coefficient of satellites of compact shape would be 2.2. That numerical value, independent of altitude, was used by Jacchia to construct his model from the early measurements of satellite drag. Consequently, there is an altitude dependent bias in the model. From the sparce orbital experiments that have been done, we know that the molecules which strike satellite surfaces rebound in a diffuse angular distribution with an energy loss given by the energy accommodation coefficient. As more evidence accumulates on the energy loss, more realistic drag coefficients are being calculated. These improved drag

  9. Numerical experiment to estimate the validity of negative ion diagnostic using photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudini, N. [Laboratoire des plasmas de décharges, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout BP 17 Baba Hassen, 16081 Algiers (Algeria); Sirse, N.; Ellingboe, A. R. [Plasma Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Benallal, R. [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables, BP 119, Université Abou Bekr Belkaïd, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Taccogna, F. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e di Plasmi, CNR, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, (CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud), École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bendib, A. [Laboratoire d' Electronique Quantique, Faculté de Physique, USTHB, El Alia BP 32, Bab Ezzouar, 16111 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a critical assessment of the theory of photo-detachment diagnostic method used to probe the negative ion density and electronegativity α = n{sub -}/n{sub e}. In this method, a laser pulse is used to photo-detach all negative ions located within the electropositive channel (laser spot region). The negative ion density is estimated based on the assumption that the increase of the current collected by an electrostatic probe biased positively to the plasma is a result of only the creation of photo-detached electrons. In parallel, the background electron density and temperature are considered as constants during this diagnostics. While the numerical experiments performed here show that the background electron density and temperature increase due to the formation of an electrostatic potential barrier around the electropositive channel. The time scale of potential barrier rise is about 2 ns, which is comparable to the time required to completely photo-detach the negative ions in the electropositive channel (∼3 ns). We find that neglecting the effect of the potential barrier on the background plasma leads to an erroneous determination of the negative ion density. Moreover, the background electron velocity distribution function within the electropositive channel is not Maxwellian. This is due to the acceleration of these electrons through the electrostatic potential barrier. In this work, the validity of the photo-detachment diagnostic assumptions is questioned and our results illustrate the weakness of these assumptions.

  10. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  11. Using Multisite Experiments to Study Cross-Site Variation in Treatment Effects: A Hybrid Approach with Fixed Intercepts and A Random Treatment Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Howard S.; Raudenbush, Stephen W.; Weiss, Michael J.; Porter, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    The present article considers a fundamental question in evaluation research: "By how much do program effects vary across sites?" The article first presents a theoretical model of cross-site impact variation and a related estimation model with a random treatment coefficient and fixed site-specific intercepts. This approach eliminates…

  12. Detection and migration of gases in geological media: Experiments and numerical simulations at the Roselend Natural Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, S.

    2013-01-01

    Gas migration in rocks results from natural and artificial processes. Understanding gas migration matters for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), to improve the detection of underground nuclear explosions by their radioactive gases. This work concerns many other fields in Earth Sciences, for fundamental as well as applied science. Issues in improving the detection and the understanding of gas migration in geological media are the following. What are the driving forces of gas migration from depth to the surface? How much of the gases produced at depth do arrive at the surface? Does this migration lead to temporal delays and dilution between production and breakthrough at the surface? To answer these questions, this thesis is dedicated to the identification of gas transport mechanisms in fractured rocks, from both field experiments and numerical simulations. The Roselend Natural Laboratory (French Alps) is a unique facility for studying gas transport in the unsaturated zone at the field scale, representative of natural processes. Parameters and external forcings have been determined. A tunnel and an isolated chamber, at 55 m depth, as well as boreholes at depth and at the surface, allow to monitor gases that are present in the rocks. Pneumatic properties of the rocks, permeability and porosity, were determined at scales ranging from 1 to 55 m, from both pneumatic injection tests and pressure monitoring as well as from computational studies of fluid flow and transport in porous media. Inverse modeling was used to quantify the associated uncertainties. The results underline the strong spatial heterogeneity of fractured media. The natural dynamics of three gases, CO 2 , SF 6 and 222 Rn, was monitored continuously for more than one year. The results, interpreted with numerical simulations, determined that the processes controlling the natural dynamics, or baseline, of gases are atmospheric pressure fluctuations and water movements. Such water movements also

  13. Power1D: a Python toolbox for numerical power estimates in experiments involving one-dimensional continua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd C. Pataky

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The unit of experimental measurement in a variety of scientific applications is the one-dimensional (1D continuum: a dependent variable whose value is measured repeatedly, often at regular intervals, in time or space. A variety of software packages exist for computing continuum-level descriptive statistics and also for conducting continuum-level hypothesis testing, but very few offer power computing capabilities, where ‘power’ is the probability that an experiment will detect a true continuum signal given experimental noise. Moreover, no software package yet exists for arbitrary continuum-level signal/noise modeling. This paper describes a package called power1d which implements (a two analytical 1D power solutions based on random field theory (RFT and (b a high-level framework for computational power analysis using arbitrary continuum-level signal/noise modeling. First power1d’s two RFT-based analytical solutions are numerically validated using its random continuum generators. Second arbitrary signal/noise modeling is demonstrated to show how power1d can be used for flexible modeling well beyond the assumptions of RFT-based analytical solutions. Its computational demands are non-excessive, requiring on the order of only 30 s to execute on standard desktop computers, but with approximate solutions available much more rapidly. Its broad signal/noise modeling capabilities along with relatively rapid computations imply that power1d may be a useful tool for guiding experimentation involving multiple measurements of similar 1D continua, and in particular to ensure that an adequate number of measurements is made to detect assumed continuum signals.

  14. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  15. Transfer coefficients in ultracold strongly coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Vorob'ev, V. S.; Zelener, B. V.

    2018-03-01

    We use both analytical and molecular dynamic methods for electron transfer coefficients in an ultracold plasma when its temperature is small and the coupling parameter characterizing the interaction of electrons and ions exceeds unity. For these conditions, we use the approach of nearest neighbor to determine the average electron (ion) diffusion coefficient and to calculate other electron transfer coefficients (viscosity and electrical and thermal conductivities). Molecular dynamics simulations produce electronic and ionic diffusion coefficients, confirming the reliability of these results. The results compare favorably with experimental and numerical data from earlier studies.

  16. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  17. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  18. A Monte Carlo experiment to analyze the curse of dimensionality in estimating random coefficients models with a full variance–covariance matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta; Guevara, Cristian Angelo

    2012-01-01

    of parameters increases is usually known as the “curse of dimensionality” in the simulation methods. We investigate this problem in the case of the random coefficients Logit model. We compare the traditional Maximum Simulated Likelihood (MSL) method with two alternative estimation methods: the Expectation......–Maximization (EM) and the Laplace Approximation (HH) methods that do not require simulation. We use Monte Carlo experimentation to investigate systematically the performance of the methods under different circumstances, including different numbers of variables, sample sizes and structures of the variance...

  19. CFD Modeling of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Self-Pressurization and Spray Bar Mixing Experiments in Normal Gravity: Effect of the Accommodation Coefficient on the Tank Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    A CFD model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank is utilized in this paper to model the MHTB self-pressurization experiment. The kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensi ng interfacial mass flows in this model. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial mass transfer rate on the tank pressure during tank selfpressurization is studied. The values of the accommodation coefficient which were considered in this study vary from 1.0e-3 to 1.0e-1 for the explicit VOF model and from 1.0e-4 to 1.0e-3 for the implicit VOF model. The ullage pressure evolutions are compared against experimental data. A CFD model for controlling pressure in cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid into the ullage is also presented. The Euler-Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling the interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet-ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux, as well as droplets trajectories, size distribution and temperatures predicted by the model are presented. The ul lage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial and droplet mass transfer rates on the tank pressure during mixing of the vapor using spray is studied. The values used for the accommodation coefficient at the interface vary from 1.0e-5 to 1.0e-2. The droplet accommodation coefficient values vary from 2.0e-6 to 1.0e-4.

  20. Super-thermal particles in hot plasmas—Kinetic models, numerical solution strategies, and comparison to tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauber, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The excitation of collective instabilities by super-thermal particles in hot plasmas and the related transport processes attract increasing interest due to their fundamental challenges for theoretical models and their practical importance for burning fusion plasmas. In fact, the physics of a self-heated thermonuclear plasma due to fusion-born 3.5 MeV α-particles is one of the most important outstanding fundamental research topics on the way to a fusion power plant with magnetic confinement. Within the last 10 years significant advances on both the theoretical and the experimental sides have been made leading to a more detailed and quantitative understanding of fast-particle-driven instabilities. On the theoretical side, the crucial step was to move from fluid models for the plasma background with a hybrid kinetic expression for the energetic particles to a fully kinetic model for all the plasma species, i.e. background ions, background electrons, and fast ions. This improvement allows one to describe consistently the resonant interaction between global plasma waves such as shear Alfvén and Alfvén–acoustic waves, and the particles via Landau damping, i.e. the dynamics parallel to the magnetic background field. Also, mode conversion mechanisms require the inclusion of background ion scales in a kinetic, non-perturbative way. This accurate treatment of the plasma background leads not only to changes in the linear mode properties such as frequency, growth/damping rate, and mode structure but also influences the non-linear dynamics. Due to major advances, innovations and installation of diagnostics in present day experiments, this comparison can be carried out in a more detailed and comprehensive way than a few years ago. For example, the measurement of damping rates via active external antennas, the imaging of 2D mode structures via electron–cyclotron-emission spectroscopy, and the direct detection of escaping fast ions allow to diagnose various kinetic features

  1. A drying coefficient for building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    coefficient is defined which can be determined based on measured drying data. The correlation of this coefficient with the water absorption and the vapour diffusion coefficient is analyzed and its additional information content is critically challenged. As result, a drying coefficient has been derived......The drying experiment is an important element of the hygrothermal characterisation of building materials. Contrary to other moisture transport experiments as the vapour diffusion and the water absorption test, it is until now not possible to derive a simple coefficient for the drying. However......, in many cases such a coefficient would be highly appreciated, e.g. in interaction of industry and research or for the distinction and selection of suitable building materials throughout design and practise. This article first highlights the importance of drying experiments for hygrothermal...

  2. Comparison of Speed-Up Over Hills Derived from Wind-Tunnel Experiments, Wind-Loading Standards, and Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei Pirooz, Amir A.; Flay, Richard G. J.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluate the accuracy of the speed-up provided in several wind-loading standards by comparison with wind-tunnel measurements and numerical predictions, which are carried out at a nominal scale of 1:500 and full-scale, respectively. Airflow over two- and three-dimensional bell-shaped hills is numerically modelled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method with a pressure-driven atmospheric boundary layer and three different turbulence models. Investigated in detail are the effects of grid size on the speed-up and flow separation, as well as the resulting uncertainties in the numerical simulations. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical prediction of speed-up, as well as the wake region size and location, with that according to large-eddy simulations and the wind-tunnel results. The numerical results demonstrate the ability to predict the airflow over a hill with good accuracy with considerably less computational time than for large-eddy simulation. Numerical simulations for a three-dimensional hill show that the speed-up and the wake region decrease significantly when compared with the flow over two-dimensional hills due to the secondary flow around three-dimensional hills. Different hill slopes and shapes are simulated numerically to investigate the effect of hill profile on the speed-up. In comparison with more peaked hill crests, flat-topped hills have a lower speed-up at the crest up to heights of about half the hill height, for which none of the standards gives entirely satisfactory values of speed-up. Overall, the latest versions of the National Building Code of Canada and the Australian and New Zealand Standard give the best predictions of wind speed over isolated hills.

  3. Safety Analysis in Large Volume Vacuum Systems Like Tokamak: Experiments and Numerical Simulation to Analyze Vacuum Ruptures Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Malizia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large volume vacuum systems are used in many industrial operations and research laboratories. Accidents in these systems should have a relevant economical and safety impact. A loss of vacuum accident (LOVA due to a failure of the main vacuum vessel can result in a fast pressurization of the vessel and consequent mobilization dispersion of hazardous internal material through the braches. It is clear that the influence of flow fields, consequence of accidents like LOVA, on dust resuspension is a key safety issue. In order to develop this analysis an experimental facility is been developed: STARDUST. This last facility has been used to improve the knowledge about LOVA to replicate a condition more similar to appropriate operative condition like to kamaks. By the experimental data the boundary conditions have been extrapolated to give the proper input for the 2D thermofluid-dynamics numerical simulations, developed by the commercial CFD numerical code. The benchmark of numerical simulation results with the experimental ones has been used to validate and tune the 2D thermofluid-dynamics numerical model that has been developed by the authors to replicate the LOVA conditions inside STARDUST. In present work, the facility, materials, numerical model, and relevant results will be presented.

  4. Cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams: experiment and simulations on the numerical influence of the steel-concrete bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, L.; Torre-Casanova, A.; Pinelli, X.; Davenne, L.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are provided in this contribution to study the global and cracking behaviors of two reinforced concrete beams subjected to four point bending. Experimentally, the use of image correlation technique enables to obtain precise information concerning the cracking properties (spacing, cumulated, maximum and mean values of the opening). Numerically, two simulations are compared taking into account a bond model between steel and concrete or supposing a perfect relation between the two materials. In both cases, a good agreement is achieved between numerical and experimental results even if the introduction of the bond effects has a direct influence during the development of the cracks (better agreement during the 'active' cracking phase). (authors)

  5. Hot-blade cutting of EPS foam for double-curved surfaces—numerical simulation and experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril P.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper, experimental and numerical studies of a newly developed process of Hot-Blade Cutting used for free forming of double-curved surfaces and cost effective rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene foam is carried out. The experimental part of the study falls in two parts...... during the cutting process. A novel measurement method for determination of kerfwidth (i.e., the gap space after material removal) applying a commercially available large-scale optical 3D scanning technique was developed and used. A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical numerical model for Hot...

  6. Task A, High energy physics program experiment and theory: Task B, High energy physics program numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses progress in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Fixed target experiments, collider experiments, computing, networking, VAX upgrade, SSC preparation, detector development, and particle theory are some of the areas covered

  7. An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE to Assess the Impact of Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL Measurements on the Numerical Simulation of a Tropical Cyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of wind observations has been recognized for many years. However, wind observations—especially three-dimensional global wind measurements—are very limited. A satellite-based Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL is proposed to measure three-dimensional wind profiles using remote sensing techniques. Assimilating these observations into a mesoscale model is expected to improve the performance of the numerical weather prediction (NWP models. In order to examine the potential impact of the DWL three-dimensional wind profile observations on the numerical simulation and prediction of tropical cyclones, a set of observing simulation system experiments (OSSEs is performed using the advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model and its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR data assimilation system. Results indicate that assimilating the DWL wind observations into the mesoscale numerical model has significant potential for improving tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasts.

  8. Design and implementation of new design of numerical experiments for non linear models; Conception et mise en oeuvre de nouvelles methodes d'elaboration de plans d'experiences pour l'apprentissage de modeles non lineaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazut, St

    2007-03-15

    This thesis addresses the problem of the construction of surrogate models in numerical simulation. Whenever numerical experiments are costly, the simulation model is complex and difficult to use. It is important then to select the numerical experiments as efficiently as possible in order to minimize their number. In statistics, the selection of experiments is known as optimal experimental design. In the context of numerical simulation where no measurement uncertainty is present, we describe an alternative approach based on statistical learning theory and re-sampling techniques. The surrogate models are constructed using neural networks and the generalization error is estimated by leave-one-out, cross-validation and bootstrap. It is shown that the bootstrap can control the over-fitting and extend the concept of leverage for non linear in their parameters surrogate models. The thesis describes an iterative method called LDR for Learner Disagreement from experiment Re-sampling, based on active learning using several surrogate models constructed on bootstrap samples. The method consists in adding new experiments where the predictors constructed from bootstrap samples disagree most. We compare the LDR method with other methods of experimental design such as D-optimal selection. (author)

  9. Origin of preferential flow and its controlling factors on emission potential using numerical simulations and lab experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baviskar, S.M.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    We believe the unsaturated and heterogeneous nature of landfills leads to the emergence of preferential pathways of water and dissolved compounds through the waste body. In this research we explore the origin of preferential flow in a porous media with a deterministic numerical model. In this model

  10. Numerical-Technological Skills and Work Experience in the Perceived Usefulness in an Accounting Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrador-Alcaide, Teresa Carmen; Hernández-Solís, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the perceived usefulness of a set of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) applied in a virtual learning environment (VLE) in a distance education model. We analysed whether the numerical and technological preferences of the students could explain the perceived usefulness related to the ICT…

  11. Numerical prediction and performance experiment in a deep-well centrifugal pump with different impeller outlet width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weidong; Zhou, Ling; Lu, Weigang; Pei, Bing; Lang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The existing research of the deep-well centrifugal pump mainly focuses on reduce the manufacturing cost and improve the pump performance, and how to combine above two aspects together is the most difficult and important topic. In this study, the performances of the deep-well centrifugal pump with four different impeller outlet widths are studied by the numerical, theoretical and experimental methods in this paper. Two stages deep-well centrifugal pump equipped with different impellers are simulated employing the commercial CFD software to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional incompressible steady flow. The sensitivity analyses of the grid size and turbulence model have been performed to improve numerical accuracy. The flow field distributions are acquired and compared under the design operating conditions, including the static pressure, turbulence kinetic energy and velocity. The prototype is manufactured and tested to certify the numerical predicted performance. The numerical results of pump performance are higher than the test results, but their change trends have an acceptable agreement with each other. The performance results indicted that the oversize impeller outlet width leads to poor pump performances and increasing shaft power. Changing the performance of deep-well centrifugal pump by alter impeller outlet width is practicable and convenient, which is worth popularizing in the engineering application. The proposed research enhances the theoretical basis of pump design to improve the performance and reduce the manufacturing cost of deep-well centrifugal pump.

  12. Evaluation of Rock Joint Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audy, Ondřej; Ficker, Tomáš

    2017-10-01

    A computer method for evaluation of rock joint coefficients is described and several applications are presented. The method is based on two absolute numerical indicators that are formed by means of the Fourier replicas of rock joint profiles. The first indicator quantifies the vertical depth of profiles and the second indicator classifies wavy character of profiles. The absolute indicators have replaced the formerly used relative indicators that showed some artificial behavior in some cases. This contribution is focused on practical computations testing the functionality of the newly introduced indicators.

