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Sample records for cochrane review grommets

  1. Extracts from the Cochrane Library: "Grommets (ventilation tubes) for hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion in children".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Martin J; Derkay, Craig S; Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2011-05-01

    The Cochrane Corner is a quarterly section in the journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology–head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features an updated Cochrane review "Grommets (Ventilation Tubes) for Hearing Loss Associated with Otitis Media with Effusion in Children" that reinforces the modest benefits demonstrated in the original review published in 2005.

  2. Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeflang, Mariska M. G.; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Macaskill, Petra

    2013-01-01

    In 1996, shortly after the founding of The Cochrane Collaboration, leading figures in test evaluation research established a Methods Group to focus on the relatively new and rapidly evolving methods for the systematic review of studies of diagnostic tests. Seven years later, the Collaboration

  3. Searching for unpublished data for Cochrane reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Jeppe Bennekou; Bero, Lisa; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    To describe the experiences of authors of Cochrane reviews in searching for, getting access to, and using unpublished data.......To describe the experiences of authors of Cochrane reviews in searching for, getting access to, and using unpublished data....

  4. Grommets for otitis media with effusion in children with cleft palate: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-Lung; Tsao, Yuan-Heng; Cheng, Hao-Min; Lien, Chiang-Feng; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Huang, Chii-Yuan; Shiao, An-Suey

    2014-11-01

    No consensus has yet been reached with regard to the link between otitis media with effusion (OME), hearing loss, and language development in children with cleft palate. The objective of this study was to address the effectiveness of ventilation tube insertion (VTI) for OME in children with cleft palate. A dual review process was used to assess eligible studies drawn from PubMed, Medline via Ovid, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Cochrane Library, and reference lists between 1948 and November 2013. Potentially relevant papers were selected according to the full text of the articles. Relevant data were extracted onto a data extraction sheet. Nine high- or moderate-quality cohort studies were included in this study. VTI was administered in 38% to 53% of the OME cases, and more severe cases appeared more likely to undergo VTI. Compared with conservative forms of management (eg, watchful waiting), VTI has been shown to be beneficial to the recovery of hearing in children with cleft palate and OME. A growing body of evidence demonstrates the benefits of VTI in the development of speech and language in children with cleft palate and OME. These children face a higher risk of complications than those undergoing conservative treatments, the most common of which are eardrum retraction and tympanosclerosis, with an incidence of ∼ 11% to 37%. This review provides evidence-based information related to the selection of treatment for OME in children with cleft palate. Additional randomized controlled trials are required to obtain bias-resistant evidence capable of reliably guiding treatment decisions. The conclusions in this review are based on underpowered cohort studies and very-low-strength evidence. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Cochrane review: virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, K; George, S; Thomas, S; Deutsch, J E; Crotty, M

    2012-09-01

    Virtual reality and interactive video gaming are innovative therapy approaches in the field of stroke rehabilitation. The primary objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of virtual reality on motor function after stroke. The impact on secondary outcomes including activities of daily living was also assessed. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials that compared virtual reality with an alternative or no intervention were included in the review. The authors searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, electronic databases, trial registers, reference lists, Dissertation Abstracts, conference proceedings and contacted key researchers and virtual reality manufacturers. Search results were independently examined by two review authors to identify studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Nineteen studies with a total of 565 participants were included in the review. Variation in intervention approaches and outcome data collected limited the extent to which studies could be compared. Virtual reality was found to be significantly more effective than conventional therapy in improving upper limb function (standardised mean difference, SMD) 0.53, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.25 to 0.81)) based on seven studies, and activities of daily living (ADL) function (SMD 0.81, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.22) based on three studies. No statistically significant effects were found for grip strength (based on two studies) or gait speed (based on three studies). Virtual reality appears to be a promising approach however, further studies are required to confirm these findings.

  6. Statistical Multiplicity in Systematic Reviews of Anaesthesia Interventions: A Quantification and Comparison between Cochrane and Non-Cochrane Reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imberger, Georgina; Vejlby, Alexandra Hedvig Damgaard; Hansen, Sara Bohnstedt

    2011-01-01

    Systematic reviews with meta-analyses often contain many statistical tests. This multiplicity may increase the risk of type I error. Few attempts have been made to address the problem of statistical multiplicity in systematic reviews. Before the implications are properly considered, the size...... of the issue deserves clarification. Because of the emphasis on bias evaluation and because of the editorial processes involved, Cochrane reviews may contain more multiplicity than their non-Cochrane counterparts. This study measured the quantity of statistical multiplicity present in a population...... of systematic reviews and aimed to assess whether this quantity is different in Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews....

  7. Prevalence of honorary and ghost authorship in Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowatt, Graham; Shirran, Liz; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Rennie, Drummond; Flanagin, Annette; Yank, Veronica; MacLennan, Graeme; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Bero, Lisa A

    2002-06-05

    To determine the prevalence of honorary and ghost authorship in Cochrane reviews, how authorship is assigned, and the ways in which authors and Cochrane editorial teams contribute. Using a Web-based, self-administered survey, corresponding authors for 577 reviews published in issues 1 and 2 from 1999 of The Cochrane Library were invited to report on the prevalence of honorary and ghost authors, contributions by authors listed in the byline and members of Cochrane editorial teams, and identification of methods of assigning authorship. Responses were received for 362 reviews (63% response rate), which contained 913 authors. One hundred forty-one reviews (39%) had evidence of honorary authors, 32 (9%) had evidence of ghost authors (most commonly a member of the Cochrane editorial team), and 9 (2%) had evidence of both honorary and ghost authors. The editorial teams contributed in a wide variety of ways to 301 reviews (83%). Authorship was decided by the group of authors (31%) or lead author (25%) in most reviews. Authorship order was assigned according to contribution in most reviews (76%). The 3 functions contributed to most by those listed in the byline were assessing the quality of included studies (83%), interpreting data (82%), and abstracting data from included studies (77%). A substantial proportion of reviews had evidence of honorary and ghost authorship. The Cochrane editorial teams contributed to most Cochrane reviews.

  8. Assessing and presenting summaries of evidence in Cochrane Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendam, Miranda W.; Akl, Elie A.; Dahm, Philipp; Glasziou, Paul; Guyatt, Gordon; Schünemann, Holger J.

    2013-01-01

    Cochrane Reviews are intended to help providers, practitioners and patients make informed decisions about health care. The goal of the Cochrane Applicability and Recommendation Methods Group (ARMG) is to develop approaches, strategies and guidance that facilitate the uptake of information from

  9. WITHDRAWN: Interventions for ear discharge associated with grommets (ventilation tubes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaile, Louise; Williamson, Tim; Waddell, Angus; Taylor, Gordon J

    2016-11-15

    The insertion of grommets (also known as ventilation or tympanostomy tubes) is one of the most common surgical procedures performed on children. Postoperative otorrhoea (discharge) is the most common complication with a reported incidence ranging from 10% to 50%. In the UK, many ENT surgeons treat with topical antibiotics/steroid combinations, but general practitioners, mainly through fears of ototoxicity, are unlikely to prescribe these and choose systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics. 1. To identify the most effective non-surgical management of discharge from ears with grommets in place.2. To identify the risks of non-surgical management for this condition (e.g. ototoxicity), and to set benefits of treatment against these risks. We searched the Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2005), MEDLINE (1966 to 2005) and EMBASE (1974 to 2005). We also searched the CINAHL, AMED, LILACS, ISI WEB OF KNOWLEDGE, ISI PROCEEDINGS, mRCT, NNR, ZETOC, KOREAMED, CSA, MEDCARIB, INDMED and SAMED databases. The date of the last search was February 2005. Randomised controlled trials of adults or children, with any type of grommet and an ear with discharge were included. The trials compared treatment with placebo or one treatment with another. The primary outcome measure was the duration of the discharge. The trials were selected independently according to the above criteria by the four reviewers. Differences in opinion over the inclusion of studies were resolved by discussion. The studies were graded using the CASP critical appraisal tool. Analyses were based on the presence of discharge seven days from the onset of treatment. There was very little good quality evidence. Four studies were included, all of them investigating different interventions and therefore a meta-analysis was not possible.Only one study demonstrated a significant difference. Oral amoxicillin

  10. Avoidable Ignorance and the Role of Cochrane and Campbell Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    The Campbell and Cochrane Collaborations were created to reveal the evidentiary status of claims focusing especially on the effectiveness of specific interventions. Such reviews are constrained by the population of studies available and biases that may influence this availability such as preferred framing of problems. This highlights the…

  11. Clinical recommendations of Cochrane reviews in pediatric gastroenterology: systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Yvonne; Sauer, Harald; Schöndorf, Dominik; Hennes, Pia; Gortner, Ludwig; Gräber, Stefan; Meyer, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Systematic and up-to-date Cochrane reviews in pediatrics in general and in pediatric gastroenterology in particular are important tools in disseminating the best available evidence to the medical community, thus providing the physician at the bedside with invaluable information and recommendations with regard to specific clinical questions. A systematic literature review was conducted, including all Cochrane reviews published by the Cochrane Review Group in the field of pediatric gastroenterology between 1993 and 2012, with regard to the percentage of reviews that concluded that a certain intervention provided a benefit, percentage of reviews that concluded that a certain intervention should not be performed, and percentage of studies that concluded that the current level of evidence was inconclusive. In total, 86 reviews in the field of pediatric gastroenterology were included. The majority of reviews assessed pharmacological interventions (46/86); other important fields included prevention (15/86) and nutrition (9/86). A total of 33/86 reviews issued definite recommendations (positive, 19/86; negative, 14/86). The remaining 53/86 reviews were either inconclusive (24/86) or only of limited conclusiveness (29/86). The percentage of inconclusive reviews increased from 9% (1998-2002) to 19% (2003-2007; P < 0.05) to finally 24% (2008-2012) (P < 0.05). The three most common reasons for the need for further research were heterogeneity of studies (26/86), small number of patients (18/86), and insufficient data (16/86). Further high-quality research is necessary to increase the proportion of reviews with clear recommendations. Funding and research agencies are key to selecting the most appropriate research programs. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Interventions for tophi in gout: a Cochrane systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranganathan, Melonie K; Vinik, Ophir; Falzon, Louise; Bombardier, Claire; van der Heijde, Desiree M; Edwards, Christopher J

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review the available literature on the management of tophi in gout. This article is based on the Cochrane Review Interventions for Tophi in Gout published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library were searched using a strategy developed with an experienced librarian. We also searched American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism conference abstracts from 2010-2011. Included articles were reviewed in detail and a risk of bias (using the Cochrane tool) and quality assessment were performed. In total, 3206 references were recovered. Of these, 72 articles were selected based on our inclusion criteria. This included 1 report of 2 randomized controlled trials, 2 nonrandomized studies, and 69 case series and reports. The study with 2 randomized controlled trials looked at pegloticase. This showed improvement in tophi with treatment. One observational prospective trial looked at allopurinol and benzbromarone individually and in combination. It noted that achieving lower serum urate levels was associated with a faster reduction of tophi. An open-label extension trial noted that longterm maintenance of serum uric acid < 6.0 mg/dl with febuxostat led to a reduction in tophi. The case series and reports looked at surgical, pharmacological, and other interventions, as well as combination therapies. All surgical interventions reported improvement in pain and/or function. No report had objective measures of outcome. Treatment with urate-lowering therapy such as allopurinol, benzbromarone, allopurinol + benzbromarone in combination, febuxostat, or pegloticase can lead to reduction in tophi. There is some evidence that achieving a lower serum urate level leads to a faster rate of tophi reduction.

  13. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Cindy; Rishworth, Josephine R; Brown, Julie; Nelen, Willianne L D M; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2015-07-15

    As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving birth to a healthy live baby of their own. Fertility treatments are complex, and each ART cycle consists of several steps. If one of the steps is incorrectly applied, the stakes are high as conception may not occur. With this in mind, it is important that each step of the ART cycle is supported by good evidence from well-designed studies. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on procedures and treatment options available to couples with subfertility undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART). Published Cochrane systematic reviews of couples undergoing ART (in vitro fertilisation or intracytoplasmic sperm injection) were eligible for inclusion in the overview. We also identified Cochrane reviews in preparation, for future inclusion.The outcomes of the overview were live birth (primary outcome), clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, miscarriage and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (secondary outcomes). Studies of intrauterine insemination and ovulation induction were excluded.Selection of systematic reviews, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken in duplicate. Review quality was assessed by using the AMSTAR tool. Reviews were organised by their relevance to specific stages in the ART cycle. Their findings were summarised in the text and data for each outcome were reported in 'Additional tables'. Fifty-nine systematic reviews published in The Cochrane Library up to July 2015 were included. All were high quality. Thirty-two reviews identified interventions that were effective (n = 19) or promising (n = 13), 14 reviews identified interventions that were either ineffective (n = 2) or possibly ineffective (n = 12), and 13 reviews were unable to

  14. Usefulness of Cochrane Skin Group reviews for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila-Seijo, P; Batalla, A; Garcia-Doval, I

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reviews are one of the most important sources of information for evidence-based medicine. However, there is a general impression that these reviews rarely report results that provide sufficient evidence to change clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine the percentage of Cochrane Skin Group reviews reporting results with the potential to guide clinical decision-making. We performed a bibliometric analysis of all the systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Skin Group up to 16 August, 2012. We retrieved 55 reviews, which were analyzed and graded independently by 2 investigators into 3 categories: 0 (insufficient evidence to support or reject the use of an intervention), 1 (insufficient evidence to support or reject the use of an intervention but sufficient evidence to support recommendations or suggestions), and 2 (sufficient evidence to support or reject the use of an intervention). Our analysis showed that 25.5% (14/55) of the studies did not provide sufficient evidence to support or reject the use of the interventions studied, 45.5% (25/25) provided sufficient but not strong evidence to support recommendations or suggestions, and 29.1% (16/55) provided strong evidence to support or reject the use of 1 or more of the interventions studied. Most of the systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Skin Group provide useful information to improve clinical practice. Clinicians should read these reviews and reconsider their current practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing bias in osteoarthritis trials included in Cochrane reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Julie Bolvig; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Boutron, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The validity of systematic reviews and meta-analysis depends on methodological quality and unbiased dissemination of trials. Our objective is to evaluate the association of estimates of treatment effects with different bias-related study characteristics in meta-analyses of intervent......INTRODUCTION: The validity of systematic reviews and meta-analysis depends on methodological quality and unbiased dissemination of trials. Our objective is to evaluate the association of estimates of treatment effects with different bias-related study characteristics in meta......-analyses of interventions used for treating pain in osteoarthritis (OA). From the findings, we hope to consolidate guidance on interpreting OA trials in systematic reviews based on empirical evidence from Cochrane reviews. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Only systematic reviews that compare experimental interventions with sham...... the first appearing forest plot for overall pain in the Cochrane review. Treatment effect sizes will be expressed as standardised mean differences (SMDs), where the difference in mean values available from the forest plots is divided by the pooled SD. To empirically assess the risk of bias in treatment...

  16. Do Cochrane reviews provide a good model for social science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Merete; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    2012-01-01

    Formalised research synthesis to underpin evidence-based policy and practice has become increasingly important in areas of public policy. In this paper we discuss whether the Cochrane standard for systematic reviews of healthcare interventions is appropriate for social research. We examine...... to conclude that the majority of reviews appears limited to considering randomised controlled trials only. Because recent studies have delineated conditions for observational studies in social research to produce valid evidence, we argue that an inclusive approach is essential for truly evidence-based policy...... and practice in regard to social interventions....

  17. Production and citation of cochrane systematic reviews: a bibliometrics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiantong; Li, Youping; Clarke, Mike; Du, Liang; Wang, Li; Zhong, Dake

    2014-05-06

    To evaluate the production and utilization of Cochrane systematic reviews(CSRs) and to analyze its influential factors, so as to improve the capacity of translating CSRs into practice. All CSRs and protocols were retrieved from the Cochrane Library ISSUE 2, 2011 and citation data were retrieved from SCI database. Citation analysis was used to analyze the situation of CSRs production and utilization. CSR publication had grown from an annual average of 32 to 718 documents. Only one developing country was among the ten countries with the largest amount of publications. High income countries accounted for 83% of CSR publications and 90.8% of cited counts. 34.7% of CSRs had a cited count of 0, while only 0.9% had been cited more than 50 times. Highly cited CSRs were published in England, Australia, Canada, USA and other high income countries. The countries with a Cochrane center or a Cochrane methodology group had a greater capability of CSRs production and citing than others. The CSRs addressing the topics of diseases were more than those targeted at public health issues. There was a big gap in citations of different interventions even for the same topic. The capability of CSR production and translation grew rapidly, but varied among countries and institutions, which was affected by several factors such as the capability of research, the resourcesand the applicability of the evidence. It is important to improve evidence translation through educating, training and prioritizing the problems based on real demands of end user. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Interventions for bronchiectasis: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Emma J; Evans, David J; Fowler, Stephen J; Spencer, Sally

    2015-07-14

    Bronchiectasis is a chronic respiratory disease characterised by abnormal dilatation of the bronchi, and presents typically with a chronic productive cough (or chronic wet cough in children) and recurrent infective exacerbations. It significantly impacts daily activities and quality of life, and can lead to recurrent hospitalisations, severe lung function impairment, respiratory failure and even death. To provide an overview of the efficacy and safety of interventions for adults and children with bronchiectasis from Cochrane reviews.To identify gaps in the evidence base that will inform recommendations for new research and reviews, and to summarise information on reported outcomes and make recommendations for the reporting of standard outcomes in future trials and reviews. We included Cochrane reviews of non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The search is current to 11 February 2015. We also identified trials that were potentially eligible for, but not currently included in, published reviews to make recommendations for new Cochrane reviews. We assessed the quality of included reviews using the AMSTAR criteria. We presented an evidence synthesis of data from reviews alongside an evidence map of clinical trials and guideline data. The primary outcomes were exacerbations, lung function and quality of life. We included 21 reviews but extracted data from, and rated the quality of, only nine reviews that reported results for people with bronchiectasis alone. Of the reviews with no usable data, two reviews included studies with mixed clinical populations where data were not reported separately for people with bronchiectasis and 10 reviews did not contain any trials. Of the 40 studies included across the nine reviews, three (number of participants nine to 34) included children. The studies ranged from single session to year-long studies. Each review included from one to 11 trials and 28 (70%) trials in the

  19. Grommets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the duration of OME.5 Risk factors for developmental difficulties include permanent ... of OME, suspected or confirmed speech and language delay, autism and other ... blindness, cleft palate or any other cause of developmental delay.2,3.

  20. Grommets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    or confirmed speech and language delay, autism and other pervasive developmental disorders, syndromes ... OME sufferers the benefits of tympanostomy tubes include a. 30% reduction of middle ear effusion (MEE) with .... unless children are immuno-compromised, swim in heavily contaminated water, participate in deep ...

  1. Grommets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    therapy. However, tympanostomy tube insertion is associated with risks, and remains a controversial practice especially in children with OME of less than three months' duration and in children with ... speech, language and learning development, irrespective of ... or confirmed speech and language delay, autism and other.

  2. Colesevelam for Type 2 diabetes mellitus: an abridged Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, C P; Loke, S C

    2014-01-01

    Colesevelam, a second-generation bile acid sequestrant, may be beneficial in controlling both glycaemia and lipids simultaneously. Our goal was to evaluate the systemic effects of colesevelam on Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The original Cochrane review was conducted using the methodology for the systematic review of interventions of the Cochrane Collaboration in RevMan 5.2. We comprehensively searched the literature in several databases up to January 2012. Two reviewing authors independently selected and extracted the data, and then evaluated the quality of the randomized controlled trials that met the inclusion criteria. Six randomized controlled trials were selected, which ranged from 8 to 26 weeks in duration. A total of 1450 participants were divided into two groups: those treated with colesevelam and no other anti-diabetic drug treatments/placebo, or with colesevelam added on to anti-diabetic drug treatments. The colesevelam added on to anti-diabetic agents demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in the fasting blood glucose (mean difference of -0.82 mmol/l, 95% CI -1.2 to -0.44), HbA1c (mean difference -0.5%, 95% CI -0.6 to -0.4) and LDL cholesterol (mean difference -0.34 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.44 to -0.23). There were no reported data on weight. Non-severe hypoglycaemic episodes were infrequently observed. The limited number of studies concerning the treatment with colesevelam added to anti-diabetic agents showed significant effects on glycaemic control; however, more research on the reduction of cardiovascular risks is required. Furthermore, long-term data on the health-related quality of life and all-cause mortality also need to be investigated. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  3. Scope for improvement in the quality of reporting of systematic reviews. From the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shea, Beverley; Bouter, Lex M.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Francis, Daniel; Ortiz, Zulma; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter S.; Boers, Maarten

    Objective. To assess the quality of reporting in Cochrane musculoskeletal systematic reviews (excluding back and injury reviews). Methods. This study assessed all the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group's systematic reviews from Issue 4, 2002, of the Cochrane Library Database of Systematic Reviews. Two

  4. Opioids for cancer pain - an overview of Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J; Wee, Bee; Derry, Sheena; Bell, Rae F; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-07-06

    Pain is a common symptom with cancer, and 30% to 50% of all people with cancer will experience moderate to severe pain that can have a major negative impact on their quality of life. Opioid (morphine-like) drugs are commonly used to treat moderate or severe cancer pain, and are recommended for this purpose in the World Health Organization (WHO) pain treatment ladder. The most commonly-used opioid drugs are buprenorphine, codeine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, tramadol, and tapentadol. To provide an overview of the analgesic efficacy of opioids in cancer pain, and to report on adverse events associated with their use. We identified systematic reviews examining any opioid for cancer pain published to 4 May 2017 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in the Cochrane Library. The primary outcomes were no or mild pain within 14 days of starting treatment, withdrawals due to adverse events, and serious adverse events. We included nine reviews with 152 included studies and 13,524 participants, but because some studies appeared in more than one review the number of unique studies and participants was smaller than this. Most participants had moderate or severe pain associated with a range of different types of cancer. Studies in the reviews typically compared one type of opioid or formulation with either a different formulation of the same opioid, or a different opioid; few included a placebo control. Typically the reviews titrated dose to effect, a balance between pain relief and adverse events. Various routes of administration of opioids were considered in the reviews; oral with most opioids, but transdermal administration with fentanyl, and buprenorphine. No review included studies of subcutaneous opioid administration. Pain outcomes reported were varied and inconsistent. The average size of included studies varied considerably between reviews: studies of older opioids, such as codeine, morphine, and methadone, had low

  5. Scope for improvement in the quality of reporting of systematic reviews. From the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shea, Beverley; Bouter, Lex M.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Francis, Daniel; Ortiz, Zulma; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter S.; Boers, Maarten

    ABSTRACT. Objective. To assess the quality of reporting in Cochrane musculoskeletal systematic reviews (excluding back and injury reviews). Methods. This study assessed all the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group’’s systematic reviews from Issue 4, 2002, of the Cochrane Library Database of Systematic

  6. The updated Cochrane review 2014 on GnRH agonist trigger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kol, Shahar; Humaidan, Peter; Alsbjerg, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Cochrane reviews are powerful tools, internationally recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care. A Cochrane analysis makes use of precise, reproducible criteria in the selection of studies for review. In the context of a previous Cochrane review (2010) on the subject of gona...

  7. The Cochrane Library : more systematic reviews on nutrition needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Summerbell, CD; Chinnock, P; O'Malley, C; van Binsbergen, JJ

    The knowledge and relevance of nutrition as well as the demand for well-funded advices increase. The Cochrane Collaboration plays a leading role within the evidence-based medicine and practice. We advocate therefore more specialized nutritional interest within the Cochrane Collaboration. In case

  8. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Influenza Vaccines for Preventing Cardiovascular Disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;5:CD005050].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Daniel; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2015-01-01

    Influenza infections are associated to increased risk of cardiovascular events. The systematic review of Cochrane Collaboration evaluated the role of influenza vaccination on primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. The meta-analysis of four randomized controlled trials with moderate quality, including 1 682 patients with coronary artery disease, showed a 55% risk reduction on cardiovascular mortality. Data evaluating the role of vaccination in primary cardiovascular prevention were not robust. Portuguese and international recommendations for influenza vaccination in patients with coronary artery disease are then supported by this systematic review.

  9. 2009 updated method guidelines for systematic reviews in the Cochrane Back Review Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furlan, A.D.; Pennick, V.; Bombardier, C.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Method guidelines for systematic reviews of trials of treatments for neck and back pain. OBJECTIVE. To help review authors design, conduct and report systematic reviews of trials in this field. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. In 1997, the Cochrane Back Review Group published Method

  10. Peripheral Nerve Blocks for Hip Fractures: A Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Joanne; Parker, Martyn J; Griffiths, Richard; Kopp, Sandra L

    2017-10-04

    This review focuses on the use of peripheral nerve blocks as preoperative analgesia, as postoperative analgesia, or as a supplement to general anesthesia for hip fracture surgery and tries to determine if they offer any benefit in terms of pain on movement at 30 minutes after block placement, acute confusional state, myocardial infarction/ischemia, pneumonia, mortality, time to first mobilization, and cost of analgesic. Trials were identified by computerized searches of Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2016, Issue 8), MEDLINE (Ovid SP, 1966 to 2016 August week 1), Embase (Ovid SP, 1988 to 2016 August week 1), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (EBSCO, 1982 to 2016 August week 1), trials registers, and reference lists of relevant articles. Randomized controlled trials involving the use of nerve blocks as part of the care for hip fractures in adults aged 16 years and older were included. The quality of the studies was rated according to the Cochrane tool. Two authors independently extracted the data. The quality of evidence was judged according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluations Working Group scale. Based on 8 trials with 373 participants, peripheral nerve blocks reduced pain on movement within 30 minutes of block placement: standardized mean difference, -1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], -2.14 to -0.67; equivalent to -3.4 on a scale from 0 to 10; I statistic = 90%; high quality of evidence). The effect size was proportional to the concentration of local anesthetic used (P < .00001). Based on 7 trials with 676 participants, no difference was found in the risk of acute confusional state: risk ratio, 0.69 (95% CI, 0.38-1.27; I statistic = 48%; very low quality of evidence). Based on 3 trials with 131 participants, the risk for pneumonia was decreased: risk ratio, 0.41 (95% CI, 0.19-0.89; I statistic = 3%; number needed-to-treat for additional beneficial outcome, 7 [95% CI, 5

  11. Empty reviews: a description and consideration of Cochrane systematic reviews with no included studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Yaffe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is no specific guidance for the reporting of Cochrane systematic reviews that do not have studies eligible for inclusion. As a result, the reporting of these so-called "empty reviews" may vary across reviews. This research explores the incidence of empty systematic reviews in The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (The CDSR and describes their current characteristics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Empty reviews within The CDSR as of 15 August 2010 were identified, extracted, and coded for analysis. Review group, original publication year, and time since last update, as well as number of studies listed as excluded, awaiting assessment, or on-going within empty reviews were examined. 376 (8.7% active reviews in The CDSR reported no included studies. At the time of data collection, 45 (84.9% of the Cochrane Collaboration's 53 Review Groups sustained at least one empty review, with the number of empty reviews for each of these 45 groups ranging from 1 to 35 (2.2-26.9%. Time since original publication of empty reviews ranged from 0 to 15 years with a mean of 4.2 years (SD = 3.4. Time since last assessed as up-to-date ranged from 0 to 12 years with a mean of 2.8 years (SD = 2.2. The number of excluded studies reported in these reviews ranged from 0 to 124, with an average of 9.6 per review (SD = 14.5. Eighty-eight (23.4% empty reviews reported no excluded studies, studies awaiting assessment, or on-going studies. CONCLUSIONS: There is a substantial number of empty reviews in The CDSR, and there is some variation in the reporting and updating of empty reviews across Cochrane Review Groups. This variation warrants further analysis, and may indicate a need to develop guidance for the reporting of empty systematic reviews in The CDSR.

  12. Should Cochrane reviews be performed during the development of new concepts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humaidan, P; Kol, S; Engmann, L

    2012-01-01

    Cochrane reviews are internationally recognized as the highest standard in evidence-based health care. A Cochrane analysis conducts systematic reviews of primary research in human health care, and the analysis includes a comprehensive search of all potentially relevant studies and the use of expl...

  13. A Review of Cochrane Systematic Reviews of Interventions Relevant to Orthoptic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Elliott, Sue; Gordon, Iris; Shah, Anupa

    2017-09-01

    To present an overview of the range of systematic reviews on intervention trials pertinent to orthoptic practice, produced by the Cochrane Eyes and Vision group (CEV). We searched the 2016 Cochrane Library database (31.03.2016) to identify completed reviews and protocols of direct relevance to orthoptic practice. These reviews are currently completed and published, available on www.thecochranelibrary.com (free to UK health employees) or via the CEV website (http://eyes.cochrane.org/) . We found 27 completed CEV reviews across the topics of strabismus, amblyopia, refractive errors, and low vision. Seven completed CEV protocols addressed topics of strabismus, amblyopia, refractive errors, low vision, and screening. We found 3 completed Cochrane Stroke reviews addressing visual field loss, eye movement impairment, and age-related vision loss. The systematic review process presents an important opportunity for any clinician to contribute to the establishment of reliable, evidence-based orthoptic practice. Each review has an abstract and plain language summary that many non-clinicians find useful, followed by a full copy of the review (background, objectives, methods, results, discussion) with a conclusion section that is divided into implications for practice and implications for research. The current reviews provide patients/parents/carers with information about various different conditions and treatment options, but also provide clinicians with a summary of the available evidence on interventions, to use as a guide for both clinical practice and future research planning. The reviews identified in this overview highlight the evidence available for effective interventions for strabismus, amblyopia, refractive errors, and low vision or stroke rehabilitation as well as the gaps in the evidence base. Thus, a demand exists for future robust, randomized, controlled trials of such interventions of importance in orthoptic practice.

  14. The Cochrane Collaboration withdraws a review on methylphenidate for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Kim; Saiz, Luis Carlos; Erviti, Juan

    2017-01-01

    A Cochrane systematic review on immediate-release methylphenidate for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was withdrawn from the Cochrane Library on 26 May 2016 after substantial criticism of its methods and flawed conclusions. Retraction of scientific papers on this basis...

  15. Impact of including Korean randomized controlled trials in Cochrane reviews of acupuncture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hyung Kim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Acupuncture is commonly practiced in Korea and is regularly evaluated in clinical trials. Although many Cochrane reviews of acupuncture include searches of both English and Chinese databases, there is no information on the value of searching Korean databases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of searching Korean databases and journals for trials eligible for inclusion in existing Cochrane acupuncture reviews. METHODS: We searched 12 Korean databases and seven Korean journals to identify randomised trials meeting the inclusion criteria for acupuncture reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We compared risk of bias assessments of the Korean trials with the trials included in the Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Where possible, we added data from the Korean trials to the existing meta-analyses in the relevant Cochrane review and conducted sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of the results. RESULTS: Sixteen Korean trials (742 participants met the inclusion criteria for eight Cochrane acupuncture reviews (125 trials; 13,041 participants. Inclusion of the Korean trials provided data for 20% of existing meta-analyses (24 out of 120. Inclusion of the Korean trials did not change the direction of effect in any of the existing meta-analyses. The effect size and heterogeneity remained mostly unchanged. In only one meta-analysis did the significance change. Compared to the studies included in the Cochrane acupuncture reviews, the risk of bias in the Korean trials was higher in terms of outcome assessor blinding and allocation concealment. CONCLUSIONS: Many Korean studies contributed additional data to the existing meta-analyses in Cochrane acupuncture reviews. Although inclusion of these studies did not alter the results of the meta-analyses, comprehensive searches of the literature are important to avoid potential language bias. The identification and inclusion of eligible Korean trials should be considered for

  16. How useful are systematic reviews for informing palliative care practice? Survey of 25 Cochrane systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadley Gina

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contemporary medical research, randomised controlled trials are seen as the gold standard for establishing treatment effects where it is ethical and practical to conduct them. In palliative care such trials are often impractical, unethical, or extremely difficult, with multiple methodological problems. We review the utility of Cochrane reviews in informing palliative care practice. Methods Published reviews in palliative care registered with the Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group as of December 2007 were obtained from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, issue 1, 2008. We reviewed the quality and quantity of primary studies available for each review, assessed the quality of the review process, and judged the strength of the evidence presented. There was no prior intention to perform any statistical analyses. Results 25 published systematic reviews were identified. Numbers of included trials ranged from none to 54. Within each review, included trials were heterogeneous with respect to patients, interventions, and outcomes, and the number of patients contributing to any single analysis was generally much lower than the total included in the review. A variety of tools were used to assess trial quality; seven reviews did not use this information to exclude low quality studies, weight analyses, or perform sensitivity analysis for effect of low quality. Authors indicated that there were frequently major problems with the primary studies, individually or in aggregate. Our judgment was that the reviewing process was generally good in these reviews, and that conclusions were limited by the number, size, quality and validity of the primary studies. We judged the evidence about 23 of the 25 interventions to be weak. Two reviews had stronger evidence, but with limitations due to methodological heterogeneity or definition of outcomes. No review provided strong evidence of no effect. Conclusion Cochrane reviews

  17. Herbal medicine for low back pain: a Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagnier, J.J.; van Tulder, M.W.; Berman, B.; Bombardier, C.

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVES. To determine the effectiveness of herbal medicine compared with placebo, no intervention, or "standard/accepted/conventional treatments" for nonspecific low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Low back pain is a common

  18. Specialist outreach clinics in primary care and rural hospital settings (Cochrane Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight SE,

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Specialist outreach clinics in primary care and rural hospital settings. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2003, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD003798.pub2. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003798.pub2.

  19. The impact of Cochrane Systematic Reviews: a mixed method evaluation of outputs from Cochrane Review Groups supported by the UK National Institute for Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been a growing emphasis on evidence-informed decision-making in health care. Systematic reviews, such as those produced by the Cochrane Collaboration, have been a key component of this movement. The UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Systematic Review Programme currently supports 20 Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs). The aim of this study was to identify the impacts of Cochrane reviews published by NIHR-funded CRGs during the years 2007–2011. Methods We sent questionnaires to CRGs and review authors, interviewed guideline developers and used bibliometrics and documentary review to get an overview of CRG impact and to evaluate the impact of a sample of 60 Cochrane reviews. We used a framework with four categories (knowledge production, research targeting, informing policy development and impact on practice/services). Results A total of 1,502 new and updated reviews were produced by the 20 NIHR-funded CRGs between 2007 and 2011. The clearest impacts were on policy with a total of 483 systematic reviews cited in 247 sets of guidance: 62 were international, 175 national (87 from the UK) and 10 local. Review authors and CRGs provided some examples of impact on practice or services, for example, safer use of medication, the identification of new effective drugs or treatments and potential economic benefits through the reduction in the use of unproven or unnecessary procedures. However, such impacts are difficult to objectively document, and the majority of reviewers were unsure if their review had produced specific impacts. Qualitative data suggested that Cochrane reviews often play an instrumental role in informing guidance, although a poor fit with guideline scope or methods, reviews being out of date and a lack of communication between CRGs and guideline developers were barriers to their use. Conclusions Health and economic impacts of research are generally difficult to measure. We found that to be the case with this evaluation

  20. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Antihistamines for the Common Cold. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;11:CD009345].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrantino, Carmel; Duarte, Gonçalo; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-03-01

    The common cold is an acute, self-limiting inflammation of the mucosa of the upper airways, which may involve one or all the sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx and larynx. It is common to have at least one episode per year. Common cold symptoms, which may include sore throat, sneezing, nasal congestion, runny nose, headache, malaise and mild fever usually disappear within a few days without treatment. The causative agent of most colds is rhinovirus. Although not associated with mortality, common cold is associated with significant morbidity. There is no vaccine or cure for common cold and, therefore, their treatment is centered on relieving the symptoms. This Cochrane review aimed to synthesize the existing evidence about the clinical benefit of antihistamines, used as monotherapy, compared with placebo or no treatment in children and adult patients with common cold. A total of 18 randomized clinical trials with 4342 participants were included. Main results were: 1) Antihistamines have a small (days one and two) beneficial effect in the short term on the severity of overall symptoms in adult patients, although this effect is not present in the medium to long term; 2) antihistamines were not associated with a clinically significant beneficial effect on the individual symptoms (nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, and sneezing); 3) Antihistamines are not associated with an increased risk of adverse effects; 4) No conclusion can be made about the effectiveness of antihistamines in pediatric populations. Our interpretation of the results is that the available evidence is insufficient to support the prescription or buying OTC antihistamines to relieve the symptoms of common cold without allergic component.

  1. Reporting and Handling Missing Outcome Data in Mental Health: A Systematic Review of Cochrane Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spineli, Loukia M.; Pandis, Nikolaos; Salanti, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to provide empirical evidence about the reporting of methodology to address missing outcome data and the acknowledgement of their impact in Cochrane systematic reviews in the mental health field. Methods: Systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews after January 1, 2009 by…

  2. Investing in updating: how do conclusions change when Cochrane systematic reviews are updated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie Joanne E

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cochrane systematic reviews aim to provide readers with the most up-to-date evidence on the effects of healthcare interventions. The policy of updating Cochrane reviews every two years consumes valuable time and resources and may not be appropriate for all reviews. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of updating Cochrane systematic reviews over a four year period. Methods This descriptive study examined all completed systematic reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR Issue 2, 1998. The latest version of each of these reviews was then identified in CDSR Issue 2, 2002 and changes in the review were described. For reviews that were updated within this time period and had additional studies, we determined whether their conclusion had changed and if there were factors that were predictive of this change. Results A total of 377 complete reviews were published in CDSR Issue 2, 1998. In Issue 2, 2002, 14 of these reviews were withdrawn and one was split, leaving 362 reviews to examine for the purpose of this study. Of these reviews, 254 (70% were updated. Of these updated reviews, 23 (9% had a change in conclusion. Both an increase in precision and a change in statistical significance of the primary outcome were predictive of a change in conclusion of the review. Conclusion The concerns around a lack of updating for some reviews may not be justified considering the small proportion of updated reviews that resulted in a changed conclusion. A priority-setting approach to the updating of Cochrane systematic reviews may be more appropriate than a time-based approach. Updating all reviews as frequently as every two years may not be necessary, however some reviews may need to be updated more often than every two years.

  3. Investing in updating: how do conclusions change when Cochrane systematic reviews are updated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simon D; McDonald, Steve; McKenzie, Joanne E; Green, Sally E

    2005-10-14

    Cochrane systematic reviews aim to provide readers with the most up-to-date evidence on the effects of healthcare interventions. The policy of updating Cochrane reviews every two years consumes valuable time and resources and may not be appropriate for all reviews. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of updating Cochrane systematic reviews over a four year period. This descriptive study examined all completed systematic reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issue 2, 1998. The latest version of each of these reviews was then identified in CDSR Issue 2, 2002 and changes in the review were described. For reviews that were updated within this time period and had additional studies, we determined whether their conclusion had changed and if there were factors that were predictive of this change. A total of 377 complete reviews were published in CDSR Issue 2, 1998. In Issue 2, 2002, 14 of these reviews were withdrawn and one was split, leaving 362 reviews to examine for the purpose of this study. Of these reviews, 254 (70%) were updated. Of these updated reviews, 23 (9%) had a change in conclusion. Both an increase in precision and a change in statistical significance of the primary outcome were predictive of a change in conclusion of the review. The concerns around a lack of updating for some reviews may not be justified considering the small proportion of updated reviews that resulted in a changed conclusion. A priority-setting approach to the updating of Cochrane systematic reviews may be more appropriate than a time-based approach. Updating all reviews as frequently as every two years may not be necessary, however some reviews may need to be updated more often than every two years.

  4. Agreement between Cochrane Neonatal reviews and clinical practice guidelines for newborns in Denmark a cross sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Greisen, Gorm; Madsen, Lars P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical practice guidelines in Denmark. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of clinical guidelines for newborn infants. Materials:All Cochrane neonatal reviews and Danish local clinical guidelines for newborn infants. MAIN OUT...

  5. Reporting of conflicts of interest from drug trials in Cochrane reviews : cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roseman, Michelle; Turner, Erick H.; Lexchin, Joel; Coyne, James C.; Bero, Lisa A.; Thombs, Brett D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the degree to which Cochrane reviews of drug interventions published in 2010 reported conflicts of interest from included trials and, among reviews that reported this information, where it was located in the review documents. Design Cross sectional study. Data sources

  6. Divine intervention? A Cochrane review on intercessory prayer gone beyond science and reason

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2009-01-01

    We discuss in this commentary a recent Cochrane review of 10 randomised trials aimed at testing the religious belief that praying to a god can help those who are prayed for. The review concluded that the available studies merit additional research. However, the review presented a scientifically...

  7. Heterogeneity in search strategies among Cochrane acupuncture reviews: is there room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Steve; Smith, Erica J; Terplan, Mishka

    2010-09-01

    Given the international focus and rigorous literature searches employed in Cochrane systematic reviews, this study was undertaken to evaluate strategies employed in Cochrane reviews and protocols assessing acupuncture as a primary or secondary intervention. The Cochrane Collaboration of systematic reviews was searched in February 2009 for all reviews and protocols including information on acupuncture. Information was abstracted from all retrieved articles on review status, type and number of English and Chinese language databases searched, participation of at least one Chinese speaking author and language restriction. Frequencies were calculated and bivariate analyses were performed stratifying on interventions of interest to assess differences in search strategy techniques, language restrictions and results. The search retrieved 68 titles, including 48 completed reviews, 17 protocols and three previously withdrawn titles. Acupuncture was the primary intervention of interest in 44/65 (67.7%) of the retrieved reviews and protocols. While all articles searched at least one English language database, only 26/65 (40.0%) articles searched Chinese language databases. Significantly more articles where acupuncture was the primary intervention of interest searched Chinese language databases (53% vs 9%, pacupuncture were found in 28/48 (58.3%) of all completed reviews; this type of finding was more common in reviews which did not search any Chinese language databases. It is important for reviews assessing the effectiveness of acupuncture to search Chinese language databases. The Cochrane Collaboration should develop specific criteria for Chinese language search strategies to ensure the continued publication of high-quality reviews.

  8. Updated method guidelines for cochrane musculoskeletal group systematic reviews and metaanalyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghogomu, Elizabeth A T; Maxwell, Lara J; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG), one of 53 groups of the not-for-profit, international Cochrane Collaboration, prepares, maintains, and disseminates systematic reviews of treatments for musculoskeletal diseases. It is important that authors conducting CMSG reviews and the readers of our...... using network metaanalysis. Method guidelines specific to musculoskeletal disorders are provided by CMSG editors for various aspects of undertaking a systematic review. These method guidelines will help improve the quality of reporting and ensure high standards of conduct as well as consistency across...

  9. Antenatal interventions to reduce preterm birth: an overview of Cochrane Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piso, Brigitte; Zechmeister-Koss, Ingrid; Winkler, Roman

    2014-04-23

    Several factors are associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (PTB); therefore, various interventions might have the potential to influence it. Due to the large number of interventions that address PTB, the objective of this overview is to summarise evidence from Cochrane reviews regarding the effects and safety of these different interventions. We conducted a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Included reviews should be based on randomised controlled trials comparing antenatal non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions that directly or indirectly address PTB with placebo/no treatment or routine care in pregnant women at less than 37 completed weeks of gestation without signs of threatened preterm labour. We considered PTB at less than 37 completed weeks of gestation as the primary outcome. We included 56 Cochrane systematic reviews. Three interventions increased PTB risk significantly. Twelve interventions led to a statistically significant lower incidence of PTBs. However, this reduction was mostly observed in defined at-risk subgroups of pregnant women. The remaining antenatal interventions failed to prove a significant effect on PTB reduction in early PTBs). As an unintended result of this review, we identified 28 additional Cochrane reviews which intended to report on PTB interventions on PTB have been evaluated in Cochrane systematic reviews. Few interventions have been demonstrated to be effective and a small number have been found to be harmful. For around half of the interventions evaluated, the Cochrane review concluded that there was insufficient evidence to provide sound recommendations for clinical practice. No RCT evidence is available for a number of potentially relevant interventions.

  10. Clinical heterogeneity was a common problem in Cochrane reviews of physiotherapy and occupational therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Steultjens, E.M.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Dekker, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To identify the strategies used to deal with the clinical heterogeneity of interventions and multiple outcome measures used in Cochrane reviews on physiotherapy and occupational therapy. METHODS: A search for systematic reviews on physiotherapy and occupational therapy in

  11. The evidence for nursing interventions in the Cochrane database of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Poot, E.; Hickox, S.; Wagner, C.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe how they conducted a search of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in order to explore the evidence for nursing interventions. They identify the number of studies, the number of participants, and the conclusions of systematic reviews concerning nursing

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L J; Taylor, R S

    2014-12-15

    Overviews are a new approach to summarising evidence and synthesising results from related systematic reviews. To conduct an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews to provide a contemporary review of the evidence for cardiac rehabilitation (CR), identify opportunities for merging or splitting existing Cochrane reviews, and identify current evidence gaps to inform new review titles. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched to identify reviews that address the objectives of this overview. Data presentation is descriptive with tabular presentations of review- and trial-level characteristics and results. The six included Cochrane systematic reviews were of high methodological quality and included 148 randomised controlled trials in 97,486 participants. Compared to usual care alone, exercise-based CR reduces hospital admissions and improves patient health related quality of life (HRQL) in low to moderate risk heart failure and coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. At 12 months or more follow-up, there was evidence of some reduction in mortality in patients with CHD. Psychological- and education-based interventions appear to have little impact on mortality or morbidity but may improve HRQL. Home- and centre-based programmes are equally effective in improving HRQL at similar costs. Selected interventions can increase the uptake of CR programmes but evidence to support interventions that improve adherence is weak. This overview confirms that exercise-based CR is effective and safe in the management of clinically stable heart failure and post-MI and PCI patients. We discuss the implications of this overview on the future direction of the Cochrane CR reviews portfolio. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Reporting of the Role of the Expert Searcher in Cochrane Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Sampson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study applied the principles of evidence based information practice to clarify the role of information specialists and librarians in the preparation of Cochrane systematic reviews and to determine whether information specialists impact the quality of searching in Cochrane systematic reviews.Objectives This research project sought to determine how the contribution of the person responsible for searching in the preparation of Cochrane systematic reviews was reported; whether the contribution was recognized through authorship or acknowledgement; the qualifications of the searcher; and the association between the type of contributorship and characteristics of the search strategy, assessability, and the presence of certain types of errors.Methods Data sources: The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, The Cochrane Library 3 (2002. Inclusion criteria: The study included systematic reviews that met the following criteria: one or more sections of the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategy were utilised, primary studies were either randomised controlled trials (RCTs or quasi‐RCTs, and included and excluded studies were clearly identified. Data extraction: Two librarians assessed the searches for errors, establishing consensus on discordant ratings.Results Of the 169 reviews screened for this project, 105 met all eligibility criteria. Authors fulfilled the searching role in 41.9% of reviews studied, acknowledged persons or groups in 13.3%, a combination in 9.5%, and the role was not reported in 35.2% of reviews. For the 78 reviews in which meta‐analyses were performed, the positions of those responsible for statistical decisions were examined for comparative purposes. The statistical role was performed by an author in 47.4% of cases and unreported in the same number of cases. Insufficient analyzable data was obtained regarding professional qualifications (3/105 for searching, 2/78 for statistical decisions. Search quality was

  14. Inclusion criteria for outcomes of studies not clearly reported in Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Jos; Ijaz, Sharea; Mischke, Christina

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to survey how outcomes in recent Cochrane reviews were defined and used for inclusion of studies and how this compares with guidance on preventing outcome reporting bias. A survey of Cochrane reviews. We extracted data on the outcomes and how the outcomes were used for inclusion of studies in the review. We included 52 reviews with a mean of 8.4 (standard deviation, 4.3) outcomes. Of all reviews, 47 (90%) used primary and secondary outcomes as the names for their review's outcomes but without further definition. None reported using a core outcome set. Forty reviews (77%) did not explain if they used outcomes for inclusion of studies, 8 (15%) stated that studies were included if they reported either primary or secondary outcomes, 1 (2%) reported that outcomes were not used for inclusion, and for 3 (6%), this was unclear. In a sample of Cochrane reviews, most reviews did not state if outcomes were used for inclusion of studies. Better explanation of inclusion decisions is needed to be able to understand the risk of outcome reporting bias in a review. Consistent guidance in names and definitions for different types of outcomes used in systematic reviews is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reporting and methodologic quality of Cochrane Neonatal review group systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Faleh Khalid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cochrane Neonatal Review Group (CNRG has achieved a lot with limited resources in producing high quality systematic reviews to assist clinicians in evidence-based decision-making. A formal assessment of published CNRG systematic reviews has not been undertaken; we sought to provide a comprehensive assessment of the quality of systematic reviews (both methodologic and reporting quality published in CNRG. Methods We selected a random sample of published CNRG systematic reviews. Items of the QUOROM statement were utilized to assess quality of reporting, while items and total scores of the Oxman-Guyatt Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ were used to assess methodologic quality. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed quality. A Student t-test was used to compare quality scores pre- and post-publication of the QUOROM statement. Results Sixty-one systematic reviews were assessed. Overall, the included reviews had good quality with minor flaws based on OQAQ total scores (mean, 4.5 [0.9]; 95% CI, 4.27–4.77. However, room for improvement was noted in some areas, such as the title, abstract reporting, a priori plan for heterogeneity assessment and how to handle heterogeneity in case it exists, and assessment of publication bias. In addition, reporting of agreement among reviewers, documentation of trials flow, and discussion of possible biases were addressed in the review process. Reviews published post the QUOROM statement had a significantly higher quality scores. Conclusion The systematic reviews published in the CNRG are generally of good quality with minor flaws. However, efforts should be made to improve the quality of reports. Readers must continue to assess the quality of published reports on an individual basis prior to implementing the recommendations.

