WorldWideScience

Sample records for code plagiarism detection

  1. Plagiarism Detection Algorithm for Source Code in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Xu, Chan; Ouyang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, computer programming is getting more necessary in the course of program design in college education. However, the trick of plagiarizing plus a little modification exists among some students' home works. It's not easy for teachers to judge if there's plagiarizing in source code or not. Traditional detection algorithms cannot fit this…

  2. A Comparison of Source Code Plagiarism Detection Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Thomas; Culwin, Fintan

    2004-06-01

    Automated techniques for finding plagiarism in student source code submissions have been in use for over 20 years and there are many available engines and services. This paper reviews the literature on the major modern detection engines, providing a comparison of them based upon the metrics and techniques they deploy. Generally the most common and effective techniques are seen to involve tokenising student submissions then searching pairs of submissions for long common substrings, an example of what is defined to be a paired structural metric. Computing academics are recommended to use one of the two Web-based detection engines, MOSS and JPlag. It is shown that whilst detection is well established there are still places where further research would be useful, particularly where visual support of the investigation process is possible.

  3. Process Model Improvement for Source Code Plagiarism Detection in Student Programming Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermek, Dragutin; Novak, Matija

    2016-01-01

    In programming courses there are various ways in which students attempt to cheat. The most commonly used method is copying source code from other students and making minimal changes in it, like renaming variable names. Several tools like Sherlock, JPlag and Moss have been devised to detect source code plagiarism. However, for larger student…

  4. WASTK: A Weighted Abstract Syntax Tree Kernel Method for Source Code Plagiarism Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deqiang Fu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a source code plagiarism detection method, named WASTK (Weighted Abstract Syntax Tree Kernel, for computer science education. Different from other plagiarism detection methods, WASTK takes some aspects other than the similarity between programs into account. WASTK firstly transfers the source code of a program to an abstract syntax tree and then gets the similarity by calculating the tree kernel of two abstract syntax trees. To avoid misjudgment caused by trivial code snippets or frameworks given by instructors, an idea similar to TF-IDF (Term Frequency-Inverse Document Frequency in the field of information retrieval is applied. Each node in an abstract syntax tree is assigned a weight by TF-IDF. WASTK is evaluated on different datasets and, as a result, performs much better than other popular methods like Sim and JPlag.

  5. Detection of bilingual plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Zamora R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a computational algorithm for text alignment in the task of automatically detecting bilingual plagiarism is proposed. The method of detecting bilingual plagiarism uses machine translation services, in order to have the documents in question a base language, and apply techniques of monolingual plagiarism. The algorithm was tested with The corpus belonging to the International Competition Plagiarism 2013, with the objective of evaluating the step of detecting monolingual plagiarism. Besides it’s experimented with the collection of texts EUROPARL, a collection of documents pertaining to the meeting the European Parliament, specifically it´s to English and Spanish documents.

  6. Detecting Source Code Plagiarism on .NET Programming Languages using Low-level Representation and Adaptive Local Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Karnalim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though there are various source code plagiarism detection approaches, only a few works which are focused on low-level representation for deducting similarity. Most of them are only focused on lexical token sequence extracted from source code. In our point of view, low-level representation is more beneficial than lexical token since its form is more compact than the source code itself. It only considers semantic-preserving instructions and ignores many source code delimiter tokens. This paper proposes a source code plagiarism detection which rely on low-level representation. For a case study, we focus our work on .NET programming languages with Common Intermediate Language as its low-level representation. In addition, we also incorporate Adaptive Local Alignment for detecting similarity. According to Lim et al, this algorithm outperforms code similarity state-of-the-art algorithm (i.e. Greedy String Tiling in term of effectiveness. According to our evaluation which involves various plagiarism attacks, our approach is more effective and efficient when compared with standard lexical-token approach.

  7. Social Network Aided Plagiarism Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrnec, Aljaž; Lavbic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of different kinds of electronic devices and the volume of content on the Web have increased the amount of plagiarism, which is considered an unethical act. If we want to be efficient in the detection and prevention of these acts, we have to improve today's methods of discovering plagiarism. The paper presents a research study where…

  8. Plagiarism Detection by Online Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-01-01

    The problem of plagiarism represents one of the burning issues of the modern scientific world. Detection of plagiarism is a problem that the Editorial Board encounters in their daily work. Software solutions represent a good solution for the detection of plagiarism. The problem of plagiarism will become most discussed topic of the modern scientific world, especially due to the development of standard measures, which rank the work of one author. Investment in education, education of young research personnel about the importance of scientific research, with paying particular attention on ethical behavior, becomes an imperative of academic staff. Editors have to invest additional effort in the development of the base of reviewers team as well as in their proper guidance, because after all, despite the software solutions, they are the best weapon to fight plagiarism. Peer review process should be a key of successful operation of each journal.

  9. Students versus Plagiarism: How is Online Plagiarism Detection Service Perceived?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Affan Ramadhana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of information and communication technology plays a considerable role for students in writing their theses. The positive side, it will help the students to find countless number of academic sources ranging from journal articles to complete theses written by other scholars. On the other hand, it will also create a chance for the students to commit plagiarism easier. Unoriginal writing and plagiarism in this digital era can be detected in the digital way by using plagiarism detection software. This paper elaborates how students understand the concept of plagiarism, how they avoid plagiarism, and how they perceive online plagiarism detection service. The data was taken from interviews to MA students during their period of thesis writing. This paper concludes several important outlines to be learning guidelines for the students in improving their academic writing.

  10. Citation-based plagiarism detection detecting disguised and cross-language plagiarism using citation pattern analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gipp, Bela

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is a problem with far-reaching consequences for the sciences. However, even today's best software-based systems can only reliably identify copy & paste plagiarism. Disguised plagiarism forms, including paraphrased text, cross-language plagiarism, as well as structural and idea plagiarism often remain undetected. This weakness of current systems results in a large percentage of scientific plagiarism going undetected. Bela Gipp provides an overview of the state-of-the art in plagiarism detection and an analysis of why these approaches fail to detect disguised plagiarism forms. The aut

  11. Plagiarism Detection Based on SCAM Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anzelmi, Daniele; Carlone, Domenico; Rizzello, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex problem and considered one of the biggest in publishing of scientific, engineering and other types of documents. Plagiarism has also increased with the widespread use of the Internet as large amount of digital data is available. Plagiarism is not just direct copy but also...... paraphrasing, rewording, adapting parts, missing references or wrong citations. This makes the problem more difficult to handle adequately. Plagiarism detection techniques are applied by making a distinction between natural and programming languages. Our proposed detection process is based on natural language...... document. Our plagiarism detection system, like many Information Retrieval systems, is evaluated with metrics of precision and recall....

  12. Automatic Student Plagiarism Detection: Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozgovoy, Maxim; Kakkonen, Tuomo; Cosma, Georgina

    2010-01-01

    The availability and use of computers in teaching has seen an increase in the rate of plagiarism among students because of the wide availability of electronic texts online. While computer tools that have appeared in recent years are capable of detecting simple forms of plagiarism, such as copy-paste, a number of recent research studies devoted to…

  13. Rapid assessment of assignments using plagiarism detection software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Whitney R; Abrego, Patricia C

    2011-01-01

    Faculty members most often use plagiarism detection software to detect portions of students' written work that have been copied and/or not attributed to their authors. The rise in plagiarism has led to a parallel rise in software products designed to detect plagiarism. Some of these products are configurable for rapid assessment and teaching, as well as for plagiarism detection.

  14. Research into Plagiarism Cases and Plagiarism Detection Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kashkur, M; Paršutins, S; Borisovs, A

    2010-01-01

    In the age of information technology intellectual property becomes especially valuable. This is one of the causes why the cases of the plagiarism appear more frequently in all vital sectors. Due to that, there is a growing need for different instruments for the protection and verification of copyright for finding plagiarism. Before checking the document for plagiarism, reviewing algorithms and approaches for searching plagiarism, you must know and understand what constitutes the plagiarism. T...

  15. Does the Adoption of Plagiarism-Detection Software in Higher Education Reduce Plagiarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youmans, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    In two studies, students at California State University, Northridge wrote papers that were checked for plagiarism using plagiarism-detection software. In the first study, half of the students in two classes were randomly selected and told by the professor that their term papers would be scanned for plagiarism using the software. Students in the…

  16. Guidelines on What Constitutes Plagiarism and Electronic Tools to Detect it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksanapruksa, Panya; Millhouse, Paul W

    2016-04-01

    Plagiarism is a serious ethical problem among scientific publications. There are various definitions of plagiarism, and the major categories include unintentional (unsuitable paraphrasing or improper citations) and intentional. Intentional plagiarism includes mosaic plagiarism, plagiarism of ideas, plagiarism of text, and self-plagiarism. There are many Web sites and software packages that claim to detect plagiarism effectively. A violation of plagiarism laws can lead to serious consequences including author banning, loss of professional reputation, termination of a position, and even legal action.

  17. The Toolbox for Local and Global Plagiarism Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butakov, Sergey; Scherbinin, Vladislav

    2009-01-01

    Digital plagiarism is a problem for educators all over the world. There are many software tools on the market for uncovering digital plagiarism. Most of them can work only with text submissions. In this paper, we present a new architecture for a plagiarism detection tool that can work with many different kinds of digital submissions, from plain or…

  18. Intelligent Bar Chart Plagiarism Detection in Documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mumtaz Al-Dabbagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR. By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts.

  19. Intelligent bar chart plagiarism detection in documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Rehman, Amjad; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts.

  20. Intelligent Bar Chart Plagiarism Detection in Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts. PMID:25309952

  1. Education Improves Plagiarism Detection by Biology Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Emily A.

    2012-01-01

    Regrettably, the sciences are not untouched by the plagiarism affliction that threatens the integrity of budding professionals in classrooms around the world. My research, however, suggests that plagiarism training can improve students' recognition of plagiarism. I found that 148 undergraduate ecology students successfully identified plagiarized…

  2. Realigning the Focus of Plagiarism Detection Using "Plagiarismdetect.com"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabapathy, Elangkeeran A/L; Rahim, Rozlan Abd; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which "plagiarismdetect.com," an internet help/tool to detect plagiarism helps academicians tackle the ever-growing problem of plagiarism. Concerned with term papers, essays and most of the time with full-blown research reports, a tool like "plagiarismdetect.com" may…

  3. Protecting Student Intellectual Property in Plagiarism Detection Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butakov, Sergey; Barber, Craig

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of the Internet along with increasing computer literacy has made it easy and tempting for digital natives to copy-paste someone's work. Plagiarism is now a burning issue in education, industry and even in the research community. In this study, the authors concentrate on plagiarism detection with particular focus on the…

  4. Plagiarism Detection for Indonesian Language using Winnowing with Parallel Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Y.; Isa, S. M.; Wulandhari, L. A.; Abdurachman, E.

    2018-03-01

    The plagiarism has many forms, not only copy paste but include changing passive become active voice, or paraphrasing without appropriate acknowledgment. It happens on all language include Indonesian Language. There are many previous research that related with plagiarism detection in Indonesian Language with different method. But there are still some part that still has opportunity to improve. This research proposed the solution that can improve the plagiarism detection technique that can detect not only copy paste form but more advance than that. The proposed solution is using Winnowing with some addition process in pre-processing stage. With stemming processing in Indonesian Language and generate fingerprint in parallel processing that can saving time processing and produce the plagiarism result on the suspected document.

  5. Plagiarism: Examination of Conceptual Issues and Evaluation of Research Findings on Using Detection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Angelos; Theodosiadou, Dimitra; Pappos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze and evaluate the research findings on using Plagiarism Detection Services (PDS) in universities. In order to do that, conceptual issues about plagiarism are examined and the complex nature of plagiarism is discussed. Subsequently, the pragmatic forms of student plagiarism are listed and PDS strategies on…

  6. A Real-Time Plagiarism Detection Tool for Computer-Based Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Heimo J.; Lall, Manoj; Kogeda, Okuthe P.

    2018-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The aim of this article is to develop a tool to detect plagiarism in real time amongst students being evaluated for learning in a computer-based assessment setting. Background: Cheating or copying all or part of source code of a program is a serious concern to academic institutions. Many academic institutions apply a combination of…

  7. Plagiarism detection and prevention techniques in engineering education

    OpenAIRE

    Halak, Basel; El-Hajjar, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism seriously damages the education process in a number of ways; it prevents students from developing the skills of creative thinking and critical analysis; it undermines the trust between lectures and students, and if goes undetected, it can impact the reputation of the academic institution and devalue its degrees. In this paper, we present two techniques for plagiarism detection and prevention. The first method is based on the allocation of a unique assignment for each student, and t...

  8. Combating unethical publications with plagiarism detection services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H R

    2011-01-01

    About 3,000 new citations that are highly similar to citations in previously published manuscripts that appear each year in the biomedical literature (Medline) alone. This underscores the importance for the opportunity for editors and reviewers to have detection system to identify highly similar text in submitted manuscripts so that they can then review them for novelty. New software-based services, both commercial and free, provide this capability. The availability of such tools provides both a way to intercept suspect manuscripts and serve as a deterrent. Unfortunately, the capabilities of these services vary considerably, mainly as a consequence of the availability and completeness of the literature bases to which new queries are compared. Most of the commercial software has been designed for detection of plagiarism in high school and college papers; however, there is at least 1 fee-based service (CrossRef) and 1 free service (etblast.org), which are designed to target the needs of the biomedical publication industry. Information on these various services, examples of the type of operability and output, and things that need to be considered by publishers, editors, and reviewers before selecting and using these services is provided. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Combating unethical publications with plagiarism detection services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    About 3,000 new citations that are highly similar to citations in previously published manuscripts that appear each year in the biomedical literature (Medline) alone. This underscores the importance for the opportunity for editors and reviewers to have detection system to identify highly similar text in submitted manuscripts so that they can then review them for novelty. New software-based services, both commercial and free, provide this capability. The availability of such tools provides both a way to intercept suspect manuscripts and serve as a deterrent. Unfortunately, the capabilities of these services vary considerably, mainly as a consequence of the availability and completeness of the literature bases to which new queries are compared. Most of the commercial software has been designed for detection of plagiarism in high school and college papers, however, there is at least one fee-based service (CrossRef) and one free service (etblast.org) which are designed to target the needs of the biomedical publication industry. Information on these various services, examples of the type of operability and output, and things that need to be considered by publishers, editors and reviewers before selecting and using these services is provided. PMID:21194644

  10. Python Source Code Plagiarism Attacks on Introductory Programming Course Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnalim, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    This paper empirically enlists Python plagiarism attacks that have been found on Introductory Programming course assignments for undergraduate students. According to our observation toward 400 plagiarism-suspected cases, there are 35 plagiarism attacks that have been conducted by students. It starts with comment & whitespace modification as…

  11. A Plagiarism Detection Algorithm based on Extended Winnowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Xuliang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is a common problem faced by academia and education. Mature commercial plagiarism detection system has the advantages of comprehensive and high accuracy, but the expensive detection costs make it unsuitable for real-time, lightweight application environment such as the student assignments plagiarism detection. This paper introduces the method of extending classic Winnowing plagiarism detection algorithm, expands the algorithm in functionality. The extended algorithm can retain the text location and length information in original document while extracting the fingerprints of a document, so that the locating and marking for plagiarism text fragment are much easier to achieve. The experimental results and several years of running practice show that the expansion of the algorithm has little effect on its performance, normal hardware configuration of PC will be able to meet small and medium-sized applications requirements. Based on the characteristics of lightweight, high efficiency, reliability and flexibility of Winnowing, the extended algorithm further enhances the adaptability and extends the application areas.

  12. Detecting Plagiarism in MS Access Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Assurance of individual effort from students in computer-based assignments is a challenge. Due to digitization, students can easily use a copy of their friend's work and submit it as their own. Plagiarism in assignments puts students who cheat at par with those who work honestly and this compromises the learning evaluation process. Using a…

  13. Plagiarism and Self-plagiarism

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism is unauthorized appropriation of other people’s ideas, processes or text without giving correct credit and with intention to present it as own property. Appropriation of own published ideas or text and passing it as original is denominated self-plagiarism and considered as bad as plagiarism. The frequency of plagiarism is increasing and development of information and communication technologies facilitates it, but simultaneously, thanks to the same technology, plagiarism detection s...

  14. An Empirical Research Study of the Efficacy of Two Plagiarism-Detection Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jacob D.; Page, Elaine Fetyko

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a study of the two most popular plagiarism-detection software platforms available on today's market--Turnitin (http://www.turnitin.com/static/index.html) and SafeAssign (http://www.safeassign.com/). After a brief discussion of plagiarism's relevance to librarians, the authors examine plagiarism-detection methodology and…

  15. Hermetic and Web Plagiarism Detection Systems for Student Essays--An Evaluation of the State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkonen, Tuomo; Mozgovoy, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Plagiarism has become a serious problem in education, and several plagiarism detection systems have been developed for dealing with this problem. This study provides an empirical evaluation of eight plagiarism detection systems for student essays. We present a categorical hierarchy of the most common types of plagiarism that are encountered in…

  16. Knowledge Graphs as Context Models: Improving the Detection of Cross-Language Plagiarism with Paraphrasing

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Salvador, Marc; Gupta, Parth; Rosso, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Cross-language plagiarism detection attempts to identify and extract automatically plagiarism among documents in different languages. Plagiarized fragments can be translated verbatim copies or may alter their structure to hide the copying, which is known as paraphrasing and is more difficult to detect. In order to improve the paraphrasing detection, we use a knowledge graph-based approach to obtain and compare context models of document fragments in different languages. Experimental results i...

  17. Plagiarism and Source Deception Detection Based on Syntax Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Salih Al-Shamery

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the shingle algorithm with Jaccard method are employed as a new approach to detect deception in sources in addition to detect plagiarism . Source deception occurs as a result of taking a particular text from a source and relative it to another source, while plagiarism occurs in the documents as a result of taking part or all of the text belong to another research, this approach is based on Shingle algorithm with Jaccard coefficient , Shingling is an efficient way to compare the set of shingle in the files that contain text which are used as a feature to measure the syntactic similarity of the documents and it will work with Jaccard coefficient that measures similarity between sample sets . In this proposed system, text will be checked whether it contains syntax plagiarism or not and gives a percentage of similarity with other documents , As well as research sources will be checked to detect deception in source , by matching it with available sources from Turnitin report of the same research by using shingle algorithm with Jaccard coefficient. The motivations of this work is to discovery of literary thefts that occur on the researches , especially what students are doing in their researches , also discover the deception that occurs in the sources.

  18. An analysis of student privacy rights in the use of plagiarism detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Bo

    2013-09-01

    Plagiarism detection services are a powerful tool to help encourage academic integrity. Adoption of these services has proven to be controversial due to ethical concerns about students' rights. Central to these concerns is the fact that most such systems make permanent archives of student work to be re-used in plagiarism detection. This computerization and automation of plagiarism detection is changing the relationships of trust and responsibility between students, educators, educational institutions, and private corporations. Educators must respect student privacy rights when implementing such systems. Student work is personal information, not the property of the educator or institution. The student has the right to be fully informed about how plagiarism detection works, and the fact that their work will be permanently archived as a result. Furthermore, plagiarism detection should not be used if the permanent archiving of a student's work may expose him or her to future harm.

  19. Plagiarism by Adult Learners Online: A case study in detection and remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Jocoy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Detecting and combating plagiarism from Web-based sources is a concern for administrators and instructors involved in online distance education. In this paper, we quantify copy-and-paste plagiarism among adult learners in an online geography course offered through Penn State’s World Campus Geographic Information Systems (GIS certificate program. We also evaluate the effectiveness of an “expectation management” strategy intended to discourage adult learners from unintentional violations. We found that while manual methods detected plagiarism in only about 3 percent of assignments, Turnitin.com revealed a 13 percent plagiarism rate among the same assignments. Our attempts to increase awareness and manage expectations decreased infractions measurably, but not significantly. In contrast, Turnitin.com substantially improved our ability to detect infractions. We conclude that raising awareness and managing expectations about plagiarism may be worthwhile, but is no substitute for systematic detection and vigilant enforcement, even among adult learners.

  20. Back Translation: An Emerging Sophisticated Cyber Strategy to Subvert Advances in "Digital Age" Plagiarism Detection and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael; Sheridan, Lynnaire

    2015-01-01

    Advances have been made in detecting and deterring the student plagiarism that has accompanied the uptake and development of the internet. Many authors from the late 1990s onwards grappled with plagiarism in the digital age, presenting articles that were provoking and established the foundation for strategies to address cyber plagiarism, including…

  1. Plagiarism in the Context of Education and Evolving Detection Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Nurmashev, Bekaidar; Seksenbayev, Bakhytzhan; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Kitas, George D

    2017-08-01

    Plagiarism may take place in any scientific journals despite currently employed anti-plagiarism tools. The absence of widely acceptable definitions of research misconduct and reliance solely on similarity checks do not allow journal editors to prevent most complex cases of recycling of scientific information and wasteful, or 'predatory,' publishing. This article analyses Scopus-based publication activity and evidence on poor writing, lack of related training, emerging anti-plagiarism strategies, and new forms of massive wasting of resources by publishing largely recycled items, which evade the 'red flags' of similarity checks. In some non-Anglophone countries 'copy-and-paste' writing still plagues pre- and postgraduate education. Poor research management, absence of courses on publication ethics, and limited access to quality sources confound plagiarism as a cross-cultural and multidisciplinary phenomenon. Over the past decade, the advent of anti-plagiarism software checks has helped uncover elementary forms of textual recycling across journals. But such a tool alone proves inefficient for preventing complex forms of plagiarism. Recent mass retractions of plagiarized articles by reputable open-access journals point to critical deficiencies of current anti-plagiarism software that do not recognize manipulative paraphrasing and editing. Manipulative editing also finds its way to predatory journals, ignoring the adherence to publication ethics and accommodating nonsense plagiarized items. The evolving preventive strategies are increasingly relying on intelligent (semantic) digital technologies, comprehensively evaluating texts, keywords, graphics, and reference lists. It is the right time to enforce adherence to global editorial guidance and implement a comprehensive anti-plagiarism strategy by helping all stakeholders of scholarly communication. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  2. Plagiarism in computer science courses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J.K. [Francis Marion Univ., Florence, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Plagiarism of computer programs has long been a problem in higher education. Ease of electronic copying, vague understanding by students as to what constitutes plagiarism, increasing acceptance of plagiarism by students, lack of enforcement by instructors and school administrators, and a whole host of other factors contribute to plagiarism. The first step in curbing plagiarism is prevention, the second (and much less preferable) is detection. History files and software metrics can be used as a tool to aid in detecting possible plagiarism. This paper gives advice concerning how to deal with plagiarism and with using software monitors to detect plagiarism.

  3. Fostering academic competence or putting students under general suspicion? Voluntary plagiarism check of academic papers by means of a web-based plagiarism detection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Eleonora Kohl

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing number of cases of plagiarism and the ease of use of online published texts, universities are faced with a considerable challenge to prevent and take action against plagiarism in academic student papers. In reaction to plagiarism, web-based plagiarism detection systems (PDSs are increasingly used to check submitted papers - this checking entails various problems, for example the percentage of plagiarism found is only an indication of the actual extent of plagiarism and not all types of plagiarism can be identified. To cope with this problematic situation the voluntary plagiarism check (VPC, an alternative preventive university didactic concept, was developed at the University of Education, Freiburg (Germany. It focused on the development of individual skills. Students were able to submit their academic papers (e.g. an undergraduate paper, final thesis anonymously. These were then tested with the PDS Ephorus. Following interpretation and summary of the findings by the project team - plagiarism as well as referencing mistakes - we advised the students on a suitable approach to academic writing based on their own typical mistakes. The VPC was conducted as a three-semester research project and was later evaluated. About 500 academic papers were tested. In 90% of the undergraduates' work incorrect and/or missing citations were found. This high percentage decreased among students in later semesters. Instances of plagiarism were detected in about 40% of the papers when the texts of advanced students (≥6th semester were tested. At the same time the length of the plagiarised texts decreased. Around half of the students stated that it was acceptable to copy single sentences or short passages from other sources without citation; they did not consider plagiarising on a limited scale as cheating. A similar number of students admitted to having doubts about whether they could write a good paper without plagiarising. Almost all

  4. Plagiarism in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabuddin, Syed

    2009-01-01

    Plagiarism sometimes creates legal and ethical problems for students and faculty. It can have serious consequences. Fortunately, there are ways to stop plagiarism. There are many tools available to detect plagiarism, e.g. using software for detecting submitted articles. Also, there are many ways to punish a plagiarist, e.g. banning plagiarists…

  5. Student's Plagiarisms in Higher Learning Institutions in the Era of Improved Internet Access: Case Study of Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anney, Vicent Naano; Mosha, Mary Atanas

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated students' plagiarism practices in Tanzania higher learning institutions by involving two universities-one public and one private university as a case study. The universities involved have honour code and policies for plagiarism detection however they do not employ software for checking students' plagiarism. The study…

  6. Personalized Assessment as a Means to Mitigate Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Sathiamoorthy

    2017-01-01

    Although every educational institution has a code of academic honesty, they still encounter incidents of plagiarism. These are difficult and time-consuming to detect and deal with. This paper explores the use of personalized assessments with the goal of reducing incidents of plagiarism, proposing a personalized assessment software framework…

  7. A Comprehensive Definition of Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Jean

    2003-01-01

    Explains how the internet has made it easy for students to plagiarize papers. Gives definitions for plagiarism. Explains reasons why students plagiarize including the following: they don't understand what it is, they think they won't get caught, etc. Describes ways to detect and prevent plagiarism. (ontains 58 references.)(MZ)

  8. An IR-Based Approach Utilizing Query Expansion for Plagiarism Detection in MEDLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, Rao Muhammad Adeel; Stevenson, Mark; Clough, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The identification of duplicated and plagiarized passages of text has become an increasingly active area of research. In this paper, we investigate methods for plagiarism detection that aim to identify potential sources of plagiarism from MEDLINE, particularly when the original text has been modified through the replacement of words or phrases. A scalable approach based on Information Retrieval is used to perform candidate document selection-the identification of a subset of potential source documents given a suspicious text-from MEDLINE. Query expansion is performed using the ULMS Metathesaurus to deal with situations in which original documents are obfuscated. Various approaches to Word Sense Disambiguation are investigated to deal with cases where there are multiple Concept Unique Identifiers (CUIs) for a given term. Results using the proposed IR-based approach outperform a state-of-the-art baseline based on Kullback-Leibler Distance.

  9. Plagiarism and Self-plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakir Mehić

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is unauthorized appropriation of other people’s ideas, processes or text without giving correct credit and with intention to present it as own property. Appropriation of own published ideas or text and passing it as original is denominated self-plagiarism and considered as bad as plagiarism. The frequency of plagiarism is increasing and development of information and communication technologies facilitates it, but simultaneously, thanks to the same technology, plagiarism detection software is developing[1].Within academia, plagiarism by students, professors, or researchers is considered academic dishonesty or academic fraud, and offenders are punished by sanctions ranging from suspension to termination, along with the loss of credibility and perceived integrity[2].When we talking about self-plagiarism avid B. Resnik clarifies, “Self-plagiarism involves dishonesty but not intellectual theft[3].” Roig (2002[4] offers a useful classification system including four types of self-plagiarism: - duplicate publication of an article in more than one journal;- partitioning of one study into multiple publications, often called salami-slicing;- text recycling; and- copyright infringement. In cases of proven plagiarism and academic self-plagiarism consequences may include[5]: - The author is obliged to withdraw the disputable manuscript which is already published or in different pre-publication stages.- In the event of co-authorship, the co-author must approve of publication withdrawal, even if the misconduct is not related to them.- Publications proved to be false by the Commission are erased from author’s bibliography or marked appropriately.- The procedure for detraction from academic degrees (MSc or PhD at the University is initiated if obtained based on false thesis or dissertation.- The procedure for detraction from scientific and educational titles is initiated by a relevant body if based on false publications or other

  10. The problem of plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa S; Steneck, Nicholas H

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is a form of research misconduct and a serious violation of the norms of science. It is the misrepresentation of another's ideas or words as one's own, without proper acknowledgement of the original source. Certain aspects of plagiarism make it less straightforward than this definition suggests. Over the past 30 years, the U.S. Federal Government has developed and refined its policies on misconduct, and Federal agencies, as well as research institutions, have established approaches to responding to allegations and instances of plagiarism. At present, efforts to avert plagiarism focus on plagiarism-detection software and instructional strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. How to Act When Research Misconduct Is Not Detected by Software but Revealed by the Author of the Plagiarized Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydik, Olga D; Gasparyan, Armen Yuri

    2016-10-01

    The detection of plagiarism in scholarly articles is a complex process. It requires not just quantitative analysis with the similarity recording by anti-plagiarism software but also assessment of the readers' opinion, pointing to the theft of ideas, methodologies, and graphics. In this article we describe a blatant case of plagiarism by Chinese authors, who copied a Russian article from a non-indexed and not widely visible Russian journal, and published their own report in English in an open-access journal indexed by Scopus and Web of Science and archived in PubMed Central. The details of copying in the translated English article were presented by the Russian author to the chief editor of the index journal, consultants from Scopus, anti-plagiarism experts, and the administrator of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The correspondents from Scopus and COPE pointed to the decisive role of the editors' of the English journal who may consider further actions if plagiarism is confirmed. After all, the chief editor of the English journal retracted the article on grounds of plagiarism and published a retraction note, although no details of the complexity of the case were reported. The case points to the need for combining anti-plagiarism efforts and actively seeking opinion of non-native English-speaking authors and readers who may spot intellectual theft which is not always detected by software.

  12. How to Act When Research Misconduct Is Not Detected by Software but Revealed by the Author of the Plagiarized Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The detection of plagiarism in scholarly articles is a complex process. It requires not just quantitative analysis with the similarity recording by anti-plagiarism software but also assessment of the readers’ opinion, pointing to the theft of ideas, methodologies, and graphics. In this article we describe a blatant case of plagiarism by Chinese authors, who copied a Russian article from a non-indexed and not widely visible Russian journal, and published their own report in English in an open-access journal indexed by Scopus and Web of Science and archived in PubMed Central. The details of copying in the translated English article were presented by the Russian author to the chief editor of the index journal, consultants from Scopus, anti-plagiarism experts, and the administrator of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). The correspondents from Scopus and COPE pointed to the decisive role of the editors’ of the English journal who may consider further actions if plagiarism is confirmed. After all, the chief editor of the English journal retracted the article on grounds of plagiarism and published a retraction note, although no details of the complexity of the case were reported. The case points to the need for combining anti-plagiarism efforts and actively seeking opinion of non-native English-speaking authors and readers who may spot intellectual theft which is not always detected by software. PMID:27550475

  13. Analyzing Similarity in Mathematical Content To Enhance the Detection of Academic Plagiarism

    OpenAIRE

    Isele, Maurice-Roman

    2018-01-01

    Despite the effort put into the detection of academic plagiarism, it continues to be a ubiquitous problem spanning all disciplines. Various tools have been developed to assist human inspectors by automatically identifying suspicious documents. However, to our knowledge currently none of these tools use mathematical content for their analysis. This is problematic, because mathematical content potentially represents a significant amount of the scientific contribution in academic documents. Henc...

  14. Plagiarism – A Noble Misconduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rezwanur Rahman

    2015-07-01

    eloquence of the text.8 But, there is a dilemma in scientific writing where the essence of the work is the originality of the scientific content no matter how it is presented.9 Unlike any other author, the author of a scientific paper are ought to follow certain well-established scientific methodology and always be careful not to be affected by his or her intuition or biases that might jeopardize the judgment of a researcher.9,10 For a scientific paper, the author has to take sufficient time to read and understand thoroughly the main source of the article, and then he can organize into his own ideas or thoughts. Before submitting their ideas or manuscript to the journal office, the author should rewrite the article in his own words without seeing from the original source and if in any doubt, should take help of the guide/instructor.4,11,12 Researchers and authors of scholarly papers have to follow ethical codes of Good Scientific Practice (GSP,13 primarily based of the principles of honesty and integrity.11 In the modern-day collaborative and multidisciplinary research, honesty of each and every author is becoming a pillar of trustworthy science.14 Scientists absorb new information, design new studies and publish their experimental results in various related biomedical journals. Because of the ease of using various search engines for researching resources on the internet, large numbers of published papers that contain an enormous amount of study materials can be quickly obtained. As such, plagiarism or duplicate publication may occur either consciously or unconsciously when the authors are preparing their manuscript.15 In fact availability of internet facilities and free online journals are the main sources of today's plagiarism among the students, faculty and researchers of any profession.6,16-19 Unfortunately, digitalization made copy-paste plagiarism and inappropriate re-use of sources from the websites, online journals, and other electronic media widespread.14 According

  15. Cross-Language Plagiarism Detection System Using Latent Semantic Analysis and Learning Vector Quantization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Putri Ratna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Computerized cross-language plagiarism detection has recently become essential. With the scarcity of scientific publications in Bahasa Indonesia, many Indonesian authors frequently consult publications in English in order to boost the quantity of scientific publications in Bahasa Indonesia (which is currently rising. Due to the syntax disparity between Bahasa Indonesia and English, most of the existing methods for automated cross-language plagiarism detection do not provide satisfactory results. This paper analyses the probability of developing Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA for a computerized cross-language plagiarism detector for two languages with different syntax. To improve performance, various alterations in LSA are suggested. By using a linear vector quantization (LVQ classifier in the LSA and taking into account the Frobenius norm, output has reached up to 65.98% in accuracy. The results of the experiments showed that the best accuracy achieved is 87% with a document size of 6 words, and the document definition size must be kept below 10 words in order to maintain high accuracy. Additionally, based on experimental results, this paper suggests utilizing the frequency occurrence method as opposed to the binary method for the term–document matrix construction.

  16. THE CONSTRUCTION OF INDONESIAN-ENGLISH CROSS LANGUAGE PLAGIARISM DETECTION SYSTEM USING FINGERPRINTING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakiy Firdaus Alfikri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross language plagiarism detection is an important task since it can protect person intellectual property right. Since English is the most popular international language, we proposed an Indonesian-English cross language plagiarism detection to handle such problem in Indonesian-English domain where the suspected plagiarism document is written in Indonesian and the source document is written in English. To minimize translation error, we build the system by translating the Indonesian document into English and then compare the translated document with the English document collection. The detection system consists of preprocess component, heuristic retrieval component, and detailed analysis component. The main technique used in retrieval process is fingerprinting which can extract lexical features from text which is suitable to be used to detect plagiarism done using literal translation method. In this paper, we also propose additional methods to be implemented in heuristic retrieval component to increase the performance of the system: phrase chunking, stop word removal, stemming, and synonym selection. We evaluated system’s performance and the effects of additional methods to system’s performance, provided several data test sets which represents a plagiarism type. From the experiments, we concluded that the system works on 83.33% of test cases. We also concluded that mainly all additional methods except the phrase chunking have good effects in enhancing the system accuracy. Deteksi plagiarisme lintas bahasa merupakan hal yang penting untuk melindungi hak kekayaan intelektual. Bahasa Inggris adalah bahasa internasional yang paling populer, karenanya peneliti mengusulkan deteksi plagiarisme lintas bahasa Indonesia-Inggris untuk menangani masalah tersebut di mana domain dokumen yang diduga plagiat ditulis dalam bahasa Indonesia dan dokumen sumber ditulis dalam bahasa Inggris. Untuk meminimalkan kesalahan terjemahan, peneliti membangun

  17. Analyzing and reducing plagiarism at university

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge López Puga

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is one of the less desirable practises in the academic context. This paper presents an experience of massive plagiarism detection at university and the steps taken to prevent its subsequent occurrence. Plagiarism was detected in the first assessment phase of a research project practise. As a result, students were required to arrange ethical group discussions with the professor to prevent plagiarism in the future. A substantial reduction in the rate of plagiarism was observed from t...

  18. Plagiarism in Grant Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not news that software exists to check undergraduate papers for plagiarism. What is less well known is that some federal grant agencies are using technology to detect plagiarism in grant proposals. That variety of research misconduct is a growing problem, according to federal experts. The National Science Foundation, in its most recent…

  19. A Model for Determining Student Plagiarism: Electronic Detection and Academic Judgement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretag, Tracey; Mahmud, Saadia

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides insights based on the authors' own practice as university instructors, researchers and arbitrators of student plagiarism. Recognising the difficulty in defining plagiarism while still acknowledging the practical importance of doing so, the authors find the common element between the various types of plagiarism to be the lack of…

  20. The Case of the Pilfered Paper: Implications of Online Writing Assistance and Web-Based Plagiarism Detection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Phoebe; Vaughn, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    While there is nothing new about academic dishonesty, how it is committed, prevented, and detected has been dramatically transformed by the advent of online technologies. This article briefly describes the concurrent emergence of online writing assistance services and Web-based plagiarism detection tools and examines the implications of both for…

  1. EDITORIAL: On plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Simon; Webb, Steve; Hendee, William R.

    2008-03-01

    accused authors (all of them), the authors whose work may have been plagiarized, and the copyright holder of the original material. The correspondence will include the alleged plagiarizing language and a copy of the original and suspected work. If all parties agree that plagiarism (whether intentional or unintentional) has occurred, a written letter of apology should be sent promptly by the offending author(s) to the Editor/Publisher and to the authors and copyright holder whose work has been plagiarized. If the offending work has been published, a notice of plagiarism, citing both the plagiarized and the offending articles, will be published in the next available issue of PMB. The plagiarizing authors shall agree that all dissemination of the offending article shall be accompanied by the notice of plagiarism. In the most serious cases of plagiarism, a retraction (erratum) will be published (in accordance with the STM guidelines on 'Preservation of the objective record of science', retraction is favoured over removal in virtually all cases), and further sanctions applied. If the offending work hasn't yet been published (i.e. it is detected by the referees), sanctions will still be applied. If the accused authors deny that plagiarism has occurred, the Editor and Publisher must explore the accusation further. The investigation will also involve the Journals Director and the Chief Scientific Adviser of IOP Publishing (who publish PMB on behalf of IPEM) and also the General Secretary of IPEM. All parties to the allegation will be encouraged to submit corroborating evidence, and the accused authors granted an opportunity (at no expense to the journal) to testify in person to defend themselves against the allegation. The investigation should be concluded as quickly as possible (particularly if the article in question has already been published online or in print). If the investigation of the allegation of plagiarism concludes in support of the allegation, then the process for

  2. Local Plagiarisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Plagiarism and collusion are significant issues for most lecturers whatever their discipline, and to universities and the higher education sector. Universities respond to these issues by developing institutional definitions of plagiarism, which are intended to apply to all instances of plagiarism and collusion. This article first suggests that…

  3. Avoid the Plague: Tips and Tricks for Preventing and Detecting Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolkan, J. V.

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is an ugly word. Copying someone else's work and attempting to claim credit for one's self is an act that involves a number of ethical failings--theft, laziness, coveting, and lying among others. Many educators blame the Internet for what they perceive as the rise of plagiarism. Although the Internet certainly enables more efficient…

  4. Detecting and (not) dealing with plagiarism in an engineering paper: beyond CrossCheck-a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-xin; Huo, Zhao-lin; Zhang, Yue-hong

    2014-06-01

    In papers in areas such as engineering and the physical sciences, figures, tables and formulae are the basic elements to communicate the authors' core ideas, workings and results. As a computational text-matching tool, CrossCheck cannot work on these non-textual elements to detect plagiarism. Consequently, when comparing engineering or physical sciences papers, CrossCheck may return a low similarity index even when plagiarism has in fact taken place. A case of demonstrated plagiarism involving engineering papers with a low similarity index is discussed, and editor's experiences and suggestions are given on how to tackle this problem. The case shows a lack of understanding of plagiarism by some authors or editors, and illustrates the difficulty of getting some editors and publishers to take appropriate action. Consequently, authors, journal editors, and reviewers, as well as research institutions all are duty-bound not only to recognize the differences between ethical and unethical behavior in order to protect a healthy research environment, and also to maintain consistent ethical publishing standards.