  13. Nozzle geometry variations on the discharge coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.A. Alam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical works have been conducted to investigate the effect of nozzle geometries on the discharge coefficient. Several contoured converging nozzles with finite radius of curvatures, conically converging nozzles and conical divergent orifices have been employed in this investigation. Each nozzle and orifice has a nominal exit diameter of 12.7×10−3 m. A 3rd order MUSCL finite volume method of ANSYS Fluent 13.0 was used to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations in simulating turbulent flows through various nozzle inlet geometries. The numerical model was validated through comparison between the numerical results and experimental data. The results obtained show that the nozzle geometry has pronounced effect on the sonic lines and discharge coefficients. The coefficient of discharge was found differ from unity due to the non-uniformity of flow parameters at the nozzle exit and the presence of boundary layer as well.

  14. On computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, I. A.; Vinnikov, E. L.

    The algorithm of computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives is proposed with application of recurrent relations. The A.G.M.-method is used for the calculation of values L0(0), L0(1). The FORTRAN-program corresponding to the algorithm is given. The precision control was provided with numerical integrating by Simpsons method. The behavior of Laplace's coefficients and their third derivatives whith varying indices K, n for fixed values of the α-parameter is presented graphically.

  15. Project Fog Drops 5. Task 1: A numerical model of advection fog. Task 2: Recommendations for simplified individual zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C. W.; Eadie, W. J.; Katz, U.; Kocmond, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model was used to investigate the formation of marine advection fog. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, horizontal wind, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical cross section of the atmosphere as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection, as well as radiative cooling and drop sedimentation. The model is designed to simulate the formation, development, or dissipation of advection fog in response to transfer of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and the surface as driven by advection over horizontal discontinuities in the surface temperature. Results from numerical simulations of advection fog formation are discussed with reference to observations of marine fog. A survey of candidate fog or cloud microphysics experiments which might be performed in the low gravity environment of a shuttle-type spacecraft in presented. Recommendations are given for relatively simple experiments which are relevent to fog modification problems.

  16. Importance of root HTO uptake in controlling land-surface tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition: a numerical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masakazu; Nagai, Haruyasu; Koarashi, Jun

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of belowground root uptake of tritiated water (HTO) in controlling land-surface tritium (T) dynamics, a sophisticated numerical model predicting tritium behavior in an atmosphere-vegetation-soil system was developed, and numerical experiments were conducted using the model. The developed model covered physical tritiated hydrogen (HT) transport in a multilayered atmosphere and soil, as well as microbial oxidation of HT to HTO in the soil, and it was incorporated into a well-established HTO-transfer organically bound tritium (OBT)-formation model. The model performance was tested through the simulation of an existing HT-release experiment. Numerical experiments involving a hypothetical acute HT exposure to a grassland field with a range of rooting depths showed that the HTO release from the leaves to the atmosphere, driven by the root uptake of the deposited HTO, can exceed the HTO evaporation from the ground surface to the atmosphere when root water absorption preferentially occurs beneath the ground surface. Such enhanced soil-leaf-atmosphere HTO transport, caused by the enhanced root HTO uptake, increased HTO concentrations in both the surface atmosphere and in the cellular water of the leaf. Consequently, leaf OBT assimilation calculated for shallow rooting depths increased by nearly an order of magnitude compared to that for large rooting depths. - Highlights: ► A model that calculates HT deposition from atmosphere to soil was developed. ► Tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition was studied by numerical experiments. ► OBT formation highly depends on magnitude of uptake of the deposited HTO by roots.

  17. Numerical experiments with assimilation of the mean and unresolved meteorological conditions into large-eddy simulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Esau, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Micrometeorology, city comfort, land use management and air quality monitoring increasingly become important environmental issues. To serve the needs, meteorology needs to achieve a serious advance in representation and forecast on micro-scales (meters to 100 km) called meteorological terra incognita. There is a suitable numerical tool, namely, the large-eddy simulation modelling (LES) to support the development. However, at present, the LES is of limited utility for applications. The study a...

  18. Numerical experiments on the solution of the Holmholtz equation in the case of domains of complicated boundary shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, G.S.; Laura, P.A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Domains of complicated boundary shape are of great practical importance in several fields of technology and applied science; e.g. solid propellant rocket grains, electromagnetic and acoustic waveguides, and certain elements used in nuclear engineering. The technical literature contains very few comparative studies of analytical and numerical solutions when dealing with such rather complex geometries. The present study constitutes an effort in that direction. (Auth.)

  19. Two-phase flow experiments in emergency core cooling feed through the hot leg for developing numerical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, T.; Meyer, L.; Schulenberg, T.; Laurien, E.

    2006-01-01

    When a leakage, a 'loss-of-coolant accident', occurs in a light water reactor, the emergency cooling system is able to supply large amounts of coolant to ensure residual heat removal. This supply can be routed through a special emergency cooling pipe, the 'scoop', into the horizontal section of the main coolant pipe, the 'hot leg'. At the same time, hot steam from the superheated, partly voided core flows against the coolant. This gives rise to a two-phase flow in the opposite direction. A factor of primary interest in this situation is whether the coolant supplied by the emergency cooling system will reach the reactor core. The research project is being conducted in order to compute the rate of water supply by numerical methods. The WENKA test facility has been designed and built at the Karlsruhe Research Center to verify numerical calculations. It can be used to study the fluid dynamics phenomena expected to arise in emergency coolant feeding into the hot leg; the necessary local data can be determined experimentally. An extensive database for validating the numerical calculations is then available to complete the experimental work. (orig.)

  20. The influence of ground heterogeneity on the migration of radionuclides in the soil and soil-water system. Numerical and laboratory experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loxham, M.; van Meurs, G.A.M.; Weststrate, F.A.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of macro scale soil structures, such as lenses and inclusions, on the migration patterns of leached components from a shallow burial trench for radioactive waste, a theoretical and experimental study has been carried out. In the study the unsaturated as well as the saturated zone has been considered. The objectives of the study are two-fold: 1. to assess the importance of macro-structure in the soil for typical parameter choices associated with a generic shallow burial site. 2. to examine various models for predicting the migration patterns in the light of the soil macro-structure. For the saturated aquifer pathways fully determinate calculations have been made, using the preverified numerical contaminant transport code VERA. Laboratory experiments on thin-slit models resulted in substantial qualitative and reasonable conformation of the numerical results. As for the unsaturated pathway no such determinate numerical model is available, several statistic and analytical models have been used to achieve the first objective. In this case the second objective cannot be achieved without recourse to an experimental program. The unsaturated thin-slit laboratory experiments, however, have not met with experimental success to date. The report presents the results of the theoretical and laboratory experiments. Furthermore a short analysis of the practical consequences of these results is given

  1. One-dimensional numerical simulations of the low-frequency electric fields in the CRIT 1 and CRIT 2 rocket experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, O.; Brenning, N.

    1992-04-01

    One-dimensional numerical particle simulations have been performed of the ionospheric barium injection experiments CRIT 1 and CRIT 2, using a realistic model for the shape and the time development of the injected neutral cloud. The electrodynamic response of the ionosphere to these injections is modelled by magnetic-field-aligned currents, using the concept of Alfven conductivity. The results shows very good agreement with the CRIT data, especially concerning the low-frequency oscillations that were seen after the initial phase of the injections. The shapes, amplitudes, phases, and decay times of the electric fields are all very close to the values measured in the CRIT experiments. (au)

  2. Laboratory-Scale Column Testing Using IONSIV IE-911 for Removing Cesium from Acidic Tank Waste Simulant. 2: Determination of Cesium Exchange Capacity and Effective Mass Transfer Coefficient from a 500-cm3 Column Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.J. Tranter; R.D. Tillotson; T.A. Todd

    2005-01-01

    A semi-scale column test was performed using a commercial form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) for removing radio-cesium from a surrogate acidic tank solution, which represents liquid waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The engineered form of CST ion exchanger, known as IONSIVtmIE-911 (UOP, Mt. Laurel, NJ, USA), was tested in a 500-cm3 column to obtain a cesium breakthrough curve. The cesium exchange capacity of this column matched that obtained from previous testing with a 15-mc3 column. A numerical algorithm using implicit finite difference approximations was developed to solve the governing mass transport equations for the CST columns. An effective mass transfer coefficient was derived from solving these equations for previously reported 15 cm3 tests. The effective mass transfer coefficient was then used to predict the cesium breakthrough curve for the 500-cm3 column and compared to the experimental data reported in this paper. The calculated breakthrough curve showed excellent agreement with the data from the 500-cm3 column even though the interstitial velocity was a factor of two greater. Thus, this approach should provide a reasonable method for scale up to larger columns for treating actual tank waste

  3. An experiment to measure lambda=G sub A /G sub V from a combination of angular correlation coefficients in the beta decay of polarized neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kuznetsov, I A; Serebrov, A P; Solovei, V A; Stepanenko, I V; Vasilev, A V; Mostovoy, Y A; Zimmer, O; Yerozolimsky, B G; Dewey, M S; Wietfeldt, F E

    2000-01-01

    A technique is described which allows us to measure the ratio lambda=G sub A /G sub V of the weak axial-vector and vector coupling constants in neutron decay without any measurement of the neutron beam polarization. lambda is determined from a combination of the parity-odd angular correlations sigma-> centre dot p-> sub e and sigma-> centre dot p-> subnu between the neutron spin sigma-> and the electron momentum p-> sub e and the anti-neutrino momentum p-> subnu, respectively, both of which are measured in a single experiment using the same neutron beam. A description of the experiment and the results of the first run at the cold neutron beam facility at the Institut Laue-Langevin are presented.

  4. On a possibility of inelasticity partial coefficient K sub gamma determination in pi C and pi Pb interactions at 10 to the 14th power eV (experiment PAMIR 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, A. S.; Cherdyntseva, K. V.; Guseva, Z. M.; Denisova, V. G.; Dunaevsky, A. M.; Kanevskaya, E. A.; Maximenko, V. M.; Nam, R. A.; Pashkov, S. V.; Puchkov, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation of hadron-nuclear interactions in Pamir experiment is carried out by means of X-ray emulsion chambers of two types: carbon (C) and lead (Pb). While comparing the results from the chambers of both types it was found a discrepancy in n sub h and E sub h(1)R values. The observed discrepancy in C and Pb chambers is connected with the difference in values of effective coefficients of energy transfer to the soft component K sub eff for C and Pb chambers.

  5. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  6. Contributions to the uncertainty management in numerical modelization: wave propagation in random media and analysis of computer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iooss, B.

    2009-01-01

    The present document constitutes my Habilitation thesis report. It recalls my scientific activity of the twelve last years, since my PhD thesis until the works completed as a research engineer at CEA Cadarache. The two main chapters of this document correspond to two different research fields both referring to the uncertainty treatment in engineering problems. The first chapter establishes a synthesis of my work on high frequency wave propagation in random medium. It more specifically relates to the study of the statistical fluctuations of acoustic wave travel-times in random and/or turbulent media. The new results mainly concern the introduction of the velocity field statistical anisotropy in the analytical expressions of the travel-time statistical moments according to those of the velocity field. This work was primarily carried by requirements in geophysics (oil exploration and seismology). The second chapter is concerned by the probabilistic techniques to study the effect of input variables uncertainties in numerical models. My main applications in this chapter relate to the nuclear engineering domain which offers a large variety of uncertainty problems to be treated. First of all, a complete synthesis is carried out on the statistical methods of sensitivity analysis and global exploration of numerical models. The construction and the use of a meta-model (inexpensive mathematical function replacing an expensive computer code) are then illustrated by my work on the Gaussian process model (kriging). Two additional topics are finally approached: the high quantile estimation of a computer code output and the analysis of stochastic computer codes. We conclude this memory with some perspectives about the numerical simulation and the use of predictive models in industry. This context is extremely positive for future researches and application developments. (author)

  7. Numerical experiment designs: study of the vibrational behaviour of the control rod cluster of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulier, B.; Bosselut, D.; Regnier, G.

    1997-01-01

    A finite element model has been performed at EDF to simulate the vibrations of control rod cluster assembly and to analyse the wear phenomenon of control rods. A parametrical study bas been performed for a given computer experiment domain with an experimental design method. The building of the computer experiment design is described. The influence of parameters on calculated mean wear power has been determined along rods and responses surfaces have been easily approximated. Systematism and closeness of experiment design technique is underlined. (authors)

  8. Numerical experiments in finite element analysis of thermoelastoplastic behaviour of materials. Further developments of the PLASTEF code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basombrio, F.G.; Sarmiento, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    In a previous paper the finite element code PLASTEF for the numerical simulation of thermoelastoplastic behaviour of materials was presented in its general outline. This code employs an initial stress incremental procedure for given histories of loads and temperature. It has been formulated for medium sized computers. The present work is an extension of the previous paper to consider additional aspects of the variable temperature case. Non-trivial tests of this type of situation are described. Finally, details are given of some concrete applications to the prediction of thermoelastoplastic collapse of nuclear fuel element cladding. (author)

  9. Numerical analysis and scale experiment design of the hot water layer system of the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweizer, Fernando Lage Araújo

    2014-01-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) consists in a 30 MW open pool research reactor and its design is currently in development. The RMB is intended to produce a neutron flux applied at material irradiation for radioisotope production and materials and nuclear fuel tests. The reactor is immersed in a deep water pool needed for radiation shielding and thermal protection. A heating and purifying system is applied in research reactors with high thermal power in order to create a Hot Water Layer (HWL) on the pool top preventing that contaminated water from the reactor core neighboring reaches its surface reducing the room radiation dose rate. This dissertation presents a study of the HWL behavior during the reactor operation first hours where perturbations due to the cooling system and pool heating induce a mixing flow in the HWL reducing its protection. Numerical simulations using the CFD code CFX 14.0 have been performed for theoretical dose rate estimation during reactor operation, for a 1/10 scaled down model using dimensional analysis and mesh testing as an initial verification of the commercial code application. Equipment and sensor needed for an experimental bench project were defined by the CFD numerical simulation. (author)

  10. Comparison of Conventional Deep Drawing, Hydromechanical Deep-Drawing and High Pressure Sheet Metal Forming by Numerical Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oender, I. Erkan; Tekkaya, A. Erman

    2005-01-01

    Increasing use of new technologies in automotive and aircraft applications requires intensive research and developments on sheet metal forming processes. This study focuses on the assessment of sheet hydroforming, hydro-mechanical deep drawing and conventional deep-drawing processes by performing a systematic analysis by numerical simulations. Circular, elliptic, rectangular and square cross-section cups have been selected for the geometry spectrum. Within the range of each cross section, depth, drawing ratio and fillet radii have been altered systematically. St14 stainless steel has been used as the material throughout the study. The deformation behavior has been described by an elasto-plastic material model and all numerical simulations have been carried out by using a dynamic-explicit commercial finite element code. During the analyses each workpiece is produced by the three competing processes. The analyses results such as sheet thickness distribution, necking, forming of radii etc., are used for assessing the success of each forming process alternative. The analyses revealed that depending on the workpiece geometry and dimensional properties certain processes are preferable for obtaining satisfactory products. The process windows for each process have been established based on the analyzed parameters of the three different product geometries. This data is expected to be useful for selecting the appropriate production process for a given workpiece geometry

  11. Determining the Viscosity Coefficient for Viscoelastic Wave Propagation in Rock Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Leilei; Zhu, Wancheng; Li, Shaohua; Guan, Kai

    2018-05-01

    Rocks with microdefects exhibit viscoelastic behavior during stress wave propagation. The viscosity coefficient of the wave can be used to characterize the attenuation as the wave propagates in rock. In this study, a long artificial bar with a readily adjustable viscosity coefficient was fabricated to investigate stress wave attenuation. The viscoelastic behavior of the artificial bar under dynamic loading was investigated, and the initial viscoelastic coefficient was obtained based on the amplitude attenuation of the incident harmonic wave. A one-dimensional wave propagation program was compiled to reproduce the time history of the stress wave measured during the experiments, and the program was well fitted to the Kelvin-Voigt model. The attenuation and dispersion of the stress wave in long artificial viscoelastic bars were quantified to accurately determine the viscoelastic coefficient. Finally, the method used to determine the viscoelastic coefficient of a long artificial bar based on the experiments and numerical simulations was extended to determine the viscoelastic coefficient of a short rock bar. This study provides a new method of determining the viscosity coefficient of rock.

  12. Static coefficient of friction between stainless steel and PMMA used in cemented hip and knee implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño, N; Groppetti, R; Senin, N

    2006-11-01

    Design of cemented hip and knee implants, oriented to improve the longevity of artificial joints, is largely based on numerical models. The static coefficient of friction between the implant and the bone cement is necessary to characterize the interface conditions in these models and must be accurately provided. The measurement of this coefficient using a repeatable and reproducible methodology for materials used in total hip arthroplasty is missing from the literature. A micro-topographic surface analysis characterized the surfaces of the specimens used in the experiments. The coefficient of friction between stainless steel and bone cement in dry and wet conditions using bovine serum was determined using a prototype computerized sliding friction tester. The effects of surface roughness (polished versus matt) and of contact pressure on the coefficient of friction have also been investigated. The serum influences little the coefficient of friction for the matt steel surface, where the mechanical interactions due to higher roughness are still the most relevant factor. However, for polished steel surfaces, the restraining effect of proteins plays a very relevant role in increasing the coefficient of friction. When the coefficient of friction is used in finite element analysis, it is used for the debonded stem-cement situation. It can thus be assumed that serum will propagate between the stem and the cement mantle. The authors believe that the use of a static coefficient of friction of 0.3-0.4, measured in the present study, is appropriate in finite element models.