  16. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about interventions for autism spectrum disorders?

    OpenAIRE

    Lyra, Larissa; Rizzo, Luiz Eduardo; Sunahara, Camila Sá; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Latorraca, Carolina Oliveira Cruz; Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Riera, Rachel [UNIFESP

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) include autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. The manifestations of ASDs can have an important impact on learning and social functioning that may persist during adulthood. The aim here was to summarize the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Review of systematic reviews, conducted within the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Esco...

  17. A descriptive analysis of child-relevant systematic reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomson Denise

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic reviews (SRs are considered an important tool for decision-making. There has been no recent comprehensive identification or description of child-relevant SRs. A description of existing child-relevant SRs would help to identify the extent of available child-relevant evidence available in SRs and gaps in the evidence base where SRs are required. The objective of this study was to describe child-relevant SRs from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR, Issue 2, 2009. Methods SRs were assessed for relevance using pre-defined criteria. Data were extracted and entered into an electronic form. Univariate analyses were performed to describe the SRs overall and by topic area. Results The search yielded 1666 SRs; 793 met the inclusion criteria. 38% of SRs were last assessed as up-to-date prior to 2007. Corresponding authors were most often from the UK (41%. Most SRs (59% examined pharmacological interventions. 53% had at least one external source of funding. SRs included a median of 7 studies (IQR 3, 15 and 679 participants (IQR 179, 2833. Of all studies, 48% included only children, and 27% only adults. 94% of studies were published in peer-reviewed journals. Primary outcomes were specified in 72% of SRs. Allocation concealment and the Jadad scale were used in 97% and 25% of SRs, respectively. Adults and children were analyzed separately in 12% of SRs and as a subgroup analysis in 14%. Publication bias was assessed in only 14% of SRs. A meta-analysis was conducted in 68% of SRs with a median of 5 trials (IQR 3, 9 each. Variations in these characteristics were observed across topic areas. Conclusions We described the methodological characteristics and rigour of child-relevant reviews in the CDSR. Many SRs are not up-to-date according to Cochrane criteria. Our study describes variation in conduct and reporting across SRs and reveals clinicians' ability to access child-specific data.

  18. Systemisk prokinetisk behandling af postoperativ ileus efter abdominalkirurgi. Gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine

    2010-01-01

    Based on the evidence presented in the Cochrane review "Systemic prokinetic pharmacologic treatment for postoperative adynamic ileus following abdominal surgery in adults", routine administration of systemic prokinetics for the prevention of postoperative ileus is not recommendable. The potential...... of selective opioid antagonists and intravenous lidocaine should be further investigated, particularly in conjunction with laparoscopic surgery, epidural pain management and fast-track surgery....

  19. Potential and Limitations of Cochrane Reviews in Pediatric Cardiology: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poryo, Martin; Khosrawikatoli, Sara; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Meyer, Sascha

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine has contributed substantially to the quality of medical care in pediatric and adult cardiology. However, our impression from the bedside is that a substantial number of Cochrane reviews generate inconclusive data that are of limited clinical benefit. We performed a systematic synopsis of Cochrane reviews published between 2001 and 2015 in the field of pediatric cardiology. Main outcome parameters were the number and percentage of conclusive, partly conclusive, and inconclusive reviews as well as their recommendations and their development over three a priori defined intervals. In total, 69 reviews were analyzed. Most of them examined preterm and term neonates (36.2%), whereas 33.3% included also non-pediatric patients. Leading topics were pharmacological issues (71.0%) followed by interventional (10.1%) and operative procedures (2.9%). The majority of reviews were inconclusive (42.9%), while 36.2% were conclusive and 21.7% partly conclusive. Although the number of published reviews increased during the three a priori defined time intervals, reviews with "no specific recommendations" remained stable while "recommendations in favor of an intervention" clearly increased. Main reasons for missing recommendations were insufficient data (n = 41) as well as an insufficient number of trials (n = 22) or poor study quality (n = 19). There is still need for high-quality research, which will likely yield a greater number of Cochrane reviews with conclusive results.

  20. Does antibiotic prophylaxis at implant placement decrease early implant failures? A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Loli, Vasiliki; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    2010-01-01

    Marco Esposito is the first author of two of the included studies; however, he was not involved in the quality assessment of these trials. This review is based on a Cochrane systematic review entitled 'Interventions for replacing missing teeth: antibiotics at dental implant placement to prevent complications' published in The Cochrane Library (see http://www.cochrane.org for more information). Cochrane systematic reviews are regularly updated to include new research, and in response to comments and criticisms from readers. If you wish to comment on this review, please send your comments to the Cochrane website or to Marco Esposito. The Cochrane Library should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. The results of a Cochrane Review can be interpreted differently, depending on people's perspectives and circumstances. Please consider the conclusions presented carefully. They are the opinions of the review authors, and are not necessarily shared by the Cochrane Collaboration. To assess the beneficial or harmful effects of systemic prophylactic antibiotics at dental implant placement versus no antibiotic/placebo administration and, if antibiotics are of benefit, to find which type, dosage and duration is the most effective. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to 2 June 2010 for randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with a follow-up of at least 3 months comparing the administration of various prophylactic antibiotic regimens versus no antibiotics to patients undergoing dental implant placement. Outcome measures were prosthesis failures, implant failures, postoperative infections and adverse events (gastrointestinal, hypersensitivity, etc.). Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by two review authors. Meta-analyses were

  1. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about interventions for vitamin D supplementation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vendramin Mateussi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Despite the high prevalence of vitamin D supplementation, its use remains controversial. The objective of this review was to identify and summarize the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews regarding vitamin D supplementation for preventing ortreating any clinical condition. DESIGN AND SETTING: Review of systematic reviews, conducted in the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: A search was conducted to identify all Cochrane systematic reviews that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Titles and abstracts were screened by two authors. RESULTS: We included 27 Cochrane systematic reviews: 10 assessing use of vitamin D for prevention and 17 for treatment. The reviews found moderate to high quality of evidence regarding the benefit of vitamin D for pregnant women (prevention of adverse events: preterm birth risk [rate ratio, RR 0.36; 95% confidence interval, CI 0.14 to 0.93] and low birthweight risk [RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.67] and for asthma patients (reduction of severe exacerbations [RR 0.63; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.88]. No benefit was found regarding vitamin D supplementation alone (without calcium for preventing hip or any new fracture. For all other outcomes assessed under various conditions, the current quality of evidence is low or unknown, and therefore insufficient for any recommendation. CONCLUSION: Based on moderate to high quality of evidence, the Cochrane systematic reviews included here showed that there were some benefits from vitamin D supplementation for pregnant women and asthma patients and no benefits for preventing fractures.

  2. Reducing ineffective practice: challenges in identifying low-value health care using Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Sarah; Docherty, Mary; Somner, John; Sharma, Tarang; Choudhury, Moni; Clarke, Mike; Littlejohns, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Despite international agreement that stopping low value practices will increase efficiency, identifying them is difficult and controversial. Opponents of centralized lists of low value practices stress that the actual problem is inappropriate low value use, and better targeting and implementation of treatment thresholds is needed. Our objective was to use Cochrane Reviews to identify low value practices to support local disinvestment decisions. New or updated reviews were included if the authors concluded that the uncertain effectiveness of an intervention meant it should only be used in research, or that it was ineffective or harmful and should not be used. The reviews go through a production and quality assurance process, and are published as 'Cochrane Quality and Productivity topics' through the NHS Evidence website (http://www.library.nhs.uk/qipp/). Over a six-month period, 65 Cochrane reviews were processed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Of these, 28 identified potentially low value practices in the UK context. This was primarily due to a lack of randomized evidence of effectiveness, rather than robust evidence of a lack of effectiveness, or evidence of harm. Identifying low-value health care practices for local disinvestment (total or partial) is both practically and politically challenging, yet it is necessary to manage health budgets. This project identified that Cochrane Reviews can potentially identify low value health care practices. However, each review has to be reinterpreted for the UK context and additional analysis has to be undertaken to facilitate local implementation. Recommendations to improve the usability of systematic reviews are made.

  3. Scope and quality of Cochrane reviews of nutrition interventions: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naude, Celeste E; Durao, Solange; Harper, Abigail; Volmink, Jimmy

    2017-04-07

    All countries face significant challenges from complex manifestations of malnutrition, which affects one in three people globally. Systematic reviews provide ready-to-use syntheses of quality-appraised evidence to inform decision-making for actions. To enhance the utility and quality of future Cochrane nutrition evidence, we described the scope and quality of all nutrition systematic reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). We screened all active CDSR records (31 July 2015) to identify reviews and protocols using pre-specified eligibility criteria and definitions. Duplicate, independent data extraction included criteria for inclusion of studies in completed reviews (PICOS). We assessed methodological quality (AMSTAR), use of GRADE, mapped reviews against 2013 Global Burden of Disease data, and categorised the paradigm (medical, lifestyle and socio-ecological) of the review question. We analysed our results using descriptive statistics. We screened 8484 records, and included 470 (8%) completed reviews (in 45 Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs)) and 169 (7%) protocols (in 41 CRGs) published by 47 of 53 CRGs with reviews. Most completed reviews were produced by the Pregnancy and Childbirth (n = 73), Neonatal (n = 64), Metabolic and Endocrine Disorders (n = 33), Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems (n = 26), Kidney and Transplant (n = 18) and Heart (n = 18) CRGs. Only 27% (n = 129) of reviews had searches for new studies in 2013 or thereafter. Supplementation/supplement interventions were most common (50%; n = 235; majority with micronutrients; 73%, n = 173), followed by food interventions (20%; n = 95). All reviews included randomised controlled trials; about 5% included other designs; 25% used GRADE; the median AMSTAR score was 9 (interquartile range: 7 to 10), 51% were high (AMSTAR 9-11) and 49% moderate (AMSTAR 5-8) quality. More than 80% framed questions using a medical paradigm. For top

  4. Setting priorities for knowledge translation of Cochrane reviews for health equity: Evidence for Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugwell, Peter; Petkovic, Jennifer; Welch, Vivian; Vincent, Jennifer; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Churchill, Rachel; deSavigny, Don; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Pantoja, Tomas

    2017-12-02

    A focus on equity in health can be seen in many global development goals and reports, research and international declarations. With the development of a relevant framework and methods, the Campbell and Cochrane Equity Methods Group has encouraged the application of an 'equity lens' to systematic reviews, and many organizations publish reviews intended to address health equity. The purpose of the Evidence for Equity (E4E) project was to conduct a priority-setting exercise and apply an equity lens by developing a knowledge translation product comprising summaries of systematic reviews from the Cochrane Library. E4E translates evidence from systematic reviews into 'friendly front end' summaries for policy makers. The following topic areas with high burdens of disease globally, were selected for the pilot: diabetes/obesity, HIV/AIDS, malaria, nutrition, and mental health/depression. For each topic area, a "stakeholder panel" was assembled that included policymakers and researchers. A systematic search of Cochrane reviews was conducted for each area to identify equity-relevant interventions with a meaningful impact. Panel chairs developed a rating sheet which was used by all panels to rank the importance of these interventions by: 1) Ease of Implementation; 2) Health System Requirements; 3)Universality/Generalizability/Share of Burden; and 4) Impact on Inequities/Effect on equity. The ratings of panel members were averaged for each intervention and criterion, and interventions were ordered according to the average overall ratings. Stakeholder panels identified the top 10 interventions from their respective topic areas. The evidence on these interventions is being summarized with an equity focus and the results posted online, at http://methods.cochrane.org/equity/e4e-series . This method provides an explicit approach to setting priorities by systematic review groups and funders for providing decision makers with evidence for the most important equity

  5. Efficacy of interventions to combat tobacco addiction: Cochrane update of 2012 reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Stead, Lindsay F; Cahill, Kate; Lancaster, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration is an international not-for-profit organization which produces and disseminates systematic reviews of health-care interventions. This paper is the first in a series of annual updates of Cochrane reviews on tobacco addiction interventions. It also provides an up-to-date overview of review findings in this area to date and summary statistics for cessation reviews in which meta-analyses were conducted. In 2012, the Group published seven new reviews and updated 13 others. This update summarizes and comments on these reviews. It also summarizes key findings from all the other reviews in this area. New reviews in 2012 found that in smokers using pharmacotherapy, behavioural support improves success rates [risk ratio (RR) 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.09-1.24], and that combining behavioural support and pharmacotherapy aids cessation (RR 1.82, 95% CI = 1.66-2.00). Updated reviews established mobile phones as potentially helpful in aiding cessation (RR 1.71, 95% CI = 1.47-1.99), found that cytisine (RR 3.98, 95% CI = 2.01-7.87) and low-dose varenicline (RR 2.09, 95% CI = 1.56-2.78) aid smoking cessation, and found that training health professionals in smoking cessation improves patient cessation rates (RR 1.60, 95% CI = 1.26-2.03). The updated reviews confirmed the benefits of nicotine replacement therapy, standard dose varenicline and providing cessation treatment free of charge. Lack of demonstrated efficacy remained for partner support, expired-air carbon monoxide feedback and lung function feedback. Cochrane systematic review evidence for the first time establishes the efficacy of behavioural support over and above pharmacotherapy, as well as the efficacy of cytisine, mobile phone technology, low-dose varenicline and health professional training in promoting smoking cessation. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Baekkenbundstraening til gravide og barslende kvinder--en gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Due, Ulla; Lose, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Urinary and anal incontinence are prevalent in pregnant and parturient women. Pelvic floor muscle training is frequently employed for prevention and treatment. A recent Cochrane review is discussed. Fifteen studies with a total of 6,181 women were included. Pregnant women without urinary...... incontinence experienced a reduction of the risk of developing urinary incontinence in later pregnancy or post partum. Peripartum patients with urinary and anal incontinence experienced a reduction of their symptoms following training....

  7. [Pelvic floor muscle training in pregnant and parturient women--a survey of a Cochrane review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Due, Ulla; Lose, Gunnar

    2010-09-06

    Urinary and anal incontinence are prevalent in pregnant and parturient women. Pelvic floor muscle training is frequently employed for prevention and treatment. A recent Cochrane review is discussed. Fifteen studies with a total of 6,181 women were included. Pregnant women without urinary incontinence experienced a reduction of the risk of developing urinary incontinence in later pregnancy or post partum. Peripartum patients with urinary and anal incontinence experienced a reduction of their symptoms following training.

  8. Cochrane Airways Group reviews were prioritized for updating using a pragmatic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, E; Stovold, E; Karner, C; Cates, C

    2015-03-01

    Cochrane Reviews should address the most important questions for guideline writers, clinicians, and the public. It is not possible to keep all reviews up-to-date, so the Cochrane Airways Group (CAG) decided to prioritize updates and new reviews without requesting additional resources. The aim of the objective was to develop pragmatic and transparent prioritization techniques to identify 25 to 35 high-priority updates from a total of 270 CAG Reviews and become more selective over which new reviews we publish. We used elements from existing prioritization processes, including existing health care uncertainties, expert opinion, and a decision tool. We did not conduct a full face-to-face workshop or an iterative group decision-making process. We prioritized 30 reviews in need of updating and aimed to update these within 2 years. Within the first 18 months, nine of these have been published. A pragmatic approach to prioritization can indicate priority reviews without an excessive drain on time and resources. The steps provide us with better control over the reviews in our scope and can be built on in the future. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Equity issues were not fully addressed in Cochrane human immunodeficiency virus systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aves, Theresa; Kredo, Tamara; Welch, Vivian; Mursleen, Sara; Ross, Stephanie; Zani, Babalwa; Motaze, Nkengafac Villyen; Quinlan, Leah; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    To describe and summarize equity reporting in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) systematic reviews and explore the extent to which equity issues are addressed and reported in HIV reviews using the PROGRESS Plus framework. Application of the PROGRESS Plus framework to a bibliometric analysis of HIV reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The analysis included 103 reviews published as of March 2014, with a median of five studies per review (first quartile; Q1 = 2; third quartile; Q3 = 11). Reporting of PROGRESS Plus factors was as follows: Place of residence (low, middle, and high income; 55.3%), place of residence (urban or rural; 24.3%), race or ethnicity (20.4%), occupation (10.7%), gender (65.0%), religion (1.9%), education (7.8%), socioeconomic position (10.7%), social networks and capital (1.0%), age (1.9%), and sexual orientation (3.8%). Gaps in the reporting of relevant equity indicators were identified within Cochrane HIV systematic review indicating that research is not consistently conducted through an equity lens. There is a need to incorporate PROGRESS Plus factors into both primary and secondary studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials on interventions for melasma: an abridged Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutley, Gurpreet Singh; Rajaratnam, Ratna; Halpern, James; Salim, Asad; Emmett, Charis

    2014-02-01

    Multiple treatments exist for melasma; they are often substandard and associated with side effects. We sought to assess the effectiveness of interventions used in the management of all types of melasma. We undertook a systematic review using the methodology of the Cochrane Collaboration. We included 20 studies with a total of 2125 participants covering 23 different treatments. A meta-analysis was not possible because of the heterogeneity of treatments. Triple-combination cream (hydroquinone, tretinoin, and fluocinolone acetonide) was more effective at lightening melasma than hydroquinone alone (relative risk 1.58, 95% confidence interval 1.26-1.97) or any of the agents in a dual-combination cream. Azelaic acid (20%) was significantly more effective than 2% hydroquinone (relative risk 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.48) at lightening melasma. In 2 studies where tretinoin was compared with placebo, objective measures demonstrated significant reductions in the severity. However, only in 1 study did participants rate a significant improvement (relative risk 13, 95% confidence interval 1.88-89.74). There was poor methodology, a lack of standardized outcome assessments, and short duration of studies. The current limited evidence supports the efficacy of multiple interventions. Randomized controlled trials on well-defined participants with long-term outcomes are needed. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physical rehabilitation for critical illness myopathy and neuropathy: an abridged version of Cochrane Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, J; Pohl, M; Kugler, J; Burridge, J; Mückel, S; Elsner, B

    2015-10-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) acquired or generalised weakness due to critical illness myopathy (CIM) and polyneuropathy (CIP) are major causes of chronically impaired motor function that can affect activities of daily living and quality of life. Physical rehabilitation of those affected might help to improve activities of daily living. Our primary objective was to assess the effects of physical rehabilitation therapies and interventions for people with CIP and CIM in improving activities of daily living such as walking, bathing, dressing and eating. Secondary objectives were to assess effects on muscle strength and quality of life, and to assess adverse effects of physical rehabilitation. On 16 July 2014 we searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register and on 14 July 2014 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus. In July 2014, we searched the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and three trials registries for ongoing trials and further data about included studies with no language restrictions. We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings and screened reference lists to identify further trials. We planned to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and randomised controlled cross-over trials of any rehabilitation intervention in people with acquired weakness syndrome due to CIP/CIM. We would have extracted data, assessed the risk of bias and classified the quality of evidence for outcomes in duplicate, according to the standard procedures of The Cochrane Collaboration. Outcome data collection would have been for activities of daily living (for example, mobility, walking, transfers and self care). Secondary outcomes included muscle strength, quality of life and adverse events. The search strategy retrieved 3587 references. After examination of titles and abstracts, we retrieved the full text of 24 potentially relevant studies. None of these studies met the inclusion criteria of our review. No data were

  12. Cochrane reviews compared with industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs: systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders W; Hilden, Jørgen; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the methodological quality and conclusions in Cochrane reviews with those in industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs. DESIGN: Systematic review comparing pairs of meta-analyses that studied the same two drugs in the same disease and were pu...

  13. Commentary on a Cochrane Review of Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in Health Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Chloe

    2017-12-01

    Intimate partner violence is a universal phenomenon that warrants awareness by all health care providers. This article summarizes a Cochrane Review on screening women for intimate partner violence in health care settings. The review authors identified 13 randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of screening for intimate partner violence. The authors concluded that there was insufficient evidence to justify implementation of universal screening for intimate partner violence. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  14. Exploring Treatment by Covariate Interactions Using Subgroup Analysis and Meta-Regression in Cochrane Reviews: A Review of Recent Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donegan, Sarah; Williams, Lisa; Tudur-Smith, Catrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment by covariate interactions can be explored in reviews using interaction analyses (e.g., subgroup analysis). Such analyses can provide information on how the covariate modifies the treatment effect and is an important methodological approach for personalising medicine. Guidance exists regarding how to apply such analyses but little is known about whether authors follow the guidance. Methods Using published recommendations, we developed criteria to assess how well interaction analyses were designed, applied, interpreted, and reported. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched (8th August 2013). We applied the criteria to the most recently published review, with an accessible protocol, for each Cochrane Review Group. We excluded review updates, diagnostic test accuracy reviews, withdrawn reviews, and overviews of reviews. Data were summarised regarding reviews, covariates, and analyses. Results Each of the 52 included reviews planned or did interaction analyses; 51 reviews (98%) planned analyses and 33 reviews (63%) applied analyses. The type of analysis planned and the type subsequently applied (e.g., sensitivity or subgroup analysis) was discrepant in 24 reviews (46%). No review reported how or why each covariate had been chosen; 22 reviews (42%) did state each covariate a priori in the protocol but no review identified each post-hoc covariate as such. Eleven reviews (21%) mentioned five covariates or less. One review reported planning to use a method to detect interactions (i.e., interaction test) for each covariate; another review reported applying the method for each covariate. Regarding interpretation, only one review reported whether an interaction was detected for each covariate and no review discussed the importance, or plausibility, of the results, or the possibility of confounding for each covariate. Conclusions Interaction analyses in Cochrane Reviews can be substantially improved. The proposed criteria can be used to

  15. Exploring treatment by covariate interactions using subgroup analysis and meta-regression in cochrane reviews: a review of recent practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Donegan

    Full Text Available Treatment by covariate interactions can be explored in reviews using interaction analyses (e.g., subgroup analysis. Such analyses can provide information on how the covariate modifies the treatment effect and is an important methodological approach for personalising medicine. Guidance exists regarding how to apply such analyses but little is known about whether authors follow the guidance.Using published recommendations, we developed criteria to assess how well interaction analyses were designed, applied, interpreted, and reported. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched (8th August 2013. We applied the criteria to the most recently published review, with an accessible protocol, for each Cochrane Review Group. We excluded review updates, diagnostic test accuracy reviews, withdrawn reviews, and overviews of reviews. Data were summarised regarding reviews, covariates, and analyses.Each of the 52 included reviews planned or did interaction analyses; 51 reviews (98% planned analyses and 33 reviews (63% applied analyses. The type of analysis planned and the type subsequently applied (e.g., sensitivity or subgroup analysis was discrepant in 24 reviews (46%. No review reported how or why each covariate had been chosen; 22 reviews (42% did state each covariate a priori in the protocol but no review identified each post-hoc covariate as such. Eleven reviews (21% mentioned five covariates or less. One review reported planning to use a method to detect interactions (i.e., interaction test for each covariate; another review reported applying the method for each covariate. Regarding interpretation, only one review reported whether an interaction was detected for each covariate and no review discussed the importance, or plausibility, of the results, or the possibility of confounding for each covariate.Interaction analyses in Cochrane Reviews can be substantially improved. The proposed criteria can be used to help guide the reporting and

  16. Intervention for replacing missing teeth: Different types of implants - evidence summary of updated Cochrane review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balendra Pratap Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Around 1300 different types of dental implants are available worldwide and the implant manufacturers are resorting to aggressive marketing strategies; claiming their implants to provide a superior outcome. The clinician is left with a constant dilemma on which implant to choose for better clinical outcome and welfare of the patient. Moreover, in India, economical consideration is a concern too. The dentist has to select an implant that provides a good result and is economical. Cochrane systematic reviews provide the gold standard evidence for intervention, diagnosis, etc., and follow a strict quality control. A Cochrane systematic review was done to shed light on whether the different implant surface modifications, shapes or materials significantly influence clinical outcomes. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs till January 17, 2014 were searched and out of the 81 trials, only 27 met the inclusion criteria. This evidence summary from the review concludes that based on the available literature; there is no evidence of any one type of implant being superior to another. There is weak evidence showing roughened dental implants are more prone to bone loss due to periimplantitis. This review indicated that there is a need for well-designed RCTs, with long-term follow-up and low bias. Moreover, none of the included studies was from India, which also points out the need for improving the quality of RCTs conducted in India.

  17. Recommendations by Cochrane Review Groups for assessment of the risk of bias in studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessing the risk of bias in individual studies in a systematic review can be done using individual components or by summarizing the study quality in an overall score. METHODS: We examined the instructions to authors of the 50 Cochrane Review Groups that focus on clinical interventions...... for recommendations on methodological quality assessment of studies. RESULTS: Forty-one of the review groups (82%) recommended quality assessment using components and nine using a scale. All groups recommending components recommended to assess concealment of allocation, compared to only two of the groups recommending...... scales (P analysis. Only 28 groups (56%) had specific recommendations for using the quality assessment of studies analytically in reviews, with sensitivity...

  18. Effective and evidence-based management strategies for rosacea: summary of a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuuren, E J; Kramer, S F; Carter, B R; Graber, M A; Fedorowicz, Z

    2011-10-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic skin disease affecting the face. There are numerous treatment options, but it is unclear which are the most effective. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence for the efficacy and safety of treatments for rosacea. Searches included the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and Ongoing Trials Registers (updated February 2011). Randomized controlled trials in people with moderate to severe rosacea were included. Fifty-eight trials, including 27 from the original review, comprising 6633 participants were included in this updated review. Interventions included topical metronidazole, oral antibiotics, topical azelaic cream or gel, topical benzoyl peroxide and/or combined with topical antibiotics, sulphacetamide/sulphur, and others. There was some evidence that topical metronidazole and azelaic acid were more effective than placebo. Two trials indicated that doxycycline 40mg was more effective than placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in effectiveness between doxycycline 40mg and 100mg but there were fewer adverse effects. One study reported that ciclosporin ophthalmic emulsion was significantly more effective than artificial tears for treating ocular rosacea. Although the majority of included studies were assessed as being at high or unclear risk of bias, there was some evidence to support the effectiveness of topical metronidazole, azelaic acid and doxycycline (40mg) in the treatment of moderate to severe rosacea, and ciclosporin 0·05% ophthalmic emulsion for ocular rosacea. Further well-designed, adequately powered randomized controlled trials are required. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  19. [The effect of zinc therapy on common cold--a survey of a Cochrane review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2012-01-09

    The Cochrane review "Zinc and the common cold" included 15 randomized controlled double-blind trials. It was concluded, that zinc would shorten the duration of the episode of common cold and also could be used as a prevention so that the risk of developing an episode of common cold would be decreased. It is too early to give general recommendations for the use of zinc as we do not have sufficient knowledge about the optimal dose, formulation and duration of treatment. Further research should focus on the effect of zinc in patients who are at increased risk of developing complications after common cold.

  20. Systematic versus opportunistic risk assessment for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: Cochrane systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Dyakova

    2015-12-01

    health and clinical efforts. This has prompted the initiation of national  screening/systematic risk assessment programmes for vascular disease in healthy populations. These exist in addition to the more ad hoc opportunistic risk assessment initiatives undertaken worldwide. There is currently not enough indisputable evidence either showing clear clinical or economic benefits of systematic screening-like programmes over opportunistic risk assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD in primary care. We present the rationale and methodology of a Cochrane systematic review, assessing the effectiveness, costs and adverse effects of systematic risk assessment compared to opportunistic risk assessment for the primary prevention of CVD.

  1. Information retrieval for the Cochrane systematic reviews: the case of breast cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Cognetti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Systematic reviews are fundamental sources of knowledge on the state-of-the-art interventions for various clinical problems. One of the essential components in carrying out a systematic review is that of developing a comprehensive literature search. Materials and methods. Three Cochrane systematic reviews published in 2012 were retrieved using the MeSH descriptor breast neoplasms/surgery, and analyzed with respect to the information sources used and the search strategies adopted. In March 2014, an update of one of the reviews retrieved was also considered in the study. Results. The number of databases queried for each review ranged between three and seven. All the reviews reported the search strategies adopted, however some only partially. All the reviews explicitly claimed that the searches applied no language restriction although sources such as the free database Lilacs (in Spanish and Portuguese was not consulted. Conclusion. To improve the quality it is necessary to apply standards in carrying out systematic reviews (as laid down in the MECIR project. To meet these standards concerning literature searching, professional information retrieval specialist staff should be involved. The peer review committee in charge of evaluating the publication of a systematic review should also include specialists in information retrieval for assessing the quality of the literature search.

  2. Single versus double intrauterine insemination in stimulated cycles for subfertile couples : a systematic review based on a Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantineau, AEP; Heineman, MJ; Cohlen, BJ

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this review was to determine, from the best available evidence, the difference in outcome using single versus double intrauterine insemination (IUI) in stimulated cycles for subfertile couples. METHODS: The principles of the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility

  3. Evidence-based treatments for female pattern hair loss: a summary of a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuuren, E J; Fedorowicz, Z; Carter, B

    2012-11-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) or androgenic alopecia is the most common type of hair loss affecting women with reduced hair density and can have a serious psychological impact. It is characterized by progressive replacement of slow cycling terminal hair follicles by miniaturized, rapidly cycling vellus hair follicles. The frontal hair line may or may not be preserved. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence for the effectiveness and safety of the treatments available for FPHL. Searches included: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO, LILACS and several ongoing trials registries (October 2011). Randomized controlled trials in women with FPHL were identified. Twenty-two trials, comprising 2349 participants, were included. A range of interventions was evaluated, with 10 studies examining varying concentrations of minoxidil. Pooled data from four studies indicated that a greater proportion of participants treated with minoxidil reported a moderate increase in their hair regrowth compared with placebo (relative risk 1·86, 95% confidence interval 1·42-2·43). There was no difference between the number of adverse events experienced in the twice daily minoxidil and the placebo intervention groups, except for a reported increase with minoxidil 5% twice daily. Single studies accounted for most of the other comparisons, which were assessed as either having high risk of bias and/or they did not address the prespecified outcomes for this review and provided limited evidence of either the effectiveness or safety of these interventions. Further well-designed, adequately powered randomized controlled trials investigating other treatment options are still required. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. Discrepancies in Outcome Reporting Exist Between Protocols and Published Oral Health Cochrane Systematic Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Pandis

    Full Text Available To assess discrepancies in the analyzed outcomes between protocols and published reviews within Cochrane oral health systematic reviews (COHG on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR.All COHG systematic reviews on the CDSR and the corresponding protocols were retrieved in November 2014 and information on the reported outcomes was recorded. Data was collected at the systematic review level by two reviewers independently.One hundred and fifty two reviews were included. In relation to primary outcomes, 11.2% were downgraded to secondary outcomes, 9.9% were omitted altogether in the final publication and new primary outcomes were identified in 18.4% of publications. For secondary outcomes, 2% were upgraded to primary, 12.5% were omitted and 30.9% were newly introduced in the publication. Overall, 45.4% of reviews had at least one discrepancy when compared to the protocol; these were reported in 14.5% reviews. The number of review updates appears to be associated with discrepancies between final review and protocol (OR: 3.18, 95% CI: 1.77, 5.74, p<0.001. The risk of reporting significant results was lower for both downgraded outcomes [RR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.17, 1.58, p = 0.24] and upgraded or newly introduced outcomes [RR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.36, 1.64, p = 0.50] compared to outcomes with no discrepancies. The risk of reporting significant results was higher for upgraded or newly introduced outcomes compared to downgraded outcomes (RR = 1.19, 95% CI: 0.65, 2.16, p = 0.57. None of the comparisons reached statistical significance.While no evidence of selective outcome reporting was found in this study, based on the present analysis of SRs published within COHG systematic reviews, discrepancies between outcomes in pre-published protocols and final reviews continue to be common. Solutions such as the use of standardized outcomes to reduce the prevalence of this issue may need to be explored.

  5. Systemic wound care: a meta-review of cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Santema, Trientje B; Stoekenbroek, Robert M

    2014-03-01

    Wound care is a classic example of a surgical realm with a great variation in care. The diversity in wounds and wound treatments, the limited amount of convincing evidence, and the diverging opinions among doctors and nurses involved in wound care contribute to this undesirable variation in care. For chronic wounds, such as arterial or venous ulcers, pressure sores, and diabetic foot ulcers, but also for acute wounds after surgery or trauma, international and national guidelines provide recommendations on diagnostic procedures and treatment options, but rely mostly on expert opinion. We present the available evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews for the systemic treatment (i.e., not prevention) of patients with wounds, as opposed to topical wound treatments. This evidence shows: - Venous ulcers: High-compression therapy is the classic and evidence-based treatment for treating venous ulcers. Oral pentoxifylline promotes ulcer healing with and without compression therapy. Oral zinc is not effective to heal venous ulcers. - Acute wounds: Recombinant human growth hormone accelerates healing of large burn wounds and donor sites, while high-carbohydrate feeding might reduce the risk of pneumonia. Linezolid is more effective than vancomycin for treating skin and soft tissue infections. Hyperbaric oxygen may help heal crush wounds and skin grafts. Therapeutic touch does not heal acute wounds. - Pressure sores: Air-fluidized and some low-tech devices appear effective for treating existing pressure ulcers. Oral zinc, protein, or vitamin C supplements seem ineffective. Also, evidence is lacking on the effectiveness of repositioning regimes as a treatment option. - Diabetic ulcers: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and pressure-relieving devices may improve healing rates. - Arterial ulcers: Prostanoids and spinal cord stimulation may be effective in healing ischemic ulcers. Thus, fortunately, some high-level evidence exists for various local and systemic interventions in wound

  6. Effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in eating disorders: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcelle Barrueco; Melnik, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders are psychiatric conditions originated from and perpetuated by individual, family and sociocultural factors. The psychosocial approach to treatment and prevention of relapse is crucial. To present an overview of the scientific evidence on effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in treatment of eating disorders. All systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Cochrane Library on the topic were included. Afterwards, as from the least recent date of these reviews (2001), an additional search was conducted at PubMed with sensitive search strategy and with the same keywords used. A total of 101 primary studies and 30 systematic reviews (5 Cochrane systematic reviews), meta-analysis, guidelines or narrative reviews of literature were included. The main outcomes were: symptomatic remission, body image, cognitive distortion, psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial functioning and patient satisfaction. The cognitive behavioral approach was the most effective treatment, especially for bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and the night eating syndrome. For anorexia nervosa, the family approach showed greater effectiveness. Other effective approaches were interpersonal psychotherapy, dialectic behavioral therapy, support therapy and self-help manuals. Moreover, there was an increasing number of preventive and promotional approaches that addressed individual, family and social risk factors, being promising for the development of positive self-image and self-efficacy. Further studies are required to evaluate the impact of multidisciplinary approaches on all eating disorders, as well as the cost-effectiveness of some effective modalities, such as the cognitive behavioral therapy. RESUMO Transtornos alimentares são doenças psiquiátricas originadas de e perpetuadas por fatores individuais, familiares e socioculturais. A abordagem psicossocial é essencial para o tratamento e a prevenção de recaídas. Apresentar uma vis

  7. Sedation protocols to reduce duration of mechanical ventilation in the ICU: a Cochrane Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Leanne M; Bucknall, Tracey; Kent, Bridie; Mitchell, Marion; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Keogh, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    Assess the effects of protocol-directed sedation management on the duration of mechanical ventilation and other relevant patient outcomes in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients. Sedation is a core component of critical care. Sub-optimal sedation management incorporates both under- and over-sedation and has been linked to poorer patient outcomes. Cochrane systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, LILACS, Current Controlled Trials and US National Institutes of Health Clinical Research Studies (1990-November 2013) and reference lists of articles were used. Randomized controlled trials conducted in intensive care units comparing management with and without protocol-directed sedation were included. Two authors screened titles, abstracts and full-text reports. Potential risk of bias was assessed. Clinical, methodological and statistical heterogeneity were examined and the random-effects model used for meta-analysis where appropriate. Mean difference for duration of mechanical ventilation and risk ratio for mortality, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated. Two eligible studies with 633 participants comparing protocol-directed sedation delivered by nurses vs. usual care were identified. There was no evidence of differences in duration of mechanical ventilation or hospital mortality. There was statistically significant heterogeneity between studies for duration of mechanical ventilation. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effectiveness of protocol-directed sedation as results from the two randomized controlled trials were conflicting. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about interventions for autism spectrum disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Lyra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs include autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. The manifestations of ASDs can have an important impact on learning and social functioning that may persist during adulthood. The aim here was to summarize the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Review of systematic reviews, conducted within the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: We included and summarized the results from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. RESULTS: Seventeen reviews were included. These found weak evidence of benefits from acupuncture, gluten and casein-free diets, early intensive behavioral interventions, music therapy, parent-mediated early interventions, social skill groups, Theory of Mind cognitive model, aripiprazole, risperidone, tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI; this last only for adults. No benefits were found for sound therapies, chelating agents, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, omega-3, secretin, vitamin B6/magnesium and SSRI for children. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture, gluten and casein-free diets, early intensive behavioral interventions, music therapy, parent-mediated early interventions, social skill groups and the Theory of Mind cognitive model seem to have benefits for patients with autism spectrum disorders (very low to low-quality evidence. Aripiprazole, risperidone, tricyclic antidepressants and SSRI (this last only for adults also showed some benefits, although associated with higher risk of adverse events. Experimental studies to confirm a link between probable therapies and the disease, and then high-quality long-term clinical trials, are needed.

  9. Interventions for rosacea: abridged updated Cochrane systematic review including GRADE assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuuren, E J; Fedorowicz, Z

    2015-09-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic facial dermatosis. This update of our Cochrane review on interventions for rosacea summarizes the evidence, including Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group assessments, of the effects of the currently available treatments. Searches included the following: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and the Science Citation Index, and ongoing trials registries (July 2014). We included 106 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 13 631 participants, a more than 80% increase since the last update in 2011. Pooling of data was feasible for a few outcomes, for topical metronidazole and azelaic acid and both appeared to be more effective than placebo (moderate and high-quality evidence, respectively). Topical ivermectin was more effective than placebo based on two studies (high-quality evidence), and slightly more effective than metronidazole in one study. Brimonidine was more effective than vehicle in reducing erythema in rosacea (high-quality evidence). Ciclosporin ophthalmic emulsion was effective for ocular rosacea (low-quality evidence). For oral treatments there was moderate-quality evidence for the effectiveness of tetracycline based on two old studies, and high-quality evidence for doxycycline 40 mg compared with placebo according to physician assessments. One study at high risk of bias demonstrated equivalent effectiveness for azithromycin and doxycycline 100 mg. Minocycline 45 mg may be effective for papulopustular rosacea (low-quality evidence). Low-dose isotretinoin appeared to be slightly more effective than doxycycline 50-100 mg (high-quality evidence). Laser and light-based therapies for erythema in rosacea were effective (low-quality evidence). Further RCTs are required for ocular rosacea. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Producing Cochrane systematic reviews-a qualitative study of current approaches and opportunities for innovation and improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tari; Green, Sally; Tovey, David; McDonald, Steve; Soares-Weiser, Karla; Pestridge, Charlotte; Elliott, Julian

    2017-08-01

    Producing high-quality, relevant systematic reviews and keeping them up to date is challenging. Cochrane is a leading provider of systematic reviews in health. For Cochrane to continue to contribute to improvements in heath, Cochrane Reviews must be rigorous, reliable and up to date. We aimed to explore existing models of Cochrane Review production and emerging opportunities to improve the efficiency and sustainability of these processes. To inform discussions about how to best achieve this, we conducted 26 interviews and an online survey with 106 respondents. Respondents highlighted the importance and challenge of creating reliable, timely systematic reviews. They described the challenges and opportunities presented by current production models, and they shared what they are doing to improve review production. They particularly highlighted significant challenges with increasing complexity of review methods; difficulty keeping authors on board and on track; and the length of time required to complete the process. Strong themes emerged about the roles of authors and Review Groups, the central actors in the review production process. The results suggest that improvements to Cochrane's systematic review production models could come from improving clarity of roles and expectations, ensuring continuity and consistency of input, enabling active management of the review process, centralising some review production steps; breaking reviews into smaller "chunks", and improving approaches to building capacity of and sharing information between authors and Review Groups. Respondents noted the important role new technologies have to play in enabling these improvements. The findings of this study will inform the development of new Cochrane Review production models and may provide valuable data for other systematic review producers as they consider how best to produce rigorous, reliable, up-to-date reviews.

  11. Treadmill training for patients with Parkinson Disease. An abridged version of a Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Kugler, Joachim; Storch, Alexander; Pohl, Marcus; Hirsch, Kathleen; Elsner, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Treadmill training is used in rehabilitation might improve gait parameters of patients with Parkinson Disease. Aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of treadmill training in improving the gait of patients with Parkinson Disease and the acceptability and safety of this type of therapy. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Specialized Register (last searched September 2014), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1950 to September 2014), and EMBASE (1980 to September 2014). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, searched trials and research registers, and checked reference lists (last searched September 2014). We contacted trialists, experts and researchers in the field and manufacturers of commercial devices. We included all randomized controlled trials comparing treadmill training with no treadmill training in patients with Parkinson Disease. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Treadmill training improved gait speed (MD=0.09 m/s; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.14; P=0.001; I2=24%; moderate quality of evidence), stride length (MD=0.05 meters; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.09; P=0.01; I2=0%; low quality of evidence), but walking distance (MD=48.9 meters; 95% CI -1.32 to 99.14; P=0.06; I2=91%; very low quality of evidence) and cadence did not improve (MD=2.16 steps/minute; 95% CI -0.13 to 4.46; P=0.07; I2=28%; low quality of evidence) at the end of study. Treadmill training did not increase the risk of patients dropping out from intervention (RD=-0.02; 95% CI -0.06 to 0.02; P=0.32; I2=13%; moderate quality of evidence) and adverse events were not reported. This systematic review provides evidence from eighteen trials with moderate to low risk of bias that the use of treadmill training in patients with PD may improve clinically relevant gait parameters such as gait speed and stride length. This apparent

  12. Single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Aldington, Dominic; Wiffen, Philip J

    2015-09-28

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane overview published in Issue 9, 2011. That overview considered both efficacy and adverse events, but adverse events are now dealt with in a separate overview.Thirty-nine Cochrane reviews of randomised trials have examined the analgesic efficacy of individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain. This overview brings together the results of those individual reviews and assesses the reliability of available data. To summarise the efficacy of pharmaceutical interventions for acute pain in adults with at least moderate pain following surgery who have been given a single dose of oral analgesic. We identified systematic reviews in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single review group, had a standard title, and had as their primary outcome the number of participants with at least 50% pain relief over four to six hours compared with placebo. For individual reviews, we extracted the number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for this outcome for each drug/dose combination, and also the percentage of participants achieving at least 50% maximum pain relief, the mean of mean or median time to remedication, and the percentage of participants remedicating by six, eight, 12, or 24 hours. Where there was adequate information for pairs of drug and dose (at least 200 participants, in at least two studies), we defined the addition of four comparisons of typical size (400 participants in total) with zero effect as making the result potentially subject to publication bias and therefore unreliable. The overview included 39 separate Cochrane Reviews with 41 analyses of single dose oral analgesics tested in acute postoperative pain models, with results from about 50,000 participants in approximately 460 individual studies. The individual reviews included only high-quality trials of standardised design

  13. Agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines for newborns at a Copenhagen University Hospital - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Greisen, Gorm; Jacobsen, Robert Thorkild

    2007-01-01

    To assess the agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines of a University Neonatology Department, to evaluate the reasons for potential disagreements and to ascertain whether Cochrane reviews were considered for the guidelines development.......To assess the agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines of a University Neonatology Department, to evaluate the reasons for potential disagreements and to ascertain whether Cochrane reviews were considered for the guidelines development....

  14. Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Omega-3 Fatty Acids for the Treatment of Dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016;4:CD009002.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cordeiro Sousa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from fish and plant sources is commonly prescribed as a nonfarmacological alternative to improve brain functions and slow down the progression of dementia. This use is mostly based on findings of preclinical studies which established the role of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the development and integrity of the brain, as well as epidemiological research that found evidence of malnutrition in patients with dementia. This Cochrane systematic review included three randomized, placebo-controlled trials at low risk of bias, in which omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were administered to people with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease in the form of supplements. Of the main results of this systematic review we highlight the lack of convincing evidence for the efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation in the treatment of patients with Alzheimer’s disease, as well as the low frequency of reported adverse events, with a comparable overall frequency between omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and the placebo groups. The effects on other populations with dementia remain unclear. This paper aims to summarize and discuss the main results and conclusions of this systematic review, as well as its implications for the daily clinical practice.