  5. Beyond Plagiarism: Transgressive and Nontransgressive Intertextuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasoma, Ranamukalage; Thompson, Celia; Pennycook, Alastair

    2004-01-01

    The debate about what constitutes plagiarism and how it should be dealt with in the academy continues to gain momentum. The response from many higher education institutions is to channel ever-increasing amounts of resources into plagiarism detection technologies, rather than trying to ascertain why plagiarism might be occurring in the first place.…

  6. Revisiting Information Technology tools serving authorship and editorship: a case-guided tutorial to statistical analysis and plagiarism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamidis, P D; Lithari, C; Konstantinidis, S T

    2010-12-01

    With the number of scientific papers published in journals, conference proceedings, and international literature ever increasing, authors and reviewers are not only facilitated with an abundance of information, but unfortunately continuously confronted with risks associated with the erroneous copy of another's material. In parallel, Information Communication Technology (ICT) tools provide to researchers novel and continuously more effective ways to analyze and present their work. Software tools regarding statistical analysis offer scientists the chance to validate their work and enhance the quality of published papers. Moreover, from the reviewers and the editor's perspective, it is now possible to ensure the (text-content) originality of a scientific article with automated software tools for plagiarism detection. In this paper, we provide a step-bystep demonstration of two categories of tools, namely, statistical analysis and plagiarism detection. The aim is not to come up with a specific tool recommendation, but rather to provide useful guidelines on the proper use and efficiency of either category of tools. In the context of this special issue, this paper offers a useful tutorial to specific problems concerned with scientific writing and review discourse. A specific neuroscience experimental case example is utilized to illustrate the young researcher's statistical analysis burden, while a test scenario is purpose-built using open access journal articles to exemplify the use and comparative outputs of seven plagiarism detection software pieces.

  7. Revisiting Information Technology tools serving authorship and editorship: a case-guided tutorial to statistical analysis and plagiarism detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamidis, P D; Lithari, C; Konstantinidis, S T

    2010-01-01

    With the number of scientific papers published in journals, conference proceedings, and international literature ever increasing, authors and reviewers are not only facilitated with an abundance of information, but unfortunately continuously confronted with risks associated with the erroneous copy of another's material. In parallel, Information Communication Technology (ICT) tools provide to researchers novel and continuously more effective ways to analyze and present their work. Software tools regarding statistical analysis offer scientists the chance to validate their work and enhance the quality of published papers. Moreover, from the reviewers and the editor's perspective, it is now possible to ensure the (text-content) originality of a scientific article with automated software tools for plagiarism detection. In this paper, we provide a step-bystep demonstration of two categories of tools, namely, statistical analysis and plagiarism detection. The aim is not to come up with a specific tool recommendation, but rather to provide useful guidelines on the proper use and efficiency of either category of tools. In the context of this special issue, this paper offers a useful tutorial to specific problems concerned with scientific writing and review discourse. A specific neuroscience experimental case example is utilized to illustrate the young researcher's statistical analysis burden, while a test scenario is purpose-built using open access journal articles to exemplify the use and comparative outputs of seven plagiarism detection software pieces. PMID:21487489

  8. Patchwork plagiarism – a jigsaw of stolen puzzle pieces

    OpenAIRE

    Šupak Smolčić, Vesna; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism remains at the top in terms of interest to the scientific community. In its many vicious forms, patchwork plagiarism is characterized by numerous unresolved issues and often passes “below the radar” of editors and reviewers. The problem of detecting the complexity of misconduct has been partially resolved by plagiarism detection software. However, interpretation of relevant reports is not always obvious or easy. This article deals with plagiarism in general and patchwork plagiarism...

  9. Plagiarism Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probett, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism does exist at universities today. In some cases, students are naive with respect to understanding what plagiarism is and how to avoid it. In other cases, students blatantly disregard and disrespect the written work of others, claiming it as their own. Regardless, educators must be vigilant in their efforts to discourage and prevent…

  10. Avoiding plagiarism in academic writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Irene

    Plagiarism means taking the work of another and presenting it as one's own, resulting in potential upset for the original author and disrepute for the professions involved. This article aims to explore the issue of plagiarism and some mechanisms for detection and avoidance.

  11. Plagiarism, Cheating and Research Integrity: Case Studies from a Masters Program in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnero, Andres M; Mayta-Tristan, Percy; Konda, Kelika A; Mezones-Holguin, Edward; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Alvarado, German F; Canelo-Aybar, Carlos; Maguiña, Jorge L; Segura, Eddy R; Quispe, Antonio M; Smith, Edward S; Bayer, Angela M; Lescano, Andres G

    2017-08-01

    Plagiarism is a serious, yet widespread type of research misconduct, and is often neglected in developing countries. Despite its far-reaching implications, plagiarism is poorly acknowledged and discussed in the academic setting, and insufficient evidence exists in Latin America and developing countries to inform the development of preventive strategies. In this context, we present a longitudinal case study of seven instances of plagiarism and cheating arising in four consecutive classes (2011-2014) of an Epidemiology Masters program in Lima, Peru, and describes the implementation and outcomes of a multifaceted, "zero-tolerance" policy aimed at introducing research integrity. Two cases involved cheating in graded assignments, and five cases correspond to plagiarism in the thesis protocol. Cases revealed poor awareness of high tolerance to plagiarism, poor academic performance, and widespread writing deficiencies, compensated with patchwriting and copy-pasting. Depending on the events' severity, penalties included course failure (6/7) and separation from the program (3/7). Students at fault did not engage in further plagiarism. Between 2011 and 2013, the Masters program sequentially introduced a preventive policy consisting of: (i) intensified research integrity and scientific writing education, (ii) a stepwise, cumulative writing process; (iii) honor codes; (iv) active search for plagiarism in all academic products; and (v) a "zero-tolerance" policy in response to documented cases. No cases were detected in 2014. In conclusion, plagiarism seems to be widespread in resource-limited settings and a greater response with educational and zero-tolerance components is needed to prevent it.

  12. [Plagiarism in medical schools, and its prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annane, Djillali; Annane, Frédérique

    2012-09-01

    The plagiarism has become very common in universities and medical school. Undoubtedly, the easy access to a huge amount of electronic documents is one explanation for the increasing prevalence of plagiarism among students. While most of universities and medical school have clear statements and rules about plagiarism, available tools for the detection of plagiarism remain inefficient and dedicate training program for students and teachers too scarce. As lack of time is one reason for students to choose plagiarism, it should be one main target for educational programs. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Prevalence of plagiarism among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Frković, Vedran; Turk, Tamara; Azman, Josip; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2005-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of plagiarism among medical students in writing essays. During two academic years, 198 second year medical students attending Medical Informatics course wrote an essay on one of four offered articles. Two of the source articles were available in an electronic form and two in printed form. Two (one electronic and one paper article) were considered less complex and the other two more complex. The essays were examined using plagiarism detection software "WCopyfind," which counted the number of matching phrases with six or more words. Plagiarism rate, expressed as the percentage of the plagiarized text, was calculated as a ratio of the absolute number of matching words and the total number of words in the essay. Only 17 (9%) of students did not plagiarize at all and 68 (34%) plagiarized less than 10% of the text. The average plagiarism rate (% of plagiarized text) was 19% (5-95% percentile=0-88). Students who were strictly warned not to plagiarize had a higher total word count in their essays than students who were not warned (P=0.002) but there was no difference between them in the rate of plagiarism. Students with higher grades in Medical Informatics exam plagiarized less than those with lower grades (P=0.015). Gender, subject source, and complexity had no influence on the plagiarism rate. Plagiarism in writing essays is common among medical students. An explicit warning is not enough to deter students from plagiarism. Detection software can be used to trace and evaluate the rate of plagiarism in written student assays.

  14. Stolen science: why plagiarism and self-plagiarism are unacceptable

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova E.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism is appropriation of someone else's ideas, texts, images and other materials without acknowledging their author. It is a serious violation of publication ethics that once detected results in the retraction of the submitted article. It has a disastrous impact on the author's reputation, because the publication is not removed from online databases, but stored there with a retracted publication tag. Plagiarism comes in different forms many of which still cannot be detected even by a sp...

  15. Plagiarism: an egregious form of misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyal, Deepak; Thawani, Vijay; Thaledi, Shweta

    2015-02-01

    Publishing research papers for academic fraternity has become important for career advancement and promotion. Number of publications in peer reviewed journals and subsequent citations are recognized as measures of scientific success. Non-publishing academicians and researchers are invisible to the scientific community. With pressure to publish, misconduct has crept into scientific writing with the result that research misconduct, plagiarism, misappropriation of intellectual property, and substantial unattributed textual copying of another's publication have become common. The Office of Research Integrity, USA, defines research misconduct as "fabrication, falsification or plagiarism in proposing, performing or reviewing research, or in reporting research results." Although plagiarism is difficult to define in few words, it can be viewed as the stealing of another person's ideas, methods, results, or words without giving proper attribution. The Office of Research Integrity defines plagiarism as being "theft or misappropriation of intellectual property and the substantial unattributed textual copying of another's work." Plagiarism is one of the most vehemently derided breaches of research integrity as it undermines the original and honest contribution to an existing body of knowledge. Plagiarism has many forms viz. blatant plagiarism, technical plagiarism, patchwork plagiarism, and self-plagiarism. In any form, the plagiarism is a threat to the research integrity and is unacceptable. We do need to detect such acts and effectively prosecute the offenders.

  16. Plagiarism: An Egregious Form of Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyal, Deepak; Thawani, Vijay; Thaledi, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Publishing research papers for academic fraternity has become important for career advancement and promotion. Number of publications in peer reviewed journals and subsequent citations are recognized as measures of scientific success. Non-publishing academicians and researchers are invisible to the scientific community. Discussion: With pressure to publish, misconduct has crept into scientific writing with the result that research misconduct, plagiarism, misappropriation of intellectual property, and substantial unattributed textual copying of another's publication have become common. The Office of Research Integrity, USA, defines research misconduct as “fabrication, falsification or plagiarism in proposing, performing or reviewing research, or in reporting research results.” Although plagiarism is difficult to define in few words, it can be viewed as the stealing of another person's ideas, methods, results, or words without giving proper attribution. The Office of Research Integrity defines plagiarism as being “theft or misappropriation of intellectual property and the substantial unattributed textual copying of another's work.” Plagiarism is one of the most vehemently derided breaches of research integrity as it undermines the original and honest contribution to an existing body of knowledge. Conclusion: Plagiarism has many forms viz. blatant plagiarism, technical plagiarism, patchwork plagiarism, and self-plagiarism. In any form, the plagiarism is a threat to the research integrity and is unacceptable. We do need to detect such acts and effectively prosecute the offenders. PMID:25789254

  17. Educational approaches for discouraging plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Beth A; Zigmond, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Suggested approaches to reduce the occurrence of plagiarism in academia, particularly among trainees. These include (1) educating individuals as to the definition of plagiarism and its consequences through written guidelines, active discussions, and practice in identifying proper and improper citation practices; (2) distributing checklists that break the writing task into more manageable steps, (3) requiring the submission of an outline and then a first draft prior to the deadline for a paper; (4) making assignments relevant to individual interests; and (5) providing trainees with access to software programs that detect plagiarism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  19. An Institutional Code of Ethics--A Response to Attitude of Israeli Teachers' Education College Students towards Academic Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reingold,, Roni; Baratz, Lea

    2011-01-01

    Academic plagiarism becomes very easy due to new opportunities provided by the Internet era (Scrinber, 2003; Underwood & Sazabo, 2003; Ross, 2005). We believe that academic dishonesty is a major issue, because it strikes at the heart of the academic and social values: honesty, trust and integrity. When dealing with education students, the…

  20. Source-Code Plagiarism in Universities: A Comparative Study of Student Perspectives in China and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyang; Joy, Mike; Cosma, Georgina; Boyatt, Russell; Sinclair, Jane; Yau, Jane

    2014-01-01

    There has been much research and discussion relating to variations in plagiaristic activity observed in students from different demographic backgrounds. Differences in behaviour have been noted in many studies, although the underlying reasons are still a matter of debate. Existing work focuses mainly on textual plagiarism, and most often derives…

  1. Predictive coding in Agency Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Marc Malmdorf

    2017-01-01

    Agency detection is a central concept in the cognitive science of religion (CSR). Experimental studies, however, have so far failed to lend support to some of the most common predictions that follow from current theories on agency detection. In this article, I argue that predictive coding, a highly...... promising new framework for understanding perception and action, may solve pending theoretical inconsistencies in agency detection research, account for the puzzling experimental findings mentioned above, and provide hypotheses for future experimental testing. Predictive coding explains how the brain......, unbeknownst to consciousness, engages in sophisticated Bayesian statistics in an effort to constantly predict the hidden causes of sensory input. My fundamental argument is that most false positives in agency detection can be seen as the result of top-down interference in a Bayesian system generating high...

  2. Recursos informáticos para detectar el plagio académico / Computer resources for academic plagiarism detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrían Cabedo Nebot

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En el ámbito académico es posible que, en determinadas circunstancias y por diferente finalidad, se requiera la elaboración de un informe descriptivo sobre un caso de plagio o de atribución de autoría. Esta tarea debe realizarla un lingüista perfectamente formado y que, en el momento de redactar su análisis, posea una metodología compacta y sistemática. Este artículo, en tal sentido, esboza un protocolo de actuación, mediante el uso de algunas herramientas informáticas que facilitan la detección del plagio en el marco académico.Summary: In an academic environment it is possible that, under certain circumstances and for different purposes, some kind of descriptive report on a case of plagiarism or attribution will be required. This task must be performed by a fully trained linguist and, at the time of writing his analysis, this one should apply a compact and a systematic methodology. This article, in this sense, outlines an action protocol, using some tools that facilitate the detection of plagiarism in an academic framework.

  3. "Turnitin Said It Wasn't Happy": Can the Regulatory Discourse of Plagiarism Detection Operate as a Change Artefact for Writing Development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penketh, Claire; Beaumont, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper centres on the tensions between the introduction of plagiarism detection software (Turnitin) for student and tutor use at undergraduate level and the aim to promote a developmental approach to writing for assessment at a UK university. Aims to promote developmental models for writing often aim to counteract the effects of the structural…

  4. Rethinking Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealy, Chynette

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism, presenting someone's words or other creative products as one's own, is a mandatory discussion and writing assignment in many undergraduate business communication courses. Class discussions about this topic tend to be lively, ranging from questions about simply omitting identified sources to different standards of ethical behaviors…

  5. Plagiarism: Librarians Help Provide New Solutions to an Old Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Denise

    2003-01-01

    While technology has made plagiarism easier, it has also made it easier to detect. This article explains how librarians are getting involved in this battle, what can tip off a plagiarized hand, and the software that can turn suspicion into confirmation. A list of online sources of plagiarism guidelines is provided. (AEF)

  6. CASE STUDY: POLICIES, STRATEGIES AND RESPONSES TO PLAGIARISM IN SLOVAKIA

    OpenAIRE

    FOLTYNEK, Tomas; KRAVJAR, Julius; GLENDINNING, Irene

    2014-01-01

    The European project “Impact of Policies for Plagiarism in Higher Education Across Europe“ has identified best practices and gaps related to plagiarism in different European countries. Slovakia is one of interesting ones, where national repository for plagiarism detection was established. However, there are still gaps in terms of policies and overall understanding of plagiarism. This case study describes what happened in Slovakia in last few years, compares the situation with other European c...

  7. Ethical and Unethical Methods of Plagiarism Prevention in Academic Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhtiyari, Kaveh; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Shakiba, Masoud; Zavvari, Azam; Shahbazi-Moghadam, Masoomeh; Ale Ebrahim, Nader; Mohammadjafari, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses plagiarism origins, and the ethical solutions to prevent it. It also reviews some unethical approaches, which may be used to decrease the plagiarism rate in academic writings. We propose eight ethical techniques to avoid unconscious and accidental plagiarism in manuscripts without using online systems such as Turnitin and/or iThenticate for cross checking and plagiarism detection. The efficiency of the proposed techniques is evaluated on five different texts using student...

  8. Biochemia Medica has started using the CrossCheck plagiarism detection software powered by iThenticate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šupak-Smolčić, Vesna; Šimundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, Biochemia Medica has joined CrossRef, which enabled us to implement CrossCheck plagiarism detection service. Therefore, all manuscript submitted to Biochemia Medica are now first assigned to Research integrity editor (RIE), before sending the manuscript for peer-review. RIE submits the text to CrossCheck analysis and is responsible for reviewing the results of the text similarity analysis. Based on the CrossCheck analysis results, RIE subsequently provides a recommendation to the Editor-in-chief (EIC) on whether the manuscript should be forwarded to peer-review, corrected for suspected parts prior to peer-review or immediately rejected. Final decision on the manuscript is, however, with the EIC. We hope that our new policy and manuscript processing algorithm will help us to further increase the overall quality of our Journal. PMID:23894858

  9. Plagiarism in Personal Statements of Anesthesiology Residency Applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Lance J; Sizemore, Daniel C; Johnstone, Robert E

    2016-02-15

    Plagiarism by residency applicants in their personal statements, as well as sites that sell personal statements, have been described, and led in 2011 to advice to avoid plagiarism and the caution that plagiarism detection software was available. We screened personal statements of 467 anesthesiology residency applicants from 2013-2014 using Viper Plagiarism Scanner software, and studied them for plagiarism. After quotes and commonly used phrases were removed, 82 statements contained unoriginal content of 8 or more consecutive words. After the study, 13.6% of personal statements from non-United States medical school graduates, and 4.0% from United States medical school graduates, contained plagiarized material, a significant difference. Plagiarized content ranged up to 58%. Plagiarism continues to occur in anesthesiology residency personal statements, with a higher incidence among graduates of non-United States medical schools.

  10. Plagiarism in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesson, Gert; Eriksson, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Plagiarism is a major problem for research. There are, however, divergent views on how to define plagiarism and on what makes plagiarism reprehensible. In this paper we explicate the concept of "plagiarism" and discuss plagiarism normatively in relation to research. We suggest that plagiarism should be understood as "someone using someone else's intellectual product (such as texts, ideas, or results), thereby implying that it is their own" and argue that this is an adequate and fruitful definition. We discuss a number of circumstances that make plagiarism more or less grave and the plagiariser more or less blameworthy. As a result of our normative analysis, we suggest that what makes plagiarism reprehensible as such is that it distorts scientific credit. In addition, intentional plagiarism involves dishonesty. There are, furthermore, a number of potentially negative consequences of plagiarism.

  11. Patchwork plagiarism--a jigsaw of stolen puzzle pieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supak Smolcić, Vesna; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism remains at the top in terms of interest to the scientific community. In its many vicious forms, patchwork plagiarism is characterized by numerous unresolved issues and often passes "below the radar" of editors and reviewers. The problem of detecting the complexity of misconduct has been partially resolved by plagiarism detection software. However, interpretation of relevant reports is not always obvious or easy. This article deals with plagiarism in general and patchwork plagiarism in particular, as well as related problems that editors must deal with to maintain the integrity of scientific journals.

  12. Patchwork plagiarism – a jigsaw of stolen puzzle pieces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolčić, Vesna Šupak; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism remains at the top in terms of interest to the scientific community. In its many vicious forms, patchwork plagiarism is characterized by numerous unresolved issues and often passes “below the radar” of editors and reviewers. The problem of detecting the complexity of misconduct has been partially resolved by plagiarism detection software. However, interpretation of relevant reports is not always obvious or easy. This article deals with plagiarism in general and patchwork plagiarism in particular, as well as related problems that editors must deal with to maintain the integrity of scientific journals. PMID:23457762

  13. Is there an effective approach to deterring students from plagiarizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilic-Zulle, Lidija; Azman, Josip; Frkovic, Vedran; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of plagiarism detection software and penalty for plagiarizing in detecting and deterring plagiarism among medical students. The study was a continuation of previously published research in which second-year medical students from 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 school years were required to write an essay based on one of the four scientific articles offered by the instructor. Students from 2004/2005 (N = 92) included in present study were given the same task. Topics of two of the four articles were considered less complex, and two were more complex. One less and one more complex articles were available only as hardcopies, whereas the other two were available in electronic format. The students from 2001/2002 (N = 111) were only told to write an original essay, whereas the students from 2002/2003 (N = 87) were additionally warned against plagiarism, explained what plagiarism was, and how to avoid it. The students from 2004/2005 were warned that their essays would be examined by plagiarism detection software and that those who had plagiarized would be penalized. Students from 2004/2005 plagiarized significantly less of their essays than students from the previous two groups (2% vs. 17% vs. 21%, respectively, P plagiarism. Use of plagiarism detection software in evaluation of essays and consequent penalties had effectively deterred students from plagiarizing.

  14. Analyzing and reducing plagiarism at university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge López Puga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is one of the less desirable practises in the academic context. This paper presents an experience of massive plagiarism detection at university and the steps taken to prevent its subsequent occurrence. Plagiarism was detected in the first assessment phase of a research project practise. As a result, students were required to arrange ethical group discussions with the professor to prevent plagiarism in the future. A substantial reduction in the rate of plagiarism was observed from the first practical assessment to the second one, t(16=2.5, p=.02, d=0.83, 1-?=.63, unilateral contrast. Additionally, a survey was developed to analyse students’ opinions and attitudes about plagiarism. A sample of 64 students (15 boys and 49 girls with an average age of 22.69 (SD=2.8 filled in an electronic questionnaire. More than a half of the sample (56.92% admitted that they had plagiarised before but most of the students (83.08% agreed they would not like someone else plagiarising their reports. A preliminary short scale to measure attitude towards plagiarism in undergraduate students at university is provided. Finally, a set of recommendations are given based on this experience to prevent and to reduce the level of plagiarism in the university contex.

  15. Why Do Students Plagiarize? Efl Undergraduates’ Views on the Reasons Behind Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doró Katalin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheating and plagiarism spread like pandemics in many educational contexts and are difficulty to detect, fight and also to understand. The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate what first-year students of English at a large Hungarian university believe to be the main reasons for plagiarism. Twenty-five students were asked to express their views in a free opinion essay. Perceived reasons were categorized into twelve main groups based on the literature and the reasons for plagiarism provided by faculty members at the same university. The most often mentioned reasons included saving time and effort and unintentional plagiarism.

  16. Knowing and avoiding plagiarism during scientific writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Mohan; Priya, N Swapna; Musalaiah, Svvs; Nagasree, M

    2014-09-01

    Plagiarism has become more common in both dental and medical communities. Most of the writers do not know that plagiarism is a serious problem. Plagiarism can range from simple dishonesty (minor copy paste/any discrepancy) to a more serious problem (major discrepancy/duplication of manuscript) when the authors do cut-copy-paste from the original source without giving adequate credit to the main source. When we search databases like PubMed/MedLine there is a lot of information regarding plagiarism. However, it is still a current topic of interest to all the researchers to know how to avoid plagiarism. It's time to every young researcher to know ethical guidelines while writing any scientific publications. By using one's own ideas, we can write the paper completely without looking at the original source. Specific words from the source can be added by using quotations and citing them which can help in not only supporting your work and amplifying ideas but also avoids plagiarism. It is compulsory to all the authors, reviewers and editors of all the scientific journals to know about the plagiarism and how to avoid it by following ethical guidelines and use of plagiarism detection software while scientific writing.

  17. Knowing and Avoiding Plagiarism During Scientific Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Mohan; Priya, N Swapna; Musalaiah, SVVS; Nagasree, M

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism has become more common in both dental and medical communities. Most of the writers do not know that plagiarism is a serious problem. Plagiarism can range from simple dishonesty (minor copy paste/any discrepancy) to a more serious problem (major discrepancy/duplication of manuscript) when the authors do cut-copy-paste from the original source without giving adequate credit to the main source. When we search databases like PubMed/MedLine there is a lot of information regarding plagiarism. However, it is still a current topic of interest to all the researchers to know how to avoid plagiarism. It's time to every young researcher to know ethical guidelines while writing any scientific publications. By using one's own ideas, we can write the paper completely without looking at the original source. Specific words from the source can be added by using quotations and citing them which can help in not only supporting your work and amplifying ideas but also avoids plagiarism. It is compulsory to all the authors, reviewers and editors of all the scientific journals to know about the plagiarism and how to avoid it by following ethical guidelines and use of plagiarism detection software while scientific writing. PMID:25364588

  18. The confounding factors leading to plagiarism in academic writing and some suggested remedies: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guraya, Salman Yousuf; Guraya, Shaista Salman

    2017-05-01

    There is a staggering upsurge in the incidence of plagiarism of scientific literature. Literature shows divergent views about the factors that make plagiarism reprehensible. This review explores the causes and remedies for the perennial academic problem of plagiarism. Data sources were searched for full text English language articles published from 2000 to 2015. Data selection was done using medical subject headline (MeSH) terms plagiarism, unethical writing, academic theft, retraction, medical field, and plagiarism detection software. Data extraction was undertaken by selecting titles from retrieved references and data synthesis identified key factors leading to plagiarism such as unawareness of research ethics, poor writing skills and pressure or publish mantra. Plagiarism can be managed by a balance among its prevention, detection by plagiarism detection software, and institutional sanctions against proven plagiarists. Educating researchers about ethical principles of academic writing and institutional support in training writers about academic integrity and ethical publications can curtail plagiarism.

  19. The academic plagiarism and its punishments - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto G. S. Berlinck

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently there is an increase in the occurrence of plagiarism in varied types of academic texts. Therefore, in agreement with the Brazilian Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES policies, Brazilian higher education institutions should establish guidelines for the detection and inhibition of academic plagiarism. However, the notion of plagiarism is extremely complex, since the ability of textual construction acquired during education is also developed using others' words. Thus, it is necessary to better know the concept of plagiarism and its implications, as well as the consequences of plagiarism and the punishments that may result from it. Consequently, rules and policies to be established will be better founded in order to address the problem of plagiarism in academic texts in a comprehensive and consistent way, not only to inhibit plagiarism but also to promote education on how is possible to create texts in an original fashion.

  20. Students' Perception on Plagiarism

    OpenAIRE

    Manalu, Mika Hatigoran

    2013-01-01

    This research is intended to find out how far college students' knowledge within act of plagiarism. Also, the issue of plagiarism was lifted to the surface because issues of plagiarism that have been revealed to the public is spread rapidly. One of the main reasons why plagiarism exists because teaching processing in classroom doesn't care on this issue. In this research, respondents were given a questionnaire that consists of 20 questions. Analysis of completed questionnaire showed student u...

  1. The plagiarism project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Nancy R; Sorensen, Karen; Habousha, Racheline G; Minuti, Aurelia; Schwartz, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism has been a problem plaguing academia for centuries. The Internet has made it easier than ever to copy material from one electronic document and paste it into another. Many cases are unintentional, as writers are unaware of the rules regarding plagiarism. This paper provides an overview of plagiarism and describes a project in which librarians partnered with the assistant dean of a graduate science program to educate students about the perils of plagiarism and encourage ethical writing practices.

  2. Academy Policy on Plagiarism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    any evidence of plagiarism including self-plagiarism in manuscripts submitted to them. Every reasonable effort will be made to investigate any allegations of plagiarism brought to their attention, as well as instances that come up during the peer review process. Such behaviour when proven beyond doubt is unacceptable, ...

  3. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  4. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data.......Matlab code to do multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data....

  5. Detecting non-coding selective pressure in coding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchette Mathieu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics approaches, where orthologous DNA regions are compared and inter-species conserved regions are identified, have proven extremely powerful for identifying non-coding regulatory regions located in intergenic or intronic regions. However, non-coding functional elements can also be located within coding region, as is common for exonic splicing enhancers, some transcription factor binding sites, and RNA secondary structure elements affecting mRNA stability, localization, or translation. Since these functional elements are located in regions that are themselves highly conserved because they are coding for a protein, they generally escaped detection by comparative genomics approaches. Results We introduce a comparative genomics approach for detecting non-coding functional elements located within coding regions. Codon evolution is modeled as a mixture of codon substitution models, where each component of the mixture describes the evolution of codons under a specific type of coding selective pressure. We show how to compute the posterior distribution of the entropy and parsimony scores under this null model of codon evolution. The method is applied to a set of growth hormone 1 orthologous mRNA sequences and a known exonic splicing elements is detected. The analysis of a set of CORTBP2 orthologous genes reveals a region of several hundred base pairs under strong non-coding selective pressure whose function remains unknown. Conclusion Non-coding functional elements, in particular those involved in post-transcriptional regulation, are likely to be much more prevalent than is currently known. With the numerous genome sequencing projects underway, comparative genomics approaches like that proposed here are likely to become increasingly powerful at detecting such elements.

  6. Is It Cheating or Learning the Craft of Writing? Using Turnitin to Help Students Avoid Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Matheson, Lynne; Starr, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism is a growing problem for universities, many of which are turning to software detection for help in detecting and dealing with it. This paper explores issues around plagiarism and reports on a study of the use of Turnitin in a new university. The purpose of the study was to inform the senior management team about the plagiarism policy…

  7. AuDeNTES: Automatic Detection of teNtative Plagiarism According to a rEference Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Leonardo; Micucci, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    In academic courses, students frequently take advantage of someone else's work to improve their own evaluations or grades. This unethical behavior seriously threatens the integrity of the academic system, and teachers invest substantial effort in preventing and recognizing plagiarism. When students take examinations requiring the production of…

  8. Decreasing Plagiarism: What Works and What Doesn't

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Anne M.; Walker, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The authors tested the predictions of a game theory model of plagiarism, using a test population of student papers submitted to an online plagiarism detection program, over five semesters in a non-majors biology course with multiple sections and high enrollment. Consistent with the model, as the probability of detection and the penalty if caught…

  9. The problem of plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Sherill Nones

    2007-01-01

    Unfortunately, the frequency of plagiarism is increasing in the nursing profession. We are encouraged to write, especially those of us in academia, and we all live very active lives. Pressure to publish, especially when coupled with lack of time, can lead to plagiarism, whether inadvertent or not. This article will discuss the problem of plagiarism and provide tips on how to avoid it in your own work.

  10. CASE STUDY: POLICIES, STRATEGIES AND RESPONSES TO PLAGIARISM IN SLOVAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FOLTYNEK, Tomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The European project “Impact of Policies for Plagiarism in Higher Education Across Europe“ has identified best practices and gaps related to plagiarism in different European countries. Slovakia is one of interesting ones, where national repository for plagiarism detection was established. However, there are still gaps in terms of policies and overall understanding of plagiarism. This case study describes what happened in Slovakia in last few years, compares the situation with other European countries and discusses the results. Additionally, the number of occurrences of the terms “plagiarism” and “academic integrity” in media and on the Internet is examined in relation to recent changes.

  11. Plagiarism, Cultural Diversity and Metaphor--Implications for Academic Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leask, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex, culturally loaded concept which causes much anxiety for both academics and students. Exactly what constitutes plagiarism is dependent on a number of contextual factors. Despite the difficulties associated with defining and detecting plagiarism, it is said to be on the increase, and students from "other cultures"…

  12. Stealing or Sharing? Cross-Cultural Issues of Plagiarism in an Open-Source Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitch, Russell

    2016-01-01

    More professors and institutions want to move from a detect-and-punish to an educate-and-prevent model for dealing with plagiarism. Understanding the causes of plagiarism, especially among international students, can aid in efforts to educate students and prevent plagiarism. Research points to a confluence of causal factors, such as time pressure,…

  13. Plagiarism and Cheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.; Permuth, Steve

    Plagiarism and cheating can be defined as academic dishonesty and represent policy concerns among all levels of education. Such cases involve academic versus disciplinary decisions and the need to determine the student's understanding of the definition of plagiarism or cheating. This paper analyzes six legal issues raised in court cases and…

  14. Plagiarism and Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brian

    1984-01-01

    There are several kinds of plagiarism, and its significance varies with its circumstances. College administrations seem to avoid responsibility for examining allegations of academic plagiarism, and few procedures exist for addressing them. Until standard and open procedures are established and accepted, rigid and unrealistic attitudes will prevail…

  15. Plagiarism-Proofing Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    2004-01-01

    Mr. Johnson has discovered that the higher the level of student engagement and creativity, the lower the probability of plagiarism. For teachers who would like to see such desirable results, he describes the characteristics of assignments that are most likely to produce them. Two scenarios of types of assignments that avoid plagiarism are…

  16. Plagiarism explainer for students

    OpenAIRE

    Barba, Lorena A.

    2016-01-01

    A slide deck to serve as an explainer of plagiarism in academic settings, with a personal viewpoint. For my students.Also on SpeakerDeck:https://speakerdeck.com/labarba/plagiarism-explainer-for-students(The slide viewer on SpeakerDeck is much nicer.)

  17. Note on plagiarism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    especially of plagiarism (including selfplagiarism), as something directly affecting the integrity of the sci- entific process. Such behaviour is unacceptable and deserves exposure and an appropriate level of penalty. In case it is inadvertently published, a paper containing plagiarized material steals credit from the original.

  18. The Plagiarism Polyconundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethany, Reine D.

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism hinders student success because it shortcuts genuine writing practice and incurs penalties when discovered. Although students are aware of its potential consequences, plagiarism continues. This article reflects on the polyconundrum of empathizing with the many hindrances to student writing while deploying strategies to reduce plagiarism…

  19. Detecting Malicious Code by Binary File Checking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius POPA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The object, library and executable code is stored in binary files. Functionality of a binary file is altered when its content or program source code is changed, causing undesired effects. A direct content change is possible when the intruder knows the structural information of the binary file. The paper describes the structural properties of the binary object files, how the content can be controlled by a possible intruder and what the ways to identify malicious code in such kind of files. Because the object files are inputs in linking processes, early detection of the malicious content is crucial to avoid infection of the binary executable files.

  20. How to Verify and Manage the Translational Plagiarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    The use of Google translator as a tool for determining translational plagiarism is a big challenge. As noted, plagiarism of the original papers written in Macedonian and translated into other languages can be verified after computerised translation in other languages. Attempts to screen the translational plagiarism should be supported. The use of Google Translate tool might be helpful. Special focus should be on any non-English reference that might be the source of plagiarised material and non-English article that might translate from an original English article, which cannot be detected by simple plagiarism screening tool. It is a hard job for any journal to detect the complex translational plagiarism but the harder job might be how to effectively manage the case. PMID:27703588

  1. Prevalence of plagiarism in recent submissions to the Croatian Medical Journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baždarić, Ksenija; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Brumini, Gordana; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2012-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of plagiarism in manuscripts submitted for publication in the Croatian Medical Journal (CMJ). All manuscripts submitted in 2009-2010 were analyzed using plagiarism detection software: eTBLAST, CrossCheck, and WCopyfind. Plagiarism was suspected in manuscripts with more than 10% of the text derived from other sources. These manuscripts were checked against the Déjà vu database and manually verified by investigators. Of 754 submitted manuscripts, 105 (14%) were identified by the software as suspicious of plagiarism. Manual verification confirmed that 85 (11%) manuscripts were plagiarized: 63 (8%) were true plagiarism and 22 (3%) were self-plagiarism. Plagiarized manuscripts were mostly submitted from China (21%), Croatia (14%), and Turkey (19%). There was no significant difference in the text similarity rate between plagiarized and self-plagiarized manuscripts (25% [95% CI 22-27%] vs. 28% [95% CI 20-33%]; U = 645.50; P = 0.634). Differences in text similarity rate were found between various sections of self-plagiarized manuscripts (H = 12.65, P = 0.013). The plagiarism rate in the Materials and Methods (61% (95% CI 41-68%) was higher than in the Results (23% [95% CI 17-36%], U = 33.50; P = 0.009) or Discussion (25.5 [95% CI 15-35%]; U = 57.50; P Plagiarism detection software combined with manual verification may be used to detect plagiarized manuscripts and prevent their publication. The prevalence of plagiarized manuscripts submitted to the CMJ, a journal dedicated to promoting research integrity, was 11% in the 2-year period 2009-2010.

  2. Undergraduates’ Misconceptions Concerning Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Çakmak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In their education lives undergraduate students’ one of the most encountered difficulty is to provide citations for their research projects and term papers. This difficulty drives students to two kinds of plagiarism: intentional or unintentional plagiarism. In this context, plagiarism is a no ethical  scientific behaviour we encounter most frequently among undergraduate students. When plagiarism is investigated in national and international literature, which is considered as an important problem regarding scientific communication and ethics principles, it is seen that research focused on intentional plagiarism. In this context the present study aimed to focus on university students’ unintentional plagiarism, a nonethical academic behaviour, based on their misconceptions. Adding it is aimed to attract the attention of the researchers in librarianship and information sciences to the problem, increase their awareness and to encourage them to make in-depth research. Thus the present study includes issues of conceptions; learning concepts; misconceptions; plagiarism; misconceptions of university students regarding plagiarism and the reasoning; defining and preventing misconceptions; the roles of librarianships and teachers in correcting the misconceptions regarding plagiarism. Present study followed a comprehensive review utilizing descriptive approaches to reveal the situation. At the end of the study a short summary evaluating the situation depending on the literature analysed is also added. Adding ideas and suggestions in how to reveal probable misconceptions and how to prevent or decrease their formation are also presented.

  3. Error-Detecting Identification Codes for Algebra Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses common error-detecting identification codes using linear algebra terminology to provide an interesting application of algebra. Presents examples from the International Standard Book Number, the Universal Product Code, bank identification numbers, and the ZIP code bar code. (YP)

  4. Plagiarism in South African management journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism by academics has been relatively unexplored thus far. However, there has been a growing awareness of this problem in recent years. We submitted 371 published academic articles appearing in 19 South African management journals in 2011 through the plagiarism detection software program Turnitin. High and excessive levels of plagiarism were detected. The cost to government of subsidising unoriginal work in these journals was calculated to approximate ZAR7 million for the period under review. As academics are expected to role model ethical behaviour to students, such a finding is disturbing and has implications for the reputations of the institutions to which the authors are affiliated as well as that of the journals that publish articles that contain plagiarised material.

  5. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  6. There Was a Crooked Man(uscript): A Not-so-Serious Look at the Serious Subject of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Kevin T.

    2010-01-01

    The problem of plagiarism by political scientists has not received much attention. The incidence of plagiarism, however, may be greater than one would think. In this article, I offer a humorous look at what happened when a manuscript of mine was plagiarized. Based on my experience, I offer some suggestions on how scholars might detect and prevent…

  7. Useful Tips on Avoiding Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Maryellen

    2007-01-01

    Teachers are generally kind and nurturing people. Students who plagiarize their assignments from these kind and nurturing teachers are often given a second chance when caught and encouraged to do their work over, but it would be better to eliminate their need to plagiarize. The first tip for eliminating plagiarism has not so much to do with what…

  8. Beyond the Accusation of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; Brooks, Jane

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the complexity of the notion of plagiarism from sociocultural and psychological perspectives. Plagiarism is a dynamic and multi-layered phenomenon [Russikoff, K., Fucaloro, L., Salkauskiene, D., 2003. "Plagiarism as a cross-cultural phenomenon." "The CAL Poly Pomona Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies" 16, 109-120.…

  9. Managing Plagiarism: A Preventative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insley, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is a reality in most college classes where some students plagiarize unknowingly and others do so knowingly. This situation requires instructors to decide how to manage the situation. Some may take the easy way out by ignoring the problem, simply pretending that none of their students plagiarize. In contrast, other instructors embrace…

  10. Plagiarism and Self-plagiarism. A Reflexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Ramirez Bacca

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available En el año 2011, el Ministro de Defensa Alemán Karl Theodor zu Guttenberg renunció a su cargo por ser acusado de plagiar su tesis doctoral (Luchini 2011.  Además, por primera vez en la historia de El Colegio de México, se decidió en el 2015 revocar el título de Doctor en Historia conferido en 2004 a Rodrigo Christian Núñez por plagiar su tesis doctoral (Martínez 2015. El otro caso reciente es el de César Acuña Peralta, excandidato a la presidencia en el Perú, fundador y dueño de la Universidad César Vallejo quien ha sido señalado de plagiar todos sus títulos y la autoría de un libro (Fowks 2016. Estos sucesos a nivel internacional, ofrecen un panorama para la reflexión sobre el plagio y el “auto-plagio”  en las publicaciones científicas y académicas.