  13. Development of a numerical experiment technique to solve inverse gamma-ray transport problems with application to nondestructive assay of nuclear waste barrels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.J.; Anghaie, S.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical experimental technique is presented to find an optimum solution to an undetermined inverse gamma-ray transport problem involving the nondestructive assay of radionuclide inventory in a nuclear waste drum. The method introduced is an optimization scheme based on performing a large number of numerical simulations that account for the counting statistics, the nonuniformity of source distribution, and the heterogeneous density of the self-absorbing medium inside the waste drum. The simulation model uses forward projection and backward reconstruction algorithms. The forward projection algorithm uses randomly selected source distribution and a first-flight kernel method to calculate external detector responses. The backward reconstruction algorithm uses the conjugate gradient with nonnegative constraint or the maximum likelihood expectation maximum method to reconstruct the source distribution based on calculated detector responses. Total source activity is determined by summing the reconstructed activity of each computational grid. By conducting 10,000 numerical simulations, the error bound and the associated confidence level for the prediction of total source activity are determined. The accuracy and reliability of the simulation model are verified by performing a series of experiments in a 208-ell waste barrel. Density heterogeneity is simulated by using different materials distributed in 37 egg-crate-type compartments simulating a vertical segment of the barrel. Four orthogonal detector positions are used to measure the emerging radiation field from the distributed source. Results of the performed experiments are in full agreement with the estimated error and the confidence level, which are predicted by the simulation model

  14. Diffusion Coefficients of Several Aqueous Alkanolamine Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Erwin D.; Riele, Marcel J.M. te; Versteeg, Geert F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1993-01-01

    The Taylor dispersion technique was applied for the determination of diffusion coefficients of various systems. Experiments with the system KCl in water showed that the experimental setup provides accurate data. For the alkanolamines monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methyldiethanolamine

  15. Axially symmetric reconstruction of plasma emission and absorption coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lixin; Jia Hui; Yang Jiankun; Li Xiujian; Chen Shaorong; Liu Xishun

    2013-01-01

    A layered structure imaging model is developed in order to reconstruct emission coefficients and absorption coefficients simultaneously, in laser fusion core plasma diagnostics. A novel axially symmetric reconstruction method that utilizes the LM (Levenberg-Marquardt) nonlinear least squares minimization algorithm is proposed based on the layered structure. Numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method is sufficiently accurate to reconstruct emission coefficients and absorption coefficients, and when the standard deviation of noise is 0.01, the errors of emission coefficients and absorption coefficients are 0.17, 0.22, respectively. Furthermore, this method could perform much better on reconstruction effect compared with traditional inverse Abel transform algorithms. (authors)

  16. Numerical experiments on charging of a spherical body in a plasma with Maxwellian distributions of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovsky, Victor L.; Kiselyov, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    New results of numerical simulation of collisionless plasma perturbation caused by a sphere absorbing electrons and ions are presented. Consideration is given to nonstationary phenomena accompanying the process of charging as well as to plasma steady state reached at long times. Corresponding asymptotic values of charges of the sphere and trapped-ion cloud around it have been found along with self-consistent electric field pattern depending on parameters of the unperturbed plasma. It is established that contribution of the trapped ions to screening of the charged sphere can be quite significant, so that the screening becomes essentially nonlinear in nature. A simple interconnection between the sphere radius, electron and ion Debye lengths has been revealed as the condition for maximum trapped-ion effect. Kinetic structure of the space charge induced in the plasma is discussed with relation to the specific form of the unperturbed charged particle distribution functions.

  17. Fully developed laminar flow of non-Newtonian liquids through annuli: comparison of numerical calculations with experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudier, M.P.; Smith, S. [Department of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Oliveira, P.J. [Departamento de Engenharia Electromecanica, Universidade da Beira Interior, Rua Marques D' Avila e Boloma, 6200 Covilha (Portugal); Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEMEGI, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    Experimental data are reported for fully developed laminar flow of a shear-thinning liquid through both a concentric and an 80% eccentric annulus with and without centrebody rotation. The working fluid was an aqueous solution of 0.1% xanthan gum and 0.1% carboxymethylcellulose for which the flow curve is well represented by the Cross model. Comparisons are reported between numerical calculations and the flow data, as well as with other laminar annular-flow data for a variety of shear-thinning liquids previously reported in the literature. In general, the calculations are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental data, even in situations where viscoelastic effects, neglected in the calculations, would be expected to play a role. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of different soil water extraction systems for the prognoses of solute transport at the field scale using numerical simulations, field and lysimeter experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weihermueller, L

    2005-07-01

    To date, the understanding of processes, factors, and interactions that influence the amount of extracted water and the solute composition sampled with suction cups is limited. But this information is required for process description of solute transport in natural soils. Improved system understanding can lead to a low cost and easy to install water sampling system which can help to predict solute transport in natural soils for the benefit of environmental protection. The main objectives of this work were to perform numerical simulations with different boundary conditions and to implement the findings in the interpretation of the lysimeter and field experiments. In a first part of this thesis, theoretical considerations on the processes affecting the spatial influence of a suction cup in soil and changes in solute transport initiated by the suction cups are presented, including testing and validation of available model and experimental approaches. In the second part, a detailed experimental study was conducted to obtain data for the comparison of the different soil water sampling systems. Finally, the numerical experiments of the suction cup influence were used for the interpretation of the experimental data. The main goals are summarized as follows: - Characterization of the suction cup activity domain (SCAD), suction cup extraction domain (SCED) and suction cup sampling area (SCSA) of active suction cups (definitions are given in Chapter 6). - Determination of the boundary conditions and soil properties [e.g. infiltration, applied suction, duration of water extraction, soil hydraulic properties and soil heterogeneity] affecting the activity domain, extraction domain and sampling area of a suction cup. - Identification of processes that change the travel time and travel time variance of solutes extracted by suction cups. - Validation of the numerically derived data with analytical and experimental data from literature. - Comparison of the experimental data obtained

  19. Numerical relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piran, T.

    1982-01-01

    There are many recent developments in numerical relativity, but there remain important unsolved theoretical and practical problems. The author reviews existing numerical approaches to solution of the exact Einstein equations. A framework for classification and comparison of different numerical schemes is presented. Recent numerical codes are compared using this framework. The discussion focuses on new developments and on currently open questions, excluding a review of numerical techniques. (Auth.)

  20. Numerical analysis of resonances induced by s wave neutrons in transmission time-of-flight experiments with a computer IBM 7094 II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corge, Ch.

    1969-01-01

    Numerical analysis of transmission resonances induced by s wave neutrons in time-of-flight experiments can be achieved in a fairly automatic way on an IBM 7094/II computer. The involved computations are carried out following a four step scheme: 1 - experimental raw data are processed to obtain the resonant transmissions, 2 - values of experimental quantities for each resonance are derived from the above transmissions, 3 - resonance parameters are determined using a least square method to solve the over determined system obtained by equalling theoretical functions to the correspondent experimental values. Four analysis methods are gathered in the same code, 4 - graphical control of the results is performed. (author) [fr

  1. Numerical simulations and analysis for the Aespoe pillar stability experiment. Part 1. Continuum based approaches using finite element method and comparison with other analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Koyama, Tomofumi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nakama, Shigeo; Fujita, Tomoo

    2013-01-01

    DECOVALEX-2011 is an international cooperation project for enhancing the numerical models of radioactive waste repositories. In DECOVALEX-2011 project, the failure mechanism during excavation and heating processes observed in the Aespoe pillar stability experiment, which was carried out at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, were simulated using Finite Element Method. When the calibrated parameters were used, simulation results agree qualitatively well with the experimental results. Therefore, it can be said that the spalling phenomenon is expressible even by the application with the continuum model by the use of the suitable parameters. (author)

  2. Determination of the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was determined from of the rate of retracting nitrogen from thin initially N-saturated coupons. Nitrogen saturated homogeneous foils of expanded austenite were obtained by nitriding AISI 304 and AISI 316 in pure...... in the composition range where nitrogen can be extracted by hydrogen gas at the diffusion temperature. Numerical simulation of the denitriding experiments shows that the thus determined concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are an accurate approximation of the actual diffusivity of nitrogen in expanded...... ammonia at 693 K and 718 K. Denitriding experiments were performed by equilibrating the foils with a successively lower nitrogen activity, as imposed by a gas mixture of ammonia and hydrogen. The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was approximated...

  3. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokaltun, Seckin [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Munroe, Norman [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States); Subramaniam, Shankar [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  4. Microneedle-assisted transdermal delivery of Zolmitriptan: effect of microneedle geometry, in vitro permeation experiments, scaling analyses and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppuluri, Chandra Teja; Devineni, Jyothirmayee; Han, Tao; Nayak, Atul; Nair, Kartik J; Whiteside, Benjamin R; Das, Diganta B; Nalluri, Buchi N

    2017-08-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of salient microneedle (MN) geometry parameters like length, density, shape and type on transdermal permeation enhancement of Zolmitriptan (ZMT). Two types of MN devices viz. AdminPatch ® arrays (ADM) (0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5 mm lengths) and laboratory fabricated polymeric MNs (PM) of 0.6 mm length were employed. In the case of PMs, arrays were applied thrice at different places within a 1.77 cm 2 skin area (PM-3) to maintain the MN density closer to 0.6 mm ADM. Scaling analyses was done using dimensionless parameters like concentration of ZMT (C t /C s ), thickness (h/L) and surface area of the skin (Sa/L 2 ). Micro-injection molding technique was employed to fabricate PM. Histological studies revealed that the PM, owing to their geometry/design, formed wider and deeper microconduits when compared to ADM of similar length. Approximately 3.17- and 3.65-fold increase in ZMT flux values were observed with 1.5 mm ADM and PM-3 applications when compared to the passive studies. Good correlations were observed between different dimensionless parameters with scaling analyses. Numerical simulations, using MATLAB and COMSOL software, based on experimental data and histological images provided information regarding the ZMT skin distribution after MN application. Both from experimental studies and simulations, it was inferred that PM were more effective in enhancing the transdermal delivery of ZMT when compared to ADM. The study suggests that MN application enhances the ZMT transdermal permeation and the geometrical parameters of MNs play an important role in the degree of such enhancement.

  5. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  6. Numerical differences between Guttman's reliability coefficients and the GLB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, P.R.; van der Ark, L.A.; Sijtsma, K.; van der Ark, L.A.; Bolt, D.M; Wang, W.-C.; Douglas, J.A.; Wiberg, M.

    2016-01-01

    For samples smaller than 1000 and tests longer than ten items, the greatest lower bound (GLB) to the reliability is known to be biased and not recommended as a method to estimate test-score reliability. As a first step in finding alternative lower bounds under these conditions, we investigated the

  7. Numerical simulation of air- and water-flow experiments in a block of variably saturated, fractured tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwicklis, E.M.; Healy, R.W.; Thamir, F.; Hampson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical models of water movement through variably saturated, fractured tuff have undergone little testing against experimental data collected from relatively well-controlled and characterized experiments. This report used the results of a multistage experiment on a block of variably saturated, fractured, welded tuff and associated core samples to investigate if those results could be explained using models and concepts currently used to simulate water movement in variably saturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential location of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. Aspects of the experiment were modeled with varying degrees of success. Imbibition experiments performed on cores of various lengths and diameters were adequately described by models using independently measured permeabilities and moisture-characteristic curves, provided that permeability reductions resulting from the presence of entrapped air were considered. Entrapped gas limited maximum water saturations during imbibition to approximately 0.70 to 0,80 of the fillable porosity values determined by vacuum saturation. A numerical simulator developed for application to fluid flow problems in fracture networks was used to analyze the results of air-injection tests conducted within the tuff block through 1.25-cm-diameter boreholes. These analyses produced estimates of transmissivity for selected fractures within the block. Transmissivities of other fractures were assigned on the basis of visual similarity to one of the tested fractures. The calibrated model explained 53% of the observed pressure variance at the monitoring boreholes (with the results for six outliers omitted) and 97% of the overall pressure variance (including monitoring and injection boreholes) in the subset of air-injection tests examined

  8. Complexities in barrier island response to sea level rise: Insights from numerical model experiments, North Carolina Outer Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura J.; List, Jeffrey H.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Stolper, David

    2010-09-01

    Using a morphological-behavior model to conduct sensitivity experiments, we investigate the sea level rise response of a complex coastal environment to changes in a variety of factors. Experiments reveal that substrate composition, followed in rank order by substrate slope, sea level rise rate, and sediment supply rate, are the most important factors in determining barrier island response to sea level rise. We find that geomorphic threshold crossing, defined as a change in state (e.g., from landward migrating to drowning) that is irreversible over decadal to millennial time scales, is most likely to occur in muddy coastal systems where the combination of substrate composition, depth-dependent limitations on shoreface response rates, and substrate erodibility may prevent sand from being liberated rapidly enough, or in sufficient quantity, to maintain a subaerial barrier. Analyses indicate that factors affecting sediment availability such as low substrate sand proportions and high sediment loss rates cause a barrier to migrate landward along a trajectory having a lower slope than average barrier island slope, thereby defining an "effective" barrier island slope. Other factors being equal, such barriers will tend to be smaller and associated with a more deeply incised shoreface, thereby requiring less migration per sea level rise increment to liberate sufficient sand to maintain subaerial exposure than larger, less incised barriers. As a result, the evolution of larger/less incised barriers is more likely to be limited by shoreface erosion rates or substrate erodibility making them more prone to disintegration related to increasing sea level rise rates than smaller/more incised barriers. Thus, the small/deeply incised North Carolina barriers are likely to persist in the near term (although their long-term fate is less certain because of the low substrate slopes that will soon be encountered). In aggregate, results point to the importance of system history (e

  9. Complexities in barrier island response to sea level rise: Insights from numerical model experiments, North Carolina Outer Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura J.; List, Jeffrey H.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Stolper, David

    2010-01-01

    Using a morphological-behavior model to conduct sensitivity experiments, we investigate the sea level rise response of a complex coastal environment to changes in a variety of factors. Experiments reveal that substrate composition, followed in rank order by substrate slope, sea level rise rate, and sediment supply rate, are the most important factors in determining barrier island response to sea level rise. We find that geomorphic threshold crossing, defined as a change in state (e.g., from landward migrating to drowning) that is irreversible over decadal to millennial time scales, is most likely to occur in muddy coastal systems where the combination of substrate composition, depth-dependent limitations on shoreface response rates, and substrate erodibility may prevent sand from being liberated rapidly enough, or in sufficient quantity, to maintain a subaerial barrier. Analyses indicate that factors affecting sediment availability such as low substrate sand proportions and high sediment loss rates cause a barrier to migrate landward along a trajectory having a lower slope than average barrier island slope, thereby defining an “effective” barrier island slope. Other factors being equal, such barriers will tend to be smaller and associated with a more deeply incised shoreface, thereby requiring less migration per sea level rise increment to liberate sufficient sand to maintain subaerial exposure than larger, less incised barriers. As a result, the evolution of larger/less incised barriers is more likely to be limited by shoreface erosion rates or substrate erodibility making them more prone to disintegration related to increasing sea level rise rates than smaller/more incised barriers. Thus, the small/deeply incised North Carolina barriers are likely to persist in the near term (although their long-term fate is less certain because of the low substrate slopes that will soon be encountered). In aggregate, results point to the importance of system history (e

  10. Gini coefficient as a life table function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a toolkit for measuring and analyzing inter-individual inequality in length of life by Gini coefficient. Gini coefficient and four other inequality measures are defined on the length-of-life distribution. Properties of these measures and their empirical testing on mortality data suggest a possibility for different judgements about the direction of changes in the degree of inequality by using different measures. A new computational procedure for the estimation of Gini coefficient from life tables is developed and tested on about four hundred real life tables. The estimates of Gini coefficient are precise enough even for abridged life tables with the final age group of 85+. New formulae have been developed for the decomposition of differences between Gini coefficients by age and cause of death. A new method for decomposition of age-components into effects of mortality and composition of population by group is developed. Temporal changes in the effects of elimination of causes of death on Gini coefficient are analyzed. Numerous empirical examples show: Lorenz curves for Sweden, Russia and Bangladesh in 1995, proportional changes in Gini coefficient and four other measures of inequality for the USA in 1950-1995 and for Russia in 1959-2000. Further shown are errors of estimates of Gini coefficient when computed from various types of mortality data of France, Japan, Sweden and the USA in 1900-95, decompositions of the USA-UK difference in life expectancies and Gini coefficients by age and cause of death in 1997. As well, effects of elimination of major causes of death in the UK in 1951-96 on Gini coefficient, age-specific effects of mortality and educational composition of the Russian population on changes in life expectancy and Gini coefficient between 1979 and 1989. Illustrated as well are variations in life expectancy and Gini coefficient across 32 countries in 1996-1999 and associated changes in life expectancy and Gini

  11. Comparison of two numerical modelling approaches to a field experiment of unsaturated radon transport in a covered uranium mill tailings soil (Lavaugrasse, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, Zakaria; Guillevic, Jerome [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SEDRAN/BRN, 31 avenue de la Division Leclerc, B.P. 17, 92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    .m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}) was 34% of the one calculated by TRACI and much closer to the time-averaged measured flux (4.04 Bq.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1}) for an adequate soil radon diffusion coefficient model. Moreover, the EOS7Rn model can better estimate experimental time-variations of the radon flux and depth concentration by comparison to TRACI. As a final result, EOS7Rn is a good candidate model for predicting radon transport in the landfill cover once its physical processes at the soil/plant/atmosphere interface are improved and the numerical inversion of its parameters from the experimental data are realized. (authors)

  12. Numerical modeling of first experiments on PbLi MHD flows in a rectangular duct with foam-based SiC flow channel insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, S., E-mail: sergey@fusion.ucla.edu [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Courtessole, C.; Abdou, M.; Sharafat, S. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Sahu, S. [Institute of Plasma Research (India); Sketchley, T. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Numerical studies were performed as a pre-experimental analysis to the experiment on MHD PbLi flows in a rectangular duct with a flow channel insert (FCI). • Dynamic testing of foam-based SiC foam-based CVD coated FCI has been performed using MaPLE facility at UCLA. • Two physical models were proposed to explain the experimental results and 3D and 2D computations performed using COMSOL, HIMAG and UCLA codes. • The obtained results suggest that more work on FCI development, fabrication and testing has to be done to assure good hermetic properties before the implementation in a fusion device. - Abstract: A flow channel insert (FCI) is the key element of the DCLL blanket concept. The FCI serves as electrical and thermal insulator to reduce the MHD pressure drop and to decouple the temperature-limited ferritic structure from the flowing hot lead-lithium (PbLi) alloy. The main focus of the paper is on numerical computations to simulate MHD flows in the first experiments on PbLi flows in a stainless steel rectangular duct with a foam-based silicon carbide (SiC) FCI. A single uninterrupted long-term (∼6500 h) test has recently been performed on a CVD coated FCI sample in the flowing PbLi in a magnetic field up to 1.5 T at the PbLi temperature of 300 °C using the MaPLE loop at UCLA. An unexpectedly high MHD pressure drop measured in this experiment suggests that a PbLi ingress into the FCI occurred in the course of the experiment, resulting in degradation of electroinsulating FCI properties. The ingress through the protective CVD layer was further confirmed by the post-experimental microscopic analysis of the FCI. The numerical modeling included 2D and 3D computations using HIMAG, COMSOL and a UCLA research code to address important flow features associated with the FCI finite length, fringing magnetic field, rounded FCI corners and also to predict changes in the MHD pressure drop in the unwanted event of a PbLi ingress. Two physical

  13. Calibration with respect to hydraulic head measurements in stochastic simulation of groundwater flow - a numerical experiment using MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.O.; Oppelstrup, J.