  15. Physical activity and exercise for chronic pain in adults: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneen, Louise J; Moore, R Andrew; Clarke, Clare; Martin, Denis; Colvin, Lesley A; Smith, Blair H

    2017-04-24

    Chronic pain is defined as pain lasting beyond normal tissue healing time, generally taken to be 12 weeks. It contributes to disability, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and healthcare costs. Chronic pain has a weighted mean prevalence in adults of 20%.For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity. However, exercise may have specific benefits in reducing the severity of chronic pain, as well as more general benefits associated with improved overall physical and mental health, and physical functioning.Physical activity and exercise programmes are increasingly being promoted and offered in various healthcare systems, and for a variety of chronic pain conditions. It is therefore important at this stage to establish the efficacy and safety of these programmes, and furthermore to address the critical factors that determine their success or failure. To provide an overview of Cochrane Reviews of adults with chronic pain to determine (1) the effectiveness of different physical activity and exercise interventions in reducing pain severity and its impact on function, quality of life, and healthcare use; and (2) the evidence for any adverse effects or harm associated with physical activity and exercise interventions. We searched theCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) on the Cochrane Library (CDSR 2016, Issue 1) for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), after which we tracked any included reviews for updates, and tracked protocols in case of full review publication until an arbitrary cut-off date of 21 March 2016 (CDSR 2016, Issue 3). We assessed the methodological quality of the reviews using the AMSTAR tool, and also planned to analyse data for each painful condition based on quality of the evidence.We extracted data for (1) self-reported pain severity, (2) physical function (objectively or subjectively measured), (3) psychological function, (4) quality of

  16. Antenatal and intrapartum interventions for preventing cerebral palsy: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Emily; Salam, Rehana A; Middleton, Philippa; Makrides, Maria; McIntyre, Sarah; Badawi, Nadia; Crowther, Caroline A

    2017-08-08

    Cerebral palsy is an umbrella term encompassing disorders of movement and posture, attributed to non-progressive disturbances occurring in the developing fetal or infant brain. As there are diverse risk factors and causes, no one strategy will prevent all cerebral palsy. Therefore, there is a need to systematically consider all potentially relevant interventions for their contribution to prevention. To summarise the evidence from Cochrane reviews regarding the effects of antenatal and intrapartum interventions for preventing cerebral palsy. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on 7 August 2016, for reviews of antenatal or intrapartum interventions reporting on cerebral palsy. Two authors assessed reviews for inclusion, extracted data, assessed review quality, using AMSTAR and ROBIS, and quality of the evidence, using the GRADE approach. We organised reviews by topic, and summarised findings in text and tables. We categorised interventions as effective (high-quality evidence of effectiveness); possibly effective (moderate-quality evidence of effectiveness); ineffective (high-quality evidence of harm or of lack of effectiveness); probably ineffective (moderate-quality evidence of harm or of lack of effectiveness); and no conclusions possible (low- to very low-quality evidence). We included 15 Cochrane reviews. A further 62 reviews pre-specified the outcome cerebral palsy in their methods, but none of the included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reported this outcome. The included reviews were high quality and at low risk of bias. They included 279 RCTs; data for cerebral palsy were available from 27 (10%) RCTs, involving 32,490 children. They considered interventions for: treating mild to moderate hypertension (two) and pre-eclampsia (two); diagnosing and preventing fetal compromise in labour (one); preventing preterm birth (four); preterm fetal maturation or neuroprotection (five); and managing preterm fetal compromise (one). Quality of

  17. Virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation: an abridged version of a Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, K; George, S; Thomas, S; Deutsch, J E; Crotty, M

    2015-08-01

    Virtual reality and interactive video gaming have emerged as new treatment approaches in stroke rehabilitation settings over the last ten years. The primary objective of this review was to determine the effectiveness of virtual reality on upper limb function and activity after stroke. The impact on secondary outcomes including gait, cognitive function and activities of daily living was also assessed. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing virtual reality with an alternative intervention or no intervention were eligible to be included in the review. The authors searched a number of electronic databases including: the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, clinical trial registers, reference lists, Dissertation Abstracts and contacted key researchers in the field. Search results were independently examined by two review authors to identify studies meeting the inclusion criteria. A total of 37 randomized or quasi randomized controlled trials with a total of 1019 participants were included in the review. Virtual reality was found to be significantly more effective than conventional therapy in improving upper limb function (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.28, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.08 to 0.49) based on 12 studies and significantly more effective than no therapy in improving upper limber function (SMD 0.44 [95% CI 0.15 to 0.73]) based on nine studies. The use of virtual reality also significantly improved activities of daily living function when compared to more conventional therapy approaches (SMD 0.43 [95% CI 0.18 to 0.69]) based on eight studies. While there are a large number of studies assessing the efficacy of virtual reality they tend to be small and many are at risk of bias. While there is evidence to support the use of virtual reality intervention as part of upper limb training programs, more research is required to determine whether it

  18. Intermittent catheterisation for long-term bladder management (abridged cochrane review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jacqui A; Murphy, Catherine; Moore, Katherine N; Fader, Mandy J

    2015-09-01

    To review the evidence on strategies to reduce UTI, other complications or improve satisfaction in intermittent catheter (IC) users by comparing: (1) one catheter design, material or technique versus another; (2) sterile technique versus clean; or (3) single-use (sterile) or multiple-use (clean) catheters. We searched Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, ERIC, reference lists, and conference proceedings to November 2013. We contacted other investigators for unpublished data or clarification. Trial screening, assessment and data abstraction were all in accordance with the Cochrane handbook. Thirty one trials (13 RCTs and 18 randomized crossover trials), addressed the inclusion criteria comparing method or design and UTI/bacteriuria, other complications or participant assessed outcomes. Studies varied widely in follow-up, UTI definition and attrition; in some, data could not be combined. Where there were data, confidence intervals were wide and hence clinically important differences could neither be reliably identified nor ruled out. Current research evidence is weak and design issues are significant. It has not yet been established whether incidence of UTI, other complications such as haematuria, or user satisfaction are affected by sterile or clean technique, coated or uncoated catheters, single or multiple-use catheters or by any other strategy. For people using IC, choice of catheter will depend on personal preference, cost, portability, and ease of use. Individuals should discuss the catheter options with their healthcare practitioner. Cost-effectiveness analysis and use of the standard definition of UTI are essential in any proposed clinical trial. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Physical activity and exercise for chronic pain in adults: an overview of Cochrane Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneen, Louise J; Moore, R Andrew; Clarke, Clare; Martin, Denis; Colvin, Lesley A; Smith, Blair H

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is defined as pain lasting beyond normal tissue healing time, generally taken to be 12 weeks. It contributes to disability, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and healthcare costs. Chronic pain has a weighted mean prevalence in adults of 20%. For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity. However, exercise may have specific benefits in reducing the severity of chronic pain, as well as more general benefits associated with improved overall physical and mental health, and physical functioning. Physical activity and exercise programmes are increasingly being promoted and offered in various healthcare systems, and for a variety of chronic pain conditions. It is therefore important at this stage to establish the efficacy and safety of these programmes, and furthermore to address the critical factors that determine their success or failure. Objectives To provide an overview of Cochrane Reviews of adults with chronic pain to determine (1) the effectiveness of different physical activity and exercise interventions in reducing pain severity and its impact on function, quality of life, and healthcare use; and (2) the evidence for any adverse effects or harm associated with physical activity and exercise interventions. Methods We searched theCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) on the Cochrane Library (CDSR 2016, Issue 1) for systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), after which we tracked any included reviews for updates, and tracked protocols in case of full review publication until an arbitrary cut-off date of 21 March 2016 (CDSR 2016, Issue 3). We assessed the methodological quality of the reviews using the AMSTAR tool, and also planned to analyse data for each painful condition based on quality of the evidence. We extracted data for (1) self-reported pain severity, (2) physical function (objectively or subjectively measured), (3

  20. Adhesion prevention agents for gynaecological surgery: an overview of Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindocha, Akshay; Beere, Lawrence; Dias, Sofia; Watson, Andrew; Ahmad, Gaity

    2015-01-06

    Intraperitoneal adhesions are associated with considerable co-morbidity and have large financial and public health repercussions. They have secondary effects that include chronic pelvic pain, dyspareunia, subfertility and bowel obstruction. In women with adhesions, subsequent surgery is more difficult, often takes longer, and is associated with a higher complication rate (Broek 2013). The significant burden of adhesions has led to the development of several anti-adhesion agents, although there is disagreement as to their relative effectiveness. To summarise evidence derived from Cochrane systematic reviews on the clinical safety and effectiveness of solid agents, gel agents, liquid agents and pharmacological agents, used as adjuvants to prevent formation of adhesions after gynaecological pelvic surgery. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched using the keyword 'adhesion' up to August 2014. The Cochrane information management system was also searched for any titles or protocols of reviews in progress. Two review authors independently extracted information from the reviews, with disagreements being resolved by a third review author. The quality of the included reviews was described in a narrative manner, and the AMSTAR tool was used to formally assess each review included in this overview. The quality of evidence provided in the original reviews was described using GRADE methods. We included two reviews, one with 18 studies comparing solid agents (oxidised regenerated cellulose expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, sodium hyaluronate and carboxymethylcellulose, and fibrin sheets) with control or with each other. The other review included 29 studies which compared liquid agents (4% icodextrin, 32% dextran, crystalloids), gel agents (carboxymethylcellulose and polyethylene oxide, polyethylene glycol gels, hyaluronic acid based gel, 0.5% ferric hyaluronate gel, sodium hyaluronate spray) and pharmacological agents (gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist

  1. Oral fumaric acid esters for psoriasis: abridged Cochrane systematic review including GRADE assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwan, A; Ingram, J R; Abbott, R; Kelson, M J; Pickles, T; Bauer, A; Piguet, V

    2016-11-01

    Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) are licensed for the treatment of moderate-to-severe psoriasis in Germany but are also used off-label in many other countries. We conducted this systematic review to synthesize the highest-quality evidence for the benefits and risks of FAEs for psoriasis. Our primary outcomes were change in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score and dropout rates due to adverse effects. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of FAEs or dimethylfumarate were included, with no restriction on age or psoriasis subtype. We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, LILACS and five trials registers, and hand searched six conference proceedings. Six RCTs with a total of 544 participants were included, four of which were published only as abstracts or brief reports, limiting study reporting. Five RCTs compared FAEs with placebo, and all demonstrated benefit in favour of FAEs. However, meta-analysis was possible only for PASI 50 response after 12-16 weeks, which was achieved by 64% of participants on FAEs compared with 14% on placebo: risk ratio (RR) 4·55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2·80-7·40; two studies; 247 participants; low-quality evidence). There was no difference in dropout rates due to adverse effects (RR 5·36, 95% CI 0·28-102·12; one study; 27 participants; very low-quality evidence and wide CI). More participants experienced nuisance adverse effects with FAEs (76%) than with placebo (16%) (RR 4·72, 95% CI 2·45-9·08; one study; 99 participants; moderate-quality evidence), mainly abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flushing. One head-to-head study of very low-quality evidence comparing FAEs with methotrexate reported comparable efficacy and dropout rates, although FAEs caused more flushing. The evidence in this review was limited and must be interpreted with caution; studies with better design and outcome reporting are needed. © 2016 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by

  2. Behandling af våd aldersrelateret makuladegeneration med vaskulaer endotel vaekstfaktorhaemmer. Gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Larsen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This evaluation of a Cochrane-review including five clinical trials of good methodological quality indicates that the antiangiogenic therapeutic agents, pegaptanib and ranibizumab, are effective treatment strategies for neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). The review does not inclu...

  3. Behandling af våd aldersrelateret makuladegeneration med vaskulaer endotel vaekstfaktorhaemmer. Gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Larsen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This evaluation of a Cochrane-review including five clinical trials of good methodological quality indicates that the antiangiogenic therapeutic agents, pegaptanib and ranibizumab, are effective treatment strategies for neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). The review does not include...

  4. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Vitamin D supplementation for prevention of cancer in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014, 6:CD007469].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, André Torres; Nanji, Liliana; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D has been mentioned in the literature has a potentially important agent for preventing the development of tumors, namely breast, colon, prostate and ovary tumors. However, the currently available evidence on the subject is contradictory and inconclusive. In this Cochrane systematic review, patients taking supplemental vitamin D on its various forms (cholecalciferol, ergocalciferol, alfacalcidol or calcitriol), regardless the dose, duration and route of administration, were compared with placebo, healthy adults without any intervention or adults with a disease in a stable phase, non-related with vitamin D metabolism. The results showed that currently, there is no firm evidence that vitamin D supplementation increases or decreases the risk of cancer occurrence, mainly in elderly community-dwelling women. Though at risk of type I errors due to small samples and substantial dropout of participants during the trials, the administration of supplemental cholecalciferol led to a 12% (CI 95%: 2 a 22%) decreased in cancer mortality, while the administration of supplemental vitamin D decreased all-cause mortality by 7% (CI 95%: 2 a 12%). The combined administration of supplements of cholecalciferol and calcium induced an increased incidence of nephrolithiasis.

  5. What efficacy measures are clinically relevant and should be used in Cochrane Reviews of acute migraine trials?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cochrane Reviews are methodologically of high quality but the clinical relevance of analysed efficacy measures (EMs) should also be assessed. METHODS: The clinical relevance of EMs used in one systematic Cochrane review of oral zolmitriptan for migraine headache was evaluated. RESULTS......: The following EMs were used: pain free at two hours (30%), headache relief at two hours (60%), sustained pain free for 24 hours (19%) and sustained headache relief for 24 hours (39%). These EMs were also used in four other Cochrane reviews of acute migraine treatment. Of these EMs sustained headache relief...... for 24 h is not judged clinically relevant. CONCLUSION: Pain free and sustained pain free are clinically relevant, but the responses are rather low, demonstrating that there is a need for improvement of acute drug treatment in migraine....

  6. Interventions for preventing elder abuse: applying findings of a new Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Philip Robert; Francis, Daniel Peter; Mohd Hairi, Noran Naqiah; Othman, Sajaratulnisah; Choo, Wan Yuen

    2017-05-01

    There is evidence that elder abuse is a significant public health problem that is destined to grow as population age. Countries are considering how best to act and this requires an understanding of the complex causal mechanisms contributing to its occurrence and the identification of effective interventions which can potentially make a difference. Previously, a high quality synthesis of evidence for policy and practice has been missing. In this paper, we describe a new Cochrane review of interventions to prevent the occurrence or reoccurrence of elder abuse. Overall, the quality of the evidence available for decision making is very low and there is little to guide practice. Amongst the interventions, there is some evidence that teaching coping skills to family carers of persons with dementia might make the situation better. We argue that poor quality and wasteful research needs to be avoided, and front-line agencies be supported in undertaking comparative evaluation of their services. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Sedation med propofol til koloskopi. Gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Anders Thorsmark; Vilmann, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Cochrane collaboration metaanalysis of propofol use during colonoscopy found a faster patient recovery, higher patient satisfaction and unchanged complication rate compared to traditional sedatives. Patient groups consisted mostly of ASA I-II-patients, therefore the study is inconclusive...

  8. Propofol for sedation during colonoscopy- A survey of a Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høj, Anders Thorsmark

    2010-01-01

    The Cochrane collaboration metaanalysis of propofol use during colonoscopy found a faster patient recovery, higher patient satisfaction and unchanged complication rate compared to traditional sedatives. Patient groups consisted mostly of ASA I-II-patients, therefore the study is inconclusive...

  9. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Sciatica: An Updated Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus J A; Roelofs, Pepijn D D M; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2017-04-15

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. To determine the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported adverse effects in people with sciatica. NSAIDs are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for sciatica. We updated a 2008 Cochrane Review through June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that compared NSAIDs with placebo, with other NSAIDs, or with other medication were included. Outcomes included pain using mean difference (MD, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI]). For global improvement and adverse effects risk ratios (RR, 95% CI) were used. We assessed level of evidence using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Ten trials were included (N = 1651). Nine out of 10 trials were assessed at high risk of bias. For pain reduction (visual analog scale, 0 to 100) NSAIDs were no more effective than placebo (MD -4.56, 95% CI -11.11 to 1.99, quality of evidence: very low). For global improvement NSAIDs were more effective than placebo (RR 1.14 [95% CI 1.03 to 1.27], low quality of evidence). One trial reported the effect of NSAIDs on disability with very low-quality evidence that NSAIDs are no more effective than placebo. There was low-quality evidence that the risk for adverse effects is higher for NSAID than placebo (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.93). Our findings show very low-quality evidence that the efficacy of NSAIDs for pain reduction is comparable with that of placebo, low-quality evidence that NSAIDs is better than placebo for global improvement and low-quality evidence for higher risk of adverse effects using NSAIDs compared with placebo. The findings must be interpreted with caution, due to small study samples, inconsistent results, and a high risk of bias in the included trials. 1.

  10. Distribution of country of origin in studies used in Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Robert F; Reinders, Stefan; Barth, Michael; Antes, Gerd

    2011-04-19

    Inclusion in systematic reviews is one important component in judging the potential impact of clinical studies upon practice and hence the 'value for money' of spending for clinical research. This study aims to quantify the distribution of countries of origin of clinical studies used in Cochrane Reviews (CRs), and to link these data to the size of a country and to its spending on research. Random sample of publications used for CRs published in Issue 1 2008 and of publications used in CRs in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Publications without original data were excluded. Likely countries of origin determined based on abstracts/full texts. CIA World Factbook (population data) and OECD database (economic data) were used. 1,000 random entries out of 140,005 references available in all specialities. In 876 (91.4%) of 959 eligible studies, country of origin was determined. The USA was the leading contributor (36.0% of the studies), followed by UK (13.4%), Canada (5.3%), Australia and Sweden (3.7%). In the CAM sample, country of origin was determined in 458 (93.5%) of 497 assessed studies. Again, the USA was the leading contributor (24.9%), with China also emerging as a significant contributor (24.7%) in this field. For both samples, the contribution of smaller countries (especially Scandinavian countries, Greece, and Ireland) became more noteworthy when considered in relation to population size and research spending. Our results support the leading roles of both the USA and the UK in publishing clinical papers. The emerging role of China can be seen, particularly related to CAM studies. Taking into account size of population and economic power, countries like France, Germany, Italy, and Spain provide small contributions. In contrast, smaller countries like Australia, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, New Zealand, and Sweden also play major roles.

  11. Effectiveness and efficacy of nutritional therapy: A systematic review following Cochrane methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Krznarić, Zeljko; Singer, Pierre; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; Golay, Alain; Van Gossum, André; Kennedy, Nicholas; Kreymann, Georg; Laviano, Alessandro; Pavić, Tajana; Puljak, Livia; Sambunjak, Dario; Utrobičić, Ana; Schneider, Stéphane M

    2017-08-01

    Disease-related malnutrition has deleterious consequences on patients' outcome and healthcare costs. The demonstration of improved outcome by appropriate nutritional management is on occasion difficult. The European Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) appointed the Nutrition Education Study Group (ESPEN-NESG) to increase recognition of nutritional knowledge and support in health services. To obtain the best available evidence on the potential effects of malnutrition on morbidity, mortality and hospital stay; cost of malnutrition; effect of nutritional treatment on outcome parameters and pharmaco-economics of nutritional therapy, a systematic review of the literature was performed following Cochrane methodology, to answer the following key questions: Q1) Is malnutrition an independent predictive factor for readmission within 30 days from hospital discharge? Q2) Does nutritional therapy reduce the risk of readmission within 30 days from hospital discharge? Q3) Is nutritional therapy cost-effective/does it reduce costs in hospitalized patients? and Q4) Is nutritional therapy cost effective/does it reduce costs in outpatients? For Q1 six of 15 identified observational studies indicated that malnutrition was predictive of re-admissions, whereas the remainder did not. For Q2 nine randomized controlled trials and two meta-analyses gave non-conclusive results whether re-admissions could be reduced by nutritional therapy. Economic benefit and cost-effectiveness of nutritional therapy was consistently reported in 16 identified studies for hospitalized patients (Q3), whereas the heterogeneous and limited corresponding data on out-patients (Q4) indicated cost-benefits in some selected sub-groups. This result of this review supports the use of nutritional therapy to reduce healthcare costs, most evident from large, homogeneous studies. In general, reports are too heterogeneous and overall of limited quality for conclusions on impact of malnutrition and its

  12. Psychological interventions for coronary heart disease: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Suzanne H; Anderson, Lindsey; Jenkinson, Caroline E; Whalley, Ben; Rees, Karen; Davies, Philippa; Bennett, Paul; Liu, Zulian; West, Robert; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2018-02-01

    Background Although psychological interventions are recommended for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), there remains considerable uncertainty regarding their effectiveness. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions for CHD. Methods The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched to April 2016. Retrieved papers, systematic reviews and trial registries were hand-searched. We included RCTs with at least 6 months of follow-up, comparing the direct effects of psychological interventions to usual care for patients following myocardial infarction or revascularisation or with a diagnosis of angina pectoris or CHD defined by angiography. Two authors screened titles for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Studies were pooled using random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression was used to explore study-level predictors. Results Thirty-five studies with 10,703 participants (median follow-up 12 months) were included. Psychological interventions led to a reduction in cardiovascular mortality (rfcelative risk 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63 to 0.98), although no effects were observed for total mortality, myocardial infarction or revascularisation. Psychological interventions improved depressive symptoms (standardised mean difference [SMD] -0.27, 95% CI -0.39 to -0.15), anxiety (SMD -0.24, 95% CI -0.38 to -0.09) and stress (SMD -0.56, 95% CI -0.88 to -0.24) compared with controls. Conclusions We found that psychological intervention improved psychological symptoms and reduced cardiac mortality for people with CHD. However, there remains considerable uncertainty regarding the magnitude of these effects and the specific techniques most likely to benefit people with different presentations of CHD.

  13. ω-3 Fatty acids for major depressive disorder in adults: an abridged Cochrane review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Katherine M; Sallis, Hannah M; Perry, Rachel; Ness, Andrew R; Churchill, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFAs; also known as ω-3 fatty acids) compared with comparator for major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Design Systematic review and meta-analyses. Data sources The Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Registers (CCDANCTR) and International Trial Registries searched to May 2015. CINAHL searched to September 2013. Trial selection Inclusion criteria: a randomised controlled trial (RCT); that provided n-3PUFAs as an intervention; used a comparator; measured depressive symptomology as an outcome; and was conducted in adults with MDD. Outcomes Primary outcomes were depressive symptomology and adverse events. Results 20 trials encompassing 26 relevant studies were found. For n-3PUFAs versus placebo, n-3PUFA supplementation resulted in a small-to-modest benefit for depressive symptomology: SMD=−0.32 (95% CI −0.52 to −0.12; 25 studies, 1373 participants, very low-quality evidence), but this effect is unlikely to be clinically meaningful, is very imprecise and, based on funnel plot inspection, sensitivity analyses and comparison with large well-conducted trials, is likely to be biased. Considerable evidence of heterogeneity between studies was also found, and was not explained by subgroup or sensitivity analyses. Numbers of individuals experiencing adverse events were similar in intervention and placebo groups (OR=1.24, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.62; 19 studies, 1207 participants; very low-quality evidence). For n-3PUFAs versus antidepressants, no differences were found between treatments in depressive symptomology (MD=−0.70 (95% CI −5.88 to 4.48); 1 study, 40 participants, very low-quality evidence). Conclusions At present, we do not have sufficient evidence to determine the effects of n-3PUFAs as a treatment for MDD. Further research in the form of adequately powered RCTs is needed. PMID:26936905

  14. Blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin inhibitors for primary hypertension: a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musini, V M; Fortin, P M; Bassett, K; Wright, J M

    2009-08-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of double-blind randomized controlled trials to quantify the dose-related systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) lowering efficacy of renin inhibitors vs placebo in the treatment of adults with primary hypertension. Databases searched were Medline (1966-March 2008), EMBASE (1988-March 2008) and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL). Six trials in 3694 patients met the inclusion criteria. All examined aliskiren, the only renin inhibitor licensed for marketing in Canada and the United States. Aliskiren caused a dose-related SBP/DBP lowering effect compared to placebo: weighted mean difference with 95% CI: aliskiren 75 mg, -2.9 (-4.6, -1.3)/-2.3 (-3.3, -1.3) mm Hg; aliskiren 150 mg, -5.5 (-6.5, -4.4)/-3.0 (-3.7, -2.3) mm Hg; aliskiren 300 mg, -8.7 (-9.7,-7.6)/-5.0 (-5.6, -4.3) and aliskiren 600 mg, -11.4 (-13.5, -9.2)/-6.6 (-7.9, -5.2) mm Hg. Aliskiren 300 mg significantly lowered both SBP -3.0 (-4.0, -2.0) and DBP -1.7 (-2.3, -1.0) as compared to aliskiren 150 mg. Aliskiren has no effect on blood pressure variability. No data were available to assess the effect of aliskiren on heart rate or pulse pressure. This review found weak evidence that during 4- to 8-week use, aliskiren did not increase withdrawals due to adverse effects as compared to placebo. We concluded that aliskiren has a dose-related blood pressure lowering effect better than placebo and magnitude of effect is similar to that determined for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers.

  15. Topical analgesics for acute and chronic pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Wiffen, Philip J; Kalso, Eija A; Bell, Rae F; Aldington, Dominic; Phillips, Tudor; Gaskell, Helen; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-12

    Topical analgesic drugs are used for a variety of painful conditions. Some are acute, typically strains or sprains, tendinopathy, or muscle aches. Others are chronic, typically osteoarthritis of hand or knee, or neuropathic pain. To provide an overview of the analgesic efficacy and associated adverse events of topical analgesics (primarily nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), salicylate rubefacients, capsaicin, and lidocaine) applied to intact skin for the treatment of acute and chronic pain in adults. We identified systematic reviews in acute and chronic pain published to February 2017 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (the Cochrane Library). The primary outcome was at least 50% pain relief (participant-reported) at an appropriate duration. We extracted the number needed to treat for one additional beneficial outcome (NNT) for efficacy outcomes for each topical analgesic or formulation, and the number needed to treat for one additional harmful outcome (NNH) for adverse events. We also extracted information on withdrawals due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, systemic and local adverse events, and serious adverse events. We required information from at least 200 participants, in at least two studies. We judged that there was potential for publication bias if the addition of four studies of typical size (400 participants) with zero effect increased NNT compared with placebo to 10 (minimal clinical utility). We extracted GRADE assessment in the original papers, and made our own GRADE assessment. Thirteen Cochrane Reviews (206 studies with around 30,700 participants) assessed the efficacy and harms from a range of topical analgesics applied to intact skin in a number of acute and chronic painful conditions. Reviews were overseen by several Review Groups, and concentrated on evidence comparing topical analgesic with topical placebo; comparisons of topical and oral analgesics were rare.For at least 50% pain relief, we considered evidence was

  16. An abridged version of the Cochrane review of exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larun, Lillebeth; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan; Price, Jonathan R; Brurberg, Kjetil G

    2016-04-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is estimated to affect between 2 in 1000 and 2 in 100 adults depending on how diagnostic criteria are applied. Patients with CFS have long-lasting fatigue in addition to symptoms including muscle pain, concentration and sleep problems. These symptoms cause significant disability and distress to the people affected. This review is an update of a previous Cochrane review (2004) that showed that exercise therapy was a promising treatment for adults with CFS. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effects of exercise therapy for patients with CFS. Systematic review. Health care settings. Participants over 18 years with a primary diagnosis of CFS, able to attend an outpatient clinic for exercise therapy, were included. We searched electronic databases, including SPORTDiscus, up to May 2014 using a comprehensive list of free-text terms for CFS and exercise. Randomized clinical trials from all health care settings with participants over 18 years with a primary diagnosis of CFS, able to attend an outpatient clinic for exercise therapy, were included. We have included 8 randomized clinical studies that reported data from 1518 participants. Seven studies used aerobic exercise such as walking, swimming, or cycling and one study used non-aerobic exercise. The exercise therapies lasted between 12 and 26 weeks. Meta-analysis was done when appropriate. Exercise therapy was more effective at reducing fatigue than "passive" treatments or no treatment at end of treatment. Exercise therapy also had a positive effect on people's daily physical functioning, sleep quality and self-rated overall health. Nearly twice as many patients reported improvement self-rated overall health after exercise therapy (40 per 100) compared to standard treatment (22 per 100). The evidence was too sparse and/or of too low quality to conclude if exercise therapy has an effect on pain, quality of life, anxiety or

  17. Missing binary data extraction challenges from Cochrane reviews in mental health and Campbell reviews with implications for empirical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spineli, Loukia M

    2017-09-29

    Tο report challenges encountered during the extraction process from Cochrane reviews in mental health and Campbell reviews and to indicate their implications on the empirical performance of different methods to handle missingness. We used a collection of meta-analyses on binary outcomes collated from a previous work on missing outcome data. To evaluate the accuracy of their extraction, we developed specific criteria pertaining to the reporting of missing outcome data in systematic reviews. Using the most popular methods to handle missing binary outcome data, we investigated the implications of the accuracy of the extracted meta-analysis on the random-effects meta-analysis results. Of 113 meta-analyses from Cochrane reviews, 60 (53%) were judged as "unclearly" extracted (ie, no information on the outcome of completers but available information on how missing participants were handled) and 42 (37%) as "unacceptably" extracted (ie, no information on the outcome of completers as well as no information on how missing participants were handled). For the remaining meta-analyses, it was judged that data were "acceptably" extracted (ie, information on the completers' outcome was provided for all trials). Overall, "unclear" extraction overestimated the magnitude of the summary odds ratio and the between-study variance and additionally inflated the uncertainty of both meta-analytical parameters. The only eligible Campbell review was judged as "unclear." Depending on the extent of missingness, the reporting quality of the systematic reviews can greatly affect the accuracy of the extracted meta-analyses and by extent, the empirical performance of different methods to handle missingness. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. H1-antihistamines for chronic spontaneous urticaria: an abridged Cochrane Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Maulina; Bennett, Cathy; Carter, Ben; Cohen, Stuart N

    2015-10-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria is characterized by recurrent itchy wheals. First-line management is with H1-antihistamines. We sought to conduct a Cochrane Review of H1-antihistamines in the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria. A systematic search of major databases for randomized controlled trials was conducted. We included 73 studies with 9759 participants; 34 studies provided outcome data for 23 comparisons. Compared with placebo, cetirizine 10 mg daily in the short and intermediate term (RR 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51-4.91) led to complete suppression of urticaria. Levocetirizine 20 mg daily was effective for short-term use (RR 20.87; 95% CI 1.37-317.60) as was 5 mg for intermediate-term use (RR 52.88; 95% CI 3.31-843.81). Desloratadine 20 mg was effective for the short term (RR 15.97; 95% CI 1.04-245.04) as was 5 mg in the intermediate term (RR 37.00; 95% CI 2.31-593.70). There was no evidence to suggest difference in adverse event rates between treatments. Some methodological limitations were observed. Few studies for each comparison reported outcome data that could be incorporated in meta-analyses. At standard doses, several antihistamines are effective and safe in complete suppression of chronic spontaneous urticaria. Research on long-term treatment using standardized outcome measures and quality of life scores is needed. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Langtidseffekt af vægtreducerende behandlinghos patienter med hypertension--en gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2011-01-01

    In eight studies included in the present Cochrane review the effects of orlistat or sibutramine versus placebo on mortality, cardiovascular mortality and adverse events were investigated in obese people with hypertension. No studies with rimonabant fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The weight loss...

  20. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamper, Steven J; Apeldoorn, A T; Chiarotto, A; Smeets, R J E M; Ostelo, R W J G; Guzman, J; van Tulder, M W

    2015-02-18

    To assess the long term effects of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for patients with chronic low back pain. Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Electronic searches of Cochrane Back Review Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases up to February 2014, supplemented by hand searching of reference lists and forward citation tracking of included trials. Trials published in full; participants with low back pain for more than three months; multidisciplinary rehabilitation involved a physical component and one or both of a psychological component or a social or work targeted component; multidisciplinary rehabilitation was delivered by healthcare professionals from at least two different professional backgrounds; multidisciplinary rehabilitation was compared with a non- multidisciplinary intervention. Forty one trials included a total of 6858 participants with a mean duration of pain of more than one year who often had failed previous treatment. Sixteen trials provided moderate quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation decreased pain (standardised mean difference 0.21, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.37; equivalent to 0.5 points in a 10 point pain scale) and disability (0.23, 0.06 to 0.40; equivalent to 1.5 points in a 24 point Roland-Morris index) compared with usual care. Nineteen trials provided low quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation decreased pain (standardised mean difference 0.51, -0.01 to 1.04) and disability (0.68, 0.16 to 1.19) compared with physical treatments, but significant statistical heterogeneity across trials was present. Eight trials provided moderate quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation improves the odds of being at work one year after intervention (odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.39 to 2.53) compared with physical treatments. Seven trials provided moderate quality evidence that

  1. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about the clinical effectiveness of screening and diagnostic tests for cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, André Tito Pereira; Capelasso, Vladimir Lisboa; Pacheco, Rafael Leite; Latorraca, Carolina de Oliveira Cruz; Castria, Tiago Biachi de; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Riera, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of screening tests for cancer is to detect it at an early stage in order to increase the chances of treatment. However, their unrestrained use may lead to unnecessary examinations, overdiagnosis and higher costs. It is thus necessary to evaluate their clinical effects in terms of benefits and harm. Review of Cochrane systematic reviews, carried out in the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. Cochrane reviews on the clinical effectiveness of cancer screening procedures were included. Study titles and abstracts were independently assessed by two authors. Conflicts were resolved by another two authors. Findings were summarized and discussed. Seventeen reviews were selected: fifteen on screening for specific cancers (bladder, breast, colorectal, hepatic, lung, nasopharyngeal, esophageal, oral, prostate, testicular and uterine) and two others on cancer in general. The quality of evidence of the findings varied among the reviews. Only two reviews resulted in high-quality evidence: screening using low-dose computed tomography scans for high-risk individuals seems to reduce lung cancer mortality; and screening using flexible sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood tests seems to reduce colorectal cancer mortality. The evidence found through Cochrane reviews did not support most of the commonly used screening tests for cancer. It is recommended that patients should be informed of the possibilities of false positives and false negatives before they undergo the tests. Further studies to fully assess the effectiveness of cancer screening tests and adverse outcomes are required.

  2. Behandling med dopaminagonister i den tidlige fase af Parkinsons sygdom: gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bode, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The Cochrane analysis confirms some well-known facts: initial therapy with dopamine agonists (DA) delays the incidence of motor complications, but is associated with inferior motor control and a higher frequency of non-motor adverse events (AE) compared with levodopa. Some serious AE are missing,...

  3. Back schools for nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymans, M W; van Tulder, M W; Esmail, R; Bombardier, C; Koes, B W

    2005-10-01

    A systematic review within the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group. To assess the effectiveness of back schools for patients with nonspecific low back pain (LBP). Since the introduction of the Swedish back school in 1969, back schools have frequently been used for treating patients with LBP. However, the content of back schools has changed and appears to vary widely today. We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to November 2004 for relevant trials reported in English, Dutch, French, or German. We also screened references from relevant reviews and included trials. Randomized controlled trials that reported on any type of back school for nonspecific LBP were included. Four reviewers, blinded to authors, institution, and journal, independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of the trials. We set the high-quality level, a priori, at a trial meeting six or more of 11 internal validity criteria. Because data were clinically and statistically too heterogeneous to perform a meta-analysis, we used a qualitative review (best evidence synthesis) to summarize the results. The evidence was classified into four levels (strong, moderate, limited, or no evidence), taking into account the methodologic quality of the studies. We also evaluated the clinical relevance of the studies. Nineteen randomized controlled trials (3,584 patients) were included in this updated review. Overall, the methodologic quality was low, with only six trials considered to be high-quality. It was not possible to perform relevant subgroup analyses for LBP with radiation versus LBP without radiation. The results indicate that there is moderate evidence suggesting that back schools have better short- and intermediate-term effects on pain and functional status than other treatments for patients with recurrent and chronic LBP. There is moderate evidence suggesting that back schools for chronic LBP in an occupational setting are more

  4. Adverse events associated with single dose oral analgesics for acute postoperative pain in adults - an overview of Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R Andrew; Derry, Sheena; Aldington, Dominic; Wiffen, Philip J

    2015-10-13

    This is an update of a Cochrane overview published in Issue 9, 2011; that overview considered both efficacy and adverse events. This overview considers adverse events, with efficacy dealt with in a separate overview.Thirty-nine Cochrane reviews of randomised trials have examined the adverse events associated with individual drug interventions in acute postoperative pain. This overview brings together the results of those individual reviews. To provide an overview of adverse event rates associated with single-dose oral analgesics, compared with placebo, for acute postoperative pain in adults. We identified systematic reviews in The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews on The Cochrane Library through a simple search strategy. All reviews were overseen by a single review group. We extracted information related to participants experiencing any adverse event, and reports of serious adverse events, and deaths from the individual reviews. Information was available from 39 Cochrane reviews for 41 different analgesics or analgesic combinations (51 drug/dose/formulations) tested in single oral doses in participants with moderate or severe postoperative pain. This involved around 350 unique studies involving about 35,000 participants. Most studies involved younger participants with pain following removal of molar teeth.For most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), paracetamol, and combinations not containing opioids, there were few examples where participants experienced significantly more or fewer adverse events than with placebo. For aspirin 1000 mg and diflunisal 1000 mg, opioids, or fixed-dose combination drugs containing opioids, participants typically experienced significantly more adverse events than with placebo. Studies of combinations of ibuprofen and paracetamol reported significantly fewer adverse events.Serious adverse events were rare, occurring a rate of about 1 in 3200 participants.Most reviews did not report specific adverse events. Despite

  5. Methodological quality and implications for practice of systematic Cochrane reviews in pediatric oral health: a critical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaïl-Faugeron, Violaine; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Courson, Frédéric

    2014-04-09

    To ensure evidence-based decision-making in pediatric oral health, Cochrane systematic reviews that address topics pertinent to this field are necessary. We aimed to identify all systematic reviews of paediatric dentistry and oral health by the Cochrane Oral Health Group (COHG), summarize their characteristics and assess their methodological quality. Our second objective was to assess implications for practice in the review conclusions and provide an overview of clinical implications about the usefulness of paediatric oral health interventions in practice. We conducted a methodological survey including all paediatric dentistry reviews from the COHG. We extracted data on characteristics of included reviews, then assessed the methodological quality using a validated 11-item quality assessment tool (AMSTAR). Finally, we coded each review to indicate whether its authors concluded that an intervention should be implemented in practice, was not supported or was refuted by the evidence, or should be used only in research (inconclusive evidence). We selected 37 reviews; most concerned the prevention of caries. The methodological quality was high, except for the assessment of reporting bias. In 7 reviews (19%), the research showed that benefits outweighed harms; in 1, the experimental intervention was found ineffective; and in 29 (78%), evidence was insufficient to assess benefits and harms. In the 7 reviews, topical fluoride treatments (with toothpaste, gel or varnish) were found effective for permanent and deciduous teeth in children and adolescents, and sealants for occlusal tooth surfaces of permanent molars. Cochrane reviews of paediatric dentistry were of high quality. They provided strong evidence that topical fluoride treatments and sealants are effective for children and adolescents and thus should be implemented in practice. However, a substantial number of reviews yielded inconclusive evidence.

  6. Intervention for replacing missing teeth: Different types of implants - evidence summary of updated Cochrane review

    OpenAIRE

    Balendra Pratap Singh; Hemant Jivanani

    2015-01-01

    Around 1300 different types of dental implants are available worldwide and the implant manufacturers are resorting to aggressive marketing strategies; claiming their implants to provide a superior outcome. The clinician is left with a constant dilemma on which implant to choose for better clinical outcome and welfare of the patient. Moreover, in India, economical consideration is a concern too. The dentist has to select an implant that provides a good result and is economical. Cochrane system...

  7. Training practitioners in preparing systematic reviews: a cross-sectional survey of participants in the Australasian Cochrane Centre training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silagy Chris

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although systematic reviews of health care interventions are an invaluable tool for health care providers and researchers, many potential authors never publish reviews. This study attempts to determine why some people with interest in performing systematic reviews do not subsequently publish a review; and what steps could possibly increase review completion. Methods Cross-sectional survey by email and facsimile of the 179 participants in Australasian Cochrane Centre training events between 1998 and 2000. Results Ninety-two participants responded to the survey (51 percent. Response rate of deliverable surveys was 82 percent (92/112. The remainder of the participants had invalid or no contact information on file. More than 75 percent of respondents felt that the current workshops met their needs for training. The most critical barriers to completion of a Cochrane review were: lack of time (80 percent, lack of financial support (36 percent, methodological problems (23 percent and problems with group dynamics (10 percent. Conclusions Strategies to protect reviewer time and increase the efficiency of the review process may increase the numbers of trained reviewers completing a systematic review.

  8. No difference in knowledge obtained from infographic or plain language summary of a Cochrane systematic review: three randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, Ivan; Malički, Mario; Wager, Elizabeth; Puljak, Livia; Hren, Darko; Kellie, Frances; West, Helen; Alfirević, Žarko; Marušić, Ana

    2017-12-18

    The aim of this study was to test the usefulness of an infographic in the translation of knowledge about health information from a Cochrane systematic review to lay and professional populations in comparison to a plain language summary (PLS) and scientific abstract (SA). We conducted three parallel randomized trials with university students (n = 171), consumers (n = 99), and doctors (n = 64), to examine the effect of different summary formats of a Cochrane systematic review on the knowledge about health information presented in the review, reading experience, and perceived user-friendliness. In the trials involving students and doctors, an infographic was compared to a PLS and a SA, while in those with consumers, an infographic was compared to a PLS. We found no difference in knowledge between the infographic and the text-based PLS in any of the trials or in the whole participant sample. All three participant groups preferred the infographic and gave it higher ratings for reading experience (d = 0.48 in the overall sample) and user-friendliness (d = 0.46 in the overall sample). Although the infographic format was perceived as more enjoyable for reading, it was not better than a traditional, text-based PLS in the translation of knowledge about findings from a Cochrane systematic review. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Russian translations for Cochrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudina, E V; Ziganshina, L E

    2015-01-01

    Cochrane collaboration has made a huge contribution to the development of evidence-based medicine; Cochrane work is the international gold standard of independent, credible and reliable high-quality information in medicine. Over the past 20 years the Cochrane Collaboration helped transforming decision-making in health and reforming it significantly, saving lives and contributing to longevity [1]. Until recently, Cochrane evidence were available only in English, which represents a significant barrier to their wider use in non-English speaking countries. To provide access to evidence, obtained from Cochrane Reviews, for health professionals and general public (from non-English-speaking countries), bypassing language barriers, Cochrane collaboration in 2014 initiated an international project of translating Plain language summaries of Cochrane Reviews into other languages [2, 3]. Russian translations of Plain language summaries were started in May 2014 by the team from Kazan Federal University (Department of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology; 2014-2015 as an Affiliated Centre in Tatarstan of the Nordic Cochrane Centre, since August 2015 as Cochrane Russia, a Russian branch of Cochrane Nordic, Head - Liliya Eugenevna Ziganshina) on a voluntary basis. To assess the quality of Russian translations of Cochrane Plain Language Summaries (PLS) and their potential impact on the Russian speaking community through user feedback with the overarching aim of furthering the translations project. We conducted the continuous online survey via Google Docs. We invited respondents through the electronic Russian language discussion forum on Essential Medicines (E-lek), links to survey on the Russian Cochrane.org website, invitations to Cochrane contributors registered in Archie from potential Russian-speaking countries. We set up the survey in Russian and English. The respondents were asked to respond to the questionnaire regarding the relevance and potential impact of the Cochrane Russian

  10. Cochrane review: social skills groups for people aged 6 to 21 with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichow, Brian; Steiner, Amanda M; Volkmar, Fred

    2013-03-07

    Since autism was first described, major difficulties in social interaction have been a defining feature of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Social skills groups are a common intervention for individuals with ASD. Although a frequently recommended practice, the few studies that have addressed the efficacy of social skills groups have shown mixed results. To determine the effectiveness of social skills groups for improving social competence, social communication, and quality of life for people with ASD who are six to 21 years of age. We searched the following databases in December 2011: CENTRAL (2011 Issue 4), MEDLINE (1948 to November Week 3, 2011), EMBASE (1980 to Week 50, 2011), PsycINFO (1887 to December Week 2, 2011), CINAHL (1937 to current), ERIC (1966 to current), Sociological Abstracts (1952 to current), OCLC WorldCat (12 December 2011), Social Science Citation Index (1970 to 16 December 2011), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (20 December 2011). We also searched the reference lists of published papers. Randomized control trials (RCTs) comparing treatment (social skills groups) with a control group who were not receiving the treatment for participants aged six to 21 years with ASD. The control group could be no intervention, wait list, or treatment as usual. Outcomes sought were standardized measures of social competence, social communication, quality of life, emotion recognition, and any other specific behaviors. Two review authors independently selected and appraised studies for inclusion and assessed the risk of bias in each included study. All outcome data were continuous and standardized mean difference effect sizes (ES) with small sample correction were calculated. We conducted random-effects meta-analysis where possible. We included five RCTs evaluating the effects of social skills groups in 196 participants with ASD aged 6 to 21 years old. The results show there is some evidence that social skills groups improve overall

  11. Does Syndrome Differentiation Matter? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials in Cochrane Reviews of Acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Bourchier, Suzannah; Liu, Jianping

    2012-06-01

    One of the basic and important principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine theory is syndrome differentiation, which is widely utilized for individual diagnosis and in the application of acupuncture treatment. However, the impact of syndrome differentiation on therapeutic effect is unclear because of insufficient supportive clinical evidence. The aim of this study was to analyze current Cochrane Database systematic reviews of acupuncture and to evaluate differences in therapeutic effects of acupuncture treatment when syndrome differentiation is utilized, compared to when this approach is not utilized. Cochrane Database systematic reviews of acupuncture were included if the reviews had sufficient data to perform subgroup analyses by syndrome differentiation applied during acupoints' selection. Searching was conducted across all available articles of the Cochrane Library, and the search concluded in July 2011. Forty-four trials from five Cochrane reviews were included in 10 subgroup meta-analyses. Seven meta-analyses showed that there were no differences between trials using fixed acupoints prescriptions and trials using individualized treatment based on relevant symptom improvements in cases of acute stroke, depression, epilepsy, migraine, and peripheral joint osteoarthritis (OA). The remaining 3 meta-analyses showed that acupuncture with fixed prescriptions was superior to individualized acupuncture for pain relief of peripheral joint OA, compared to sham control. The available evidence showed no significant difference between acupuncture treatment with or without syndrome differentiation. Large, well-designed trials are warranted to address the use of syndrome differentiation for specific diseases or conditions in order to confirm if there are any advantages of using syndrome differentiation to achieve better therapeutic effects with acupuncture.