  11. Plagiarism: A silent epidemic in scientific writing - Reasons, recognition and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Jyotindu

    2016-04-01

    Plagiarism is one of the most serious forms of scientific misconduct prevalent today and is an important reason for significant proportion of rejection of manuscripts and retraction of published articles. It is time for the medical fraternity to unanimously adopt a 'zero tolerance' policy towards this menace. While responsibility for ensuring a plagiarism-free manuscript primarily lies with the authors, editors cannot absolve themselves of their accountability. The only way to write a plagiarism-free manuscript for an author is to write an article in his/her own words, literally and figuratively. This article discusses various types of plagiarism, reasons for increasingly reported instances of plagiarism, pros and cons of use of plagiarism detection tools for detecting plagiarism and role of authors and editors in preventing/avoiding plagiarism in a submitted manuscript. Regular usage of professional plagiarism detection tools for similarity checks with critical interpretation by the editorial team at the pre-review stage will certainly help in reducing the menace of plagiarism in submitted manuscripts.

  12. Exploring Plagiarism into Perspectives of Indonesian Academics and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Agustina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism has been done by students from around the globes. There has been a heated discussion of finding reasons why plagiarism occurred in academic world and Eastern students in particular. This research wants to explore how actually students perceive plagiarism in their academic writing as well as how lecturers coped with plagiarism in the students’ assignments. The research participants were taken from 2 different majors, 32 English Education students and 10 Psychology students as well as 5 lecturers from English Education Department and 3 lecturers from Psychology Faculty in one of private universities in Central Java Province, Indonesia. Questionnaires were distributed to those respondents and also interviews were conducted to several lecturers and students. The results of questionnaire and interview showed that both students and lecturers knew and understand the essence of plagiarism, however, students admitted that they still plagiarised in their assignment. Lecturers, on the other hand, revealed that they could figure out when students plagiarised others’ works. However, it was limited to crossing over assignments between students. In other words, detecting plagiarism was done manually and restricted to students’ written works only. In conclusion, despite comprehending the meaning of plagiarism, student still plagiarised since there was not any real action from lecturers to encounter it.

  13. What is Plagiarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2012-01-01

    Manuscripts submitted to The Astrophysical Journal are required to contain "novel and significant" material and to be free of plagiarism. There is a surprising amount of confusion regarding the definition of plagiarism and what constitutes prior publication. I will discuss the definitions used by the ApJ and the procedures we follow to to support this rule. Individual members of the community frequently show a very different understanding of these standards and are surprised at the conflict. Time allowing, I will briefly discuss some of the other common ethical problems that arise during the preparation and publication of articles.

  14. Surveillance in Programming Plagiarism beyond Techniques: An Incentive-Based Fishbone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Chen, Min; Liang, Yaowen; Jiang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Lots of researches have showed that plagiarism becomes a severe problem in higher education around the world, especially in programming learning for its essence. Therefore, an effective strategy for plagiarism surveillance in program learning is much essential. Some literature focus on code similarity algorithm and the related tools can help to…

  15. Plagiarism in submitted manuscripts: incidence, characteristics and optimization of screening-case study in a major specialty medical journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Janet R; Lin, Feng-Chang; Evans, James P

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism is common and threatens the integrity of the scientific literature. However, its detection is time consuming and difficult, presenting challenges to editors and publishers who are entrusted with ensuring the integrity of published literature. In this study, the extent of plagiarism in manuscripts submitted to a major specialty medical journal was documented. We manually curated submitted manuscripts and deemed an article contained plagiarism if one sentence had 80 % of the words copied from another published paper. Commercial plagiarism detection software was utilized and its use was optimized. In 400 consecutively submitted manuscripts, 17 % of submissions contained unacceptable levels of plagiarized material with 82 % of plagiarized manuscripts submitted from countries where English was not an official language. Using the most commonly employed commercial plagiarism detection software, sensitivity and specificity were studied with regard to the generated plagiarism score. The cutoff score maximizing both sensitivity and specificity was 15 % (sensitivity 84.8 % and specificity 80.5 %). Plagiarism was a common occurrence among manuscripts submitted for publication to a major American specialty medical journal and most manuscripts with plagiarized material were submitted from countries in which English was not an official language. The use of commercial plagiarism detection software can be optimized by selecting a cutoff score that reflects desired sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Defining Plagiarism: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Akbar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism has repeatedly occurred in Indonesia, resulting in focusing on such academic misbehavior as a “central issue” in Indonesian higher education. One of the issues of addressing plagiarism in higher education is that there is a confusion of defining plagiarism. It seems that Indonesian academics had different perception when defining plagiarism. This article aims at exploring the issue of plagiarism by helping define plagiarism to address confusion among Indonesian academics. This article applies literature review by firs finding relevant articles after identifying databases for literature searching. After the collection of required articles for review, the articles were synthesized before presenting the findings. This study has explored the definition of plagiarism in the context of higher education. This research found that plagiarism is defined in the relation of criminal acts. The huge numbers of discursive features used position plagiaristic acts as an illegal deed. This study also found that cultural backgrounds and exposure to plagiarism were influential in defining plagiarism.

  17. Statement on Plagiarism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Statement on Plagiarism. S Mahadevan N Mukunda. Editorial Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 403-404. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/05/0403-0404. Author Affiliations.

  18. The Ethics of Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Peggy

    Within the academy the commonly held definition of plagiarism--using another's words, ideas, or stylistic individuality without attribution--is widespread, appearing on most English course syllabi. Judicial guidelines are followed: neither stealing nor ignorance of the law is to be sanctioned. Furthermore, penalties for students can be severe: a…

  19. Plagiarism and scientific writing: a personal commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponniah, Irulandy

    2012-11-01

    There have been a number of papers that have addressed the issue of plagiarism. Nevertheless, the charges of plagiarism usually merit little attention with experts, because it is still not clear what sort of copying actually constitutes plagiarism. Another problem that eludes consensus is whether plagiarism was committed with or without intention. This paper discusses certain issues relating to plagiarism and differentiates between intentional and unintentional forms of plagiarism. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Student plagiarism and professional practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    With the ever-increasing availability and accessibility of the Internet, students are able to access a multitude of resources in support of their studies. However, this has also led to an increase in their ability to cheat through plagiarising text and claiming it as their own. Increased pressures of balancing work and study have contributed to this rise. Not only confined to the student population, some academics are also guilty of engaging in this practice providing a less than favourable role model for their students. Of increasing concern is the links of this practice to professionalism or indeed in this case unprofessionalism. Both pre- and post-registration nursing students who plagiarise risk bringing the reputation of the profession into disrepute. There are a number of methods that may be used to detect plagiarism but often the penalties are menial and inconsistently applied. Overall it is essential that academic institutions foster a culture of honesty and integrity amongst its academic community. A culture that clearly emphasises that plagiarism in any form is unacceptable.

  1. Undergraduate and Postgraduate Pharmacy Students' Perceptions of Plagiarism and Academic Honesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Helen; Krass, Ines; Scouller, Karen; Smith, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students' perceptions of plagiarism and academic honesty. Methods A questionnaire was administered to undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students to determine their levels of awareness of university policy concerning academic honesty; attitudes to plagiarism by rating the acceptability of a range of plagiarizing and cheating practices; and choice of appropriate penalties for a first and second occurrence. The choice of behaviors in response to a scenario about the preparation of a reading-based written assignment and the strategies that students would be prepared to use in order to submit the assignment on time were also assessed. Results Findings indicated widespread deficiencies in student knowledge of, and attitudes towards, plagiarism. Students did not perceive plagiarism as a serious issue and the use of inappropriate strategies for sourcing and acknowledging material was common. Conclusions The study highlights the importance of achieving a balance among the 3 dimensions of plagiarism management: prevention, detection and penalty. PMID:19885074

  2. Undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students' perceptions of plagiarism and academic honesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Greg; Bonanno, Helen; Krass, Ines; Scouller, Karen; Smith, Lorraine

    2009-10-01

    To assess undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students' perceptions of plagiarism and academic honesty. A questionnaire was administered to undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students to determine their levels of awareness of university policy concerning academic honesty; attitudes to plagiarism by rating the acceptability of a range of plagiarizing and cheating practices; and choice of appropriate penalties for a first and second occurrence. The choice of behaviors in response to a scenario about the preparation of a reading-based written assignment and the strategies that students would be prepared to use in order to submit the assignment on time were also assessed. Findings indicated widespread deficiencies in student knowledge of, and attitudes towards, plagiarism. Students did not perceive plagiarism as a serious issue and the use of inappropriate strategies for sourcing and acknowledging material was common. The study highlights the importance of achieving a balance among the 3 dimensions of plagiarism management: prevention, detection and penalty.

  3. Combating plagiarism: a shared responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Sujit D

    2010-01-01

    Scientific progress depends on the free dissemination of original thinking and research. With the evidence base formed by publication, investigators develop and implement additional studies, and policy makers propose new laws and regulations. The ramifications of this evidence can affect millions of lives and reallocate considerable resources for programmes or research. As such, it is incumbent on investigators to conduct rigorous research, which precludes engaging in scientific misconduct such as falsification, fabrication and plagiarism. This article addresses the causes and consequences of plagiarism and the processes by which plagiarism is discovered. It concludes by considering the responsibilities of members of the research community in preventing and addressing plagiarism.

  4. Teaching about Plagiarism in the Age of the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausman, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Considers how the Internet provides new opportunities for teaching about plagiarism and how to avoid it. Defines and gives examples of three different kinds of plagiarism: direct plagiarism, paraphrase plagiarism, and patchwork plagiarism. Discusses a way of teaching students about plagiarism. Concludes that plagiarism is usually unintentional.…

  5. Plagiarism Curricula May Reduce Need for Punitive Plagiarism Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin E. Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To describe the development and implementation of two courses designed to help university students avoid plagiarism. Design – Quantitative and qualitative analysis. Setting – A university in the United Kingdom. Subjects – An unknown number of university students who took a Plagiarism Awareness Program (PAP course between 2008 and 2011, and approximately 3,000 university students enrolled in a Plagiarism Avoidance for New Students (PANS course delivered via a virtual learning environment (VLE between October and December 2012. The authors attempted to collect rates of continued plagiarism among students who had taken plagiarism education courses. The authors also surveyed 702 university students about plagiarism in 2011. Methods – Data collected from PAP participants informed revision of the authors’ approach to plagiarism education and led to development of the second course, PANS. At the end of the course, students completed a test of their knowledge about plagiarism. Authors compared scores from students who took a course supervised by a librarian to the scores from students who took the course independently. Main Results – Students reported that many aspects of citation and attribution are challenging (p. 149. The authors discovered that 93% of students who completed the PANS course facilitated by a librarian in-person passed the final exam with a grade of 70% or higher, while 85% of students who took the same course independently, without a librarian instructor, in an online VLE scored 70% or higher (p. 155. The authors report that referrals of students who plagiarized declined significantly (p-value < 0.001 since the implementation of a plagiarism avoidance curriculum. Conclusion – As reported by the authors, first-year university students require more extensive education about plagiarism avoidance. A university plagiarism avoidance program instructed by librarians reduces the total number of students caught

  6. Plagiarism: a case study of quality improvement in a taught postgraduate programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Tom; Taylor, Beck; Hothersall, Ellie; Pérez-Martín, Leticia

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is a common issue in education. Software can detect plagiarism but little is known about prevention. To identify ways to reduce the incidence of plagiarism in a postgraduate programme. From 2006, all student assignments were monitored using plagiarism detection software (Turn It In) to produce percentage text matches for each assignment. In 2007, students were advised software was being used, and that plagiarism would result in penalties. In 2008, students attending a key module took part in an additional interactive seminar on plagiarism. A separate cohort of students did not attend the seminar, allowing comparison between attendees and non-attendees. Between 2006 and 2007, mean percentage text match values were consistent with a stable process, indicating advice and warnings were ineffective. Control chart analysis revealed that between 2007 and 2008, mean percentage text match changes showed a reduced text match in all nine modules, where students attended the interactive seminar, but none where students did not. This indicated that the interactive seminar had an effect. In 2008, there were no occurrences of plagiarism. Improvements were maintained in 2009. Advice and warnings against plagiarism were ineffective but a subsequent interactive seminar was effective at reducing plagiarism.

  7. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader's own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  8. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader’s own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  9. Plagiarism and self-plagiarism: What every author should know

    OpenAIRE

    Roig, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    The scientific community is greatly concerned about the problem of plagiarism and self-plagiarism. In this paper I explore these two transgressions and their various manifestations with a focus on the challenges faced by authors with limited English profi ciency.

  10. Plagiarism in Academic Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eugenia Rojas-Porras

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ethical and social responsibility of citing the sources in a scientific or artistic work is undeniable. This paper explores, in a preliminary way, academic plagiarism in its various forms. It includes findings based on a forensic analysis. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness on the importance of considering these details when writing and publishing a text. Hopefully, this analysis may put the issue under discussion.

  11. The plagiarism menace

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan, S

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid advancement of science, there has been a phenomenal increase in output in the form of publications in all scientific disciplines, particularly in the biomedical field. Unfortunately, there has also been a concomitant increase in unethical practices that include plagiarism (publishing writings that have substantial overlap in contents with those of others, including verbatim reproduction of the text), duplicate publication (publishing one’s own data already published in another ...

  12. PLAGIARISM IN DISSERTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Gelfand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Originality and independence is the first, absolute and general requirement to the content of dissertations, regardless of an academic degree and research direction. At the same time, recently a considerable fraction of different types of plagiarism have been found out in the Russian dissertation works. The aim is an analysis of the most frequent plagiarism in candidate and doctoral dissertations. Results. We consider the established practices in the evaluation of independence in academic works. Unethical use of someone else’s work and materials by the authors of dissertations include, in particular, copying from official documents and abstracts without acknowledgement the source and with no citation; replication of existing reviews and chapters from already defended dissertations; falsification by refreshing of outdated data with substituted dates, and or wordfor-word copy-pasting with substitution of the research object. The latter type of the plagiarism involving fraud in experimental and statistical data constitutes a special peril for the science and for the society in general. The primary principle for assessment of independence in dissertations has to be proper citing and referencing that should allow a reader to distinguish the author’s contribution from someone else’s text. Undocumented verbatim quotations in dissertations are inadmissible, whether the author claims scientific novelty or not. At that, it does not matter whether well-known or unique data are provided, and whether the source is protected by a copyright. Practical significance. The qualitative analysis of the factual material, based on the author’s observations, can serve as a starting point for the subsequent quantitative analysis of plagiarism in scientific texts. 

  13. From Tavarod to Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gavad Mortezaei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract “Plagiarism” has been one of the important subjects in the field of literary criticism and argued in the press and meetings from past till now. Today, there isn't any day and month that will go by without seeing a case in this field being presented or claimed in books, journals or newspapers. However, thanks to the expanse of operation and wide scope of the Judiciary, mentioned claims are studied in Judicial courts as well (you can just search “Plagiarism” in Google search engine, and then you will encounter with hundred different pages on this subject. In countries that they have copyright rule, this subject is taken into account seriously and if someone adapts a subject or extracts some text from another one's, without mentioning its reference, he will be punished firmly in accordance with rules and regulations. Despite the importance of this subject in literary criticism, unfortunately it is not considered as it deserves in our country. Regardless of definition and categorization of Plagiarism by rhetoricians, there is disagreement for making decision whether a Plagiarism is happened or it is some other cases such as Tavarod (occurrence of one thought in two persons' minds or Intertextuality. Considering the fact that contents and concepts are common between people in every inches of our planet, it is so hard to determine and prove that someone is innovator and creator of concept or content and if someone else uses the same content, he is copying the original creator. We know that sometimes the same word or phrase comes to the minds of two persons accidentally, so accusing somebody of plagiary should be done with care and comprehensive study and it should be provable. In other words, definition of Plagiarism boundaries based on rate of uniformity and similarity of terms and concepts of two works is very hard and the border between plagiarism and Tavarod is very narrow and skeptical.

  14. [High frequency of plagiarism in medical thesis from a Peruvian public university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña-Gastulo, J Jhan C; Quezada-Osoria, C Claudia; Peña-Oscuvilca, Américo; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2010-03-01

    An observational study was conducted to describe the presence of plagiarism in medical thesis in 2008 performed at a public university in Peru. Search for plagiarism in 33 thesis introductions using a Google search algorithm, characterizes of the study type and we search in electronic form if the thesis mentor have published articles in scientific journals. We found evidence of plagiarism in 27/33 introductions, 37.3% (171/479) of all the paragraphs analyzed had some degree of plagiarism, literal plagiarism was the most frequent (20/27) and journals were the most common sources of plagiarism (19/27). The characteristics of the studies were observational (32/33), cross-sectional (30/33), descriptive (25/33) and retrospective (19/33). None of the authors had published in a scientific journal, and only nine of his tutors of them had at least one publication. No association was found between the characteristics of the thesis and the presence of plagiarism. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of plagiarism in theses analyzed. Is responsibility of medical schools take the necessary actions to detect and avoid plagiarism among their students.

  15. Investigating Some Main Causes and Reasons of Writing Plagiarism in an EFL Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zarfsaz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at exploring the causes and reasons of the EFL learners’ plagiarism. To this end, 150 females and males TEFL students from State and Azad universities in Iran, participated the study. A questionnaire developed by Rezanejad and Rezaeibased (2013 and a semi-structured interview which were piloted on a similar sample before administering were used as the instruments of the study. To triangulate the findings, for the qualitative part of the study, a semi-structured interview including 16 questions was run with 10 learners to collect the quantitative data at the end of the study. Based on the findings of this study, it was revealed that most of the students were aware of the concept of plagiarism and had the same definition of it. Moreover, their professors used the Internet and search engines to detect plagiarism and warned them about plagiarism continuously.  The students claimed inadequate information about how not to plagiarize and less command over English language to be the main reason of plagiarism. They heard of it from their university professors, then in workshops or seminars on plagiarism, and finally from their high school teachers. Moreover, they got familiar with the concept of plagiarism through university professors, friends or family members, newspapers and magazines, Internet, TV, and radio. The implications are discussed in terms of raising learners' awareness about plagiarism in EFL contexts.

  16. Plagiarism: More than Meets the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Habsah; Ismail, Maimunah

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism is the euphemism for "academic theft", "academic dishonesty" and "academic misconduct in academia"; and is the taboo word among academics in academia. This paper discusses the issue of plagiarism in terms of what constitutes plagiarism, who are normally "the practitioners" of plagiarism, be it…

  17. University Students' Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Lori G.

    2009-01-01

    Plagiarism is an intriguing topic with many avenues for exploration. Students' perceptions of plagiarism certainly differ from their professors' and it is valuable to attempt to listen in some small measure to what those perceptions are. The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of some of the ways first- and second-year university…

  18. Undergraduate Plagiarism: A Pedagogical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Student plagiarism is a pervasive and increasing problem at all levels of study in tertiary institutions. This study attempted explicitly and implicitly to address issues of plagiarism within the broad context of an academic writing framework in tutorials in a first-year module at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Despite these…

  19. The Illusory Dichotomy of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhmcke, Anita; Booth, Tracey; Wangmann, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism has been characterised as a "major problem" for universities. While tensions between students and universities are inevitable, the problem with the existing system of plagiarism management and prevention is that it operates to problematise the relationship between the university and the student, rather than address the core…

  20. Exploring Student Self-Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halupa, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Student self-plagiarism is a confusing issue for both faculty and students alike. This problem is compounded because both groups perceive the concept very differently. Recent literature regarding these perceptions is reviewed and some brief preliminary results of an exploratory multi-university study of student perceptions of self-plagiarism are…

  1. Single Sourcing, Boilerplates, and Re-Purposing: Plagiarism and Technical Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louch, Michelle O'Brien

    2016-01-01

    In academia, plagiarism adheres to the traditional definition: utilizing another person's words or ideas without proper credit. Students are taught to cite everything, while instructors are given tools to detect plagiarism. This ultimately creates an atmosphere of paranoia, where students fear accusation and teachers are convinced that plagiarism…

  2. Whose Line Is It? Plagiarism in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Gary A. Hoover

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey regarding the instances of plagiarism reported by journal editors in the economics profession. The survey finds that nearly 24% of responding editors encounter one case of plagiarism in a typical year. In addition, the survey reveals that less than 19% of responding journals have a formal policy regarding plagiarism. Moreover, there is a great deal of variance in what is considered plagiarism and what an appropriate response to plagiarism should be. ...

  3. Plagiarism in Student Research: Responsibility of the Supervisors and Suggestions to Ensure Plagiarism Free Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishan, Kewal; Kanchan, Tanuj; Baryah, Neha; Mukhra, Richa

    2017-08-01

    Plagiarism is a serious threat plaguing the research in publication of science globally. There is an increasing need to address the issue of plagiarism especially among young researchers in the developing part of the world. Plagiarism needs to be earnestly discouraged to ensure a plagiarism free research environment. We provide further suggestions to combat student plagiarism at Master's level and the regulations/guidelines regarding plagiarism in India.

  4. An editorial on plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Keilman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In January this year, we were confronted with a case of plagiarism. One paper that had been submitted last year by a certain person turned out to be written by three other persons. It was presented by the three true authors at a conference in 2010, where they distributed copies of their paper. One of the reviewers of the paper informed us about that fact. We asked the three authors for a copy, which turned out to be identical with the submission, except for a few minor details. When confronted with these facts, the person who had submitted the paper was unable to give us a satisfactory explanation. This is a case of serious scientific misconduct. The editors and the publisher of Demographic Research cannot and will not accept any form of plagiarism. Nor will we accept any other form of misconduct in science, including fabrication, falsification, or other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the scientific community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research. With Long et al. ("Responding to possible plagiarism", Science 6 March 2009, we are of the opinion that the responsibility for research integrity ultimately lies in the hands of the scientific community: educators, students, authors, and those who provide peer reviews. Journal editors must take appropriate action and verify the originality of suspected manuscripts. The Office of Research Integrity provides useful guidelines (http://ori.dhhs.gov/. We have decided that any future submission to Demographic Research that lists the plagiarist as an author or co-author will be rejected automatically.

  5. Dynamic detection technology of malicious code for Android system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Boya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing popularization of mobile phones,people's dependence on them is rising,the security problems become more and more prominent.According to the calling of the APK file permission and the API function in Android system,this paper proposes a dynamic detecting method based on API interception technology to detect the malicious code.The experimental results show that this method can effectively detect the malicious code in Android system.

  6. Plagiarism: More than Meets the Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habsah Hussin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is the euphemism for ‘academic theft’, ‘academic dishonesty’ and ‘academic misconduct in academia’; and is the taboo word among academics in academia. This paper discusses the issue of plagiarism in terms of what constitutes plagiarism, who are normally ‘the practitioners’ of plagiarism, be it un-intentionally or otherwise, factors contributing to the practise of plagiarism, effects and implications of plagiarism on the ‘practitioners’, and offers suggestions on how to reduce (if not eliminate any involvement in plagiarism. Knowledge and awareness about plagiarism would help academics and aspiring scholars to steer away from this act, as plagiarism would have dire and long term repercussions on their career, reputation and those who come to be associated with them.

  7. Multiple-Symbol Detection Of Multiple-Trellis-Coded MDPSK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Simon, Marvin K.; Shahshahani, Mehrdad M.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed scheme for detection and decoding of multiple-trellis-coded multilevel differential-phase-shift-keyed (MDPSK) radio signals, observation time for differential detection extended from conventional 2 to larger number of symbol periods. Decreases rate of error in differential detection of uncoded MDPSK by increasing number of symbol periods.

  8. Plagiarism: More than Meets the Eye

    OpenAIRE

    Habsah Hussin; Maimunah Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism is the euphemism for ‘academic theft’, ‘academic dishonesty’ and ‘academic misconduct in academia’; and is the taboo word among academics in academia. This paper discusses the issue of plagiarism in terms of what constitutes plagiarism, who are normally ‘the practitioners’ of plagiarism, be it un-intentionally or otherwise, factors contributing to the practise of plagiarism, effects and implications of plagiarism on the ‘practitioners’, and offers suggestions on how to reduce (if n...

  9. Minimizing Cyber-Plagiarism through Turnitin: Faculty’s & Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holi Ibrahim Holi Ali

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This is an attempt to investigate and evaluate students’ and faculty’s experiences and understanding to the strengths and limitations of anti-plagiarism software, specifically, Turnitin and how it could be used to promote academic integrity among engineering students. 50 engineering students and 20 professors were surveyed and interviewed. The paper argues that although Turnitin is widely used these days to tackle and minimize plagiarism practices, however cyber-plagiarism is increasing and the software might be inadequate in fighting such practice. The paper also questions the effectiveness and limitations of the software in relation to current practices. The findings revealed that most of the respondents perceive Turnitin positively; limitations of the software are not many and they believed that the software is effective in detecting and minimizing plagiarism incidents among their students’ papers. The study puts forward some recommendations which might help practitioners in minimizing plagiarism practices.

  10. Beyond the accusation of plagiarism

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Qing; Brooks, A. Jane

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the complexity of the notion of plagiarism from sociocultural and psychological perspectives. Plagiarism is a dynamic and multi-layered phenomenon (Russikoff et al., 2003; Sutherland-Smith, 2005) and needs to be understood in relation to a specific context of academic conventions and environment. Drawing upon the experiences of ten Chinese students on a pre-sessional course and subsequently their postgraduate courses, the paper investigates change in these students’ percept...

  11. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  12. Hydrogen detection systems leak response codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmas, T.; Kong, N.; Maupre, J.P.; Schindler, P.; Blanc, D.

    1990-01-01

    A loss in tightness of a water tube inside a Steam Generator Unit of a Fast Reactor is usually monitored by hydrogen detection systems. Such systems have demonstrated in the past their ability to detect a leak in a SGU. However, the increase in size of the SGU or the choice of ferritic material entails improvement of these systems in order to avoid secondary leak or to limit damages to the tube bundle. The R and D undertaken in France on this subject is presented. (author). 11 refs, 10 figs

  13. A comprehensive study of sparse codes on abnormality detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Pan, Hong; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2017-01-01

    Sparse representation has been applied successfully in abnor-mal event detection, in which the baseline is to learn a dic-tionary accompanied by sparse codes. While much empha-sis is put on discriminative dictionary construction, there areno comparative studies of sparse codes regarding abnormal-ity...... detection. We comprehensively study two types of sparsecodes solutions - greedy algorithms and convex L1-norm so-lutions - and their impact on abnormality detection perfor-mance. We also propose our framework of combining sparsecodes with different detection methods. Our comparative ex-periments are carried...

  14. Combating student plagiarism an academic librarian's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lampert, Lynn D

    2014-01-01

    This practical book introduces readers to the current issues facing todays academic reference and instruction librarians grappling with the growing problem of student plagiarism. The book provides up-to-date overviews of student plagiarism, examples of ways in which librarians can educate students through proven instructional techniques, collaboration approaches and outreach methods, and discusses common problems and questions librarians may encounter when incorporating current anti-plagiarism instruction into their instructional services. Topics include: role of the academic librarian in combating student plagiarism, discipline-based approaches to combating student plagiarism, information literacy techniques and faculty/librarian collaboration. Investigates the issues surrounding the growth of instances of student plagiarism Discusses the academic librarian's role in combating student plagiarism Recommends effective outreach techniques and instructional methods for preventing plagiarism.

  15. Rethinking Plagiarism in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evering, Lea Calvert; Moorman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex issue in need of reexamination. A common misconception is there is consensus on what constitute plagiarism, and general agreement that engaging in plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty is a major breech of ethics. There seems to be little concern for differentiating degrees of seriousness; the intentional…

  16. Plagiarism: Moving from Punitive to Proactive Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine; Guglielmin, Melanie; Otoo, Benedict Kojo

    2017-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be an issue in postsecondary contexts. This paper discusses how educators can take a proactive stance to prevent plagiarism and cultivate students' sense of honour and academic integrity, rather than focusing on punitive consequences after plagiarism has already occurred. Strategies include assessment design, formative…

  17. Students' Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Reva; Hura, Gerri

    2013-01-01

    While plagiarism by college students is a serious problem that must be addressed, students generally overestimate the frequency of plagiarism at their schools and blame students they do not know for the majority of incidents. This study looked at students' estimations of the frequency of plagiarism at a large urban college and explored how…

  18. Plagiarism Due to Misunderstanding: Online Instructor Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Scott; Holbeck, Rick; Steele, John; Dyer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism is an ongoing problem in higher education. This problem exists in both online and face-to-face modalities. The literature indicates that there are three ways higher education institutions define plagiarism, which includes theft, deception, and misunderstanding. Plagiarism due to misunderstanding has received less attention in the…

  19. The Ethics and Politics of Policing Plagiarism: A Qualitative Study of Faculty Views on Student Plagiarism and Turnitin®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Samuel; Childers, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the usage of plagiarism detection software such as Turnitin® has increased dramatically among university instructors. At the same time, academic criticism of this software's employment has also increased. We interviewed 23 faculty members from various departments at a medium-sized, public university in the southeastern US to determine…

  20. Evolving a Dynamic Predictive Coding Mechanism for Novelty Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Haggett, Simon J.; Chu, Dominique; Marshall, Ian W.

    2007-01-01

    Novelty detection is a machine learning technique which identifies new or unknown information in data sets. We present our current work on the construction of a new novelty detector based on a dynamical version of predictive coding. We compare three evolutionary algorithms, a simple genetic algorithm, NEAT and FS-NEAT, for the task of optimising the structure of an illustrative dynamic predictive coding neural network to improve its performance over stimuli from a number of artificially gener...

  1. Multiple symbol differential detection of uncoded and trellis coded MPSK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Simon, Marvin K.; Shahshahani, Mehrdad

    1989-01-01

    A differential detection for MPSK, which uses a multiple symbol observation interval, is presented and its performance analyzed and simulated. The technique makes use of maximum-likelihood sequence estimation of the transmitted phases rather than symbol-by-symbol detection as in conventional differential detection. As such the performance of this multiple symbol detection scheme fills the gap between conventional (two-symbol observation) differentially coherent detection of MPSK and ideal coherent of MPSK with differential encoding. The amount of improvement gained over conventional differential detection depends on the number of phases, M, and the number of additional symbol intervals added to the observation. What is particularly interesting is that substantial performance improvement can be obtained for only one or two additional symbol intervals of observation. The analysis and simulation results presented are for uncoded and trellis coded MPSK.

  2. Rate adaptive multilevel coded modulation with high coding gain in intensity modulation direct detection optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Qinghua; Tian, Feng; Wang, Yongjun; Rao, Lan; Ullah, Rahat; Zhao, Feng; Li, Deng'ao

    2018-02-01

    A rate-adaptive multilevel coded modulation (RA-MLC) scheme based on fixed code length and a corresponding decoding scheme is proposed. RA-MLC scheme combines the multilevel coded and modulation technology with the binary linear block code at the transmitter. Bits division, coding, optional interleaving, and modulation are carried out by the preset rule, then transmitted through standard single mode fiber span equal to 100 km. The receiver improves the accuracy of decoding by means of soft information passing through different layers, which enhances the performance. Simulations are carried out in an intensity modulation-direct detection optical communication system using MATLAB®. Results show that the RA-MLC scheme can achieve bit error rate of 1E-5 when optical signal-to-noise ratio is 20.7 dB. It also reduced the number of decoders by 72% and realized 22 rate adaptation without significantly increasing the computing time. The coding gain is increased by 7.3 dB at BER=1E-3.

  3. Authors, editors, and the signs, symptoms and causes of plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Shashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism and inadequate citing appear to have reached epidemic proportions in research publication. This article discusses how plagiarism is defined and suggests some possible causes for the increase in the plagiarism disease. Most editors do not have much tolerance for text re-use with inadequate citation regardless of reasons why words are copied from other sources without correct attribution. However, there is now some awareness that re-use of words in research articles to improve the writing or "the English" (which has become a common practice should be distinguished from intentional deceit for the purpose of stealing other authors′ ideas (which appears to remain a very rare practice. Although it has become almost as easy for editors to detect duplicate text as it is for authors to re-use text from other sources, editors often fail to consider the reasons why researchers resort to this strategy, and tend to consider any text duplication as a symptom of serious misconduct. As a result, some authors may be stigmatized unfairly by being labeled as plagiarists. The article concludes with practical advice for researchers on how to improve their writing and citing skills and thus avoid accusations of plagiarism.

  4. Authors, editors, and the signs, symptoms and causes of plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashok, Karen

    2011-07-01

    Plagiarism and inadequate citing appear to have reached epidemic proportions in research publication. This article discusses how plagiarism is defined and suggests some possible causes for the increase in the plagiarism disease. Most editors do not have much tolerance for text re-use with inadequate citation regardless of reasons why words are copied from other sources without correct attribution. However, there is now some awareness that re-use of words in research articles to improve the writing or "the English" (which has become a common practice) should be distinguished from intentional deceit for the purpose of stealing other authors' ideas (which appears to remain a very rare practice). Although it has become almost as easy for editors to detect duplicate text as it is for authors to re-use text from other sources, editors often fail to consider the reasons why researchers resort to this strategy, and tend to consider any text duplication as a symptom of serious misconduct. As a result, some authors may be stigmatized unfairly by being labeled as plagiarists. The article concludes with practical advice for researchers on how to improve their writing and citing skills and thus avoid accusations of plagiarism.

  5. Authors, editors, and the signs, symptoms and causes of plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashok, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism and inadequate citing appear to have reached epidemic proportions in research publication. This article discusses how plagiarism is defined and suggests some possible causes for the increase in the plagiarism disease. Most editors do not have much tolerance for text re-use with inadequate citation regardless of reasons why words are copied from other sources without correct attribution. However, there is now some awareness that re-use of words in research articles to improve the writing or “the English” (which has become a common practice) should be distinguished from intentional deceit for the purpose of stealing other authors’ ideas (which appears to remain a very rare practice). Although it has become almost as easy for editors to detect duplicate text as it is for authors to re-use text from other sources, editors often fail to consider the reasons why researchers resort to this strategy, and tend to consider any text duplication as a symptom of serious misconduct. As a result, some authors may be stigmatized unfairly by being labeled as plagiarists. The article concludes with practical advice for researchers on how to improve their writing and citing skills and thus avoid accusations of plagiarism. PMID:21957412

  6. Runtime Detection of C-Style Errors in UPC Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirkelbauer, P; Liao, C; Panas, T; Quinlan, D

    2011-09-29

    Unified Parallel C (UPC) extends the C programming language (ISO C 99) with explicit parallel programming support for the partitioned global address space (PGAS), which provides a global memory space with localized partitions to each thread. Like its ancestor C, UPC is a low-level language that emphasizes code efficiency over safety. The absence of dynamic (and static) safety checks allows programmer oversights and software flaws that can be hard to spot. In this paper, we present an extension of a dynamic analysis tool, ROSE-Code Instrumentation and Runtime Monitor (ROSECIRM), for UPC to help programmers find C-style errors involving the global address space. Built on top of the ROSE source-to-source compiler infrastructure, the tool instruments source files with code that monitors operations and keeps track of changes to the system state. The resulting code is linked to a runtime monitor that observes the program execution and finds software defects. We describe the extensions to ROSE-CIRM that were necessary to support UPC. We discuss complications that arise from parallel code and our solutions. We test ROSE-CIRM against a runtime error detection test suite, and present performance results obtained from running error-free codes. ROSE-CIRM is released as part of the ROSE compiler under a BSD-style open source license.

  7. Plagiarism: What's the Big Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Brittney; Stith, Danica; Tesdell, Lee S.

    2011-01-01

    In academic culture, plagiarism is considered to be a form of cheating and therefore unethical. Understandably, instructors try to eliminate this kind of unethical behavior from their courses. But what if they designed their assignments and exams in such a way that students would find no reason to cheat? The authors think that it is possible, at…

  8. Plagiarism in the Internet Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca Moore; Davies, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    In an age when students gravitate to online sources for research--and when tremendous amounts of both reputable and questionable information are available online--many have come to regard the Internet itself as a culprit in students' plagiarism. Some teachers go so far as to forbid students from researching online, in the mistaken assumption that…

  9. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  10. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: a Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Cahyono, Bambang Yudi

    2005-01-01

    This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained ...

  11. How to Verify Plagiarism of the Paper Written in Macedonian and Translated in Foreign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiroski, Mirko

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to show how to verify plagiarism of the paper written in Macedonian and translated in foreign language. Original article "Ethics in Medical Research Involving Human Subjects", written in Macedonian, was submitted as an assay-2 for the subject Ethics and published by Ilina Stefanovska, PhD candidate from the Iustinianus Primus Faculty of Law, Ss Cyril and Methodius University of Skopje (UKIM), Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in Fabruary, 2013. Suspected article for plagiarism was published by Prof. Dr. Gordana Panova from the Faculty of Medical Sciences, University Goce Delchev, Shtip, Republic of Macedonia in English with the identical title and identical content in International scientific on-line journal "SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGIES", Publisher "Union of Scientists - Stara Zagora". Original document (written in Macedonian) was translated with Google Translator; suspected article (published in English pdf file) was converted into Word document, and compared both documents with several programs for plagiarism detection. It was found that both documents are identical in 71%, 78% and 82%, respectively, depending on the computer program used for plagiarism detection. It was obvious that original paper was entirely plagiarised by Prof. Dr. Gordana Panova, including six references from the original paper. Plagiarism of the original papers written in Macedonian and translated in other languages can be verified after computerised translation in other languages. Later on, original and translated documents can be compared with available software for plagiarism detection.

  12. Investigating Plagiarism: The Form and The Motivation in Performing Plagiarism in High Education

    OpenAIRE

    S Sariffuddin; Khristiana Dwi Astuti; Riyan Arthur

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of information technology, especially the Internet is pointed out to be factor driving the student to practice plagiarism. Prevention efforts continue to be made both from government policies and stakeholder by creating software anti-plagiarism. However, in the reality the practice of plagiarism re-mains common and relatively more widespread. This practice continues to be varied, so that we need to up-date the information and findings through investigations plagiarism pr...

  13. Implementation of Winnowing Algorithm Based K-Gram to Identify Plagiarism on File Text-Based Document

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiansyah Yanuar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism occurs when the students have tasks and pursued by the deadline. Plagiarism is considered as the fastest way to accomplish the tasks. This reason makes the author tried to build a plagiarism detection system with Winnowing algorithm as document similarity search algorithm. The documents that being tested are Indonesian journals with extension .doc, .docx, and/or .txt. Similarity calculation process through two stages, the first is the process of making a document fingerprint using Winnowing algorithm and the second is using Jaccard coefficient similarity. In order to develop this system, the author used iterative waterfall model approach. The main objective of this project is to determine the level of plagiarism. It is expected to prevent plagiarism either intentionally or unintentionally before our journal published by displaying the percentage of similarity in the journals that we make.

  14. CrossCheck plagiarism screening : Experience of the Journal of Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Katsumi

    Due to technological advances in the past two decades, researchers now have unprecedented access to a tremendous amount of useful information. However, because of the extreme pressure to publish, this abundance of information can sometimes tempt researchers to commit scientific misconduct. A serious form of such misconduct is plagiarism. Editors are always concerned about the possibility of publishing plagiarized manuscripts. The plagiarism detection tool CrossCheck allows editors to scan and analyze manuscripts effectively. The Journal of Epidemiology took part in a trial of CrossCheck, and this article discusses the concerns journal editors might have regarding the use of CrossCheck and its analysis. In addition, potential problems identified by CrossCheck, including self-plagiarism, are introduced.