    1994-12-01

    A simulator for 2D stochastic continuum simulation and inverse modelling of groundwater flow has been developed. The simulator is well suited for method evaluation and what-if simulation and written in MATLAB. Conductivity fields are generated by unconditional simulation, conditional simulation on measured conductivities and calibration on both steady-state head measurements and transient head histories. The fields can also include fracture zones and zones with different mean conductivities. Statistics of conductivity fields and particle travel times are recorded in Monte-Carlo simulations. The calibration uses the pilot point technique, an inverse technique proposed by RamaRao and LaVenue. Several Kriging procedures are implemented, among others Kriging neighborhoods. In cases where the expectation of the log-conductivity in the truth field is known the nonbias conditions can be omitted, which will make the variance in the conditionally simulated conductivity fields smaller. A simulation experiment, resembling the initial stages of a site investigation and devised in collaboration with SKB, is performed and interpreted. The results obtained in the present study show less uncertainty than in our preceding study. This is mainly due to the modification of the Kriging procedure but also to the use of more data. Still the large uncertainty in cases of sparse data is apparent. The variogram represents essential characteristics of the conductivity field. Thus, even unconditional simulations take account of important information. Significant improvements in variance by further conditioning will be obtained only as the number of data becomes much larger. 16 refs, 26 figs

  14. Calibration with respect to hydraulic head measurements in stochastic simulation of groundwater flow - a numerical experiment using MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, L O; Oppelstrup, J [Starprog AB (Sweden)

    1994-12-01

    A simulator for 2D stochastic continuum simulation and inverse modelling of groundwater flow has been developed. The simulator is well suited for method evaluation and what-if simulation and written in MATLAB. Conductivity fields are generated by unconditional simulation, conditional simulation on measured conductivities and calibration on both steady-state head measurements and transient head histories. The fields can also include fracture zones and zones with different mean conductivities. Statistics of conductivity fields and particle travel times are recorded in Monte-Carlo simulations. The calibration uses the pilot point technique, an inverse technique proposed by RamaRao and LaVenue. Several Kriging procedures are implemented, among others Kriging neighborhoods. In cases where the expectation of the log-conductivity in the truth field is known the nonbias conditions can be omitted, which will make the variance in the conditionally simulated conductivity fields smaller. A simulation experiment, resembling the initial stages of a site investigation and devised in collaboration with SKB, is performed and interpreted. The results obtained in the present study show less uncertainty than in our preceding study. This is mainly due to the modification of the Kriging procedure but also to the use of more data. Still the large uncertainty in cases of sparse data is apparent. The variogram represents essential characteristics of the conductivity field. Thus, even unconditional simulations take account of important information. Significant improvements in variance by further conditioning will be obtained only as the number of data becomes much larger. 16 refs, 26 figs.

  15. Symmetry chains and adaptation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzer, H.P.; Gruber, B.

    1985-01-01

    Given a symmetry chain of physical significance it becomes necessary to obtain states which transform properly with respect to the symmetries of the chain. In this article we describe a method which permits us to calculate symmetry-adapted quantum states with relative ease. The coefficients for the symmetry-adapted linear combinations are obtained, in numerical form, in terms of the original states of the system and can thus be represented in the form of numerical tables. In addition, one also obtains automatically the matrix elements for the operators of the symmetry groups which are involved, and thus for any physical operator which can be expressed either as an element of the algebra or of the enveloping algebra. The method is well suited for computers once the physically relevant symmetry chain, or chains, have been defined. While the method to be described is generally applicable to any physical system for which semisimple Lie algebras play a role we choose here a familiar example in order to illustrate the method and to illuminate its simplicity. We choose the nuclear shell model for the case of two nucleons with orbital angular momentum l = 1. While the states of the entire shell transform like the smallest spin representation of SO(25) we restrict our attention to its subgroup SU(6) x SU(2)/sub T/. We determine the symmetry chains which lead to total angular momentum SU(2)/sub J/ and obtain the symmetry-adapted states for these chains

  16. Attenuation coefficients of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, E.; Naziry, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    As a prerequisite to the interpretation of gamma-spectrometric in situ measurements of activity concentrations of soil radionuclides the attenuation of 60 to 1332 keV gamma radiation by soil samples varying in water content and density has been investigated. A useful empirical equation could be set up to describe the dependence of the mass attenuation coefficient upon photon energy for soil with a mean water content of 10%, with the results comparing well with data in the literature. The mean density of soil in the GDR was estimated at 1.6 g/cm 3 . This value was used to derive the linear attenuation coefficients, their range of variation being 10%. 7 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  17. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Khabaza, I M

    1960-01-01

    Numerical Analysis is an elementary introduction to numerical analysis, its applications, limitations, and pitfalls. Methods suitable for digital computers are emphasized, but some desk computations are also described. Topics covered range from the use of digital computers in numerical work to errors in computations using desk machines, finite difference methods, and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. This book is comprised of eight chapters and begins with an overview of the importance of digital computers in numerical analysis, followed by a discussion on errors in comput

  18. Numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    This book is composed of two parts: First part describes basics in numerical relativity, that is, the formulations and methods for a solution of Einstein's equation and general relativistic matter field equations. This part will be helpful for beginners of numerical relativity who would like to understand the content of numerical relativity and its background. The second part focuses on the application of numerical relativity. A wide variety of scientific numerical results are introduced focusing in particular on the merger of binary neutron stars and black holes.

  19. Code-experiment comparison on wall condensation tests in the presence of non-condensable gases-Numerical calculations for containment studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malet, J., E-mail: jeanne.malet@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PSN-RES, SCA, BP 68, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Porcheron, E.; Dumay, F.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PSN-RES, SCA, BP 68, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Steam condensation on walls has been investigated in the TOSQAN vessel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experiments on 7 different tests have been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different steam injections and wall temperatures are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulations are performed in 2D using the TONUS code. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Code-experiments comparisons at many different locations show a good agreement. - Abstract: During the course of a severe Pressurized Water Reactor accident, pressurization of the containment occurs and hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed in the containment according to convection flows and wall condensation. Filmwise wall condensation in the presence of non-condensable gases is a subject of many interests and extensive studies have been performed in the past. Some empirical correlations have demonstrated their limit for extrapolation under different thermal-hydraulic conditions and at different geometries/scales. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has developed a numerical tool and an experimental facility in order to investigate free convection flows in the presence of condensation. The objective of this paper is to present numerical results obtained on different wall condensation tests in 7 m{sup 3} volume vessel (TOSQAN facility), and to compare them with the experimental ones. Over eight tests are considered here, and code-experiment comparison is performed on many different locations, giving an extensive insight of the code assessment for air-steam mixture flows involving wall condensation in the presence of non-condensable gases.

  20. Unification and extension of the similarity scaling criteria and mixing transition for studying astrophysics using high energy density laboratory experiments or numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ye

    2007-01-01

    The Euler similarity criteria for laboratory experiments and time-dependent mixing transition are important concepts introduced recently for application to prediction and analysis of astrophysical phenomena. However, Euler scaling by itself provides no information on the distinctive spectral range of high Reynolds number turbulent flows found in astrophysics situations. On the other hand, time-dependent mixing transition gives no indication on whether a flow that just passed the mixing transition is sufficient to capture all of the significant dynamics of the complete astrophysical spectral range. In this paper, a new approach, based on additional insight gained from review of Navier-Stokes turbulence theory, is developed. It allows for revelations about the distinctive spectral scale dynamics associated with high Reynolds number astrophysical flows. From this perspective, the energy-containing range of the turbulent flow measured in a laboratory setting must not be unintentionally contaminated in such a way that the interactive influences of this spectral scale range in the corresponding astrophysical situation cannot be faithfully represented. In this paper, the concept of a minimum state is introduced as the lowest Reynolds number turbulent flow that a time-dependent mixing transition must achieve to fulfill this objective. Later in the paper, the Reynolds number of the minimum state is determined as 1.6x10 5 . The temporal criterion for the minimum state is also obtained. The efforts here can be viewed as a unification and extension of the concepts of both similarity scaling and transient mixing transition concepts. Finally, the implications of our approach in planning future intensive laser experiments or massively parallel numerical simulations are discussed. A systematic procedure is outlined so that as the capabilities of the laser interaction experiments and supporting results from detailed numerical simulations performed in recently advanced

  1. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  2. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, John Eric [Department of Physics, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA 24501 (United States); Carre, Matt J, E-mail: goff@lynchburg.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  3. Numerical analysis of experiments on the generation of shock waves in aluminium under indirect (X-ray) action on the Iskra-5 facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, S V; Dolgoleva, G V; Novikova, E A

    2013-07-31

    The dynamics of laser and X-ray radiation fields in experiments with cylindrical converter boxes (illuminators), which had earlier been carried out on the Iskra-5 laser facility (the second harmonic of iodine laser radiation, {lambda} = 0.66 {mu}m) was investigated in a sector approximation using the SND-LIRA numerical technique. In these experiments, the X-ray radiation temperature in the box was determined by measuring the velocity of the shock wave generated in the sample under investigation, which was located at the end of the cylindrical illuminator. Through simulations were made using the SND-LIRA code, which took into account the absorption of laser driver radiation at the box walls, the production of quasithermal radiation, as well as the formation and propagation of the shock wave in the sample under investigation. An analysis of the experiments permits determining the electron thermal flux limiter f: for f = 0.03 it is possible to match the experimental scaling data for X-ray in-box radiation temperature to the data of our simulations. The shock velocities obtained from the simulations are also consistent with experimental data. In particular, in the experiment with six laser beams (and a laser energy E{sub L} = 1380 J introduced into the box) the velocity of the shock front (determined from the position of a laser mark) after passage through a 50-{mu}m thick base aluminium layer was equal to 35{+-}1.6 km s{sup -1}, and in simulations to 36 km s{sup -1}. In the experiment with four laser beams (for E{sub L} = 850 J) the shock velocity (measured from the difference of transit times through the base aluminium layer and an additional thin aluminium platelet) was equal to 30{+-}3.6 km s{sup -1}, and in simulations to 30 km s{sup -1}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. An innovative method for determining the diffusion coefficient of product nuclide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chih Lung [Dept. of Nuclear Back-end Management, Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (China); Wang, Tsing Hai [Dept. Biomedical Engineering and Environment Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (China)

    2017-08-15

    Diffusion is a crucial mechanism that regulates the migration of radioactive nuclides. In this study, an innovative numerical method was developed to simultaneously calculate the diffusion coefficient of both parent and, afterward, series daughter nuclides in a sequentially reactive through-diffusion model. Two constructed scenarios, a serial reaction (RN{sub 1} → RN{sub 2} → RN{sub 3}) and a parallel reaction (RN{sub 1} → RN{sub 2}A + RN{sub 2}B), were proposed and calculated for verification. First, the accuracy of the proposed three-member reaction equations was validated using several default numerical experiments. Second, by applying the validated numerical experimental concentration variation data, the as-determined diffusion coefficient of the product nuclide was observed to be identical to the default data. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. The significance of the proposed numerical method will be particularly powerful in determining the diffusion coefficients of systems with extremely thin specimens, long periods of diffusion time, and parent nuclides with fast decay constants.

  5. The Truth About Ballistic Coefficients

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The ballistic coefficient of a bullet describes how it slows in flight due to air resistance. This article presents experimental determinations of ballistic coefficients showing that the majority of bullets tested have their previously published ballistic coefficients exaggerated from 5-25% by the bullet manufacturers. These exaggerated ballistic coefficients lead to inaccurate predictions of long range bullet drop, retained energy and wind drift.

  6. Numerical Models for Exact Description of in-situ Digital In-Line Holography Experiments with Irregularly-Shaped Arbitrarily-Located Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Brunel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of a numerical simulator for digital in-line holography applications. In-line holograms of arbitrarily shaped and arbitrarily located objects are calculated using generalized Huygens-Fresnel integrals. The objects are 2D opaque or phase objects. The optical set-up is described by its optical transfer matrix. A wide variety of optical systems, involving windows, spherical or cylindrical lenses, can thus be taken into account. It makes the simulator applicable for design and description of in situ experiments. We discuss future applications of this simulator for detection of nanoparticles in droplets, or calibration of airborne instruments that detect and measure ice crystals in the atmosphere.

  7. A cone-beam tomography system with a reduced size planar detector: A backprojection-filtration reconstruction algorithm as well as numerical and practical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liang; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Xing Yuxiang; Kang Kejun

    2007-01-01

    In a traditional cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system, the cost of product and computation is very high. In this paper, we develop a transversely truncated cone-beam X-ray CT system with a reduced-size detector positioned off-center, in which X-ray beams only cover half of the object. The existing filtered backprojection (FBP) or backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithms are not directly applicable in this new system. Hence, we develop a BPF-type direct backprojection algorithm. Different from the traditional rebinning methods, our algorithm directly backprojects the pretreated projection data without rebinning. This makes the algorithm compact and computationally more efficient. Because of avoiding interpolation errors of rebinning process, higher spatial resolution is obtained. Finally, some numerical simulations and practical experiments are done to validate the proposed algorithm and compare with rebinning algorithm

  8. Dynamics of Soil Water Evaporation during Soil Drying in the Presence of a Shallow Water Table: Laboratory Experiment and Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Lin, J.; Liu, P.; Li, W.

    2017-12-01

    Evaporation from a porous medium plays a key role in hydrological, agricultural, environmental, and engineering applications. Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3. Although the magnitude of condensation zone was much smaller than that for the evaporation zone, the importance of the contribution of condensation zone to soil water dynamics should not be underestimated. Results from our experiment and numerical simulation show that this condensation process resulted in an unexpected and apparent water content increase in the middle of vadose zone profile.

  9. The influence of aerodynamic coefficients on the elements of classic projectile paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir D. Jerković

    2011-04-01

    flight The velocity of the projectile flight in relation to the Earth represents the relative velocity, and the time derivatives of the velocity projections to coordinate frame axis represent the relative acceleration components. The mass of classic axisymetric projectile is constant during the flight, because there is no mass change caused by the rocket engine. The values of components of aerodynamic force and moment depend on the angle of attack being the basic parameter. The projections of the total aerodynamic force, because of the nature of its effect on the projectile, are given in an aeroballistics coordinate frame with the coordinate origin positioned in the center of gravity. The determination of aerodynamic coefficients with respect to projectile construction, i. e. the projectile geometry, is based on the theoretical approach of fluid mechanic equation and it leads to numerical solving of the partial differential equation system with the given boundary conditions and experimental results of tunnel research, i. e. measured flight parameters. In this part of the article, the aim is to describe the functions of dependence of aerodynamic coefficients on given parameters. Flight simulation of the classic projectile The determination of aerodynamic coefficients, i. e. the determination of the motion trajectory elements and stability parameters according to the model of six degrees of freedom, is done on the classic 40mm axisymmetric projectile model, the shape of which is based on the geometric characteristics of the front ogive part and the back cone with the flat bottom. The equations of the model of six degrees of freedom are given in the aeroballistics coordinate frame. The initial data in the simulation are given for the values of aerodynamic coefficients and derivatives obtained by the calculations and experiments. The analysis of the change of trajectory elements and stability characteristics is done with respect to two given kinds of aerodynamic

  10. Numerical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  11. Hindi Numerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  12. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, G Shanker

    2006-01-01

    About the Book: This book provides an introduction to Numerical Analysis for the students of Mathematics and Engineering. The book is designed in accordance with the common core syllabus of Numerical Analysis of Universities of Andhra Pradesh and also the syllabus prescribed in most of the Indian Universities. Salient features: Approximate and Numerical Solutions of Algebraic and Transcendental Equation Interpolation of Functions Numerical Differentiation and Integration and Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations The last three chapters deal with Curve Fitting, Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors of a Matrix and Regression Analysis. Each chapter is supplemented with a number of worked-out examples as well as number of problems to be solved by the students. This would help in the better understanding of the subject. Contents: Errors Solution of Algebraic and Transcendental Equations Finite Differences Interpolation with Equal Intervals Interpolation with Unequal Int...

  13. Some observations concerning blade-element-momentum (BEM) methods and vortex wake methods, including numerical experiments with a simple vortex model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snel, H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy (Netherlands)

    1997-08-01

    Recently the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method has been made more versatile. Inclusion of rotational effects on time averaged profile coefficients have improved its achievements for performance calculations in stalled flow. Time dependence as a result of turbulent inflow, pitching actions and yawed operation is now treated more correctly (although more improvement is needed) than before. It is of interest to note that adaptations in modelling of unsteady or periodic induction stem from qualitative and quantitative insights obtained from free vortex models. Free vortex methods and further into the future Navier Stokes (NS) calculations, together with wind tunnel and field experiments, can be very useful in enhancing the potential of BEM for aero-elastic response calculations. It must be kept in mind however that extreme caution must be used with free vortex methods, as will be discussed in the following chapters. A discussion of the shortcomings and the strength of BEM and of vortex wake models is given. Some ideas are presented on how BEM might be improved without too much loss of efficiency. (EG)

  14. Supersonic flow over a pitching delta wing using surface pressure measurements and numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa HADIDOOLABI

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical methods were applied to investigating high subsonic and supersonic flows over a 60° swept delta wing in fixed state and pitching oscillation. Static pressure coefficient distributions over the wing leeward surface and the hysteresis loops of pressure coefficient versus angle of attack at the sensor locations were obtained by wind tunnel tests. Similar results were obtained by numerical simulations which agreed well with the experiments. Flow structure around the wing was also demonstrated by the numerical simulation. Effects of Mach number and angle of attack on pressure distribution curves in static tests were investigated. Effects of various oscillation parameters including Mach number, mean angle of attack, pitching amplitude and frequency on hysteresis loops were investigated in dynamic tests and the associated physical mechanisms were discussed. Vortex breakdown phenomenon over the wing was identified at high angles of attack using the pressure coefficient curves and hysteresis loops, and its effects on the flow features were discussed.