  12. Commentary on a Cochrane Review of Debriefing Interventions for the Prevention of Psychological Trauma in Women After Childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choperena Aguilar, Daniel Guadalupe

    Childbirth can be a traumatic event for some women, with psychological effects that can be significant and long-lasting. Authors of a Cochrane Review of seven randomized controlled trials concluded that debriefing interventions for women after childbirth are not well-defined in the literature and that not enough evidence exists to conclude that there is a positive or adverse effect from using these interventions. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  13. Bækkenbundstræning til gravide og barslende kvinder--en gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Due, Ulla; Lose, G.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary and anal incontinence are prevalent in pregnant and parturient women. Pelvic floor muscle training is frequently employed for prevention and treatment. A recent Cochrane review is discussed. Fifteen studies with a total of 6,181 women were included. Pregnant women without urinary...... incontinence experienced a reduction of the risk of developing urinary incontinence in later pregnancy or post partum. Peripartum patients with urinary and anal incontinence experienced a reduction of their symptoms following training...

  14. Bækkenbundstræning til gravide og barslende kvinder--en gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Due, Ulla; Lose, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Urinary and anal incontinence are prevalent in pregnant and parturient women. Pelvic floor muscle training is frequently employed for prevention and treatment. A recent Cochrane review is discussed. Fifteen studies with a total of 6,181 women were included. Pregnant women without urinary incontin...... incontinence experienced a reduction of the risk of developing urinary incontinence in later pregnancy or post partum. Peripartum patients with urinary and anal incontinence experienced a reduction of their symptoms following training....

  15. Evidence for non-communicable diseases: analysis of Cochrane reviews and randomised trials by World Bank classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, C; Blacklock, C; Perera, R; Davis, R; Banerjee, A; Gill, P; Liew, S; Chamas, L; Hernandez, J; Mahtani, K; Hayward, G; Harrison, S; Lasserson, D; Mickan, S; Sellers, C; Carnes, D; Homer, K; Steed, L; Ross, J; Denny, N; Goyder, C; Thompson, M; Ward, A

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing globally, with the greatest projected increases in low-income and middle-income countries. We sought to quantify the proportion of Cochrane evidence relating to NCDs derived from such countries. We searched the Cochrane database of systematic reviews for reviews relating to NCDs highlighted in the WHO NCD action plan (cardiovascular, cancers, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases). We excluded reviews at the protocol stage and those that were repeated or had been withdrawn. For each review, two independent researchers extracted data relating to the country of the corresponding author and the number of trials and participants from countries, using the World Bank classification of gross national income per capita. 797 reviews were analysed, with a reported total number of 12 340 trials and 10 937 306 participants. Of the corresponding authors 90% were from high-income countries (41% from the UK). Of the 746 reviews in which at least one trial had met the inclusion criteria, only 55% provided a summary of the country of included trials. Analysis of the 633 reviews in which country of trials could be established revealed that almost 90% of trials and over 80% of participants were from high-income countries. 438 (5%) trials including 1 145 013 (11.7%) participants were undertaken in low-middle income countries. We found that only 13 (0.15%) trials with 982 (0.01%) participants were undertaken in low-income countries. Other than the five Cochrane NCD corresponding authors from South Africa, only one other corresponding author was from Africa (Gambia). The overwhelming body of evidence for NCDs pertains to high-income countries, with only a small number of review authors based in low-income settings. As a consequence, there is an urgent need for research infrastructure and funding for the undertaking of high-quality trials in this area.

  16. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about the clinical effectiveness of screening and diagnostic tests for cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Tito Pereira Bueno

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The purpose of screening tests for cancer is to detect it at an early stage in order to increase the chances of treatment. However, their unrestrained use may lead to unnecessary examinations, overdiagnosis and higher costs. It is thus necessary to evaluate their clinical effects in terms of benefits and harm. DESIGN AND SETTING: Review of Cochrane systematic reviews, carried out in the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Cochrane reviews on the clinical effectiveness of cancer screening procedures were included. Study titles and abstracts were independently assessed by two authors. Conflicts were resolved by another two authors. Findings were summarized and discussed. RESULTS: Seventeen reviews were selected: fifteen on screening for specific cancers (bladder, breast, colorectal, hepatic, lung, nasopharyngeal, esophageal, oral, prostate, testicular and uterine and two others on cancer in general. The quality of evidence of the findings varied among the reviews. Only two reviews resulted in high-quality evidence: screening using low-dose computed tomography scans for high-risk individuals seems to reduce lung cancer mortality; and screening using flexible sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood tests seems to reduce colorectal cancer mortality. CONCLUSION: The evidence found through Cochrane reviews did not support most of the commonly used screening tests for cancer. It is recommended that patients should be informed of the possibilities of false positives and false negatives before they undergo the tests. Further studies to fully assess the effectiveness of cancer screening tests and adverse outcomes are required.

  17. Radiofrequency denervation for neck and back pain: a systematic review within the framework of the cochrane collaboration back review group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemistö, Leena; Kalso, Eija; Malmivaara, Antti; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2003-08-15

    Systematic review. To assess the effectiveness of radiofrequency denervation for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain disorders. There is a lack of effective treatment for chronic zygapophysial joint pain and discogenic pain. Radiofrequency denervation appears to be an emerging technology, with substantial variation in its use. Original articles for this review were identified by electronically searching MEDLINE, PsycLIT, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library to February 2002, hand-screening references, and consulting experts in the field. Two reviewers selected the randomized controlled trials that met the inclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the main results and methodologic quality of the selected trials. Finally, qualitative analysis was conducted to evaluate the level of scientific evidence. Of seven relevant randomized controlled trials, six were considered to be high quality. The selected trials included 275 randomized patients, 141 of whom received active treatment. One study examined cervical zygapophysial joint pain; two, cervicobrachial pain; three, lumbar zygapophysial joint pain; and one, discogenic low back pain. The sample sizes were small, follow-up times short, and there were deficiencies noted in patient selection, outcome assessments, and statistical analyses. There is limited evidence that radiofrequency denervation offers short-term relief for chronic neck pain of zygapophysial joint origin and for chronic cervicobrachial pain, and conflicting evidence for its effectiveness for lumbar zygapophysial joint pain. There is limited evidence suggesting that intradiscal radiofrequency may not be effective in relieving discogenic low back pain. Further high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed, with larger patient samples and data on long-term effects, for which current evidence is inconclusive.

  18. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about non-pharmacological interventions for treating cognitive decline and dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Vitória Carvalho; Pacheco, Rafael Leite; Latorraca, Carolina Oliveira Cruz; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Riera, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Dementia is a highly prevalent condition worldwide. Its chronic and progressive presentation has an impact on physical and psychosocial characteristics and on public healthcare. Our aim was to summarize evidence from Cochrane reviews on non-pharmacological treatments for cognitive disorders and dementia. Review of systematic reviews, conducted in the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. Cochrane reviews on non-pharmacological interventions for cognitive dysfunctions and/or type of dementia were included. For this, independent assessments were made by two authors. Twenty-four reviews were included. These showed that carbohydrate intake and validation therapy may be beneficial for cognitive disorders. For dementia, there is a potential benefit from physical activity programs, cognitive training, psychological treatments, aromatherapy, light therapy, cognitive rehabilitation, cognitive stimulation, hyperbaric oxygen therapy in association with donepezil, functional analysis, reminiscence therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, structured decision-making on feeding options, case management approaches, interventions by non-specialist healthcare workers and specialized care units. No benefits were found in relation to enteral tube feeding, acupuncture, Snoezelen stimulation, respite care, palliative care team and interventions to prevent wandering behavior. Many non-pharmacological interventions for patients with cognitive impairment and dementia have been studied and potential benefits have been shown. However, the strength of evidence derived from these studies was considered low overall, due to the methodological limitations of the primary studies.

  19. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about non-pharmacological interventions for treating cognitive decline and dementia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitória Carvalho Vilela

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Dementia is a highly prevalent condition worldwide. Its chronic and progressive presentation has an impact on physical and psychosocial characteristics and on public healthcare. Our aim was to summarize evidence from Cochrane reviews on non-pharmacological treatments for cognitive disorders and dementia. DESIGN AND SETTING: Review of systematic reviews, conducted in the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Cochrane reviews on non-pharmacological interventions for cognitive dysfunctions and/or type of dementia were included. For this, independent assessments were made by two authors. RESULTS: Twenty-four reviews were included. These showed that carbohydrate intake and validation therapy may be beneficial for cognitive disorders. For dementia, there is a potential benefit from physical activity programs, cognitive training, psychological treatments, aromatherapy, light therapy, cognitive rehabilitation, cognitive stimulation, hyperbaric oxygen therapy in association with donepezil, functional analysis, reminiscence therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, structured decision-making on feeding options, case management approaches, interventions by non-specialist healthcare workers and specialized care units. No benefits were found in relation to enteral tube feeding, acupuncture, Snoezelen stimulation, respite care, palliative care team and interventions to prevent wandering behavior. CONCLUSION: Many non-pharmacological interventions for patients with cognitive impairment and dementia have been studied and potential benefits have been shown. However, the strength of evidence derived from these studies was considered low overall, due to the methodological limitations of the primary studies.

  20. Langtidseffekt af vægtreducerende behandlinghos patienter med hypertension--en gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2011-01-01

    In eight studies included in the present Cochrane review the effects of orlistat or sibutramine versus placebo on mortality, cardiovascular mortality and adverse events were investigated in obese people with hypertension. No studies with rimonabant fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The weight loss...... was larger in the groups treated with orlistat or sibutramine compared with placebo therapy. Orlistat reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure more than placebo, while blood pressure increased during treatment with sibutramine. The studies were too small and of too short duration to allow an evaluation...

  1. Intervention for replacing missing teeth: Alveolar ridge preservation techniques for dental implant site development - evidence summary of Cochrane review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Jayaraman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cochrane reviews have transparent reporting of the methodology to clarify the reader the methods used for writing the review; hence, each review becomes a large volume of scientific literature. This evidence summary of the Cochrane review published in 2015 for the question, what are the clinical effects (preservation of both width and height of bone, esthetic outcomes, complications, and failure of implant for different alveolar ridge preservation techniques (ARP and materials used in patients planning implant placement following extraction after 6 months follow-up. This review provides evidence for efficacy of different ARP techniques, materials, and superiority of one over the other. It also tries to settle the controversy of timing of placement of implant after grafting. Of the 8 included studies from 50, two trials provide moderate evidence for xenografts versus extraction favoring xenografts in preserving the width and height of bone by 1.97 mm (2.48–1.46 and 2.60 mm (3.43–1.76, respectively in pooled estimates of meta-analysis. Using different material, five-trial were found; of which, two trials provide moderate evidence for alloplast versus xenografts favoring alloplast in preserving the width by 0.44 mm (0.90–0.02 and low-grade evidence for height of bone by 0.35 mm (0.86–0.16 in pooled estimates of meta-analysis. There is a paucity of randomized controlled trial to address other primary and secondary outcomes addressed in this review.

  2. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for Prevention of Postoperative Vitreous Cavity Hemorrhage after Vitrectomy for Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;8:CD008214.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, David Cordeiro; Leal, Inês; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2017-08-31

    Postoperative vitreous hemorrhage is a complication following vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy, delaying visual recovery and making fundus examination and disease follow-up more difficult. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drugs such as bevacizumab, when injected in the vitreous cavity, reduce vascular proliferation and their use has been proposed to reduce the incidence of postoperative vitreous hemorrhage. The authors of this Cochrane systematic review evaluated all randomized controlled trials on the pre- or intraoperative use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor to reduce postoperative vitreous hemorrhage occurrence after vitrectomy in patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The results suggested that the use of intravitreal bevacizumab was effective in reducing early postoperative vitreous hemorrhage (i.e. at four weeks) occurrence, with a good safety profile. This work aims to summarize and discuss the findings and clinical implications of this Cochrane systematic review.

  3. Serenoa repens monotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): an updated Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Roderick; Tacklind, James W; Rutks, Indulis; Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? For the past 30 years Serenoa repens has become a widely used phytotherapy in the USA and in Europe, mostly because of positive comparisons to α-blockers and 5α-reductase inhibitors. During the last 4 years we have seen two very high quality trials comparing Serenoa repens to placebo and up to 72 weeks' duration. These trials found Serenoa repens no better than placebo, even (in one trial) at escalating doses. • To estimate the effectiveness and harms of Serenoa repens monotherapy in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) consistent with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). • We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and other sources through to January 2012 to identify randomised trials. • Trials were eligible if they randomised men with symptomatic BPH to receive Serenoa repens extract monotherapy for at least 4 weeks in comparison with placebo, and assessed clinical outcomes and urodynamic measurements. • Our primary outcome was improvement in LUTS, based on change in urological symptom-scale scores. • In all, 17 randomised controlled trials (N= 2008) assessing Serenoa repens monotherapy (typically 320 mg/day) vs placebo met inclusion criteria, although only five reported American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUASI) or International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS). Trial lengths ranged from 4 to 72 weeks. The mean age of all enrolees was 64.3 years and most participants were of White race. The mean baseline total score was 14 points, indicating moderately severe symptoms. In all, 16 trials were double blinded and adequate treatment allocation concealment was reported in six trials. • In a meta-analysis of three high quality long-to-moderate term trials (n= 661), Serenoa repens therapy was no better than placebo in reducing LUTS based on the AUASI/IPSS (weighted mean difference [WMD]-0.16 points, 95% confidence interval [CI]-1

  4. Adding non-randomised studies to a Cochrane review brings complementary information for healthcare stakeholders: an augmented systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Arditi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce the burden of asthma, chronic disease management (CDM programmes have been widely implemented and evaluated. Reviews including randomised controlled trials (RCTs suggest that CDM programmes for asthma are effective. Other study designs are however often used for pragmatic reasons, but excluded from these reviews because of their design. We aimed to examine what complementary information could be retrieved from the addition of non-randomised studies to the studies included in a published Cochrane review on asthma CDM programmes, for healthcare stakeholders involved in the development, implementation, conduct or long-term sustainability of such programmes. Methods Extending a previously published Cochrane review, we performed a systematic review (augmented review including any type of study designs instead of only those initially accepted by Cochrane and the Effective Practice and Organization of Care Review group. After double data selection and extraction, we compared study and intervention characteristics, assessed methodological quality and ran meta-analyses, by study design. Results We added 37 studies to the 20 studies included in the Cochrane review. The applicability of results was increased because of the larger variety of settings and asthma population considered. Also, adding non-randomised studies provided new evidence of improvements associated with CDM intervention (i.e. healthcare utilisation, days off work, use of action plan. Finally, evidence of CDM effectiveness in the added studies was consistent with the Cochrane review in terms of direction of effects. Conclusions The evidence of this augmented review is applicable to a broader set of patients and settings than those in the original Cochrane review. It also strengthens the message that CDM programmes have a beneficial effect on quality of life and disease severity, meaningful outcomes for the everyday life of patients with asthma. Despite the

  5. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain - An updated Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Pepijn D. D. M.; Deyo, Rick A.; Koes, Bart W.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Objectives. To assess the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of nonspecific low back pain and to assess which type of NSAID is most effective. Summary of Background Data.

  6. Injection therapy for subacute and chronic low back pain: an updated Cochrane review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, J.B.; Bie, R.A. de; Vet, H.C. de; Hildebrandt, J.; Nelemans, P.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). OBJECTIVE: To determine if injection therapy is more effective than placebo or other treatments for patients with subacute or chronic low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The effectiveness of injection therapy for low

  7. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Sciatica : An Updated Cochrane Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus J. A.; Roelofs, Pepijn D. D. M.; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported adverse effects in people with sciatica. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: NSAIDs are one of the most frequently

  8. Current State of Reporting Pain Outcomes in Cochrane Reviews of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions and Considerations for an OMERACT Research Agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maxwell, L.J.; Wells, G.A.; Simon, L.S.; Conaghan, P.G.; Grosskleg, S.; Scrivens, K.; Beaton, D.E.; Bingham, C.O.; Busse, J.W.; Christensen, R.; Goel, N.; Juni, P.; Kaiser, U.; Lyddiatt, A.; Mease, P.J.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Phillips, K.; Sapunar, D.; Singh, J.A.; Strand, V; Taylor, A.M.; Terwee, C.B.; Tugwell, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the current state of reporting of pain outcomes in Cochrane reviews on chronic musculoskeletal painful conditions and to elicit opinions of patients, healthcare practitioners, and methodologists on presenting pain outcomes to patients, clinicians, and policymakers. Methods. We

  9. Oral fumaric acid esters for psoriasis: abridged Cochrane systematic review including GRADE assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Atwan, A.; Ingram, John R.; Abbott, Rachel; Kelson, Mark James; Pickles, Timothy E.; Bauer, A.; Piguet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fumaric acid esters (FAEs) are licensed for the treatment of moderate?to?severe psoriasis in Germany but are also used off?label in many other countries. We conducted this systematic review to synthesize the highest?quality evidence for the benefits and risks of FAEs for psoriasis. Our primary outcomes were change in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score and dropout rates due to adverse effects. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of FAEs or dimethylfumarate were included, with no r...

  10. Enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) for periodontal tissue regeneration in intrabony defects. A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infective disease of the gums caused by bacteria present in dental plaque. This condition induces the breakdown of the tooth supporting apparatus until teeth are lost. Surgery may be indicated to arrest disease progression and regenerate lost tissues. Several surgical techniques have been developed to regenerate periodontal tissues including guided tissue regeneration (GTR), bone grafting (BG) and the use of enamel matrix derivative (EMD). EMD is an extract of enamel matrix and contains amelogenins of various molecular weights. Amelogenins are involved in the formation of enamel and periodontal attachment formation during tooth development. To test whether EMD is effective, and to compare EMD versus GTR, and various BG procedures for the treatment of intrabony defects. The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Several dental journals were hand searched. No language restrictions were applied. Authors of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) identified, personal contacts and the manufacturer were contacted to identify unpublished trials. The last electronic search was conducted on 4 February 2009. RCTs on patients affected by periodontitis having intrabony defects of at least 3 mm treated with EMD compared with open flap debridement, GTR and various BG procedures with at least 1 year of follow-up. The outcome measures considered were: tooth loss, changes in probing attachment levels (PAL), pocket depths (PPD), gingival recessions (REC), bone levels from the bottom of the defects on intraoral radiographs, aesthetics and adverse events. The following time points were to be evaluated: 1, 5 and 10 years. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by at least two authors. Results were expressed as random-effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) for

  11. Critique of the review of 'Water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries' published by the Cochrane Collaboration in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugg-Gunn, A J; Spencer, A J; Whelton, H P; Jones, C; Beal, J F; Castle, P; Cooney, P V; Johnson, J; Kelly, M P; Lennon, M A; McGinley, J; O'Mullane, D; Sgan-Cohen, H D; Sharma, P P; Thomson, W M; Woodward, S M; Zusman, S P

    2016-04-01

    The Cochrane Review on water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries was published in 2015 and attracted considerable interest and comment, especially in countries with extensive water fluoridation programmes. The Review had two objectives: (i) to evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on the prevention of dental caries, and (ii) to evaluate the effects of water fluoridation (artificial or natural) on dental fluorosis. The authors concluded, inter alia, that there was very little contemporary evidence, meeting the Review's inclusion criteria, that evaluated the effectiveness of water fluoridation for the prevention of dental caries. The purpose of this critique is to examine the conduct of the above Review, and to put it into context in the wider body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of water fluoridation. While the overall conclusion that water fluoridation is effective in caries prevention agrees with previous reviews, many important public health questions could not be answered by the Review because of the restrictive criteria used to judge adequacy of study design and risk of bias. The potential benefits of using wider criteria in order to achieve a fuller understanding of the effectiveness of water fluoridation are discussed.

  12. An equity lens can ensure an equity-oriented approach to agenda setting and priority setting of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Mona; Ueffing, Erin; Welch, Vivian; Tugwell, Peter

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to develop and pilot an equity lens that could help researchers in developing a more equity-oriented approach toward priority setting and agenda setting in systematic reviews. We developed an equity lens to guide the development and evaluation of a prioritization process and evaluate its outcomes based on the information derived from a discussion workshop and a comparison with the existing literature on the topic. We piloted the process section of the equity lens across the 13 structured priority-setting approaches in the Cochrane Collaboration. We devised an equity lens with two checklists: one to guide the process of priority setting (nine questions) and the other to evaluate the outcomes of priority setting (eight questions). Of the nine questions, seven questions were partially addressed by at least one of the prioritization projects. Two questions were not considered in any of them. The prioritization projects did not report sufficient outcome data, thus we could not explore the eight question on evaluating outcomes. Currently, there are few strategies in the Cochrane Collaboration that explicitly address the research priorities of individuals from different sociodemographic groups. The equity lens for priority setting and agenda setting can help project teams to develop a more equity-oriented approach to set a research agenda and/or prioritize research topics. However, further studies are needed to evaluate its impact on the prioritization process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pilates for Low Back Pain: Complete Republication of a Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Tiê P; Maher, Christopher G; Saragiotto, Bruno T; Hancock, Mark J; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Cabral, Cristina M N; Costa, Luciola C Menezes; Costa, Leonardo O P

    2016-06-01

    Systematic review. To determine the effects of the Pilates method for patients with nonspecific acute, subacute, or chronic low back pain. The Pilates method is one of the most common forms of intervention based on exercise used for treating patients with low back pain. However, its effectiveness is not well established. We conducted searches on CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, and SPORTDiscus up to March 2014. We included randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of Pilates in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic nonspecific low back pain. The outcomes evaluated were pain, disability, function, and global impression of recovery. Two independent reviewers screened for potentially eligible studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted the data. We evaluated the overall quality of evidence using the GRADE approach and treatment effect sizes were described using mean differences and 95% confidence intervals. Searches retrieved 126 trials, of which 10 were included in the review (n = 510 participants). Seven studies were considered to have low risk of bias, and three were considered at high risk of bias. When compared to minimal intervention, Pilates reduces pain at short and intermediate term with low- to moderate-quality evidence and medium effect sizes. For disability, there is also a significant difference in favor to Pilates with low- to moderate-quality evidence and small effect size for short term and medium effect size for intermediate term compared with minimal intervention. It is unclear whether Pilates is better than other exercises for short-term pain, but there is low-quality evidence that Pilates reduces pain at intermediate term. For disability, there is moderate-quality evidence that there is no significant difference between Pilates and other exercises in either the short term or the intermediate term. There is low- to moderate-quality evidence that Pilates is more effective than minimal intervention with most of the

  14. Urate-lowering therapy for the management of gout: a summary of 2 Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Alison S; Seth, Rakhi; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Falzon, Louise; Edwards, Christopher J; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Bombardier, Claire

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of urate-lowering therapy for gout: xanthine oxidase inhibitors (allopurinol and febuxostat), uricosuric medications (benzbromarone, probenecid and sulfinpyrazone), and uricases (pegloticase and rasburicase). A systematic review was performed as part of the 3e (Evidence, Expertise, Exchange) Initiative on Gout. The primary efficacy outcomes were frequency of acute gout attacks, study participant withdrawal due to adverse events, and cost-effectiveness. Serum urate-lowering was a secondary outcome and was the most commonly reported outcome in the included trials. The search identified 17 articles for efficacy, 31 for safety, and 3 for cost-effectiveness. The main outcome described in these studies was serum urate-lowering. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective at lowering serum urate compared to placebo and febuxostat (≥ 80 mg) was more effective at lowering serum urate than allopurinol. Compared to probenecid, benzbromarone was more effective at lowering serum urate. Regarding acute gout attacks, pegloticase and febuxostat (≥ 120 mg) resulted in more acute attacks than placebo. Regarding the primary safety outcome, more withdrawals due to adverse events were seen only when pegloticase was compared to placebo. The two trials of cost-effectiveness were inconclusive. There is currently moderate quality data supporting the efficacy and safety of allopurinol, febuxostat, benzbromarone, and probenecid in gout. Pegloticase, while efficacious, is associated with more withdrawals due to adverse events and infusion reactions. There is insufficient evidence currently with respect to the cost-effectiveness or the most optimal sequencing of urate-lowering therapy.

  15. Can a core outcome set improve the quality of systematic reviews? – a survey of the Co-ordinating Editors of Cochrane review groups

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    Kirkham Jamie J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Missing outcome data or the inconsistent reporting of outcome data in clinical research can affect the quality of evidence within a systematic review. A potential solution is an agreed standardized set of outcomes known as a core outcome set (COS to be measured in all studies for a specific condition. We investigated the amount of missing patient data for primary outcomes in Cochrane systematic reviews, and surveyed the Co-ordinating Editors of Cochrane Review Groups (CRGs on issues related to the standardization of outcomes in their CRG’s reviews. These groups are responsible for the more than 7,000 protocols and full versions of Cochrane Reviews that are currently available, and the several hundred new reviews published each year, presenting the world’s largest collection of standardized systematic reviews in health care. Methods Using an unselected cohort of Cochrane Reviews, we calculated and presented the percentage of missing patient data for the primary outcome measure chosen for each review published by each CRG. We also surveyed the CRG Co-ordinating Editors to see what their policies are with regards to outcome selection and outcomes to include in the Summary of Finding (SoF tables in their Cochrane Reviews. They were also asked to list the main advantages and challenges of standardizing outcomes across all reviews within their CRG. Results In one fifth of the 283 reviews in the sample, more than 50% of the patient data for the primary outcome was missing. Responses to the survey were received from 90% of Co-ordinating Editors. Thirty-six percent of CRGs have a centralized policy regarding which outcomes to include in the SoF table and 73% of Co-ordinating Editors thought that a COS for effectiveness trials should be used routinely for a SoF table. Conclusions The reliability of systematic reviews, in particular meta-analyses they contain, can be improved if more attention is paid to missing outcome data. The

  16. Chlorpromazine for schizophrenia: a Cochrane systematic review of 50 years of randomised controlled trials

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    Borrill Jo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorpromazine (CPZ remains one of the most common drugs used for people with schizophrenia worldwide, and a benchmark against which other treatments can be evaluated. Quantitative reviews are rare; this one evaluates the effects of chlorpromazine in the treatment of schizophrenia in comparison with placebo. Methods We sought all relevant randomised controlled trials (RCT comparing chlorpromazine to placebo by electronic and reference searching, and by contacting trial authors and the pharmaceutical industry. Data were extracted from selected trials and, where possible, synthesised and random effects relative risk (RR, the number needed to treat (NNT and their 95% confidence intervals (CI calculated. Results Fifty RCTs from 1955–2000 were included with 5276 people randomised to CPZ or placebo. They constitute 2008 person-years spent in trials. Meta-analysis of these trials showed that chlorpromazine promotes a global improvement (n = 1121, 13 RCTs, RR 0.76 CI 0.7 to 0.9, NNT 7 CI 5 to 10, although a considerable placebo response is also seen. People allocated to chlorpromazine tended not to leave trials early in both the short (n = 945, 16 RCTs, RR 0.74 CI 0.5 to 1.1 and medium term (n = 1861, 25 RCTs, RR 0.79 CI 0.6 to 1.1. There were, however, many adverse effects. Chlorpromazine is sedating (n = 1242, 18 RCTs, RR 2.3 CI 1.7 to 3.1, NNH 6 CI 5 to 8, increases a person's chances of experiencing acute movement disorders, Parkinsonism and causes low blood pressure with dizziness and dry mouth. Conclusion It is understandable why the World Health Organization (WHO have endorsed and included chlorpromazine in their list of essential drugs for use in schizophrenia. Low- and middle-income countries may have more complete evidence upon which to base their practice compared with richer nations using recent innovations.

  17. Heterogeneity in application, design, and analysis characteristics was found for controlled before-after and interrupted time series studies included in Cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polus, Stephanie; Pieper, Dawid; Burns, Jacob; Fretheim, Atle; Ramsay, Craig; Higgins, Julian P T; Mathes, Tim; Pfadenhauer, Lisa M; Rehfuess, Eva A

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the application, design, and analysis characteristics of controlled before-after (CBA) and interrupted time series (ITS) studies and their use in Cochrane reviews. We searched the Cochrane library for reviews including these study designs from May 2012 to March 2015 and purposively selected, where available, two reviews each across 10 prespecified intervention types. We randomly selected two CBA and two ITS studies from each review. Two researchers independently extracted information from the studies and the respective reviews. Sixty-nine reviews considered CBA and ITS studies for inclusion. We analyzed 21 CBA and 16 ITS studies from 11 to 8 reviews, respectively. Cochrane reviews inconsistently defined and labeled CBA and ITS studies. Many studies did not meet the Cochrane definition or the minimum criteria provided by Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care. The studies present a heterogeneous set of study features and applied a large variety of analyses. While CBA and ITS studies represent important study designs to evaluate the effects of interventions, especially on a population or organizational level, unclear study design features challenge unequivocal classification and appropriate use. We discuss options for more specific definitions and explicit criteria for CBA and ITS studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interventions for treating hyperemesis gravidarum: a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelig, Rupsa C; Barton, Samantha J; Saccone, Gabriele; Kelly, Anthony J; Edwards, Steven J; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2017-07-11

    While nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy are very common, affecting approximately 80% of the pregnancies, hyperemesis gravidarum is a severe form affecting 0.3-1.0% of the pregnancies. Although hyperemesis gravidarum is rarely a source of mortality, it is a significant source of morbidity. It is one of the most common indications for hospitalization in pregnancy. Beyond the maternal and fetal consequences of malnutrition, the severity of hyperemesis symptoms causes a major psychosocial burden leading to depression, anxiety, and even pregnancy termination. The aim of this meta-analysis was to examine all randomized controlled trials of interventions specifically for hyperemesis gravidarum and evaluate them based on both subjective and objective measures of efficacy, maternal and fetal/neonatal safety, and economic costs. Randomized controlled trials were identified by searching electronic databases. We included all randomized controlled trials for the treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum. The primary outcome was intervention efficacy as defined by severity, reduction, or cessation in nausea/vomiting; number of episodes of emesis; and days of hospital admission. Secondary outcomes included other measures of intervention efficacy, adverse maternal/fetal/neonatal outcomes, quality of life measures, and economic costs. Twenty-five trials (2052 women) met the inclusion criteria but the majority of 18 different comparisons described in the review include data from single studies with small numbers of participants. Selected comparisons reported below: No primary outcome data were available when acupuncture was compared with placebo. There was insufficient evidence to identify clear differences between acupuncture and metoclopramide in a study with 81 participants regarding reduction/cessation in nausea or vomiting (risk ratio (RR) 1.40, 95% CI 0.79-2.49 and RR 1.51, 95% CI 0.92-2.48, respectively). Midwife-led outpatient care was associated with fewer hours of hospital

  19. A large-scale assessment of temporal trends in meta-analyses using systematic review reports from the Cochrane Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanshawe, Thomas R; Shaw, Luke F; Spence, Graeme T

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that many systematic reviews contain meta-analyses that display temporal trends, such as the first study's result being more extreme than later studies' or a drift in the pooled estimate. We assessed the extent and characteristics of temporal trends using all Cochrane intervention reports published 2008-2012. We selected the largest meta-analysis within each report and analysed trends using methods including a Z-test (first versus subsequent estimates); generalised least squares; and cumulative sum charts. Predictors considered include meta-analysis size and review group. Of 1288 meta-analyses containing at least 4 studies, the point estimate from the first study was more extreme and in the same direction as the pooled estimate in 738 (57%), with a statistically significant difference (first versus subsequent) in 165 (13%). Generalised least squares indicated trends in 717 (56%); 18% of fixed effects analyses had at least one violation of cumulative sum limits. For some methods, meta-analysis size was associated with temporal patterns and use of a random effects model, but there was no consistent association with review group. All results suggest that more meta-analyses demonstrate temporal patterns than would be expected by chance. Hence, assuming the standard meta-analysis model without temporal trend is sometimes inappropriate. Factors associated with trends are likely to be context specific. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Culturally appropriate health education for Type 2 diabetes in ethnic minority groups: an updated Cochrane Review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, J; Attridge, M; Ramsden, M; Cannings-John, R; Hawthorne, K

    2016-02-01

    To give an updated perspective of interventions from additional data collected since our first review, conducted in 2008. This updated Cochrane Review incorporates new information from recent randomized controlled trials on culturally appropriate diabetes health education interventions. An electronic literature search of six databases was repeated, with databases of ongoing trials checked and three journals hand-searched. Meta-analysis was carried out for sufficiently homogeneous outcomes, and common themes among trials were highlighted. A total of 22 new trials were added to the original 11. Meta-analysis of 28 trials containing suitable data showed significant improvements in glycaemic control (HbA1c ) and diabetes knowledge over a period of 24 months, after the delivery of culturally appropriate education to participants, compared with those receiving 'conventional' care. There were no consistent benefits over the control group in other selected outcome measures, and lack of data continued to make analysis of several outcome measures difficult. Research activity in this field has increased considerably over the past 6 years, with culturally appropriate diabetes education showing consistent benefits over conventional care in terms of glycaemic control and diabetes knowledge, sustained in the short- to mid-term. Further research is needed to determine the clinical significance of these improvements and their cost-effectiveness. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  1. The Cochrane Library and safety of systemic corticosteroids for acute respiratory conditions in children: an overview of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ricardo M; Oleszczuk, Marta; Woods, Charles R; Rowe, Brian H; Cates, Christopher J; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Acute respiratory conditions are a leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. Corticosteroids are effective and established treatments in some acute respiratory infections (e.g. croup) and asthma exacerbations; however, their role is controversial in other conditions owing to inconsistent effectiveness or safety concerns (e.g. bronchiolitis, acute wheeze). To examine clinically relevant short-term safety outcomes related to acute single or recurrent systemic short-term (corticosteroid use based on systematic reviews of acute respiratory conditions. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in February 2013 for systematic reviews comparing systemic corticosteroids with placebo for children (aged 0-18 years) with acute asthma, preschool wheezing, bronchiolitis, croup, pharyngitis/tonsillitis or pneumonia. We selected the following outcomes a priori: gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and abdominal pain; behavioural effects (tremor or hyperactivity, jitteriness, irritability or emotional distress); hypertension; serious adverse events, including death, length of stay in hospital; and relapse leading to hospitalization. One reviewer extracted data and another reviewer independently verified data. Results were combined using Peto odds ratios and risk differences (RD) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences for continuous outcomes. Seven reviews containing 44 relevant randomized controlled trials were included. Three reviews were on asthma and one each on bronchiolitis, croup, wheeze and pharyngitis/tonsillitis. Six trials (2114 patients) assessed GI bleeding and/or abdominal pain and showed no significant differences between corticosteroids and placebo (1.5% vs. 1.8%, respectively). Various behavioural effects and hypertension/blood pressure were measured in four trials each (838 and 1617 patients, respectively), with no significant differences reported. None of the trials reported deaths in any of the treatment groups. Based on 17 trials (2056

  2. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Portion, Package or Tableware Size for Changing Selection and Consumption of Food, Alcohol and Tobacco. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015;09: CD011045.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gonçalo S; Brogueira Rodrigues, Filipe; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-08-01

    Some of the main causes of mortality and morbidity among the developed countries - such as the cardiovascular, neurological and oncologic diseases - are deeply associated with modifiable risk factors. Primordial/primary prevention strategies that alter our environment can have an impact on these risk factors. The authors of this Cochrane systematic review sought evidence from randomized controlled trials to study the effect of the size of portions, packages, dishes and cups, as well as their respective formats, on the consumption and selection of food, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and tobacco products. Overall, this review concludes that the choice of larger portions results in an increased consumption in food, non-alcoholic beverages and tobacco.

  3. Early orthodontic treatment for Class II malocclusion reduces the chance of incisal trauma: Results of a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Harrison, Jayne; Worthington, Helen; O'Brien, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we summarize the most clinically relevant findings of our recently updated Cochrane systematic review into the treatment of Class II Division 1 malocclusion. A systematic review of the databases was performed to identify all randomized controlled trials evaluating early treatment with functional appliances to correct Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Three early treatment studies with data from 353 participants were included in this review. The results showed no significant difference for any outcomes, except new incidence of incisor trauma, which was significantly less for the early treatment group. The risk ratio analysis for new incisor trauma showed that providing early treatment reduced the risk of trauma by 33% and 41% in the functional and headgear groups, respectively. However, when the numbers needed to treat were calculated, early treatment with functional appliances prevents 1 incidence of incisal trauma for every 10 patients (95% CI, 5-174), and headgear treatment prevents 1 incidence of incisal trauma for every 6 patients (95% CI, 3-23). Orthodontic treatment for young children, followed by a later phase of treatment when the child is in early adolescence, appears to reduce the incidence of new incisal trauma significantly compared with treatment that is provided in 1 phase when the child is in early adolescence. However, these data should be interpreted with caution because of the high degree of uncertainty. There are no other advantages in providing 2-phase treatment compared with 1 phase in early adolescence. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Presenting evidence to patients online: what do web users think of consumer summaries of cochrane musculoskeletal reviews?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Santesso, Nancy; O'Connor, Annette M; Lott, Alison; Lindgaard, Gitte; Syrowatka, Ania; Graham, Ian D; Tugwell, Peter S

    2011-01-18

    The Internet has the potential to be an effective medium for delivering health care knowledge to consumers. While computer usability research makes recommendations about how to present Web-based information generally, there remains no clear guidance on how to present specific forms of health care research evidence online in a way that facilitates understanding and good health care decision making. The two goals of this study were to describe the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group's (CMSG's) process for developing online patient-focused summaries of systematic reviews and to evaluate the impressions of these summaries formed by users. A process for summarizing the results of systematic reviews via consumer summaries has evolved over 15 years. An evaluation of this approach took the form of Internet surveys on the Arthritis Society of Canada website and surveys of members of the Canadian Arthritis Patient Alliance (CAPA). Respondents provided information on background, relationship to the decision, their satisfaction with and preparation for decision making, and suggestions for improvements to the summaries. Survey data were collected between August 1, 2005, and February 28, 2006. A total of 261 respondents completed the survey. The majority (226/261 or 87%) of respondents reported having an arthritis-related condition. The consumer summary approach was generally reviewed favorably by respondents, with most agreeing that the summary provided appropriate information (177/261 or 68%), would be useful to others (160/261 or 61%), was well laid out (159/261 or 61%), was easy to learn from (157/261 or 60%), and was useful to the reader (153/261 or 59%). Areas of potential improvement were indicated by relatively fewer respondents agreeing that they could easily find all the information they wanted (118/261 or 45%), by a substantial proportion being unable to judge whether the providers of the information are reliable (80/261 or 31%), and by a similar proportion being unable to

  5. Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group to play a leading role in guiding the production of informed high-quality, timely research evidence syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelle Garritty

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policymakers and healthcare stakeholders are increasingly seeking evidence to inform the policymaking process, and often use existing or commissioned systematic reviews to inform decisions. However, the methodologies that make systematic reviews authoritative take time, typically 1 to 2 years to complete. Outside the traditional SR timeline, “rapid reviews” have emerged as an efficient tool to get evidence to decision-makers more quickly. However, the use of rapid reviews does present challenges. To date, there has been limited published empirical information about this approach to compiling evidence. Thus, it remains a poorly understood and ill-defined set of diverse methodologies with various labels. In recent years, the need to further explore rapid review methods, characteristics, and their use has been recognized by a growing network of healthcare researchers, policymakers, and organizations, several with ties to Cochrane, which is recognized as representing an international gold standard for high-quality, systematic reviews. Purpose In this commentary, we introduce the newly established Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group developed to play a leading role in guiding the production of rapid reviews given they are increasingly employed as a research synthesis tool to support timely evidence-informed decision-making. We discuss how the group was formed and outline the group’s structure and remit. We also discuss the need to establish a more robust evidence base for rapid reviews in the published literature, and the importance of promoting registration of rapid review protocols in an effort to promote efficiency and transparency in research. Conclusion As with standard systematic reviews, the core principles of evidence-based synthesis should apply to rapid reviews in order to minimize bias to the extent possible. The Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group will serve to establish a network of rapid review stakeholders

  6. Effect of longer term modest salt reduction on blood pressure: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Li, Jiafu; Macgregor, Graham A

    2013-04-03

    To determine the effects of longer term modest salt reduction on blood pressure, hormones, and lipids. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Medline, Embase, Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and reference list of relevant articles. Randomised trials with a modest reduction in salt intake and duration of at least four weeks. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers. Random effects meta-analyses, subgroup analyses, and meta-regression were performed. Thirty four trials (3230 participants) were included. Meta-analysis showed that the mean change in urinary sodium (reduced salt v usual salt) was -75 mmol/24 h (equivalent to a reduction of 4.4 g/day salt), and with this reduction in salt intake, the mean change in blood pressure was -4.18 mm Hg (95% confidence interval -5.18 to -3.18, I(2)=75%) for systolic blood pressure and -2.06 mm Hg (-2.67 to -1.45, I(2)=68%) for diastolic blood pressure. Meta-regression showed that age, ethnic group, blood pressure status (hypertensive or normotensive), and the change in 24 hour urinary sodium were all significantly associated with the fall in systolic blood pressure, explaining 68% of the variance between studies. A 100 mmol reduction in 24 hour urinary sodium (6 g/day salt) was associated with a fall in systolic blood pressure of 5.8 mm Hg (2.5 to 9.2, P=0.001) after adjustment for age, ethnic group, and blood pressure status. For diastolic blood pressure, age, ethnic group, blood pressure status, and the change in 24 hour urinary sodium explained 41% of the variance between studies. Meta-analysis by subgroup showed that in people with hypertension the mean effect was -5.39 mm Hg (-6.62 to -4.15, I(2)=61%) for systolic blood pressure and -2.82 mm Hg (-3.54 to -2.11, I(2)=52%) for diastolic blood pressure. In normotensive people, the figures were -2.42 mm Hg (-3.56 to -1.29, I(2)=66%) and -1.00 mm Hg (-1.85 to -0.15, I(2)=66%), respectively. Further

  7. [Acupuncture resources in Cochrane Library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mai-Lan; Lan, Lei; Wu, Xi; Du, Huai-Bin; Tang, Hong-Zhi; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2011-07-01

    To identify acupuncture resources in six databases of Cochrane Library (CL) with computer retrieve. Seventy-two literatures were identified in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Among them, 12 Cochrane systematic review (CSR) verified the effectiveness of acupuncture, 29 concerning the indeterminacy of the efficacy of acupuncture with 1 didn't support acupuncture for epilepsy and 31 remained as protocols; 121 literatures were found in Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) with more types of diseases or symptoms and rich modality comparing to CSR; 4218 randomized controlled trials and clinical controlled trials were identified in Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CCRCT); 43 literatures in Cochrane Methodology Register Database (CMRD) which focused on blindness study, quality assessment of methodology of research and publication bias and so on; 25 literatures in Health Technology Assessment Database (HTAD) and 18 in NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) which were centered on acupuncture analgesia. Consequently, acupuncture literatures in 6 databases of CL do provide good resources for acupuncture researchers due to its abundant content, concrete classification and high quality evidence.

  8. Compared with what? An analysis of control-group types in Cochrane and Campbell reviews of psychosocial treatment efficacy with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Patrik; Bergmark, Anders

    2015-03-01

    A crucial, but under-appreciated, aspect in experimental research on psychosocial treatments of substance use disorders concerns what kinds of control groups are used. This paper examines how the distinction between different control-group designs have been handled by the Cochrane and the Campbell Collaborations in their systematic reviews of psychosocial treatments of substance abuse disorders. We assessed Cochrane and Campbell reviews (n = 8) that were devoted to psychosocial treatments of substance use disorders. We noted what control groups were considered and analysed the extent to which the reviews provided a rationale for chosen comparison conditions. We also analysed whether type of control group in the primary studies influenced how the reviews framed the effects discussed and whether this was related to conclusions drawn. The reviews covered studies involving widely different control conditions. Overall, little attention was paid to the use of different control groups (e.g. head-to-head comparisons versus untreated controls) and what this implies when interpreting effect sizes. Seven of eight reviews did not provide a rationale for the choice of comparison conditions. Cochrane and Campbell reviews of the efficacy of psychosocial interventions with substance use disorders seem to underappreciate that the use of different control-group types yields different effect estimates. Most reviews have not distinguished between different control-group designs and therefore have provided a confused picture regarding absolute and relative treatment efficacy. A systematic approach to treating different control-group designs in research reviews is necessary for meaningful estimates of treatment efficacy. © 2014 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Adverse events associated with medium- and long-term use of opioids for chronic non-cancer pain: an overview of Cochrane Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, Charl; Jackson, Tanya D; Kunyk, Diane; Lappi, Vernon G; Sonnenberg, Barend; Hagtvedt, Reidar; Sharma, Sangita; Kolahdooz, Fariba; Straube, Sebastian

    2017-10-30

    Chronic pain is common and can be challenging to manage. Despite increased utilisation of opioids, the safety and efficacy of long-term use of these compounds for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) remains controversial. This overview of Cochrane Reviews complements the overview entitled 'High-dose opioids for chronic non-cancer pain: an overview of Cochrane Reviews'. To provide an overview of the occurrence and nature of adverse events associated with any opioid agent (any dose, frequency, or route of administration) used on a medium- or long-term basis for the treatment of CNCP in adults. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (the Cochrane Library) Issue 3, 2017 on 8 March 2017 to identify all Cochrane Reviews of studies of medium- or long-term opioid use (2 weeks or more) for CNCP in adults aged 18 and over. We assessed the quality of the reviews using the AMSTAR criteria (Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews) as adapted for Cochrane Overviews. We assessed the quality of the evidence for the outcomes using the GRADE framework. We included a total of 16 reviews in our overview, of which 14 presented unique quantitative data. These 14 Cochrane Reviews investigated 14 different opioid agents that were administered for time periods of two weeks or longer. The longest study was 13 months in duration, with most in the 6- to 16-week range. The quality of the included reviews was high using AMSTAR criteria, with 11 reviews meeting all 10 criteria, and 5 of the reviews meeting 9 out of 10, not scoring a point for either duplicate study selection and data extraction, or searching for articles irrespective of language and publication type. The quality of the evidence for the generic adverse event outcomes according to GRADE ranged from very low to moderate, with risk of bias and imprecision being identified for the following generic adverse event outcomes: any adverse event, any serious adverse event, and withdrawals due to adverse

  10. Grommets and speech at three and six years in children born with total cleft or cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzi, Oumama El; Herzog, Georges; Broome, Martin; Trichet-Zbinden, Chantal; Hohlfeld, Judith; Cherpillod, Jacques; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony S

    2015-12-01

    Grommets may be considered as the treatment of choice for otitis media with effusion (OME) in children born with a cleft. But the timing and precise indications to use them are not well established. The aim of the study is to compare the results of hearing and speech controls at three and six year-old in children born with total cleft or cleft palate in the presence or not of grommets. This retrospective study concerns non syndromic children born between 1994 and 2006 and operated for a unilateral cleft lip palate (UCLP) or a cleft palate (CP) alone, by one surgeon with the same schedule of operations (Malek procedure). We compared the results of clinical observation, tympanometry, audiometry and nasometry at three and six year-old. The Borel-Maisonny classification was used to evaluate the velar insufficiency. None of the children had preventive grommets. The Fisher Exact Test was used for statistical analysis with p<0.05 considered as significant. Seventy-seven patients were analyzed in both groups. Abnormal hearing status was statistically more frequent in children with UCLP compared to children with CP, at three and six years (respectively, 80-64%, p<0.03 and 78-60%, p<0.02), with the use of grommets at six years in 43% of cases in both groups. Improvement of hearing status between three and six year-old was present in 5% of children with UCLP and 9% with CP, without the use of grommets. The use of grommets between three and six year-old was not associated to any improvement of hearing status or speech results children with UCLP or with CP, with a low risk of tympanosclerosis. These results favor the use of grommets before the age of three, taking into account the risk of long term tympanosclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Are sham acupuncture interventions more effective than (other) placebos? A re-analysis of data from the Cochrane review on placebo effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Klaus; Niemann, Karin; Meissner, Karin

    2010-10-01

    A recent Cochrane review on placebo interventions for all kinds of conditions found that 'physical placebos' (which included sham acupuncture) were associated with larger effects over no-treatment control groups than 'pharmacological placebos'. We re-analyzed the data from this review to investigate whether effects associated with sham acupuncture differed from those of other 'physical placebos'. All trials included in the Cochrane review as investigating 'physical placebos' were classified as investigating either (sham) acupuncture or other physical placebos. The latter group was further subclassified into groups of similar interventions. Data from the Cochrane review were re-entered into the RevMan 5 software for meta-analysis. The primary analysis was a random-effects analysis of trials reporting continuous outcomes of trials that used either sham acupuncture or other physical placebos. Out of a total of 61 trials which reported a continuous outcome measure, 19 compared sham acupuncture and 42 compared other physical placebos with a no-treatment control group. The trials re-analyzed were highly heterogeneous regarding patients, interventions and outcomes measured. The pooled standardized mean difference was -0.41 (95% confidence interval -0.56, -0.24) between sham acupuncture and no treatment and -0.26 (95% CI -0.37, -0.15) between other physical placebos and no treatment (p value for subgroup differences = 0.007). Significant differences were also observed between subgroups of other physical placebos. Due to the heterogeneity of the trials included and the indirect comparison our results must be interpreted with caution. Still, they suggest that sham acupuncture interventions might, on average, be associated with larger effects than pharmacological and other physical placebos. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. HIV-1 and intestinal helminth review update: updating a Cochrane Review and building the case for treatment and has the time come to test and treat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P E; De, P

    2009-06-01

    Intestinal helminth infection activates and dysregulates the immune system and impacts the host's capacity to respond to illness. Such neglected tropical infections exact the greatest burden on resource-limited settings and there appears to be considerable overlapping epidemiology with HIV-1 and other high-burden infections and illnesses in such settings. Recent limited yet controlled RCT evidence suggests a potentially beneficial therapeutic effect when persons co-infected with soil-transmitted worms and HIV-1, are treated with albendazole. The positive impact on CD4+ counts and plasma RNA levels appears to delay HIV-1 progression. The evidence-base has been conflicting and the unequivocal evidence needed to support large-scale de-worming remains lacking. The recent RCT by Walson and colleagues provides the first real tantalizing evidence of a beneficial impact of worm treatment and adds to a prior Cochrane review that was inconclusive. Further controlled, longer duration and larger trial arm designs that are minimally biased and comparable, are needed to provide the conclusive evidence needed yet the case for de-worming in delaying high-burden illnesses such as HIV-1 has been made much stronger.