  15. Penguins and Plagiarism: Stemming the Tide of Plagiarism in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Plagiarism is on the rise on high school and college campuses. There are many reasons why students tend to plagiarize. One of these is that many students are interested in the shortest possible route through a course. Some students also fear that their writing ability is inadequate. If student plagiarism and lack of academic integrity are…

  16. Tactile detection of slip: surface microgeometry and peripheral neural codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, M A; Whitehouse, J M; LaMotte, R H

    1990-06-01

    1. The role of the microgeometry of planar surfaces in the detection of sliding of the surfaces on human and monkey fingerpads was investigated. By the use of a servo-controlled tactile stimulator to press and stroke glass plates on passive fingerpads of human subjects, the ability of humans to discriminate the direction of skin stretch caused by friction and to detect the sliding motion (slip) of the plates with or without micrometer-sized surface features was determined. To identify the associated peripheral neural codes, evoked responses to the same stimuli were recorded from single, low-threshold mechanoreceptive afferent fibers innervating the fingerpads of anesthetized macaque monkeys. 2. Humans could not detect the slip of a smooth glass plate on the fingerpad. However, the direction of skin stretch was perceived based on the information conveyed by the slowly adapting afferents that respond differentially to the stretch directions. Whereas the direction of skin stretch signaled the direction of impending slip, the perception of relative motion between the plate and the finger required the existence of detectable surface features. 3. Barely detectable micrometer-sized protrusions on smooth surfaces led to the detection of slip of these surfaces, because of the exclusive activation of rapidly adapting fibers of either the Meissner (RA) or the Pacinian (PC) type to specific geometries of the microfeatures. The motion of a smooth plate with a very small single raised dot (4 microns high, 550 microns diam) caused the sequential activation of neighboring RAs along the dot path, thus providing a reliable spatiotemporal code. The stroking of the plate with a fine homogeneous texture composed of a matrix of dots (1 microns high, 50 microns diam, and spaced at 100 microns center-to-center) induced vibrations in the fingerpad that activated only the PCs and resulted in an intensive code. 4. The results show that surprisingly small features on smooth surfaces are

  17. Plagiarism In English Language Theses In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Like Raskova Octaberlina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that plagiarism in Indonesia exists due to some reasons. The reasons range from the requirements on the part of the students to adhere to uniformity in terms of thesis format to failure on the part of the government to effectively enforce a regulation dealing with plagiarism. Anecdotal observations as a student in one Indonesian university will give color to the discussion throughout this article. A recommendation to subdue plagiarism in Indonesia will conclude the article.

  18. Uncovering highly obfuscated plagiarism cases using fuzzy semantic-based similarity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salha M. Alzahrani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly obfuscated plagiarism cases contain unseen and obfuscated texts, which pose difficulties when using existing plagiarism detection methods. A fuzzy semantic-based similarity model for uncovering obfuscated plagiarism is presented and compared with five state-of-the-art baselines. Semantic relatedness between words is studied based on the part-of-speech (POS tags and WordNet-based similarity measures. Fuzzy-based rules are introduced to assess the semantic distance between source and suspicious texts of short lengths, which implement the semantic relatedness between words as a membership function to a fuzzy set. In order to minimize the number of false positives and false negatives, a learning method that combines a permission threshold and a variation threshold is used to decide true plagiarism cases. The proposed model and the baselines are evaluated on 99,033 ground-truth annotated cases extracted from different datasets, including 11,621 (11.7% handmade paraphrases, 54,815 (55.4% artificial plagiarism cases, and 32,578 (32.9% plagiarism-free cases. We conduct extensive experimental verifications, including the study of the effects of different segmentations schemes and parameter settings. Results are assessed using precision, recall, F-measure and granularity on stratified 10-fold cross-validation data. The statistical analysis using paired t-tests shows that the proposed approach is statistically significant in comparison with the baselines, which demonstrates the competence of fuzzy semantic-based model to detect plagiarism cases beyond the literal plagiarism. Additionally, the analysis of variance (ANOVA statistical test shows the effectiveness of different segmentation schemes used with the proposed approach.

  19. Plagiarism challenges at Ukrainian science and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denys Svyrydenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the types and severity of plagiarism violations at the modern educational and scientific spheres using the philosophic methodological approaches. The author analyzes Ukrainian context as well as global one and tries to formulate "order of the day" of plagiarism challenges. The plagiarism phenomenon is intuitively comprehensible for academicians but in reality it has a very complex nature and a lot of manifestation. Using approaches of ethics, philosophical anthropology, philosophy of science and education author formulates the series of recommendation for overcoming of plagiarism challenges at Ukrainian science and education.

  20. How Australian and Indonesian Universities Treat Plagiarism: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Yudi Cahyono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is a part of a larger study comparing various aspects of policies on plagiarism in two university contexts. It compares policies on plagiarism in universities in Australia and Indonesia. The results of this comparative study showed that Australian and Indonesian universities treat plagiarism differently. Australian universities treat plagiarism explicitly in their university policies. In Australian universities, plagiarism is defined clearly and forms of plagiarism are explained thoroughly, policies on plagiarism are informed to all university academic members, and there are mechanisms to manage cases related to plagiarism. In contrast, not all Indonesian universities treat plagiarism directly. Some universities depend on religious morality and academic ethics in dealing with plagiarism. Accordingly, this article recommends the explicit treatment of plagiarism in Indonesian universities.

  1. Investigating Plagiarism: The Form and The Motivation in Performing Plagiarism in High Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sariffuddin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of information technology, especially the Internet is pointed out to be factor driving the student to practice plagiarism. Prevention efforts continue to be made both from government policies and stakeholder by creating software anti-plagiarism. However, in the reality the practice of plagiarism re-mains common and relatively more widespread. This practice continues to be varied, so that we need to up-date the information and findings through investigations plagiarism practices in student assign-ments. The method used was a mixed-method approach or mix of quantitative and quali-tative approaches. A quantitative approach was done by using software turnitin.com to scan for plagiarism indication of the level of student assignment in common. To study the behavior of plagiarism, the interview process was also done informally to students who commit high plagiarism. The results showed that the pattern of students’ plagiarism consists of five forms: sham paraphrasing, illicit paraphrasing, other plagiarism, copying verbatim and purloining. Illicit paraphrasing practices are a form of copy-paste literature review and did not pay attention to the bibliography. Besides, the practice of plagiarism is closely associated with low academic writing knowledge. Therefore, the practice of plagiarism should not only be viewed from the perspective of the academic violations, but also from the other perspectives.

  2. Coded aperture imaging system for nuclear fuel motion detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalker, K.T.; Kelly, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    A Coded Aperature Imaging System (CAIS) has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to image the motion of nuclear fuel rods undergoing tests simulating accident conditions within a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The tests require that the motion of the test fuel be monitored while it is immersed in a liquid sodium coolant precluding the use of normal optical means of imaging. However, using the fission gamma rays emitted by the fuel itself and coded aperture techniques, images with 1.5 mm radial and 5 mm axial resolution have been attained. Using an electro-optical detection system coupled to a high speed motion picture camera a time resolution of one millisecond can be achieved. This paper will discuss the application of coded aperture imaging to the problem, including the design of the one-dimensional Fresnel zone plate apertures used and the special problems arising from the reactor environment and use of high energy gamma ray photons to form the coded image. Also to be discussed will be the reconstruction techniques employed and the effect of various noise sources on system performance. Finally, some experimental results obtained using the system will be presented

  3. Beyond Trust: Plagiarism and Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Bart

    2018-03-01

    Academic misconduct distorts the relationship between scientific practice and the knowledge it produces. The relationship between science and the knowledge it produces is, however, not something universally agreed upon. In this paper I will critically discuss the moral status of an act of research misconduct, namely plagiarism, in the context of different epistemological positions. While from a positivist view of science, plagiarism only influences trust in science but not the content of the scientific corpus, from a constructivist point of view both are at stake. Consequently, I argue that discussions of research misconduct and responsible research ought to be explicitly informed by the authors' views on the relationship between science and the knowledge it produces.

  4. Measuring students' perceptions of plagiarism: modification and Rasch validation of a plagiarism attitude scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Steven J; Ehrich, John F; Walton, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is a significant area of concern in higher education, given university students' high self-reported rates of plagiarism. However, research remains inconsistent in prevalence estimates and suggested precursors of plagiarism. This may be a function of the unclear psychometric properties of the measurement tools adopted. To investigate this, we modified an existing plagiarism scale (to broaden its scope), established its psychometric properties using traditional (EFA, Cronbach's alpha) and modern (Rasch analysis) survey evaluation approaches, and examined results of well-functioning items. Results indicated that traditional and modern psychometric approaches differed in their recommendations. Further, responses indicated that although most respondents acknowledged the seriousness of plagiarism, these attitudes were neither unanimous nor consistent across the range of issues assessed. This study thus provides rigorous psychometric testing of a plagiarism attitude scale and baseline data from which to begin a discussion of contextual, personal, and external factors that influence students' plagiarism attitudes.

  5. Plagiarism in nursing education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Joan; Everett, Bronwyn; Ramjan, Lucie M; Callins, Renee; Glew, Paul; Salamonson, Yenna

    2017-10-01

    To identify the prevalence and antecedents of plagiarism within nursing education and approaches to prevention and management. There has been growing media attention highlighting the prevalence of plagiarism in universities, including the academic integrity of undergraduate nursing students. A breach of academic integrity among nursing students also raises further concern with the potential transfer of this dishonest behaviour to the clinical setting. Integrative review. A systematic search of five electronic databases including CINAHL, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, ProQuest Nursing & Allied Health Source, and ERIC was undertaken. Only primary studies related to plagiarism and nursing students (undergraduate or postgraduate) studying at a tertiary education institution or nursing faculty were included. Both qualitative and quantitative study designs were included. Twenty studies were included in this review with six key themes identified: (1) prevalence; (2) knowledge, understanding and attitudes; (3) types of plagiarism; (4) antecedents to plagiarism; (5) interventions to reduce or prevent plagiarism; and (6) the relationship between academic honesty and professional integrity. Plagiarism is common among university nursing students, with a difference in perception of this behaviour between students and academics. The review also highlighted the importance of distinguishing between inadvertent and deliberate plagiarism, with differing strategies suggested to address this behaviour. Nevertheless, interventions to reduce plagiarism have not been shown to be effective. The current punitive approach to plagiarism within nursing faculties has not reduced its occurrence. There is a need to promote awareness, knowledge and provide students with the appropriate referencing skills, to reduce the significant amount of inadvertent plagiarism. The importance of promoting honesty and academic integrity in nursing education is highlighted. Cheating within the academic setting has been

  6. [Is there protection against copying? Thoughts about plagiarism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, András; Glänzel, Wolfgang

    2015-12-13

    There are at least two reasons why more and more cases of suspected plagiarism are perceived in the scientific literature. On one hand, the ever increasing pressure for publication makes it easier for authors, reviewers and editors to infringe or overlook this serious ethical misdemeanor; on the other hand, with the development of text analysis software, detecting text similarities has become a simple task. The judgement of actual cases, however, requires well-grounded professional knowledge and prudent human decisions.

  7. Scintillator Based Coded-Aperture Imaging for Neutron Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Sean-C.; Gamage, Kelum-A-A.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we are going to assess the variations of neutron images using a series of Monte Carlo simulations. We are going to study neutron images of the same neutron source with different source locations, using a scintillator based coded-aperture system. The Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted making use of the EJ-426 neutron scintillator detector. This type of detector has a low sensitivity to gamma rays and is therefore of particular use in a system with a source that emits a mixed radiation field. From the use of different source locations, several neutron images have been produced, compared both qualitatively and quantitatively for each case. This allows conclusions to be drawn on how suited the scintillator based coded-aperture neutron imaging system is to detecting various neutron source locations. This type of neutron imaging system can be easily used to identify and locate nuclear materials precisely. (authors)

  8. An ELT's Solution to Combat Plagiarism: "Birth" of CALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabieh, Christine

    One English-as-a Second-Language professor fought plagiarism using computer assisted language learning (CALL). She succeeded in getting half of her class to write documented research papers free of plagiarism. Although all of the students claimed to know how to avoid plagiarizing, 35 percent presented the work with minor traces of plagiarism. The…

  9. An Instructional Approach to Practical Solutions for Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Chi Hong; Cheng, Simone Chung Ling

    2017-01-01

    Plagiarism is an academic misconduct commonly found in the educational institutions nowadays. This paper first defines the types of plagiarism and explains the typical reasons for university students to engage in plagiarism. Then, the factors influencing plagiarism are discussed, including the access of materials on the Internet, the social norm…

  10. Online Plagiarism Training Falls Short in Biology Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Emily A.; Fagerheim, Britt; Durham, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Online plagiarism tutorials are increasingly popular in higher education, as faculty and staff try to curb the plagiarism epidemic. Yet no research has validated the efficacy of such tools in minimizing plagiarism in the sciences. Our study compared three plagiarism-avoidance training regimens (i.e., no training, online tutorial, or homework…

  11. Experiences of experts about the instances of plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvanara, Mahmod; Ojaghi, Rezvan; Sohrabi, Mozafar Cheshmeh; Papi, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism is defined as intentional deceiving or lack of honesty, which deprives others from both material and spiritual possessions. Ethics is considered as one of the most important aspects of evaluating the quality of higher education. Moreover, scientific ethics should be reflected from university values, as a specialized institution, rather than being a reflection of the others cares. Therefore, the main aim of the present study is explore of expert experiences about plagiarism in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. This study employed qualitative method with using in-deep interview. The research participants consisted of 21, who tend to this work. Semi structure interview were conducted and recorded. The method of analyzing data was 'thematic analysis'. The data were transcribed and saved on computer after each interview. Themes and sub-themes were extracted. Finally, relevant sub-themes were arranged in a category and suggested were presented. Analyzing data showed 600 primary codes, 40 sub-themes and 6 themes. The main themes included repeated works, non-normative adoption, non-normative adaptation, shares distribution, forging, and profit-seeking, each of which consisted of one or several subgroups. The findings of this study show that since, there are numerous ways of cheating, the universities' research committees must create institutions in order to educate the individuals how to avoid plagiarism. In addition, providing information about different types of scientific violations, as well as their following punishments might lead to the decrease of such misbehaviors.

  12. False feathers a perspective on academic plagiarism

    CERN Document Server

    Weber-Wulff, Debora

    2014-01-01

    With plagiarism a growing problem on university campuses, this book explains a range of strategies to identify instances of the offence. Written by an activist in the VroniPlag Wiki group, it shows how members find and document plagiarism in dissertations.

  13. Exploring Reflective Means to Handle Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Nikunj

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism has become widespread in the university teaching environment. This article presents practical wisdom from several years of experience handling plagiarism in two Information Systems (IS) courses with the exploratory use of reflective means such as dialogues and essays. There has been very little work on the use of reflective approaches…

  14. Plagiarism in Second-Language Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Diane; Petric, Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is a broad and multidisciplinary field of study, and within second-language (L2) writing, research on the topic goes back to the mid-1980s. In this review article we first discuss the received view of plagiarism as a transgressive act and alternative understandings which have been presented in the L1 and L2 writing literature. We then…

  15. Chinese University EFL Teachers' Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jun; Hu, Guangwei

    2015-01-01

    Although Chinese university students' perceptions of plagiarism have been extensively investigated, those of their teachers have been surprisingly under-researched. This study sought to address this gap by investigating 112 Chinese university English teachers' knowledge of and attitudes towards plagiarism. While 57 participating teachers had…

  16. Viewpoint of Undergraduate Engineering Students on Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovoytova, Diana; Namango, Saul Sitati

    2016-01-01

    Undoubtedly, plagiarism has been a global concern, especially so, in institutions of higher learning. Furthermore, over the past decades, cases of student plagiarism, in higher education, have increased, substantially. This issue cannot be taken, without due consideration, and it is crucial for educators, and universities, at large, to find the…

  17. The challenges for scientists in avoiding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, E R; Partin, K M

    2014-01-01

    Although it might seem to be a simple task for scientists to avoid plagiarism and thereby an allegation of research misconduct, assessment of trainees in the Responsible Conduct of Research and recent findings from the National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General regarding plagiarism suggests otherwise. Our experiences at a land-grant academic institution in assisting researchers in avoiding plagiarism are described. We provide evidence from a university-wide multi-disciplinary course that understanding how to avoid plagiarism in scientific writing is more difficult than it might appear, and that a failure to learn the rules of appropriate citation may cause dire consequences. We suggest that new strategies to provide training in avoiding plagiarism are required.

  18. Behavior Analysis Usage with Behavior Tures Adoption for Malicious Code Detection on JAVASCRIPT Scenarios Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Tumanov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article offers the method of malicious JavaScript code detection, based on behavior analysis. Conceptions of program behavior, program state, an algorithm of malicious code detection are described.

  19. Coded aperture material motion detection system for the ACPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArthur, D.A.; Kelly, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    Single LMFBR fuel pins are being irradiated in Sandia's Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR). In these experiments single fuel pins have been driven well into the melt and vaporization regions in transients with pulse widths of about 5 ms. The ACPR is being upgraded so that it can be used to irradiate bundles of seven LMFBR fuel pins. The coded aperture material motion detection system described is being developed for this upgraded ACPR, and has for its design goals 1 mm transverse resolution (i.e., in the axial and radial directions), depth resolution of a few cm, and time resolution of 0.1 ms. The target date for development of this system is fall 1977. The paper briefly reviews the properties of coded aperture imaging, describes one possible system for the ACPR upgrade, discusses experiments which have been performed to investigate the feasibility of such a system, and describes briefly the further work required to develop such a system. The type of coded aperture to be used has not yet been fixed, but a one-dimensional section of a Fresnel zone plate appears at this time to have significant advantages

  20. JOURNAL CLUB: Plagiarism in Manuscripts Submitted to the AJR: Development of an Optimal Screening Algorithm and Management Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Donna B

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence of plagiarism in a sample of manuscripts submitted to the AJR using CrossCheck, develop an algorithm to identify significant plagiarism, and formulate management pathways. A sample of 110 of 1610 (6.8%) manuscripts submitted to AJR in 2014 in the categories of Original Research or Review were analyzed using CrossCheck and manual assessment. The overall similarity index (OSI), highest similarity score from a single source, whether duplication was from single or multiple origins, journal section, and presence or absence of referencing the source were recorded. The criteria outlined by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors were the reference standard for identifying manuscripts containing plagiarism. Statistical analysis was used to develop a screening algorithm to maximize sensitivity and specificity for the detection of plagiarism. Criteria for defining the severity of plagiarism and management pathways based on the severity of the plagiarism were determined. Twelve manuscripts (10.9%) contained plagiarism. Nine had an OSI excluding quotations and references of less than 20%. In seven, the highest similarity score from a single source was less than 10%. The highest similarity score from a single source was the work of the same author or authors in nine. Common sections for duplication were the Materials and Methods, Discussion, and abstract. Referencing the original source was lacking in 11. Plagiarism was undetected at submission in five of these 12 articles; two had been accepted for publication. The most effective screening algorithm was to average the OSI including quotations and references and the highest similarity score from a single source and to submit manuscripts with an average value of more than 12% for further review. The current methods for detecting plagiarism are suboptimal. A new screening algorithm is proposed.

  1. Social influences on unconscious plagiarism and anti-plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollins, Timothy J; Lange, Nicholas; Dennis, Ian; Longmore, Christopher A

    2016-08-01

    People are more likely to unconsciously plagiarise ideas from a same-sex partner than a different-sex partner, and more likely to unconsciously plagiarise if recalling alone rather than in the presence of their partner [Macrae, C. N., Bodenhausen, G. V., & Calvini, G. (1999). Contexts of cryptomnesia: May the source be with you. Social Cognition, 17, 273-297. doi: 10.1521/soco.1999.17.3.273 ]. Two sets of experiments explore these phenomena, using extensions of the standard unconscious plagiarism paradigm. In Experiment 1A participants worked together in same- or different-sex dyads before trying to recall their own ideas or their partner's ideas. More source errors were evident for same-sex dyads (Experiment 1A), but this effect was absent when participants recalled from both sources simultaneously (Experiment 1B). In Experiment 2A, participants recalled ideas from a single source either alone or in the presence of the partner, using an extended-recall task. Partner presence did not affect the availability of ideas, but did reduce the propensity to report them as task compliant, relative to a partner-present condition. Simultaneous recall from both sources removed this social effect (Experiment 2B). Thus social influences on unconscious plagiarism are apparent, but are influenced by the salience of the alternate source at retrieval.

  2. Error detecting capabilities of the shortened Hamming codes adopted for error detection in IEEE Standard 802.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Toru; Kasami, Tadao; Lin, Shu

    1989-09-01

    The error-detecting capabilities of the shortened Hamming codes adopted for error detection in IEEE Standard 802.3 are investigated. These codes are also used for error detection in the data link layer of the Ethernet, a local area network. The weight distributions for various code lengths are calculated to obtain the probability of undetectable error and that of detectable error for a binary symmetric channel with bit-error rate between 0.00001 and 1/2.

  3. Avoiding Plagiarism in Writing a Research Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Wajdi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses how to avoid plagiarism in a research paper. Avoiding plagiarism is part of a scientific writing ethic that always stated in any publication. Every writer should pay attention to their papers submitted to a journal or a scientific forum that they are free from unethical conduct. Writing a research paper needs overall accuracy especially in avoiding plagiarism in the paper that is to be published in a journal or to be presented at a certain scientific meeting, seminar or symposium. It is based on writers’ experience as a paper writer as well as a journal reviewer. The first application that the writers use is ‘checker’, a Mac computer application, used to check spelling and grammar. It assists the writers to check how misspelling and an ungrammatical inaccuracy in the writers’ papers. The second free application is ‘plagiarism checker’. Checking originality of a paper is essential and it is not too difficult to do today. It is freely accessible that plagiarism checker can be used to check how original the paper is. By visiting “Google” then write down ‘plagiarism checker’, it will appear ‘smallseatools’ and then the writers could choose and check how original the paper is. This application is freely accessed and helps immensely to check how original a paper is and how far a paper is free from plagiarism. The unoriginal phrase will be underlined and marked red and finally will be shown how inimitable the paper is. Plagiarism scan report which consists of the date of the report, plagiarism status, total words and total characters can be downloaded.

  4. An in-depth study of sparse codes on abnormality detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Pan, Hong; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2016-01-01

    Sparse representation has been applied successfully in abnormal event detection, in which the baseline is to learn a dictionary accompanied by sparse codes. While much emphasis is put on discriminative dictionary construction, there are no comparative studies of sparse codes regarding abnormality...... are carried out from various angles to better understand the applicability of sparse codes, including computation time, reconstruction error, sparsity, detection accuracy, and their performance combining various detection methods. The experiment results show that combining OMP codes with maximum coordinate...

  5. CYBER-DIGITAL PLAGIARISM: AN AWARENESS APPROACH*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lehobye

    Plagiarism, as opposed to cyber-ethics, is the practice of claiming or implying original authorship, in whole or in part, by incorporating ... the "Borrowing, purchasing, or otherwise obtaining work composed by someone else and submitting it ...

  6. Methods for Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Joshua D.; Druen, Perri B.; Arcuri, Jennifer A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an experiment used with undergraduate students to educate students about plagiarism and paraphrasing techniques. Discusses the procedure used for the experiment as well as results from the experiment and a postexperiement questionnaire. (CMK)

  7. Beyond Culture: Helping International Students Avoid Plagiarism

    OpenAIRE

    Soni Adhikari

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of international students from different academic backgrounds around the world, college and university teachers in the West find it harder to understand the many and complex reasons when these students plagiarize or use sources ineffectively. Reviewing relevant literature, I first make a pedagogical analysis of student plagiarism then show why teachers should shift focus from traditional views about cultural difference toward a multidimensional understand...

  8. A dual-sided coded-aperture radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penny, R.D.; Hood, W.E.; Polichar, R.M.; Cardone, F.H.; Chavez, L.G.; Grubbs, S.G.; Huntley, B.P.; Kuharski, R.A.; Shyffer, R.T.; Fabris, L.; Ziock, K.P.; Labov, S.E.; Nelson, K.

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a large-area, mobile, coded-aperture radiation imaging system for localizing compact radioactive sources in three dimensions while rejecting distributed background. The 3D Stand-Off Radiation Detection System (SORDS-3D) has been tested at speeds up to 95 km/h and has detected and located sources in the millicurie range at distances of over 100 m. Radiation data are imaged to a geospatially mapped world grid with a nominal 1.25- to 2.5-m pixel pitch at distances out to 120 m on either side of the platform. Source elevation is also extracted. Imaged radiation alarms are superimposed on a side-facing video log that can be played back for direct localization of sources in buildings in urban environments. The system utilizes a 37-element array of 5x5x50 cm 3 cesium-iodide (sodium) detectors. Scintillation light is collected by a pair of photomultiplier tubes placed at either end of each detector, with the detectors achieving an energy resolution of 6.15% FWHM (662 keV) and a position resolution along their length of 5 cm FWHM. The imaging system generates a dual-sided two-dimensional image allowing users to efficiently survey a large area. Imaged radiation data and raw spectra are forwarded to the RadioNuclide Analysis Kit (RNAK), developed by our collaborators, for isotope ID. An intuitive real-time display aids users in performing searches. Detector calibration is dynamically maintained by monitoring the potassium-40 peak and digitally adjusting individual detector gains. We have recently realized improvements, both in isotope identification and in distinguishing compact sources from background, through the installation of optimal-filter reconstruction kernels.

  9. Text-based plagiarism in scientific publishing: issues, developments and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2013-09-01

    Text-based plagiarism, or copying language from sources, has recently become an issue of growing concern in scientific publishing. Use of CrossCheck (a computational text-matching tool) by journals has sometimes exposed an unexpected amount of textual similarity between submissions and databases of scholarly literature. In this paper I provide an overview of the relevant literature, to examine how journal gatekeepers perceive textual appropriation, and how automated plagiarism-screening tools have been developed to detect text matching, with the technique now available for self-check of manuscripts before submission; I also discuss issues around English as an additional language (EAL) authors and in particular EAL novices being the typical offenders of textual borrowing. The final section of the paper proposes a few educational directions to take in tackling text-based plagiarism, highlighting the roles of the publishing industry, senior authors and English for academic purposes professionals.

  10. Plagiarism: A plaque to research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gowri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The virus of scientific dishonesty has spread across the globe and in all age groups, students as well as faculties. Copying text, figures, tables from other published material without giving due credit are rampant. This kind of act will not only defame the individual, but also puts forth a question mark on the integrity of practitioners in general. The concept of plagiarism is by no means simple or an unambiguous one, yet unless we are clear on this, we cannot begin to make any kind of progress on the practical measures that need to be taken to reduce it. In what follows, we will attempt to explore the confusions and contradictions in the way the term is currently used, and an attempt is made to relocate its meaning such that at least some information and knowledge can be imbibed.

  11. Knowing and avoiding plagiarism during scientific writing | Mohan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowing and avoiding plagiarism during scientific writing. ... from the original source without giving adequate credit to the main source. When we search databases like PubMed/MedLine there is a lot of information regarding plagiarism.

  12. Students' Views on Prevention of Coursework Plagiarism | Bada ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and unrealistic coursework timeframes were cited for plagiarism in doing coursework assignments. Recommendations for preventing plagiarism are drawn out of these findings. Thereafter, a framework for administering coursework is developed. Keywords: Academic dishonesty; Higher education evaluation; Research ...

  13. Detected-jump-error-correcting quantum codes, quantum error designs, and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alber, G.; Mussinger, M.; Beth, Th.; Charnes, Ch.; Delgado, A.; Grassl, M.

    2003-01-01

    The recently introduced detected-jump-correcting quantum codes are capable of stabilizing qubit systems against spontaneous decay processes arising from couplings to statistically independent reservoirs. These embedded quantum codes exploit classical information about which qubit has emitted spontaneously and correspond to an active error-correcting code embedded in a passive error-correcting code. The construction of a family of one-detected-jump-error-correcting quantum codes is shown and the optimal redundancy, encoding, and recovery as well as general properties of detected-jump-error-correcting quantum codes are discussed. By the use of design theory, multiple-jump-error-correcting quantum codes can be constructed. The performance of one-jump-error-correcting quantum codes under nonideal conditions is studied numerically by simulating a quantum memory and Grover's algorithm

  14. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fimmel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick’s hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C3 and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C3 codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  15. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-15

    In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick's hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C³ and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising) result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six) with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C(3) codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  16. Plagiarism: Why is it such a big issue for medical writers?

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Das; Monica Panjabi

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is the wrongful presentation of somebody else‘s work or idea as one’s own without adequately attributing it to the source. Most authors know that plagiarism is an unethical publication practice. Yet, it is a serious problem in the medical writing arena. Plagiarism is perhaps the commonest ethical issue plaguing medical writing. In this article, we highlight the different types of plagiarism and address the issues of plagiarism of text, plagiarism of ideas, mosaic plagiarism, self-p...

  17. Inoculating against Pro-Plagiarism Justifications: Rational and Affective Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Josh; Pfau, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Student plagiarism continues to threaten academic integrity. This investigation assessed whether an inoculation message strategy could combat university plagiarism by protecting student attitudes against pro-plagiarism justification arguments. Additionally, we sought theoretical confirmation of previous findings on involvement and accessibility in…

  18. Perceptions about Plagiarism between Faculty and Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Serene

    2010-01-01

    The problem. Through observation and the review of literature, students often receive inconsistent and vague messages about plagiarism from faculty. Marcoux (2002) and Roig (2001) found a lack of consensus between faculty concerning definitions and forms of plagiarism. Although some students develop skills in order to avoid plagiarism, almost half…

  19. Ethical and Unethical Methods of Plagiarism Prevention in Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiyari, Kaveh; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Shakiba, Masoud; Zavvari, Azam; Shahbazi-Moghadam, Masoomeh; Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Mohammadjafari, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses plagiarism origins, and the ethical solutions to prevent it. It also reviews some unethical approaches, which may be used to decrease the plagiarism rate in academic writings. We propose eight ethical techniques to avoid unconscious and accidental plagiarism in manuscripts without using online systems such as Turnitin and/or…

  20. The significance of anti-plagiarism in modern day authorship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institutions should set policies and take responsibility for integrity of research reporting. This is particularly important for boosting potentials of novice researchers. This in turn ensures the quality of education most especially in developing countries. Keywords: Plagiarism, self-plagiarism, plagiarism process, research integrity, ...

  1. "You Fail": Plagiarism, the Ownership of Writing, and Transnational Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Arabella

    2009-01-01

    Responding to cultural concerns about the ownership of writing and the nature of plagiarism, this article examines discourses about plagiarism by ESL students and argues for a plurality of approaches to understanding the ownership of language and textual appropriation. First, it uses speech act theory to explain the dynamics of plagiarism; second,…

  2. Technology Enhanced Learning and Plagiarism in Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risquez, Angelica; O'Dwyer, Michele; Ledwith, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore the relationship between entrepreneurship students' ethical views on plagiarism, their self reported engagement in plagiarism and their participation in an online plagiarism prevention tutorial. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on a questionnaire administered to 434 undergraduate university…

  3. The Issue of (Software) Plagiarism: A Student View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuda, D.; Navrat, P.; Kovacova, B.; Humay, P.

    2012-01-01

    The issue of plagiarism is discussed in the context of university education in disciplines related to computing. The focus is therefore mainly on software plagiarism. First, however, a case is made for the claim that the most important reason that plagiarism cannot be tolerated lies in the essence of the concept of a university as it is rooted in…

  4. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism appears to be a common problem among college students, yet there is little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to minimize plagiarism. This study presents the results of a field experiment that evaluated the effects of a web-based educational tutorial in reducing plagiarism. We found that assignment to the treatment…

  5. Examining Students' Perceptions of Plagiarism: A Cross-Cultural Study at Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaoglu, M. Naci; Erbay, Sakire; Flitner, Cristina; Saltas, Dogan

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to dominate the academic world as one of its greatest challenges, and the existing literature suggests cross-cultural investigation of this critical issue may help all shareholders who detect, are confronted by and struggle with this issue to address it. Therefore, the present study, drawing upon a cross-cultural investigation…

  6. International perspectives on plagiarism and considerations for teaching international trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees' scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Foreign-Educated Graduate Nursing Students and Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Mary; Collins, Shawn Bryant

    2017-04-01

    Plagiarism is a concern related to students educated in countries other than the United States, where English is not the first language spoken. The authors' experience with plagiarism by a foreign-educated nursing student prompted an investigation into this topic. This article focuses on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism, a common focus with foreign-educated students, addressing linguistic, as well as cultural, viewpoints. The findings from the literature on plagiarism among foreign-educated students are elicited and the article discusses strategies to help foreign-educated students learn about plagiarism and how to properly cite and reference sources. A variety of proactive strategies exist that can be used by both faculty and students to mitigate the occurrence of plagiarism by foreign-educated nursing students in higher education, starting with a clearer understanding of some of the antecedents to the problem of plagiarism. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):211-214.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Plagiarism and ghostwriting: The rise in academic misconduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawren Singh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the current situation regarding plagiarism and ghostwriting, and to stimulate debate about how universities should respond to the rise in these forms of academic misconduct. The apparent upsurge in academic misconduct means that universities today face one of the greatest challenges to academic integrity they have had to deal with ever since the university system came into existence some 800 years ago. Plagiarism and ghostwriting are undermining the integrity of university degrees to an extent not seen before. Academia and fraud are not strangers. Universities have a long history of cheating of one sort or another, often associated with examinations, but also with research. In the past this cheating involved activities such as smuggling notes (commonly called "crib sheets" into examinations, and consulting them even under the watchful eyes of invigilators. It also involved students obtaining sight of an examination paper in advance. The fraudulent creation of research results has also been an issue. However, in the 21st century, the opportunities for cheating have exploded. This has resulted in universities becoming more concerned about ensuring the integrity of their examination processes and the degrees they award. Our paper focuses on cheating in the writing of dissertations or theses required at undergraduate or postgraduate level, with an emphasis on plagiarism and ghostwriting. We do not propose a simple solution to these problems, as preventing or stopping cheating is not just a matter of catching the wrongdoers. Cheating is endogenous to the current university education system, and needs to be addressed in terms of not only prevention and detection but also how people who are found to engage in such misconduct are treated. We suggest that creative ways of promoting learning would help to minimise cheating at universities. It is also important to ensure that the issue is discussed openly among students

  9. Is it cheating or learning the craft of writing? Using Turnitin to help students avoid plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Graham-Matheson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is a growing problem for universities, many of which are turning to software detection for help in detecting and dealing with it. This paper explores issues around plagiarism and reports on a study of the use of Turnitin in a new university. The purpose of the study was to inform the senior management team about the plagiarism policy and the use of Turnitin. The study found that staff and students largely understood the university's policy and Turnitin's place within it, and were very supportive of the use of Turnitin in originality checking. Students who had not used Turnitin were generally keen to do so. The recommendation to the senior management team, which was implemented, was that the use of Turnitin for originality checking should be made compulsory where possible – at the time of the study the use of Turnitin was at the discretion of programme directors. A further aim of the study was to contribute to the sector's body of knowledge. Prevention of plagiarism through education is a theme identified by Badge and Scott (2009 who conclude an area lacking in research is “investigation of the impact of these tools on staff teaching practices”. Although a number of recent studies have considered educational use of Turnitin they focus on individual programmes or subject areas rather than institutions as a whole and the relationship with policy.

  10. Avoiding plagiarism: guidance for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    The pressures of study, diversity of source materials, past assumptions relating to good writing practice, ambiguous writing guidance on best practice and students' insecurity about their reasoning ability, can lead to plagiarism. With the use of source checking software, there is an increased chance that plagiarised work will be identified and investigated, and penalties given. In extreme cases, plagiarised work may be reported to the Nursing and Midwifery Council and professional as well as academic penalties may apply. This article provides information on how students can avoid plagiarism when preparing their coursework for submission.

  11. Plagiarism: A Shared Responsibility of All, Current Situation, and Future Actions in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthanna, Abdulghani

    2016-01-01

    As combating plagiarism is a shared responsibility of all, this article focuses on presenting the current situation of higher education in Yemen. The critical review of four implementable policy documents and interviews revealed the absence of research ethics code, research misconduct policy, and institutional policies in the country. This led to the presence of several acts of research dishonesty. The article concludes with an initiative for necessary future actions in the nation.

  12. Attitude toward plagiarism among Iranian medical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Hassanpour, Kiana; Aramesh, Kiarash; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6±3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7±0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4±0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1). It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses) to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medical research ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  13. Attitude toward Plagiarism among Iranian Medical Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Emami-Razavi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess attitude towards plagiarism in faculty members of Medical School at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. One hundred and twenty medical faculty members ofTehran University of Medical Sciences were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. They were asked to answer to valid and reliable Persian version of attitude towards plagiarism questionnaire. Attitude toward plagiarism, positive attitude toward self-plagiarism and plagiarism acceptance were assessed. Eighty seven filled-up questionnaires were collected. Mean total number of correct answers was 11.6 ± 3.1. Mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating self-plagiarism was 1.7 ± 0.4 and mean number of correct answers to questions evaluating plagiarism acceptance was 1.4 ± 0.2. There was no significant correlation between plagiarism acceptance and self-plagiarism (r=0.17, P=0.1. It is essential to provide materials (such as workshops, leaflets and mandatory courses to make Iranian medical faculty members familiar with medicalresearch ethics issues such as plagiarism.

  14. Academy Policy on Plagiarism | Overview | Journals | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Defined by the US Office of Research Integrity as “the appropriation of another person's ideas, processes, results or words without giving appropriate credit”, the increase in plagiarism is due not only to all too human failings, but also to the ease with which the emergence of the Internet has made such misconduct possible.

  15. Plagiarism: Do Students Know What It Is?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Maureen M.; Overfield, Joyce A.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of students to plagiarise coursework assessments has been a topic of much debate in recent years. The consequences of plagiarism for students may be devastating, since their failure to learn and use appropriate study skills will affect both their university experience and their subsequent career. This project set out to investigate…

  16. Academy Policy on Plagiarism | Overview | Journals | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-21

    Dec 21, 2017 ... Plagiarism as a form of scientific misconduct has been on the rise in recent times. Defined by the US Office of Research Integrity as “the appropriation of ... institutions and their funding agencies about the editors' findings.

  17. An Investigation of Plagiarism in Developmental Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Emily Grace Ehrlich; Agnello, Mary Frances; Kiser, Michelle; Osaghae, Osariemen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of higher education is to prepare students for the workforce. In order to prepare students for the workforce, many life lessons must be learned specifically respect for others' work. One of the invaluable lessons that a student can learn regarding respect for others' work is to appreciate originality and avoid of plagiarism. To be…

  18. Plagiarism: What Don't They Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Troy A.; Love, Leonard G.; Pentina, Iryna

    2012-01-01

    The present economic environment is beneficial for universities and schools of business that are experiencing significant enrollment increases. But just as the U.S. economy is suffering from an economic recession, universities increasingly suffer from an integrity recession. Student academic misconduct, particularly plagiarism, is at an all-time…

  19. Plagiarism under a Magnifying-Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovoytova, Diana

    2017-01-01

    This paper embodies the findings from a small part, of a larger study on plagiarism, at the School of Engineering (SOE). The study is a cross-sectional survey, conducted in an institutional setting. 15 senior academic members of staff (N = 15), from SOE were invited to complete a questionnaire. The questioner was pre-tested, to ensure its validity…

  20. Beyond Culture: Helping International Students Avoid Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Soni

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid increase in the number of international students from different academic backgrounds around the world, college and university teachers in the West find it harder to understand the many and complex reasons when these students plagiarize or use sources ineffectively. Reviewing relevant literature, I first make a pedagogical analysis…

  1. CYBER-DIGITAL PLAGIARISM: AN AWARENESS APPROACH*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lehobye

    Internet plagiarism, it is imperative to deal with the following questions: Do ... source by using its phrases or sentences, with a few changes in grammar or ..... Brinson JD et al Analysing E-Commerce and Internet Law (Prentice-Hall Upper.

  2. Plagiarism within Extension: Origin and Current Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Dora

    2011-01-01

    Extension publication editors from around the United States are finding cases of plagiarism within manuscripts that Extension educators submit as new public education materials. When editors confront such educators with the problem, some don't understand it as such, rationalizing that reproducing published information for a new purpose qualifies…

  3. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism Prevention at Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai: A case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bandi, Shekappa; Pothare, Devyani; Angadi, Mallikarjun; Jange, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism is not always a black and white issue. The boundary between plagiarism and research is often unclear. Learning to recognize the various forms of plagiarism, especially the more ambiguous ones, is an important step towards effective prevention. The study overview the concept and types of plagiarism and it`s benefits, Plagiarism Policies in India, and also discussed turnitin and its workflow process of the TISS comparison of the Turnitin and iThenticate plagiarism tools and other rel...