  15. Opto-acoustic measurement of the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media: 2. On the possibility of light absorption coefficient measurement in a turbid medium from the amplitude of the opto-acoustic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Barskaya, M I; Podymova, N B; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2009-01-01

    The second part of this work describes the experimental technique of measuring the local light absorption in turbid media. The technique is based on the measurement of the amplitude of an opto-acoustic (OA) signal excited in a turbid medium under the condition of one-sided access to the object under study. An OA transducer is developed to perform the proposed measurement procedure. Experiments are conducted for the turbid media with different optical properties (light absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) and for different diameters of the incident laser beam. It is found that the laser beam diameter can be chosen so that the dependences of the measured OA signal amplitude on the light absorption coefficient coincide upon varying the reduced scattering coefficient by more than twice. The obtained numerical and experimental results demonstrate that the OA method is applicable for measuring the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media, for example, in biological tissues. (measurement of parametrs of laser radiation)

  16. Numerical experiments on thermal convection of highly compressible fluids with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity: Implications for mantle convection of super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Mayumi

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids in a two-dimensional rectangular box, in order to study the mantle convection on super-Earths. The thermal conductivity and viscosity are assumed to exponentially depend on depth and temperature, respectively, while the variations in thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity and reference density) with depth are taken to be relevant for the super-Earths with 10 times the Earth's. From our experiments we identified a distinct regime of convecting flow patterns induced by the interplay between the adiabatic temperature change and the spatial variations in viscosity and thermal conductivity. That is, for the cases with strong temperature-dependent viscosity and depth-dependent thermal conductivity, a "deep stratosphere" of stable thermal stratification is formed at the base of the mantle, in addition to thick stagnant lids at their top surfaces. In the "deep stratosphere", the fluid motion is insignificant particularly in the vertical direction in spite of smallest viscosity owing to its strong dependence on temperature. Our finding may further imply that some of super-Earths which are lacking in mobile tectonic plates on their top surfaces may have "deep stratospheres" at the base of their mantles.

  17. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

    When water flows in an open channel, energy is lost through friction along the banks and bed of the channel and through turbulence within the channel. The amount of energy lost is governed by channel roughness, which is expressed in terms of a roughness coefficient. An evaluation of the roughness coefficient is necessary in many hydraulic computations that involve flow in an open channel. Owing to the lack of satisfactory quantitative procedure, the ability of evaluate roughness coefficients can be developed only through experience; however, a basic knowledge of the methods used to assign the coefficients and the factors affecting them will be a great help. One of the most commonly used equations in open-channel hydraulics is that of Manning. The Manning equation is       1.486

  18. A new proposal for Lagrangian correlation coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinsoy, N.; Tugrul, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The statistical description of dispersion in turbulent flow was first considered by Taylor (Proc. London Math. Soc. 20 (1921) 196) and the statistical properties of the field were determined by Lagrangian correlation coefficient R L (τ). Frenkiel (Adv. Appl. Mech. 3 (1953) 61) has proposed several simple forms for R L (τ). Some workers have investigated for a proper form of the Lagrangian correlation coefficient. In this work, a new proposal for the Lagrangian correlation coefficient is proposed and discussed. It can be written in general form with the one of the Frenkiel's (Adv. Appl. Mech. 3 (1953) 61) Lagrangian correlation coefficient. There is very satisfactory agreement between the new correlation and the experiment

  19. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    be a significant contribution to the uncertainty of the measurement. Determining the environmental coefficients of individual specimens of measurement microphones can be a straightforward though time-consuming procedure provided the appropriate facilities are available. An alternative is to determine them using...... coefficients. For this purpose, the environmental coefficients of some commercially available microphones have been determined experimentally, and whenever possible, compared with the coefficients determined numerically using the Boundary Element Method....... for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. Working standard microphones are not exempt of these influences. However, manufacturers usually provide a low frequency value of the environmental coefficient. While in some applications the influence of this coefficient may be negligible, in others it may...

  20. Initializing numerical weather prediction models with satellite-derived surface soil moisture: Data assimilation experiments with ECMWF's Integrated Forecast System and the TMI soil moisture data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusch, M.

    2007-02-01

    Satellite-derived surface soil moisture data sets are readily available and have been used successfully in hydrological applications. In many operational numerical weather prediction systems the initial soil moisture conditions are analyzed from the modeled background and 2 m temperature and relative humidity. This approach has proven its efficiency to improve surface latent and sensible heat fluxes and consequently the forecast on large geographical domains. However, since soil moisture is not always related to screen level variables, model errors and uncertainties in the forcing data can accumulate in root zone soil moisture. Remotely sensed surface soil moisture is directly linked to the model's uppermost soil layer and therefore is a stronger constraint for the soil moisture analysis. For this study, three data assimilation experiments with the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have been performed for the 2-month period of June and July 2002: a control run based on the operational soil moisture analysis, an open loop run with freely evolving soil moisture, and an experimental run incorporating TMI (TRMM Microwave Imager) derived soil moisture over the southern United States. In this experimental run the satellite-derived soil moisture product is introduced through a nudging scheme using 6-hourly increments. Apart from the soil moisture analysis, the system setup reflects the operational forecast configuration including the atmospheric 4D-Var analysis. Soil moisture analyzed in the nudging experiment is the most accurate estimate when compared against in situ observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet. The corresponding forecast for 2 m temperature and relative humidity is almost as accurate as in the control experiment. Furthermore, it is shown that the soil moisture analysis influences local weather parameters including the planetary boundary layer height and cloud coverage.

  1. Lattice cell diffusion coefficients. Definitions and comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    Definitions of equivalent diffusion coefficients for regular lattices of heterogeneous cells have been given by several authors. The paper begins by reviewing these different definitions and the unification of their derivation. This unification makes clear how accurately each definition (together with appropriate cross-section definitions to preserve the eigenvalue) represents the individual reaction rates within the cell. The approach can be extended to include asymmetric cells and whereas before, the buckling describing the macroscopic flux shape was real, here it is found to be complex. A neutron ''drift'' coefficient as well as a diffusion coefficient is necessary to produce the macroscopic flux shape. The numerical calculation of the various different diffusion coefficients requires the solutions of equations similar to the ordinary transport equation for an infinite lattice. Traditional reactor physics codes are not sufficiently flexible to solve these equations in general. However, calculations in certain simple cases are presented and the theoretical results quantified. In difficult geometries, Monte Carlo techniques can be used to calculate an effective diffusion coefficient. These methods relate to those already described provided that correlation effects between different generations of neutrons are included. Again, these effects are quantified in certain simple cases. (author)

  2. The footprint of CO2 leakage in the water-column: Insights from numerical modeling based on a North Sea gas release experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielstädte, L.; Linke, P.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Wallmann, K.; McGinnis, D. F.; Haeckel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of potential CO2 leakage from offshore carbon dioxide storage sites necessitates the investigation of the corresponding pH change in the water-column. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the buoyant rise and dissolution of CO2 bubbles in the water-column and the subsequent near-field dispersion of dissolved CO2 in seawater under ocean current and tidal forcing. In order to test and improve numerical models a gas release experiment has been conducted at 80 m water-depth within the Sleipner area (North Sea). CO2 and Kr (used as inert tracer gas) were released on top of a benthic lander at varying gas flows (impact of such leakage rates is limited to the near-field bottom waters, due to the rapid dissolution of CO2 bubbles in seawater (CO2 is being stripped within the first two to five meters of bubble rise). In particular, small bubbles, which will dissolve close to the seafloor, may cause a dangerous low-pH environment for the marine benthos. However, on the larger scale, the advective transport by e.g. tidal currents, dominates the CO2 dispersal in the North Sea and dilutes the CO2 peak quickly. The model results show that at the small scales (impact on the marine environment, thereby reducing pH substantially (by 0.4 units) within a diameter of less than 50 m around the release spot (depending on the duration of leakage and the current velocities). Strong currents and tidal cycles significantly reduce the spreading of low-pH water masses into the far-field by efficiently diluting the amount of CO2 in ambient seawater.

  3. Numerical experiments of dynamical processes during the 2011-2013 surge of the Bering-Bagley Glacier System, using a full-Stokes finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantow, Thomas

    The Bering-Bagley Glacial System (BBGS) is the largest glacier system outside of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, and is the Earth's largest surge-type glacier. Surging is one of three types of glacial acceleration and the least understood one. Understanding glacial acceleration is paramount when trying to explain ice discharge to the oceans and the glacial contribution to sea-level rise, yet there are currently no numerical glacial models that account for surging. The recent 2011-2013 surge of the BBGS provides a rare opportunity to study the surge process through observations and the subsequent data analysis and numerical modeling. Using radar, altimeter, and image data collected from airborne and satellite missions, various descriptions of ice geometry are created at different times throughout the surge. Using geostatistical estimation techniques including variography and ordinary kriging, surface and bedrock Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) are derived. A time series analysis of elevation change during the current surge is then conducted and validated using a complete error analysis along with airborne observations. The derived DEMs are then used as inputs to a computer simulated model of glacier dynamics in the BBGS. Using the Finite Element software Elmer/Ice, a full-Stokes simulation, with Glen's flow law for temperate ice, is created for numerical experiments. With consideration of free surface evolution, glacial hydrology and surface mass balance, the model is able to predict a variety of field variables including velocity, stress, strain-rate, pressure and surface elevation change at any point forward in time. These outputs are compared and validated using observational data such as CryoSat-2 altimetry, airborne field data, imagery and previous detailed analysis of the BBGS. Preliminary results reveal that certain surge phenomena such as surface elevation changes, surge progression and locations at which the surge starts, can be recreated using the

  4. Airflow in Gravity Sewers - Determination of Wastewater Drag Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Østertoft, Kristian Kilsgaard; Vollertsen, Jes; Fuglsang, Emil Dietz; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2016-03-01

    Several experiments have been conducted in order to improve the understanding of the wastewater drag and the wall frictional force acting on the headspace air in gravity sewers. The aim of the study is to improve the data basis for a numerical model of natural sewer ventilation. The results of the study shows that by integrating the top/side wall shear stresses the log-law models for the air velocity distribution along the unwetted perimeter resulted in a good agreement with the friction forces calculated by use of the Colebrook-White formula for hydraulic smooth pipes. Secondly, the water surface drags were found by log-law models of the velocity distribution in turbulent flows to fit velocity profiles measured from the water surface and by integrating the water surface drags along the wetted perimeter, mean water surface drags were found and a measure of the water surface drag coefficient was found.

  5. Numerical modelling of random walk one-dimensional diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vamos, C.; Suciu, N.; Peculea, M.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of a particle which moves on a discrete one-dimensional lattice, according to a random walk low, approximates better the diffusion process smaller the steps of the spatial lattice and time are. For a sufficiently large assembly of particles one can assume that their relative frequency at lattice knots approximates the distribution function of the diffusion process. This assumption has been tested by simulating on computer two analytical solutions of the diffusion equation: the Brownian motion and the steady state linear distribution. To evaluate quantitatively the similarity between the numerical and analytical solutions we have used a norm given by the absolute value of the difference of the two solutions. Also, a diffusion coefficient at any lattice knots and moment of time has been calculated, by using the numerical solution both from the diffusion equation and the particle flux given by Fick's low. The difference between diffusion coefficient of analytical solution and the spatial lattice mean coefficient of numerical solution constitutes another quantitative indication of the similarity of the two solutions. The results obtained show that the approximation depends first on the number of particles at each knot of the spatial lattice. In conclusion, the random walk is a microscopic process of the molecular dynamics type which permits simulations precision of the diffusion processes with given precision. The numerical method presented in this work may be useful both in the analysis of real experiments and for theoretical studies

  6. Prediction of Aerodynamic Coefficient using Genetic Algorithm Optimized Neural Network for Sparse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T.; Bardina, Jorge; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Wind tunnels use scale models to characterize aerodynamic coefficients, Wind tunnel testing can be slow and costly due to high personnel overhead and intensive power utilization. Although manual curve fitting can be done, it is highly efficient to use a neural network to define the complex relationship between variables. Numerical simulation of complex vehicles on the wide range of conditions required for flight simulation requires static and dynamic data. Static data at low Mach numbers and angles of attack may be obtained with simpler Euler codes. Static data of stalled vehicles where zones of flow separation are usually present at higher angles of attack require Navier-Stokes simulations which are costly due to the large processing time required to attain convergence. Preliminary dynamic data may be obtained with simpler methods based on correlations and vortex methods; however, accurate prediction of the dynamic coefficients requires complex and costly numerical simulations. A reliable and fast method of predicting complex aerodynamic coefficients for flight simulation I'S presented using a neural network. The training data for the neural network are derived from numerical simulations and wind-tunnel experiments. The aerodynamic coefficients are modeled as functions of the flow characteristics and the control surfaces of the vehicle. The basic coefficients of lift, drag and pitching moment are expressed as functions of angles of attack and Mach number. The modeled and training aerodynamic coefficients show good agreement. This method shows excellent potential for rapid development of aerodynamic models for flight simulation. Genetic Algorithms (GA) are used to optimize a previously built Artificial Neural Network (ANN) that reliably predicts aerodynamic coefficients. Results indicate that the GA provided an efficient method of optimizing the ANN model to predict aerodynamic coefficients. The reliability of the ANN using the GA includes prediction of aerodynamic

  7. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, L Ridgway

    2011-01-01

    Computational science is fundamentally changing how technological questions are addressed. The design of aircraft, automobiles, and even racing sailboats is now done by computational simulation. The mathematical foundation of this new approach is numerical analysis, which studies algorithms for computing expressions defined with real numbers. Emphasizing the theory behind the computation, this book provides a rigorous and self-contained introduction to numerical analysis and presents the advanced mathematics that underpin industrial software, including complete details that are missing from most textbooks. Using an inquiry-based learning approach, Numerical Analysis is written in a narrative style, provides historical background, and includes many of the proofs and technical details in exercises. Students will be able to go beyond an elementary understanding of numerical simulation and develop deep insights into the foundations of the subject. They will no longer have to accept the mathematical gaps that ex...

  8. On the Kendall Correlation Coefficient

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we first discuss the Kendall rank correlation coefficient. In continuous case, we define the Kendall rank correlation coefficient in terms of the concomitants of order statistics, find the expected value of the Kendall rank correlation coefficient and show that the later is free of n. We also prove that in continuous case the Kendall correlation coefficient converges in probability to its expected value. We then propose to consider the expected value of the Kendall rank ...

  9. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions

  10. Determination of reactivity coefficients from measurable effects of small external perturbations using a bank of Kalman filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, A.

    1990-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a method for the determination of reactivity coefficients in a nuclear power reactor in operation. A method based on Kalman filtering technique and the Magill-Bogler test is proposed for the determination of reactivity coefficients from measured effects of small external perturbation introduced into a steady-state power reactor. Numerical experiments are presented to justify the procedure. A realistic problem is considered: the calculation of the control rod worth. Finally a possible way is given to check the goodness of the estimation. (author) 16 refs.; 4 figs

  11. Friction Coefficient Determination by Electrical Resistance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-01-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino…

  12. Modelling of power-reactivity coefficient measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strmensky, C.; Petenyi, V.; Jagrik, J.; Minarcin, M.; Hascik, R.; Toth, L.

    2005-01-01

    Report describes results of modeling of power-reactivity coefficient analysis on power-level. In paper we calculate values of discrepancies arisen during transient process. These discrepancies can be arisen as result of experiment evaluation and can be caused by disregard of 3D effects on neutron distribution. The results are critically discussed (Authors)

  13. Collision-dominated dust sheaths and voids - observations in micro-gravity experiments and numerical investigation of the force balance relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V N; Morfill, G; Konopka, U; Thomas, H

    2003-01-01

    Numerical solutions of stationary force balance equations are used to investigate the possible dust configurations (dust structures) in complex plasmas between two floating potential plane electrodes. The distance between electrodes is assumed to be larger than the ion-neutral mean free path and the hydrodynamic description is used. It includes the known forces operating in this limit, the ionization source and the dust charge variations. The stationary balance equations are solved both in the case of the presence of one-size dust grains and for the case of a mixture of grains with two different sizes. Recent micro-gravity experiments with single-size dust grains and two-different-size dust grains show the formation of a system of dust sheaths and dust voids between the two plane electrodes. The observed configurations of dust structures depend strongly on the gas pressure and the degree of ionization used. The numerical investigations are able to show the necessary conditions for the types of structure to be created and give their size. The size of the structures observed is larger than the ion-neutral mean free path and is of the order of magnitude of that obtained numerically. The numerical investigations give details of the spatial distributions, the dust particles, the electron/ion densities, the ion drift velocity and dust charges inside and outside different dust structures. These details have not yet been investigated experimentally and can indicate directions for further experimental work to be performed. The single-dust-sheath structure with single-size dust particles surrounded by dust free regions (dust wall-voids) and floating potential electrodes is computed. Such a structure was observed recently and the computational results are in agreement with observations. It is shown that more often a dust void in the centre is observed. It is found that a dust void in the centre region between two electrodes is formed if the ionization rate is larger than the

  14. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 4. Numerical analysis of 1/10 scaled water experiment with the AQUA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor in the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a feature of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted systems and components design to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attentions should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for gas entrainment behavior from free surface, flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, thermal stratification in the plenum, thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. A numerical analysis was carried out with a multi-dimensional code AQUA to confirm an applicability to the evaluations for the in-vessel thermohydraulic phenomena using a 1/10 scaled water experiment simulating the large-scale fast breeder reactor in the feasibility studies. From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) In-vessel thermohydraulics characterized by a radiated flow pattern to the reactor vessel wall and a strong upward flow through a slit of the upper core structures were evaluated. These characteristics agreed approximately with the water experiment. (2) The upward velocity values at the slit agreed well with the experimental data under a condition of γ z = 0.3 and ξ z = 0.5, though overall evaluations of the in-vessel thermohydraulics were failed to predict quantitatively. (3) The AQUA code is applicable to the in-vessel thermohydraulics evaluations in the feasibility studies, though it is necessary to make further modifications of the calculational models for accurate evaluations. On the one hand, it was confirmed that calculated results for the 1/10 water experimental model and the 1/1 actual-scaled model agreed quantitatively for the in-vessel thermohydraulics characteristics indicated above. (author)

  15. Updating the ranking of the coefficients of variation from maize experiments=Atualização da proposta de classificação dos coeficientes de variação para a cultura do milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Moreira Rezende

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to update the ranking of the coefficients of variation (CVs from maize experiments and evaluate the accuracy of the data from the latest Brazilian publications. We rank-ordered the CVs for grain yield, plant and ear heights, number of ears per plant, and weight of commercial ears, except for the weight of 100 grains. The data were obtained from 143 scientific papers published from 2005 to 2010. The classification was based on the average (m and standard deviation (SD and the CVs were ranked as low, intermediate, high and very high. All of the random variables had the CVs normally distributed. For most of the traits, we observed a large difference between the ranks from Scapim and Pimentel Gomes. In summary, the coefficients of variation have to be classified for each variable, significant improvement occurred in the accuracy of the national maize experiments in the last 15 years, and they still require periodic updating.O objetivo desse trabalho foi fazer a atualização na proposta de classificação dos coeficientes de variação (CV para a cultura do milho e avaliar a qualidade dos dados dos artigos mais recentes publicados no Brasil. Os CV das diferentes variáveis aleatórias foram obtidos a partir da consulta de 143 artigos científicos publicados de 2005 e 2010. As faixas de classificação dos (CV foram baseadas na média (m e no desvio-padrão (DP da seguinte forma: baixo; médio; alto; muito alto. Todos os cv das variáveis aleatórias apresentaram distribuição normal. Foi possível observar que para a maioria dos caracteres avaliados houve uma grande diferença entre a classificação proposta e a de Pimentel-Gomes. Houve melhoria significativa na qualidade experimental na cultura do milho para os principais caracteres produtividade de grãos, alturas de planta e espiga, número de espigas por planta e peso de espigas comerciais, sendo a única exceção o peso de 100 grãos. Conclui-se que as faixas

  16. Measuring Resource Inequality: The Gini Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Catalano

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper stems from work done by the authors at the Mathematics for Social Justice Workshop held in June of 2007 at Middlebury College. We provide a description of the Gini coefficient and some discussion of how it can be used to promote quantitative literacy skills in mathematics courses. The Gini Coefficient was introduced in 1921 by Italian statistician Corrado Gini as a measure of inequality. It is defined as twice the area between two curves. One, the Lorenz curve for a given population with respect to a given resource, represents the cumulative percentage of the resource as a function of the cumulative percentage of the population that shares that percentage of the resource. The second curve is the line y = x which is the Lorenz curve for a population which shares the resource equally. The Gini coefficient can be interpreted as the percentage of inequality represented in the population with respect to the given resource. We propose that the Gini coefficient can be used to enhance students’ understanding of calculus concepts and provide practice for students in using both calculus and quantitative literacy skills. Our examples are based mainly on distribution of energy resources using publicly available data from the Energy Information Agency of the United States Government. For energy resources within the United States, we find that by household, the Gini coefficient is 0.346, while using the 51 data points represented by the states and Washington D.C., the Gini coefficient is 0.158. When we consider the countries of the world as a population of 210, the Gini coefficient is 0.670. We close with ideas for questions which can be posed to students and discussion of the experiences two other mathematics instructors have had incorporating the Gini coefficient into pre-calculus-level mathematics classes.