  13. The efficacy of interventions to treat peri-implantitis: a Cochrane systematic review of randomised controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    To identify the most effective interventions for treating peri-implantitis around osseointegrated dental implants. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched and several journals were handsearched with no language restriction up to January 2008. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing interventions for treating peri-implantitis were eligible. Screening of studies, quality assessment and data extraction were conducted in duplicate. Missing information was requested. Outcome measures were: implant failure; complications; changes in radiographic marginal bone level, probing 'attachment' level (PAL), probing pocket depth (PPD), and recession; aesthetics evaluated by patients and dentists; cost and treatment time. Ten eligible trials were identified, and seven were included (148 patients). They tested: (1) local antibiotics vs ultrasonic debridement; (2) adjunctive local antibiotics to debridement; (3) different techniques of subgingival debridement; (4) laser vs manual debridement and chlorhexidine irrigation/ gel; (5) systemic antibiotics plus resective surgery plus two local antibiotics with and without implant surface smoothening; and (6) nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite vs Bio-Oss and resorbable barriers. Follow up ranged from 3 months to 2 years. After 4 months, adjunctive local antibiotics to manual debridement in patients who lost at least 50% of peri-implant bone showed improved PAL and PPD (0.6 mm). After 6 months, peri-implant infrabony defects > 3 mm treated with Bio-Oss and barriers gained 0.5 mm more PAL and PPD than those treated with hydroxyapatite. In four trials subgingival mechanical debridement seemed to achieve results similar to more complex therapies. There is very little reliable evidence suggesting which could be the most effective interventions for peri-implantitis. Sample sizes were too small and follow up too short. This is not to say that currently used interventions are ineffective

  14. Characteristics of meta-analyses and their component studies in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: a cross-sectional, descriptive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davey Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cochrane systematic reviews collate and summarise studies of the effects of healthcare interventions. The characteristics of these reviews and the meta-analyses and individual studies they contain provide insights into the nature of healthcare research and important context for the development of relevant statistical and other methods. Methods We classified every meta-analysis with at least two studies in every review in the January 2008 issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR according to the medical specialty, the types of interventions being compared and the type of outcome. We provide descriptive statistics for numbers of meta-analyses, numbers of component studies and sample sizes of component studies, broken down by these categories. Results We included 2321 reviews containing 22,453 meta-analyses, which themselves consist of data from 112,600 individual studies (which may appear in more than one meta-analysis. Meta-analyses in the areas of gynaecology, pregnancy and childbirth (21%, mental health (13% and respiratory diseases (13% are well represented in the CDSR. Most meta-analyses address drugs, either with a control or placebo group (37% or in a comparison with another drug (25%. The median number of meta-analyses per review is six (inter-quartile range 3 to 12. The median number of studies included in the meta-analyses with at least two studies is three (inter-quartile range 2 to 6. Sample sizes of individual studies range from 2 to 1,242,071, with a median of 91 participants. Discussion It is clear that the numbers of studies eligible for meta-analyses are typically very small for all medical areas, outcomes and interventions covered by Cochrane reviews. This highlights the particular importance of suitable methods for the meta-analysis of small data sets. There was little variation in number of studies per meta-analysis across medical areas, across outcome data types or across types of

  15. Evolution of poor reporting and inadequate methods over time in 20 920 randomised controlled trials included in Cochrane reviews: research on research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechartres, Agnes; Trinquart, Ludovic; Atal, Ignacio; Moher, David; Dickersin, Kay; Boutron, Isabelle; Perrodeau, Elodie; Altman, Douglas G; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-06-08

    Objective  To examine how poor reporting and inadequate methods for key methodological features in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have changed over the past three decades. Design  Mapping of trials included in Cochrane reviews. Data sources  Data from RCTs included in all Cochrane reviews published between March 2011 and September 2014 reporting an evaluation of the Cochrane risk of bias items: sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, and incomplete outcome data. Data extraction  For each RCT, we extracted consensus on risk of bias made by the review authors and identified the primary reference to extract publication year and journal. We matched journal names with Journal Citation Reports to get 2014 impact factors. Main outcomes measures  We considered the proportions of trials rated by review authors at unclear and high risk of bias as surrogates for poor reporting and inadequate methods, respectively. Results  We analysed 20 920 RCTs (from 2001 reviews) published in 3136 journals. The proportion of trials with unclear risk of bias was 48.7% for sequence generation and 57.5% for allocation concealment; the proportion of those with high risk of bias was 4.0% and 7.2%, respectively. For blinding and incomplete outcome data, 30.6% and 24.7% of trials were at unclear risk and 33.1% and 17.1% were at high risk, respectively. Higher journal impact factor was associated with a lower proportion of trials at unclear or high risk of bias. The proportion of trials at unclear risk of bias decreased over time, especially for sequence generation, which fell from 69.1% in 1986-1990 to 31.2% in 2011-14 and for allocation concealment (70.1% to 44.6%). After excluding trials at unclear risk of bias, use of inadequate methods also decreased over time: from 14.8% to 4.6% for sequence generation and from 32.7% to 11.6% for allocation concealment. Conclusions  Poor reporting and inadequate methods have decreased over time, especially for sequence generation

  16. The clinical use of drugs influencing neurotransmitters in the brain to promote motor recovery after stroke; A Cochrane systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, H.I.; Nijlant, J.M.M.; Movig, Kris L.L.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Jannink, M.J.A.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this review was to compare and to discuss the results of studies that investigated the ability of drugs to improve motor recovery after stroke by influencing dopamine, norepinephrine, or serotonin concentrations in the brain. A systematic literature search up to January 2009 was

  17. School-Based Education Programs for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse: A Cochrane Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kerryann; Zwi, Karen; Woolfenden, Susan; Shlonsky, Aron

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To assess evidence of the effectiveness of school-based education programs for the prevention of child sexual abuse (CSA). The programs deliver information about CSA and strategies to help children avoid it and encourage help seeking. Methods: Systematic review including meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cluster…

  18. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing early Gram-positive central venous catheter infections in oncology patients, a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, M. D.; van Woensel, J. B. M.; Kremer, L. C. M.; Caron, H. N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Long-term tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVC) are increasingly used in oncology patients. Infections are a frequent complication of TCVC, mostly caused by Gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics in the prevention of early

  19. Østrogen til forebyggelse af recidiverende urinvejsinfektioner hos postmenopausale kvinder--gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brostrøm, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    the efficacy of local (vaginal) oestrogen therapy in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Conversely, four randomized trials, reviewed in a weighted meta-analysis with pooled data from 2,798 women, have shown the lack of efficacy of systemic oestrogen-progesterone therapy. Local oestrogen therapy is recommended...

  20. Traction for low back pain with or without sciatica: an updated systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, J.; van Tulder, M.; Blomberg, S; de Vet, H.C.W.; van der Heijden, G; Bronfort, G.

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Systematic review. OBJECTIVE. To determine if traction is more effective than reference treatments, placebo/sham traction, or no treatment for low back pain (LBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Various types of traction are used in the treatment of LBP, often in conjunction with other

  1. Adenoidectomy with or without grommets for children with otitis media: an individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, C.W.; Rovers, M.M.; Browning, G.G.; Hoes, A.W.; Schilder, A.G.M; Burton, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Otitis media (OM) is a leading cause of medical consultations, antibiotic prescription and surgery in children. The surgical procedures offered to children with recurrent or persistent OM are insertion of grommets, adenoidectomy or a combination of the two. There is clear National

  2. Feasibility of a Knowledge Translation CME Program: "Courriels Cochrane"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluye, Pierre; Grad, Roland; Granikov, Vera; Theriault, Guylene; Fremont, Pierre; Burnand, Bernard; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Arroll, Bruce; Luconi, Francesca; Legare, France; Labrecque, Michel; Ladouceur, Roger; Bouthillier, France; Sridhar, Soumya Bindiganavile; Moscovici, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Systematic literature reviews provide best evidence, but are underused by clinicians. Thus, integrating Cochrane reviews into continuing medical education (CME) is challenging. We designed a pilot CME program where summaries of Cochrane reviews ("Courriels Cochrane") were disseminated by e-mail. Program participants…

  3. Ibuprofen and/or paracetamol (acetaminophen) for pain relief after surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth, a Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, E; Worthington, H; Coulthard, P

    2014-04-01

    This paper compares the beneficial and harmful effects of paracetamol, ibuprofen and the novel combination of both in a single tablet for pain relief following the surgical removal of lower wisdom teeth. In this systematic review only randomised controlled double-blinded clinical trials were included. We calculated the proportion of patients with at least 50% pain relief at 2 and 6 hours post dosing, along with the proportion of participants using rescue medication at 6 and 8 hours. Adverse events were also analysed. Data was meta-analysed where possible. Seven studies were included with a total of 2,241 participants enrolled. Ibuprofen 400 mg is superior to 1,000 mg paracetamol with a risk ratio for at least 50% pain relief at 6 hours of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28 to 1.69). For the combined drug, the risk ratio for at least 50% maximum pain relief over 6 hours is 1.77 (95% CI 1.32 to 2.39) based on total pain relief (TOTPAR) data. There is high quality evidence that ibuprofen is superior to paracetamol. The novel combination drug shows encouraging results when compared to the single drugs (based on two trials).

  4. Comparable effects of exercise and analgesics for pain secondary to knee osteoarthritis: a meta-analysis of trials included in Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Hansen, Julie B; Klokker, Louise; Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin

    2016-07-01

    Evidence of comparative effectiveness of different treatment approaches is important for clinical decision-making, yet absent for most recommended treatments of knee osteoarthritis pain. The objective of this study was to estimate the comparative effectiveness of exercise versus orally administered analgesics for pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The Cochrane Database of systematic reviews was searched for meta-analyses of randomized controlled studies comparing exercise or analgesics with a control group (placebo or usual care) and with pain as an outcome. Individual study estimates were identified and effect sizes were calculated from group differences. We combined study-level effects on pain with a random effects meta-analysis and compared effect sizes between exercise trials and trials with analgesic interventions. We included six Cochrane reviews (four pharmacology, two exercise). From these, 54 trials were eligible (20 pharmacology, 34 exercise), with 9806 participants (5627 pharmacology, 4179 exercise). The pooled effect size of pharmacological pain interventions was 0.41 (95% CI: 0.23-0.59) and for exercise 0.46 standardized mean difference (95% CI: 0.34-0.59). There was no statistically significant difference between the two types of intervention (difference: 0.06 standardized mean difference [95% CI: -0.28-0.16; p = 0.61]). This meta-epidemiological study provides indirect evidence that for knee osteoarthritis pain, the effects from exercise and from oral analgesics are comparable. These results may support shared decision-making where a patient for some reason is unable to exercise or who consider exercise as unviable and analgesics as a more feasible choice. PROSPERO registration: CRD42013006924.

  5. Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Anne Forbes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cochrane Library is a source of reliable information on the effects of healthcare interventions for health care practitioners and consumers. In July 2004, Saskatchewan became the first province in Canada to provide all residents with access to The Cochrane Library. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of The Cochrane Library. Training sessions were offered to promote the use of The Cochrane Library. Attendees were informed of the evaluation study and invited to participate. Those who consented to participate were telephoned and audio-taped interviews were conducted at three (n=94, six (n=71, nine (n=79, and 12 months (n=72 following the sessions. Usage of The Cochrane Library was also tracked using data available from Wiley-Blackwell. Most participants were librarians (n=31.5%, between 40 to 65 years of age (71.6% and female (92.4%. Data from Wiley-Blackwell revealed that from October 2004 to September 2007, the component of The Cochrane Library most frequently accessed was The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (abstracts=26,016; full texts =15,934. Telephone interviews with participants revealed that the majority (65.2% used The Cochrane Library at the three month interview, however this proportion fell to 27.4% at the twelve month interview even though most (83.6%-88.2% reported that The Cochrane Library was somewhat to very helpful.Most respondents claimed to have learned something from The Cochrane Library; others reported that the knowledge gained helped in their decision-making or confirmed their beliefs. Respondents accessed The Cochrane Library in response to patron requests for information on a variety of health care topics. Information was used to support changes in health care practice and policy and for the preparation of educational papers and presentations. The reported reasons for not using The Cochrane Library were lack of time, limited access to an internet ready computer in the work setting, reliance on

  6. LB01.01: ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONAL-LED INTERVENTIONS FOR IMPROVING CONTROL OF BLOOD PRESSURE IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION: A COCHRANE SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C; Smith, L; Cloutier, L; Glynn, L; Clark, O; Taylor, R; Campbell, J

    2015-06-01

    Nurse or pharmacist-led care may improve control of hypertension. We have undertaken a new Cochrane review of evidence for allied health professional led interventions in the management of hypertension. We searched multiple bibliographic databases to October 2013 for randomised controlled trials. We included any nursing, pharmacist, or allied health professional-led intervention designed to improve control of blood pressure (BP), compared to usual management of hypertension.Primary outcome measures were change in systolic BP, achievement of study target BP and use of antihypertensive medication. Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias using Cochrane criteria. Intervention effects were pooled using odds ratios (OR) or mean differences (MD). We identified 579 potential unique citations; 234 full-texts were assessed, and 98 papers met the inclusion criteria. Overall, half the risk of bias judgments across studies were rated as low risk.Compared to usual care, greater falls in systolic BP were seen for both nurse-led interventions (MD -3.8mmHg (95% CI: -5.6 to -2.0); 28 studies, 10573 participants) and pharmacist-led interventions (MD -7.6mmHg (-9.7 to -5.4); 30 studies, 6504 participants, p led interventions (OR 1.5 (1.3 to 1.7); 24 studies, 15833 participants) and pharmacist-led interventions (OR 3.5 (2.7 to 4.4); 24 studies, 4443 participants) attained higher achievement of study BP targets (p led OR 1.4 (1.1 to 1.7) vs. pharmacist-led OR 2.2 (1.3 to 3.7); p = 0.02).Interventions empowering nurses or pharmacists to prescribe or alter antihypertensive medication, compared to doctor-led medication management, achieved greater reductions in systolic BP (MD -6.7mmHg (-8.2 to -5.3) vs. -3.9mmHg (-6.7 to -1.1); p = 0.08) and greater achievement of study BP targets (OR 2.5 (2.0 to 3.2) vs. 1.7 (1.3 to 2.1); p led interventions are more likely to lower BP, achieve BP targets, and facilitate use of

  7. Some in Saskatchewan Find The Cochrane Library Useful after Promotion, Access and Training Efforts. A review of: Forbes, Dorothy, Christine Neilson, Janet Bangma, Jennifer Forbes, Daniel Fuller, and Shari Furniss. “Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library.” Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research 2.2 (2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandra Protzko

    2008-06-01

    from The Cochrane Library, although a few (11.1%reported that the information found had no impact. Others reported that the knowledge gained confirmed their beliefs (26.1%and/or helped in decision-making (32.6%. No time points were reported for the data collected about the use and helpfulness of information found in The Cochrane Library. Three-year data from Wiley-Blackwell showed that The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was most frequently accessed (abstracts=26,016; full texts=15,934. The Cochrane Central Register was accessed5,640 times and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects was accessed 1,612 times. Periods of low usage corresponded withsummer and Christmas breaks. The type of search strategy used was tracked; the authors note that an emphasis on MeSH during training between October 2004 and December 2006 corresponded with the higher number of MeSH searches during the same time period. Participants reported using The Cochrane Library in response topatron requests, to prepare educational materials, and to support health care policy and practice changes. Reasons for not using The Cochrane Library included lack of time, limited access to the Internet, forgetting how to find and use the Web site, and disappointment with the content.Conclusion – Since the fall of 2004, The Cochrane Library has been promoted and made available free of charge to all Saskatchewan residents. Usage fluctuates during the year, with less use during the summer and winter holidays; it is reasonable to presume that students use The Cochrane Library during the academic school year. Most telephone interviewees who used The Cochrane Library reported that it was somewhat to very helpful; this number increased slightly over time while the number of respondents who used the resource fell measurably over twelve months. In other words, those who continued to use The Cochrane Library over time were more likely to report a higher level of satisfaction with the resource. Interviews

  8. Alignment of systematic reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts and Reviews of Effectiveness with global burden-of-disease data: a bibliographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Hall, Alix; Williams, Christopher M; Skelton, Eliza; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Wiggers, John; Karimkhani, Chante; Boyers, Lindsay N; Dellavalle, Robert P; Hilton, John; Wolfenden, Luke

    2015-07-01

    Systematic reviews of high-quality evidence are used to inform policy and practice. To improve community health, the production of such reviews should align with burden of disease. This study aims to assess if the volume of research output from systematic reviews proportionally aligns with burden of disease assessed using percentages of mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). A cross-sectional audit of reviews published between January 2012 and August 2013 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) was undertaken. Percentages of mortality and DALYs were obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study. Standardised residual differences (SRD) based on percentages of mortality and DALYs were calculated, where conditions with SRD of more than or less than three were considered overstudied or understudied, respectively. 1029 reviews from CDSR and 1928 reviews from DARE were examined. There was a significant correlation between percentage DALYs and systematic reviews published in CDSR and DARE databases (CDSR: r=0.68, p=0.001; DARE: r=0.60, previews published in either database (CDSR: r=0.34, p=0.14; DARE: r=0.22, p=0.34). Relative to percentage of mortality, mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal conditions and other non-communicable diseases were overstudied. Maternal disorders were overstudied relative to percentages of mortality and DALYs in CDSR. The focus of systematic reviews is moderately correlated with DALYs. A number of conditions may be overstudied relative to percentage of mortality particularly in the context of health and medical reviews. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Urodynamic studies for management of urinary incontinence in children and adults: A short version Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Keiran David; Lapitan, Marie Carmela M; Omar, Muhammad Imran; Glazener, Cathryn Margaret Anne

    2015-06-01

    Urodynamic tests are used to investigate people who have urinary incontinence or other urinary symptoms in order to make an objective diagnosis. The investigations are invasive and time consuming. To determine if treatment according to a urodynamic-based diagnosis, compared to treatment based on history and examination, leads to more effective clinical care and better clinical outcomes. Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialized Register (searched February 19, 2013); reference lists of relevant articles. Randomized and quasi-randomized trials in people who were and were not investigated using urodynamics, or comparing one type of urodynamic test against another. At least two independent review authors carried out trial assessment, selection, and data abstraction. We found eight trials but data were available for only 1,036 women in seven trials. Women undergoing urodynamics were more likely to have their management changed (17% vs. 3%, risk ratio [RR] 5.07, 95% CI 1.87-13.74). Two trials suggested that women were more likely to receive drugs (RR 2.09, 95% CI 1.32-3.31), but, in five trials, women were not more likely to undergo surgery (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.88-1.12). There was no statistically significant difference in urinary incontinence in women who had urodynamics (37%) compared with those undergoing history and clinical examination alone (36%) (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.86-1.21). While urodynamics did change clinical decision-making, there was some high-quality evidence that this did not result in lower urinary incontinence rates after treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Epidural Local Anesthetics Versus Opioid-Based Analgesic Regimens for Postoperative Gastrointestinal Paralysis, Vomiting, and Pain After Abdominal Surgery: A Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Joanne; Nishimori, Mina; Kopp, Sandra L

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this review was to compare the effects of postoperative epidural analgesia with local anesthetics to postoperative systemic or epidural opioids in terms of return of gastrointestinal transit, postoperative pain control, postoperative vomiting, incidence of gastrointestinal anastomotic leak, hospital length of stay, and cost after abdominal surgery. Trials were identified by computerized searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 12), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) (from 1950 to December, 2014) and Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE) (from 1974 to December 2014) and by checking the reference lists of trials retained. We included parallel randomized controlled trials comparing the effects of postoperative epidural local anesthetic with regimens based on systemic or epidural opioids. The quality of the studies was rated according to the Cochrane tool. Two authors independently extracted data. We judged the quality of evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) working group scale. Based on 22 trials including 1138 participants, an epidural containing a local anesthetic will decrease the time required for return of gastrointestinal transit as measured by time required to observe the first flatus after an abdominal surgery standardized mean difference (SMD) -1.28 (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.71 to -0.86; high quality of evidence; equivalent to 17.5 hours). The effect is proportional to the concentration of local anesthetic used. Based on 28 trials including 1559 participants, we also found a decrease in time to first feces (stool): SMD -0.67 (95% CI, -0.86 to -0.47; low quality of evidence; equivalent to 22 hours). Based on 35 trials including 2731 participants, pain on movement at 24 hours after surgery is also reduced: SMD -0.89 (95% CI, -1.08 to -0.70; moderate quality of evidence; equivalent to 2.5 on a scale from 0 to

  11. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for neck and shoulder pain among working age adults: a systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, K; Malmivaara, A; van Tulder, M; Roine, R; Jauhiainen, M; Hurri, H; Koes, B

    2001-01-15

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. To evaluate the effectiveness of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for neck and shoulder pain among working age adults. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation programs for neck and shoulder pain require substantial staff and financial resources. They are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. The reviewed randomized controlled and controlled trials appraising the effectiveness of biopsychosocial rehabilitation for working age patients with neck and shoulder pain were identified by searching electronic bibliographic databases, checking references, and consulting experts in the rehabilitation field. Four blinded reviewers selected the trials. Two specialists on rehabilitation evaluated the clinical relevance. Two other blinded reviewers extracted the data and assessed the main results and the methodologic quality of the studies. A qualitative analysis was performed to evaluate the level of scientific evidence. After 1808 abstracts and the references of 65 reviews were screened, only two relevant studies were found that satisfied the criteria. One of these was considered a methodologically low-quality randomized controlled trial, and the other was a methodologically low-quality controlled clinical trial. The clinical relevance of included studies was satisfactory. The level of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for neck and shoulder pain was limited. There appears to be little scientific evidence for the effectiveness on neck and shoulder pain of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation compared with other rehabilitation methods. There is an urgent need for high-quality trials in this field.

  12. Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain: a systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane Back Review Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, P.; van Tulder, M. W.; van Poppel, M. N.; Nachemson, A. L.; Bouter, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    A systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials. Lumbar supports are used in the treatment of low back pain, but also to prevent the onset (primary prevention) or recurrences of a low back pain episode (secondary prevention). To assess the effects of lumbar sup-ports for

  13. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for subacute low back pain in working-age adults: a systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane Collaboration Back Review Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, K; Malmivaara, A; van Tulder, M; Roine, R; Jauhiainen, M; Hurri, H; Koes, B

    2001-02-01

    A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was performed. To evaluate the effectiveness of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for subacute low back pain among working-age adults. Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation programs are widely applied for patients with chronic low back pain. The multidisciplinary biopsychosocial approach for prolonged low back pain could be considered to prevent chronicity. Work site visits and a close relationship with occupational health care might produce results in terms of patients working ability. Reviewed randomized controlled trials as well as controlled trials were identified from electronic bibliographic databases, reference checking, and consultation with experts in the rehabilitation field. Four blinded reviewers selected the trials. Two rehabilitation specialists evaluated the clinical relevance. Two other blinded reviewers extracted the data and assessed the main results along with the methodologic quality of the studies. A qualitative analysis was performed to evaluate the level evidence. Of 1808 references, only 2 relevant studies were included. Both were considered to be methodologically low-quality randomized controlled trials. The clinical relevance of the studies was sufficient. The level of scientific evidence was moderate, showing that multidisciplinary rehabilitation involving work site visit or more comprehensive occupational health care intervention helps patients return to work faster, makes sick leaves less, and alleviates subjective disability. There is moderate evidence showing that multidisciplinary rehabilitation for subacute low back pain is effective, and that work site visit increases the effectiveness, but because the analyzed studies had some methodologic shortcomings, an obvious need still exists for high-quality trials in this field.

  14. Meta-analysis and The Cochrane Collaboration: 20 years of the Cochrane Statistical Methods Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Joanne E; Salanti, Georgia; Lewis, Steff C; Altman, Douglas G

    2013-11-26

    The Statistical Methods Group has played a pivotal role in The Cochrane Collaboration over the past 20 years. The Statistical Methods Group has determined the direction of statistical methods used within Cochrane reviews, developed guidance for these methods, provided training, and continued to discuss and consider new and controversial issues in meta-analysis. The contribution of Statistical Methods Group members to the meta-analysis literature has been extensive and has helped to shape the wider meta-analysis landscape.In this paper, marking the 20th anniversary of The Cochrane Collaboration, we reflect on the history of the Statistical Methods Group, beginning in 1993 with the identification of aspects of statistical synthesis for which consensus was lacking about the best approach. We highlight some landmark methodological developments that Statistical Methods Group members have contributed to in the field of meta-analysis. We discuss how the Group implements and disseminates statistical methods within The Cochrane Collaboration. Finally, we consider the importance of robust statistical methodology for Cochrane systematic reviews, note research gaps, and reflect on the challenges that the Statistical Methods Group faces in its future direction.

  15. Evaluation of the Cochrane tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L; Paludan-Müller, A. S.; Laursen, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials was introduced in 2008 and has frequently been commented on and used in systematic reviews. We wanted to evaluate the tool by reviewing published comments on its strengths and challenges and by describing and analysing how...... the tool is applied to both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods: A review of published comments (searches in PubMed, The Cochrane Methodology Register and Google Scholar) and an observational study (100 Cochrane and 100 non-Cochrane reviews from 2014). Results: Our review included 68...... in non-Cochrane reviews (31/100). Both types of reviews frequently implemented the tool in non-recommended ways. Most Cochrane reviews planned to use risk of bias assessments as basis for sensitivity analyses (70 %), but only a minority conducted such analyses (19 %) because, in many cases, few trials...

  16. Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and fecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women: a short version Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Rhianon; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Cody, June D; Mørkved, Siv

    2014-03-01

    Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is commonly recommended during pregnancy and after birth both for prevention and the treatment of incontinence. Effect of pelvic floor muscle training compared to usual antenatal and postnatal care on incontinence. Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialized Register; handsearching (searched February 7, 2012); the references of relevant articles. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials in pregnant or postnatal women having pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) versus no PFMT or standard care. Duplicate trial assessment, selection and data abstraction. Twenty-two trials involving 8,485 women. Continent pregnant women (prevention) who had intensive antenatal PFMT were less likely to report urinary incontinence up to 6 months after delivery (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% CI 0.54-0.95). Incontinent postnatal women (treatment) who received PFMT were less likely to report urinary incontinence 12 months after delivery (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.35-1.03). In a mixed population (women with and without incontinence symptoms in late pregnancy or after delivery), PFMT did not reduce incontinence rates after delivery. For women who are continent during pregnancy, PFMT may prevent urinary incontinence up to 6 months after delivery. The extent to which mixed prevention and treatment approaches to PFMT in the postnatal period are effective is less clear that is, offering advice on PFMT to all pregnant or postpartum women whether they have incontinence symptoms or not. There was little evidence about long-term effects for either urinary or fecal incontinence. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparative Efficacy of Antimicrobial Central Venous Catheters in Reducing Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Adults: Abridged Cochrane Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Huey Yi; Lai, Nai Ming; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-05-15

    The efficacy of antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs) remains questionable. In this network meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the comparative efficacy of antimicrobial CVC impregnations in reducing catheter-related infections in adults. We searched 4 electronic databases (Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, CINAHL) and internet sources for randomized controlled trials, ongoing clinical trials, and unpublished studies up to August 2016. Studies that assessed CVCs with antimicrobial impregnation with nonimpregnated catheters or catheters with another impregnation were included. Primary outcomes were clinically diagnosed sepsis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), and all-cause mortality. We performed a network meta-analysis to estimate risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Sixty studies with 17255 catheters were included. The effects of 14 impregnations were investigated. Both CRBSI and catheter colonization were the most commonly evaluated outcomes. Silver-impregnated CVCs significantly reduced clinically diagnosed sepsis compared with silver-impregnated cuffs (RR, 0.54 [95% CI, .29-.99]). When compared to no impregnation, significant CRBSI reduction was associated with minocycline-rifampicin (RR, 0.29 [95% CI, .16-.52]) and silver (RR, 0.57 [95% CI, .38-.86]) impregnations. No impregnations significantly reduced all-cause mortality. For catheter colonization, significant decreases were shown by miconazole-rifampicin (RR, 0.14 [95% CI, .05-.36]), 5-fluorouracil (RR, 0.34 [95% CI, .14-.82]), and chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (RR, 0.60 [95% CI, .50-.72]) impregnations compared with no impregnation. None of the studies evaluated antibiotic/antiseptic resistance as the outcome. Current evidence suggests that the minocycline-rifampicin-impregnated CVC appears to be the most effective in preventing CRBSI. However, its overall benefits in reducing clinical sepsis and mortality remain uncertain

  18. Metformin for endometrial hyperplasia: a Cochrane protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Naomi S; Oliver, Thomas R W; Shiwani, Hunain; Saner, Juliane R F; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Atiomo, William

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial hyperplasia is a precancerous lesion of the endometrium, commonly presenting with uterine bleeding. If managed expectantly, it frequently progresses to endometrial carcinoma, rates of which are increasing dramatically worldwide. However, the established treatment for endometrial hyperplasia (progestogens) involves multiple side effects and leaves the risk of recurrence. Metformin is the most commonly used oral hypoglycaemic agent in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has also been linked to the reversal of endometrial hyperplasia and may therefore contribute to decreasing the prevalence of endometrial carcinoma without the fertility and side effect consequences of current therapies. However, the efficacy and safety of metformin being used for this therapeutic target is unclear and, therefore, this systematic review will aim to determine this. Methods and analysis We will search the following trials and databases with no language restrictions: Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; PubMed; Google Scholar; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO International Trials Registry Platform portal; OpenGrey and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). We will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of use of metformin compared with a placebo or no treatment, conventional medical treatment (eg, progestogens) or any other active intervention. Two review authors will independently assess the trial eligibility, risk of bias and extract appropriate data points. Trial authors will be contacted for additional data. The primary review outcome is the regression of endometrial hyperplasia histology towards normal histology. Secondary outcomes include hysterectomy rate; abnormal uterine bleeding; quality of life scores and adverse reactions to treatments. Ethics and dissemination

  19. The Efficacy and Safety of Treatments for Acute Gout: Results from a Series of Systematic Literature Reviews Including Cochrane Reviews on Intraarticular Glucocorticoids, Colchicine, Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs, and Interleukin-1 Inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Vinik, Ophir; Moi, John H. Y.; Sivera, Francisca; van Echteld, Irene A. A. M.; van Durme, Caroline; Falzon, Louise; Bombardier, Claire; Carmona, Loreto; Aletaha, Daniel; Landewé, Robert B.; van der Heijde, Désirée M. F. M.; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine the efficacy and safety of glucocorticoids (GC), colchicine, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID), interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors, and paracetamol to treat acute gout. Methods. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to

  20. Feedback or biofeedback to augment pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence in women: shortened version of a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderschee, Roselien; Hay-Smith, E. C. Jean; Herbison, G. Peter; Roovers, Jan Paul; Heineman, Maas Jan

    2013-01-01

    Feedback and biofeedback (BF) are common adjuncts to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) for women with stress, urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence (UI). An up to date systematic review of adjunctive feedback or BF was needed to guide practice and further research. To determine whether feedback

  1. Cochrane i Norge - Hvordan formidler vi resultatene fra Cochrane-oversikter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Glenton

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cochrane-systematiske oversikter oppleves ofte som lite tilgjengelige. En av hovedaktivitetene til det norske Cochrane-miljøet er å utvikle måter å presentere resultatene fra Cochrane-oversikter på for at de lettere tas i bruk. Vi beskriver her fire hovedprinsipper for dette arbeidet, og gir eksempler på dokumentformater vi har vært med på å utvikle. De overordnete prinsippene er: 1 Informasjonen bør være forståelig for personer uten ekspertkunnskap om forskningsmetodikk. Vi har erfart at når det gjelder forståelsen av resultater fra systematiske oversikter går det største skillet mellom forskere og ikke-forskere og i mindre grad mellom ulike grupper som helsepersonell, pasienter og byråkrater. 2 Informasjonen bør presenteres på en mest mulig nøytral måte. 3 Informasjonen bør være brukertilpasset. Det innebærer at vi innhenter tilbakemeldinger fra sluttbrukere i utviklingsarbeidet og gjør nødvendige tilpasninger i flere omganger. 4 Informasjonsstrukturen bør følge ”1:3:25-prinsippet”. Her presenteres informasjonen både summarisk (1 side, kort oppsummert (3 sider, og mer utdypende (25 sider. I artikkelen beskriver vi flere presentasjonsformater vi har utviklet, blant annet ”Summary of Findings” der resultatene av Cochrane-oversikter presenteres i lettfattelige tabeller; ”plain language summaries”, som er tekstbaserte oppsummeringer rettet mot en bred lesergruppe; ”SUPPORT summaries” rettet mot byråkrater og ”policymakers”; og ”DECIDE Frameworks” der resultatene presenteres sammen med annen informasjon som er relevant i en beslutningsprosess.Glenton C, Rosenbaum S. Cochrane in Norway – How do we disseminate findings from Cochrane reviews? Nor J Epidemiol 2013; 23 (2: 215-219.ENGLISH SUMMARYCochrane systematic reviews are often perceived as inaccessible. One of the main activities of the Norwegian branch of the Cochrane Collaboration is to develop ways to present the results of Cochrane

  2. Evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration for Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Susan; Kimbrough, Elizabeth; Cheng, Ker; Berman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Cochrane Collaboration, an international not-for-profit organization that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of randomized trials of health care therapies, has produced reviews summarizing much of the evidence on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our objective was to review the evidence base according to Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods In order to detect reviews focusing on TCM, we searched the titles and abstracts of all reviews in Issue 4, 2008 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each review, we extracted data on the number of trials included and the total number of participants. We provided an indication of the strength of the review findings by assessing the reviewers' abstract conclusions statement. We supplemented our assessment of the abstract conclusions statements with a listing of the comparisons and outcomes showing statistically significant meta-analyses results. Results We identified 70 Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM, primarily acupuncture (n = 26) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 42), and 1 each of moxibustion and t'ai chi. Nineteen (19) of 26 acupuncture reviews and 22/42 herbal medicine reviews concluded that there was not enough good quality trial evidence to make any conclusion about the efficacy of the evaluated treatment, while the remaining 7 acupuncture and 20 herbal medicine reviews and each of the moxibustion and t'ai chi reviews indicated a suggestion of benefit, which was qualified by a caveat about the poor quality and quantity of studies. Most reviews included many distinct interventions, controls, outcomes, and populations, and a large number of different comparisons were made, each with a distinct forest plot. Conclusions Most Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM are inconclusive, due specifically to the poor methodology and heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Some systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence of Chinese medicine's benefits to certain patient populations

  3. Goal setting and strategies to enhance goal pursuit in adult rehabilitation: summary of a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, William M; Weatherall, Mark; Hay-Smith, Jean C; Dean, Sarah G; McPherson, Kath; Siegert, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Goal setting is considered an essential part of rehabilitation, but approaches to goal setting vary with no consensus regarding the best approach. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the effects of goal setting and strategies to enhance the pursuit of goals on improving outcomes in adult rehabilitation. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, four other databases and three trial registries for randomized control trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, or quasi-RCTs published before December 2013. Two reviewers independently screened all search results, then critically appraised and extracted data on all included studies. We identified 39 trials, which differed in clinical context, participant populations, research question related to goal use, and outcomes measured. Eighteen studies compared goal setting, with or without strategies to enhance goal pursuit, to no goal setting. These 18 studies provided very low-quality evidence for a moderate effect size that any type of goal setting is better than no goal setting for improving health-related quality of life or self-reported emotional status (N.=446, standard mean difference [SMD]=0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.17 to 0.88), and very low-quality evidence of a large effect size for self-efficacy (N.=108, SMD=1.07, 95% CI: 0.64 to 1.49). Fourteen studies compared a structured approach to goal setting to "usual care" goal setting, where some goals may have been set but no structured approach was followed. These studies provided very low-quality evidence for a small effect size that more structured goal setting results in higher patient self-efficacy (N.=134, SMD=0.37, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.71). No conclusive evidence was found to support the notion that goal setting, or structured goal setting in comparison to "usual care" goal setting, changes outcomes for patients for measures of participation, activity, or engagement in rehabilitation programs. This review found a large and increasing amount of

  4. Cochrane Corner: Corticosteroids for viral myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Daniel; Lopes, Luís R; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2015-01-01

    The causes of myocarditis are diverse, but a viral etiology is the most common. In this systematic review by the Cochrane Collaboration, the authors assessed the efficacy of corticosteroid therapy in patients with viral myocarditis. Eight randomized controlled trials with 719 patients (two trials in pediatric populations) were included for analysis. Pooled results did not show significant differences in mortality with the use of corticosteroids. Patients on corticosteroid therapy had significantly higher post-treatment left ventricular ejection fraction values compared to control. These results are limited by the significant heterogeneity associated with clinical trials. The best available evidence does not support the routine use of corticosteroids in patients with viral myocarditis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Are there any differences in the efficacy and safety of different formulations of Oral 5-ASA used for induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis? evidence from cochrane reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagan, Brian G; Chande, Nilesh; MacDonald, John K

    2013-08-01

    We systematically reviewed and compared the efficacy and safety of oral mesalamine formulations (sustained release, delayed release, and prodrugs) used for induction and maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis. The main objective of this review was to determine if there are any differences in efficacy or safety among the oral 5-ASA drugs. A literature search in February 2013 identified all applicable randomized trials. Study quality was evaluated using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria were used to assess the overall quality of the evidence. Studies were subgrouped by common mesalamine comparators for meta-analysis. Studies were pooled for analysis if they compared equimolar doses of oral 5-ASA. Seventeen studies that evaluated 2925 patients were identified. The risk of bias was low for most factors, although 1 study was single blind and 3 were open label. No difference was observed between oral 5-ASA and comparator 5-ASA formulations in the proportion of patients with clinical remission (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-1.02), clinical improvement (relative risk, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.01), or relapse at 12 months (relative risk, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.80-1.28). Subgroup analyses showed no important differences in efficacy. No significant difference was demonstrated in rates of adverse events or withdrawal due to adverse events. There does not seem to be any difference in efficacy or safety among the various formulations of oral 5-ASA. Oral mesalamine is an effective and safe treatment of mild-to-moderate or quiescent ulcerative colitis regardless of the chosen formulation.

  6. Saskatchewan Residents’ Use of The Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Anne Forbes

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence of failure to translate research findings into the health care decision-making process of consumers, practitioners and policy makers (Grimshaw, 2007. Recognizing that The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews contained in The Cochrane Library (the Library are the “gold standard” of systematic reviews, Saskatchewan’s Health Quality Council provided funding for a provincial license and an evaluation study. In July 2004, Saskatchewan became the first province in Canada to provide all residents with access to the Library. The primary aim of the study was to enhance and evaluate the use of the Library over three years. Since September 2004, over 46 training sessions have been conducted on searching the Library online databases. Attendees at the workshops were informed of the evaluation study and invited to participate. Those who consented to participate were telephoned following the workshops and audio-taped interviews were conducted. Usage of the Library was also tracked using data available from Wiley InterScience. Three month (n=94, six month (n=71, nine month (n=79, and 12 month (n=72 telephone interviews were conducted. Most participants were librarians (n=31.5%, followed by nurses (16.3%, therapists (7.6%, library support staff (5.4%, pharmacists (4.3%, physicians (3.3%, and others (30.5. Most were between 40 to 65 years of age (71.6% and female (92.4%. Most respondents had accessed the Library at the three-month (65.2% and six-month (64.2% follow-up interviews. However, this percent fell to 45.2% at the nine-month and 27.4% at the twelve-month interview. MeSH searches were more frequent than standard keyword searches and HTML full text retrievals were more common than PDF versions. It is assumed that HTML versions were scanned for particular information whereas PDF versions were selected when the person wished to save and read the whole review. Librarians, practitioners and consumers are more likely to be

  7. The Facultad Ciencias de la Salud and the Cochrane Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Delgado-Noguera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Faculty of Health Sciences of the University of Cauca is an Associate Cochrane Group since January 2009 and ratified its membership in the network in November 2013. As an associated group it has promoted the Organized training workshops in systematic reviews, occasionally in conjunction with scientific societies such as the Cauca Pediatric Society. It has also participated with the authorship of two systematic reviews in the areas of Anesthesia, Child Nutrition and Pediatric Infectology.

  8. "Is Cybermedicine Killing You?" - The Story of a Cochrane Disaster

    OpenAIRE

    Rada, Roy

    2005-01-01

    Background In October 2004, a flawed systematic review entitled “Interactive Health Communication Applications for People with Chronic Disease” was published in the Cochrane Library, accompanied by several press releases in which authors warned the public of the negative health consequences of interactive health communication applications, including the Internet. Within days of the review's publication, scientists identified major coding errors and other methodological problems that invalidat...

  9. Development and classification of an operational definition of complementary and alternative medicine for the Cochrane Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Manheimer, Eric; Berman, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade the Cochrane Collaboration has been an increasingly important source of information on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies. From 2007 to 2008 the Cochrane CAM Field developed a topics list that allowed us to categorize all 396 Cochrane reviews related to CAM (as of The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2009). This topics list is an advance in making Cochrane reviews on CAM topics accessible to the public. In this paper, we discuss challenges in developing the topics list, including developing an operational definition of CAM, deciding which reviews should be included within the CAM Field’s scope, developing the structured list of CAM Field-specific topics, and determining where in the topics list the reviews should be placed. Although aspects of our operational definition of CAM are open to revision, a standardized definition provides us with an objective, reproducible and systematic method for defining and classifying CAM therapies. PMID:21717826

  10. Sex based subgroup differences in randomized controlled trials: Empirical evidence from Cochrane meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallach, J.D. (Joshua D.); Sullivan, P.G. (Patrick G.); Trepanowski, J.F. (John F.); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the frequency, validity, and relevance of statistically significant (P<0.05) sex-treatment interactions in randomized controlled trials in Cochrane meta-analyses. Design Meta-epidemiological study. Data sources Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) and

  11. Bibliometric and content analysis of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field specialized register of controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Manheimer, Eric; Sampson, Margaret; Barnabas, Jabez Paul; Bouter, Lex M.; Cho, Kiho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Li, Xun; Liu, Jianping; Moher, David; Okabe, Tetsuro; Pienaar, Elizabeth D.; Shin, Byung Cheul; Tharyan, Prathap; Tsutani, Kiichiro; van der Windt, Daniëlle A.; Berman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The identification of eligible controlled trials for systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions can be difficult. To increase access to these difficult to locate trials, the Cochrane Collaboration Complementary Medicine Field (CAM Field) has

  12. Representation of women as editors in the Cochrane collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Soumyadeep; Mathew, Rebecca Joyce

    2014-12-01

    There is considerable gender disparity in editorial boards of medical journals. Being an editor in a Cochrane review group (CRG), like being an editor in a medical journal, is an indirect representation of one's reputation and leadership abilities in a particular specialty. The aim of the study was to analyze the representation of women editors on the editorial teams of CRG's and the Central Editorial Unit (CEU) of the Cochrane Collaboration. Information about editorial team members of CRGs and the CEU was extracted from respective websites. Gender of the individual was determined by inspection of names, individual profile description or photographs in the CRG or institutional webpage, social networking sites and internet search. Data was validated by two authors independently and differences sorted by consensus. A total of 788 editors across all CRGs and the CEU with an overall 371 females (47.1%) and 417 (52.9%) males were identified. of the CEU editors, 62.5% were females. There were 68 coordinating editors (35.3% females), and 62 managing editors (56% females), who provided leadership to the CRGs. Eighty-four percent of trial search coordinators were found to be females. Ten CRGs had 75% or more of its editors as females while 7 CRGs had less than or equal to 25% female editors. The representation of women editors in the Cochrane Collaboration was found to be better than in editorial boards of medical journals. There is still scope for improvement to ensure better gender diversity across all roles and in all CRG's. © 2014 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. The Cochrane collaboration – the role in the evolution of evidence-based medicine and development of cooperation in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperny, Magdalena; Leśniak, Wiktoria; Jankowski, Miłosz; Bała, Małgorzata

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an approach to decision making on the basis of the reliable and up to date best evidence. EBM is regarded as the gold standard all over the world. Cochrane Collaboration is one of the institutions, which promote EBM among physicians, policy makers and other health care workers. Cochrane Collaboration is international non-profit organization bringing together people from all over the world, the aim of which is to create and disseminate reliable scientific information. The Cochrane Collaboration develops and publishes systematic reviews on medical and diagnostic procedures. The article presents the history of the Cochrane Collaboration, the Cochrane Library and the first Cochrane Branch in Poland. Cochrane Branch in Poland is hosted by the Systematic Reviews Centre created in 2015 within the Faculty of Medicine at the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow. The authors presented the activities of the Cochrane Collaboration, the scope of activities of Polish Branch and briefly principles for the development of Cochrane systematic reviews.