  4. Reducing BER of spectral-amplitude coding optical code-division multiple-access systems by single photodiode detection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khafaji, H. M. R.; Aljunid, S. A.; Amphawan, A.; Fadhil, H. A.; Safar, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a single photodiode detection (SPD) technique for spectral-amplitude coding optical code-division multiple-access (SAC-OCDMA) systems. The proposed technique eliminates both phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN) and multiple-access interference (MAI) in the optical domain. Analytical results show that for 35 simultaneous users transmitting at data rate of 622 Mbps, the bit-error rate (BER) = 1.4x10^-28 for SPD technique is much better compared to 9.3x10^-6 and 9.6x10^-3 for the modified-AND as well as the AND detection techniques, respectively. Moreover, we verified the improved performance afforded by the proposed technique using data transmission simulations.

  5. Lightweight Detection of Android-specific Code Smells : The aDoctor Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palomba, F.; Di Nucci, D.; Panichella, A.; Zaidman, A.E.; De Lucia, Andrea; Pinzger, Martin; Bavota, Gabriele; Marcus, Andrian

    2017-01-01

    Code smells are symptoms of poor design solutions applied by programmers during the development of software systems. While the research community devoted a lot of effort to studying and devising approaches for detecting the traditional code smells defined by Fowler, little knowledge and support

  6. Strategies to promote a climate of academic integrity and minimize student cheating and plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Craig L

    2006-01-01

    Student academic misconduct is a growing problem for colleges and universities, including those responsible for preparing health professionals. Although the implementation of honor codes has had a positive impact on this problem, further reduction in student cheating and plagiarism can be achieved only via a comprehensive strategy that promotes an institutional culture of academic integrity. Such a strategy must combine efforts both to deter and detect academic misconduct, along with fair but rigorous application of sanctions against such behaviors. Methods useful in preventing or deterring dishonest behaviors among students include early integrity training complemented with course-level reinforcement, faculty role-modeling, and the application of selected testing/assignment preventive strategies, including honor pledges and honesty declarations. Giving students more responsibility for oversight of academic integrity also may help address this problem and better promote the culture needed to uphold its principles. Successful enforcement requires that academic administration provide strong and visible support for upholding academic integrity standards, including the provision of a clear and fair process and the consistent application of appropriate sanctions against those whose conduct is found to violate these standards.

  7. Orthogonal transformations for change detection, Matlab code (ENVI-like headers)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Matlab code to do (iteratively reweighted) multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data; accommodates ENVI (like) header files.......Matlab code to do (iteratively reweighted) multivariate alteration detection (MAD) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) on image data; accommodates ENVI (like) header files....

  8. How do we handle self-plagiarism in submitted manuscripts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šupak-Smolčić, Vesna; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija

    2013-01-01

    Self-plagiarism is a controversial issue in scientific writing and presentation of research data. Unlike plagiarism, self-plagiarism is difficult to interpret as intellectual theft under the justification that one cannot steal from oneself. However, academics are concerned, as self-plagiarized papers mislead readers, do not contribute to science, and bring undeserved credit to authors. As such, it should be considered a form of scientific misconduct. In this paper, we explain different forms of self-plagiarism in scientific writing and then present good editorial policy toward questionable material. The importance of dealing with self-plagiarism is emphasized by the recently published proposal of Text Recycling Guidelines by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). PMID:23894861

  9. How do we handle self-plagiarism in submitted manuscripts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supak-Smocić, Vesna; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija

    2013-01-01

    Self-plagiarism is a controversial issue in scientific writing and presentation of research data. Unlike plagiarism, self-plagiarism is difficult to interpret as intellectual theft under the justification that one cannot steal from oneself. However, academics are concerned, as self-plagiarized papers mislead readers, do not contribute to science, and bring undeserved credit to authors. As such, it should be considered a form of scientific misconduct. In this paper, we explain different forms of self-plagiarism in scientific writing and then present good editorial policy toward questionable material. The importance of dealing with self-plagiarism is emphasized by the recently published proposal of Text Recycling Guidelines by the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE).

  10. Digital plagiarism - The web giveth and the web shall taketh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, David E

    2000-01-01

    Publishing students' and researchers' papers on the World Wide Web (WWW) facilitates the sharing of information within and between academic communities. However, the ease of copying and transporting digital information leaves these authors' ideas open to plagiarism. Using tools such as the Plagiarism.org database, which compares submissions to reports and papers available on the Internet, could discover instances of plagiarism, revolutionize the peer review process, and raise the quality of published research everywhere. PMID:11720925

  11. Binary Large Object-Based Approach for QR Code Detection in Uncontrolled Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Lopez-Rincon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quick Response QR barcode detection in nonarbitrary environment is still a challenging task despite many existing applications for finding 2D symbols. The main disadvantage of recent applications for QR code detection is a low performance for rotated and distorted single or multiple symbols in images with variable illumination and presence of noise. In this paper, a particular solution for QR code detection in uncontrolled environments is presented. The proposal consists in recognizing geometrical features of QR code using a binary large object- (BLOB- based algorithm with subsequent iterative filtering QR symbol position detection patterns that do not require complex processing and training of classifiers frequently used for these purposes. The high precision and speed are achieved by adaptive threshold binarization of integral images. In contrast to well-known scanners, which fail to detect QR code with medium to strong blurring, significant nonuniform illumination, considerable symbol deformations, and noising, the proposed technique provides high recognition rate of 80%–100% with a speed compatible to real-time applications. In particular, speed varies from 200 ms to 800 ms per single or multiple QR code detected simultaneously in images with resolution from 640 × 480 to 4080 × 2720, respectively.

  12. A Novel Technique to Detect Code for SAC-OCDMA System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Manisha; Kumar, Manoj; Sharma, Ajay K.

    2018-04-01

    The main task of optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) system is the detection of code used by a user in presence of multiple access interference (MAI). In this paper, new method of detection known as XOR subtraction detection for spectral amplitude coding OCDMA (SAC-OCDMA) based on double weight codes has been proposed and presented. As MAI is the main source of performance deterioration in OCDMA system, therefore, SAC technique is used in this paper to eliminate the effect of MAI up to a large extent. A comparative analysis is then made between the proposed scheme and other conventional detection schemes used like complimentary subtraction detection, AND subtraction detection and NAND subtraction detection. The system performance is characterized by Q-factor, BER and received optical power (ROP) with respect to input laser power and fiber length. The theoretical and simulation investigations reveal that the proposed detection technique provides better quality factor, security and received power in comparison to other conventional techniques. The wide opening of eye in case of proposed technique also proves its robustness.

  13. Accuracy comparison among different machine learning techniques for detecting malicious codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Komal

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a machine learning based model for malware detection is proposed. It can detect newly released malware i.e. zero day attack by analyzing operation codes on Android operating system. The accuracy of Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Neural Network for detecting malicious code has been compared for the proposed model. In the experiment 400 benign files, 100 system files and 500 malicious files have been used to construct the model. The model yields the best accuracy 88.9% when neural network is used as classifier and achieved 95% and 82.8% accuracy for sensitivity and specificity respectively.

  14. Efficient coding and detection of ultra-long IDs for visible light positioning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualong; Yang, Chuanchuan

    2018-05-14

    Visible light positioning (VLP) is a promising technique to complement Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) such as Global positioning system (GPS) and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) which features the advantage of low-cost and high accuracy. The situation becomes even more crucial for indoor environments, where satellite signals are weak or even unavailable. For large-scale application of VLP, there would be a considerable number of Light emitting diode (LED) IDs, which bring forward the demand of long LED ID detection. In particular, to provision indoor localization globally, a convenient way is to program a unique ID into each LED during manufacture. This poses a big challenge for image sensors, such as the CMOS camera in everybody's hands since the long ID covers the span of multiple frames. In this paper, we investigate the detection of ultra-long ID using rolling shutter cameras. By analyzing the pattern of data loss in each frame, we proposed a novel coding technique to improve the efficiency of LED ID detection. We studied the performance of Reed-Solomon (RS) code in this system and designed a new coding method which considered the trade-off between performance and decoding complexity. Coding technique decreases the number of frames needed in data processing, significantly reduces the detection time, and improves the accuracy of detection. Numerical and experimental results show that the detected LED ID can be much longer with the coding technique. Besides, our proposed coding method is proved to achieve a performance close to that of RS code while the decoding complexity is much lower.

  15. Plagiarism Continues to Affect Scholarly Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Tae

    2017-02-01

    I have encountered 3 cases of plagiarism as editor of the Journal of Korean Medical Science (JKMS). The first one was copying figures from a JKMS article without citation, the second was submission of a copied manuscript of a published article to JKMS, and the third was publishing a copied JKMS article in another journal. The first and third cases violated copyrights of JKMS, but the violating journals made no action on the misconduct. The second and third cases were slightly modified copies of the source articles but similarity check by the Crosscheck could not identify the text overlap initially and after one year reported 96% overlap for the second case. The similarity of the third case was reported 3%. The Crosscheck must upgrade its system for better reliable screening of text plagiarism. The copy of the second case was committed by a corrupt Chinese editing company and also by some unethical researchers. In conclusion, plagiarism still threatens the trustworthiness of the publishing enterprises and is a cumbersome burden for editors of scholarly journals. We require a better system to increase the vigilance and to prevent the misconduct.

  16. Digital coherent detection research on Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry with simplex pulse codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Yun-Qi; Ye Qing; Pan Zheng-Qing; Cai Hai-Wen; Qu Rong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The digital coherent detection technique has been investigated without any frequency-scanning device in the Brillouin optical time domain reflectometry (BOTDR), where the simplex pulse codes are applied in the sensing system. The time domain signal of every code sequence is collected by the data acquisition card (DAQ). A shift-averaging technique is applied in the frequency domain for the reason that the local oscillator (LO) in the coherent detection is fix-frequency deviated from the primary source. With the 31-bit simplex code, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) has 3.5-dB enhancement with the same single pulse traces, accordant with the theoretical analysis. The frequency fluctuation for simplex codes is 14.01 MHz less than that for a single pulse as to 4-m spatial resolution. The results are believed to be beneficial for the BOTDR performance improvement. (general)

  17. Addressing Plagiarism in Online Programmes at a Health Sciences University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Helen; Anast, Ade; Roehling, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern for all educational institutions. To build a solid foundation for high academic standards and best practices at a graduate university, aspects of plagiarism were reviewed to develop better management processes for reducing plagiarism. Specifically, the prevalence of plagiarism and software programmes for…

  18. Legality, Quality Assurance and Learning: Competing Discourses of Plagiarism Management in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In universities around the world, plagiarism management is an ongoing issue of quality assurance and risk management. Plagiarism management discourses are often framed by legal concepts of authorial rights, and plagiarism policies outline penalties for infringement. Learning and teaching discourses argue that plagiarism management is, and should…

  19. A Review of Literature: Plagiarism in the Papers of Turkish Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokmenoglu, Tuba

    2017-01-01

    The present review attempted to address the direction of plagiarism literature in Turkish context. 15 studies conducted in Turkey on plagiarism were analyzed through content analysis. The context, purposes, methodological issues and results of researching plagiarism were categorized. The findings of this review indicated that although plagiarism's…

  20. Applying an Employee-Motivation Model to Prevent Student Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouff, John M.; Sims, Randi L.

    1996-01-01

    A model based on Vroom's expectancy theory of employee motivation posits that instructors can prevent plagiarism by ensuring that students understand the rules of ethical writing, expect assignments to be manageable and have personal benefits, and expect plagiarism to be difficult and have important personal costs. (SK)

  1. Application of Plagiarism Screening Software in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew E.; Bullard, Lisa G.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is an area of increasing concern for written ChE assignments, such as laboratory and design reports, due to ease of access to text and other materials via the internet. This study examines the application of plagiarism screening software to four courses in a university chemical engineering curriculum. The effectiveness of plagiarism…

  2. Online Plagiarism Training Falls Short in Biology Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Emily A.; Fagerheim, Britt; Durham, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Online plagiarism tutorials are increasingly popular in higher education, as faculty and staff try to curb the plagiarism epidemic. Yet no research has validated the efficacy of such tools in minimizing plagiarism in the sciences. Our study compared three plagiarism-avoidance training regimens (i.e., no training, online tutorial, or homework assignment) and their impacts on students’ ability to accurately discriminate plagiarism from text that is properly quoted, paraphrased, and attributed. Using pre- and postsurveys of 173 undergraduate students in three general ecology courses, we found that students given the homework assignment had far greater success in identifying plagiarism or the lack thereof compared with students given no training. In general, students trained with the homework assignment more successfully identified plagiarism than did students trained with the online tutorial. We also found that the summative assessment associated with the plagiarism-avoidance training formats (i.e., homework grade and online tutorial assessment score) did not correlate with student improvement on surveys through time. PMID:24591507

  3. Teaching Students about Plagiarism Using a Web-Based Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetter, Maria Earman

    2013-01-01

    The following research delivered a web-based module about plagiarism and paraphrasing to avoid plagiarism in both a blended method, with live instruction paired with web presentation for 105 students, and a separate web-only method for 22 other students. Participants were graduates and undergraduates preparing to become teachers, the majority of…

  4. Reducing Plagiarism by Using Online Software: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Ozgur; Arikan, Arda

    2011-01-01

    This action research attempts to explore the perceptions of Turkish university students on plagiarism while evaluating the effectiveness of an online application used to deter plagiarism. The participants were 40 first year university students studying in two different sections of an academic writing class. The findings show that the participants…

  5. None-Native University Students’ Perception of Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummul Khair Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is a complex issue especially among non-native students and it has received a lot of attention from researchers and scholars of academic writing. Some scholars attribute this problem to cultural perceptions and different attitudes toward texts. This study evaluates student perception of different aspects of plagiarism. A small group of postgraduate students in a Malaysian university were asked to categorize ten cases of plagiarism instances. They were also asked to identify plagiarized paraphrased versions of five excerpts of different source texts provided. The findings showed that students had misconceptions about different aspect of plagiarism including citation conventions, collusion, using another writer’s idea, and style of writing. Further analysis has shown that students were aware that plagiarism is wrong but they could not correctly identify the multiple forms in which plagiarism could happen. These findings indicate that students need to be taught and exposed to various forms and layers of plagiarism so that they would know how best to avoid it in their own writing.

  6. Non-Native University Students' Perception of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ummul Khair; Mansourizadeh, Kobra; Ai, Grace Koh Ming

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex issue especially among non-native students and it has received a lot of attention from researchers and scholars of academic writing. Some scholars attribute this problem to cultural perceptions and different attitudes toward texts. This study evaluates student perception of different aspects of plagiarism. A small group of…

  7. Examination of Plagiarism Tendency of Faculty of Education Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem DAĞAŞAN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research examines the tendency among students of the Faculty of Education to commit plagiarism. The research was conducted using a screening model, and was made on a sample of 1,136 students studying Classroom Teaching, Mathematics Teaching, Preschool Teaching, Social Sciences Teaching, Turkish Teaching, and Science Teaching at the Faculty of Education of Kafkas University, Kars, Turkey, during the 2016-2017 academic year. The Academic Fraud Tendency Scale (ASEÖ developed by Eminoğlu and Nartgün (2009 was used for data collection. From the findings of the research it was concluded that the plagiarism tendencies among students studying in the Faculty of Education were at low levels; male students were found to be more likely to commit plagiarism than female students; students who study in the science departments were found to be more likely to commit plagiarism than those studying in the social sciences departments; the tendency to plagiarize becomes greater as the grade level increases; the students who believe they are unsuccessful were found to have higher tendencies towards plagiarism than those who believe they are successful; students who are anxious about failure were found to have higher tendencies towards plagiarism than those who are not anxious about failure; and students who were not in the habit of studying on a regular basis were found to have higher tendencies towards plagiarism than those who were.

  8. Plagiarism Litigation Trends in the USA and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.; Cumming, J. Joy

    2008-01-01

    In this article we explore the increasing complexity of plagiarism litigation in the USA and Australia. Plagiarism has always been a serious academic issue and academic staff and students have wrestled with its definition and appropriate penalties for some time. However, the advent of the Internet and more freely accessible information resources,…

  9. Turnitin Systems: A Deterrent to Plagiarism in College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckler, Nina C.; Rice, Margaret; Bryan, C. Hobson

    2013-01-01

    Computer technology and the Internet now make plagiarism an easier enterprise. As a result, faculty must be more diligent in their efforts to mitigate the practice of academic integrity, and institutions of higher education must provide the leadership and support to ensure the context for it. This study explored the use of a plagiarism detection…

  10. Students' Perceptions of Cheating and Plagiarism in Higher Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owunwanne, Daniel; Rustagi, Narendra; Dada, Remi

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that cheating and plagiarism are prominent problems in many universities. In informal conversations, it seems that different students perceive plagiarism differently. In this paper, we conducted a survey at Howard University to examine or to follow up with this growing trend. Specifically, team leaders in school…

  11. Good intentions: providing students with skills to avoid accidental plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafron, Michelle L

    2012-01-01

    This article explores one librarian's experience with creating and implementing a plagiarism seminar as part of the library liaison program to the School of Public Health and Health Professions at the University at Buffalo. The changes and evolution of the seminar over several iterations are described. This article also examines student perceptions, misperceptions, and reactions to the plagiarism workshop.

  12. Using Computer Simulations and Games to Prevent Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth G.

    2015-01-01

    In this increasingly digital age, student plagiarism is rampant. Roughly half of college students admit to plagiarizing using content found online, directly copying and pasting the work of others. Digital technology and social media have greatly changed the landscape of how knowledge is acquired and disseminated; thus, students must be explicitly…

  13. Online plagiarism training falls short in biology classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Emily A; Fagerheim, Britt; Durham, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Online plagiarism tutorials are increasingly popular in higher education, as faculty and staff try to curb the plagiarism epidemic. Yet no research has validated the efficacy of such tools in minimizing plagiarism in the sciences. Our study compared three plagiarism-avoidance training regimens (i.e., no training, online tutorial, or homework assignment) and their impacts on students' ability to accurately discriminate plagiarism from text that is properly quoted, paraphrased, and attributed. Using pre- and postsurveys of 173 undergraduate students in three general ecology courses, we found that students given the homework assignment had far greater success in identifying plagiarism or the lack thereof compared with students given no training. In general, students trained with the homework assignment more successfully identified plagiarism than did students trained with the online tutorial. We also found that the summative assessment associated with the plagiarism-avoidance training formats (i.e., homework grade and online tutorial assessment score) did not correlate with student improvement on surveys through time.

  14. Arresting Student Plagiarism: Are We Investigators or Educators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lajuan

    2011-01-01

    Managing student plagiarism can cause instructors to feel as if they are serving educational institutions in the role of investigator rather than educator. Since many educators continue to struggle with the issue of student plagiarism, the author interviewed some of her colleagues. In this article, she shares her and her colleagues' antiplagiarism…

  15. Student Plagiarism in Higher Education in Vietnam: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Ba, Khang; Do Ba, Khai; Lam, Quoc Dung; Le, Dao Thanh Binh An; Nguyen, Phuong Lien; Nguyen, Phuong Quynh; Pham, Quoc Loc

    2017-01-01

    This paper assesses and compares the prevalence of plagiarism across different student and assignment characteristics at a university in Vietnam, using the similarity index reported by the text-matching software Turnitin as a proxy measure of plagiarism on a sample of 681 student papers. The findings present a level of match higher than reported…

  16. Instructor Perceptions of Plagiarism: Are We Finding Common Ground?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kymberley K.; Behrendt, Linda S.; Boothby, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined instructor views of what constitutes plagiarism. The authors collected questionnaire data from 158 participants recruited through three teaching-related electronic listservs. Results showed that most participants agreed that behaviors that claim credit for someone else's work constituted plagiarism. Instructors differed in…

  17. Plagiarism: Why is it such a big issue for medical writers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Natasha; Panjabi, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism is the wrongful presentation of somebody else‘s work or idea as one’s own without adequately attributing it to the source. Most authors know that plagiarism is an unethical publication practice. Yet, it is a serious problem in the medical writing arena. Plagiarism is perhaps the commonest ethical issue plaguing medical writing. In this article, we highlight the different types of plagiarism and address the issues of plagiarism of text, plagiarism of ideas, mosaic plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and duplicate publication. An act of plagiarism can have several repercussions for the author, the journal in question and the publication house as a whole. Sometimes, strict disciplinary action is also taken against the plagiarist. The article cites examples of retraction of articles, suspension of authors, apology letters from journal editors, and other such actions against plagiarism. PMID:21731858

  18. Application of neutron/gamma transport codes for the design of explosive detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Shayer, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of neutron and gamma transport codes to the design of nuclear techniques for detecting concealed explosives material are discussed. The methodology of integrating radiation transport computations in the development, optimization and analysis phases of these new technologies is discussed. Transport and Monte Carlo codes are used for proof of concepts, guide the system integration, reduce the extend of experimental program and provide insight into the physical problem involved. The paper concentrates on detection techniques based on thermal and fast neutron interactions in the interrogated object. (authors). 6 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  19. On academic plagiarism in Europe. An analytical approach based on four studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vanja Pupovac; Lidija Bilic-Zulle; Mladen Petrovecki

    2008-01-01

    With the development of information and communication technology (ICT), plagiarism becomes an ever more serious problem in the academic community. According to the studies on academic plagiarism conducted at universities in four different European countries, plagiarism rates among students are quite high and students mostly ignore or allow plagiarism because of a lack of knowledge, lack of consequences, or simply because ICT makes plagiarism easy to commit. The findings of the studies present...

  20. Where Does Originality End and Plagiarism Start? Discussing Plagiarism in Information Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greifeneder, Elke Susanne; Connaway, Lynn Silipigni; Jiang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    no longer be considered to be original and starts to be considered self-plagiarism. Parts of the discussion will center on the question of whether information science researchers can actually avoid repeating the same words when today they have to publish results from research projects in as many...

  1. Who Has Read the Policy on Plagiarism? Unpacking Students' Understanding of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullifer, J. M.; Tyson, G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has established that the term "plagiarism" is open to different interpretations, resulting in confusion among students and staff alike. University policy on academic integrity/misconduct defines the behaviours that all stakeholders must abide by, and the parameters for reporting, investigating and penalising infringements. These…

  2. Microfluidic CODES: a scalable multiplexed electronic sensor for orthogonal detection of particles in microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruxiu; Wang, Ningquan; Kamili, Farhan; Sarioglu, A Fatih

    2016-04-21

    Numerous biophysical and biochemical assays rely on spatial manipulation of particles/cells as they are processed on lab-on-a-chip devices. Analysis of spatially distributed particles on these devices typically requires microscopy negating the cost and size advantages of microfluidic assays. In this paper, we introduce a scalable electronic sensor technology, called microfluidic CODES, that utilizes resistive pulse sensing to orthogonally detect particles in multiple microfluidic channels from a single electrical output. Combining the techniques from telecommunications and microfluidics, we route three coplanar electrodes on a glass substrate to create multiple Coulter counters producing distinct orthogonal digital codes when they detect particles. We specifically design a digital code set using the mathematical principles of Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) telecommunication networks and can decode signals from different microfluidic channels with >90% accuracy through computation even if these signals overlap. As a proof of principle, we use this technology to detect human ovarian cancer cells in four different microfluidic channels fabricated using soft lithography. Microfluidic CODES offers a simple, all-electronic interface that is well suited to create integrated, low-cost lab-on-a-chip devices for cell- or particle-based assays in resource-limited settings.

  3. Code-switched English pronunciation modeling for Swahili spoken term detection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Computer Science 81 ( 2016 ) 128 – 135 5th Workshop on Spoken Language Technology for Under-resourced Languages, SLTU 2016, 9-12 May 2016, Yogyakarta, Indonesia Code-switched English Pronunciation Modeling for Swahili Spoken Term Detection Neil...

  4. Quantum-capacity-approaching codes for the detected-jump channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassl, Markus; Wei Zhaohui; Ji Zhengfeng; Zeng Bei

    2010-01-01

    The quantum-channel capacity gives the ultimate limit for the rate at which quantum data can be reliably transmitted through a noisy quantum channel. Degradable quantum channels are among the few channels whose quantum capacities are known. Given the quantum capacity of a degradable channel, it remains challenging to find a practical coding scheme which approaches capacity. Here we discuss code designs for the detected-jump channel, a degradable channel with practical relevance describing the physics of spontaneous decay of atoms with detected photon emission. We show that this channel can be used to simulate a binary classical channel with both erasures and bit flips. The capacity of the simulated classical channel gives a lower bound on the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel. When the jump probability is small, it almost equals the quantum capacity. Hence using a classical capacity-approaching code for the simulated classical channel yields a quantum code which approaches the quantum capacity of the detected-jump channel.

  5. The Pollution Of Science: Plagiarism & Predatory Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelkrim CHERITI

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 we denounced a case of plagiarism, a stupid copy and paste of our article published since 2012 in this journal (PhytoChem & BioSub Journal Vol. 6 N° 2, 83-87, 2012) by another “ scientists” - teaching in Tlemcen and Bechar universities, L. Ziane, H. A. Lazouni, A. Moussaoui, N. Hamidi - and published in Asian Journal of Natural & Applied Sciences, Vol. 2(1), 5-9, 2013 (www. leena-luna.co.jp). A journal with editorial board but the editor chief is anonymous. the same "au...

  6. [Scientific stealing (Plagiarism) in medical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enöz, Murat

    2007-01-01

    The obligation to publish academic papers in order to get academic rank has made medical doctors more ambitious to publish faster and more papers. According to the ethical and legal rules in our country and in the world, if an idea or technical methods of another person is used in a medical journal, the owner of the method or idea and its publication has to be cited. If an idea, information or a technical method of another scientist is published without citation as if it was one's own idea it's called "Plagiarism". Despite the prohibitive laws and rules, this scientific stealing has become an increasing problem for medical journals worldwide.

  7. Do medical students require education on issues related to plagiarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Joe; Jacob, Molly

    2015-01-01

    In the course of our professional experience, we have seen that many medical students plagiarise. We hypothesised that they do so out of ignorance and that they require formal education on the subject. With this objective in mind, we conducted a teaching session on issues related to plagiarism. As a part of this, we administered a quiz to assess their baseline knowledge on plagiarism and a questionnaire to determine their attitudes towards it. We followed this up with an interactive teaching session, in which we discussed various aspects of plagiarism. We subjected the data obtained from the quiz and questionnaire to bivariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 423 medical students participated in the study. Their average score for the quiz was 4.96±1.67 (out of 10). Age, gender and years in medical school were not significantly associated with knowledge regarding plagiarism. The knowledge scores were negatively correlated with permissive attitudes towards plagiarism and positively correlated with attitudes critical of the practice. Men had significantly higher scores on permissive attitudes compared to women . In conclusion, we found that the medical students' knowledge regarding plagiarism was limited. Those with low knowledge scores tended to have permissive attitudes towards plagiarism and were less critical of the practice. We recommend the inclusion of formal instruction on this subject in the medical curriculum, so that this form of academic misconduct can be tackled.

  8. Construction of knowledge, attitude and practice questionnaire for assessing plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, J; Cheraghi, P; Irani, A Doosti; Cheraghi, Z; Mirfakhraei, M

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a questionnaire in order to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of the faculty members and students toward plagiarism. A KAP study was conducted from June to October 2011 enrolling 390 volunteers anonymously (response rate 96%). The questionnaire included the following four parts: (a) general characteristics like gender, academic degree and education level; (b) nine questions regarding knowledge (Min=0, Max=9); (c) nine questions regarding attitude (Min=9, Max=27); and (d) eight questions regarding practice (Min=0, Max=8). A pilot study was conducted to assess reliability of the questions regarding knowledge and attitude. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the knowledge and attitude questions was 0.70 and 0.74 respectively. The overall prevalence of at least once plagiarism commission was 38% (SD=0.035). The overall mean score of knowledge, attitude and practice was 5.94 (SD=1.66), 24.12 (SD=2.99), and 0.66 (SD=1.15) respectively. Knowledge of plagiarism was significantly higher among higher academic degrees and females. Their negative attitude toward plagiarism was stronger too. No statistically significant difference regarding plagiarism commission was observed among different academic degrees in both sexes. According to linear regression analysis, plagiarism commission decreased 13% per one unit increase in score of knowledge (P=0.005) and 16% per one unit increase in score of attitude (Pplagiarism and to estimate the prevalence and the type of plagiarism commission.

  9. Construction of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Questionnaire for Assessing Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, J; Cheraghi, P; Irani, A Doosti; Cheraghi, Z; Mirfakhraei, M

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to develop a questionnaire in order to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of the faculty members and students toward plagiarism. Methods: A KAP study was conducted from June to October 2011 enrolling 390 volunteers anonymously (response rate 96%). The questionnaire included the following four parts: (a) general characteristics like gender, academic degree and education level; (b) nine questions regarding knowledge (Min=0, Max=9); (c) nine questions regarding attitude (Min=9, Max=27); and (d) eight questions regarding practice (Min=0, Max=8). A pilot study was conducted to assess reliability of the questions regarding knowledge and attitude. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the knowledge and attitude questions was 0.70 and 0.74 respectively. Results: The overall prevalence of at least once plagiarism commission was 38% (SD=0.035). The overall mean score of knowledge, attitude and practice was 5.94 (SD=1.66), 24.12 (SD=2.99), and 0.66 (SD=1.15) respectively. Knowledge of plagiarism was significantly higher among higher academic degrees and females. Their negative attitude toward plagiarism was stronger too. No statistically significant difference regarding plagiarism commission was observed among different academic degrees in both sexes. According to linear regression analysis, plagiarism commission decreased 13% per one unit increase in score of knowledge (P=0.005) and 16% per one unit increase in score of attitude (Pplagiarism and to estimate the prevalence and the type of plagiarism commission. PMID:23304676

  10. Plagiarism issues in post-1998 Indonesian film posters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekky Imanjaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There are online articles, with visual materials, stating that some post-1998 Indonesian film posters were accused as plagiarism by common people. However, academically speaking, it needs deeper skills and knowledge to prove acts of plagiarism. This paper will discuss the issues around Indonesian film posters and plagiarism, including the possibility of citing in graphic design. The research will treat film posters not only as marketing tools to promote the movies, as many people consider, but also as graphic design materials. Some terms such as appropriation, homage, and pastiche will be discussed to analyze the phenomenon.

  11. The dictatorship of plagiarism and the obsession with quotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Krokoscz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, plagiarism has become a concern in the national academic realm, although internationally this subject has been debated for decades. Considering some of these aspects may be important not to repeat mistakes already made ​​and overcome in relation to plagiarism and at the same time represent an opportunity to deal with the problem at a national level from what is already consolidated globally. In this sense, the aim of this text is to present some of these perspectives without intending to indicate immediate solutions to exterminate plagiarism, but rather contribute to a debate on the subject.

  12. PMD compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using LDPC-coded OFDM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2007-04-02

    The possibility of polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) compensation in fiber-optic communication systems with direct detection using a simple channel estimation technique and low-density parity-check (LDPC)-coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) is demonstrated. It is shown that even for differential group delay (DGD) of 4/BW (BW is the OFDM signal bandwidth), the degradation due to the first-order PMD can be completely compensated for. Two classes of LDPC codes designed based on two different combinatorial objects (difference systems and product of combinatorial designs) suitable for use in PMD compensation are introduced.

  13. A Coded Aperture Compressive Imaging Array and Its Visual Detection and Tracking Algorithms for Surveillance Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxiao Wu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an application of a compressive imaging system to the problem of wide-area video surveillance systems. A parallel coded aperture compressive imaging system is proposed to reduce the needed high resolution coded mask requirements and facilitate the storage of the projection matrix. Random Gaussian, Toeplitz and binary phase coded masks are utilized to obtain the compressive sensing images. The corresponding motion targets detection and tracking algorithms directly using the compressive sampling images are developed. A mixture of Gaussian distribution is applied in the compressive image space to model the background image and for foreground detection. For each motion target in the compressive sampling domain, a compressive feature dictionary spanned by target templates and noises templates is sparsely represented. An l1 optimization algorithm is used to solve the sparse coefficient of templates. Experimental results demonstrate that low dimensional compressed imaging representation is sufficient to determine spatial motion targets. Compared with the random Gaussian and Toeplitz phase mask, motion detection algorithms using a random binary phase mask can yield better detection results. However using random Gaussian and Toeplitz phase mask can achieve high resolution reconstructed image. Our tracking algorithm can achieve a real time speed that is up to 10 times faster than that of the l1 tracker without any optimization.

  14. 363 Evaluating Students' Plagiarism in Higher Education Institutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    As one of the major players in knowledge economy, higher education institutions have ..... Knowledge, they say is power and knowledge is acquired by authentic learning. ... Harris, R. (2004) Anti-Plagiarism Strategies for Research Papers.

  15. Do medical students really understand plagiarism? - Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Oana

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, more and more medicine students are involved in research, either in the form of a research project within specialized courses or as a scientific article to be presented at student international conferences or published in prestigious medical journals. The present study included 250 2nd year medical students, currently studying within the University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania. There were collected 239 responses, with a response rate of 95.6%. In our study, the results showed that foreign students within the University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova did have some issues understanding plagiarism with fewer foreign students (34%) than Romanian students (66%) recognizing that simply changing words does not avoid plagiarism. In our opinion, there should be put more emphasis upon plagiarism implications and its aspects, as well, with a permanent order to try to prevent future attempts of plagiarizing among medical students as future researchers within the medical science field.

  16. Writing a research paper at the university: authorship vs plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Alves

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the need of producing academic texts at the university, many undergraduate students do it by copying texts that were already published. In this study we discuss the presence of plagiarism versus authorship marks in the introduction of academic articles produced by freshmen in a licenciateship degree. Therefore, we emphasize the issue of plagiarism and authorship, particularly from the perspective of the enunciative bakhtinian studies and then present the theoretical basis of Literacies, with the most recent studies on Literacies and Socio-Rhetorics. Data analysis revealed and confirmed the academic writing as a complex activity, given the practice of plagiarism found in the analyzed productions. The lack of knowledge of academic writing together not the theme domain contributed to the practice of plagiarism.

  17. Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Identify Plagiarism After an Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kira; Kehr, Heather; Ford, Carolyn; Lane, Daniel C.; Nuzum, Donald S.; Compton, Cynthia; Gibson, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine if an educational intervention in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program increases pharmacy students’ ability to identify plagiarism. Methods. First-year (P1), second-year (P2), and third-year (P3) pharmacy students attended an education session during which types of plagiarism and methods for avoiding plagiarism were reviewed. Students completed a preintervention assessment immediately prior to the session and a postintervention assessment the following semester to measure their ability. Results. Two hundred fifty-two students completed both preintervention and postintervention assessments. There was a 4% increase from preintervention to postintervention in assessment scores for the overall student sample (pplagiarism can significantly improve students’ ability to identify plagiarism. PMID:24672066

  18. Pharmacy students' ability to identify plagiarism after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeeter, Michelle; Harris, Kira; Kehr, Heather; Ford, Carolyn; Lane, Daniel C; Nuzum, Donald S; Compton, Cynthia; Gibson, Whitney

    2014-03-12

    Objective. To determine if an educational intervention in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program increases pharmacy students' ability to identify plagiarism. Methods. First-year (P1), second-year (P2), and third-year (P3) pharmacy students attended an education session during which types of plagiarism and methods for avoiding plagiarism were reviewed. Students completed a preintervention assessment immediately prior to the session and a postintervention assessment the following semester to measure their ability. Results. Two hundred fifty-two students completed both preintervention and postintervention assessments. There was a 4% increase from preintervention to postintervention in assessment scores for the overall student sample (pplagiarism can significantly improve students' ability to identify plagiarism.

  19. Writing a research paper at the university: authorship vs plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Alves

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p77 Considering the need of producing academic texts at the university, many undergraduate students do it by copying texts that were already published. In this study we discuss the presence of plagiarism versus authorship marks in the introduction of academic articles produced by freshmen in a licenciateship degree. Therefore, we emphasize the issue of plagiarism and authorship, particularly from the perspective of the enunciative bakhtinian studies and then present the theoretical basis of Literacies, with the most recent studies on Literacies and Socio-Rhetorics. Data analysis revealed and confirmed the academic writing as a complex activity, given the practice of plagiarism found in the analyzed productions. The lack of knowledge of academic writing together not the theme domain contributed to the practice of plagiarism.

  20. Combating plagiarism: the role of the health librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Hannah; Adams, Rachel

    2013-12-01

    This feature looks at the issue of plagiarism in health care students and the role of the health librarian in combating the problem. In particular, consideration is given to how plagiarism can occur and provides some examples from two UK universities of approaches health librarians can take in supporting students to avoid these common pitfalls. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  1. Iranian academia: evolution after revolution and plagiarism as a disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazinoory, Sepehr; Ghazinoori, Soroush; Azadegan-Mehr, Mandana

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a few of scientific journals raise serious questions about scientific ethics and moral judgment of some of the Iranian government's senior executives in their papers. Plagiarism, under any circumstances is not justified, and we do not intend to justify it in this note. However, we find it useful in understanding why otherwise respected, responsible individuals may engage in plagiarism by terse review of the history Iranian academia.

  2. Screening for self-plagiarism in a subspecialty-versus-general imaging journal using iThenticate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnins, A U; Halm, K; Castillo, M

    2015-06-01

    Self-plagiarism is a form of research misconduct that can dilute the credibility and reputation of a scientific journal, as well as the represented specialty. Journal editors are aware of this problem when reviewing submissions and use on-line plagiarism-analysis programs to facilitate detection. The American Journal of Neuroradiology (AJNR) uses iThenticate to screen several submitted original research manuscripts selected for review per issue and retrospectively assesses 3 issues per year. The prevalence of self-plagiarism in AJNR was compared with that in Radiology; the necessity and cost of more extensive screening in AJNR were evaluated. The self-duplication rate in AJNR original research articles was compared with that in Radiology, a general imaging journal that screens all submitted original research manuscripts selected for review by using iThenticate. The rate of self-duplication in original research articles from 2 randomly selected 2012 AJNR issues was compared with the rate in the prior year to gauge the need for more extensive screening. A cost analysis of screening all submitted original research manuscripts selected for review by using iThenticate was performed. Using an empiric 15% single-source duplication threshold, we found that the rate of significant self-plagiarism in original research articles was low for both journals. While AJNR had more articles exceeding this threshold, most instances were insignificant. Analyzing 2 randomly chosen issues of AJNR for single-source duplication of >15% in original research articles yielded no significant differences compared with an entire year. The approximate annual cost of screening all submitted original research manuscripts selected for review was US $6800.00. While the rate of self-plagiarism was low in AJNR and similar to that in Radiology, its potential cost in negative impact on AJNR and the subspecialty of neuroradiology justifies the costs of broader screening. © 2015 by American Journal of

  3. Plagiarism governance in nurse education; dispositions, dimensions and tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Marion

    2017-11-01

    The reality of managing plagiarism in nurse education is indicative of multilayered and cumulative governance processes, which exist to fit with the needs of both the higher education institution and that of the Professional Statutory and Regulatory Body. However, the relationship between these entities is diffuse, particularly when this involves major plagiarism by post-qualified learners. This study sought to explore the strategic governance of plagiarism in Scottish higher education institutions offering nurse education and its articulation with the professional requirements of nurse education. The design involved a retrospective quantitative documentary analysis of plagiarism policies within 11 Scottish higher education institutions and a national on-line survey involving nurse educators with an active teaching role (n = 187). The documentary analysis demonstrated deficits and variations in how Scottish higher education institutions communicated the dimensions of plagiarism, and its subsequent management. Statistically significant findings from the on-line survey provided a clear mandate for educational providers to make visible the connectivity between organisational and professional governance processes to support responsive and proportional approaches to managing plagiarism by nurse learners. Significant findings also confirmed role implications and responsibilities, which nurse educators in this study, viewed as primarily pedagogical but crucially remain professionally centric. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Construction and validation of attitudes toward plagiarism questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrinac, Martina; Brumini, Gordana; Bilić-Zulle, Lidija; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2010-06-01

    To develop and test the psychometric characteristics of a questionnaire measuring attitudes toward plagiarism. Participants were 227 undergraduates and graduate students (128 women and 99 men) from three Croatian universities, with a median age of 21 years (range 18 to 48). Research was conducted from March to June 2009. For the purpose of construction of the first version of the questionnaire, 67 statements (items) were developed. The statements were based on the relevant literature and were developed following rules and recommendations for questionnaire writing, and 36 items were chosen for final validation. Factor analysis was used to find out the factor structure of the questionnaire and to measure construct validity. The final version of the questionnaire consisted of 29 items divided into a three-factor structure: factor I - positive attitude toward plagiarism (12 items); factor II - negative attitude toward plagiarism (7 items); and factor III - subjective norms toward plagiarism (10 items). Cronbach alpha was calculated to confirm the reliability of the scale: factor I - alpha=0.83; factor II - alpha=0.79; and factor III - alpha=0.85. Correlations between factors were: -0.37 between I and II, -0.41 between I and III, and +0.31 between II and III. Attitudes Toward Plagiarism questionnaire was developed, with good psychometric characteristics. It will be used in future research as a standardized tool for measuring attitudes toward plagiarism.