  17. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brezinski, C

    2012-01-01

    Numerical analysis has witnessed many significant developments in the 20th century. This book brings together 16 papers dealing with historical developments, survey papers and papers on recent trends in selected areas of numerical analysis, such as: approximation and interpolation, solution of linear systems and eigenvalue problems, iterative methods, quadrature rules, solution of ordinary-, partial- and integral equations. The papers are reprinted from the 7-volume project of the Journal of Computational and Applied Mathematics on '/homepage/sac/cam/na2000/index.html<

  18. Numerical Simulation and Experiment on Spray Characteristics of GDI Engines%GDI发动机喷雾特性的数值模拟和试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 李云清; 王德福

    2012-01-01

    汽油直喷发动机高压燃油喷射系统与燃油经济性和废气排放等密切相关,通过试验和数值模拟对高压喷油系统和旋流喷油器的喷雾特性进行了研究.在不同喷射压力、背压压力条件下,利用高速摄像机对喷入定体积容器的喷雾进行了喷雾贯穿距离和喷雾锥角参数的测量.结果表明:在低背压压力下,喷雾呈现出空锥、较大范围的分布形态,有利于实现燃油与空气的均质混合;在高背压条件下,喷雾呈现出紧凑密集的分布形态,有利于实现燃油与空气的分层混合.获得的贯穿距离经验公式与试验测量值在一定范围内是一致的.基于AVL HYDSIM环境建立了一维高压喷油系统模型,模拟得到的针阀升程与试验获得的图像在时间上具有一致性.%Spray characteristics of high-pressure swirl type of gasoline direct injection(GDI)injector are investigated experimentally and numerically.Visualized experiment was carried out in a constant volume chamber using high speed CMOS camera.Spray penetration,spray cone angle,spray tip velocity and droplet characteristics were measured at different injection pressures and injection durations as well as different ambient pressures.Results show that at low ambient pressure,the spray shows a hollow cone pattern with wide spray angle which is beneficial to the preparation of homogenous mixture,while the spray exhibits a solid compact cone pattern at high ambient pressure which produces the stratified mixture.The correlated empirical equation for spray penetration is validated by the experimental results.Numerical analysis was made based on one-dimensional model in the AVL HYDSIM environment.Consistency in needle lift is found between the model prediction and measured.

  19. ANL results for LMFR reactivity coefficients benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The fast reactor analysis methods developed at ANL were extensively tested in ZPR and ZPPR experiments, applied to EBR-2 and FFTF test reactors. The basic nuclear data library used was ENDF/B-V.2 with the ETOE-2 data processing code and the ENDF/B-VI. Multigroup constants were generated by Monte Carlo code MCNP 2 -2. Neutron flux calculation were done by DIF3D code applying neutron diffusion theory and finite difference method. The results obtained include basic parameters; fuel and structure regional Doppler coefficients; geometry expansion fuel coefficients; kinetics parameters. In general, agreement between phase 1 and 2 results were excellent

  20. Effects of forest cover changes in European Russia on regional weather conditions: results of numerical experiments with the COSMO-CLM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, Alexander; Kuzmina, Ekaterina; Rozinkina, Inna; Nikitin, Mikhail; Rivin, Gdaly S.

    2017-04-01

    The forests have a significant effect on the climatic system. They capture CO2 from the atmosphere, regulate the surface evaporation and runoff, and influence the radiation and thermal conditions of the land surface. It is obvious, that their influence depends on many different factors including regional climate conditions, land use and vegetation structure, surface topography, etc. The main goal of the study is to assess the possible influence of forest cover changes (under deforestation and/or afforestation) on regional weather conditions in the central part of European Russia using the results of modeling experiments provided by the meso-scale COSMO-CLM model. The need of the study lies in a lack of the experimental and modeling data characterizing the influence of the forest and land-use changes on regional weather conditions in European part of Russia. The forest ecosystems in the study region play a very important biosphere role that is significantly increased in the last decades due to considerable strengthening of anthropogenic activity in the area of European Russia. The area selected for the study is located in the central part of European Russia between 55 and 59N and 28 and 37E. It comprises several geographical zones including dark-coniferous forests of the South-European taiga in the north, the mixed forests in the central part and the broad-leaved forests in the south. The forests within the study area are very heterogeneous. The total area covered by forests according to recent remote sensing data is about 50%. The numerical experiments were provided using the COSMO-CLM model with the spatial resolution 13.2 km. As initial and boundary conditions for the numerical experiments the global reanalysis ERA Interim (with the 6-hour resolution in time and 0.75° × 0.75° in space) were used. The weather conditions were simulated in a continuous cycle for several months for the entire area of European Russia using the results of global reanalysis on

  1. Numerical Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  2. Multilevel Methods for Elliptic Problems with Highly Varying Coefficients on Nonaligned Coarse Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheichl, Robert [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Vassilevski, Panayot S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zikatanov, Ludmil T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics

    2012-06-21

    We generalize the analysis of classical multigrid and two-level overlapping Schwarz methods for 2nd order elliptic boundary value problems to problems with large discontinuities in the coefficients that are not resolved by the coarse grids or the subdomain partition. The theoretical results provide a recipe for designing hierarchies of standard piecewise linear coarse spaces such that the multigrid convergence rate and the condition number of the Schwarz preconditioned system do not depend on the coefficient variation or on any mesh parameters. One assumption we have to make is that the coarse grids are sufficiently fine in the vicinity of cross points or where regions with large diffusion coefficients are separated by a narrow region where the coefficient is small. We do not need to align them with possible discontinuities in the coefficients. The proofs make use of novel stable splittings based on weighted quasi-interpolants and weighted Poincaré-type inequalities. Finally, numerical experiments are included that illustrate the sharpness of the theoretical bounds and the necessity of the technical assumptions.

  3. A mechanistic understanding of the wear coefficient: From single to multiple asperities contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frérot, Lucas; Aghababaei, Ramin; Molinari, Jean-François

    2018-05-01

    Sliding contact between solids leads to material detaching from their surfaces in the form of debris particles, a process known as wear. According to the well-known Archard wear model, the wear volume (i.e. the volume of detached particles) is proportional to the load and the sliding distance, while being inversely proportional to the hardness. The influence of other parameters are empirically merged into a factor, referred to as wear coefficient, which does not stem from any theoretical development, thus limiting the predictive capacity of the model. Based on a recent understanding of a critical length-scale controlling wear particle formation, we present two novel derivations of the wear coefficient: one based on Archard's interpretation of the wear coefficient as the probability of wear particle detachment and one that follows naturally from the up-scaling of asperity-level physics into a generic multi-asperity wear model. As a result, the variation of wear rate and wear coefficient are discussed in terms of the properties of the interface, surface roughness parameters and applied load for various rough contact situations. Both new wear interpretations are evaluated analytically and numerically, and recover some key features of wear observed in experiments. This work shines new light on the understanding of wear, potentially opening a pathway for calculating the wear coefficient from first principles.

  4. Numerical simulations of thermal conductivity in dissipative two-dimensional Yukawa systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalyov, Yu V; Vaulina, O S

    2012-04-01

    Numerical data on the heat transfer constants in two-dimensional Yukawa systems were obtained. Numerical study of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity was carried out for the equilibrium systems with parameters close to conditions of laboratory experiments with dusty plasma. For calculations of heat transfer constants the Green-Kubo formulas were used. The influence of dissipation (friction) on the heat transfer processes in nonideal systems was investigated. The approximation of the coefficient of thermal conductivity is proposed. Comparison of the obtained results to the existing experimental and numerical data is discussed.

  5. Optical gain coefficients of silicon: a theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Yi

    2018-05-01

    A theoretical model is presented and an explicit formula is derived for calculating the optical gain coefficients of indirect band-gap semiconductors. This model is based on the second-order time-dependent perturbation theory of quantum mechanics by incorporating all the eight processes of photon/phonon emission and absorption between the band edges of the conduction and valence bands. Numerical calculation results are given for Si. The calculated absorption coefficients agree well with the existing fitting formula of experiment data with two modes of phonons: optical phonons with energy of 57.73 meV and acoustic phonons with energy of 18.27 meV near (but not exactly at) the zone edge of the X-point in the dispersion relation of phonons. These closely match with existing data of 57.5 meV transverse optical (TO) phonons at the X4-point and 18.6 meV transverse acoustic (TA) phonons at the X3-point of the zone edge. The calculated results show that the material optical gain of Si will overcome free-carrier absorption if the energy separation of quasi-Fermi levels between electrons and holes exceeds 1.15 eV.

  6. Methodology for using prompt gamma activation analysis to measure the binary diffusion coefficient of a gas in a porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios Perez, Carlos A.; Biegalski, Steve R.; Deinert, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Prompt gamma activation analysis is used to study gas diffusion in a porous system. ► Diffusion coefficients are determined using prompt gamma activation analysis. ► Predictions concentrations fit experimental measurements with an R 2 of 0.98. - Abstract: Diffusion plays a critical role in determining the rate at which gases migrate through porous systems. Accurate estimates of diffusion coefficients are essential if gas transport is to be accurately modeled and better techniques are needed that can be used to measure these coefficients non-invasively. Here we present a novel method for using prompt gamma activation analysis to determine the binary diffusion coefficients of a gas in a porous system. Argon diffusion experiments were conducted in a 1 m long, 10 cm diameter, horizontal column packed with a SiO 2 sand. The temporal variation of argon concentration within the system was measured using prompt gamma activation analysis. The binary diffusion coefficient was obtained by comparing the experimental data with the predictions from a numerical model in which the diffusion coefficient was varied until the sum of square errors between experiment and model data was minimized. Predictions of argon concentration using the optimal diffusivity fit experimental measurements with an R 2 of 0.983.

  7. Parallel accelerated cyclic reduction preconditioner for three-dimensional elliptic PDEs with variable coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Chavez Chavez, Gustavo Ivan

    2017-12-07

    We present a robust and scalable preconditioner for the solution of large-scale linear systems that arise from the discretization of elliptic PDEs amenable to rank compression. The preconditioner is based on hierarchical low-rank approximations and the cyclic reduction method. The setup and application phases of the preconditioner achieve log-linear complexity in memory footprint and number of operations, and numerical experiments exhibit good weak and strong scalability at large processor counts in a distributed memory environment. Numerical experiments with linear systems that feature symmetry and nonsymmetry, definiteness and indefiniteness, constant and variable coefficients demonstrate the preconditioner applicability and robustness. Furthermore, it is possible to control the number of iterations via the accuracy threshold of the hierarchical matrix approximations and their arithmetic operations, and the tuning of the admissibility condition parameter. Together, these parameters allow for optimization of the memory requirements and performance of the preconditioner.

  8. Damage to tungsten macro-brush targets under multiple ELM-like heat loads. Experiments vs. numerical simulations and extrapolation to ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazylev, B.; Landman, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). IHM; Janeschitz, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (DE). Fusion EURATOM] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Operation of ITER at high fusion gain is assumed to be the H-mode. A characteristic feature of this regime is the transient release of energy from the confined plasma onto PFCs by multiple ELMs (about 104 ELMs per ITER discharge), which can play a determining role in the erosion rate and lifetime of these components. The expected energy heat loads on the ITER divertor during Type I ELM are in range 0.5-4 MJ/m{sup 2} in timescales of 0.3-0.6 ms. Tungsten macro-brush armour (W-brushes) is foreseen as one of plasma facing components (PFC) for ITER divertor and dome. During the intense transient events in ITER the surface melting, melt motion, melt splashing and evaporation are seen as the main mechanisms of W erosion. The expected erosion of the ITER plasma facing components under transient energy loads can be properly estimated by numerical simulations validated against target erosion of the experiments at the plasma gun facility QSPA-T. Within the collaboration established between EU fusion programme and the Russian Federation, W-brush targets (produced either from pure tungsten or tungsten with 1% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) manufactured according to the EU specifications for the ITER divertor targets, have been exposed to multiple ITER ELM-like loads in plasma gun facilities at TRINITI in the range 0.5 - 2.2 MJ/m2 with pulse duration of 0.5 ms. The measured material erosion data have been used to validate the codes MEMOS and PHEMOBRID. Numerical simulations, including 3D-simulations (codes MEMOS and PHEMOBRID), carried out for the conditions of the QSPA-T experiments with heat loads in the range 0.5-2.2 MJ/m{sup 2} and the timescale 0.5 ms demonstrated a rather good agreement with the data obtained at the plasma gun facility QSPA: melting of brush edges at low heat loads, intense melt motion and bridge formation caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at heat loads Q>1.3 MJ/m{sup 2}. The melt splashing generated by the Kelvin-Helmholtz, and Rayleigh

  9. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bojanov, Borislav

    2009-09-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node formula for the Fourier-Tchebycheff coefficients given by Micchelli and Sharma and construct new Gaussian formulas for the Fourier coefficients of a function, based on the values of the function and its derivatives. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Field experiment and numerical simulation of coupling non-Darcy flow caused by curtain and pumping well in foundation pit dewatering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxiu; Liu, Xiaotian; Wu, Yuanbin; Liu, Shaoli; Wu, Lingao; Lou, Rongxiang; Lu, Jiansheng; Yin, Yao

    2017-06-01

    High-velocity non-Darcy flow produced larger drawdown than Darcy flow under the same pumping rate. When the non-Darcy flow caused by curtain met non-Darcy flow caused by pumping wells, superposition and amplification effect occurred in the coupling area, the non-Darcy flow was defined as coupling non-Darcy flow. The coupling non-Darcy flow can be produced and controlled using different combination of curtain and pumping wells in foundation pit dewatering to obtain the maximum drawdown using the minimum pumping rate. The Qianjiang Century City Station foundation pit of Hangzhou subway, China, was selected as background. Field experiments were performed to observe the coupling non-Darcy flow in round gravel. A generalized conceptual model was established to study the coupling effect under different combination of curtain and pumping wells. Numerical simulations of the coupling non-Darcy flow in foundation pit dewatering were carried out based on the Forchheimer equation. The non-Darcy flow area and flow velocity were influenced by the coupling effect. Short filter tube, large pumping rate, small horizontal distance between filter tube and diaphragm wall, and small vertical distance between the filter tube and confined aquifer roof effectively strengthened the coupling effect and obtained a large drawdown. The pumping wells installed close to a curtain was an intentional choice designed to create coupling non-Darcy flow and obtain the maximize drawdown. It can be used in the dewatering of a long and narrow foundation pit, such as a subway foundation pit.

  11. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  12. Coefficient estimates of negative powers and inverse coefficients for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and the inequality is sharp for the inverse of the Koebe function k(z) = z/(1 − z)2. An alternative approach to the inverse coefficient problem for functions in the class S has been investigated by Schaeffer and Spencer [27] and FitzGerald [6]. Although, the inverse coefficient problem for the class S has been completely solved ...

  13. Measuring of heat transfer coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Lindegren, Maria

    Subtask 3.4 Measuring of heat transfer coefficient Subtask 3.4.1 Design and setting up of tests to measure heat transfer coefficient Objective: Complementary testing methods together with the relevant experimental equipment are to be designed by the two partners involved in order to measure...... the heat transfer coefficient for a wide range of interface conditions in hot and warm forging processes. Subtask 3.4.2 Measurement of heat transfer coefficient The objective of subtask 3.4.2 is to determine heat transfer values for different interface conditions reflecting those typically operating in hot...