  14. PEDro or Cochrane to Assess the Quality of Clinical Trials? A Meta-Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo-Olivo, Susan; da Costa, Bruno R; Cummings, Greta G; Ha, Christine; Fuentes, Jorge; Saltaji, Humam; Egger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    There is debate on how the methodological quality of clinical trials should be assessed. We compared trials of physical therapy (PT) judged to be of adequate quality based on summary scores from the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale with trials judged to be of adequate quality by Cochrane Risk of Bias criteria. Meta-epidemiological study within Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Meta-analyses of PT trials were identified in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each trial PeDro and Cochrane assessments were extracted from the PeDro and Cochrane databases. Adequate quality was defined as adequate generation of random sequence, concealment of allocation, and blinding of outcome assessors (Cochrane criteria) or as trials with a PEDro summary score ≥5 or ≥6 points. We combined trials of adequate quality using random-effects meta-analysis. Forty-one Cochrane reviews and 353 PT trials were included. All meta-analyses included trials with PEDro scores ≥5, 37 (90.2%) included trials with PEDro scores ≥6 and only 22 (53.7%) meta-analyses included trials of adequate quality according to the Cochrane criteria. Agreement between PeDro and Cochrane was poor for PeDro scores of ≥5 points (kappa = 0.12; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.16) and slight for ≥6 points (kappa 0.24; 95% CI 0.16-0.32). When combining effect sizes of trials deemed to be of adequate quality according to PEDro or Cochrane criteria, we found that a substantial difference in the combined effect size (≥0.15) was evident in 9 (22%) out of the 41 meta-analyses for PEDro cutoff ≥5 and 10 (24%) for cutoff ≥6. The PeDro and Cochrane approaches lead to different sets of trials of adequate quality, and different combined treatment estimates from meta-analyses of these trials. A consistent approach to assessing RoB in trials of physical therapy should be adopted.

  15. PEDro or Cochrane to Assess the Quality of Clinical Trials? A Meta-Epidemiological Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    Full Text Available There is debate on how the methodological quality of clinical trials should be assessed. We compared trials of physical therapy (PT judged to be of adequate quality based on summary scores from the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale with trials judged to be of adequate quality by Cochrane Risk of Bias criteria.Meta-epidemiological study within Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.Meta-analyses of PT trials were identified in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each trial PeDro and Cochrane assessments were extracted from the PeDro and Cochrane databases. Adequate quality was defined as adequate generation of random sequence, concealment of allocation, and blinding of outcome assessors (Cochrane criteria or as trials with a PEDro summary score ≥5 or ≥6 points. We combined trials of adequate quality using random-effects meta-analysis.Forty-one Cochrane reviews and 353 PT trials were included. All meta-analyses included trials with PEDro scores ≥5, 37 (90.2% included trials with PEDro scores ≥6 and only 22 (53.7% meta-analyses included trials of adequate quality according to the Cochrane criteria. Agreement between PeDro and Cochrane was poor for PeDro scores of ≥5 points (kappa = 0.12; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.16 and slight for ≥6 points (kappa 0.24; 95% CI 0.16-0.32. When combining effect sizes of trials deemed to be of adequate quality according to PEDro or Cochrane criteria, we found that a substantial difference in the combined effect size (≥0.15 was evident in 9 (22% out of the 41 meta-analyses for PEDro cutoff ≥5 and 10 (24% for cutoff ≥6.The PeDro and Cochrane approaches lead to different sets of trials of adequate quality, and different combined treatment estimates from meta-analyses of these trials. A consistent approach to assessing RoB in trials of physical therapy should be adopted.

  16. Cochrane Corner: Colchicine in acute and recurrent pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Daniel; Vaz-Carneiro, António; Costa, João

    2015-11-01

    The potential anti-inflammatory effect of colchicine has been explored in many conditions, including pericarditis. The Cochrane Collaboration Systematic Review included four randomized controlled trials enrolling 564 patients with acute pericarditis (two studies) or recurrent pericarditis (two studies), followed for a period of 20-24 months. Colchicine was associated with a significant reduction in short-term persistence of chest pain and in long-term risk of recurrence of pericarditis. No significant increase in overall adverse events was observed. Despite the available evidence, the use of colchicine in this context remains strictly off-label. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Extracts from the Cochrane Library: modifications of the Epley (canalith repositioning) maneuver for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Martin J; Eby, Thomas L; Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2012-09-01

    The "Cochrane Corner" is a quarterly section in the Journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features a Cochrane review "Modifications of the Epley (Canalith Repositioning) Manoeuvre for Posterior Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)" that finds no evidence of benefit for mastoid oscillation applied during the Epley maneuver nor any clinically important benefit for post-Epley postural restrictions in comparison with the Epley maneuver alone.

  18. Uit de Cochrane Library: Marginaal grotere genezingskans door antibioticabehandeling bij acute bacteriële conjunctivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamerlynck, J. V. T. H.; Rietveld, R. P.; Hooft, L.

    2007-01-01

    Acute bacterial conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently encountered ocular disorders in primary care. It is frequently self-limiting, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has led to concerns regarding antibiotic resistance. Therefore, a Cochrane systematic review of 5 randomised

  19. Uit de Cochrane Library: fosfodiësteraseremmers effectief bij diabetici met erectiestoornissen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamerlynck, J. V. Th H.; Middeldorp, S.; Hooft, L.

    2007-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common multifactorial complication of diabetes mellitus. In recent years, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have been introduced in the management of erectile dysfunction. A recent Cochrane systematic review assessed the effects ofPDE-5 inhibitors in patients with

  20. Glucocorticosteroids for primary sclerosing cholangitis. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have been suggested for primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is characterised by chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary tree.......Glucocorticosteroids have been suggested for primary sclerosing cholangitis, which is characterised by chronic inflammation and fibrosis in the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary tree....

  1. Interventions for paracetamol (acetaminophen) overdoses. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, J; Buckley, N; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    Poisoning with paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a common cause of hepatotoxicity in the Western World. Inhibition of absorption, removal from the vascular system, antidotes, and liver transplantation are interventions for paracetamol poisoning.......Poisoning with paracetamol (acetaminophen) is a common cause of hepatotoxicity in the Western World. Inhibition of absorption, removal from the vascular system, antidotes, and liver transplantation are interventions for paracetamol poisoning....

  2. Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farquhar, C.; Rishworth, J.R.; Brown, J.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Marjoribanks, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As many as one in six couples will encounter problems with fertility, defined as failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after regular intercourse for 12 months. Increasingly, couples are turning to assisted reproductive technology (ART) for help with conceiving and ultimately giving

  3. Evidence-based pain management and palliative care in issue four for 2009 of The Cochrane Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J

    2010-03-01

    The Cochrane Library of Systematic Reviews is published quarterly. Issue 4 for 2009 contains 4027 complete reviews, 1906 protocols for reviews in production, and 11447 one-page summaries of systematic reviews published in the general medical literature. In addition, there are citations of 600,000 randomized controlled trials, and 12,200 cited papers in the Cochrane methodology register. The health technology assessment database contains over 7500 citations. This edition of the Library contains 90 new reviews, of which 19 have potential relevance for practitioners in pain and palliative medicine.

  4. The first ever Cochrane event in Russia and Russian speaking countries - Cochrane Russia Launch - Evidence-based medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziganshina, Liliya Eugenevna; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Kazan hosted Russia's second International Conference QiQUM 2015 on Cochrane evidence for health policy, which was entirely independent of the pharmaceutical or other health industry, bringing together 259 participants from 11 countries and 13 regions of the Russian Federation. The Conference...... was greeted and endorsed by world leaders in Evidence-based medicine, health and pharmaceutical information, policy and regulation, and the World Health Organization. Participants discussed the professional and social problems arising from biased health information, unethical pharmaceutical promotion......, misleading reporting of clinical trials with consequent flaws in health care delivery and the role of Cochrane evidence for informed decisions and better health. The first in history Cochrane workshop, facilitated jointly by experts from Cochrane and the WHO, with 40 participants from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan...

  5. The first ever Cochrane event in Russia and Russian speaking countries - Cochrane Russia Launch - Evidence-based medicine: Achievements and barriers (QiQUM 2015) International Conference, Kazan, December 7-8, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshina, Liliya Eugenevna; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2016-01-01

    Kazan hosted Russia's second International Conference QiQUM 2015 on Cochrane evidence for health policy, which was entirely independent of the pharmaceutical or other health industry, bringing together 259 participants from 11 countries and 13 regions of the Russian Federation. The Conference was greeted and endorsed by world leaders in Evidence-based medicine, health and pharmaceutical information, policy and regulation, and the World Health Organization. Participants discussed the professional and social problems arising from biased health information, unethical pharmaceutical promotion, misleading reporting of clinical trials with consequent flaws in health care delivery and the role of Cochrane evidence for informed decisions and better health. The first in history Cochrane workshop, facilitated jointly by experts from Cochrane and the WHO, with 40 participants from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Russia introduced the concept of Cochrane systematic review and the Use of Cochrane evidence in WHO policy setting. Websites document conference materials and provide interface for future collaboration: http://kpfu.ru/biology-medicine/struktura-instituta/kafedry/kfikf/konferenciya/mezhdunarodnaya-konferenciya-39dokazatelnaya.html and http://russia.cochrane.org/news/international-conference.

  6. Cochrane Commentary: Probiotics For Prevention of Acute Upper Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics may improve a person's health by regulating their immune function. Some trials have shown that probiotic strains can prevent respiratory infections. Even though the previous version of our review showed benefits of probiotics for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), several new studies have been published. To assess the effectiveness and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose), compared with placebo, in the prevention of acute URTIs in people of all ages, who are at risk of acute URTIs. We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 6), MEDLINE (1950 to July week 3, 2014), EMBASE (1974 to July 2014), Web of Science (1900 to July 2014), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, which includes the China Biological Medicine Database (from 1978 to July 2014), the Chinese Medicine Popular Science Literature Database (from 2000 to July 2014) and the Masters Degree Dissertation of Beijing Union Medical College Database (from 1981 to July 2014). We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov for completed and ongoing trials on 31 July 2014. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing probiotics with placebo to prevent acute URTIs. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility and quality of trials, and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 13 RCTs, although we could only extract data to meta-analyze 12 trials, which involved 3720 participants including children, adults (aged around 40 years) and older people. We found that probiotics were better than placebo when measuring the number of participants experiencing episodes of acute URTI [at least one episode: odds ratio (OR): 0.53; 95% CI = 0.37-0.76, P Probiotics and placebo were similar when measuring the rate ratio of episodes of acute URTI (rate ratio: 0.83; 95% CI = 0.66-1.05, P = .12, very low quality evidence) and adverse

  7. Getting evidence into practice: the work of the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of care Group (EPOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowatt, G; Grimshaw, J M; Davis, D A; Mazmanian, P E

    2001-01-01

    Policy makers and continuing educators often face difficult decisions about which educational and quality assurance interventions to provide. Where possible, such decisions are best informed by rigorous evidence, such as that provided by systematic reviews. The Cochrane Collaboration is an international organization that aims to help people make well-informed decisions about health care by preparing, maintaining, and ensuring the accessibility of systematic reviews of the benefits and risks of health care interventions. International collaborative review groups prepare Cochrane reviews for publication in The Cochrane Library, a collection of databases available on CD-ROM and the World Wide Web and updated quarterly. The Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care Group (EPOC) aims to prepare and maintain systematic reviews of professional, financial, organizational, and regulatory interventions that are designed to improve professional practice and the delivery of effective health services. EPOC has 17 reviews and 20 protocols published in Issue 3, 2000, of the Cochrane Library, with further protocols in development. We also have undertaken an overview of previously published systematic reviews of professional behavior change strategies. Our specialized register contains details of over 1,800 studies that fall within the group's scope. Systematic reviews provide a valuable source of information for policy makers and educators involved in planning continuing education and quality assurance initiatives and organizational change. EPOC will attempt to keep the Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions informed on an ongoing basis about new systematic reviews that it produces in the area of continuing medical education and quality assurance.

  8. Uit de Cochrane Library: lokale toepassing van antibiotica effectiever dan systemische voor de behandeling van chronische otitis media met geperforeerd trommelvlies en purulente afscheiding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamerlynck, J. V. Th H.; van Benthem, P. P. G.; Scholten, R. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic suppurative otitis media with underlying persistent eardrum perforation is a common cause of preventable hearing impairment. A Cochrane systematic review compared topical treatment (antibiotics or antiseptics) with systemic antibiotics to identify which is best. Nine randomised controlled

  9. Diagnosis in vascular dementia, applying 'Cochrane diagnosis rules' to 'dementia diagnostic tools'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terence J; McCleery, Jenny

    2017-04-25

    In this issue of Clinical Science, Biesbroek and colleagues describe recent work on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based cerebral lesion location and its association with cognitive decline. The authors conclude that diagnostic neuroimaging in dementia should shift from whole-brain evaluation to focused quantitative analysis of strategic brain areas. This commentary uses the review of lesion location mapping to discuss broader issues around studies of dementia test strategies. We draw upon work completed by the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group designed to improve design, conduct and reporting of dementia biomarker studies. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. Archibald Cochrane: evidencia, efectividad y toma de decisiones en salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arantxa Fátima Hortiales González

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente, la Medicina Basada en Evidencia tiene un papel fundamental en la toma de decisiones médicas, ya que intenta, a través de los métodos de la ciencia, justificar las diferentes alternativas que se le pueden ofrecer a un paciente. Para entender la evolución histórica de esta forma de practicar la medicina, es necesario revisar la contribución de uno de los principales participantes en este movimiento cultural: Archibald Leman Cochrane, quien ayudó a definir el marco teórico que ha permitido incorporar la ciencia a la práctica de la medicina. Su papel, al insistir en la necesidad de integrar la evidencia científica y conjuntarla con la experiencia clínica, constituyó un elemento fundamental y decisivo en el desarrollo de una nueva disciplina, la Medicina Basada en Evidencia.

  11. [Cochrane EPOC group: closing the gap between quality assurance and organization of care research and front line professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, P L; Castelli, B; McCauley, L; Grilli, R; Auxilia, F

    2005-01-01

    Keeping physicians informed on an ongoing basis is a new challenge for continuing medical education and quality assurance. In Italy over the last 5 years interest in evidence based literature is growing. This is demonstrated by the launch of an Italian edition of Clinical Evidence and by the growing number of guidelines and systematic reviews produced by Italian authors and institutions. However, there is some uncertainty concerning the familiarity of Italian policy makers and public health physicians with the evidence-based resources, including also how to access them. This article attempts to close this gap, by describing the activities of the Cochrane Collaboration and, within it, of the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC), both aim to prepare and maintaining SR of health care interventions. Specifically, the EPOC group develops systematic reviews of professional, financial, organisational and regulatory interventions that are designed to improve professional practice and the delivery of effective health services. EPOC has 31 reviews and 24 protocols published in Issue 4, 2004 of the Cochrane Library and has developed standard methods to assist people, such as quality criteria for study design specific to health services research. The EPOC specialized register contains details of over 2200 studies that fall within the group's scope. Systematic reviews provide a valuable and efficient source of information for policy makers and health care professionals aimed at implementing effective and efficient strategies to encourage medical behavioural change and deliver of high quality services.

  12. False-positive findings in Cochrane meta-analyses with and without application of trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imberger, Georgina; Thorlund, Kristian; Gluud, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many published meta-analyses are underpowered. We explored the role of trial sequential analysis (TSA) in assessing the reliability of conclusions in underpowered meta-analyses. METHODS: We screened The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and selected 100 meta-analyses with a binary...... new trial. For each false positive, we performed TSA, using three different approaches. RESULTS: We screened 4736 systematic reviews to find 100 meta-analyses that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Using conventional cumulative meta-analysis, false positives were present in seven of the meta......-analyses (7%, 95% CI 3% to 14%), occurring more than once in three. The total number of false positives was 14 and TSA prevented 13 of these (93%, 95% CI 68% to 98%). In a post hoc analysis, we found that Cochrane meta-analyses that are negative are 1.67 times more likely to be updated (95% CI 0.92 to 2...

  13. [Cochrane Corner: Intra-aortic balloon pump in patients with cardiogenic shock following myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Daniel; Pereira, Hélder; Costa, João; Vaz-Carneiro, António

    2016-04-01

    Improvement of hemodynamic parameters is the rationale for the use of intra-aortic balloon pump counterpulsation (IABP) in patients with cardiogenic shock following acute myocardial infarction (MI). This Cochrane systematic review evaluated the impact of this intervention in reducing mortality. Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 790 patients were included (four using medical therapy as a comparator, and three comparing IABP with other ventricular assist devices). IABP did not reduce mortality in either the short or long term. Therefore, the systematic use of IABP in patients with cardiogenic shock following MI cannot be recommended. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Social Media for the Dissemination of Cochrane Child Health Evidence: Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Michele P; Newton, Amanda S; Shave, Kassi; Featherstone, Robin M; Thomson, Denise; Wingert, Aireen; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    Health care providers value ready access to reliable synthesized information to support point-of-care decision making. Web-based communities, facilitated by the adoption of social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, are increasingly being used for knowledge dissemination, bridging the gap between knowledge generation and synthesis and knowledge implementation. Our objective was to implement and evaluate a structured social media strategy, using multiple platforms, to disseminate Cochrane Child Health evidence to health care providers caring for children. Our social media strategy had three components: daily "tweets" using the Cochrane Child Health Twitter account, weekly WordPress blog posts, and a monthly journal club on Twitter ("tweet chat"). Each tweet, blog, and journal club shared Cochrane evidence on a child health topic. We evaluated the strategy through (1) Twitter and blog site analytics, (2) traceable link (Bitly) statistics, (3) Altmetric.com scores for promoted evidence, and (4) participant feedback. We also tracked the resources required to write the blog, tweet content, and manage the strategy. The 22-week social media strategy ran between November 2014 and April 2015. We created 25 blog posts, sent 585 tweets, and hosted 3 tweet chats. Monthly blog visits and views and Twitter account followers increased over time. During the study period, the blog received 2555 visitors and 3967 page views from a geographically diverse audience of health care providers, academics, and health care organizations. In total, 183 traceable Bitly links received 3463 clicks, and the Twitter account gained 469 new followers. The most visited and viewed blog posts included gastrointestinal topics (lactose avoidance), research on respiratory conditions (honey for cough and treatments for asthma), and maternal newborn care (skin-to-skin contact). On Twitter, popular topics were related to public health (vaccination) and pain management. We collected Altmetric

  15. Lifestyle Factors in Hypertension Drug Research: Systematic Analysis of Articles in a Leading Cochrane Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan E. Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Established standards for first-line hypertension management include lifestyle modification and behavior change. The degree to which and how lifestyle modification is systematically integrated into studies of first-line drug management for hypertension is of methodological and clinical relevance. This study systematically reviewed the methodology of articles from a recent Cochrane review that had been designed to inform first-line medical treatment of hypertension and was representative of high quality established clinical trials in the field. Source articles (n=34 were systematically reviewed for lifestyle interventions including smoking cessation, diet, weight loss, physical activity and exercise, stress reduction, and moderate alcohol consumption. 54% of articles did not mention lifestyle modification; 46% contained nonspecific descriptions of interventions. We contend that hypertension management research trials (including drug studies need to elucidate the benefits and risks of drug-lifestyle interaction, to support the priority of lifestyle modification, and that lifestyle modification, rather than drugs, is seen by patients and the public as a priority for health professionals. The inclusion of lifestyle modification strategies in research designs for hypertension drug trials could enhance current research, from trial efficacy to clinical outcome effectiveness, and align hypertension best practices of a range of health professionals with evidence-based knowledge translation.

  16. Systemic wound care: a meta-review of cochrane systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Santema, Trientje B.; Stoekenbroek, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Wound care is a classic example of a surgical realm with a great variation in care. The diversity in wounds and wound treatments, the limited amount of convincing evidence, and the diverging opinions among doctors and nurses involved in wound care contribute to this undesirable variation in care.

  17. Uit de Cochrane Library: met postmenopauzale hormonale substitutietherapie geen bescherming tegen hart-vaatziekte, wel meer kans op veneuze trombo-embolie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamerlynck, J. V. Th H.; Middeldorp, S.; Scholten, R. J. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Observational studies in the early nineteen-nineties have strongly suggested that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has benefits for reducing cardiovascular events in postmenopausal women. A recent Cochrane systematic review assessed the effects of HRT in primary and secondary prevention of

  18. Psychosocial interventions to reduce alcohol consumption in concurrent problem alcohol and illicit drug users: Cochrane Reviewa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimas Jan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem alcohol use is common among illicit drug users and is associated with adverse health outcomes. It is also an important factor in poor prognosis among drug users with hepatitis C virus (HCV as it impacts progression to hepatic cirrhosis or opiate overdose in opioid users. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of psychosocial interventions for problem alcohol use in adult illicit drug users with concurrent problem alcohol use (principally, problem drug users of opiates and stimulants. Methods We searched the following databases (November 2011: Cochrane Library, PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and reference list of articles. We also searched conference proceedings and online registers of clinical trials. Two reviewers independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data from included randomized controlled trials. Results Four studies (594 participants were included in this review. Half of the trials were rated as having a high or unclear risk of bias. The four studies considered six different psychosocial interventions grouped into four comparisons: 1 cognitive-behavioral coping skills training versus 12-step facilitation (N = 41, 2 brief intervention versus treatment as usual (N = 110, 3 hepatitis health promotion versus motivational interviewing (N = 256, and 4 brief motivational intervention versus assessment-only group (N = 187. Differences between studies precluded any pooling of data. Findings are described for each trial individually. Most findings were not statistically significant except for comparison 2: decreased alcohol use at three months (risk ratio (RR 0.32; 95% confidence interval (CI 0.19 to 0.54 and nine months (RR 0.16; 95% CI 0.08 to 0.33 in the treatment-as-usual group and comparison 4: reduced alcohol use in the brief motivational intervention (RR 1.67; 95% CI 1.08 to 2.60. Conclusions No conclusion can be made because of the paucity of the data and the low quality of the

  19. Cochrane in context: Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tiffany; Stang, Antonia S; Ganshorn, Heather; Hartling, Lisa; Maconochie, Ian K; Thomsen, Anna M; Johnson, David W

    2014-09-01

    Health-care professionals frequently recommend fever treatment regimens for children who either combine paracetamol and ibuprofen or alternate them.However, there is uncertainty about whether these regimens are better than using single agents and about the adverse effect profile of combination regimens. To assess the results and side effects of combining paracetamol and ibuprofen, or alternating them in consecutive treatments, compared with monotherapy for treating fever in children. In September 2013, we searched Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (2009-2011). We included randomized controlled trials that compared alternating or combined paracetamol and ibuprofen regimens with monotherapy in children with fever. One review author and two assistants independently screened the searches and applied the inclusion criteria. Two authors assessed risk of bias and graded the evidence independently. We conducted various analyses for different comparison groups (combined therapy versus monotherapy, alternating therapy versus monotherapy and combined therapy versus alternating therapy). Six studies, enrolling 915 participants, are included. Compared to administering a single antipyretic alone, administering combined paracetamol and ibuprofen to febrile children can result in a lower mean temperature at 1 hour after treatment (mean difference -0.27 ∘C, 95% confidence interval -0.45 to -0.08, two trials, 163 participants, moderate quality evidence). If no further antipyretics are given, combined treatment probably also results in a lower mean temperature at 4 hours (mean difference -0.70 ∘C, 95% confidence interval -1.05 to -0.35, two trials, 196 participants, moderate quality evidence), and in fewer children remaining or becoming febrile for at least 4 hours after treatment (relative risk 0.08, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0

  20. Empirical likelihood inference for the Rao-Hartley-Cochran sampling design

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Yves G.

    2016-01-01

    The Hartley-Rao-Cochran sampling design is an unequal probability sampling design which can be used to select samples from finite populations. We propose to adjust the empirical likelihood approach for the Hartley-Rao-Cochran sampling design. The approach proposed intrinsically incorporates sampling weights, auxiliary information and allows for large sampling fractions. It can be used to construct confidence intervals. In a simulation study, we show that the coverage may be better for the emp...

  1. User experiences of evidence-based online resources for health professionals: User testing of The Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenton Claire

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based decision making relies on easy access to trustworthy research results. The Cochrane Library is a key source of evidence about the effect of interventions and aims to "promote the accessibility of systematic reviews to anyone wanting to make a decision about health care". We explored how health professionals found, used and experienced The Library, looking at facets of user experience including findability, usability, usefulness, credibility, desirability and value. Methods We carried out 32 one-hour usability tests on participants from Norway and the UK. Participants both browsed freely and attempted to perform individually tailored tasks while "thinking aloud". Sessions were recorded and viewed in real time by researchers. Transcriptions and videos were reviewed by one researcher and one designer. Findings reported here reflect issues receiving a high degree of saturation and that we judge to be critical to the user experience of evidence-based web sites, based on principles for usability heuristics, web guidelines and evidence-based practice. Results Participants had much difficulty locating both the site and its contents. Non-native English speakers were at an extra disadvantage when retrieving relevant documents despite high levels of English-language skills. Many participants displayed feelings of ineptitude, alienation and frustration. Some made serious mistakes in correctly distinguishing between different information types, for instance reviews, review protocols, and individual studies. Although most expressed a high regard for the site's credibility, some later displayed a mistrust of the independence of the information. Others were overconfident, thinking everything on The Cochrane Library site shared the same level of quality approval. Conclusion Paradoxically, The Cochrane Library, established to support easy access to research evidence, has its own problems of accessibility. Health professionals

  2. Cochrane meta-analysis: teicoplanin versus vancomycin for proven or suspected infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Diniz Gomes Bugano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare efficacy and safety of vancomycin versusteicoplanin in patients with proven or suspected infection.Methods: Data Sources: Cochrane Renal Group’s SpecializedRegister, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, nephrology textbooksand review articles. Inclusion criteria: Randomized controlled trialsin any language comparing teicoplanin to vancomycin for patientswith proven or suspected infection. Data extraction: Two authorsindependently evaluated methodological quality and extracted data.Study investigators were contacted for unpublished information. Arandom effect model was used to estimate the pooled risk ratio (RRwith 95% confidence interval (CI. Results: A total of 24 studies (2,610patients were included. The drugs had similar rates of clinical cure(RR: 1.03; 95%CI: 0.98-1.08, microbiological cure (RR: 0.98; 95%CI:0.93-1.03 and mortality (RR: 1.02; 95%CI: 0.79-1.30. Teicoplaninhad lower rates of skin rash (RR: 0.57; 95%CI: 0.35-0.92, red mansyndrome (RR: 0.21; 95%CI: 0.08-0.59 and total adverse events (RR:0.73; 95%CI: 0.53-1.00. Teicoplanin reduced the risk of nephrotoxicity(RR: 0.66; 95%CI: 0.48-0.90. This effect was consistent for patientsreceiving aminoglycosides (RR: 0.51; 95%CI: 0.30-0.88 or havingvancomycin doses corrected by serum levels (RR: 0.22; 95%CI:0.10-0.52. There were no cases of acute kidney injury needingdialysis. Limitations: Studies lacked a standardized definition fornephrotoxicity. Conclusions: Teicoplanin and vancomycin are equallyeffective; however the incidence of nephrotoxicity and other adverseevents was lower with teicoplanin. It may be reasonable to considerteicoplanin for patients at higher risk for acute kidney injury.

  3. Are the Cochrane group registers comprehensive? A case study of Japanese psychiatry trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire Hugh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Language bias is a form of publication bias and constitutes a serious threat to meta-analyses. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register is one attempt to remedy this and now contains more than 300,000 citations. However we are still unsure if it provides comprehensive coverage, particularly for non-English trials. Methods We have recently established a comprehensive register of Japanese trials of psychotropic drugs through extensive personal contacts, electronic searches and handsearches. We examined two Cochrane psychiatry group registers against this Japanese database. Results The Japanese register contained 56 reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs of antidepressants for depression but the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis group register contained 18, with an overlap of only nine. The Japanese register contained 61 reports of RCTs of neuroleptics for schizophrenia and the Cochrane Schizophrenia group register contained 36, with an overlap of only six. Taking account of some duplicate publications, only a quarter to a third of all relevant Japanese RCTs were retrievable from the Cochrane group registers. Conclusions Similar, or worse, yields may be expected with RCTs conducted in other East Asian countries, and in other fields of medicine. What evidence there is suggests that this situation may lead to a systematic over estimate of treatment effect.

  4. Core outcome sets in dermatology: report from the second meeting of the International Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, J; Jacobi, L; Hahnel, E; Alam, M; Balzer, K; Beeckman, D; Busard, C; Chalmers, J; Deckert, S; Eleftheriadou, V; Furlan, K; Horbach, S E R; Kirkham, J; Nast, A; Spuls, P; Thiboutot, D; Thorlacius, L; Weller, K; Williams, H C; Schmitt, J

    2018-02-14

    Results of clinical trials are the most important information source for generating external clinical evidence. The use of different outcomes across trials, which investigate similar interventions for similar patient groups, significantly limits the interpretation, comparability and clinical application of trial results. Core outcome sets (COSs) aim to overcome this limitation. A COS is an agreed standardized collection of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all clinical trials for a specific clinical condition. The Core Outcome Set Initiative within the Cochrane Skin Group (CSG-COUSIN) supports the development of core outcomes in dermatology. In the second CSG-COUSIN meeting held in 2017, 11 COS development groups working on skin diseases presented their current work. The presentations and discussions identified the following overarching methodological challenges for COS development in dermatology: it is not always easy to define the disease focus of a COS; the optimal method for outcome domain identification and level of detail needed to specify such domains is challenging to many; decision rules within Delphi surveys need to be improved; appropriate ways of patient involvement are not always clear. In addition, there appear to be outcome domains that may be relevant as potential core outcome domains for the majority of skin diseases. The close collaboration between methodologists in the Core Outcome Set Initiative and the international Cochrane Skin Group has major advantages for trialists, systematic reviewers and COS developers. © 2018 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Chinese medicinal herbs for chronic hepatitis B. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J P; Lin, Haili; McIntosh, H

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is a serious health problem worldwide. Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs have been widely used to treat chronic liver diseases, and many controlled trials have been done to investigate their efficacy.......Hepatitis B virus infection is a serious health problem worldwide. Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs have been widely used to treat chronic liver diseases, and many controlled trials have been done to investigate their efficacy....

  6. Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss: a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Jos H.; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Mischke, Christina

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of interventions for preventing occupational noise exposure or hearing loss compared to no intervention or alternative interventions. We searched biomedical databases up to 25 January 2012 for randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled before-after studies and

  7. Interventions to prevent occupational noise-induced hearing loss: A Cochrane systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Jos H.; Kateman, Erik; Morata, Thais C.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Mischke, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of interventions for preventing occupational noise exposure or hearing loss compared to no intervention or alternative interventions. Design We searched biomedical databases up to 25 January 2012 for randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled before-after studies and interrupted time-series of hearing loss prevention among workers exposed to noise. Study sample We included 19 studies with 82 794 participants evaluating effects of hearing loss prevention programs (HLPP). The overall quality of studies was low to very low, as rated using the GRADE approach. Results One study of stricter legislation showed a favorable effect on noise levels. Three studies, of which two RCTs, did not find an effect of a HLPP. Four studies showed that better use of hearing protection devices in HLPPs decreased the risk of hearing loss. In four other studies, workers in a HLPP still had a 0.5 dB greater hearing loss at 4 kHz (95% CI – 0.5 to 1.7) than non-exposed workers. In two similar studies there was a substantial risk of hearing loss in spite of a HLPP. Conclusions Stricter enforcement of legislation and better implementation of HLPPs can reduce noise levels in workplaces. Better evaluations of technical interventions and long-term effects are needed. PMID:24564697

  8. Comment on: "Cell Therapy for Heart Disease: Trial Sequential Analyses of Two Cochrane Reviews"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Nielsen, Emil Eik; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Trial Sequential Analysis is a frequentist method to help researchers control the risks of random errors in meta-analyses (1). Fisher and colleagues used Trial Sequential Analysis on cell therapy for heart diseases (2). The present article discusses the usefulness of Trial Sequential Analysis...

  9. Physical activity and exercise for chronic pain in adults: an overview of Cochrane Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Geneen, Louise J.; Moore, R Andrew; Clarke, Clare; Martin, Denis; Lesley A Colvin; Smith, Blair H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is defined as pain lasting beyond normal tissue healing time, generally taken to be 12 weeks. It contributes to disability, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and healthcare costs. Chronic pain has a weighted mean prevalence in adults of 20%. For many years, the treatment choice for chronic pain included recommendations for rest and inactivity. However, exercise may have specific benefits in reducing the severity of chronic pain, as well as ...

  10. Medicinal herbs for hepatitis C virus infection. Protokol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J P; Manheimer, E; Tsutani, K

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem world-wide. Medicinal herbs are increasingly being used for hepatitis C.......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem world-wide. Medicinal herbs are increasingly being used for hepatitis C....

  11. Cochrane review abstracts: The psychological effects of the physical healthcare environment on healthcare personnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, K.; Pieterse, Marcel E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The physical healthcare environment is capable of affecting patients. This concept of 'healing environments' refers to the psychological impact of environmental stimuli through sensory perceptions. It excludes more physiological effects such as those produced by ergonomic (i.e. fall

  12. Aromatase inhibitors for subfertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome: summary of a Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franik, S.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Farquhar, C.; Marjoribanks, J.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common cause of anovulatory subfertility. We evaluated the effectiveness and safety of aromatase inhibitors compared with other methods of ovulation induction in women with anovulatory PCOS.

  13. Antioxidant supplements for preventing gastrointestinal cancers. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, G; Nikolova, D; Simonetti, R G

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory.......Oxidative stress may cause gastrointestinal cancers. The evidence on whether antioxidant supplements are effective in preventing gastrointestinal cancers is contradictory....

  14. Chinese medicinal herbs for asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus infection. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J P; Lin, Haili; McIntosh, H

    2000-01-01

    About 350 million people are chronically infected carriers of hepatitis B virus and are at a higher risk of serious illness and death from cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer. Chinese medicinal herbs have been used widely for more than 2000 years to treat chronic liver disease....

  15. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease the degree of allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium...

  16. Conservative treatment of acute knee osteoarthritis: A review of the Cochrane Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerito Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Five main strategies for the conservative treatment of knee osteoarthritis exist that must be used before indicating surgical treatment: medical treatment, physical medicine and rehabilitation, intra-articular injections, acupuncture, and self-management education programs.

  17. Dealing with substantial heterogeneity in Cochrane reviews. Cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Jeppe B.; Moustgaard, Rasmus; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    Dealing with heterogeneity in meta-analyses is often tricky, and there is only limited advice for authors on what to do. We investigated how authors addressed different degrees of heterogeneity, in particular whether they used a fixed effect model, which assumes that all the included studies...

  18. Colchicine for alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2000-01-01

    The majority of liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis cases in the Western World is caused by alcohol and hepatotoxic viruses. Colchicine is an anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic medication. Several randomised clinical trials have addressed the question whether colchicine has any efficacy in patients...

  19. Meta-analysis: antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding - an updated Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez-Tapia, N C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T; Tellez-Avila, F

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention.......Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention....

  20. Systematic reviews of herbal medicines--an annotated bibliography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, K.; ter Riet, G.; Hondras, M.; Vickers, A.; Saller, R.; Melchart, D.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials on herbal medicines. METHODS: Potentially relevant reviews were searched through the register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and bibliographies of

  1. Empirical Likelihood Confidence Intervals under the Rao-Hartley-Cochran Sampling Design

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Yves G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hartley-Rao-Cochran (RHC) sampling design (Rao et al., 1962) is a popular unequal probability sampling design. We show how empirical likelihood confidence intervals can be derived under this sampling design. Berger and De La Riva Torres (2012) proposed an empirical likelihood approach which can be used for point estimation and to construct confidence intervals under complex sampling designs. We show how this approach can be adjusted for the RHC sampling design. The proposed approach intri...

  2. RSCABS: An R package for performing the Rao-Scott Adjusted Cochran-Armitage trend test By Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSCABS[3] (Rao-Scott adjusted Cochran-Armitage trend test By Slices) is a modification to the Rao-Scott[5] adjusted Cochran-Armitage trend test[1, 2] that allows for testing at each individual severity score often seen in histopathological data. The test was originally developed ...

  3. Gastric banding or bypass? A systematic review comparing the two most popular bariatric procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tice, JA

    2008-01-01

    .... The MEDLINE database (1966 to January 2007), Cochrane clinical trials database, Cochrane reviews database, and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were searched using the key terms gastroplasty, gastric bypass, laparoscopy, Swedish...

  4. Adverse effects of biologics: a network meta-analysis and Cochrane overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. A.; Wells, G. A.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. While the efficacy of biologics has been established, there is uncertainty regarding the adverse effects of this treatment. Since serious risks such as tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, serious...... infections, and lymphomas may be common to the biologics but occur in small numbers across the various indications, we planned to combine the results from biologics used in many conditions to obtain the much needed risk estimates. Objectives To compare the adverse effects of tumor necrosis factor blocker...... controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and open-label extension (OLE) studies that studied one of the nine biologics for use in any indication (with the exception of HIV/AIDS) and that reported our pre-specified adverse outcomes were considered for inclusion. We searched The Cochrane...

  5. Dr Robert Greenhill Cochrane CMG MD FRCP DTM&H: leprologist par excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, A

    1996-08-01

    Dr Robert Cochrane devoted his entire working life to the study and control of leprosy. Most of his working life was spent in India, with interludes in Britain and East Africa. He initiated epidemiological surveys of leprosy, was instrumental in the introduction of sulphones for the definitive therapy of the disease, and contributed significantly to the development of rehabilitation programmes for sufferers from the disease. He campaigned actively for altering social attitudes to leprosy and latterly was in favour of replacing the often pejorative term with that of Hansen's disease. A devout Christian, he believed strongly in setting an example for others as an important means of introducing them to Christianity. At the same time, he was not a taciturn individual and had a well developed sense of humour.

  6. Differentiating the Cochran-Armitage Trend Test and Pearson's χ2 Test: Location and Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengyang; Ku, Hung-Chih; Huang, Zhipeng; Xing, Guan; Xing, Chao

    2017-09-01

    In genetic case-control association studies, a standard practice is to perform the Cochran-Armitage (CA) trend test with 1 degree-of-freedom (d.f.) under the assumption of an additive model. However, when the true genetic model is recessive or near recessive, it is outperformed by Pearson's χ2 test with 2 d.f. In this article, we analytically reveal the statistical basis that leads to the phenomenon. First, we show that the CA trend test examines the location shift between the case and control groups, whereas Pearson's χ2 test examines both the location and dispersion shifts between the two groups. Second, we show that under the additive model, the effect of location deviation outweighs that of the dispersion deviation and vice versa under a near recessive model. Therefore, Pearson's χ2 test is a more robust test than the CA trend test, and it outperforms the latter when the mode of inheritance evolves to the recessive end. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  7. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy: a systematic review of international clinical practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillon, Tessa E. R.; Pels, Anouk; von Dadelszen, Peter; MacDonell, Karen; Magee, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are developed to assist health care providers in decision-making. We systematically reviewed existing CPGs on the HDPs (hypertensive disorders of pregnancy) to inform clinical practice. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane

  8. Exercise therapy and other types of physical therapy for patients with neuromuscular diseases: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cup, E.H.C.; Pieterse, A.J.; Broek-Pastoor, J.M. Ten; Munneke, M.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Hendricks, H.T.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and critically appraise the available evidence on exercise therapy and other types of physical therapies for patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMD). DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, CINAHL,

  9. SEED: a tool for disseminating systematic review data into Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lena; Friedel, Johannes; Adams, Clive E

    2017-10-17

    Wikipedia, the free-content online encyclopaedia, contains many heavily accessed pages relating to healthcare. Cochrane systematic reviews contain much high-grade evidence but dissemination into Wikipedia has been slow. New skills are needed to both translate and relocate data from Cochrane reviews to implant into Wikipedia pages. This letter introduces a programme to greatly simplify the process of disseminating the summary of findings of Cochrane reviews into Wikipedia pages.

  10. 77 FR 65545 - Mr. Jesse S. Capel and Mr. Hilton J. Cochran; EWP LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... the Eury Dam Project No. 4815, originally issued February 7, 1983,\\1\\ and transferred to EWP LLC by application.\\2\\ The project is located on the Little River in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The transfer... Energy Regulatory Commission Mr. Jesse S. Capel and Mr. Hilton J. Cochran; EWP LLC; Notice of Transfer of...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 264 - Cochran's Approximation to the Behrens-Fisher Students' t-test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Table III of “Statistical Tables for Biological, Agricultural, and Medical Research” (1947, R. A. Fisher... found in Statistical Methods (6th Edition, Section 4.14) by G. W. Snedecor and W. G. Cochran, or... summary measures to calculate a t-statistic (t*) and a comparison t-statistic (tc). The t* value is...

  12. Diet and nutrition advice from the Cochrane Library: is it useful for the consumers and family physicians?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasser, M.; Binsbergen, J.J. van; Javaheri, H.; Yassiny, K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of nutrition in public health is well established. This raises the need for reliable and up to date evidence and its ready accessibility for health professionals and consumers. OBJECTIVES: The principal objectives are to evaluate whether nutrition-related Cochrane Systematic

  13. Grommets - an update on common indications for tympanostomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otolaryngology–. Head and Neck Surgery. 2013;149(1) Suppl:S1-S35. 4. Klein J, Pelton S. Otitis media with effusion (serous otitis media) in children. UpToDate Waltham, MA. 2012. 5. Rosenfeld RM, Shin JJ, Schwartz SR, Coggins R, Gagnon L, Hackell JM, et al. Clinical practice guideline: otitis media with effusion (update).

  14. Grommets - an update on common indications for tympanostomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is defined as middle-ear effusion. (MEE) without acute signs of infection4 (Figure 1). It is common;. 90% of children have OME before school age, experiencing, on average, 4 episodes of OME per year.5 The prevalence of OME in children with Down Syndrome or cleft palate is much higher.

  15. A Cochrane review on brain [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in dementia: limitations and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morbelli, Silvia [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine Unit, IRCCS San Martino - IST, Department of Health Sciences, Genoa (Italy); Garibotto, Valentina [Geneva University and Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Medical Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); Giessen, Elsmarieke van de [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arbizu, Javier [University of Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Chetelat, Gael [Inserm, U1077, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, UMR-S1077, Caen (France); Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen (France); CHU de Caen, U1077, Caen (France); Drezgza, Alexander [Universitaet zu Koeln, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Koeln (Germany); Hesse, Swen [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Law, Ian [Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Pappata' , Sabina [Institute of Biostructure and Bioimaging, CNR, Naples (Italy); Payoux, Pierre [INSERM UMR 825 Toulouse Univ., Imagerie Cerebrale et Handicaps Neurologiques (France); Pagani, Marco [Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Technologies, CNR, Rome (Italy); Karolinska Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    2015-09-15

    Based on a large body of evidence on its diagnostic sensitivity for the identification of AD, in 2004 [18F]FDG PET imaging was approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS, USA) as a routine examination tool for early and differential diagnosis of AD. Since then, large amounts of additional [18F]FDG PET data have become available showing that the addition of [18F]FDG PET to clinical examinations increases diagnostic accuracy in identifying AD patients even in the predementia stage. Of course, new opportunities and new challenges are coming up, which require the definition of the specific role of [18F]FDG PET in the era of AD biomarkers (i.e. relationship with other biomarkers and role as a marker of progression in AD [46, 48]). Meanwhile, in daily clinical practice, nuclear medicine experts should continue to perform high-quality [18F]FDG PET scans, constantly improving the standard through continuous education and the use of appropriate tools, knowing that it is one of the most informative biomarkers currently available for the prediction of dementia at the MCI stage.

  16. Do psychological treatments reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder? Evidence update - Summary of a Cochrane Review

    OpenAIRE

    Effective Health Care Research Consortium

    2008-01-01

    Trauma focused cognitive behavioural therapy (TFCBT), eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR), stress management, and group TFCBT reduce traumatic symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder.

  17. What is a clinical pathway? Refinement of an operational definition to identify clinical pathway studies for a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K. Lawal (Adegboyega K.); T. Rotter (Thomas); L. Kinsman (Leigh); A. Machotta (Andreas); U. Ronellenfitsch (Ulrich); S.D. Scott (Shannon D.); D. Goodridge (Donna); C. Plishka (Christopher); G. Groot (Gary)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractClinical pathways (CPWs) are a common component in the quest to improve the quality of health. CPWs are used to reduce variation, improve quality of care, and maximize the outcomes for specific groups of patients. An ongoing challenge is the operationalization of a definition of CPW in

  18. [Comparison of application of Cochran-Armitage trend test and linear regression analysis for rate trend analysis in epidemiology study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D Z; Wang, C; Shen, C F; Zhang, Y; Zhang, H; Song, G D; Xue, X D; Xu, Z L; Zhang, S; Jiang, G H

    2017-05-10

    We described the time trend of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) from 1999 to 2013 in Tianjin incidence rate with Cochran-Armitage trend (CAT) test and linear regression analysis, and the results were compared. Based on actual population, CAT test had much stronger statistical power than linear regression analysis for both overall incidence trend and age specific incidence trend (Cochran-Armitage trend P value

  19. Effectiveness of antibiotics given before admission in reducing mortality from meningococcal disease: systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahné, Susan J M; Charlett, André; Purcell, Bernadette; Samuelsson, Susanne; Camaroni, Ivonne; Ehrhard, Ingrid; Heuberger, Sigrid; Santamaria, Maria; Stuart, James M

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence for effectiveness of treatment with antibiotics before admission in reducing case fatality from meningococcal disease. DESIGN: Systematic review. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane register of trials and systematic reviews, database of abstracts of reviews of effectiveness,

  20. Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Non-medical Prescribing versus Medical Prescribing for Acute and Chronic Disease Management in Primary and Secondary Care. Cochrane Database Syst Ver. 2016;11:CD011227.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Silva Duarte

    2017-01-01

    of evidence, among others. Prescription by pharmacists and nurses with different levels of undergraduate, specific and postgraduate education could provide comparable outcomes to medical prescription, specifically with regards to adherence to therapy, adverse events, overall satisfaction, quality of life, and resource utilisation (hospitalisations, visits to the emergency department, and consultations. Non-medical prescribers frequently had medical support available to facilitate a collaborative practice. With appropriate training and support, non-medical prescription by nurses and pharmacists can be as effective as when carried out by doctors.