  5. Performance Measures of Diagnostic Codes for Detecting Opioid Overdose in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher; Vittinghoff, Eric; Santos, Glenn-Milo; Behar, Emily; Turner, Caitlin; Coffin, Phillip O

    2017-04-01

    Opioid overdose mortality has tripled in the United States since 2000 and opioids are responsible for more than half of all drug overdose deaths, which reached an all-time high in 2014. Opioid overdoses resulting in death, however, represent only a small fraction of all opioid overdose events and efforts to improve surveillance of this public health problem should include tracking nonfatal overdose events. International Classification of Disease (ICD) diagnosis codes, increasingly used for the surveillance of nonfatal drug overdose events, have not been rigorously assessed for validity in capturing overdose events. The present study aimed to validate the use of ICD, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes in identifying opioid overdose events in the emergency department (ED) by examining multiple performance measures, including sensitivity and specificity. Data on ED visits from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2014, including clinical determination of whether the visit constituted an opioid overdose event, were abstracted from electronic medical records for patients prescribed long-term opioids for pain from any of six safety net primary care clinics in San Francisco, California. Combinations of ICD-9-CM codes were validated in the detection of overdose events as determined by medical chart review. Both sensitivity and specificity of different combinations of ICD-9-CM codes were calculated. Unadjusted logistic regression models with robust standard errors and accounting for clustering by patient were used to explore whether overdose ED visits with certain characteristics were more or less likely to be assigned an opioid poisoning ICD-9-CM code by the documenting physician. Forty-four (1.4%) of 3,203 ED visits among 804 patients were determined to be opioid overdose events. Opioid-poisoning ICD-9-CM codes (E850.2-E850.2, 965.00-965.09) identified overdose ED visits with a sensitivity of 25.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 13.6% to 37.8%) and

  6. Development and using computer codes for improvement of defect assembly detection on Russian WWER NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, V.; Evdokimov, I.; Zborovskii, V.; Kanukova, V.; Sorokin, A.; Taran, M.; Ugrumov, A.; Riabinin, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic methods of fuel failure detection for improving the radiation safety and shortening of fuel reload time at Russian WWERs are currently in development . The works include creation new computer means for increase of effectiveness of fuel monitoring and reliability of leakage tests. Reliability of failure detection can be noticeably improved when we apply an integrated approach including the following methods. The first is fuel failure analysis under operating conditions. Analysis is performed with the pilot version of the expert system, which has been developed on the basis of the mechanistic code RTOP-CA. The second stage of failure monitoring is 'sipping' tests in the mast of the refueling machine. The leakage tests are the final stage of failure monitoring. A new technique with pressure cycling in the specialized casks was introduced to meet the requirements of higher reliability in detection/confirmation of the leakages. Measurements of the activity release kinetics during the pressure cycling and handling of the acquired data with the RTOP-LT code enable to evaluate a defect size in leaking fuel assembly. The mechanistic codes RTOP-CA and RTOP-LT were verified on a base of specialized experimental data and currently the code were certified by Russian authorities Rostechnadzor. Now the pressure cycling method in the specialized casks has official status and is utilized at the all Russian WWER units. Some results of application of the integrated approach to fuel failure monitoring at several Russian NPPs with WWER units are reported in the present paper. Predictions of the current version of the expert system are compared with the results of the leakage tests and with the estimations of the defect size by the pressure cycling technique. Using the RTOP-CA code the level of activity is assessed for the following fuel campaign if the leaking fuel assembly was decided to be reloaded into the core. A project of the automated computer system on the basis of

  7. FAULT DETECTION AND LOCALIZATION IN MOTORCYCLES BASED ON THE CHAIN CODE OF PSEUDOSPECTRA AND ACOUSTIC SIGNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Anami

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vehicles produce sound signals with varying temporal and spectral properties under different working conditions. These sounds are indicative of the condition of the engine. Fault diagnosis is a significantly difficult task in geographically remote places where expertise is scarce. Automated fault diagnosis can assist riders to assess the health condition of their vehicles. This paper presents a method for fault detection and location in motorcycles based on the chain code of the pseudospectra and Mel-frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC features of acoustic signals. The work comprises two stages: fault detection and fault location. The fault detection stage uses the chain code of the pseudospectrum as a feature vector. If the motorcycle is identified as faulty, the MFCCs of the same sample are computed and used as features for fault location. Both stages employ dynamic time warping for the classification of faults. Five types of faults in motorcycles are considered in this work. Observed classification rates are over 90% for the fault detection stage and over 94% for the fault location stage. The work identifies other interesting applications in the development of acoustic fingerprints for fault diagnosis of machinery, tuning of musical instruments, medical diagnosis, etc.

  8. Technical justification for ASME code section xi crack detection by visual examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickell, R.E.; Rashid, Y.R.

    2001-01-01

    A critical technical element of nuclear power plant license renewal in the United States is the demonstration that the effects of aging do not compromise the intended safety function(s) of a system, structure, or component during the extended term of operation. The demonstration may take either of two forms. First, it can be shown that the design basis for the system, structure, or component is sufficiently robust that the aging effects have been insignificant through the current license term, and will continue to be insignificant through the extended term. Alternatively, it can be shown that, while the aging effects may be potentially significant, those effects can be managed and functionality maintained by defined programmatic activities during the extended term of operation. The first of the two approaches is generally provided by the construction basis, such as construction in accordance with the ASME Code Section III and other consensus codes and standards. The second of the two approaches is often provided by periodic inservice inspection and testing, in accordance with the ASME Code Section XI. The purpose of the ASME Section XI inspections and tests is to assure that systems, components, and structures are fit for continued service until the next scheduled inspection or test. The purpose of this paper is to document the effectiveness of the current ASME Code Section XI visual examination procedures in detecting the effects of aging for systems, structures, and components that are tolerant of mature cracks. (author)

  9. Importance sampling implemented in the code PRIZMA for deep penetration and detection problems in reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandiev, Y.Z.; Zatsepin, O.V.

    2013-01-01

    At RFNC-VNIITF, the PRIZMA code which has been developed for more than 30 years, is used to model radiation transport by the Monte Carlo method. The code implements individual and coupled tracking of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons and ions in one dimensional (1D), 2D or 3D geometry. Attendance estimators are used for tallying, i.e., the estimators whose scores are only nonzero from particles which cross a region or surface of interest. Importance sampling is used to make deep penetration and detection calculations more effective. However, its application to reactor analysis appeared peculiar and required further development. The paper reviews methods used for deep penetration and detection calculations by PRIZMA. It describes in what these calculations differ when applied to reactor analysis and how we compute approximated importance functions and parameters for biased distributions. Methods to control the statistical weight of particles are also discussed. A number of test and applied calculations which were done for the purpose of verification are provided. They are shown to agree either with asymptotic solutions if exist, or with results of analog calculations or predictions by other codes. The applied calculations include the estimation of ex-core detector response from neutron sources arranged in the core, and the estimation of in-core detector response. (authors)

  10. The Plagiarism in the Theses of English Education Students at Kabupaten Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizkariani Sulaiman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this study is “Plagiarism in the Theses of English Education Students: Forms and Causes. In this study, the researcher limits the discussion by the following research questions: “what are the forms of students’ plagiarism in theses? and what are the causes that make students engage in the plagiarism?”. The objective of the study is specifically to know the forms of students’ plagiarism in theses; and to know the causes that make students engage in the plagiarism. In order to achieve the objective of this study, the researcher applied descriptive quantitative research. The population of this study was the theses of English education students that were submitted in 2011 and lecturers from two colleges. As instrument of the research, plagiarism forms according to government rule No. 17, 2010 and duplichecker application used to investigate the first research question; and questionnaire used to investigate the second research question. The result of the study revealed that plagiarism type 1 was the dominant type occurred in students theses, followed by plagiarism type 2, 3 and 4; chapter 1 and 2 of most of the theses are the most frequent place for plagiarism types occurred; another type of plagiarism found was chained plagiarism; and the causes of students engage in plagiarism can be divided into four main causes: a lack of knowledge in referencing and quoting; b limited access of literature; c attitude; and d plagiarism is not managed yet administratively. In line with the result, the researcher suggests that plagiarism in colleges should be familiarized, socialized and actively founded; the students also should enrich the knowledge of referencing and paraphrasing; and colleges should try to organize the standard rule clearly and firmly and introduce plagiarism detectors to reduce the plagiarism action.

  11. Detecting anomalies in crowded scenes via locality-constrained affine subspace coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yaxiang; Wen, Gongjian; Qiu, Shaohua; Li, Deren

    2017-07-01

    Video anomaly event detection is the process of finding an abnormal event deviation compared with the majority of normal or usual events. The main challenges are the high structure redundancy and the dynamic changes in the scenes that are in surveillance videos. To address these problems, we present a framework for anomaly detection and localization in videos that is based on locality-constrained affine subspace coding (LASC) and a model updating procedure. In our algorithm, LASC attempts to reconstruct the test sample by its top-k nearest subspaces, which are obtained by segmenting the normal samples space using a clustering method. A sample with a large reconstruction cost is detected as abnormal by setting a threshold. To adapt to the scene changes over time, a model updating strategy is proposed. We experiment on two public datasets: the UCSD dataset and the Avenue dataset. The results demonstrate that our method achieves competitive performance at a 700 fps on a single desktop PC.

  12. Angular resolution study of a combined gamma-neutron coded aperture imager for standoff detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen; Hayward, Jason P.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Fabris, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear threat source observables at standoff distances of tens of meters from mCi class sources include both gamma-rays and neutrons. This work uses simulations to investigate the effects of the angular resolution of a mobile gamma-ray and neutron coded aperture imaging system upon orphan source detection significance and specificity. The design requires maintaining high sensitivity and specificity while keeping the system size as compact as possible to reduce weight, footprint, and cost. A mixture of inorganic and organic scintillators was considered in the detector plane for high sensitivity to both gamma-rays and fast neutrons. For gamma-rays (100 to 2500 keV) and fission spectrum neutrons, angular resolutions of 1–9° and radiation angles of incidence appropriate for mobile search were evaluated. Detection significance for gamma-rays considers those events that contribute to the photopeak of the image pixel corresponding the orphan source location. For detection of fission spectrum neutrons, energy depositions above a set pulse shape discrimination threshold were tallied. The results show that the expected detection significance for the system at an angular resolution of 1° is significantly lower compared to its detection significance an angular resolution of ∼3–4°. An angular resolution of ∼3–4° is recommended both for better detection significance and improved false alarm rate, considering that finer angular resolution does not result in improved background rejection when the coded aperture method is used. Instead, over-pixelating the search space may result in an unacceptably high false alarm rate

  13. Publication misconduct and plagiarism retractions: a systematic, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stretton, Serina; Bramich, Narelle J; Keys, Janelle R; Monk, Julie A; Ely, Julie A; Haley, Cassandra; Woolley, Mark J; Woolley, Karen L

    2012-10-01

    To investigate whether plagiarism is more prevalent in publications retracted from the medical literature when first authors are affiliated with lower-income countries versus higher-income countries. Secondary objectives included investigating other factors associated with plagiarism (e.g., national language of the first author's country affiliation, publication type, journal ranking). Systematic, controlled, retrospective, bibliometric study. Retracted publications dataset in MEDLINE (search filters: English, human, January 1966-February 2008). Retracted misconduct publications were classified according to the first author's country affiliation, country income level, and country national language, publication type, and ranking of the publishing journal. Standardised definitions and data collection tools were used; data were analysed (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence limits [CL], chi-squared tests) by an independent academic statistician. Of the 213 retracted misconduct publications, 41.8% (89/213) were retracted for plagiarism, 52.1% (111/213) for falsification/fabrication, 2.3% (5/213) for author disputes, 2.3% (5/213) for ethical issues, and 1.4% (3/213) for unknown reasons. The OR (95% CL) of plagiarism retractions (other misconduct retractions as reference) were higher (P 1 retraction) with publications retracted for plagiarism (11.5%, 9/78) than other types of misconduct (28.9%, 24/83). This is the first study to demonstrate that publications retracted for plagiarism are significantly associated with first authors affiliated with lower-income countries. These findings have implications for developing appropriate evidence-based strategies and allocation of resources to help mitigate plagiarism misconduct.

  14. Scientists Admitting to Plagiarism: A Meta-analysis of Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupovac, Vanja; Fanelli, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of anonymous surveys asking scientists whether they ever committed various forms of plagiarism. From May to December 2011 we searched 35 bibliographic databases, five grey literature databases and hand searched nine journals for potentially relevant studies. We included surveys that asked scientists if, in a given recall period, they had committed or knew of a colleague who committed plagiarism, and from each survey extracted the proportion of those who reported at least one case. Studies that focused on academic (i.e. student) plagiarism were excluded. Literature searches returned 12,460 titles from which 17 relevant survey studies were identified. Meta-analysis of studies reporting committed (N = 7) and witnessed (N = 11) plagiarism yielded a pooled estimate of, respectively, 1.7% (95% CI 1.2-2.4) and 30% (95% CI 17-46). Basic methodological factors, including sample size, year of survey, delivery method and whether survey questions were explicit rather than indirect made a significant difference on survey results. Even after controlling for these methodological factors, between-study differences in admission rates were significantly above those expected by sampling error alone and remained largely unexplained. Despite several limitations of the data and of this meta-analysis, we draw three robust conclusions: (1) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is higher than for data fabrication and falsification; (2) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is correlated to that of fabrication and falsification; (3) The rate at which scientists admit having committed either form of misconduct (i.e. fabrication, falsification and plagiarism) in surveys has declined over time.

  15. "It's Not Fair": Policy Discourses and Students' Understandings of Plagiarism in a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Lee; Anderson, Vivienne; Spronken-Smith, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Plagiarism is a concept that is difficult to define. Although most higher education institutions have policies aimed at minimising and addressing student plagiarism, little research has examined the ways in which plagiarism is discursively constructed in university policy documents, or the connections and disconnections between institutional and…

  16. Is It Happening? How to Avoid the Deleterious Effects of Plagiarism and Cheating in Your Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be "plaguing" if it is not discussed, understood, and enforced by the professor right at the beginning of the course and throughout the semester. Students usually don't "have" to cheat or plagiarize; they do so mainly because "they can." Professors who turn a deaf ear or a blind eye to students who plagiarize create deleterious…

  17. First-Year University Science and Engineering Students' Understanding of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a case study of first-year science and engineering students' understandings of plagiarism. Students were surveyed for their views on scenarios illustrating instances of plagiarism in the context of the academic work and assessment of science and engineering students. The aim was to explore their understandings of plagiarism and their…

  18. The Effect of Enrollment Status on Plagiarism among Traditional and Non-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that plagiarism in higher education exists. Most of the previous research had measured the number of incidents of plagiarism at different institutions of higher learning. Recently, research has tried to identify incidents of plagiarism in relation to student demographics or academic discipline. With the…

  19. Placing the Library at the Heart of Plagiarism Prevention: The University of Bradford Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah; Costigan, Anne; O'hara, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Plagiarism is a vexing issue for Higher Education, affecting student transition, retention, and attainment. This article reports on two initiatives from the University of Bradford library aimed at reducing student plagiarism. The first initiative is an intensive course for students who have contravened plagiarism regulations. The second course…

  20. An Integrated Academic Literacy Approach to Improving Students' Understanding of Plagiarism in an Accounting Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Lisa; Singh, Nishani

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism in higher education is a widespread and complex issue. Students' understanding of plagiarism differs as a result of combining their prior learning about referencing with their current experience of institutional policies and generic resources. Plagiarism was identified as a major learning issue in a core second-year undergraduate…

  1. A Safe Place: The Role of Librarians and Writing Centers in Addressing Citation Practices and Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    In American colleges and universities, plagiarism is a hot topic: teachers wail and moan about the rise in student plagiarism (though often without evidence to demonstrate this supposed rise); they complain that the Web has "caused" plagiarism; and at the same time, many believe that technology is the key to "solving" the problem of student…

  2. The Use of Technology to Combat Plagiarism in Business Communication Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Robert H.; Hummel, Julie Y.

    2011-01-01

    Some have called plagiarism literary theft. Plagiarizing is akin to stealing the intellect of another person. At times, plagiarism occurs because of ignorance, sloppy authorship, or lack of knowledge about proper sourcing. Sometimes, it is done purposefully. Experts have suggested that the concept of intellectual ownership is limited to Western…

  3. Technical and Non-Technical Programme Students' Attitudes and Reasons for Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harji, Madhubala Bava; Ismail, Zalina; Chetty, Thiba Naraina; Letchumanan, Krishnaveni

    2017-01-01

    To date, plagiarism continues to be a widespread problem in higher education. Deemed to be endemic, researchers continue to examine various aspects of plagiarism, including students' perception, practices, attitudes and reasons for plagiarism, in addressing this growing concern. Most studies, however, tend to examine these aspects independently.…

  4. Is Cheating Always Intentional? The Perception of College Students toward the Issues of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    The definition of plagiarism that is used in university handbooks is a simple one, and policies along with tiers of disciplinary strategies are used by faculty members in higher education to deter students from committing a plagiarism infraction based on this simple definition. However, plagiarism still occurs on college campuses, and this may be…

  5. Plagiarism Awareness among Students: Assessing Integration of Ethics Theory into Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strittmatter, Connie; Bratton, Virginia K.

    2014-01-01

    The library literature on plagiarism instruction focuses on students' understanding of what plagiarism is and is not. This study evaluates the effect of library instruction from a broader perspective by examining the pre- and posttest (instruction) levels of students' perceptions toward plagiarism ethics. Eighty-six students completed a pre- and…

  6. PMD compensation in multilevel coded-modulation schemes with coherent detection using BLAST algorithm and iterative polarization cancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B; Xu, Lei; Wang, Ting

    2008-09-15

    We present two PMD compensation schemes suitable for use in multilevel (M>or=2) block-coded modulation schemes with coherent detection. The first scheme is based on a BLAST-type polarization-interference cancellation scheme, and the second scheme is based on iterative polarization cancellation. Both schemes use the LDPC codes as channel codes. The proposed PMD compensations schemes are evaluated by employing coded-OFDM and coherent detection. When used in combination with girth-10 LDPC codes those schemes outperform polarization-time coding based OFDM by 1 dB at BER of 10(-9), and provide two times higher spectral efficiency. The proposed schemes perform comparable and are able to compensate even 1200 ps of differential group delay with negligible penalty.

  7. Supersensitive detection and discrimination of enantiomers by dorsal olfactory receptors: evidence for hierarchical odour coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko; Emura, Makoto; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Kizumi, Miwako; Hamana, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Akio; Hirono, Junzo

    2015-09-11

    Enantiomeric pairs of mirror-image molecular structures are difficult to resolve by instrumental analyses. The human olfactory system, however, discriminates (-)-wine lactone from its (+)-form rapidly within seconds. To gain insight into receptor coding of enantiomers, we compared behavioural detection and discrimination thresholds of wild-type mice with those of ΔD mice in which all dorsal olfactory receptors are genetically ablated. Surprisingly, wild-type mice displayed an exquisite "supersensitivity" to enantiomeric pairs of wine lactones and carvones. They were capable of supersensitive discrimination of enantiomers, consistent with their high detection sensitivity. In contrast, ΔD mice showed selective major loss of sensitivity to the (+)-enantiomers. The resulting 10(8)-fold differential sensitivity of ΔD mice to (-)- vs. (+)-wine lactone matched that observed in humans. This suggests that humans lack highly sensitive orthologous dorsal receptors for the (+)-enantiomer, similarly to ΔD mice. Moreover, ΔD mice showed >10(10)-fold reductions in enantiomer discrimination sensitivity compared to wild-type mice. ΔD mice detected one or both of the (-)- and (+)-enantiomers over a wide concentration range, but were unable to discriminate them. This "enantiomer odour discrimination paradox" indicates that the most sensitive dorsal receptors play a critical role in hierarchical odour coding for enantiomer identification.

  8. Ethical conduct for research : a code of scientific ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcia Patton-Mallory; Kathleen Franzreb; Charles Carll; Richard Cline

    2000-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service recently developed and adopted a code of ethical conduct for scientific research and development. The code addresses issues related to research misconduct, such as fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research or in reporting research results, as well as issues related to professional misconduct, such...

  9. Non-coding RNA detection methods combined to improve usability, reproducibility and precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreikemeyer Bernd

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs gain more attention as their diverse roles in many cellular processes are discovered. At the same time, the need for efficient computational prediction of ncRNAs increases with the pace of sequencing technology. Existing tools are based on various approaches and techniques, but none of them provides a reliable ncRNA detector yet. Consequently, a natural approach is to combine existing tools. Due to a lack of standard input and output formats combination and comparison of existing tools is difficult. Also, for genomic scans they often need to be incorporated in detection workflows using custom scripts, which decreases transparency and reproducibility. Results We developed a Java-based framework to integrate existing tools and methods for ncRNA detection. This framework enables users to construct transparent detection workflows and to combine and compare different methods efficiently. We demonstrate the effectiveness of combining detection methods in case studies with the small genomes of Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Streptococcus pyogenes. With the combined method, we gained 10% to 20% precision for sensitivities from 30% to 80%. Further, we investigated Streptococcus pyogenes for novel ncRNAs. Using multiple methods--integrated by our framework--we determined four highly probable candidates. We verified all four candidates experimentally using RT-PCR. Conclusions We have created an extensible framework for practical, transparent and reproducible combination and comparison of ncRNA detection methods. We have proven the effectiveness of this approach in tests and by guiding experiments to find new ncRNAs. The software is freely available under the GNU General Public License (GPL, version 3 at http://www.sbi.uni-rostock.de/moses along with source code, screen shots, examples and tutorial material.

  10. Auditory detection of ultrasonic coded transmitters by seals and sea lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kane A; Hayes, Sean A; Michelle Wargo Rub, A; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasonic coded transmitters (UCTs) are high-frequency acoustic tags that are often used to conduct survivorship studies of vulnerable fish species. Recent observations of differential mortality in tag control studies suggest that fish instrumented with UCTs may be selectively targeted by marine mammal predators, thereby skewing valuable survivorship data. In order to better understand the ability of pinnipeds to detect UCT outputs, behavioral high-frequency hearing thresholds were obtained from a trained harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and a trained California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Thresholds were measured for extended (500 ms) and brief (10 ms) 69 kHz narrowband stimuli, as well as for a stimulus recorded directly from a Vemco V16-3H UCT, which consisted of eight 10 ms, 69 kHz pure-tone pulses. Detection thresholds for the harbor seal were as expected based on existing audiometric data for this species, while the California sea lion was much more sensitive than predicted. Given measured detection thresholds of 113 dB re 1 μPa and 124 dB re 1 μPa, respectively, both species are likely able to detect acoustic outputs of the Vemco V16-3H under water from distances exceeding 200 m in typical natural conditions, suggesting that these species are capable of using UCTs to detect free-ranging fish.

  11. Two-stage sparse coding of region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels to detect saliency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Cai; Zhang, Ping

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel bottom-up saliency detection algorithm from the perspective of covariance matrices on a Riemannian manifold. Each superpixel is described by a region covariance matrix on Riemannian Manifolds. We carry out a two-stage sparse coding scheme via Log-Euclidean kernels to extract salient objects efficiently. In the first stage, given background dictionary on image borders, sparse coding of each region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels is performed. The reconstruction error on the background dictionary is regarded as the initial saliency of each superpixel. In the second stage, an improvement of the initial result is achieved by calculating reconstruction errors of the superpixels on foreground dictionary, which is extracted from the first stage saliency map. The sparse coding in the second stage is similar to the first stage, but is able to effectively highlight the salient objects uniformly from the background. Finally, three post-processing methods-highlight-inhibition function, context-based saliency weighting, and the graph cut-are adopted to further refine the saliency map. Experiments on four public benchmark datasets show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and mean absolute error, and demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coded moderator approach for fast neutron source detection and localization at standoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littell, Jennifer [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, 305 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Lukosi, Eric, E-mail: elukosi@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, 305 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Institute for Nuclear Security, University of Tennessee, 1640 Cumberland Avenue, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Hayward, Jason; Milburn, Robert; Rowan, Allen [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, 305 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Considering the need for directional sensing at standoff for some security applications and scenarios where a neutron source may be shielded by high Z material that nearly eliminates the source gamma flux, this work focuses on investigating the feasibility of using thermal neutron sensitive boron straw detectors for fast neutron source detection and localization. We utilized MCNPX simulations to demonstrate that, through surrounding the boron straw detectors by a HDPE coded moderator, a source-detector orientation-specific response enables potential 1D source localization in a high neutron detection efficiency design. An initial test algorithm has been developed in order to confirm the viability of this detector system's localization capabilities which resulted in identification of a 1 MeV neutron source with a strength equivalent to 8 kg WGPu at 50 m standoff within ±11°.

  13. The Plagiarism in the Theses of English Education Students at Kabupaten Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Rizkariani Sulaiman

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this study is “Plagiarism in the Theses of English Education Students: Forms and Causes. In this study, the researcher limits the discussion by the following research questions: “what are the forms of students’ plagiarism in theses? and what are the causes that make students engage in the plagiarism?”. The objective of the study is specifically to know the forms of students’ plagiarism in theses; and to know the causes that make students engage in the plagiarism. In order to achi...

  14. An RNA-Seq strategy to detect the complete coding and non-coding transcriptome including full-length imprinted macro ncRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Huang

    Full Text Available Imprinted macro non-protein-coding (nc RNAs are cis-repressor transcripts that silence multiple genes in at least three imprinted gene clusters in the mouse genome. Similar macro or long ncRNAs are abundant in the mammalian genome. Here we present the full coding and non-coding transcriptome of two mouse tissues: differentiated ES cells and fetal head using an optimized RNA-Seq strategy. The data produced is highly reproducible in different sequencing locations and is able to detect the full length of imprinted macro ncRNAs such as Airn and Kcnq1ot1, whose length ranges between 80-118 kb. Transcripts show a more uniform read coverage when RNA is fragmented with RNA hydrolysis compared with cDNA fragmentation by shearing. Irrespective of the fragmentation method, all coding and non-coding transcripts longer than 8 kb show a gradual loss of sequencing tags towards the 3' end. Comparisons to published RNA-Seq datasets show that the strategy presented here is more efficient in detecting known functional imprinted macro ncRNAs and also indicate that standardization of RNA preparation protocols would increase the comparability of the transcriptome between different RNA-Seq datasets.

  15. LeARN: a platform for detecting, clustering and annotating non-coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiex Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last decade, sequencing projects have led to the development of a number of annotation systems dedicated to the structural and functional annotation of protein-coding genes. These annotation systems manage the annotation of the non-protein coding genes (ncRNAs in a very crude way, allowing neither the edition of the secondary structures nor the clustering of ncRNA genes into families which are crucial for appropriate annotation of these molecules. Results LeARN is a flexible software package which handles the complete process of ncRNA annotation by integrating the layers of automatic detection and human curation. Conclusion This software provides the infrastructure to deal properly with ncRNAs in the framework of any annotation project. It fills the gap between existing prediction software, that detect independent ncRNA occurrences, and public ncRNA repositories, that do not offer the flexibility and interactivity required for annotation projects. The software is freely available from the download section of the website http://bioinfo.genopole-toulouse.prd.fr/LeARN

  16. An intervention aimed at reducing plagiarism in undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Alison; Crawford, Tonia; Cloete, Linda

    2015-05-01

    Plagiarism is a current and developing problem in the tertiary education sector where students access information and reproduce it as their own. It is identified as occurring in many tertiary level degrees including nursing and allied health profession degrees. Nursing specifically, is a profession where standards and ethics are required and honesty is paramount. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in nursing student's knowledge and understanding of plagiarism before and after an educational intervention in their first semester of the Bachelor of nursing degree at a private college of higher education in Sydney, Australia. This study concluded that an educational intervention can increase knowledge and awareness of plagiarism among nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iterative MIMO Turbo Multiuser Detection and Equalization for STTrC-Coded Systems with Unknown Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinovic Nenad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Iterative multiuser detection in a single-carrier broadband multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO system is studied in this paper. A minimum mean squared error (MMSE low-complexity multiuser receiver is derived for space-division multiple-access (SDMA space-time trellis-coded (STTrC systems in frequency-selective fading channels. The receiver uses MMSE filtering to jointly detect several transmit antennas of the user of interest, while the interference from the undetected transmit antennas, cochannel interference (CCI, and intersymbol interference (ISI are all cancelled by the soft cancellation. The performances of two extreme receiver cases are evaluated. In the first case, only one transmit antenna of the user of interest is detected at a time and the remaining ones are cancelled by soft cancellation. In the second case, all the transmit antennas are detected jointly. The comparison of the two cases shows improvement with the latter one, both in single-user and multiuser communications and in the presence of unknown cochannel interference (UCCI. It is further shown that in the multiuser case, the proposed receivers approach the corresponding single-user bounds. The number of receive antenna elements required to achieve single-user bound is thereby equal to the number of users and not to the total number of transmit antennas.

  18. Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Statement on Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Shellie L; Iserson, Kenneth V; Merck, Lisa H

    2017-10-01

    The integrity of the research enterprise is of the utmost importance for the advancement of safe and effective medical practice for patients and for maintaining the public trust in health care. Academic societies and editors of journals are key participants in guarding scientific integrity. Avoiding and preventing plagiarism helps to preserve the scientific integrity of professional presentations and publications. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Ethics Committee discusses current issues in scientific publishing integrity and provides a guideline to avoid plagiarism in SAEM presentations and publications. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. Cooperative multi-user detection and ranging based on pseudo-random codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Morhart

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an improved approach for a Round Trip Time of Flight distance measurement system. The system is intended for the usage in a cooperative localisation system for automotive applications. Therefore, it is designed to address a large number of communication partners per measurement cycle. By using coded signals in a time divison multiple access order, we can detect a large number of pedestrian sensors with just one car sensor. We achieve this by using very short transmit bursts in combination with a real time correlation algorithm. Futhermore, the correlation approach offers real time data, concerning the time of arrival, that can serve as a trigger impulse for other comunication systems. The distance accuracy of the correlation result was further increased by adding a fourier interpolation filter. The system performance was checked with a prototype at 2.4 GHz. We reached a distance measurement accuracy of 12 cm at a range up to 450 m.

  20. Simulation for photon detection in spectrometric system of high purity (HPGe) using MCNPX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Guilherme Jorge de Souza

    2013-01-01

    The Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy defines parameters for classification and management of radioactive waste in accordance with the activity of materials. The efficiency of a detection system is crucial to determine the real activity of a radioactive source. When it's possible, the system's calibration should be performed using a standard source. Unfortunately, there are only a few cases that it can be done this way, considering the difficulty of obtaining appropriate standard sources for each type of measurement. So, computer simulations can be performed to assist in calculating of the efficiency of the system and, consequently, also auxiliary the classification of radioactive waste. This study aims to model a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector with MCNPX code, approaching the spectral values computationally obtained of the values experimentally obtained for the photopeak of 137 Cs. The approach will be made through changes in outer dead layer of the germanium crystal modeled. (author)

  1. PCR-free quantitative detection of genetically modified organism from raw materials. An electrochemiluminescence-based bio bar code method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Debin; Tang, Yabing; Xing, Da; Chen, Wei R

    2008-05-15

    A bio bar code assay based on oligonucleotide-modified gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) provides a PCR-free method for quantitative detection of nucleic acid targets. However, the current bio bar code assay requires lengthy experimental procedures including the preparation and release of bar code DNA probes from the target-nanoparticle complex and immobilization and hybridization of the probes for quantification. Herein, we report a novel PCR-free electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based bio bar code assay for the quantitative detection of genetically modified organism (GMO) from raw materials. It consists of tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR)-labeled bar code DNA, nucleic acid hybridization using Au-NPs and biotin-labeled probes, and selective capture of the hybridization complex by streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads. The detection of target DNA is realized by direct measurement of ECL emission of TBR. It can quantitatively detect target nucleic acids with high speed and sensitivity. This method can be used to quantitatively detect GMO fragments from real GMO products.

  2. On academic plagiarism in Europe. An analytical approach based on four studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Pupovac

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available With the development of information and communication technology (ICT, plagiarism becomes an ever more serious problem in the academic community. According to the studies on academic plagiarism conducted at universities in four different European countries, plagiarism rates among students are quite high and students mostly ignore or allow plagiarism because of a lack of knowledge, lack of consequences, or simply because ICT makes plagiarism easy to commit. The findings of the studies presented in this paper indicate that strict policies against plagiarism need to be introduced at universities. We believe that the problem of plagiarism should be brought to public attention and discussed at a higher level and that effective measures against plagiarism should be implemented. Prevalence of plagiarism among students and their attitudes towards plagiarism are influenced by cultural environment as well as the academic setting. In multicultural communities, such as the European community, it is necessary to investigate and compare academic behaviour in different countries in order to establish equivalent standards in education across Europe.

  3. Decoding of DBEC-TBED Reed-Solomon codes. [Double-Byte-Error-Correcting, Triple-Byte-Error-Detecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Robert H.; Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A problem in designing semiconductor memories is to provide some measure of error control without requiring excessive coding overhead or decoding time. In LSI and VLSI technology, memories are often organized on a multiple bit (or byte) per chip basis. For example, some 256 K bit DRAM's are organized in 32 K x 8 bit-bytes. Byte-oriented codes such as Reed-Solomon (RS) codes can provide efficient low overhead error control for such memories. However, the standard iterative algorithm for decoding RS codes is too slow for these applications. The paper presents a special decoding technique for double-byte-error-correcting, triple-byte-error-detecting RS codes which is capable of high-speed operation. This technique is designed to find the error locations and the error values directly from the syndrome without having to use the iterative algorithm to find the error locator polynomial.

  4. A Reflection on Plagiarism, Patchwriting, and the Engineering Master's Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Early in his career as an engineering librarian, the author saw plagiarism in completely black and white terms. However, digging into the scholarly literature, he finds ample evidence that there are other factors at work in student writing besides a lack of ethics or the intent to cheat. In this article, he briefly highlights some of these…

  5. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  6. EDITORIAL Plagiarism - time to strike at the epidemic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Plagiarism - time to strike at the epidemic. Lukman Yusuf1, Abraham Aseffa2. We live in a globalized world where information is instantly shared across continents. The number of biomedical journals available for reference is quite enormous and there is a sudden huge surge of free open access journals in the last few years ...

  7. Plagiarism: Misconduct Awareness on Novice Research within the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More often than not, there exists some form of infringement relating to the use of other authors' work. This is particularly so in instances in which novice authors make use of the information available within the cyber-digital environment. The article explains the meaning of plagiarism and describes the many manifestations ...

  8. Lessons on Plagiarism: Issues for Teachers and Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Regina

    2004-01-01

    While student difficulty with academic referencing is not new, it is apparent that many tertiary students are not skilled in following referencing conventions, are confused about what does and does not constitute plagiarism in the eyes of academics, and are fearful of the consequences. This paper begins by examining the cases of a number of…

  9. More Heat than Light: Plagiarism in Its Appearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Sue; Flint, Abbi

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues that the recent debate about plagiarism has taken on aspects of a moral panic, which reflects underlying anxieties about the state of higher education in the United Kingdom. In contrast to the moral absolutism of some commentators, we argue for the significance of posing the phenomenological question of "what is plagiarism…

  10. Strategies to Help Legal Studies Students Avoid Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Linda B.; Bast, Carol M.

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is certainly not new to academics, but it may be on the rise with easy access to the vast quantities of information available on the Internet. Students researching on the Internet do not have to take handwritten or typewritten notes. They can simply print out or copy and save whatever they find. They are even spared the tedium of having…

  11. Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism at Queensborough Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sara; Beck, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    The researchers surveyed English and Speech & Theater faculty members at Queensborough Community College on their perceptions of and attitudes toward plagiarism. The researchers used the Queensborough Community College Academic Integrity Policy as the basis for their analysis. Based on the responses received, it was determined that 50% of the…

  12. Ensuring Effective Student Support in Higher Education Alleged Plagiarism Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Craig; Dooey, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct are matters of great concern at all levels of study worldwide. This is especially so for students in higher education institutions, where higher degrees and publications are key focus activities. Ready access to internet based resources assist academic writing practices. However, the unintentional,…

  13. WHY MUSLIM STUDENTS PLAGIARIZE IN WRITING ENGLISH TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhid Nashruddin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reasons for copy-pasting someone else’s works has attracted attention from many sides that copy-pasting activities, or more popular with term plagiarism, have been considered as a threat for academic life. It also happens at the case of muslim students, in which Islam teaches the students to be honest and not to steal from others. For understanding why it happens, this exploration is conducted. The students of English Department of IAIN Syekh Nurjati Cirebon have to write many of their assignments in English. The result of my observations, the quality of the students’ writing is not good enough. One of the cases found is the copy-paste works, or plagiarism. Using interviews instrument, I try to figure out why students of English Department of IAIN Syekh Nurjati Cirebon. There are at least three reasons behind why students act plagiarism; ignorance on the quotation and citation rules, poor writing skills, and the need of instant writing result. This paper tries to explore these reasons. Keywords: copy-paste, plagiarism, writing in English

  14. Derivatives. Replication and (auto)plagiarism in the social sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tweehuysen (Rolandt ); J. den Haan (Joost); K. Berkhout (Karel ); P.A.G. van Bergeijk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis working paper reports on the travelling exhibition “Derivatives”. This exhibition investigates the issue of originality in the context of (self) plagiarism and replication. The different views in the Arts and the scientific discourse form the point of departure for discovering how

  15. Letter to the editor: Predatory Publishers and Plagiarism Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.A.; Forget, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    M. Balter (“Reviewer's Déjà Vu, French science sleuthing uncover plagiarized papers,” News & Analysis, 9 March, p. 1157) describes how a scientist recently published at least nine articles that largely or entirely duplicated papers written by others and was exposed only after we found one of our

  16. Loss, Responsibility, Blame? Staff Discourses of Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Lesley; Deane, Janis

    2012-01-01

    Student plagiarism and difficulties with writing have been widely investigated in the literature, but there has been less research on staff perspectives. A Joint Information Services Committee (JISC)-funded questionnaire (n = 80) and focus group study investigated the views of lecturers, librarians and study advisors at a UK post-92 university,…

  17. Assessing Domestic vs. International Student Perceptions and Attitudes of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Daniel Adrian; Henley, Russ; Gokaraju, Balakrishna; McElreath, David; Lackey, Hilliard; Hong, Qiuqi; Miller, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined students' perceptions of plagiarism from a higher education teaching institution within the U.S. southeast. This study employed a five-point Likert-scale to examine differences of perceptions between domestic versus international students. Statistically significant outcomes were observed regarding the notions that plagiarism…

  18. Awareness about Plagiarism amongst University Students in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Munir, Muhammad Asif; Siddique, Nadeem; Asif, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Research is an original and systematic investigation undertaken to discover new facts and information about a phenomenon. However a variety of empirical and ethical issues are on the rise in academia, especially plagiarism is quickly becoming part of global educational and research culture. More and more students and researchers are turning to the…

  19. Instance of plagiarism in Journal of Chemical Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Our own investigations reveal that the author has reproduced cyclic volt- ammograms and also some paragraphs verbatim from the earlier paper. The author was provided an opportunity to explain the alleged plagiarism and to submit copies of original polarograms he had recorded and laboratory notebooks to substantiate ...