  14. Mitigation of Atmospheric Delay in SAR Absolute Ranging Using Global Numerical Weather Prediction Data: Corner Reflector Experiments at 3 Different Test Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Balss, Ulrich; Eineder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric delay due to vertical stratification, the so-called stratified atmospheric delay, has a great impact on both interferometric and absolute range measurements. In our current researches [1][2][3], centimeter-range accuracy has been proven based on Corner Reflector (CR) based measurements by applying atmospheric delay correction using the Zenith Path Delay (ZPD) corrections derived from nearby Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. For a global usage, an effective method has been introduced to estimate the stratified delay based on global 4-dimensional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) products: the direct integration method [4][5]. Two products, ERA-Interim and operational data, provided by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) are used to integrate the stratified delay. In order to access the integration accuracy, a validation approach is investigated based on ZPD derived from six permanent GPS stations located in different meteorological conditions. Range accuracy at centimeter level is demonstrated using both ECMWF products. Further experiments have been carried out in order to determine the best interpolation method by analyzing the temporal and spatial correlation of atmospheric delay using both ECMWF and GPS ZPD. Finally, the integrated atmospheric delays in slant direction (Slant Path Delay, SPD) have been applied instead of the GPS ZPD for CR experiments at three different test sites with more than 200 TerraSAR-X High Resolution SpotLight (HRSL) images. The delay accuracy is around 1-3 cm depending on the location of test site due to the local water vapor variation and the acquisition time/date. [1] Eineder M., Minet C., Steigenberger P., et al. Imaging geodesy - Toward centimeter-level ranging accuracy with TerraSAR-X. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, 2011, 49(2): 661-671. [2] Balss U., Gisinger C., Cong X. Y., et al. Precise Measurements on the Absolute Localization Accuracy of TerraSAR-X on the

  15. Numerical Simulation of the Borehole Magnetic Field for Resolving the Possible Rotation of Tectonic Basins and Plates during ICDP and IODP Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. M.; Parq, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate measurement of magnetic field inside the borehole, together with a right set of paleomagnetic measurements on the recovered core samples, should allow one to resolve important elements such as the rotation of the basin or the plate on which the basin is located. The ability to resolve the rotation of the basin can be crucial during drilling experiments by International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP). A good example where the rotation is a central question is the Philippine Sea Plate, which is thought to have rotated about 90° clockwise during the last 55 million years. Despite the significance, previous borehole magnetometers were not accurate enough to achieve such a goal because, among various technical issues, determining the orientation of the sensor inside the borehole to a very high level of accuracy was not easy. The next-generation (third-generation) borehole magnetometer (3GBM) was developed to overcome this difficulty and to bring paleomagnetic investigations to a new level. Even with the new development, however, there are still concerns whether the new instrument can really resolve the rotation because the magnetic field anomalies generated by the sediment is generally very low. In this paper, we present numerical simulations based on finite element method of the magnetic field inside the borehole that were conducted as part of a test to demonstrate that, despite low levels of magnetization, the magnetic fields can be resolved. The results also served as an important input on the design requirements of the borehole magnetometer. Various cases were considered, including the situation where the sedimentary layer is horizontal and inclined. We also explored the cases where volcanic sills were present within the sedimentary layer as they may provide a greater magnetic signature than having sediment alone, and thus improving our chances of determining the rotation. Simulations are

  16. Numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    In GR13 we heard many reports on recent. progress as well as future plans of detection of gravitational waves. According to these reports (see the report of the workshop on the detection of gravitational waves by Paik in this volume), it is highly probable that the sensitivity of detectors such as laser interferometers and ultra low temperature resonant bars will reach the level of h ~ 10—21 by 1998. in this level we may expect the detection of the gravitational waves from astrophysical sources such as coalescing binary neutron stars once a year or so. Therefore the progress in numerical relativity is urgently required to predict the wave pattern and amplitude of the gravitational waves from realistic astrophysical sources. The time left for numerical relativists is only six years or so although there are so many difficulties in principle as well as in practice.

  17. Determination of Dimensionless Attenuation Coefficient in Shaped Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, C.; Steinetz, B.; Finkbeiner, J.; Raman, G.; Li, X.

    2003-01-01

    The value of dimensionless attenuation coefficient is an important factor when numerically predicting high-amplitude acoustic waves in shaped resonators. Both the magnitude of the pressure waveform and the quality factor rely heavily on this dimensionless parameter. Previous authors have stated the values used, but have not completely explained their methods. This work fully describes the methodology used to determine this important parameter. Over a range of frequencies encompassing the fundamental resonance, the pressure waves were experimentally measured at each end of the shaped resonators. At the corresponding dimensionless acceleration, the numerical code modeled the acoustic waveforms generated in the resonator using various dimensionless attenuation coefficients. The dimensionless attenuation coefficient that most closely matched the pressure amplitudes and quality factors of the experimental and numerical results was determined to be the value to be used in subsequent studies.

  18. A numerical scheme for the generalized Burgers–Huxley equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajesh K. Singh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a numerical solution of generalized Burgers–Huxley (gBH equation is approximated by using a new scheme: modified cubic B-spline differential quadrature method (MCB-DQM. The scheme is based on differential quadrature method in which the weighting coefficients are obtained by using modified cubic B-splines as a set of basis functions. This scheme reduces the equation into a system of first-order ordinary differential equation (ODE which is solved by adopting SSP-RK43 scheme. Further, it is shown that the proposed scheme is stable. The efficiency of the proposed method is illustrated by four numerical experiments, which confirm that obtained results are in good agreement with earlier studies. This scheme is an easy, economical and efficient technique for finding numerical solutions for various kinds of (nonlinear physical models as compared to the earlier schemes.

  19. Changes in Electrokinetic Coupling Coefficients of Granite under Triaxial Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Kuwano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic phenomena are believed to be the most likely origin of electromagnetic signals preceding or accompanying earthquakes. The intensity of the source current due to the electrokinetic phenomena is determined by the fluid flux and the electrokinetic coupling coefficient called streaming current coefficient; therefore, how the coefficient changes before rupture is essential. Here, we show how the electrokinetic coefficients change during the rock deformation experiment up to failure. The streaming current coefficient did not increase before failure, but continued to decrease up to failure, which is explained in terms of the elastic closure of capillary. On the other hand, the streaming potential coefficient, which is the product of the streaming current coefficient and bulk resistivity of the rock, increased at the onset of dilatancy. It may be due to change in bulk resistivity. Our result indicates that the zeta potential of the newly created surface does not change so much from that of the preexisting fluid rock interface.

  20. Unsteady aerodynamic coefficients obtained by a compressible vortex lattice method.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiano Hernandes

    2009-01-01

    Unsteady solutions for the aerodynamic coefficients of a thin airfoil in compressible subsonic or supersonic flows are studied. The lift, the pitch moment, and pressure coefficients are obtained numerically for the following motions: the indicial response (unit step function) of the airfoil, i.e., a sudden change in the angle of attack; a thin airfoil penetrating into a sharp edge gust (for several gust speed ratios); a thin airfoil penetrating into a one-minus-cosine gust and sinusoidal gust...

  1. Analytical computation of reflection and transmission coefficients for love waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, F.; Vaccari, F.

    1995-09-01

    The computation of the transmission and reflection coefficients is an important step in the construction, if modal summation technique is used, of synthetic seismograms for 2-D or 3-D media. These coupling coefficients for Love waves at a vertical discontinuity are computed analytically. Numerical test for realistic structures show how the energy carried by an incoming mode is redistributed on the various modes existing on both sides of the vertical interface. (author). 15 refs, 8 figs

  2. Determination of air and hydrofoil pressure coefficient by laser doppler anemometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Slavica S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some results of experiments performed in water cavitation tunnel are presented. Pressure coefficient (Cp was experimentally determined by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA measurements. Two models were tested: model of airplane G4 (Super Galeb and hydrofoil of high speed axial pump. These models are not prepared for conventional pressure measurements, so that LDA is applied for Cp determination. Numerical results were obtained using a code for average Navier-Stokes equations solutions. Comparisons between computational and experimental results prove the effectiveness of the LDA. The advantages and disadvantages of LDA application are discussed. Flow visualization was made by air bubbles.

  3. Peltier Coefficient and Photon-Assisted Tunnelling in Quantum Point Contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafa, H. Aly

    2008-01-01

    We present the Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures. Also we obtain the oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in external fields. Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes and temperatures. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature

  4. Effect of Variable Manning Coefficients on Tsunami Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberopoulou, A.; Rees, D.

    2017-12-01

    Numerical simulations are commonly used to help estimate tsunami hazard, improve evacuation plans, issue or cancel tsunami warnings, inform forecasting and hazard assessments and have therefore become an integral part of hazard mitigation among the tsunami community. Many numerical codes exist for simulating tsunamis, most of which have undergone extensive benchmarking and testing. Tsunami hazard or risk assessments employ these codes following a deterministic or probabilistic approach. Depending on the scope these studies may or may not consider uncertainty in the numerical simulations, the effects of tides, variable friction or estimate financial losses, none of which are necessarily trivial. Distributed manning coefficients, the roughness coefficients used in hydraulic modeling, are commonly used in simulating both riverine and pluvial flood events however, their use in tsunami hazard assessments is primarily part of limited scope studies and for the most part, not a standard practice. For this work, we investigate variations in manning coefficients and their effects on tsunami inundation extent, pattern and financial loss. To assign manning coefficients we use land use maps that come from the New Zealand Land Cover Database (LCDB) and more recent data from the Ministry of the Environment. More than 40 classes covering different types of land use are combined into major classes such as cropland, grassland and wetland representing common types of land use in New Zealand, each of which is assigned a unique manning coefficient. By utilizing different data sources for variable manning coefficients, we examine the impact of data sources and classification methodology on the accuracy of model outputs.

  5. Efficient evaluation of influence coefficients in three-dimensional extended boundary-node method for potential problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Taku; Saitoh, Ayumu; Kamitani, Atsushi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    For the purpose of speed-up of the three-dimensional eXtended Boundary-Node Method (X-BNM), an efficient algorithm for evaluating influence coefficients has been developed. The algorithm can be easily implemented into the X-BNM without using any integration cells. By applying the resulting X-BNM to the Laplace problem, the performance of the algorithm is numerically investigated. The numerical experiments show that, by using the algorithm, computational costs for evaluating influence coefficients in the X-BNM are reduced considerably. Especially for a large-sized problem, the algorithm is efficiently performed, and the computational costs of the X-BNM are close to those of the Boundary-Element Method (BEM). In addition, for the problem, the X-BNM shows almost the same accuracy as that of the BEM. (author)

  6. Robust Stabilization of Nonlinear Systems with Uncertain Varying Control Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiyue Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the stabilization problem for a class of nonlinear systems, whose control coefficient is uncertain and varies continuously in value and sign. The study emphasizes the development of a robust control that consists of a modified Nussbaum function to tackle the uncertain varying control coefficient. By such a method, the finite-time escape phenomenon has been prevented when the control coefficient is crossing zero and varying its sign. The proposed control guarantees the asymptotic stabilization of the system and boundedness of all closed-loop signals. The control performance is illustrated by a numerical simulation.

  7. Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2014-01-01

    into random incidence absorption coefficients for porous absorbers are investigated. Two optimization-based conversion methods are suggested: the surface impedance estimation for locally reacting absorbers and the flow resistivity estimation for extendedly reacting absorbers. The suggested conversion methods...

  8. Approximate reflection coefficients for a thin VTI layer

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2017-09-18

    We present an approximate method to derive simple expressions for the reflection coefficients of P- and SV-waves for a thin transversely isotropic layer with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) embedded in a homogeneous VTI background. The layer thickness is assumed to be much smaller than the wavelengths of P- and SV-waves inside. The exact reflection and transmission coefficients are derived by the propagator matrix method. In the case of normal incidence, the exact reflection and transmission coefficients are expressed in terms of the impedances of vertically propagating P- and S-waves. For subcritical incidence, the approximate reflection coefficients are expressed in terms of the contrast in the VTI parameters between the layer and the background. Numerical examples are designed to analyze the reflection coefficients at normal and oblique incidence, and investigate the influence of transverse isotropy on the reflection coefficients. Despite giving numerical errors, the approximate formulae are sufficiently simple to qualitatively analyze the variation of the reflection coefficients with the angle of incidence.

  9. Dynamic modeling of the horizontal eddy viscosity coefficient for quasigeostrophic ocean circulation problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romit Maulik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forth a simplified dynamic modeling strategy for the eddy viscosity coefficient parameterized in space and time. The eddy viscosity coefficient is dynamically adjusted to the local structure of the flow using two different nonlinear eddy viscosity functional forms to capture anisotropic dissipation mechanism, namely, (i the Smagorinsky model using the local strain rate field, and (ii the Leith model using the gradient of the vorticity field. The proposed models are applied to the one-layer and two-layer wind-driven quasigeostrophic ocean circulation problems, which are standard prototypes of more realistic ocean dynamics. Results show that both models capture the quasi-stationary ocean dynamics and provide the physical level of eddy viscosity distribution without using any a priori estimation. However, it is found that slightly less dissipative results can be obtained by using the dynamic Leith model. Two-layer numerical experiments also reveal that the proposed dynamic models automatically parameterize the subgrid-scale stress terms in each active layer. Furthermore, the proposed scale-aware models dynamically provide higher values of the eddy viscosity for smaller resolutions taking into account the local resolved flow information, and addressing the intimate relationship between the eddy viscosity coefficients and the numerical resolution employed by the quasigeostrophic models.

  10. Study of atmospheric stratification influence on pollutants dispersion using a numerical fluid mechanics model. Code-Saturne validation with the Prairie Grass experiment/Study of atmospheric stratification influence on pollutants dispersion using a numerical fluid mechanics software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, Fanny

    2010-09-01

    A validation of Code-Saturne, a computational fluids dynamics model developed by EDF, is proposed for stable conditions. The goal is to guarantee the performance of the model in order to use it for impacts study. A comparison with the Prairie Grass data field experiment and with two Gaussian plume models will be done [fr

  11. Probabilistic optimization of safety coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, M.; Devictor, N.; Magistris, F. de

    1999-01-01

    This article describes a reliability-based method for the optimization of safety coefficients defined and used in design codes. The purpose of the optimization is to determine the partial safety coefficients which minimize an objective function for sets of components and loading situations covered by a design rule. This objective function is a sum of distances between the reliability of the components designed using the safety coefficients and a target reliability. The advantage of this method is shown on the examples of the reactor vessel, a vapour pipe and the safety injection circuit. (authors)

  12. Measurement of off-diagonal transport coefficients in two-phase flow in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, T S; Goode, P A

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent description of low capillary number two-phase flow in porous media relies on the independence of phase transport. An extended Darcy's law with a saturation dependent effective permeability is used for each phase. The driving force for each phase is given by its pressure gradient and the body force. This diagonally dominant form neglects momentum transfer from one phase to the other. Numerical and analytical modeling in regular geometries have however shown that while this approximation is simple and acceptable in some cases, many practical problems require inclusion of momentum transfer across the interface. Its inclusion leads to a generalized form of extended Darcy's law in which both the diagonal relative permeabilities and the off-diagonal terms depend not only on saturation but also on the viscosity ratio. Analogous to application of thermodynamics to dynamical systems, any of the extended forms of Darcy's law assumes quasi-static interfaces of fluids for describing displacement problems. Despite the importance of the permeability coefficients in oil recovery, soil moisture transport, contaminant removal, etc., direct measurements to infer the magnitude of the off-diagonal coefficients have been lacking. The published data based on cocurrent and countercurrent displacement experiments are necessarily indirect. In this paper, we propose a null experiment to measure the off-diagonal term directly. For a given non-wetting phase pressure-gradient, the null method is based on measuring a counter pressure drop in the wetting phase required to maintain a zero flux. The ratio of the off-diagonal coefficient to the wetting phase diagonal coefficient (relative permeability) may then be determined. The apparatus is described in detail, along with the results obtained. We demonstrate the validity of the experimental results and conclude the paper by comparing experimental data to numerical simulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jacques, Ian

    1987-01-01

    This book is primarily intended for undergraduates in mathematics, the physical sciences and engineering. It introduces students to most of the techniques forming the core component of courses in numerical analysis. The text is divided into eight chapters which are largely self-contained. However, with a subject as intricately woven as mathematics, there is inevitably some interdependence between them. The level of difficulty varies and, although emphasis is firmly placed on the methods themselves rather than their analysis, we have not hesitated to include theoretical material when we consider it to be sufficiently interesting. However, it should be possible to omit those parts that do seem daunting while still being able to follow the worked examples and to tackle the exercises accompanying each section. Familiarity with the basic results of analysis and linear algebra is assumed since these are normally taught in first courses on mathematical methods. For reference purposes a list of theorems used in the t...

  14. Comparison of field-measured radon diffusion coefficients with laboratory-measured coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepel, E.A.; Silker, W.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare radon diffusion coefficients determined for 0.1-m depths of soils by a steady-state method in the laboratory and diffusion coefficients evaluated from radon fluxes through several-fold greater depths of the same soils covering uranium-mill tailings. The coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore volume of the soils and are equivalent to values for the quantity, D/P, in the Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two soils were tested: a well-graded sand and an inorganic clay of low plasticity. For the flux evaluations, radon was collected by adsorption on charcoal following passive diffusion from the soil surface and also from air recirculating through an aluminum tent over the soil surface. An analysis of variance in the flux evaluations showed no significant difference between these two collection methods. Radon diffusion coefficients evaluated from field data were statistically indistinguishable, at the 95% confidence level, from those measured in the laboratory; however, the low precision of the field data prevented a sensitive validation of the laboratory measurements. From the field data, the coefficients were calculated to be 0.03 +- 0.03 cm 2 /s for the sand cover and 0.0036 +- 0.0004 cm 2 /s for the clay cover. The low precision in the coefficients evaluated from field data was attributed to high variation in radon flux with time and surface location at the field site

  15. Friction coefficient determination by electrical resistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunyagi, A.; Kandrai, K.; Fülöp, Z.; Kapusi, Z.; Simon, A.

    2018-05-01

    A simple and low-cost, DIY-type, Arduino-driven experiment is presented for the study of friction and measurement of the friction coefficient, using a conductive rubber cord as a force sensor. It is proposed for high-school or college/university-level students. We strongly believe that it is worthwhile planning, designing and performing Arduino and compatible sensor-based experiments in physics class in order to ensure a better understanding of phenomena, develop theoretical knowledge and multiple experimental skills.

  16. Quadrature formulas for Fourier coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bojanov, Borislav; Petrova, Guergana

    2009-01-01

    We consider quadrature formulas of high degree of precision for the computation of the Fourier coefficients in expansions of functions with respect to a system of orthogonal polynomials. In particular, we show the uniqueness of a multiple node

  17. Diffusion coefficient for anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A report on the progress towards the goal of estimating the diffusion coefficient for anomalous transport is given. The gyrokinetic theory is used to identify different time and length scale inherent to the characteristics of plasmas which exhibit anomalous transport

  18. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  19. [High energy particle physics]: Task A, High energy physics program: Experiment and theory; Task B, High energy physics program: Numerical simulation of quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannutti, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following research: fixed target experiments; collider experiments; computing, networking and VAX upgrade; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; solid argon calorimetry; absorption of CAD system geometries into GEANT for SSC; and particle theory programs

  20. Playing Linear Numerical Board Games Promotes Low-Income Children's Numerical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Robert S.; Ramani, Geetha B.