  1. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane index most primary studies but not abstracts included in orthopedic meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobogean, Gerard P; Verma, Ashim; Giustini, Dean; Slobogean, Bronwyn L; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2009-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that all primary studies used in orthopedic meta-analyses are indexed in MEDLINE or EMBASE. Using MEDLINE from 1995 to 2005, we retrieved all published meta-analyses of orthopedic surgical interventions. The primary studies in each meta-analysis were defined as the "gold standard" set. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for each primary study, and a recall rate was calculated. Secondary searches were performed using Web of Science (WoS), the Cochrane databases, and CINAHL. High recall rates were achieved searching MEDLINE (90%) and EMBASE (81%) for the gold standard set, and the combined search retrieved 91%. Titles not indexed by MEDLINE or EMBASE included 45 abstracts, eight journal articles, and three unpublished studies. Searching the Cochrane databases yielded 36 titles not in MEDLINE or EMBASE. Using all three databases produced 97% recall of the primary studies; WoS and CINAHL did not increase the recall rate. These results suggest that a very high percentage of primary research in orthopedics can be found using the major databases. Additional database searches are unlikely to increase the yield of published manuscripts; however, conference proceedings and journal supplements should still be searched to ensure that relevant remaining reports are identified.

  2. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from COCHRANE in the South China Sea and other seas from 09 January 1987 to 22 February 1987 (NODC Accession 8700095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT from the COCHRANE in the South China and other seas. Data were collected from 09 January...

  3. The use of systematic reviews in clinical trials and narrative reviews in dermatology: is the best evidence being used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Taboada, A; Aranegui, B; García-Doval, I; Dávila-Seijo, P; González-Castro, U

    2014-04-01

    Systematic reviews -the most comprehensive type of literature review-should be taken into account before a clinical trial or a narrative review on a topic is undertaken. The objective of this study was to describe the use of systematic reviews in clinical trials and narrative reviews in dermatology. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. We selected randomized clinical trials and narrative reviews from the dermatological clinical research journals identified as most important (according to impact factor) and from Actas Dermosifiliográficas, and studied the bibliographies to ascertain whether the authors made reference to existing systematic reviews and Cochrane reviews. Of the 72 clinical trials for which a systematic review was available, 24 (33.3%) cited at least 1 review; reference was made to relevant Cochrane reviews in 15.6% of cases and to non-Cochrane reviews in 32%. In the case of the 24 narrative reviews for which a review was available, 10 (41.7%) cited at least 1 review; Cochrane reviews were cited in 20% and non-Cochrane reviews in 35.3%.In the case of Actas Dermosifiliográficas, very few clinical trials were found and the findings for narrative review articles were similar to those observed for the other journals. Systematic reviews are not often taken into account by the authors of clinical trials and narrative reviews and this may lead to redundant studies and publications. Authors appear to use Cochrane reviews even less than non-Cochrane reviews and are therefore ignoring one of the main sources of available evidence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Chess

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical heterogeneity can be defined as differences in participant characteristics, types or timing of outcome measurements and intervention characteristics. Clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews has the possibility to significantly affect statistical heterogeneity leading to inaccurate conclusions and misled decision making. The aim of this study is to identify to what extent investigators are assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods The most recent 100 systematic reviews from the top five journals in medicine—JAMA, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, The Lancet, and PLOS Medicine—and the 100 most recently published and/or updated systematic reviews from Cochrane were collected. Various defined items of clinical heterogeneity were extracted from the included reviews. Investigators used chi-squared tests, logarithmic modeling and linear regressions to determine if the presence of such items served as a predictor for clinical heterogeneity when comparing Cochrane to non-Cochrane reviews. Extracted variables include number of studies, number of participants, presence of quantitative synthesis, exploration of clinical heterogeneity, heterogeneous characteristics explored, basis and methods used for investigating clinical heterogeneity, plotting/visual aids, author contact, inferences from clinical heterogeneity investigation, reporting assessment, and the presence of a priori or post-hoc analysis. Results A total of 317 systematic reviews were considered, of which 199 were in the final analysis. A total of 81 % of Cochrane reviews and 90 % of non-Cochrane reviews explored characteristics that are considered aspects of clinical heterogeneity and also described the methods they planned to use to investigate the influence of those characteristics. Only 1 % of non-Cochrane reviews and 8 % of Cochrane reviews explored the clinical

  5. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chess, Laura E; Gagnier, Joel J

    2016-02-17

    Clinical heterogeneity can be defined as differences in participant characteristics, types or timing of outcome measurements and intervention characteristics. Clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews has the possibility to significantly affect statistical heterogeneity leading to inaccurate conclusions and misled decision making. The aim of this study is to identify to what extent investigators are assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. The most recent 100 systematic reviews from the top five journals in medicine-JAMA, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, The Lancet, and PLOS Medicine-and the 100 most recently published and/or updated systematic reviews from Cochrane were collected. Various defined items of clinical heterogeneity were extracted from the included reviews. Investigators used chi-squared tests, logarithmic modeling and linear regressions to determine if the presence of such items served as a predictor for clinical heterogeneity when comparing Cochrane to non-Cochrane reviews. Extracted variables include number of studies, number of participants, presence of quantitative synthesis, exploration of clinical heterogeneity, heterogeneous characteristics explored, basis and methods used for investigating clinical heterogeneity, plotting/visual aids, author contact, inferences from clinical heterogeneity investigation, reporting assessment, and the presence of a priori or post-hoc analysis. A total of 317 systematic reviews were considered, of which 199 were in the final analysis. A total of 81% of Cochrane reviews and 90% of non-Cochrane reviews explored characteristics that are considered aspects of clinical heterogeneity and also described the methods they planned to use to investigate the influence of those characteristics. Only 1% of non-Cochrane reviews and 8% of Cochrane reviews explored the clinical characteristics they initially chose as potential for clinical heterogeneity. Very

  6. An Iterated GMM Procedure for Estimating the Campbell-Cochrane Habit Formation Model, with an Application to Danish Stock and Bond Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Møller, Stig Vinther

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an iterated GMM approach to estimate and test the consumption based habit persistence model of Campbell and Cochrane, and we apply the approach on annual and quarterly Danish stock and bond returns. For comparative purposes we also estimate and test the standard constant relative risk......-aversion (CRRA) model. In addition, we compare the pricing errors of the different models using Hansen and Jagannathan's specification error measure. The main result is that for Denmark the Campbell-Cochrane model does not seem to perform markedly better than the CRRA model. For the long annual sample period...... covering more than 80 years there is absolutely no evidence of superior performance of the Campbell-Cochrane model. For the shorter and more recent quarterly data over a 20-30 year period, there is some evidence of counter-cyclical time-variation in the degree of risk-aversion, in accordance...

  7. An iterated GMM procedure for estimating the Campbell-Cochrane habit formation model, with an application to Danish stock and bond returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Møller, Stig V.

    We suggest an iterated GMM approach to estimate and test the consumption based habit persistence model of Campbell and Cochrane (1999), and we apply the approach on annual and quarterly Danish stock and bond returns. For comparative purposes we also estimate and test the standard CRRA model....... In addition, we compare the pricing errors of the different models using Hansen and Jagannathan's (1997) specification error measure. The main result is that for Denmark the Campbell-Cochrane model does not seem to perform markedly better than the CRRA model. For the long annual sample period covering more...... than 80 years there is absolutely no evidence of superior performance of the Campbell-Cochrane model. For the shorter and more recent quarterly data over a 20-30 year period, there is some evidence of counter-cyclical time-variation in the degree of risk-aversion, in accordance with the Campbell...

  8. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    BOOK REVIEWS (99) Complete A-Z Physics Handbook Science Magic in the Kitchen The Science of Cooking Science Experiments You Can Eat WEB WATCH (101) These journal themes are pasta joke Microwave oven Web links CD REVIEW (104) Electricity and Magnetism, KS3 Big Science Comics

  9. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    CD-ROM REVIEW (551) Essential Physics BOOK REVIEWS (551) Collins Advanced Science: Physics, 2nd edition Quarks, Leptons and the Big Bang, 2nd edition Do Brilliantly: A2 Physics IGCSE Physics Geophysics in the UK Synoptic Skills in Advanced Physics Flash! The hunt for the biggest explosions in the universe Materials Maths for Advanced Physics

  10. Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Thomas; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When conducting systematic reviews, it is essential to perform a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies relevant to the specific research question. The Cochrane Collaborations Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) guidelines...... of musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible...... if they indexed RCTs, were in English and used in more than three of the systematic reviews. Relative recall was calculated as the number of studies identified by the literature search divided by the number of eligible studies i.e. included studies in the individual systematic reviews. Finally, cumulative median...

  11. Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this review, I shall attempt to convince readers that improving your knowledge of bird sounds ... images of mine within this book include the Hartlaub's Turaco Tauraco hartlaubi (p. ... head and slams her book down as the memory arrives.

  12. review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute intestinal obstruction in Nnewi Nigeria: a five-year review ... postoperative complication was burst abdomen (4%) and mortality was (9.2%). ... resection and anastomosis due to gangrenous bowel. The commonest causes of acute.

  13. Information Literacy for Users at the National Medical Library of Cuba: Cochrane Library Course for the Search of Best Evidence for Clinical Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Arroyo, Sonia; del Carmen Gonzalez Rivero, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The National Medical Library of Cuba is currently developing an information literacy program to train users in the use of biomedical databases. This paper describes the experience with the course "Cochrane Library: Evidence-Based Medicine," which aims to teach users how to make the best use of this database, as well as the evidence-based…

  14. Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Issacharoff. Discourse as Performance . Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1989. vii + 161 pp. Reviewed by Gerald Prince, University of Pennsylvania Thomas M. Kavanagh, ed. The Limits of Theory . Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1989. 254 pp. Reviewed by André J.M. Prévos, Pennsylvania State University, Worthington Scranton Campus Wendy B. Faris. Labyrinths of Language: Symbolic Landscape and Narrative Design in Modern Fiction . Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1988. 242 pp. Reviewed by Carol Rigolot, Princeton University Eve Tavor Bannet. Structuralism and the Logic of Dissent: Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Lacan . Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1989. 299 pp. Reviewed by Andrew J. McKenna, Loyoyla University of Chicago Gary Saul Morson and Caryl Emerson, eds. Rethinking Bakhtin: Extensions and Challenges . Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1989. Reviewed by Lewis Bagby, University of Wyoming Fernando Moreno. Carlos Fuentes. La mort d'Artemio Cruz: entre le mythe et l'histoire . Paris: Editions Caribeennes, 1989. Reviewed by Susan Levine, Lawrence, Kansas

  15. GASTRIC CANCER - A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Fateme parooei, Mahmood Anbari, Morteza Salarzaei *

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Gastric cancer in most cases is diagnosed in symptomatic patients with an advanced disease lacking a definite treatment. The common symptoms of the primary diagnosis include weight loss (0.62), stomachache (0.52), nausea (0.34), and swallowing disorder (dysphagia) (0.26). Methods: In this review article, the databases Medline, Cochrane, Science Direct, and Google Scholar were thoroughly searched to identify the Gastric cancer. In this review, the papers published until early Jan...

  16. Prospective risk of stillbirth and neonatal complications in twin pregnancies : systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheong-See, Fiona; Schuit, Ewoud; Arroyo-Manzano, David; Khalil, Asma; Barrett, Jon; Joseph, K S; Asztalos, Elizabeth; Hack, Karien; Lewi, Liesbeth; Lim, Arianne; Liem, Sophie; Norman, Jane E; Morrison, John; Combs, C Andrew; Garite, Thomas J; Maurel, Kimberly; Serra, Vicente; Perales, Alfredo; Rode, Line; Worda, Katharina; Nassar, Anwar; Aboulghar, Mona; Rouse, Dwight; Thom, Elizabeth; Breathnach, Fionnuala; Nakayama, Soichiro; Russo, Francesca Maria; Robinson, Julian N; Dodd, Jodie M; Newman, Roger B; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Tang, Selphee; Mol, Ben Willem J; Zamora, Javier; Thilaganathan, Basky; Thangaratinam, Shakila

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the risks of stillbirth and neonatal complications by gestational age in uncomplicated monochorionic and dichorionic twin pregnancies. DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES: Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases (until December 2015). REVIEW METHODS:

  17. Enzyme replacement therapy for Anderson-Fabry disease: A complementary overview of a Cochrane publication through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Dib, Regina; Gomaa, Huda; Ortiz, Alberto; Politei, Juan; Kapoor, Anil; Barreto, Fellype

    2017-01-01

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked recessive inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by a deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. Renal failure, heart and cerebrovascular involvement reduce survival. A Cochrane review provided little evidence on the use of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We now complement this review through a linear regression and a pooled analysis of proportions from cohort studies. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ERT for AFD. For the systematic review, a literature search was performed, from inception to March 2016, using Medline, EMBASE and LILACS. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies, patients with AFD on ERT or natural history, and at least one patient-important outcome (all-cause mortality, renal, cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, and adverse events) reported. The pooled proportion and the confidence interval (CI) are shown for each outcome. Simple linear regressions for composite endpoints were performed. 77 cohort studies involving 15,305 participants proved eligible. The pooled proportions were as follows: a) for renal complications, agalsidase alfa 15.3% [95% CI 0.048, 0.303; I2 = 77.2%, p = 0.0005]; agalsidase beta 6% [95% CI 0.04, 0.07; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 21.4% [95% CI 0.1522, 0.2835; I2 = 89.6%, p<0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta compared to untreated patients; b) for cardiovascular complications, agalsidase alfa 28% [95% CI 0.07, 0.55; I2 = 96.7%, p<0.0001]; agalsidase beta 7% [95% CI 0.05, 0.08; I2 = not applicable]; and untreated patients 26.2% [95% CI 0.149, 0.394; I2 = 98.8%, p<0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta compared to untreated patients; and c) for cerebrovascular complications, agalsidase alfa 11.1% [95% CI 0.058, 0.179; I2 = 70.5%, p = 0.0024]; agalsidase beta 3.5% [95% CI 0.024, 0.046; I2 = 0%, p = 0.4209]; and untreated patients 18.3% [95% CI 0.129, 0.245; I2 = 95% p < 0.0001]. Effect differences favored agalsidase beta

  18. Systematic review adherence to methodological or reporting quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pussegoda, Kusala; Turner, Lucy; Garritty, Chantelle

    2017-01-01

    Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) and Overview Quality Assessment Questionnaire (OQAQ) quality assessment tools as evaluated in methodological overviews. METHODS: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE®, and EMBASE® databases were searched from January 1990 to October 2014. Title and abstract screening and full...

  19. The efficacy of anticonvulsants on orofacial pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, W.J.J.M.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Controversy exists about the effectiveness of anticonvulsants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. To ascertain appropriate therapies, a systematic review was conducted of existing randomized controlled trials. Study design. Trials were identified from PubMed, Cochrane, and

  20. The prevalence of onychomycosis in psoriatic patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, K.M.G.; Dulak, M.G.; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Pasch, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed all available literature concerning the prevalence of onychomycosis in patients with nail psoriasis and the distribution of pathogens causing onychomycosis in this specific group of patients. Databases searched were Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trial

  1. Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Frits

    1995-01-01

    This is the second volume of a revision of Tabernaemontana (Apocynaceae). The volume covers the New World species (44) and the genus Stemmadenia (10 species). This part of the revision of Tabernaemontana comes up to the high standards set in the first volume [see the review by Leenhouts, Blumea 38

  2. Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The yeast vacuole, which is equivalent to the lysosome of higher eukaryotes, is one of the best characterized degradative organelles. This review describes the biosynthesis and function of yeast vacuolar proteases. Most of these enzymes are delivered to the vacuole via the early compartments...

  3. Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Reviews a software planetarium package called "Sky Travel." Includes two audiovisuals: "Conquest of Space" and "Windows on Science: Earth Science"; and four books: "Small Energy Sources: Choices that Work,""Stonehenge Complete,""Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science…

  4. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.

    1994-01-01

    This review marks the appearance of Volume II, after the publication of Volume I, Pteridophytes and Gymnosperms, in 1990; several more volumes are expected in the future before completion of the Vascular plants as a whole. The present volume contains 73 families out of some 250-500 families which

  5. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    BOOK REVIEWS (353) Dr Dyer's Academy Further Advanced Physics Physics 11-14, with Biology 11-14 and Chemistry 11-14 Nelson Modular Science: Books 1 and 2 Key Science: Physics, 3rd Edition Nelson Science: Physics, 2nd Edition Physics for AQA: Separate Award, Coordinated Award Physical Processes: A Visual Approach WEB WATCH (359) Physics Favourites: John Miller's selection

  6. Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma D'Ambrosio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the great interest raised by Maurizio Gabrieli’s review of the book Musical Networks. Parallel Distributed Perception and Performance (various authors; edited by Niall Griffith and Peter M. Todd, MA: MIT Press, Cambridge, 1999 which appeared in our last issue of Analitica, the present review section no longer follows the format used up to now but offers a survey of texts dedicated to the relationship between music analysis and technology. This decision was also made as a result of the request for more information on the subject by many of our readers. In coming issues we plan to extend this bibliography and comment on at least some of the most interesting texts published in recent years, among which we would immediately like to draw attention to the important work by Baroni, Dalmonte and Jacoboni published in 1999 (Le regole della musica. Indagine sui meccanismi della comunicazione, Torino, I Manuali EDT/SIdM, 1999.

  7. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, H.W.; Hesselink, G.; Geense, W.; Vincent, C.; Wollersheim, H.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. DESIGN: Systematic review of systematic reviews. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October

  8. [The evolution of otitis media with effusion treated by transtympanic drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta, J L; Zabaleta, M; Erdozain, I

    1996-01-01

    One hundred sixty children with effusive otitis media who did not improve with medical treatment were reviewed. The evolution and complications observed in 294 ears treated by myringotomy and ventilation tubes (grommets) over a three-year period were analyzed. Otorrhea occurred during grommet placement in 11.6%. The disease remitted in 84%. Recurrences occurred in 15.3%: 4.8% had different degrees of tympanic atelectasia and 0.7% had perforation. Three per cent of the children were reoperated for bilateral recurrence of otitis. Younger children and those whose had delayed surgery had a worse outcome. Insertion of ear grommets improved hearing.

  9. Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Thomas; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When conducting systematic reviews, it is essential to perform a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies relevant to the specific research question. The Cochrane Collaborations Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) guidelines...... state that searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL should be considered mandatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MECIR recommendations to use MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined, and examine the yield of using these to find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the area...... of musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible...

  10. Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Barker

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and Learning Online is a collection of seventeen papers divided into six sections. The papers have their origins in an 'expert' seminar held at the International Centre for Learner Managed Learning at Middlesex University, London. The seminar brought together a group of practitioners (academic, training and media from around the world to consider progress to date and the future of learning and teaching online. For the purposes of the book 'online' is understood to include 'electronic means of distributing and engaging with learning' (ix and only includes broadcast media to the degree that they overlap with 'the overall internet scenario' (ix. According to the book details of the original seminar are available from http:llwww.iclml.mdx.acuk/TLonline. Readers are invited to contribute to online discussion. However, at the time this review was written the Website was unavailable.

  11. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    WE RECOMMEND When Physics Became King This book delves into the history of science since the 18th century. The History of the Laser An interesting read that will teach you far more than its title suggests. History of Physics Selected Reprints A fascinating collection of physics papers spanning four decades. Datalogging set-ups Five great products from Leybold Didactic’s CASSY range. Videocom Measure motion and convert it to graphs with this great device. Basic Raybox This simple piece of equipment offers great performance. WORTH A LOOK Virtual Physics Lab John Nunn’s software demystifies science using clear illustrations. HANDLE WITH CARE Microchem Electricity Kit This box of equipment for introducing electricity lacks quality. Raymond the Raybox A disappointing raybox. The basic version reviewed on p389 is better. WEB WATCH A rough guide to e-learning.

  12. Quality of systematic reviews in pediatric oncology--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundh, Andreas; Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L; Jørgensen, Anders W

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To ensure evidence-based decision making in pediatric oncology systematic reviews are necessary. The objective of our study was to evaluate the methodological quality of all currently existing systematic reviews in pediatric oncology. METHODS: We identified eligible systematic reviews...... through a systematic search of the literature. Data on clinical and methodological characteristics of the included systematic reviews were extracted. The methodological quality of the included systematic reviews was assessed using the overview quality assessment questionnaire, a validated 10-item quality...... assessment tool. We compared the methodological quality of systematic reviews published in regular journals with that of Cochrane systematic reviews. RESULTS: We included 117 systematic reviews, 99 systematic reviews published in regular journals and 18 Cochrane systematic reviews. The average methodological...

  13. Self-management interventions that include COPD exacerbation action plans improve health-related quality of life – A Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, Anke; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; van der Valk, Paul; Frith, Peter; Zwerink, Marlies; Monninkhof, Evelyn; van der Palen, Job; Effing, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    COPD self-management interventions usually have an action plan as a key component. Studies of these interventions show contradictory results. We have assessed the effectiveness of COPD self-management interventions that include COPD exacerbation action plans compared to usual care. After a

  14. Effects of low-sodium diet vs. high-sodium diet on blood pressure, renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, cholesterol, and triglyceride (Cochrane Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether reduced sodium intake is effective as a health prophylaxis initiative is unsolved. The purpose was to estimate the effects of low-sodium vs. high-sodium intake on blood pressure (BP), renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, and lipids.......The question of whether reduced sodium intake is effective as a health prophylaxis initiative is unsolved. The purpose was to estimate the effects of low-sodium vs. high-sodium intake on blood pressure (BP), renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, and lipids....

  15. The comparative efficacy and safety of sugammadex and neostigmine in reversing neuromuscular blockade in adults. A Cochrane systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hristovska, A-M; Duch, P; Allingstrup, M

    2018-01-01

    We compared the efficacy and safety of sugammadex and neostigmine in reversing neuromuscular blockade in adults. Our outcomes were: recovery time from second twitch to train-of-four ratio > 0.9; recovery time from post-tetanic count 1-5 to train-of-four ratio > 0.9; and risk of composite adverse...... and serious adverse events. We searched for randomised clinical trials irrespective of publication status and date, blinding status, outcomes reported or language. We included 41 studies with 4206 participants. Time to reversal of neuromuscular blockade from second twitch to a train-of-four ratio > 0.9 was 2.......0 min with sugammadex 2 mg.kg-1 and 12.9 min with neostigmine 0.05 mg.kg-1 , with a mean difference (MD) (95%CI)) of 10.2 (8.5-12.0) (I2 = 84%, 10 studies, n = 835, Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE): moderate quality). Time to reversal of neuromuscular blockade...

  16. Helklæbende plast til afdækning af operationsfeltet kan øge risikoen for sårinfektioner. Gennemgang af et Cochrane-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Niels; Kolmos, Hans Jørn J

    2009-01-01

    In theory, the products act as a barrier, which hinders the spreading of bacteria from the deeper skin layers and hair follicles to the incision. On the other hand, the use of plastic adhesive drapes may promote bacterial overgrowth due to a >>greenhouse effect... is based on seven trials showed that there was no evidence that plastic adhesive drapes reduces the surgical site infection rate and some evidence that they increase infection rates in clean operations. Consequently, their use should be abandoned. Further studies are warranted to determine the effect...

  17. Neurobiology of Anxious Depression: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Niciu, Mark J; Mathews, Daniel C; Richards, Erica M; Zarate, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Anxious depression is a common, distinct clinical subtype of major depressive disorder (MDD). This review summarizes current neurobiological knowledge regarding anxious depression. Peer-reviewed articles published January 1970 through September 2012 were identified via PUBMED, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library, using the following key words: anxious depression electroencephalography (EEG), anxious depression functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anxious depression genetics, anxious depress...

  18. Wrist arthroplasty--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H

    2014-01-01

    was to review the literature on second, third and fourth generation implants. METHODS: The review was conducted according to the PRISMA-guidelines. A search was made using a protocolled strategy and well-defined criteria in PubMed, in the Cochrane Library and by screening reference lists. RESULTS: 37...

  19. Systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions frequently consider patient-important outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameur, Hayet; Ravaud, Philippe; Fayard, Florence; Riveros, Carolina; Dechartres, Agnes

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether recently published and ongoing systematic reviews of therapeutic interventions assess patient-important outcomes. For this methodological review, we searched MEDLINE via PubMed for recently published systematic reviews and online registry of systematic reviews (PROSPERO) for ongoing systematic reviews. We selected systematic reviews with meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. We extracted all outcomes defined in the methods section and categorized them. Mortality, other clinical events, pain, quality of life, function, and therapeutic decisions were considered patient-important outcomes. We included 420 systematic reviews: 90 Cochrane reviews, 200 other published reviews, and 130 registered ongoing reviews. Primary outcomes were defined in 85 Cochrane reviews (95%), 98 (49%) other published reviews and all ongoing reviews. At least one patient-important outcome was defined as a primary outcome in 81/85 Cochrane reviews (95%), 78/98 other published reviews (80%), and 117/130 ongoing reviews (90%). Considering all outcomes assessed, at least one patient-important outcome was evaluated in 90/90 Cochrane reviews (100%), 189/200 other published reviews (95%), and 121/130 ongoing reviews (93%). Most recent systematic reviews aim to assess patient-important outcomes, which contrasts with RCTs. These results suggest some important gaps between primary and secondary research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. All Information Is Not Equal: Using the Literature Databases PubMed and The Cochrane Library for Identifying the Evidence on Granulocyte Transfusion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Schulz, Manuela; Braun, Volker

    2014-10-01

    To be able to take well-informed decisions or carry out sound research, clinicians and researchers alike require specific information seeking skills matching their respective information needs. Biomedical information is traditionally available via different literature databases. This article gives an introduction to two diverging sources, PubMed (23 million references) and The Cochrane Library (800,000 references), both of which offer sophisticated instruments for searching an increasing amount of medical publications of varied quality and ambition. Whereas PubMed as an unfiltered source of primary literature comprises all different kinds of publication types occurring in academic journals, The Cochrane Library is a pre-filtered source which offers access to either synthesized publication types or critically appraised and carefully selected references. A search approach has to be carried out deliberately and requires a good knowledge on the scope and features of the databases as well as on the ability to build a search strategy in a structured way. We present a specific and a sensitive search approach, making use of both databases within two application case scenarios in order to identify the evidence on granulocyte transfusions for infections in adult patients with neutropenia.

  1. The all-on-four treatment concept: Systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Penaloza, David; Zaragozí Alonso, Regino; Peñarrocha Diago, María; Peñarrocha Diago, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review the literature on the ?all-on-four? treatment concept regarding its indications, surgical procedures, prosthetic protocols and technical and biological complications after at least three years in function. Study Design The three major electronic databases were screened: MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL). In addition, electronic screening was made of the ?grey literature? using the System for Infor...

  2. How do we define the policy impact of public health research? A systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kristel Alla; Wayne D Hall; Harvey A Whiteford; Brian W Head; Carla S Meurk

    2017-01-01

    ... health research influences policy. Method Keyword searches of the electronic databases Web of Science, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Informit, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar were conducted...

  3. Management of ankylosed primary molars with premolar successors A systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long D. Tieu; Stephanie L. Walker; Michael P. Major; Carlos Flores-Mir

    2013-01-01

    .... The authors searched electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Google Scholar...

  4. [Uterus preserving surgery versus vaginal hysterectomy in treatment of uterine descent: a systematic review].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detollenaere, R.J.; Boon, J. den; Vierhout, M.E.; Eijndhoven, H.W. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the outcomes of uterus preserving procedures and vaginal hysterectomy in treatment of uterine prolapse. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: We searched in Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the reference lists of relevant publications for articles comparing uterus

  5. Dexmedetomidine versus Midazolam in Procedural Sedation. A Systematic Review of Efficacy and Safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barends, Clemens R. M.; Absalom, Anthony; van Minnen, Baucke; Vissink, Arjan; Visser, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To systematically review the literature comparing the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine and midazolam when used for procedural sedation. Materials and Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and COCHRANE for clinical trials comparing dexmedetomidine and midazolam for procedural sedation

  6. Routine histopathology for carcinoma in cholecystectomy specimens not evidence based: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swank, Hilko A.; Mulder, Irene M.; Hop, Wim C.; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Lange, Johan F.; Bemelman, Willem A.

    2013-01-01

    Routine histopathological examination of gallbladder specimens is mainly performed to identify unexpected gallbladder carcinoma (GBC). This systematic review assesses the prevalence and characteristics of GBC in cholecystectomy specimens. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were

  7. The role of statins in erectile dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiang Cai Ye Tian Tao Wu Chen-Xi Cao Si-Yuan Bu Kun-Jie Wang

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of statins for erectile dysfunction (ED), a systematic review of the literature was conducted in the Cochrane Library, Embase and PubMed from the inception of each database to June 2013...

  8. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS COCHRANE using BT and XBT casts in the East China sea and other seas from 07 March 1987 to 19 March 1987 (NODC Accession 8700263)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS COCHRANE in the South China sea, East China Sea, and Philippine Sea. Data...

  9. Temperature profile and water depth data collected from USS COCHRANE using BT and XBT casts in the Indian Ocean and other seas from 01 August 1987 to 27 September 1987 (NODC Accession 8700394)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and water depth data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the USS COCHRANE in the Indian Ocean, Arabian Sea, Laccadive Sea, and Philippine...

  10. Global Postural Reeducation for patients with musculoskeletal conditions: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira,Giovanni E.; Barreto,Rodrigo G. P.; Caroline C. Robinson; Rodrigo D. M. Plentz; Silva, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review randomized controlled trials that assessed the effects of Global Postural Reeducation (GPR) on patient-reported outcomes in conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and SciELO was performed from their inception to June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that analyzed pain and patient-reported outcomes were included in this review. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Ri...

  11. Hypertonic saline (HS) for acute bronchiolitis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, C; Cantrill, H.; Hind, D.; Bradburn, M.; Everard, M L

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bronchiolitis is the commonest cause of hospitalisation in infancy. Currently management consists of supportive care and oxygen. A Cochrane review concluded that, ?nebulised 3?% saline may significantly reduce the length of hospital stay?. We conducted a systematic review of controlled trials of nebulised hypertonic saline (HS) for infants hospitalised with primary acute bronchiolitis. Methods Searches to January 2015 involved: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; ...

  12. Elbow orthoses : a review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijmans, J.M.; Postema, K.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review the available literature on elbow orthoses in patients with various diagnoses to assess the scientific base of the prescription of elbow orthoses. A search of literature in Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Recal was performed using the keyword "elbow" combined

  13. Descrição da larva de Scinax similis (Cochran com notas comparativas sobre o grupo "ruber" no sudeste do Brasil (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae Description of the larva of Scinax similis (Cochran with comparative notes on the Scinax ruber group in Southeastern Brazil (Amphibia, Anura, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C.R Alves

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The larva of Scinax similis (Cochran, 1952 is described from Ilha do Fundão (Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Comparisons with other species of the group that occur in Southeastern Brazil are added. The larva of S. similis can be distinguished by the following diagnostic features: (1 eyes large in relation to body length (17,3%, body height (26,8%, and body width (29,7%, interocular distance three times larger than eye diameter; (2 lower beak with two transverse stripes, proximal half white and distal half black.

  14. Is the evaluation of risk of bias in periodontology and implant dentistry comprehensive? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Listl, Stefan; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess how authors of systematic reviews (SRs) with meta-analyses published in periodontology and implant dentistry evaluate risk of bias (ROB) in primary studies included in these reviews. A literature search for SRs with meta-analyses was performed in PubMed and Cochrane library databases up to July 20th 2014. The reference lists of included articles were screened for further reviews. The standards of evaluating ROB in primary studies were evaluated by using a 14-item checklist based on the Cochrane approach for evaluating ROB. Standards in ROB evaluations in Cochrane and paper-based SRs were compared using the Fisher's exact test. All searches, data extraction and evaluations were performed independently and in duplicate. Seventy SRs were included (45 paper-based and 25 Cochrane SRs, respectively). The median percentage of items addressed was 58% (interquartile range 4-100%). Cochrane SRs more frequently included ROB assessments than paper-based reviews in terms of examiner blinding (p = 0.0026), selective outcome reporting (p = 0.0207) and other bias (p = 0.0241). The ROB evaluation in primary studies currently included in SRs with meta-analyses in periodontology and implant dentistry is not sufficiently comprehensive. Cochrane SRs have more comprehensive ROB evaluation than paper-based reviews. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Growing Literature, Stagnant Science? Systematic Review, Meta-Regression and Cumulative Analysis of Audit and Feedback Interventions in Health Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ivers, Noah M; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Jamtvedt, Gro; Flottorp, Signe; O’Brien, Mary Ann; French, Simon D; Young, Jane; Odgaard-Jensen, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the findings of the Cochrane systematic review of audit and feedback on professional practice to explore the estimate of effect over time and examine whether new trials have added...

  16. The efficacy of manual therapy and exercise for different stages of non-specific low back pain: an update of systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo, Benjamin; Detrembleur, Christine; Hall, Toby; Mahaudens, Philippe; Nielens, Henri

    2014-01-01

    to review and update the evidence for different forms of manual therapy (MT) for patients with different stages of non-specific low back pain (LBP). Data sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane-Register-of-Controlled-Trials, PEDro, EMBASE. Method: A systematic review of MT with a literature search covering the period of January 2000 to April 2013 was conducted by two independent reviewers according to Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. A total of 360 studies were evaluated using qualitative criteria. Two sta...

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis and complications following prostate biopsies - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemann, Nina; Helgstrand, John Thomas; Brasso, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    drug strategy. We reviewed the current evidence supporting use of prophylactic antibiotics and the risk of complications following prostate biopsies. METHODS: This review was drafted in accordance with the Prisma Guidelines. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS: A total...

  18. Examination of Reviews-Outcomes of Community Water Fluoridation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of Reviews-Outcomes of Community Water Fluoridation in Dental Caries Prevention. ... West African Journal of Industrial and Academic Research ... The purpose of this paper is to examine the different reviews of the outcomes of fluoridation of community water in the prevention of dental caries in Cochrane ...

  19. Methodological quality of systematic reviews in subfertility: a comparison of two different approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor Popovich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews are used widely to guide health care decisions. Several tools have been created to assess systematic review quality. The measurement tool for assessing the methodological quality of systematic reviews known as the AMSTAR tool applies a yes/no score to eleven relevant domains of review methodology. This tool has been reworked so that each domain is scored based on a four point scale, producing R-AMSTAR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We aimed to compare the AMSTAR and R-AMSTAR tools in assessing systematic reviews in the field of assisted reproduction for subfertility. All published systematic reviews on assisted reproductive technology, with the latest search for studies taking place from 2007-2011, were considered. Reviews that contained no included studies or considered diagnostic outcomes were excluded. Thirty each of Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews were randomly selected from a search of relevant databases. Both tools were then applied to all sixty reviews. The results were converted to percentage scores and all reviews graded and ranked based on this. AMSTAR produced a much wider variation in percentage scores and achieved higher inter-rater reliability than R-AMSTAR according to kappa statistics. The average rating for Cochrane reviews was consistent between the two tools (88.3% for R-AMSTAR versus 83.6% for AMSTAR but inconsistent for non-Cochrane reviews (63.9% R-AMSTAR vs. 38.5% AMSTAR. In comparing the rankings generated between the two tools Cochrane reviews changed an average of 4.2 places, compared to 2.9 for non-Cochrane. CONCLUSION: R-AMSTAR provided greater guidance in the assessment of domains and produced quantitative results. However, there were many problems with the construction of its criteria and AMSTAR was much easier to apply consistently. We recommend that AMSTAR incorporates the findings of this study and produces additional guidance for its application in order to improve its reliability and

  20. La Biblioteca Médica Nacional de Cuba tiene la primicia: curso Cochrane Library, aprendizaje con estrategias para obtener las mejores evidencias en salud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Santana Arroyo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available La Biblioteca Médica Nacional de Cuba ha puesto en marcha un programa de alfabetización informacional para adiestrar a sus usuarios y fomentar en ellos las habilidades necesarias para el uso de bases de datos, así como para fomentar el uso de estrategias de búsquedas bien diseñadas y validadas por los bibliotecarios especialistas en información. En el presente trabajo se describen contenidos y habilidades que se fomentan en el curso “Cochrane Library: La Medicina Basada en Evidencias”, cuyo objetivo es que el usuario domine esta base de datos y el concepto de medicina basada en evidencias para la toma de mejores decisiones en la atención médica. Durante el curso se introduce además el Modelo Big 6, como guía del pensamiento para resolver problemas de información que facilite la búsqueda y la organización de la información médica basada en evidencias. Igualmente, se capacita al estudiante para que diseñe productos informativos, como boletines electrónicos, que le permitan tanto presentar los resultados de búsquedas de información como promover información para el cuidado de la salud en el futuro

  1. INTERSTITIAL ECTOPIC PREGNANCY-A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Fateme parooei, Mahmood Anbari, Morteza Salarzaei *

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:. Interstitial ectopic pregnancy, in which rupture occurs much later than other forms of pregnancy, is a rare phenomenon that occurs in 2% of ectopic pregnancies; delayed rupture is due to the expandability of myometrium. Methods: In this review article, the databases Medline, Cochrane, Science Direct, and Google Scholar were thoroughly searched to identify the Interstitial ectopic pregnancy. In this review, the papers published until early January 2017 that were conducted ...

  2. Physiotherapy in primary dysmenorrhea: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Gerzson, Laís Rodrigues; Padilha, Juliana Falcão; Braz, Melissa Medeiros; Gasparetto, Andriele

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Dysmenorrhea is a word derived from the Greek language and means difficult menstrual cycle. It may be classified as primary, leading to poorer quality of life indices of several women. This study aimed at investigating, by means of literature review, the efficacy and accuracy of existing therapies for primary dysmenorrhea, specifically in Physiotherapy.CONTENTS:Narrative literature review by querying electronic databases Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, Cochrane library, PED...

  3. Randomized controlled trials of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment in Africa: results from the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Specialized Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Babalwa; Pienaar, Elizabeth D; Oliver, Joy; Siegfried, Nandi

    2011-01-01

    To effectively address HIV/AIDS in Africa, evidence on preventing new infections and providing effective treatment is needed. Ideally, decisions on which interventions are effective should be based on evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Our previous research described African RCTs of HIV/AIDS reported between 1987 and 2003. This study updates that analysis with RCTs published between 2004 and 2008. To describe RCTs of HIV/AIDS conducted in Africa and reported between 2004 and 2008. We searched the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Specialized Register in September 2009. Two researchers independently evaluated studies for inclusion and extracted data using standardized forms. Details included location of trials, interventions, methodological quality, location of principal investigators and funders. Our search identified 834 RCTs, with 68 conducted in Africa. Forty-three assessed prevention-interventions and 25 treatment-interventions. Fifteen of the 43 prevention RCTs focused on preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission. Thirteen of the 25 treatment trials focused on opportunistic infections. Trials were conducted in 16 countries with most in South Africa (20), Zambia (12) and Zimbabwe (9). The median sample size was 628 (range 33-9645). Methods used for the generation of the allocation sequence and allocation concealment were adequate in 38 and 32 trials, respectively, and 58 reports included a CONSORT recommended flow diagram. Twenty-nine principal investigators resided in the United States of America (USA) and 18 were from African countries. Trials were co-funded by different agencies with most of the funding obtained from USA governmental and non-governmental agencies. Nineteen pharmaceutical companies provided partial funding to 15 RCTs and African agencies co-funded 17 RCTs. Ethical approval was reported in 65 trials and informed consent in 61 trials. Prevention trials dominate the trial landscape in Africa. Of note, few principal investigators and funders

  4. Use of glucosamine and chondroitin to treat osteoarthritis: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Valadao Lopes Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the current evidence that support or disprove the use of glucosamine and chondroitin in the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis. We performed a literature review using the databases of Medline, PubMed and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register and Cochrane Databases Systematic Reviews (Cochrane Library.We considered only studies with high level of evidence.The study included analysis of randomized controlled trials that included at least 100 patients in each intervention group, meta-analyzes and systematic reviews. Seven meta-analysis, one systematic review and five randomized clinical trials fit inclusion criteria of this review. Considering the best evidences until now, the use of glucosamine and chondroitin does not provide clinical relevant benefits to patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip (Level I of evidence and grade A of recommendation. Further trials with adequate technology are necessaries to elucidate this question.

  5. The effect of cetylpyridinium chloride-containing mouth rinses as adjuncts to toothbrushing on plaque and parameters of gingival inflammation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haps, S.; Slot, D.E.; Berchier, C.E.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature concerning cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) containing mouth rinses as effective adjuncts to toothbrushing in the prevention of plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation. Materials and methods: Medline and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were

  6. Randomized controlled trials of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment in Africa: results from the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Specialized Register.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babalwa Zani

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To effectively address HIV/AIDS in Africa, evidence on preventing new infections and providing effective treatment is needed. Ideally, decisions on which interventions are effective should be based on evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Our previous research described African RCTs of HIV/AIDS reported between 1987 and 2003. This study updates that analysis with RCTs published between 2004 and 2008. OBJECTIVES: To describe RCTs of HIV/AIDS conducted in Africa and reported between 2004 and 2008. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Specialized Register in September 2009. Two researchers independently evaluated studies for inclusion and extracted data using standardized forms. Details included location of trials, interventions, methodological quality, location of principal investigators and funders. RESULTS: Our search identified 834 RCTs, with 68 conducted in Africa. Forty-three assessed prevention-interventions and 25 treatment-interventions. Fifteen of the 43 prevention RCTs focused on preventing mother-to-child HIV transmission. Thirteen of the 25 treatment trials focused on opportunistic infections. Trials were conducted in 16 countries with most in South Africa (20, Zambia (12 and Zimbabwe (9. The median sample size was 628 (range 33-9645. Methods used for the generation of the allocation sequence and allocation concealment were adequate in 38 and 32 trials, respectively, and 58 reports included a CONSORT recommended flow diagram. Twenty-nine principal investigators resided in the United States of America (USA and 18 were from African countries. Trials were co-funded by different agencies with most of the funding obtained from USA governmental and non-governmental agencies. Nineteen pharmaceutical companies provided partial funding to 15 RCTs and African agencies co-funded 17 RCTs. Ethical approval was reported in 65 trials and informed consent in 61 trials. CONCLUSION: Prevention trials dominate the trial

  7. A scoping review of rapid review methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricco, Andrea C; Antony, Jesmin; Zarin, Wasifa; Strifler, Lisa; Ghassemi, Marco; Ivory, John; Perrier, Laure; Hutton, Brian; Moher, David; Straus, Sharon E

    2015-09-16

    Rapid reviews are a form of knowledge synthesis in which components of the systematic review process are simplified or omitted to produce information in a timely manner. Although numerous centers are conducting rapid reviews internationally, few studies have examined the methodological characteristics of rapid reviews. We aimed to examine articles, books, and reports that evaluated, compared, used or described rapid reviews or methods through a scoping review. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, internet websites of rapid review producers, and reference lists were searched to identify articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently screened literature search results and abstracted data from included studies. Descriptive analysis was conducted. We included 100 articles plus one companion report that were published between 1997 and 2013. The studies were categorized as 84 application papers, seven development papers, six impact papers, and four comparison papers (one was included in two categories). The rapid reviews were conducted between 1 and 12 months, predominantly in Europe (58 %) and North America (20 %). The included studies failed to report 6 % to 73 % of the specific systematic review steps examined. Fifty unique rapid review methods were identified; 16 methods occurred more than once. Streamlined methods that were used in the 82 rapid reviews included limiting the literature search to published literature (24 %) or one database (2 %), limiting inclusion criteria by date (68 %) or language (49 %), having one person screen and another verify or screen excluded studies (6 %), having one person abstract data and another verify (23 %), not conducting risk of bias/quality appraisal (7 %) or having only one reviewer conduct the quality appraisal (7 %), and presenting results as a narrative summary (78 %). Four case studies were identified that compared the results of rapid reviews to systematic reviews. Three studies found that the conclusions between

  8. Prevention and control of neglected tropical diseases: overview of randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses/Prevention et controle des maladies tropicales negligees: vue d'ensemble des essais randomises, des revues systematiques et des meta-analyses/La prevencion y el control de enfermedades tropicales desatendidas: una vision general de ensayos aleatorios, examenes sistematicos y metaanalisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kappagoda, Shanthi; Ioannidis, John P.A

    2014-01-01

    ...) and to identify areas where evidence is lacking. Methods The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PubMed were searched for RCTs and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and PubMed were searched for meta-analyses and systematic...

  9. Effects of Mindfulness-Based Interventions on Salivary Cortisol in Healthy Adults: A Meta-Analytical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kenji Sanada; Jesus Montero-Marin; Marta Alda; Montserrat Salas-Valero; Maria C Perez-Yus; Hector Morillo; Marcelo Demarzo; Mauro Garcia-Toro; Javier Garcia-Campayo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to elucidate the effects of Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) on salivary cortisol levels in healthy adult populations. Method: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published between January 1980 and June 2015 in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and the Cochrane library. The PRISMA and Cochrane guidelines were followed. The pooled effect sizes were calculated with the random-effects model, using Hed...

  10. Does dentifrice use help to remove plaque? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, Cees; Slot, Dagmar E.; Bakker, Eric W. P.; van der Weijden, Fridus A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to establish the efficacy of brushing with and without a dentifrice for dental plaque removal. MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, EMBASE and other electronic databases were searched. The inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials and controlled clinical

  11. Orthodontic therapy and gingival recession: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joss-Vassalli, I.; Grebenstein, C.; Topouzelis, N.; Sculean, A.; Katsaros, C.

    2010-01-01

    To perform a systematic review on the effect of changes in incisor inclination owing to orthodontic treatment and the occurrence of gingival recession. PubMed, EMBASE Excerpta Medica and CENTRAL of the Cochrane Library were searched and a hand search was performed. From 1925 articles identified, 17

  12. The practice of paediatric cardiology in Nigeria: A Review | Chinawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A search for published works on practice of paediatrc cardiology in Nigeria was performed using Google and Pub Med. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was also searched. The areas of focus were historical facts, burden of the problem, organization, factors militating Paediatric cardiology practice ...