  20. PanCoreGen - Profiling, detecting, annotating protein-coding genes in microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sandip; Bhardwaj, Archana; Bag, Sumit K; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Chattopadhyay, Sujay

    2015-12-01

    A large amount of genomic data, especially from multiple isolates of a single species, has opened new vistas for microbial genomics analysis. Analyzing the pan-genome (i.e. the sum of genetic repertoire) of microbial species is crucial in understanding the dynamics of molecular evolution, where virulence evolution is of major interest. Here we present PanCoreGen - a standalone application for pan- and core-genomic profiling of microbial protein-coding genes. PanCoreGen overcomes key limitations of the existing pan-genomic analysis tools, and develops an integrated annotation-structure for a species-specific pan-genomic profile. It provides important new features for annotating draft genomes/contigs and detecting unidentified genes in annotated genomes. It also generates user-defined group-specific datasets within the pan-genome. Interestingly, analyzing an example-set of Salmonella genomes, we detect potential footprints of adaptive convergence of horizontally transferred genes in two human-restricted pathogenic serovars - Typhi and Paratyphi A. Overall, PanCoreGen represents a state-of-the-art tool for microbial phylogenomics and pathogenomics study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PanCoreGen – profiling, detecting, annotating protein-coding genes in microbial genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Bag, Sumit K; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2015-01-01

    A large amount of genomic data, especially from multiple isolates of a single species, has opened new vistas for microbial genomics analysis. Analyzing pan-genome (i.e. the sum of genetic repertoire) of microbial species is crucial in understanding the dynamics of molecular evolution, where virulence evolution is of major interest. Here we present PanCoreGen – a standalone application for pan- and core-genomic profiling of microbial protein-coding genes. PanCoreGen overcomes key limitations of the existing pan-genomic analysis tools, and develops an integrated annotation-structure for species-specific pan-genomic profile. It provides important new features for annotating draft genomes/contigs and detecting unidentified genes in annotated genomes. It also generates user-defined group-specific datasets within the pan-genome. Interestingly, analyzing an example-set of Salmonella genomes, we detect potential footprints of adaptive convergence of horizontally transferred genes in two human-restricted pathogenic serovars – Typhi and Paratyphi A. Overall, PanCoreGen represents a state-of-the-art tool for microbial phylogenomics and pathogenomics study. PMID:26456591

  2. Strategies for Using Plagiarism Software in the Screening of Incoming Journal Manuscripts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several online tools have appeared capable of identifying potential plagiarism in science. While such tools may help to maintain or even increase the originality and ethical quality of the scientific literature, no apparent consensus exists among editors on the degree of plagiarism...... or self-plagiarism necessary to reject or retract manuscripts. In this study, two entire volumes of published original papers and reviews from Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology were retrospectively scanned for similarity in anonymized form using iThenticate software to explore measures...... to predictively identify true plagiarism and self-plagiarism and to potentially provide guidelines for future screening of incoming manuscripts. Several filters were applied, all of which appeared to lower the noise from irrelevant hits. The main conclusions were that plagiarism software offers a unique...

  3. Wishing away Plagiarism in Scientific Publications! Will it work? A situational analysis of Plagiarism policy of journals in PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Jyotindu; Cariappa, M P

    2018-04-01

    Plagiarism remains a scourge for the modern academia. There are inconsistencies in the plagiarism policy scientific journals. The aims of this study was to analyze types of published articles on 'Plagiarism' available on PubMed over last two decades against a backdrop of the plagiarism policy of the journals publishing such articles. A literature search on PubMed (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) was made using the search term "plagiarism" from 01 January 1997 till 29 March 17. All publications having 'plagiarism' in the title formed the study group. The following were noted: types of articles published, ethical and plagiarism policy of the journal as available in the Instructions to authors and or in the journal home page. A total of 582 publications from 320 journals were studied. Editorials (165, 28.3%) and Letters to the Editor (159, 27.3%) formed the bulk. Research articles (56, 9.6%), Review articles (51, 8.7%) and Commentaries (47, 8%) formed the remainder. Detailed ethical guidelines were present in 221 (69%). Outline ethical guidelines only were present in 15 (4.7%) journals. 49 (15.3%) journals did not have any ethical guidelines. Detailed description of the policy on plagiarism was found in 80 (25%) journals. Only an outline description was found in 29 (9%) journals while a plagiarism policy/statement was totally absent in 176 (55%) journals. There is a need to have a well defined plagiarism policy/statement for all scholarly journals easily visible on their home pages on the internet and also in their Instructions to Authors.

  4. Plagiarism for beginners: how do we communicate academic honesty with students?

    OpenAIRE

    Pejić Bach, Mirjana; Stojanovski, Jadranka

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Plagiarism can be considered one of the most important topics related to scientific work. Previous research has indicated that plagiarism occurs more often in countries with the lower level of scientific output measured in number of papers cited in top journals. These countries at the same time have in most of the cases longer tradition of scientific research [1]. Plagiarism, like any other fraud, can be fought in three manners [2]. First, educational actions can be implemented in o...

  5. Attitudes toward plagiarism among pharmacy and medical biochemistry students – cross-sectional survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Pupovac, Vanja; Bilic-Zulle, Lidija; Mavrinac, Martina; Petrovecki, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Plagiarism is one of the most frequent and serious forms of misconduct in academic environment. The cross-sectional survey study was done with aim to explore the attitudes toward plagiarism. Materials and methods: First year students of Faculty of Pharmacy and Medical Biochemistry, University of Zagreb, Croatia (N = 146) were anonymously tested using Attitude toward Plagiarism (ATP) questionnaire. The questionnaire is composed of 29 statements on a 5 point Likert scale, (1 - ...

  6. Digital plagiarism--the Web giveth and the Web shall taketh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, J M; Presti, D E

    2000-01-01

    Publishing students' and researchers' papers on the World Wide Web (WWW) facilitates the sharing of information within and between academic communities. However, the ease of copying and transporting digital information leaves these authors' ideas open to plagiarism. Using tools such as the Plagiarism.org database, which compares submissions to reports and papers available on the Internet, could discover instances of plagiarism, revolutionize the peer review process, and raise the quality of published research everywhere.

  7. Coherent spectral amplitude coded label detection for DQPSK payload signals in packet-switched metropolitan area networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Guerrero Gonzalez, Neil; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee

    2011-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of a frequency swept local oscillator-based spectral amplitude coding (SAC) label detection for DQPSK signals after 40km of fiber transmission. Label detection was performed for a 10.7Gbaud DQPSK signal labeled with a SAC label composed of four......-frequency tones with 500MHz spectral separation. Successful label detection and recognition is achieved with the aid of digital signal processing that allows for substantial reduction of the complexity of the detection optical front-end....

  8. Orion: Detecting regions of the human non-coding genome that are intolerant to variation using population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussow, Ayal B; Copeland, Brett R; Dhindsa, Ryan S; Wang, Quanli; Petrovski, Slavé; Majoros, William H; Allen, Andrew S; Goldstein, David B

    2017-01-01

    There is broad agreement that genetic mutations occurring outside of the protein-coding regions play a key role in human disease. Despite this consensus, we are not yet capable of discerning which portions of non-coding sequence are important in the context of human disease. Here, we present Orion, an approach that detects regions of the non-coding genome that are depleted of variation, suggesting that the regions are intolerant of mutations and subject to purifying selection in the human lineage. We show that Orion is highly correlated with known intolerant regions as well as regions that harbor putatively pathogenic variation. This approach provides a mechanism to identify pathogenic variation in the human non-coding genome and will have immediate utility in the diagnostic interpretation of patient genomes and in large case control studies using whole-genome sequences.

  9. Real-time detection of natural objects using AM-coded spectral matching imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimachi, Akira

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes application of the amplitude-modulation (AM)-coded spectral matching imager (SMI) to real-time detection of natural objects such as human beings, animals, vegetables, or geological objects or phenomena, which are much more liable to change with time than artificial products while often exhibiting characteristic spectral functions associated with some specific activity states. The AM-SMI produces correlation between spectral functions of the object and a reference at each pixel of the correlation image sensor (CIS) in every frame, based on orthogonal amplitude modulation (AM) of each spectral channel and simultaneous demodulation of all channels on the CIS. This principle makes the SMI suitable to monitoring dynamic behavior of natural objects in real-time by looking at a particular spectral reflectance or transmittance function. A twelve-channel multispectral light source was developed with improved spatial uniformity of spectral irradiance compared to a previous one. Experimental results of spectral matching imaging of human skin and vegetable leaves are demonstrated, as well as a preliminary feasibility test of imaging a reflective object using a test color chart.

  10. Plagiarism education and prevention a subject-driven case-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, Cara

    2011-01-01

    Academic librarians and university instructors worldwide are grappling with an increasing incidence of student plagiarism. Recent publications urge educators to prevent plagiarism by teaching students about the issue, and some have advocated the value of a subject-specific approach to plagiarism prevention education. There is, however, a complete lack of resources and guidance for librarians and instructors who want to adopt this approach in their teaching. This book opens with a brief overview of plagiarism today, followed by arguments in favour of a subject-based approach. The rest of the bo

  11. Perceptions of undergraduate pharmacy students on plagiarism in three major public universities in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Moataz Ehab; Mohy, Nagla; Salah, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    The survey aimed to capture the perceptions of undergraduate pharmacy students towards plagiarism in three major public universities in Cairo, Egypt: Helwan, Ain-Shams, and Cairo Universities. This was a paper-based self-administrated survey study. The questionnaire was validated by both content and face validation. The final survey form captured the knowledge of the students on plagiarism in terms of definitions, attitudes, and practices. Four hundred and fourteen students, 320 females and 94 males, participated in the study. There was a significant difference between the students who knew the definition of plagiarism among the three universities with p-value = .01. More than half of the participants (67%) claimed that they had no previous education or training on plagiarism. However, after being informed about plagiarism, most of them agreed that plagiarism should be regarded as stealing and a punishment. Additionally, poor study skills and the ease of copying and pasting from the Internet were identified by the majority of the students to be the leading causes of plagiarism. Pharmacy students need to be more educated on plagiarism and its consequences on research and educational ethics. Finally, more strict policies should be incorporated to monitor and control plagiarism in undergraduate sections.

  12. Self-plagiarism in academic publishing: the anatomy of a misnomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreescu, Liviu

    2013-09-01

    The paper discusses self-plagiarism and associated practices in scholarly publishing. It approaches at some length the conceptual issues raised by the notion of self-plagiarism. It distinguishes among and then examines the main families of arguments against self-plagiarism, as well as the question of possibly legitimate reasons to engage in this practice. It concludes that some of the animus frequently reserved for self-plagiarism may be the result of, among others, poor choice of a label, unwarranted generalizations as to its ill effects based on the specific experience (and goals) of particular disciplines, and widespread but not necessarily beneficial publishing practices.

  13. The ethics of scholarly publishing: exploring differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication across nations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored national differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication in retracted biomedical literature. The national affiliations of authors and reasons for retraction of papers accessible through PubMed that were published from 2008 to 2012 and subsequently retracted were determined in order to identify countries with the largest numbers and highest rates of retraction due to plagiarism and duplicate publication. Authors from more than fifty countries retracted papers. While the United States retracted the most papers, China retracted the most papers for plagiarism and duplicate publication. Rates of plagiarism and duplicate publication were highest in Italy and Finland, respectively. Unethical publishing practices cut across nations. PMID:24860263

  14. The ethics of scholarly publishing: exploring differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication across nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This study explored national differences in plagiarism and duplicate publication in retracted biomedical literature. The national affiliations of authors and reasons for retraction of papers accessible through PubMed that were published from 2008 to 2012 and subsequently retracted were determined in order to identify countries with the largest numbers and highest rates of retraction due to plagiarism and duplicate publication. Authors from more than fifty countries retracted papers. While the United States retracted the most papers, China retracted the most papers for plagiarism and duplicate publication. Rates of plagiarism and duplicate publication were highest in Italy and Finland, respectively. Unethical publishing practices cut across nations.

  15. Self-Assessment of the Use of Plagiarism Avoiding Techniques to Create Ethical Scholarship Among Research Students

    OpenAIRE

    Saeed Ahmad; Ahsan Ullah

    2015-01-01

    The use of plagiarism avoiding techniques can be helpful to maintain academic integrity, a better learning environment and intellectual honesty. This explored the use of plagiarism avoiding techniques for creating ethical scholarship among research students. It also measured the association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and the satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism. Data were collected from seven universities through an online self-struct...

  16. Metrics-based assessments of research: incentives for 'institutional plagiarism'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Colin

    2013-06-01

    The issue of plagiarism--claiming credit for work that is not one's own, rightly, continues to cause concern in the academic community. An analysis is presented that shows the effects that may arise from metrics-based assessments of research, when credit for an author's outputs (chiefly publications) is given to an institution that did not support the research but which subsequently employs the author. The incentives for what is termed here "institutional plagiarism" are demonstrated with reference to the UK Research Assessment Exercise in which submitting units of assessment are shown in some instances to derive around twice the credit for papers produced elsewhere by new recruits, compared to papers produced 'in-house'.

  17. Developing a coding scheme for detecting usability and fun problems in computer games for young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, W.; Bekker, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development and assessment of a coding scheme for finding both usability and fun problems through observations of young children playing computer games during user tests. The proposed coding scheme is based on an existing list of breakdown indication types of the detailed

  18. Deep Constrained Siamese Hash Coding Network and Load-Balanced Locality-Sensitive Hashing for Near Duplicate Image Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Fan, Yabo; Xing, Junliang; Sun, Liang; Cai, Zhaoquan; Maybank, Stephen

    2018-09-01

    We construct a new efficient near duplicate image detection method using a hierarchical hash code learning neural network and load-balanced locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) indexing. We propose a deep constrained siamese hash coding neural network combined with deep feature learning. Our neural network is able to extract effective features for near duplicate image detection. The extracted features are used to construct a LSH-based index. We propose a load-balanced LSH method to produce load-balanced buckets in the hashing process. The load-balanced LSH significantly reduces the query time. Based on the proposed load-balanced LSH, we design an effective and feasible algorithm for near duplicate image detection. Extensive experiments on three benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of our deep siamese hash encoding network and load-balanced LSH.

  19. Construction of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Questionnaire for Assessing Plagiarism

    OpenAIRE

    M Mirfakhraei; Z Cheraghi; A Doosti Irani; P Cheraghi; J Poorolajal

    2012-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to develop a questionnaire in order to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) of the faculty members and students toward plagiarism. Methods: A KAP study was conducted from June to October 2011 enrolling 390 volunteers anonymously (response rate 96%). The questionnaire included the following four parts: (a) general characteristics like gender, academic degree and education level; (b) nine questions regarding knowledge (Min=0, Max=9); (c) nine quest...

  20. Multipass Channel Estimation and Joint Multiuser Detection and Equalization for MIMO Long-Code DS/CDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzzi Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of joint channel estimation, equalization, and multiuser detection for a multiantenna DS/CDMA system operating over a frequency-selective fading channel and adopting long aperiodic spreading codes is considered in this paper. First of all, we present several channel estimation and multiuser data detection schemes suited for multiantenna long-code DS/CDMA systems. Then, a multipass strategy, wherein the data detection and the channel estimation procedures exchange information in a recursive fashion, is introduced and analyzed for the proposed scenario. Remarkably, this strategy provides, at the price of some attendant computational complexity increase, excellent performance even when very short training sequences are transmitted, and thus couples together the conflicting advantages of both trained and blind systems, that is, good performance and no wasted bandwidth, respectively. Space-time coded systems are also considered, and it is shown that the multipass strategy provides excellent results for such systems also. Likewise, it is also shown that excellent performance is achieved also when each user adopts the same spreading code for all of its transmit antennas. The validity of the proposed procedure is corroborated by both simulation results and analytical findings. In particular, it is shown that adopting the multipass strategy results in a remarkable reduction of the channel estimation mean-square error and of the optimal length of the training sequence.

  1. Will the Real Author Come Forward? Questions of Ethics, Plagiarism, Theft and Collusion in Academic Research Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Pat

    2009-01-01

    This paper raises some questions about academic authorial honesty under the headings of Plagiarism (including self-plagiarism), Theft, and Collusion. Compared with the medical sciences, the social sciences in general and education specifically, lag behind in terms of critical attention being paid to the problem of plagiarism, the peer review…

  2. Retribution, Deterrence and Reform: The Dilemmas of Plagiarism Management in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Universities face constant scrutiny about their plagiarism management strategies, policies and procedures. A resounding theme, usually media inspired, is that plagiarism is rife, unstoppable and university processes are ineffectual in its wake. This has been referred to as a "moral panic" approach (Carroll & Sutherland-Smith,…

  3. "No Fair, Copycat!": What Children's Response to Plagiarism Tells Us about Their Understanding of Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kristina R.; Shaw, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Adults believe that plagiarizing ideas is wrong, which requires an understanding that others can have ideas and that it is wrong to copy them. In order to test when this understanding emerges, we investigated when children begin to think plagiarism is wrong. In Study 1, children aged 7, 9 and 11 years old, as well as adults, disliked someone who…

  4. "Not Necessarily a Bad Thing ...": A Study of Online Plagiarism amongst Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwyn, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Whilst the copying, falsification and plagiarism of essays and assignments has long been a prevalent form of academic misconduct amongst undergraduate students, the increasing use of the internet in higher education has raised concern over enhanced levels of online plagiarism and new types of "cyber-cheating". Based on a self-report…

  5. "Thou Shalt Not Plagiarise": From Self-Reported Views to Recognition and Avoidance of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risquez, Angelica; O'Dwyer, Michele; Ledwith, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Throughout much of the literature on plagiarism in higher education, there is an implicit assumption that students who understand plagiarism, who have high ethical views and declare not to engage in plagiaristic behaviour are able to recognise it and avoid it in practice. Challenging this supposition, this paper contrasts students' self-reported…

  6. Teaching Students about Plagiarism: What It Looks Like and How It Is Measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This case study examines how full-time faculty, adjunct instructors, and graduate teaching assistants teach students how to avoid plagiarism. Additionally, this case study includes a cross-section of teachers who encounter plagiarism in writing assignments across the curriculum. While many studies in the past have focused on students, this study…

  7. Of Flattery and Thievery: Reconsidering Plagiarism in a Time of Virtual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P. L.

    2007-01-01

    P. L. Thomas provides a framework for discussing plagiarism and calls on us to avoid overly simplified policies. After considering various perspectives on intent and the purposes of documentation, Thomas advocates developing standard definitions and guidelines for plagiarism in the department or the classroom. We should also offer professional…

  8. Deconstructing Attitudes towards Plagiarism of Japanese Undergraduates in EFL Academic Writing Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeter, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a qualitative analysis of 276 first-year Japanese university science major responses to plagiarism to deconstruct prevailing generalizations regarding the incidence of plagiarism by Japanese university students. These students were enrolled in a compulsory yearlong English academic writing course. While utilizing a contextualized…

  9. Knowledge and attitude of dental professionals of north India toward plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Guram, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism is stealing of some others work or idea without proper citation. It is one of the biggest challenges faced by the scholarly world and by far a grim form of delinquency in academics. The study was designed to explore the knowledge and attitudes of dental professionals toward plagiarism. A questionnaire having 14 questions was sent either via e-mails or by sending printed copies to 5000 dental professionals, while maintaining anonymity of all the participants. Most of the dental professionals know about plagiarism, and they believe that plagiarism cannot be avoided successfully. Pressure to publish was a major reason along with several others, which accounts for more and more indulgence in plagiarism. At the same time lack of facilities in private institutions and lack of funding for research work were the major factors as well, which hinder in creating research environment and hence promotes plagiarism and false studies to publish it. Plagiarism is present in dental professionals and that significant reduction can only be brought by awareness, objective check methods and stringent punishment. Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct must be recognized and must not be tolerated.

  10. Journals May Soon Use Anti-Plagiarism Software on Their Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampell, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This spring, academic journals may turn the anti-plagiarism software that professors have been using against their students on the professors themselves. CrossRef, a publishing industry association, and the software company iParadigms announced a deal last week to create CrossCheck, an anti-plagiarism program for academic journals. The software…

  11. Skills Training to Avoid Inadvertent Plagiarism: Results from a Randomised Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Fiona J.; Wright, Jill D.; Newton, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism continues to be a concern within academic institutions. The current study utilised a randomised control trial of 137 new entry tertiary students to assess the efficacy of a scalable short training session on paraphrasing, patch writing and plagiarism. The results indicate that the training significantly enhanced students' overall…

  12. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  13. Dealing with Plagiarism in the Academic Community: Emotional Engagement and Moral Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehviläinen, Sanna; Löfström, Erika; Nevgi, Anne

    2018-01-01

    This article deals with the demands that plagiarism places on academic communities, and with the resources staff possess in dealing with these demands. It is suggested that plagiarism ought to be placed in the context of network of intertwining communities (scholarly, pedagogical and administrative), to which participants are engaged to a…

  14. Online Academic-Integrity Mastery Training May Improve Students' Awareness of, and Attitudes toward, Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Guy J.; Gouldthorp, Bethanie; Thomas, Emma F.; O'Brien, Geraldine M.; Correia, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Some evidence has emerged in recent years that plagiarism can be reduced through the use of online mastery tests that are designed to train introductory psychology students in awareness of academic integrity and referencing conventions. Although these studies demonstrated a reduction in incidents of plagiarism they did not directly examine whether…

  15. Helping International Students Succeed Academically through Research Process and Plagiarism Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Van Ullen, Mary K.

    2011-01-01

    Workshops on the research process and plagiarism were designed to meet the needs of international students at the University at Albany. The research process workshop covered formulating research questions, as well as locating and evaluating sources. The plagiarism workshop focused on acknowledging sources, quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing…

  16. Student Perceptions of Plagiarism Avoidance Competencies: An Action Research Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Student plagiarism in higher education is widespread and presents a growing concern for faculty and administrators who are intent on upholding academic integrity. However, a myopic view of plagiarism as a purely ethical issue is misguided. It is not always simply a deliberate attempt to deceive. Through the involvement of students in an…

  17. An Intervention Designed to Reduce Plagiarism in a Research Methods Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Rita; Hill, Darryl B.

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that plagiarism is on the increase in higher education. Some state that this is due to poor knowledge rather than intentional cheating. Other researchers explain that plagiarism is on the rise due to increased competitiveness in college and easy access to work that has already been completed. In this study, we show how a 2-hr…

  18. Substantive Editing as a Form of Plagiarism among Postgraduate Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lines, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In university plagiarism policies, and in the research into plagiarism, one form of collusion remains virtually unacknowledged: substantive editing performed by editors. While almost all Australian universities allow postgraduate students to have their thesis professionally edited, "substantive" editing is prohibited. This article…

  19. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  20. Knowledge and Attitude of Dental Professionals of North India Toward Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Guram, Namrata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Plagiarism is stealing of some others work or idea without proper citation. It is one of the biggest challenges faced by the scholarly world and by far a grim form of delinquency in academics. Aim: The study was designed to explore the knowledge and attitudes of dental professionals toward plagiarism. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire having 14 questions was sent either via e-mails or by sending printed copies to 5000 dental professionals, while maintaining anonymity of all the participants. Result: Most of the dental professionals know about plagiarism, and they believe that plagiarism cannot be avoided successfully. Pressure to publish was a major reason along with several others, which accounts for more and more indulgence in plagiarism. At the same time lack of facilities in private institutions and lack of funding for research work were the major factors as well, which hinder in creating research environment and hence promotes plagiarism and false studies to publish it. Conclusion: Plagiarism is present in dental professionals and that significant reduction can only be brought by awareness, objective check methods and stringent punishment. Plagiarism and other forms of academic misconduct must be recognized and must not be tolerated. PMID:24678470

  1. Practice Makes Perfect: Improving Students' Skills in Understanding and Avoiding Plagiarism with a Themed Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estow, Sarah; Lawrence, Eva K.; Adams, Kathrynn A.

    2011-01-01

    To address the issue of plagiarism, students in two undergraduate Research Methods and Analysis courses conducted, analyzed, and wrote up original research on the topic of plagiarism. Students in an otherwise identical course completed the same assignments but examined a different research topic. At the start and end of the semester, all students…

  2. Chinese International Students' and Faculty Members' Views of Plagiarism in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Alan

    2016-01-01

    As the enrollment of Chinese international students (CIS) increased at a private institution in the Midwest, so did suspected cases of plagiarism. This study addressed the problem of how faculty members grappled with CIS' interpretation and application of Western-based views of plagiarism. The purpose of the study was to identify similarities and…

  3. A Comparison of Chinese and Australian University Students' Attitudes towards Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, John; Howard, Steven J.; Mu, Congjun; Bokosmaty, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Student plagiarism is a growing problem within Australian universities and abroad. Potentially exacerbating this situation, research indicates that students' attitudes toward plagiarism are typically more permissive and lenient than the policies of their tertiary institutions. There has been suggestion that this is especially so in Asian countries…

  4. Characterization of coded random access with compressive sensing based multi user detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Yalei; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Bockelmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication requires new Medium Access Control (MAC) schemes and physical (PHY) layer concepts to support a massive number of access requests. The concept of coded random access, introduced recently, greatly outperforms other random access methods...... coded random access with CS-MUD on the PHY layer and show very promising results for the resulting protocol....

  5. Authorship attribution of source code by using back propagation neural network based on particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyu; Xu, Guoai; Li, Qi; Guo, Yanhui; Zhang, Miao

    2017-01-01

    Authorship attribution is to identify the most likely author of a given sample among a set of candidate known authors. It can be not only applied to discover the original author of plain text, such as novels, blogs, emails, posts etc., but also used to identify source code programmers. Authorship attribution of source code is required in diverse applications, ranging from malicious code tracking to solving authorship dispute or software plagiarism detection. This paper aims to propose a new method to identify the programmer of Java source code samples with a higher accuracy. To this end, it first introduces back propagation (BP) neural network based on particle swarm optimization (PSO) into authorship attribution of source code. It begins by computing a set of defined feature metrics, including lexical and layout metrics, structure and syntax metrics, totally 19 dimensions. Then these metrics are input to neural network for supervised learning, the weights of which are output by PSO and BP hybrid algorithm. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated on a collected dataset with 3,022 Java files belong to 40 authors. Experiment results show that the proposed method achieves 91.060% accuracy. And a comparison with previous work on authorship attribution of source code for Java language illustrates that this proposed method outperforms others overall, also with an acceptable overhead.

  6. A modified carrier-to-code leveling method for retrieving ionospheric observables and detecting short-term temporal variability of receiver differential code biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Min

    2018-03-01

    Sensing the ionosphere with the global positioning system involves two sequential tasks, namely the ionospheric observable retrieval and the ionospheric parameter estimation. A prominent source of error has long been identified as short-term variability in receiver differential code bias (rDCB). We modify the carrier-to-code leveling (CCL), a method commonly used to accomplish the first task, through assuming rDCB to be unlinked in time. Aside from the ionospheric observables, which are affected by, among others, the rDCB at one reference epoch, the Modified CCL (MCCL) can also provide the rDCB offsets with respect to the reference epoch as by-products. Two consequences arise. First, MCCL is capable of excluding the effects of time-varying rDCB from the ionospheric observables, which, in turn, improves the quality of ionospheric parameters of interest. Second, MCCL has significant potential as a means to detect between-epoch fluctuations experienced by rDCB of a single receiver.

  7. Alta frecuencia de plagio en tesis de medicina de una universidad pública Peruana High frequency of plagiarism in medical thesis from a Peruvian public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jhan C. Saldaña-Gastulo

    2010-03-01

    /33, descriptive (25/33 and retrospective (19/33. None of the authors had published in a scientific journal, and only nine of his tutors of them had at least one publication. No association was found between the characteristics of the thesis and the presence of plagiarism. In conclusion, we found a high frequency of plagiarism in theses analyzed. Is responsibility of medical schools take the necessary actions to detect and avoid plagiarism among their students.

  8. Real-Time Fabric Defect Detection Using Accelerated Small-Scale Over-Completed Dictionary of Sparse Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianpeng Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An auto fabric defect detection system via computer vision is used to replace manual inspection. In this paper, we propose a hardware accelerated algorithm based on a small-scale over-completed dictionary (SSOCD via sparse coding (SC method, which is realized on a parallel hardware platform (TMS320C6678. In order to reduce computation, the image patches projections in the training SSOCD are taken as features and the proposed features are more robust, and exhibit obvious advantages in detection results and computational cost. Furthermore, we introduce detection ratio and false ratio in order to measure the performance and reliability of the hardware accelerated algorithm. The experiments show that the proposed algorithm can run with high parallel efficiency and that the detection speed meets the real-time requirements of industrial inspection.

  9. Measuring and detecting errors in occupational coding: an analysis of SHARE data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belloni, M.; Brugiavini, A.; Meschi, E.; Tijdens, K.

    2016-01-01

    This article studies coding errors in occupational data, as the quality of this data is important but often neglected. In particular, we recoded open-ended questions on occupation for last and current job in the Dutch sample of the “Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe” (SHARE) using a

  10. On low-complexity full-diversity detection of multi-user space-time coding

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Amr; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2013-01-01

    for a wide range of STBCs to achieve full-diversity under PIC group decoding with or without successive interference cancellation (SIC). Based on the provided design criteria we derive an upper-bound on the achievable rate for a class of codes. A two

  11. Accuracy of Administrative Billing Codes to Detect Urinary Tract Infection Hospitalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Matthew; Auger, Katherine A.; Hain, Paul D.; Jerardi, Karen E.; Myers, Angela L.; Rahman, Suraiya S.; Williams, Derek J.; Shah, Samir S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital billing data are frequently used for quality measures and research, but the accuracy of the use of discharge codes to identify urinary tract infections (UTIs) is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) discharge codes to identify children hospitalized with UTIs. METHODS: This multicenter study conducted in 5 children's hospitals included children aged 3 days to 18 years who had been admitted to the hospital, undergone a urinalysis or urine culture, and discharged from the hospital. Data were obtained from the pediatric health information system database and medical record review. With the use of 2 gold-standard methods, the positive predictive value (PPV) was calculated for individual and combined UTI codes and for common UTI identification strategies. PPV was measured for all groupings for which the UTI code was the principal discharge diagnosis. RESULTS: There were 833 patients in the study. The PPV was 50.3% with the use of the gold standard of laboratory-confirmed UTIs but increased to 85% with provider confirmation. Restriction of the study cohort to patients with a principle diagnosis of UTI improved the PPV for laboratory-confirmed UTI (61.2%) and provider-confirmed UTI (93.2%), as well as the ability to benchmark performance. Other common identification strategies did not markedly affect the PPV. CONCLUSIONS: ICD-9 codes can be used to identify patients with UTIs but are most accurate when UTI is the principal discharge diagnosis. The identification strategies reported in this study can be used to improve the accuracy and applicability of benchmarking measures. PMID:21768320

  12. Why do I always have the best ideas? The role of idea quality in unconscious plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Timothy J; Stark, Louisa-Jayne

    2008-05-01

    Groups of individuals often work together to generate solutions to a problem. Subsequently, one member of the group can plagiarise another either by recalling that person's idea as their own (recall-own plagiarism), or by generating a novel solution that duplicates a previous idea (generate-new plagiarism). The current study examines the extent to which these forms of plagiarism are influenced by the quality of the ideas. Groups of participants initially generated ideas, prior to an elaboration phase in which idea quality was manipulated in two ways: participants received feedback on the quality of the ideas as rated by independent judges, and they generated improvements to a subset of the ideas. Unconscious plagiarism was measured in recall-own and generate-new tasks. For recall, idea improvement led to increased plagiarism, while for the generate-new task, the independent ratings influenced plagiarism. These data indicate that different source-judgement processes underlie the two forms of plagiarism, neither of which can be reduced simply to memory strength.

  13. Pathway Detection from Protein Interaction Networks and Gene Expression Data Using Color-Coding Methods and A* Search Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yu Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the large availability of protein interaction networks and microarray data supported, to identify the linear paths that have biological significance in search of a potential pathway is a challenge issue. We proposed a color-coding method based on the characteristics of biological network topology and applied heuristic search to speed up color-coding method. In the experiments, we tested our methods by applying to two datasets: yeast and human prostate cancer networks and gene expression data set. The comparisons of our method with other existing methods on known yeast MAPK pathways in terms of precision and recall show that we can find maximum number of the proteins and perform comparably well. On the other hand, our method is more efficient than previous ones and detects the paths of length 10 within 40 seconds using CPU Intel 1.73GHz and 1GB main memory running under windows operating system.

  14. Code-Aided Estimation and Detection on Time-Varying Correlated Mimo Channels: A Factor Graph Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens Frederik

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns channel tracking in a multiantenna context for correlated flat-fading channels obeying a Gauss-Markov model. It is known that data-aided tracking of fast-fading channels requires a lot of pilot symbols in order to achieve sufficient accuracy, and hence decreases the spectral efficiency. To overcome this problem, we design a code-aided estimation scheme which exploits information from both the pilot symbols and the unknown coded data symbols. The algorithm is derived based on a factor graph representation of the system and application of the sum-product algorithm. The sum-product algorithm reveals how soft information from the decoder should be exploited for the purpose of estimation and how the information bits can be detected. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  15. COHERENT DETECTION FOR SPECTRAL AMPLITUDE-CODED OPTICAL LABEL SWITCHING SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Coherent detection for spectrally encoded optical labels is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for three label tones spectrally spaced at 1 GHz. The proposed method utilizes a frequency swept local oscillator in a coherent receiver supported by digital signal processing for improved...... flexibility and upgradeability while reducing label detection subsystem complexity as compared with the conventional optical autocorrelation based approaches....

  16. A Local Texture-Based Superpixel Feature Coding for Saliency Detection Combined with Global Saliency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfei Nan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because saliency can be used as the prior knowledge of image content, saliency detection has been an active research area in image segmentation, object detection, image semantic understanding and other relevant image-based applications. In the case of saliency detection from cluster scenes, the salient object/region detected needs to not only be distinguished clearly from the background, but, preferably, to also be informative in terms of complete contour and local texture details to facilitate the successive processing. In this paper, a Local Texture-based Region Sparse Histogram (LTRSH model is proposed for saliency detection from cluster scenes. This model uses a combination of local texture patterns and color distribution as well as contour information to encode the superpixels to characterize the local feature of image for region contrast computing. Combining the region contrast as computed with the global saliency probability, a full-resolution salient map, in which the salient object/region detected adheres more closely to its inherent feature, is obtained on the bases of the corresponding high-level saliency spatial distribution as well as on the pixel-level saliency enhancement. Quantitative comparisons with five state-of-the-art saliency detection methods on benchmark datasets are carried out, and the comparative results show that the method we propose improves the detection performance in terms of corresponding measurements.

  17. Obstacle Detection Display for Visually Impaired: Coding of Direction, Distance, and Height on a Vibrotactile Waist Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan B. F. van Erp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electronic travel aids (ETAs can potentially increase the safety and comfort of blind users by detecting and displaying obstacles outside the range of the white cane. In a series of experiments, we aim to balance the amount of information displayed and the comprehensibility of the information taking into account the risk of information overload. In Experiment 1, we investigate perception of compound signals displayed on a tactile vest while walking. The results confirm that the threat of information overload is clear and present. Tactile coding parameters that are sufficiently discriminable in isolation may not be so in compound signals and while walking and using the white cane. Horizontal tactor location is a strong coding parameter, and temporal pattern is the preferred secondary coding parameter. Vertical location is also possible as coding parameter but it requires additional tactors and makes the display hardware more complex and expensive and less user friendly. In Experiment 2, we investigate how we can off-load the tactile modality by mitigating part of the information to an auditory display. Off-loading the tactile modality through auditory presentation is possible, but this off-loading is limited and may result in a new threat of auditory overload. In addition, taxing the auditory channel may in turn interfere with other auditory cues from the environment. In Experiment 3, we off-load the tactile sense by reducing the amount of displayed information using several filter rules. The resulting design was evaluated in Experiment 4 with visually impaired users. Although they acknowledge the potential of the display, the added of the ETA as a whole also depends on its sensor and object recognition capabilities. We recommend to use not more than two coding parameters in a tactile compound message and apply filter rules to reduce the amount of obstacles to be displayed in an obstacle avoidance ETA.

  18. [Plagiarism. Document from the Ethics Commission of the Medical School, University of Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselot Jaramillo, Eduardo; Bravo Lechat, Mireya; Kottow Lang, Miguel; Valenzuela Yuraidini, Carlos; O'Ryan Gallardo, Miguel; Thambo Becker, Sergio; Horwitz Campos, Nina; Acevedo Pérez, Irene; Rueda Castro, Laura; Sotomayor, María Angélica

    2008-05-01

    Plagiarism is defined as the intellectual fraud in which an individual attempts to unduly appropriate, for his/her own benefit, the knowledge, ideas or discoveries of someone else. It is not uncommon in academic settings where research is conducted and a creative work is carried out. Due to the dismal consequences of plagiarism, cautionary measures and sanctions are required to avoid it. This paper is intended to warn and promote a discussion about plagiarism. The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Chile and its ethics committee believe that a fight against these type of actions will contribute to prevent their detrimental effects on the moral and intellectual patrimony of our society.

  19. Development of a Rubric to Assess Academic Writing Incorporating Plagiarism Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Razı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Similarity reports of plagiarism detectors should be approached with caution as they may not be sufficient to support allegations of plagiarism. This study developed a 50-item rubric to simplify and standardize evaluation of academic papers. In the spring semester of 2011-2012 academic year, 161 freshmen’s papers at the English Language Teaching Department of Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Turkey, were assessed using the rubric. Validity and reliability were established. The results indicated citation as a particularly problematic aspect, and indicated that fairer assessment could be achieved by using the rubric along with plagiarism detectors’ similarity results.

  20. Blind and semi-blind ML detection for space-time block-coded OFDM wireless systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zaib, Alam; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the joint maximum likelihood (ML) data detection and channel estimation problem for Alamouti space-time block-coded (STBC) orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) wireless systems. The joint ML estimation and data detection is generally considered a hard combinatorial optimization problem. We propose an efficient low-complexity algorithm based on branch-estimate-bound strategy that renders exact joint ML solution. However, the computational complexity of blind algorithm becomes critical at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the number of OFDM carriers and constellation size are increased especially in multiple-antenna systems. To overcome this problem, a semi-blind algorithm based on a new framework for reducing the complexity is proposed by relying on subcarrier reordering and decoding the carriers with different levels of confidence using a suitable reliability criterion. In addition, it is shown that by utilizing the inherent structure of Alamouti coding, the estimation performance improvement or the complexity reduction can be achieved. The proposed algorithms can reliably track the wireless Rayleigh fading channel without requiring any channel statistics. Simulation results presented against the perfect coherent detection demonstrate the effectiveness of blind and semi-blind algorithms over frequency-selective channels with different fading characteristics.