    2008-01-01

    The numerical knowledge of children from low-income backgrounds trails behind that of peers from middle-income backgrounds even before the children enter school. This gap may reflect differing prior experience with informal numerical activities, such as numerical board games. Experiment 1 indicated that the numerical magnitude knowledge of…

  1. Heat Transfer Coefficient at Cast-Mold Interface During Centrifugal Casting: Calculation of Air Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohacek, Jan; Kharicha, Abdellah; Ludwig, Andreas; Wu, Menghuai; Karimi-Sibaki, Ebrahim

    2018-06-01

    During centrifugal casting, the thermal resistance at the cast-mold interface represents a main blockage mechanism for heat transfer. In addition to the refractory coating, an air gap begins to form due to the shrinkage of the casting and the mold expansion, under the continuous influence of strong centrifugal forces. Here, the heat transfer coefficient at the cast-mold interface h has been determined from calculations of the air gap thickness d a based on a plane stress model taking into account thermoelastic stresses, centrifugal forces, plastic deformations, and a temperature-dependent Young's modulus. The numerical approach proposed here is rather novel and tries to offer an alternative to the empirical formulas usually used in numerical simulations for a description of a time-dependent heat transfer coefficient h. Several numerical tests were performed for different coating thicknesses d C, rotation rates Ω, and temperatures of solidus T sol. Results demonstrated that the scenario at the interface is unique for each set of parameters, hindering the possibility of employing empirical formulas without a preceding experiment being performed. Initial values of h are simply equivalent to the ratio of the coating thermal conductivity and its thickness ( 1000 Wm-2 K-1). Later, when the air gap is formed, h drops exponentially to values at least one order of magnitude smaller ( 100 Wm-2 K-1).

  2. Small-scale Scheimpflug lidar for aerosol extinction coefficient and vertical atmospheric transmittance detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guodong; Qin, Laian; Hou, Zaihong; Jing, Xu; He, Feng; Tan, Fengfu; Zhang, Silong

    2018-03-19

    In this paper, a new prototypical Scheimpflug lidar capable of detecting the aerosol extinction coefficient and vertical atmospheric transmittance at 1 km above the ground is described. The lidar system operates at 532 nm and can be used to detect aerosol extinction coefficients throughout an entire day. Then, the vertical atmospheric transmittance can be determined from the extinction coefficients with the equation of numerical integration in this area. CCD flat fielding of the image data is used to mitigate the effects of pixel sensitivity variation. An efficient method of two-dimensional wavelet transform according to a local threshold value has been proposed to reduce the Gaussian white noise in the lidar signal. Furthermore, a new iteration method of backscattering ratio based on genetic algorithm is presented to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and vertical atmospheric transmittance. Some simulations are performed to reduce the different levels of noise in the simulated signal in order to test the precision of the de-noising method and inversion algorithm. The simulation result shows that the root-mean-square errors of extinction coefficients are all less than 0.02 km -1 , and that the relative errors of the atmospheric transmittance between the model and inversion data are below 0.56% for all cases. The feasibility of the instrument and the inversion algorithm have also been verified by an optical experiment. The average relative errors of aerosol extinction coefficients between the Scheimpflug lidar and the conventional backscattering elastic lidar are 3.54% and 2.79% in the full overlap heights of two time points, respectively. This work opens up new possibilities of using a small-scale Scheimpflug lidar system for the remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Sakaki, Michiko; Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2018-01-01

    Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other) measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node) are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients were strongly

  4. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Masuda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients

  5. Clustering Coefficients for Correlation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Naoki; Sakaki, Michiko; Ezaki, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takamitsu

    2018-01-01

    Graph theory is a useful tool for deciphering structural and functional networks of the brain on various spatial and temporal scales. The clustering coefficient quantifies the abundance of connected triangles in a network and is a major descriptive statistics of networks. For example, it finds an application in the assessment of small-worldness of brain networks, which is affected by attentional and cognitive conditions, age, psychiatric disorders and so forth. However, it remains unclear how the clustering coefficient should be measured in a correlation-based network, which is among major representations of brain networks. In the present article, we propose clustering coefficients tailored to correlation matrices. The key idea is to use three-way partial correlation or partial mutual information to measure the strength of the association between the two neighboring nodes of a focal node relative to the amount of pseudo-correlation expected from indirect paths between the nodes. Our method avoids the difficulties of previous applications of clustering coefficient (and other) measures in defining correlational networks, i.e., thresholding on the correlation value, discarding of negative correlation values, the pseudo-correlation problem and full partial correlation matrices whose estimation is computationally difficult. For proof of concept, we apply the proposed clustering coefficient measures to functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained from healthy participants of various ages and compare them with conventional clustering coefficients. We show that the clustering coefficients decline with the age. The proposed clustering coefficients are more strongly correlated with age than the conventional ones are. We also show that the local variants of the proposed clustering coefficients (i.e., abundance of triangles around a focal node) are useful in characterizing individual nodes. In contrast, the conventional local clustering coefficients were strongly

  6. Conjugate gradient type methods for linear systems with complex symmetric coefficient matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Roland

    1989-01-01

    We consider conjugate gradient type methods for the solution of large sparse linear system Ax equals b with complex symmetric coefficient matrices A equals A(T). Such linear systems arise in important applications, such as the numerical solution of the complex Helmholtz equation. Furthermore, most complex non-Hermitian linear systems which occur in practice are actually complex symmetric. We investigate conjugate gradient type iterations which are based on a variant of the nonsymmetric Lanczos algorithm for complex symmetric matrices. We propose a new approach with iterates defined by a quasi-minimal residual property. The resulting algorithm presents several advantages over the standard biconjugate gradient method. We also include some remarks on the obvious approach to general complex linear systems by solving equivalent real linear systems for the real and imaginary parts of x. Finally, numerical experiments for linear systems arising from the complex Helmholtz equation are reported.

  7. Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    are suggested: An optimization method for the surface impedances for locally reacting absorbers, the flow resistivity for extendedly reacting absorbers, and the flow resistance for fabrics. With four porous type absorbers, the conversion methods are validated. For absorbers backed by a rigid wall, the surface...... coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations...... impedance optimization produces the best results, while the flow resistivity optimization also yields reasonable results. The flow resistivity and flow resistance optimization for extendedly reacting absorbers are also found to be successful. However, the theoretical conversion factors based on Miki's model...

  8. Reactor kinetics revisited: a coefficient based model (CBM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratemi, W.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a nuclear reactor kinetics model based on Guelph expansion coefficients calculation ( Coefficients Based Model, CBM), for n groups of delayed neutrons is developed. The accompanying characteristic equation is a polynomial form of the Inhour equation with the same coefficients of the CBM- kinetics model. Those coefficients depend on Universal abc- values which are dependent on the type of the fuel fueling a nuclear reactor. Furthermore, such coefficients are linearly dependent on the inserted reactivity. In this paper, the Universal abc- values have been presented symbolically, for the first time, as well as with their numerical values for U-235 fueled reactors for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons. Simulation studies for constant and variable reactivity insertions are made for the CBM kinetics model, and a comparison of results, with numerical solutions of classical kinetics models for one, two, three, and six groups of delayed neutrons are presented. The results show good agreements, especially for single step insertion of reactivity, with the advantage of the CBM- solution of not encountering the stiffness problem accompanying the numerical solutions of the classical kinetics model. (author)

  9. Coefficients of tracer transfer through membranes. Pt. 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabialska, A; Hawlicka, E; Plonka, A [Politechnika Lodzka (Poland)

    1974-01-01

    The doubled value of the tracer transfer coefficient in the self-diffusion process is equal to the sum of tracer transfer coefficients in the diffusion and interfusion processes. The fundamental phenomenological relation can be deduced for the coefficients of tracer transfer between two phases of electrolyte solutions spearated by a virtual boundary. Indeed, the doubled value of the tracer mobility in the self-diffusion experiment (no concentration gradient of the traced substance) is equal to the sum of the tracer mobilities in the diffusion (tracer movement along with the concentration gradient of the traced substance) and interfusion experiments (tracer movement against the concentration gradient of the traced substance). Thus the doubled value of the tracer transfer coefficient in the self-diffusion process should be equal to the sum of tracer transfer coefficients in the diffusion and interfusion processes. The experimental verification of that fundamental relation is presented.

  10. Discrete singular convolution for the generalized variable-coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical solutions of the generalized variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries equation are obtained using a discrete singular convolution and a fourth order singly diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta method for space and time discretisation, respectively. The theoretical convergence of the proposed method is rigorously ...

  11. Calculation of generalized secant integral using binomial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guseinov, I.I.; Mamedov, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    A single series expansion relation is derived for the generalized secant (GS) integral in terms of binomial coefficients, exponential integrals and incomplete gamma functions. The convergence of the series is tested by the concrete cases of parameters. The formulas given in this study for the evaluation of GS integral show good rate of convergence and numerical stability

  12. Estimating crop coefficients for corn during an evapotranspiration experiment on an oxisol in Brazil Determinação de coeficientes de cultura para o milho durante um experimento de evapotranspiração em um oxisol do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Villagra

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil water balance components were measured during two periods (from 1989 to 1991 on a Dark Red Latosol (oxisol in Piracicaba,SP, Brazil. The change in soil water storage and the soil water fluxes at the lower limit of the rooting zone were calculated for a transect of 25 observation plots. Hydraulic head gradients were determined by tensiometer measurements. Soil water flux densities were estimated through Darcy's equation. The actual evapotranspiration of the crops and weeds and the actual evaporation of bare soil were obtained from the water balance equation and this for two periods under different crop rotations. For the first period the sequence was bare soil-corn-weeds and for the second period it was stubble mulch-weeds-corn. For assessing the crop coefficients the potential evapotranspiration was calculated according to two different methods. The first method was based on the modified Penman equation with grass as a reference crop, to obtain this way reference coefficients, and the second method was based on the pan "A" evaporation data in order to obtain pan coefficients. These coefficients were compared with the tabulated crop coefficients. In general when there was no shortage of water during the corn growth, the crop coefficients k c"A" and k c ref were very close to the k c values.Os componentes do balanço hídrico foram medidos durante dois períodos (de 1989 a 1991 em terra roxa estruturada, em Piracicaba,SP, Brasil. As variações de armazenamento de água e os fluxos de água no solo no limite inferior da zona radicular foram calculados para uma transeção de 25 parcelas experimentais. Gradientes hidráulicos foram determinados por meio de medidas tensiométricas. Densidades de fluxo de água foram estimadas através da equação de Darcy. A evapotranspiração atual das culturas e das ervas daninhas e a evaporação atual do solo nú foram obtidas da equação do balanço hídrico, para dois períodos, sob diferentes rota

  13. Power coefficient anomaly in JOYO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H

    1980-12-15

    Operation of the JOYO experimental fast reactor with the MK-I core has been divided into two phases: (1) 50 MWt power ascension and operation; and (2) 75 MWt power ascension and operation. The 50 MWt power-up tests were conducted in August 1978. In these tests, the measured reactivity loss due to power increases from 15 MWt to 50 MWt was 0.28% ..delta.. K/K, and agreed well with the predicted value of 0.27% ..delta.. K/K. The 75 MWt power ascension tests were conducted in July-August 1979. In the process of the first power increase above 50 MWt to 65 MWt conducted on July 11, 1979, an anomalously large negative power coefficient was observed. The value was about twice the power coefficient values measured in the tests below 50 MW. In order to reproduce the anomaly, the reactor power was decreased and again increased up to the maximum power of 65 MWt. However, the large negative power coefficient was not observed at this time. In the succeeding power increase from 65 MWt to 75 MWt, a similar anomalous power coefficient was again observed. This anomaly disappeared in the subsequent power ascensions to 75 MWt, and the magnitude of the power coefficient gradually decreased with power cycles above the 50 MWt level.

  14. Numerical study of unsteady viscous flow past oscillating airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Yan; Yuan Xin [Tsinghua Univ., Dept. of Thermal Engineering, Beijing (China)

    2001-07-01

    Accurate simulation of the dynamic stall of an oscillating airfoil is of major importance to wing and wind turbine blade design. However, dynamic stall is complicated and influenced by many factors, such as geometry shape of the airfoil, reduced frequency, etc. The difficulties of simulation are both mathematical (numerical method) and physical (turbulence model). The present paper has introduced a new numerical method (new LU-type scheme and fourth-order higher resolution MUSCL TVD scheme) and q-{omega} turbulence modelling to calculate the unsteady flowfields of an oscillating NACA0015 airfoil. The test targets include attached flow, light-stall and deep-stall of the airfoil. The calculated results for attached flow and light-stall are in good agreement with those of experiments. The calculated results for deep-stall also show improvement, especially during the downstroke of the oscillation. However, there is still a significant difference between the results of calculation and experiment in the hysteresis curves of the drag coefficient. One reason is that the q-{omega} turbulence model still has limitations. Another is that the drag coefficient is difficult to measure and the experiments are not reliable. (Author)

  15. Numerical simulation of water hammer in low pressurized pipe: comparison of SimHydraulics and Lax-Wendroff method with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himr, D.

    2013-04-01

    Article describes simulation of unsteady flow during water hammer with two programs, which use different numerical approaches to solve ordinary one dimensional differential equations describing the dynamics of hydraulic elements and pipes. First one is Matlab-Simulink-SimHydraulics, which is a commercial software developed to solve the dynamics of general hydraulic systems. It defines them with block elements. The other software is called HYDRA and it is based on the Lax-Wendrff numerical method, which serves as a tool to solve the momentum and continuity equations. This program was developed in Matlab by Brno University of Technology. Experimental measurements were performed on a simple test rig, which consists of an elastic pipe with strong damping connecting two reservoirs. Water hammer is induced with fast closing the valve. Physical properties of liquid and pipe elasticity parameters were considered in both simulations, which are in very good agreement and differences in comparison with experimental data are minimal.

  16. Numerical simulation of water hammer in low pressurized pipe: comparison of SimHydraulics and Lax-Wendroff method with experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himr D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Article describes simulation of unsteady flow during water hammer with two programs, which use different numerical approaches to solve ordinary one dimensional differential equations describing the dynamics of hydraulic elements and pipes. First one is Matlab-Simulink-SimHydraulics, which is a commercial software developed to solve the dynamics of general hydraulic systems. It defines them with block elements. The other software is called HYDRA and it is based on the Lax-Wendrff numerical method, which serves as a tool to solve the momentum and continuity equations. This program was developed in Matlab by Brno University of Technology. Experimental measurements were performed on a simple test rig, which consists of an elastic pipe with strong damping connecting two reservoirs. Water hammer is induced with fast closing the valve. Physical properties of liquid and pipe elasticity parameters were considered in both simulations, which are in very good agreement and differences in comparison with experimental data are minimal.

  17. Uncertainty Quantification in Numerical Aerodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Litvinenko, Alexander; Matthies, Hermann G.; Liu, Dishi; Schillings, Claudia; Schulz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    In numerical section we compares five methods, including quasi-Monte Carlo quadrature, polynomial chaos with coefficients determined by sparse quadrature and gradient-enhanced version of Kriging, radial basis functions and point collocation polynomial chaos, in their efficiency in estimating statistics of aerodynamic performance upon random perturbation to the airfoil geometry [D.Liu et al '17]. For modeling we used the TAU code, developed in DLR, Germany.

  18. Parameter estimation in IMEX-trigonometrically fitted methods for the numerical solution of reaction-diffusion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Raffaele; Moccaldi, Martina; Paternoster, Beatrice

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, an adapted numerical scheme for reaction-diffusion problems generating periodic wavefronts is introduced. Adapted numerical methods for such evolutionary problems are specially tuned to follow prescribed qualitative behaviors of the solutions, making the numerical scheme more accurate and efficient as compared with traditional schemes already known in the literature. Adaptation through the so-called exponential fitting technique leads to methods whose coefficients depend on unknown parameters related to the dynamics and aimed to be numerically computed. Here we propose a strategy for a cheap and accurate estimation of such parameters, which consists essentially in minimizing the leading term of the local truncation error whose expression is provided in a rigorous accuracy analysis. In particular, the presented estimation technique has been applied to a numerical scheme based on combining an adapted finite difference discretization in space with an implicit-explicit time discretization. Numerical experiments confirming the effectiveness of the approach are also provided.

  19. Electron-transport, ionization, attachment, and dissociation coefficients in SF6 and its mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, A.V.; Van Brunt, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    An improved set of electron-collision cross sections is derived for SF 6 and used to calculate transport, ionization, attachment, and dissociation coefficients for pure SF 6 and mixtures of SF 6 with N 2 , O 2 , and Ne. The SF 6 cross sections differ from previously published sets primarily at very low and high electron energies. At energies below 0.03 eV the attachment cross section is adjusted to fit recent electron swarm experiments, while the elastic momentum transfer cross section is increased to the theoretical limit. At high energies an allowance is made for the excitation of highly excited levels as observed in electron beam experiments. The cross-section sets used for the admixed gases have previously been published. Electron kinetic energy distributions computed from numerical solutions of the electron-transport (Boltzmann) equation using the two-term, spherical harmonic expansion approximation were used to obtain electron-transport and reaction coefficients as functions of E/N and the fractional concentration of SF 6 . Here E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density. Attachment rate data for low concentrations of SF 6 in N 2 are used to test the attachment cross sections. Particular attention is given to the calculation of transport and reaction coefficients at the critical E/N = (E/N)/sub c/ at which the ionization and attachment rates are equal

  20. Effect of interfacial turbulence and accommodation coefficient on CFD predictions of pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks are to a large extent affected by heat and mass transport across the liquid-vapor interface. These mechanisms are, in turn, controlled by the kinetics of the phase change process and the dynamics of the turbulent recirculating flows in the liquid and vapor phases. In this paper, the effects of accommodation coefficient and interfacial turbulence on tank pressurization and pressure control simulations are examined. Comparison between numerical predictions and ground-based measurements in two large liquid hydrogen tank experiments, performed in the K-site facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are used to show the impact of accommodation coefficient and interfacial and vapor phase turbulence on evolution of pressure and temperatures in the cryogenic storage tanks. In particular, the self-pressurization comparisons indicate that: (1) numerical predictions are essentially independent of the magnitude of the accommodation coefficient; and (2) surprisingly, laminar models sometimes provide results that are in better agreement with experimental self-pressurization rates, even in parametric ranges where the bulk flow is deemed fully turbulent. In this light, shortcomings of the present CFD models, especially, numerical treatments of interfacial mass transfer and turbulence, as coupled to the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface capturing scheme, are underscored and discussed.