  1. Strategies for Using Plagiarism Software in the Screening of Incoming Journal Manuscripts: Recommendations Based on a Recent Literature Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, several online tools have appeared capable of identifying potential plagiarism in science. While such tools may help to maintain or even increase the originality and ethical quality of the scientific literature, no apparent consensus exists among editors on the degree of plagiarism or self-plagiarism necessary to reject or retract manuscripts. In this study, two entire volumes of published original papers and reviews from Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology were retrospectively scanned for similarity in anonymized form using iThenticate software to explore measures to predictively identify true plagiarism and self-plagiarism and to potentially provide guidelines for future screening of incoming manuscripts. Several filters were applied, all of which appeared to lower the noise from irrelevant hits. The main conclusions were that plagiarism software offers a unique opportunity to screen for plagiarism easily but also that it has to be employed with caution as automated or uncritical use is far too unreliable to allow a fair basis for judging the degree of plagiarism in a manuscript. This remains the job of senior editors. Whereas a few cases of self-plagiarism that would not likely have been accepted with today's guidelines were indeed identified, no cases of fraud or serious plagiarism were found. Potential guidelines are discussed. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  2. Heterodyne detection using spectral line pairing for spectral phase encoding optical code division multiple access and dynamic dispersion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Foster, Mark; Khurgin, Jacob B; Cooper, A Brinton

    2012-07-30

    A novel coherent optical code-division multiple access (OCDMA) scheme is proposed that uses spectral line pairing to generate signals suitable for heterodyne decoding. Both signal and local reference are transmitted via a single optical fiber and a simple balanced receiver performs sourceless heterodyne detection, canceling speckle noise and multiple-access interference (MAI). To validate the idea, a 16 user fully loaded phase encoded system is simulated. Effects of fiber dispersion on system performance are studied as well. Both second and third order dispersion management is achieved by using a spectral phase encoder to adjust phase shifts of spectral components at the optical network unit (ONU).

  3. Plagiarism, Intertextuality and Emergent Authorship in University Students' Academic Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Helen Thompson

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Issues of plagiarism, intertextuality and authorial presence in academic writing are fundamental to the teaching and learning activities of all university lecturers and their students. Knowing how to assist students, particularly those who speak English as an additional language (EAL, to develop a sense of text/knowledge ownership and authorial presence in the creation of discipline-based scholarly texts can be especially challenging. Clarifying what is encompassed by the notion of ‘common knowledge’ is also central to this process. The aim of this paper is to explore the political and intertextual nature of text/knowledge construction and emergent student authorship through the analysis of interviews and written assignments from two EAL students, together with interview data from lecturers from relevant disciplinary fields. Drawing on the work of Bakhtin, Kristeva and Penrose and Geisler, I conclude by suggesting that it is by engaging with, rather than fearing, intertextual connections, that we can create a dialogic pedagogy for academic writing that will enable students to articulate an authoritative authorial identity of their own. The importance of lecturer intervention during the drafting stages of text production is also emphasised. Keywords: plagiarism; intertextuality; emergent authorship; academic writing

  4. On low-complexity full-diversity detection of multi-user space-time coding

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Amr

    2013-06-01

    The incorporation of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) schemes in recent wireless communication standards paved the way to exploit the newly introduced dimension (i.e. space) to efficiently cancel the interference without requiring additional resources. In this paper, we focus on multiple input multiple ouitput (MIMO) multiple access channel (MAC) case and we answer the question about whether it is possible to suppress the interference in a MIMO MAC channel for completely blind users while achieving full-diversity with a simplified decoder in the affirmative. In fact, this goal can be attained by employing space-time block codes (STBC)s that achive full-diversity under partial interference cancellation (PIC). We derive sufficient conditions for a wide range of STBCs to achieve full-diversity under PIC group decoding with or without successive interference cancellation (SIC). Based on the provided design criteria we derive an upper-bound on the achievable rate for a class of codes. A two-user MIMO MAC interference cancellation scheme is presented and proved to achieve full-diversity under PIC group decoding. We compare our scheme to existing beamforming schemes with full or limit feedback. © 2013 IEEE.

  5. Improving early detection of gastric cancer: a novel systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emura, Fabian; Gralnek, Ian; Baron, Todd H

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive worldwide use of standard esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) examinations, gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common forms of cancer and ranks as the most common malignant tumor in East Asia, Eastern Europe and parts of Latin America. Current limitations of using non systematic examination during standard EGD could be at least partially responsible for the low incidence of early GC diagnosis in countries with a high prevalence of the disease. Originally proposed by Emura et al., systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy (SACE) is a novel method that facilitates complete examination of the upper GI tract based on sequential systematic overlapping photo-documentation using an endoluminal alphanumeric-coded nomenclature comprised of eight regions and 28 areas covering the entire surface upper GI surface. For precise localization or normal or abnormal areas, SACE incorporates a simple coordinate system based on the identification of certain natural axes, walls, curvatures and anatomical endoluminal landmarks. Efectiveness of SACE was recently demonstrated in a screening study that diagnosed early GC at a frequency of 0.30% (2/650) in healthy, average-risk volunteer subjects. Such a novel approach, if uniformly implemented worldwide, could significantly change the way we practice upper endoscopy in our lifetimes.

  6. Hybrid PAPR reduction scheme with Huffman coding and DFT-spread technique for direct-detection optical OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Miao; Chen, Ming; Zhou, Hui; Wan, Qiuzhen; Jiang, LeYong; Yang, Lin; Zheng, Zhiwei; Chen, Lin

    2018-01-01

    High peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the transmit signal is a major drawback in optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OOFDM) system. In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel hybrid scheme, combined the Huffman coding and Discrete Fourier Transmission-Spread (DFT-spread), in order to reduce high PAPR in a 16-QAM short-reach intensity-modulated and direct-detection OOFDM (IMDD-OOFDM) system. The experimental results demonstrated that the hybrid scheme can reduce the PAPR by about 1.5, 2, 3 and 6 dB, and achieve 1.5, 1, 2.5 and 3 dB receiver sensitivity improvement compared to clipping, DFT-spread and Huffman coding and original OFDM signals, respectively, at an error vector magnitude (EVM) of -10 dB after transmission over 20 km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF). Furthermore, the throughput gain can be of the order of 30% by using the hybrid scheme compared with the cases of without applying the Huffman coding.

  7. Reprint of "Two-stage sparse coding of region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels to detect saliency".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Yang, Cai; Zhang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel bottom-up saliency detection algorithm from the perspective of covariance matrices on a Riemannian manifold. Each superpixel is described by a region covariance matrix on Riemannian Manifolds. We carry out a two-stage sparse coding scheme via Log-Euclidean kernels to extract salient objects efficiently. In the first stage, given background dictionary on image borders, sparse coding of each region covariance via Log-Euclidean kernels is performed. The reconstruction error on the background dictionary is regarded as the initial saliency of each superpixel. In the second stage, an improvement of the initial result is achieved by calculating reconstruction errors of the superpixels on foreground dictionary, which is extracted from the first stage saliency map. The sparse coding in the second stage is similar to the first stage, but is able to effectively highlight the salient objects uniformly from the background. Finally, three post-processing methods-highlight-inhibition function, context-based saliency weighting, and the graph cut-are adopted to further refine the saliency map. Experiments on four public benchmark datasets show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision, recall and mean absolute error, and demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of Distributed Generation Grid Code Requirements on Islanding Detection in LV Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bignucolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent growing diffusion of dispersed generation in low voltage (LV distribution networks is entailing new rules to make local generators participate in network stability. Consequently, national and international grid codes, which define the connection rules for stability and safety of electrical power systems, have been updated requiring distributed generators and electrical storage systems to supply stabilizing contributions. In this scenario, specific attention to the uncontrolled islanding issue has to be addressed since currently required anti-islanding protection systems, based on relays locally measuring voltage and frequency, could no longer be suitable. In this paper, the effects on the interface protection performance of different LV generators’ stabilizing functions are analysed. The study takes into account existing requirements, such as the generators’ active power regulation (according to the measured frequency and reactive power regulation (depending on the local measured voltage. In addition, the paper focuses on other stabilizing features under discussion, derived from the medium voltage (MV distribution network grid codes or proposed in the literature, such as fast voltage support (FVS and inertia emulation. Stabilizing functions have been reproduced in the DIgSILENT PowerFactory 2016 software environment, making use of its native programming language. Later, they are tested both alone and together, aiming to obtain a comprehensive analysis on their impact on the anti-islanding protection effectiveness. Through dynamic simulations in several network scenarios the paper demonstrates the detrimental impact that such stabilizing regulations may have on loss-of-main protection effectiveness, leading to an increased risk of unintentional islanding.

  9. Using an ethical decision-making model to determine consequences for student plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Ermalynn M

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of plagiarism, intentional or unintentional, in the professional nursing arena has increased in recent years, as has the occurrence of plagiarism among nursing students. Strategies for cheating have become very sophisticated with the use of aids such as personal digital assistants, camera phones, and instant messaging. Cheating on written papers has also increased. The Internet provides students with ready-made research and academic papers, and access to Web sites on a plethora of topics. In this article, I describe my experience with plagiarism of ethics papers during students' final semester before graduation. How I discovered the plagiarized work and used the A-B-C-D-E ethical decision-making model in determining the student consequences for the event are presented.

  10. Self-Assessment of the Use of Plagiarism Avoiding Techniques to Create Ethical Scholarship Among Research Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of plagiarism avoiding techniques can be helpful to maintain academic integrity, a better learning environment and intellectual honesty. This explored the use of plagiarism avoiding techniques for creating ethical scholarship among research students. It also measured the association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and the satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism. Data were collected from seven universities through an online self-structured questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to explore the variance. The association between the frequency of using plagiarism avoiding techniques and satisfaction about knowledge of plagiarism was indicated. Differences were also found on the basis of gender, discipline, level and stage of study.

  11. REFLECTIONS ON THE CONDUCT OF PEOPLE WHO CHECK AND SANCTION PLAGIARISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujorel Florea

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of a general framework for the evaluation of plagiarism, accepted by the majority of those involved in the creation of intellectual works, is the main objective pursued in the present study. Obviously, the author does not propose to definitively outline the limits of such a plagiarism assessment framework, but outlines some criteria and exigencies that characterize it, being aware that only through the contribution of those interested in different spiritual fields can one agree such a standard. The question of the plagiarism, old-fashioned and the punishment of the plagiarists, which is necessary for justice, has a wide range of difficulties of appreciation. That is why the present study was born on the basis of the lack of unanimously accepted criteria for assessing the originality of intellectual creations. The author hopes that his imperfect approach will be welcome and arouse approval and interest. The author believes that in the world of today, the Internet and computer science, where an IT program can show the degree of plagiarism of any literary, artistic or scientific work, the evaluation of the suspect work of plagiarism must be done primarily by man and not by technical equipment, either very sophisticated. The man, endowed with correct thinking, artistic and scientific sense, vocation, modesty, temperament, etc., can control and weigh better than the IT apparatus of plagiarism and especially, can better determine the applicable sanction. This is why the present study is based on the truth that plagiarism judges, specialists dedicated to intellectual creation, are able to value the criteria of the plagiarism authors, correct their flaws and give them the chance to -and develops the natural vocation.

  12. Plagiarism in Publications Using the Unpublished Raw Data of Archived Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaghi, Javad; Beddu, Salmia Bnt; Muda, Zakaria Che

    2017-04-01

    It is obligatory to educate student researchers before they start their work by teaching them about the various types of plagiarism and how to avoid them. It is also vital that research supervisors take into account the sources of data that are explored in their students' manuscripts. This article tries to draw the reader's attention to the importance of avoiding all types of plagiarism in their research.

  13. Generic detection of poleroviruses using an RT-PCR assay targeting the RdRp coding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotos, Leonidas; Efthimiou, Konstantinos; Maliogka, Varvara I; Katis, Nikolaos I

    2014-03-01

    In this study a two-step RT-PCR assay was developed for the generic detection of poleroviruses. The RdRp coding region was selected as the primers' target, since it differs significantly from that of other members in the family Luteoviridae and its sequence can be more informative than other regions in the viral genome. Species specific RT-PCR assays targeting the same region were also developed for the detection of the six most widespread poleroviral species (Beet mild yellowing virus, Beet western yellows virus, Cucurbit aphid-borne virus, Carrot red leaf virus, Potato leafroll virus and Turnip yellows virus) in Greece and the collection of isolates. These isolates along with other characterized ones were used for the evaluation of the generic PCR's detection range. The developed assay efficiently amplified a 593bp RdRp fragment from 46 isolates of 10 different Polerovirus species. Phylogenetic analysis using the generic PCR's amplicon sequence showed that although it cannot accurately infer evolutionary relationships within the genus it can differentiate poleroviruses at the species level. Overall, the described generic assay could be applied for the reliable detection of Polerovirus infections and, in combination with the specific PCRs, for the identification of new and uncharacterized species in the genus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Code-switched English Pronunciation Modeling for Swahili Spoken Term Detection (Pub Version, Open Access)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-03

    model (JSM), developed using Sequitur16,17 and trained on the CMUDict0.7b18 Amer- ican English dictionary (over 134k words), was used to detect English ...modeled using the closest Swahili vowel or vowel combination. In both cases these English L2P predictions were added to a dictionary as variants to swa... English queries as a function of overlap/correspondence with an existing reference English pronunciation dictionary . As the reference dictionary , we

  15. A Low-Complexity Joint Detection-Decoding Algorithm for Nonbinary LDPC-Coded Modulation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuepeng; Bai, Baoming; Ma, Xiao

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a low-complexity joint detection-decoding algorithm for nonbinary LDPC codedmodulation systems. The algorithm combines hard-decision decoding using the message-passing strategy with the signal detector in an iterative manner. It requires low computational complexity, offers good system performance and has a fast rate of decoding convergence. Compared to the q-ary sum-product algorithm (QSPA), it provides an attractive candidate for practical applications of q-ary LDP...

  16. Knowledge of Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences Regarding Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  17. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  18. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-07-13

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  19. Anomaly Detection at Multiple Scales (ADAMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    must resort to generating their own data that simulates insider attacks. The Schonlau dataset is the most widely used for academic study. It...measurements are estimated by well-known software plagiarism tools . 39 As explained above, there are many different techniques for code trans- formation

  20. Code of ethics for dental researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for Dental Research, in 2009, adopted a code of ethics. The code applies to members of the association and is enforceable by sanction, with the stated requirement that members are expected to inform the association in cases where they believe misconduct has occurred. The IADR code goes beyond the Belmont and Helsinki statements by virtue of covering animal research. It also addresses issues of sponsorship of research and conflicts of interest, international collaborative research, duty of researchers to be informed about applicable norms, standards of publication (including plagiarism), and the obligation of "whistleblowing" for the sake of maintaining the integrity of the dental research enterprise as a whole. The code is organized, like the ADA code, into two sections. The IADR principles are stated, but not defined, and number 12, instead of the ADA's five. The second section consists of "best practices," which are specific statements of expected or interdicted activities. The short list of definitions is useful.

  1. A study of redundancy management strategy for tetrad strap-down inertial systems. [error detection codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, R. J.; Bjorkman, W. S.; Schmidt, S. F.; Carestia, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Algorithms were developed that attempt to identify which sensor in a tetrad configuration has experienced a step failure. An algorithm is also described that provides a measure of the confidence with which the correct identification was made. Experimental results are presented from real-time tests conducted on a three-axis motion facility utilizing an ortho-skew tetrad strapdown inertial sensor package. The effects of prediction errors and of quantization on correct failure identification are discussed as well as an algorithm for detecting second failures through prediction.

  2. Perceptions of Plagiarism by STEM Graduate Students: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Michelle; Schwieder, David; Buhler, Amy; Bennett, Denise Beaubien; Royster, Melody

    2015-12-01

    Issues of academic integrity, specifically knowledge of, perceptions and attitudes toward plagiarism, are well documented in post-secondary settings using case studies for specific courses, recording discourse with focus groups, analyzing cross-cultural education philosophies, and reviewing the current literature. In this paper, the authors examine the perceptions of graduate students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines at the University of Florida regarding misconduct and integrity issues. Results revealed students' perceptions of the definition and seriousness of potential academic misconduct, knowledge of institutional procedures, and views on faculty actions, all with a focus on divergences between U.S. and internationally-educated students. The open-ended questions provide anecdotal evidence to highlight personal experiences, positive and negative, aimed at the faculty, international students and undergraduates. Combined, these findings outline an important part of the campus academic integrity culture at a major American university. Recommendations for local actions also are discussed.

  3. A new code for automatic detection and analysis of the lineament patterns for geophysical and geological purposes (ADALGEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pinto, C.; Arellano-Baeza, A.; Sánchez, G.

    2013-08-01

    We present a new numerical method for automatic detection and analysis of changes in lineament patterns caused by seismic and volcanic activities. The method is implemented as a series of modules: (i) normalization of the image contrast, (ii) extraction of small linear features (stripes) through convolution of the part of the image in the vicinity of each pixel with a circular mask or through Canny algorithm, and (iii) posterior detection of main lineaments using the Hough transform. We demonstrate that our code reliably detects changes in the lineament patterns related to the stress evolution in the Earth's crust: specifically, a significant number of new lineaments appear approximately one month before an earthquake, while one month after the earthquake the lineament configuration returns to its initial state. Application of our software to the deformations caused by volcanic activity yields the opposite results: the number of lineaments decreases with the onset of microseismicity. This discrepancy can be explained assuming that the plate tectonic earthquakes are caused by the compression and accumulation of stress in the Earth's crust due to subduction of tectonic plates, whereas in the case of volcanic activity we deal with the inflation of a volcano edifice due to elevation of pressure and magma intrusion and the resulting stretching of the surface.

  4. PWR neutron ex-vessel detection calculations using three-dimensional codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekens, O.; Lefebvre, J.C.; Rohart, M.; Chiron, M.

    1997-01-01

    During the accident of TM12, the signal delivered by source detectors was exceptionally high. This phenomenon was found out to be due to the water inventory in the primary system. Thus, in their research activity, Electricite de France (EdF) and Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) have jointly launched a programme, whose aim was to determine to what extent the response of ex-vessel neutron detectors are representative of reactor water level (or sources positions) in a French 900 MWe PWR. In this framework, both partners developed the methods needed for each step of the calculation chain. Finally, a simulation of a LOCA indicates that the loss of coolant can be detected by existing monitoring system, and could be more efficiently found by changing the position of the source range detectors. (authors)

  5. Non-Linear Detection for Joint Space-Frequency Block Coding and Spatial Multiplexing in OFDM-MIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahman, Imadur Mohamed; Marchetti, Nicola; Fitzek, Frank

    2005-01-01

    (SIC) receiver where the detection is done on subcarrier by sub-carrier basis based on both Zero Forcing (ZF) and Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) nulling criterion for the system. In terms of Frame Error Rate (FER), MMSE based SIC receiver performs better than all other receivers compared......In this work, we have analyzed a joint spatial diversity and multiplexing transmission structure for MIMO-OFDM system, where Orthogonal Space-Frequency Block Coding (OSFBC) is used across all spatial multiplexing branches. We have derived a BLAST-like non-linear Successive Interference Cancellation...... in this paper. We have found that a linear two-stage receiver for the proposed system [1] performs very close to the non-linear receiver studied in this work. Finally, we compared the system performance in spatially correlated scenario. It is found that higher amount of spatial correlation at the transmitter...

  6. Chinese University EFL Teachers’ Knowledge of and Stance on Plagiarism = Conocimientos y actitudes ante el plagio del profesorado de lengua inglesa en universidades chinas

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Guangwei; Sun, Xiaoya

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism has engendered increasing concern in academia in the past few decades. While previous studies have investigated student plagiarism from various perspectives, how plagiarism is understood and responded to by university teachers, especially those in English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) writing contexts, has been under-researched. As academic insiders and educators of future academics, university teachers play a key role in educating students against plagiarism and upholding academic i...

  7. Polarization-multiplexed rate-adaptive non-binary-quasi-cyclic-LDPC-coded multilevel modulation with coherent detection for optical transport networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabaci, Murat; Djordjevic, Ivan B; Saunders, Ross; Marcoccia, Roberto M

    2010-02-01

    In order to achieve high-speed transmission over optical transport networks (OTNs) and maximize its throughput, we propose using a rate-adaptive polarization-multiplexed coded multilevel modulation with coherent detection based on component non-binary quasi-cyclic (QC) LDPC codes. Compared to prior-art bit-interleaved LDPC-coded modulation (BI-LDPC-CM) scheme, the proposed non-binary LDPC-coded modulation (NB-LDPC-CM) scheme not only reduces latency due to symbol- instead of bit-level processing but also provides either impressive reduction in computational complexity or striking improvements in coding gain depending on the constellation size. As the paper presents, compared to its prior-art binary counterpart, the proposed NB-LDPC-CM scheme addresses the needs of future OTNs, which are achieving the target BER performance and providing maximum possible throughput both over the entire lifetime of the OTN, better.

  8. Making a Difference: Library and Teaching Faculty Working Together to Develop Strategies in Dealing with Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Student plagiarism is a problem affecting all colleges. Various strategies have been developed to deal with this situation. But, the collaborative efforts of subject faculty and librarians in creating a team approach towards plagiarism can produce positive results. Research shows that these relationships can provide structure to assignments…

  9. What Prevents ESL/FL Writers from Avoiding Plagiarism? Analyses of 10 North-American College Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kyoko

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how inexperienced English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language (ESL/EFL) writers can be helped to avoid plagiarism. Analyzes 10 North American Web sites on plagiarism, which provide a window to understanding how this issue has been problemitized and explained in Anglophone academic contexts. Concludes ESL/EFL may need to emphasize the role of…

  10. Developing Students' Referencing Skills: A Matter of Plagiarism, Punishment and Morality or of Learning to Write Critically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Just as plagiarism is viewed poorly in the academic community, so is plagiarism viewed poorly in student writing, with a range of sanctions and penalties applying for not displaying academic integrity. Yet learning to cite effectively to progress one's argument, position or understandings is a skill that takes time to develop and hone. This paper…

  11. Police, Design, Plan and Manage: Developing a Framework for Integrating Staff Roles and Institutional Policies into a Plagiarism Prevention Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher; White, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    When student plagiarism occurs, academic interest and institutional policy generally assume the fault rests with the student. This paper questions this assumption. We claim that plagiarism is a shared responsibility and a complex phenomenon that requires an ongoing calibration of the relative skills and experiences of students and staff in…

  12. Using Online Resources to Improve Writing Skills and Attitudes about Writing and Plagiarism of Criminal Justice Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohe, B.; Schroeder, J.; Davis, S. R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Cheating and plagiarism are significant problems in higher education because they occur often and interfere with learning. Plagiarism creates shortcuts that bypass the time and effort required to develop the writing and analytical skills necessary to produce evidence of progress in mastering course content. The purpose of a two-semester writing…

  13. Detection of non-coding RNAs on the basis of predicted secondary structure formation free energy change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzilov Andrew V

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have a multitude of roles in the cell, many of which remain to be discovered. However, it is difficult to detect novel ncRNAs in biochemical screens. To advance biological knowledge, computational methods that can accurately detect ncRNAs in sequenced genomes are therefore desirable. The increasing number of genomic sequences provides a rich dataset for computational comparative sequence analysis and detection of novel ncRNAs. Results Here, Dynalign, a program for predicting secondary structures common to two RNA sequences on the basis of minimizing folding free energy change, is utilized as a computational ncRNA detection tool. The Dynalign-computed optimal total free energy change, which scores the structural alignment and the free energy change of folding into a common structure for two RNA sequences, is shown to be an effective measure for distinguishing ncRNA from randomized sequences. To make the classification as a ncRNA, the total free energy change of an input sequence pair can either be compared with the total free energy changes of a set of control sequence pairs, or be used in combination with sequence length and nucleotide frequencies as input to a classification support vector machine. The latter method is much faster, but slightly less sensitive at a given specificity. Additionally, the classification support vector machine method is shown to be sensitive and specific on genomic ncRNA screens of two different Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi genome alignments, in which many ncRNAs are known. The Dynalign computational experiments are also compared with two other ncRNA detection programs, RNAz and QRNA. Conclusion The Dynalign-based support vector machine method is more sensitive for known ncRNAs in the test genomic screens than RNAz and QRNA. Additionally, both Dynalign-based methods are more sensitive than RNAz and QRNA at low sequence pair identities. Dynalign can be used as a

  14. SYSTEM «PlagiarismControl» AS THE TOOL FOR THE EXPERTISE OF THE TEXT DOCUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. B. Krapivin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The description and the operability analysis of the implemented instrumental software system «PlagiarismControl» has been done. The system affords to automatize solving the task of the identification of the adopted fragments in the given text document both from the local full-text user’s database and from the Internet. The system affords solving the task taking in account explicit as well as implicit adoptions with precision up to lexical units paradigms and both lexical and grammatical synonymy relations, according to the structural-functional schematic diagram of the system of the automatic recognition of reproduced fragments of the text documents. «PlagiarismControl» is able to work in different modes, to automatize the work of the expert and to speed up significantly the procedure of the analysis of the documents, with the purpose of recognition of the adoptions (plagiarism from other text documents.

  15. Plagiarism and registered health professionals: navigating the borderlands between scholarly and professional misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, Jon

    2013-12-01

    As access to published materials becomes more readily available, the ability to plagiarise material, deliberately or unwittingly has become easier than ever. This article explores important recent decisions in Australia and the United Kingdom regarding registered health practitioners who have engaged in plagiarism, both related and unrelated to their clinical practice, and explores the ways in which regulatory authorities in these countries have viewed scholarly misconduct committed by registered health professionals. This article also examines the implications of plagiarism for the registered health professions, and makes suggestions for strategies to reduce its influence and incidence in modern clinical practice.

  16. Self-plagiarism and textual recycling: legitimate forms of research misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Samuel V

    2014-01-01

    The concept of self-plagiarism frequently elicits skepticism and generates confusion in the research ethics literature, and the ethical status of what is often called "textual recycling" is particularly controversial. I argue that, in general, self-plagiarism is unethical because it is deceptive and dishonest. I then distinguish several forms of it and argue against various common rationalizations for textual recycling. I conclude with a discussion of two instances of textual recycling, distinguishing them in terms of their ethical seriousness but concluding that both are ethically problematic.

  17. No evidence of age-related increases in unconscious plagiarism during free recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Timothy John; Defeldre, Anne-Catherine; Elliman, Rachel; Dehon, Hedwige

    2011-07-01

    In three experiments younger and older participants took part in a group generation task prior to a delayed recall task. In each, participants were required to recall the items that they had generated, avoiding plagiarism errors. All studies showed the same pattern: older adults did not plagiarise their partners any more than younger adults did. However, older adults were more likely than younger adults to intrude with entirely novel items not previously generated by anyone. These findings stand in opposition to the single previous demonstration of age-related increases in plagiarism during recall.

  18. Use of diagnosis codes for detection of clinically significant opioid poisoning in the emergency department: A retrospective analysis of a surveillance case definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joseph M; Harmon, Katherine J; Schult, Genevieve C; Staton, Catherine A; Waller, Anna E

    2016-02-08

    Although fatal opioid poisonings tripled from 1999 to 2008, data describing nonfatal poisonings are rare. Public health authorities are in need of tools to track opioid poisonings in near real time. We determined the utility of ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes for identifying clinically significant opioid poisonings in a state-wide emergency department (ED) surveillance system. We sampled visits from four hospitals from July 2009 to June 2012 with diagnosis codes of 965.00, 965.01, 965.02 and 965.09 (poisoning by opiates and related narcotics) and/or an external cause of injury code of E850.0-E850.2 (accidental poisoning by opiates and related narcotics), and developed a novel case definition to determine in which cases opioid poisoning prompted the ED visit. We calculated the percentage of visits coded for opioid poisoning that were clinically significant and compared it to the percentage of visits coded for poisoning by non-opioid agents in which there was actually poisoning by an opioid agent. We created a multivariate regression model to determine if other collected triage data can improve the positive predictive value of diagnosis codes alone for detecting clinically significant opioid poisoning. 70.1 % of visits (Standard Error 2.4 %) coded for opioid poisoning were primarily prompted by opioid poisoning. The remainder of visits represented opioid exposure in the setting of other primary diseases. Among non-opioid poisoning codes reviewed, up to 36 % were reclassified as an opioid poisoning. In multivariate analysis, only naloxone use improved the positive predictive value of ICD-9-CM codes for identifying clinically significant opioid poisoning, but was associated with a high false negative rate. This surveillance mechanism identifies many clinically significant opioid overdoses with a high positive predictive value. With further validation, it may help target control measures such as prescriber education and pharmacy monitoring.

  19. SOFTWARE INSPECTION TECHNIQUE OF SCIENTIFIC AND ACADEMIC WORKS – PANACEA FOR THE PLAGIARISM OR A SPOT OF DIFFICULT PROCEDURE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. П. Ткаченко

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of software identifying text coincidences instruments provides an analysis of scientific and academic works for the evidence of plagiarism. Besides, the anti-plagiarism is not just a fight against illegal text borrowings as consequences of this phenomenon. It should be a comprehensive mechanism for dealing with both the consequences and the causes of the appearance of such a phenomenon. Such mechanism should include the implementation of the system of values that correspond to the principles of academic integrity, along with making total enquiries of all works on plagiarism. The exhaustive list of text borrowings, which is resultant, is the basis for expertsassessors decision-making in point of plagiarism presence. What is more, there should be no permissible standards of the plagiarism. All borrowings must being drawn up in accordance with the requirements. Therefore, the best result in the fight against plagiarism will achieved only by comprehensive approach – when the academic culture and the principles of academic integrity will be instilled ever since school, along with the check of all works for plagiarism.

  20. Science ethics education: effects of a short lecture on plagiarism on the knowledge of young medical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkic, S; Bogdanovic, G; Vuckovic-Dekic, Lj; Gavrilovic, D; Kezic, I

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism is the most common form of scientific fraud. It is agreed that the best preventive measure is education of young scientists on basic principles of responsible conduct of research and writing. The purpose of this article was to contribute to the students' knowledge and adoption of the rules of scientific writing. A 45 min lecture was delivered to 98 attendees during 3 courses on science ethics. Before and after the course the attendees fulfilled an especially designed questionnaire with 13 questions, specifically related to the definition and various types of plagiarism and self-plagiarism. Although considering themselves as insufficiently educated in science ethics, the majority of the attendees responded correctly to almost all questions even before the course, with percentages of correct responses to the specific question varying from 45.9-85.7%. After completion of the course, these percentages were significantly (pplagiarism ranged from 9.18- 42.86%. The percentage of impairment ranged from 1.02- 16.33%, the latter being related to the question on correct citing unpublished materials of other people; only for this question the percentage of impairment (16.33%) was greater than the percentage of improvement (11.22%). Even a short lecture focused on plagiarism contributed to the students' awareness that there are many forms of plagiarism, and that plagiarism is a serious violation of science ethics. This result confirms the largely accepted opinion that education is the best means in preventing plagiarism.

  1. Biases in detection of apparent "weekend effect" on outcome with administrative coding data: population based study of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin; Rothwell, Peter M

    2016-05-16

     To determine the accuracy of coding of admissions for stroke on weekdays versus weekends and any impact on apparent outcome.  Prospective population based stroke incidence study and a scoping review of previous studies of weekend effects in stroke.  Primary and secondary care of all individuals registered with nine general practices in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (OXVASC, the Oxford Vascular Study).  All patients with clinically confirmed acute stroke in OXVASC identified with multiple overlapping methods of ascertainment in 2002-14 versus all acute stroke admissions identified by hospital diagnostic and mortality coding alone during the same period.  Accuracy of administrative coding data for all patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC. Difference between rates of "false positive" or "false negative" coding for weekday and weekend admissions. Impact of inaccurate coding on apparent case fatality at 30 days in weekday versus weekend admissions. Weekend effects on outcomes in patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC and impacts of other potential biases compared with those in the scoping review.  Among 92 728 study population, 2373 episodes of acute stroke were ascertained in OXVASC, of which 826 (34.8%) mainly minor events were managed without hospital admission, 60 (2.5%) occurred out of the area or abroad, and 195 (8.2%) occurred in hospital during an admission for a different reason. Of 1292 local hospital admissions for acute stroke, 973 (75.3%) were correctly identified by administrative coding. There was no bias in distribution of weekend versus weekday admission of the 319 strokes missed by coding. Of 1693 admissions for stroke identified by coding, 1055 (62.3%) were confirmed to be acute strokes after case adjudication. Among the 638 false positive coded cases, patients were more likely to be admitted on weekdays than at weekends (536 (41.0%) v 102 (26.5%); Pcoded acute stroke admissions and false positive

  2. Biases in detection of apparent “weekend effect” on outcome with administrative coding data: population based study of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linxin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the accuracy of coding of admissions for stroke on weekdays versus weekends and any impact on apparent outcome. Design Prospective population based stroke incidence study and a scoping review of previous studies of weekend effects in stroke. Setting Primary and secondary care of all individuals registered with nine general practices in Oxfordshire, United Kingdom (OXVASC, the Oxford Vascular Study). Participants All patients with clinically confirmed acute stroke in OXVASC identified with multiple overlapping methods of ascertainment in 2002-14 versus all acute stroke admissions identified by hospital diagnostic and mortality coding alone during the same period. Main outcomes measures Accuracy of administrative coding data for all patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC. Difference between rates of “false positive” or “false negative” coding for weekday and weekend admissions. Impact of inaccurate coding on apparent case fatality at 30 days in weekday versus weekend admissions. Weekend effects on outcomes in patients with confirmed stroke admitted to hospital in OXVASC and impacts of other potential biases compared with those in the scoping review. Results Among 92 728 study population, 2373 episodes of acute stroke were ascertained in OXVASC, of which 826 (34.8%) mainly minor events were managed without hospital admission, 60 (2.5%) occurred out of the area or abroad, and 195 (8.2%) occurred in hospital during an admission for a different reason. Of 1292 local hospital admissions for acute stroke, 973 (75.3%) were correctly identified by administrative coding. There was no bias in distribution of weekend versus weekday admission of the 319 strokes missed by coding. Of 1693 admissions for stroke identified by coding, 1055 (62.3%) were confirmed to be acute strokes after case adjudication. Among the 638 false positive coded cases, patients were more likely to be admitted on weekdays than at weekends (536

  3. Academic Crime and Punishment: Faculty Members' Perceptions of and Responses to Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Zanartu, Carol; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Cook-Morales, Valerie; Pena, Anna M.; Afshani, Rosalyn; Nguyen, Lynda

    2005-01-01

    Academic dishonesty and its consequences have become increasingly complex. Highly accessible electronic media, profound consequences for misconduct and reporting, and lack of standard practice intensify the issues. We surveyed 270 faculty members to determine whether they had been confronted with plagiarism and if they felt prepared to deal with…

  4. Academic Integrity and Student Plagiarism: Guided Instructional Strategies for Business Communication Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Ephraim A.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining academic integrity is critical to the sustainability of a civil society and to the democratic process. Educators across the disciplines are growing increasingly disturbed by the level of plagiarism on university campuses. The author contends that developing supportive ways of empowering students to become more independent writers in…

  5. Evaluation of an Intervention to Help Students Avoid Unintentional Plagiarism by Improving Their Authorial Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elander, James; Pittam, Gail; Lusher, Joanne; Fox, Pauline; Payne, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Students with poorly developed authorial identity may be at risk of unintentional plagiarism. An instructional intervention designed specifically to improve authorial identity was delivered to 364 psychology students at three post-1992 universities in London, UK, and evaluated with before-and-after measures of beliefs and attitudes about academic…

  6. Plagiarism and the Culture of Multilingual Students in Higher Education Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Colin

    2005-01-01

    The cultural values of multilingual students are sometimes at variance with Western academic practice, in matters such as plagiarism. In accepting this, however, it is important to avoid stereotyping. Instead we should respect and make use of the students' own traditions of study. It is also time to acknowledge that ideas and language are…

  7. Comparative Analysis of Institutional Policy Definitions of Plagiarism: A Pan-Canadian University Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This article shares the findings of a study investigating institutional policy definitions of plagiarism at twenty English-speaking Canadian universities. The types of primary sources consulted for this study included: (1) university academic calendars for 2016-2017, (2) institutional policies on academic misconduct, and (3) student academic codes…

  8. Academic Integrity, Remix Culture, Globalization: A Canadian Case Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Tokaryk, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a case study at a Canadian university that used a combination of surveys and focus groups to explore faculty members' and students' perceptions of plagiarism. The research suggests that the globalization of education and remix culture have contributed to competing and contradictory understandings of plagiarism…

  9. Online Academic Integrity: An Examination of MBA Students' Behavioral Intent of Engaging in Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rashad A.

    2017-01-01

    With the proliferation of online graduate enrollment by 35.7% from 2003 to 2014, the literature indicates the number of reported academic integrity cases is on the rise. A quantitative correlational study was used to determine which determinants, if any, had a relationship to the behavioral intent to engage in plagiarism among MBA students…

  10. Discourses of Plagiarism: Moralist, Proceduralist, Developmental and Inter-Textual Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposi, David; Dell, Pippa

    2012-01-01

    This paper reconstructs prevalent academic discourses of student plagiarism: moralism, proceduralism, development, and writing/inter-textuality. It approaches the discourses from three aspects: intention, interpretation and the nature of the academic community. It argues that the assumptions of the moralistic approach regarding suspect intention,…

  11. Teaching Note--Evaluation of an Avoiding Plagiarism Workshop for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Judy

    2016-01-01

    A 1-hour workshop on how to avoid plagiarizing when writing academic papers was developed and delivered at an orientation session for BSW and MSW students at a university in the northeast United States. Six social work instructors led the workshops at the university's main campus and two extension centers. Before and after the workshop, students…

  12. The Tangled Web: Investigating Academics' Views of Plagiarism at the University of Cape Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Karin; Brown, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the problematic question of student plagiarism, its causes and manifestations, and how it is addressed in academic environments. A literature survey was conducted to establish how higher education institutions approach these issues, and a twofold investigation was conducted at the University of Cape Town. Data was gathered…

  13. An Online Tutorial vs. Pre-Recorded Lecture for Reducing Incidents of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henslee, Amber M.; Goldsmith, Jacob; Stone, Nancy J.; Krueger, Merilee

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared an online academic integrity tutorial modified from Belter & du Pre (2009) to a pre-recorded online academic integrity lecture in reducing incidents of plagiarism among undergraduate students at a science and technology university. Participants were randomized to complete either the tutorial or the pre-recorded…

  14. Investigating Chinese University Students' Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Plagiarism from an Integrated Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangwei; Lei, Jun

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a mixed-methods study of Chinese university students' knowledge of and attitudes toward plagiarism in English academic writing. A sample of 270 undergraduates from two Chinese universities rated three short English passages under different conditions, provided open-ended responses to justify their ratings, and completed a…

  15. Reducing Unintentional Plagiarism amongst International Students in the Biological Sciences: An Embedded Academic Writing Development Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divan, Aysha; Bowman, Marion; Seabourne, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There is general agreement in the literature that international students are more likely to plagiarise compared to their native speaker peers and, in many instances, plagiarism is unintentional. In this article we describe the effectiveness of an academic writing development programme embedded into a Biological Sciences Taught Masters course…

  16. The practice and attitude towards plagiarism among postgraduate trainees in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah E Kattan

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Despite having had courses in medical writing, research ethics and/or published a scientific manuscript before; we still found a positive lean towards plagiarism. This emphasises the importance of tackling such behaviour by increasing the level of awareness among trainees to avoid such misconduct.

  17. Fraudulent Practices: Academic Misrepresentations of Plagiarism in the Name of Good Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson, Chris M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes analyses of three contexts (civic, business, and military) in which understandings of intellectual property differ from those taught in the schools. In each of these contexts, it is possible to document specific examples of unattributed material that would be considered to violate most academic plagiarism policies. Yet in…

  18. Examining Differences among Online Faculty Reporting Student Plagiarism Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeder Stowe, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Among higher education faculty, having to address academic misconduct and plagiarism is often viewed as a negative aspect of teaching resulting in inconsistent reporting by faculty. Some faculty members take no action in response. Differences exist in attitudes between traditional regular full-time and part-time adjunct faculty members in terms of…

  19. Internet Plagiarism in Higher Education: Tendencies, Triggering Factors and Reasons among Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eret, Esra; Ok, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    While plagiarism has been a growing problem in higher education for a long time, the use of the Internet has made this increasing problem more unmanageable. In many countries, this problem has become a matter of discussion, and higher education institutions feel obliged to review their policies on academic dishonesty. As part of these efforts, the…

  20. Generating Knowledge and Avoiding Plagiarism: Smart Information Use by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Kirsty; McGregor, Joy

    2011-01-01

    The article reports phase 2 of a two-year study, dubbed the Smart Information Use project, the focus of which was appropriate seeking and use of information by students at various stages of their high school education, along with the avoidance of plagiarism. In four Australian high schools, teacher librarians and classroom teachers developed and…