  13. Laparoscopic peritoneal lavage for perforated colonic diverticulitis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorenvliet, Boudewijn R.; Swank, Hilko; Schoones, Jan W.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Bemelman, Willem A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy, morbidity and mortality of laparoscopic peritoneal lavage for patients with perforated diverticulitis. Method We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases, Google Scholar and five major publisher

  14. Endoscopic treatment of colorectal perforations – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali; Thomsen, Christian Øystein; Vilmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    invasive therapy. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the existing evidence in this field. METHODS: Literature was searched on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane databases. Papers found were reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. Trials on animals were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 32...

  15. Endoscopic treatment of colorectal perforations--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali; Thomsen, Christian Øystein; Vilmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    invasive therapy. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the existing evidence in this field. METHODS: Literature was searched on PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane databases. Papers found were reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. Trials on animals were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 32...

  16. Glucagon like peptide-2 and neoplasia; a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, Linea Landgrebe; Nerup, Nikolaj; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2018-01-01

    independently by two authors in the following databases; Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane. Expert commentary: This systematic review indicated that treatment with GLP-2(1-33) up to 30 months in humans without any known pre-existing cancer did not confer an increased risk of intestinal...

  17. Histological responses of the periodontium to MTA: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsamakis, S.; Slot, D.E.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; van der Weijden, F.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) restoration of an endodontic-periodontal communication leads to regeneration of the adjacent periodontal tissues. Methodology The databases MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, and EMBASE were

  18. Histological responses of the periodontium to MTA : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katsamakis, Sokratis; Slot, Dagmar Else; Van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Van der Weijden, Fridus

    Aim The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) restoration of an endodontic-periodontal communication leads to regeneration of the adjacent periodontal tissues. Methodology The databases MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, and EMBASE were

  19. Spinal manipulative therapy for acute low-back pain (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Terwee, C.B.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Boer, M.R.M. de; Tulder, M.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many therapies exist for the treatment of low-back pain including spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), which is a worldwide, extensively practised intervention. This report is an update of the earlier Cochrane review, first published in January 2004 with the last search for studies up to

  20. Systematic review of N-acetylcysteine in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestijn, YCM; Brand, PLP

    A systematic review was carried out to evaluate whether the use of N-acetylcysteine to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis is supported by published evidence. Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched and the reference lists of all retrieved papers and of relevant chapters of

  1. Hormone therapy in ovarian granulosa cell tumors: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Velden, Jacobus; Buist, Marrije R.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review assessed the effectiveness of hormone therapy (HT) in patients with a granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary. Medline (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), prospective trial registers and PubMed (as supplied by publisher-subset)

  2. Reproducibility of Automated Voice Range Profiles, a Systematic Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Printz, Trine; Rosenberg, Tine; Godballe, Christian

    2018-01-01

    literature on test-retest accuracy of the automated voice range profile assessment. Study design: Systematic review. Data sources: PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, ComDisDome, Embase, and CINAHL (EBSCO). Methods: We conducted a systematic literature search of six databases from 1983 to 2016. The following...

  3. The quality of systematic reviews about interventions for refractive error can be improved: a review of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Ng, Sueko Matsumura; Chuck, Roy S; Li, Tianjing

    2017-09-05

    Systematic reviews should inform American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) Preferred Practice Pattern® (PPP) guidelines. The quality of systematic reviews related to the forthcoming Preferred Practice Pattern® guideline (PPP) Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery is unknown. We sought to identify reliable systematic reviews to assist the AAO Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery PPP. Systematic reviews were eligible if they evaluated the effectiveness or safety of interventions included in the 2012 PPP Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery. To identify potentially eligible systematic reviews, we searched the Cochrane Eyes and Vision United States Satellite database of systematic reviews. Two authors identified eligible reviews and abstracted information about the characteristics and quality of the reviews independently using the Systematic Review Data Repository. We classified systematic reviews as "reliable" when they (1) defined criteria for the selection of studies, (2) conducted comprehensive literature searches for eligible studies, (3) assessed the methodological quality (risk of bias) of the included studies, (4) used appropriate methods for meta-analyses (which we assessed only when meta-analyses were reported), (5) presented conclusions that were supported by the evidence provided in the review. We identified 124 systematic reviews related to refractive error; 39 met our eligibility criteria, of which we classified 11 to be reliable. Systematic reviews classified as unreliable did not define the criteria for selecting studies (5; 13%), did not assess methodological rigor (10; 26%), did not conduct comprehensive searches (17; 44%), or used inappropriate quantitative methods (3; 8%). The 11 reliable reviews were published between 2002 and 2016. They included 0 to 23 studies (median = 9) and analyzed 0 to 4696 participants (median = 666). Seven reliable reviews (64%) assessed surgical interventions. Most systematic reviews of interventions for

  4. Can electronic search engines optimize screening of search results in systematic reviews: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Margaret; Barrowman, Nicholas J; Moher, David; Clifford, Tammy J; Platt, Robert W; Morrison, Andra; Klassen, Terry P; Zhang, Li

    2006-02-24

    Most electronic search efforts directed at identifying primary studies for inclusion in systematic reviews rely on the optimal Boolean search features of search interfaces such as DIALOG and Ovid. Our objective is to test the ability of an Ultraseek search engine to rank MEDLINE records of the included studies of Cochrane reviews within the top half of all the records retrieved by the Boolean MEDLINE search used by the reviewers. Collections were created using the MEDLINE bibliographic records of included and excluded studies listed in the review and all records retrieved by the MEDLINE search. Records were converted to individual HTML files. Collections of records were indexed and searched through a statistical search engine, Ultraseek, using review-specific search terms. Our data sources, systematic reviews published in the Cochrane library, were included if they reported using at least one phase of the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategy (HSSS), provided citations for both included and excluded studies and conducted a meta-analysis using a binary outcome measure. Reviews were selected if they yielded between 1000-6000 records when the MEDLINE search strategy was replicated. Nine Cochrane reviews were included. Included studies within the Cochrane reviews were found within the first 500 retrieved studies more often than would be expected by chance. Across all reviews, recall of included studies into the top 500 was 0.70. There was no statistically significant difference in ranking when comparing included studies with just the subset of excluded studies listed as excluded in the published review. The relevance ranking provided by the search engine was better than expected by chance and shows promise for the preliminary evaluation of large results from Boolean searches. A statistical search engine does not appear to be able to make fine discriminations concerning the relevance of bibliographic records that have been pre-screened by systematic reviewers.

  5. Correlations between lower urinary tract symptoms, erectile dysfunction, and cardiovascular diseases : Are there differences between male populations from primary healthcare and urology clinics? A review of the current knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, Inge I.; Van der Heide, Wouter K.; Van der Meer, Klaas; Nijman, Rien

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the correlation between lower urinary tract symptoms, erectile dysfunction, and cardiovascular diseases in different male populations. Methods: Data sources: PubMed (Medline), clinical evidence, Embase, Cochrane reviews, and articles from reference lists. Selection criteria:

  6. Contacting of authors by systematic reviewers: protocol for a cross-sectional study and a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ladu, Luisa; Di Girolamo, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Synthesizing outcomes of underreported primary studies can pose a serious threat to the validity of outcomes and conclusions of systematic reviews. To address this problem, the Cochrane Collaboration recommends reviewers to contact authors of eligible primary studies to obtain additional information

  7. Factors associated with physical activity in children and adolescents with a physical disability : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, Manon A T; Backx, FJG; Takken, Tim; Wittink, H; Benner, Joyce; Mollema, Jurgen; de Groot, Janke F.

    AimThe aim of this review was to summarize the important factors associated with participation in physical activity in children and adolescents with physical disabilities. MethodA systematic mixed-studies review was conducted using the databases Academic Search Elite, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library,

  8. Factors associated with physical activity in children and adolescents with a physical disability: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, M.A.T.; Backx, F.J.G.; Takken, T.; Wittink, H.; Benner, J.; Mollema, J.; Groot, J.F. de

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this review was to summarize the important factors associated with participation in physical activity in children and adolescents with physical disabilities. Method: A systematic mixed-studies review was conducted using the databases Academic Search Elite, CINAHL, The Cochrane

  9. Means to an End: The Importance of the Research Question for Systematic Reviews in International Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Trifkovic, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews are increasingly used to inform policy makers about the usefulness of interventions. We stress the importance of the research question and argue that traditional Cochrane reviews work best for the focused question ‘what works’, while many policy interventions give rise to complex...

  10. Co-production of healthcare services with immigrant patients: protocol of a scoping review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radl-Karimi, Christina Mathilde; Nicolaisen, Anne; Sodemann, Morten

    2018-01-01

    ’s methodology for scoping reviews. The data will stem from the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO CINAHL, EBSCO PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. We will also screen the websites of national authorities and research organisations for publications and review the literature...

  11. Commentary on 'interventions for promoting re-integration and reducing harmful behaviour and lifestyles in street-connected children and young people' with a response from the review authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Rahila U

    2013-07-01

    This is a commentary on a Cochrane review, published in the issue of EBCH, first published as: Coren E, Hossain R, Pardo Pardo J, Veras MMS, Chakraborty K, Harris H, Martin AJ. Interventions for promoting re-integration and reducing harmful behaviour and lifestyles in street-connected children and young people. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD009823. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009823.pub2. Copyright © 2013 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. NUTRITION INTERVENTIONS AND GESTATIONAL DIABETES- A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Salarzaei 1, Mahmood Anbari2, Fateme Parooei1*

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy is a critical period in which maternal health plays a vital role in the health of the baby; so underlying conditions, illness and disorders caused during pregnancy or external factors can endanger the health of the mother, the fetus or both. Methods: In this review article, the databases Medline, Cochrane, Science Direct, and Google Scholar were thoroughly searched to identify the studies investigating Nutrition interventions and gestational diabetes. In this rev...

  13. Search strategies in systematic reviews in periodontology and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis M; Atieh, Momen A; Park, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    To perform an overview of literature search strategies in systematic reviews (SRs) published in periodontology and implant dentistry. Two electronic databases (PubMed and Cochrane Database of SRs) were searched, independently and in duplicate, for SRs with meta-analyses on interventions, with the last search performed on 11 November 2012. Manual searches of the reference lists of included SRs and 10 specialty dental journals were conducted. Methodological issues of the search strategies of included SRs were assessed with Cochrane collaboration guidelines and AMSTAR recommendations. The search strategies employed in Cochrane and paper-based SRs were compared. A total of 146 SRs with meta-analyses were included, including 19 Cochrane and 127 paper-based SRs. Some issues, such as "the use of keywords," were reported in most of the SRs (86%). Other issues, such as "search of grey literature" and "language restriction," were not fully reported (34% and 50% respectively). The quality of search strategy reporting in Cochrane SRs was better than that of paper-based SRs for seven of the eight criteria assessed. There is room for improving the quality of reporting of search strategies in SRs in periodontology and implant dentistry, particularly in SRs published in paper-based journals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cutaneous lichen planus: A systematic review of treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Nasim

    2015-06-01

    Various treatment modalities are available for cutaneous lichen planus. Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and Health Technology Assessment Database were searched for all the systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials related to cutaneous lichen planus. Two systematic reviews and nine relevant randomized controlled trials were identified. Acitretin, griseofulvin, hydroxychloroquine and narrow band ultraviolet B are demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous lichen planus. Sulfasalazine is effective, but has an unfavorable safety profile. KH1060, a vitamin D analogue, is not beneficial in the management of cutaneous lichen planus. Evidence from large scale randomized trials demonstrating the safety and efficacy for many other treatment modalities used to treat cutaneous lichen planus is simply not available.

  15. Effects of cervical headgear appliance: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Fernanda Pinelli; Janson, Guilherme; Henriques, Jose Fernando Castanha; Pupulim, Daniela Cubas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although much has been investigated about the effects of cervical headgear, there remains some controversy. Therefore, the objective of this systematic review is to disclose the actual effects of the cervical headgear appliance, based on articles of relevant quality.METHODS: A literature review was conducted using PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane databases. Inclusion criteria consisted of human studies written in English; published between 1970 and 2014; in which...

  16. Factors influencing citations to systematic reviews in skin diseases: a cross-sectional study through Web of Sciences and Scopus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manriquez, Juan; Cataldo, Karina; Harz, Isidora

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Disseminating information derived from systematic reviews is a fundamental step for translating evidence into practice. OBJECTIVE To determine which features of dermatological SR are associated with systematic review dissemination, using citation rates as an indicator. METHODS Dermatological systematic reviews published between 2008 and 2012 were obtained from Scopus, the ISI Web of Sciences and the Cochrane Skin Group. Bibliometric data of every systematic review were collected and analyzed. RESULTS A total of 320 systematic reviews were analyzed. Univariable analysis showed that the journal impact factor, number of authors, and total references cited were positively associated with the number of citations. There was a significant difference in the median number of citations with regard to the corresponding author's country, type of skin disease, type of funding, and presence of international collaboration. Cochrane reviews were significantly associated with a lower number of citations. Multivariable analysis found that the number of authors, number of references cited and the corresponding author from United Kingdom were independently correlated with many citations. Cochrane systematic reviews tended to be independently associated with a lower number of citations. CONCLUSIONS Citation number to systematic reviews may be improving by increasing the number of authors, especially collaborative authors, and the number of cited references. The reasons for the association of Cochrane SRs with fewer citations should be addressed in future studies. PMID:26560209

  17. Factors influencing citations to systematic reviews in skin diseases: a cross-sectional study through Web of Sciences and Scopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manriquez, Juan; Cataldo, Karina; Harz, Isidora

    2015-01-01

    Disseminating information derived from systematic reviews is a fundamental step for translating evidence into practice. To determine which features of dermatological SR are associated with systematic review dissemination, using citation rates as an indicator. Dermatological systematic reviews published between 2008 and 2012 were obtained from Scopus, the ISI Web of Sciences and the Cochrane Skin Group. Bibliometric data of every systematic review were collected and analyzed. A total of 320 systematic reviews were analyzed. Univariable analysis showed that the journal impact factor, number of authors, and total references cited were positively associated with the number of citations. There was a significant difference in the median number of citations with regard to the corresponding author's country, type of skin disease, type of funding, and presence of international collaboration. Cochrane reviews were significantly associated with a lower number of citations. Multivariable analysis found that the number of authors, number of references cited and the corresponding author from United Kingdom were independently correlated with many citations. Cochrane systematic reviews tended to be independently associated with a lower number of citations. Citation number to systematic reviews may be improving by increasing the number of authors, especially collaborative authors, and the number of cited references. The reasons for the association of Cochrane SRs with fewer citations should be addressed in future studies.

  18. College Students, Shared Decision Making, and the Appropriate Use of Antibiotics for Respiratory Tract Infections: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyer, Kristina; Hulton, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This systematic review examines shared decision making to promote the appropriate use of antibiotics for college students with respiratory tract infections. Participants/Methods: CINAL, Cochrane, PubMed, EBSCO, and PsycNET were searched in October 2014 using the following criteria: English language, human subjects, peer-reviewed, shared…

  19. Taste disorders: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For maintenance of the health of an individual, taste sensation is very important. It is an important sensation that serves to assess the nutritious content of food, support oral intake, and prevent ingestion of potentially toxic substances. Disturbances in the perception of taste can lead to loss of appetite, causing malnutrition and thus distressing both the physical and psychological well-being of the patient. Oral physicians are often the first clinicians who hear complaints about alteration in taste from the patients. In spite of the effect of taste changes on health, literature on the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and precise treatment of taste disorders are less. Taste changes may lead patients to seek inappropriate dental treatments. Proper diagnosis of the etiology is the foremost step in the treatment of taste disorders. Thus, it is important that dental clinicians to be familiar with the various causes and proper management of taste changes. In this article, we have reviewed related articles focusing on taste disorders and their management, to provide a quick sketch for the clinicians. A detailed search was performed to identify the systematic reviews and research articles on taste disorders, using PUBMED and Cochrane. All the authors independently extracted data for analysis and review. Ultimately, 26 articles underwent a full text review. In conclusion, the research to date certainly offers us valid management strategies for taste disorders. Meanwhile, practical strategies with the highest success are needed for further intervention.

  20. Systematic review: The relation between nutrition and nosocomial pneumonia: randomized trials in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Deborah; De Jonghe, Bernard; Heyland, Daren

    1997-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of enteral nutrition on nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients as summarized in randomized clinical trials. Study identification and selection Studies were identified through MEDLINE, SCISEARCH, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, bibliographies of primary and review articles, and personal files. Through duplicate independent review, we selected randomized trials evaluating approaches to nutrition and their relation to nosocomial pneumonia. Data abstraction I...

  1. Mapping Systematic Reviews on Atopic Eczema?An Essential Resource for Dermatology Professionals and Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki Futamura; Thomas, Kim S.; Grindlay, Douglas J.C.; Doney, Elizabeth J.; Donna Torley; Williams, Hywel C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many research studies have been published on atopic eczema and these are often summarised in systematic reviews (SRs). Identifying SRs can be time-consuming for health professionals, and researchers. In order to facilitate the identification of important research, we have compiled an on-line resource that includes all relevant eczema reviews published since 2000. METHODS: SRs were searched for in MEDLINE (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, D...

  2. Prevalence of asthenopia in children: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vilela, Manuel A.P.; Pellanda, Lucia C.; Fassa, Anaclaudia G.; Castagno, Victor D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of asthenopia in 0-18 year-old children through a systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence studies.SOURCES: Inclusion criteria were population-based studies from 1960 to May of 2014 reporting the prevalence of asthenopia in children. The search was performed independently by two reviewers in the PubMed, EMBASE, and LILACS databases, with no language restriction. This systematic review was performed in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration gu...

  3. Colaboración Cochrane Iberoamericana-Colombia región Antioquia y viejo Caldas. Identificación y descripción de los ensayos clínicos controlados publicados durante el período 1948 -1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pérez

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To locate with the highest possible exhaustiveness and then to describe the clinical trials (CT with random distribution published in the region. This information may allow a larger knowledge of this type of scientific activity, and constitute the departure base for the tasks of the Cochrane Ibero-American Collaboration. Methodology: Manual search of possible controlled clinical trials in the main titles of medical journals in the region. Results: 23 publications were reviewed, in which 53 controlled clinical trials and three randomized clinical trials were found. Conclusions: This is a pioneer work in Antioquia and old Caldas in the search for controlled clinical trials in the main publications between 1948-1998; this work is part of the study “Identification of controlled clinical studies and meta-analysis in Colombian health magazines 1948-1998”, started with the goal of creating a Latin American database specialized in clinical trials, and in this way to be able to compete with the international indexes. Entidades: Escuela de Investigaciones Médicas Aplicadas, Biblioteca Médica, Facultad de Medicina; Sistema de Bibliotecas, Universidad de Antioquia. Objetivo: localizar y describir los ensayos clínicos (EC con distribución aleatoria publicados en la región. Se pretende que esta información permita un mayor conocimiento de este tipo de actividad científica, así como que constituya la base de partida para los trabajos de la Colaboración Cochrane Iberoamericana. Metodología: búsqueda manual en los principales títulos de revistas médicas de la región de los posibles ensayos clínicos controlados. Resultados: se revisaron 23 revistas, en las cuales se encontraron 52 ensayos clínicos controlados y tres ensayos clínicos aleatorizados. Conclusiones: este trabajo es pionero en Antioquia y el viejo Caldas en la búsqueda de ensayos clínicos controlados en las principales publicaciones entre 1948-1998. Hace parte del

  4. Milk thistle for alcoholic and/or hepatitis B or C liver diseases--a systematic Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group review with meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Jacobs, Bradly P; Iaquinto, Gaetano

    2005-01-01

    Our objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of milk thistle (MT) or MT constituents versus placebo or no intervention in patients with alcoholic liver disease and/or hepatitis B and/or C liver diseases.......Our objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of milk thistle (MT) or MT constituents versus placebo or no intervention in patients with alcoholic liver disease and/or hepatitis B and/or C liver diseases....

  5. Treadmill interventions with partial body weight support in children under six years of age at risk of neuromotor delay : a report of a Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentin-Gudiol, M.; Bagur-Calafat, C.; Girabent-Farres, M.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Mattern-Baxter, K.; Angulo-Barroso, R.

    Delayed motor development may occur in children with Down syndrome, cerebral palsy or children born preterm, which in turn may limit the child's opportunities to explore the environment. Neurophysiologic and early intervention literature suggests that task-specific training facilitates motor

  6. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the COCHRANE and other platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Controlled Ecosystem Pollution Experiment (IDOE/CEPEX) from 1973-10-28 to 1975-01-29 (NODC Accession 7500529)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the COCHRANE and other platforms from 28 October 1973 to 29 January...

  7. Dental Implants With Immediate Loading Using Insertion Torque of 30 Ncm: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas de Oliveira, Dhelfeson Willya; Lages, Frederico Santos; Lanza, Leonardo Avellar; Gomes, Alex Martins; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira; Costa, Fernando de Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to perform a review of the literature regarding the survival rate of dental implants with immediate loading using insertion torque of 30 Ncm. A systematic review was performed based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions (PROSPERO CRD42014015323). The search was performed in the PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library electronic, OVID, and Scielo databases. Manual searches were also performed. The articles identified were assessed independently by 3 researchers. Clinical trials reporting dental implants with immediate loading and 30 Ncm torque in patients ages 18 years or older were included. The searches yielded 589 studies. Six studies were included in the systematic review. The survival rate of dental implants was 96.8%. Three studies showed a low potential risk of bias. There is not strong evidence that insertion torque of 30 Ncm is enough for implant survival in cases of immediate loading.

  8. Physical Exercise and Physical Activity for Children and Adolescents With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Hilenia; Fortini, Viola; Cimaz, Rolando

    2017-07-01

    This is a review of studies that investigate the efficacy of exercise therapy and physical activity for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the 2008 Cochrane Review. Studies were identified that investigated the use of physical activity and exercise therapy in the treatment of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, excluding the Cochrane Review. Two reviewers individually analyzed the results of the search to determine the eligibility of studies. The randomized controlled trial study designs were evaluated using PEDro scales. Recent literature supports the importance of the combination of strengthening, stretching, proprioceptive, and balance exercises and activities in water. Many of the reviewed studies proposed an intensive program of physical activity and exercise therapy, conducted 3 times a week for 12 weeks.

  9. Multidisciplinary Team Training in a Simulation Setting for Acute Obstetric Emergencies A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merién, A. E. R.; van de Ven, J.; Mol, B. W.; Houterman, S.; Oei, S. G.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of multidisciplinary teamwork training in a simulation setting for the reduction of medical adverse outcomes in obstetric emergency situations. DATA SOURCES: We searched Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from

  10. The reliability and validity of ultrasound to quantify muscles in older adults : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Willemke; Scafoglieri, Aldo; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Hobbelen, Johannes S. M.; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    This review evaluates the reliability and validity of ultrasound to quantify muscles in older adults. The databases PubMed, Cochrane, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were systematically searched for studies. In 17 studies, the reliability (n = 13) and validity (n = 8) of

  11. The effect of mobilization on repaired extensor tendon injuries of the hand: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, Eelkje; de Haart, Mirjam; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence comparing the effectiveness of different rehabilitation regimes in repaired extensor tendon injuries of the hand. DATA SOURCES: A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1950-January 2008), PEDro (up to January 2008),

  12. Efficacy and safety of medical cannabinoids in older subjects: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsen, G.A.H. van den; Ahmed, A.I.A.; Lammers, M.; Kramers, C.; Verkes, R.J.; Marck, M.A. van der; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to integrate the evidence on indications, efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of medical cannabinoids in older subjects. The literature search was conducted using PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane Library. We selected controlled trials including solely older subjects

  13. Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Autistic Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Stephen; Bertoglio, Kiah; Hendren, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review to determine the safety and efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids for autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). Articles were identified by a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database using the terms autism or autistic and omega-3 fatty acids. The search identified 143 potential articles and six satisfied all…

  14. The efficacy of woodsticks on plaque and gingival inflammation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoenderdos, N.L.; Slot, D.E.; Paraskevas, S.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To review the literature on whether a hand-held triangular woodstick, as compared with no adjunct or other interdental cleaning device in addition to daily toothbrushing, can improve clinical parameters of gingival inflammation. Material and Methods: MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central

  15. Plaque removal with triple-headed vs single-headed manual toothbrushes-a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalf-Scholte, S. M.; van der Weijden, G. A.; Bakker, E. W. P.; Slot, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to establish the effectiveness of brushing with a triple-headed manual toothbrush compared to a single-headed manual toothbrush on plaque removal. The MEDLINE-PubMed and Cochrane-CENTRAL databases were searched. The inclusion criteria were clinical trials

  16. Problem-Solving Therapy for Depression in Adults: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Zvi D.; Kenaley, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a systematic review of the evidence on problem-solving therapy (PST) for depressive disorders in noninstitutionalized adults. Method: Intervention studies using randomized controlled designs are included and methodological quality is assessed using a standard set of criteria from the Cochrane Collaborative Review…

  17. Efficacy and safety of uterine manipulators in laparoscopic surgery: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haak, L. van den; Alleblas, C.; Nieboer, T.E.; Rhemrev, J.P.; Jansen, F.W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This review aims to objectively assess the efficacy and safety of uterine manipulators as reported in scientific literature. Furthermore, it evaluates as to which manipulator best suits which surgical procedure. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, COCHRANE, CINAHL, Academic Search

  18. Efficacy and safety of uterine manipulators in laparoscopic surgery : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Haak, L.; Alleblas, C.; Nieboer, T.E.; Rhemrev, J.P.; Jansen, F.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This review aims to objectively assess the efficacy and safety of uterine manipulators as reported in scientific literature. Furthermore, it evaluates as to which manipulator best suits which surgical procedure. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, COCHRANE, CINAHL, Academic Search

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of disease activity in Crohn's disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, Karin; Bipat, Shandra; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Stoker, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the accuracy of MRI for grading disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD). The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the accuracy of MRI in grading CD compared to a predefined reference standard. Two independent observers

  20. The efficacy of Tai Chi Chuan in older adults: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); M. Immink; A. van der Meulen; S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) on fall prevention, balance and cardiorespiratory functions in the elderly. METHODS: A systematic review was carried out according to the Cochrane standards. A computerized literature

  1. Surgical techniques for sciatica due to herniated disc, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Wilco C H; Arts, Mark P.; van Tulder, Maurits W; Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Ostelo, Raymond W; Verhagen, Arianne P; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Disc herniation with sciatica accounts for five percent of low-back disorders but is one of the most common reasons for spine surgery. The goal of this study was to update the Cochrane review on the effect of surgical techniques for sciatica due to disc herniation, which was last

  2. Skeletal anchorage in orthodontics : A review of various systems in animal and human studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Krista I.; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Vissink, Arjan; Sandham, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present investigation was to review and evaluate the current literature on skeletal bone anchorage in orthodontics with regard to success rates of the various systems. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane searches (period January 1966 to January 2006, English

  3. The effects of mechanical instruments on contaminated titanium dental implant surfaces: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louropoulou, A.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the ability of mechanical instruments to clean contaminated implant titanium surfaces. Materials and methods MEDLINE, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to May 2013 to identify controlled studies on the cleaning

  4. Influence of mechanical instruments on the biocompatibility of titanium dental implants surfaces: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louropoulou, A.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of mechanical instruments on the biocompatibility of titanium dental implant surfaces. Materials and methods MEDLINE, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to December 2013, to identify controlled studies

  5. Intranasal fentanyl in the treatment of acute pain--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M S; Mathiesen, O; Trautner, S

    2012-01-01

    population. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence of IN fentanyl in the treatment of acute pain. Reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of IN fentanyl in treatment of pain were systematically sought using the PubMed database, Embase, Google scholar, Cochrane...

  6. Costs and financial benefits of video communication compared to usual care at home: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.M.; Mistiaen, P.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of video communication in home care to provide insight into the ratio between the costs and financial benefits (i.e. cost savings). Four databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, CINAHL) were searched for studies on video communication for patients living at home

  7. The relationship between severity of Alzheimer's Disease and the prevalence of comorbid depression: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Nuyen, J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Francke, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To gain more insight into the association between severity of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and prevalence of comorbid depression. METHODS: A systematic literature review based on the Cochrane methodology was performed. PubMed, PsychINFO and EMBASE databases were searched for existing studies

  8. Treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, Wijnand J.; Slot, Dagmar E.; Susanto, Hendri; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Abbas, Frank; D'Aiuto, Francesco; Kastelein, John J. P.; Loos, Bruno G.

    AimSystematic review and meta-analyses to study the robustness of observations that treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile. Material and MethodsLiterature was searched in Medline-PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE, based on controlled periodontal intervention trials,

  9. Treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.J.; Slot, D.E.; Susanto, H.; Gerdes, V.E.A.; Abbas, F.; D'Aiuto, F.; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Loos, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Systematic review and meta-analyses to study the robustness of observations that treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile. Material and Methods Literature was searched in Medline-PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE, based on controlled periodontal intervention trials,

  10. Treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, Wijnand J.; Slot, Dagmar E.; Susanto, Hendri; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Abbas, Frank; D'Aiuto, Francesco; Kastelein, John J. P.; Loos, Bruno G.

    2014-01-01

    AimSystematic review and meta-analyses to study the robustness of observations that treatment of periodontitis improves the atherosclerotic profile. Material and MethodsLiterature was searched in Medline-PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE, based on controlled periodontal intervention trials,

  11. The prevalence of oral and peri-oral piercings in young adults: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennequin-Hoenderdos, N.L.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of oral and/or peri-oral piercings in young adults based on a systematic review of the available literature. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were comprehensively searched through April 2012 to identify appropriate

  12. The incidence of complications associated with lip and/or tongue piercings: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennequin-Hoenderdos, N.L.; Slot, D.E.; Van der Weijden, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This review determines the incidence of complications associated with lip and/or tongue piercings based on a systematic evaluation of the available literature. Material and Methods: MEDLINE–PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were comprehensively searched through June 2014 to

  13. Voice and speech outcomes of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobi, Irene; van der Molen, Lisette; Huiskens, Hermelinde; van Rossum, Maya A.; Hilgers, Frans J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of this review is to systematically assess the effects on voice and speech of advanced head and neck cancer and its treatment by means of chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The databases Medline, Embase and Cochrane were searched (1991-2009) for terms head and neck cancer, chemoradiation, voice and

  14. Use of diuretics and the risk of gouty arthritis: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hueskes, B.A.; Roovers, E.A.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A.K.; Janssens, H.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Janssen, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature investigating the relationship between use of diuretics and the risk of gouty arthritis. METHODS: PubMed (1950-October 2009), Embase (1974-October 2009), and the Cochrane Library (up to October 2009) were searched using keywords and MeSH terms

  15. Relation between hospital volume and outcome of elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henebiens, M.; van den Broek, Th A. A.; Vahl, A. C.; Koelemay, M. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to analyse the relation between hospital volume and peri-operative mortality in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: The Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched to identify all population based studies reporting on the volume

  16. Kosten en financiële baten van videocommunicatie in de zorg thuis: een systematisch review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mistiaen, P.; Peeters, J.; Francke, A.

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To get insight into the balance between costs and financial benefits of video communication in home care. METHOD: In a systematic review four databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, COCHRANE LIBRARY, CINAHL) were searched for studies on video communication for people living at home. Studies were exclusively

  17. Whitening dentifrice and tooth surface discoloration-a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeteman, G. D.; Valkenburg, C.; van der Weijden, G. A.; van Loveren, C.; Bakker, E. W. P.; Slot, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of a whitening dentifrice (WDF) relative to a regular dentifrice (RDF) on the reduction of natural extrinsic tooth surface discoloration (ETD). The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EBSCO-Dentistry and Oral Sciences databases were

  18. Whitening dentifrice and tooth surface discoloration-a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeteman, G. D.; Valkenburg, C.; van der Weijden, G. A.; van Loveren, C.; Bakker, Ewp; Slot, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of a whitening dentifrice (WDF) relative to a regular dentifrice (RDF) on the reduction of natural extrinsic tooth surface discoloration (ETD). The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EBSCO-Dentistry and Oral Sciences databases were

  19. Ultrasound for Distal Forearm Fracture : A Systematic Review and Diagnostic Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma-den Hamer, Djoke; Blanker, Marco H; Edens, Mireille A; Buijteweg, Lonneke N; Boomsma, Martijn F; van Helden, Sven H; Mauritz, Gert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting distal forearm fractures. Methods A systematic review and diagnostic meta-analysis was performed according to the PRISMA statement. We searched MEDLINE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library from inception to

  20. Schizophrenia and depression: A systematic review of the effectiveness and the working mechanisms behind acupuncture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This systematic review assessed clinical evidence for the use of acupuncture as an add-on treatment in patients with depression and schizophrenia and for its underlying working mechanisms. DATA SOURCES: Four databases (Medline, Scopus, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library) were searched with a

  1. Mode of delivery after successful external cephalic version: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hundt, Marcella; Velzel, Joost; de Groot, Christianne J.; Mol, Ben W.; Kok, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    To assess the mode of delivery in women after a successful external cephalic version by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and the Cochrane Library for studies reporting on the

  2. Multiloculated hydrocephalus: a review of current problems in classification and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Morten; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    nomenclatures exist, and none address the pathophysiological basis of the condition. To clarify current treatment options, we carried out a review of the literature. METHODS: A protocol describing search strategy and inclusion criteria was prepared in advance, and a search of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database...

  3. Radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head and neck cancer patients : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Marjolein J.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    Purpose: To review literature on the relationship between the dose distribution in the thyroid gland and the incidence of radiation-induced hypothyroidism in adults. Material and Methods: Articles were identified through a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Approximately 2449

  4. Determining the Effectiveness of Alternative Seating Systems for Students with Attention Difficulties: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochenour, Brittany; Poskey, Gail A.

    2017-01-01

    A student's ability to attend in the classroom is an important factor in determining academic success. This systematic review examined the effects of an alternative seating system on improving attention in students with attention difficulties. Databases searched included CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, OTSeeker, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar.…

  5. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : Systematic review of clinical risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Engelen, Klaartje; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Elliott, Perry M.; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a systematic literature review of recommended 'major' and 'possible' clinical risk markers for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases for articles published between 1971 and 2007. We included English

  6. Risk stratification for sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: systematic review of clinical risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; van Engelen, Klaartje; van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Elliott, Perry M.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2010-01-01

    We performed a systematic literature review of recommended 'major' and 'possible' clinical risk markers for sudden cardiac death (SCD) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases for articles published between 1971 and 2007. We included English

  7. Fecal microbiota transplantation as novel therapy in gastroenterology: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, Noortje G.; Macdonald, John K.; de Vries, Elisabeth M.; D'Haens, Geert R.; de Vos, Willem M.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.

    2015-01-01

    To study the clinical efficacy and safety of Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). We systematically reviewed FMT used as clinical therapy. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Conference proceedings from inception to July, 2013. Treatment effect of FMT was calculated as the

  8. Fecal microbiota transplantation as novel therapy in gastroenterology: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, N.G.; MacDonald, J.K.; Vries, de E.M.; Haens, D' G.R.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Ponsioen, C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical efficacy and safety of Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). We systematically reviewed FMT used as clinical therapy. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Conference proceedings from inception to July, 2013. Treatment effect of FMT was

  9. The efficacy of Tai Chi Chuan in older adults: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); M. Immink; A. van der Meulen; S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) on fall prevention, balance and cardiorespiratory functions in the elderly. METHODS: A systematic review was carried out according to the Cochrane standards. A computerized

  10. Review: Bone conduction devices and contralateral routing of sound systems in single-sided deafness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Jeroen P M; Smit, Adriana L; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Systematically review the literature on the clinical outcome of bone conduction devices (BCD) and contralateral routing of sound systems (CROSS) for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD). DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases were searched up

  11. Whitening dentifrice and tooth surface discolorationa systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeteman, G. D.; Valkenburg, C.; van der Weijden, G. A.; van Loveren, C.; Bakker, Ewp; Slot, D. E.

    2018-01-01

    ObjectiveThe aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of a whitening dentifrice (WDF) relative to a regular dentifrice (RDF) on the reduction of natural extrinsic tooth surface discoloration (ETD). Materials and methodsThe MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EBSCO-Dentistry and Oral

  12. The Relationship between Sugar-Containing Methadone and Dental Caries: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathee, Sheela; Akbar, Tahira; Richards, Derek; Themessl-Huber, Markus; Freeman, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To review the evidence of a relationship between sugar-containing methadone and dental caries. Data sources: A systematic search of Cochrane Library, PubMed, PsychINFO, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Current Controlled Trials, WHO, OHRN, SIGLE and ERIC databases was conducted from January 1978 up to June 2010. Study selection: Articles were assessed…

  13. Recommendations for reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of diagnostic test accuracy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Trevor A; Alabousi, Mostafa; Skidmore, Becky; Korevaar, Daniël A; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Moher, David; Thombs, Brett; McInnes, Matthew D F

    2017-10-10

    This study is to perform a systematic review of existing guidance on quality of reporting and methodology for systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) in order to compile a list of potential items that might be included in a reporting guideline for such reviews: Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses of Diagnostic Test Accuracy (PRISMA-DTA). Study protocol published on EQUATOR website. Articles in full text or abstract form that reported on any aspect of reporting systematic reviews of diagnostic test accuracy were eligible for inclusion. We used the Ovid platform to search Ovid MEDLINE®, Ovid MEDLINE® In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations and Embase Classic+Embase through May 5, 2016. The Cochrane Methodology Register in the Cochrane Library (Wiley version) was also searched. Title and abstract screening followed by full-text screening of all search results was performed independently by two investigators. Guideline organization websites, published guidance statements, and the Cochrane Handbook for Diagnostic Test Accuracy were also searched. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) were assessed independently by two investigators for relevant items. The literature searched yielded 6967 results; 386 were included after title and abstract screening and 203 after full-text screening. After reviewing the existing literature and guidance documents, a preliminary list of 64 items was compiled into the following categories: title (three items); introduction (two items); methods (35 items); results (13 items); discussion (nine items), and disclosure (two items). Items on the methods and reporting of DTA systematic reviews in the present systematic review will provide a basis for generating a PRISMA extension for DTA systematic reviews.

  14. Resensie: Wolf, wolf | Cochrane | Tydskrif vir letterkunde

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eben Venter. Kaapstad: Tafelberg, 2013. 274 pp. ISBN 978-0-624-05499-3. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/tvl.v50i2.24 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  15. 25 Resensie Cochrane WEB 03.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Ná 'n publikasiedroogte van veertien jaar beleef Johann de Lange sedert die verskyning van Die algebra van nood (2009) 'n bloeitydperk met die publikasie van Weerlig van die ongeloof. (2011), Vaarwel, my effens bevlekte held (2012) en sy mees resente bundel Stil punt van die aarde. (2014). 'n Moontlike verklaring ...

  16. Methological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on acupuncture for stroke: A review of review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin-Lin; Mo, Chuan-Wei; Lu, Li-Ya; Gao, Ri-Yang; Xu, Qian; Wu, Min-Feng; Zhou, Qian-Yi; Hu, Yue; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Xian-Tao

    2017-11-01

    To assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses regarding acupuncture intervention for stroke and the primary studies within them. Two researchers searched PubMed, Cumulative index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine, Ovid Medline, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang and Traditional Chinese Medical Database to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses about acupuncture for stroke published from the inception to December 2016. Review characteristics and the criteria for assessing the primary studies within reviews were extracted. The methodological quality of the reviews was assessed using adapted Oxman and Guyatt Scale. The methodological quality of primary studies was also assessed. Thirty-two eligible reviews were identified, 15 in English and 17 in Chinese. The English reviews were scored higher than the Chinese reviews (P=0.025), especially in criteria for avoiding bias and the scope of search. All reviews used the quality criteria to evaluate the methodological quality of primary studies, but some criteria were not comprehensive. The primary studies, in particular the Chinese reviews, had problems with randomization, allocation concealment, blinding, dropouts and withdrawals, intent-to-treat analysis and adverse events. Important methodological flaws were found in Chinese systematic reviews and primary studies. It was necessary to improve the methodological quality and reporting quality of both the systematic reviews published in China and primary studies on acupuncture for stroke.

  17. Associations between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals : A systematic review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Dewi; de Brouwer, Brigitte J M; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the literature on relationships between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals. Data sources: The search was performed in Medline (PubMed), Cochrane, Embase, and CINAHL. Review methods: Included were

  18. The Effectiveness of Family Interventions in Preventing Adolescent Illicit Drug Use: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.; Verdurmen, J.E.E.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2015-01-01

    In order to quantify the effectiveness of family interventions in preventing and reducing adolescent illicit drug use, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Educational Research Information Centre

  19. The efficacy of oral irrigation in addition to a toothbrush on plaque and the clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husseini, A.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this review was to systematically review the literature on the adjunctive effect of oral irrigation in addition to toothbrushing on plaque and clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation. Material and Methods: Papers in the MEDLINE-PubMed and Cochrane Central register of

  20. Associations between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals: a systematic review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, D.; Brouwer, B.J.M. de; Kaljouw, M.J.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature on relationships between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The search was performed in Medline (PubMed), Cochrane, Embase, and CINAHL. REVIEW METHODS: Included were

  1. Are older adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain less active than older adults without pain? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbs, B.; Binnekade, T.T.; Soundy, A.; Schofield, P.; Huijnen, I.P.; Eggermont, L.H.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the overall levels of physical activity of older adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain and asymptomatic controls. Review Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using a Cochrane methodology and reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items

  2. Tools assessment and diagnosis to infant colic: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Marqués, S; Chillón Martínez, R; González Zapata, S; Rebollo Salas, M; Jiménez Rejano, J J

    2017-07-01

    Infant colic occurs between 10% and 40% of healthy born children in their first year of life. Its assessment is complex, and there are only a few instruments of appraisement and diagnosis. Scientific articles located through a systematic review using the Pubmed, Scopus, Cochrane, PEDro, Dialnet, IME and Dialnet databases. Two researchers obtained data independently from relevant studies previously identified. Risk of bias was assessed according to the methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration, with reporting following the preferred reported items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines and evaluating their methodological quality based on the EMPRO scale. Four tools were obtained for valuation of infant colic. Parental diary of infant cry and fuss behaviour, Crying Pattern Questionnaire, Infant Colic Scale and, lastly, a validity of the Turkish version of the Infant Colic Scale. Analysis of the existing tools involves the need to design and validate new assessment scales for this clinical frame. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Therapeutic Listening as a health intervention strategy: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Cláudia Mesquita; Emilia Campos de Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate and evaluate the available evidence in the literature regarding the use of Therapeutic Listening as a health intervention strategy. Method Integrative review conducted on the following databases PubMed, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, LILACS and APA PsycNET without restrictions of year or type of study. The keywords were combined in different ways to ensure extensive search of primary studies. ...

  4. Adherence to nutritional therapy in obese adolescents: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Lima Guimarães França; Viviane Sahade; Mônica Nunes; Adan, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Considering the controversies existent on the subject, the aim of this review is to discuss adherence to diet in obese adolescents. The selection of articles was made in the SCOPUS, COCHRANE, APA Psyc Net, SciELO, LILACS, CAPES Journals, PUBMED/MEDLINE and GOOGLE ACADEMIC databases. Studies published between 2002 and 2012 were selected. There was lack of evidence of conceptual discussion about adherence to diet in obesity in the child-youth context, in addition to scarcity of data on adherenc...

  5. Prevalence of sleep bruxism in children: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Machado; Cibele Dal-Fabbro; Paulo Afonso Cunali; Osvaldo Bazzan Kaizer

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of sleep bruxism (SB) in children is subject to discussions in the literature. OBJECTIVE: This study is a systematic literature review aiming to critically assess the prevalence of SB in children. METHODS: Survey using the following research databases: MEDLINE, Cochrane, EMBASE, PubMed, Lilacs and BBO, from January 2000 to February 2013, focusing on studies specifically assessing the prevalence of SB in children. RESULTS: After applying the inclusion criteria, four st...

  6. Social networking in nursing education: integrative literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Emi Kakushi; Yolanda Dora Martinez Évora

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the use of social networking in nursing education. Method: integrative literature review in the databases: LILACS, IBECS, Cochrane, BDENF, SciELO, CINAHL, Scopus, PubMed, CAPES Periodicals Portal and Web of Science, using the descriptors: social networking and nursing education and the keywords: social networking sites and nursing education, carried out in April 2015. Results: of the 489 articles found, only 14 met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Mo...

  7. Laparoscopic 5-mm Trocar Site Herniation and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Miya; Minikel, Laura; Zaritsky, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the evidence for fascial closure of 5-mm laparoscopic trocar sites. Methods: We conducted electronic database searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library for articles published between November 2008 and December 2010. We used the keywords trocar hernia, trocar-site hernia, laparoscopic hernia, trocar port-site hernia, laparoscopic port-site hernia. Prospective and retrospective case series, randomized trials, literature reviews, and randomized animal studies of trocar h...

  8. Return to sport following tibial plateau fractures: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wong, Seng J; Wood, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    AIM To systemically review all studies reporting return to sport following tibial plateau fracture, in order to provide information on return rates and times to sport, and to assess variations in sporting outcome for different treatment methods. METHODS A systematic search of CINAHAL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science was performed in January 2017 using the keywords ?tibial?, ?plateau?, ?fractures?, ?knee?, ?athletes?, ?sports?, ?non-oper...

  9. Association Between Alcohol Sports Sponsorship and Consumption: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Aim Concerns have been raised about the impact of alcohol sports sponsorship on harmful consumption, with some countries banning this practice or considering a ban. We review evidence on the relationship between exposure to alcohol sports sponsorship and alcohol consumption. Methods Search of electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and International Alcohol Information Database) supplemented by hand searches of references and conference proceedings to locate studies pro...

  10. Scoliosis and dental occlusion: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Tecco Simona; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Mummolo Stefano; Tettamanti Lucia; Saccucci Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Idiopathic scoliosis is a deformity without clear etiology. It is unclear wether there is an association between malocclusion and scoliosis. Several types of occlusion were described in subjects with scoliosis, mostly case-reports. Objectives The aim of this review was to evaluate the type of occluslins more prevalent in subjects with scoliosis Search strategy All randomised and controlled clinical trials identified from the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, a ME...

  11. Reporting of financial and non-financial conflicts of interest by authors of systematic reviews: a methodological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoum, Maram B; Anouti, Sirine; Al-Gibbawi, Mounir; Abou-Jaoude, Elias A; Hasbani, Divina Justina; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Agarwal, Arnav; Guyatt, Gordon; Akl, Elie A

    2016-08-10

    Conflicts of interest may bias the findings of systematic reviews. The objective of this methodological survey was to assess the frequency and different types of conflicts of interest that authors of Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews report. We searched for systematic reviews using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Ovid MEDLINE (limited to the 119 Core Clinical Journals and the year 2015). We defined a conflict of interest disclosure as the reporting of whether a conflict of interest exists or not, and used a framework to classify conflicts of interest into individual (financial, professional and intellectual) and institutional (financial and advocatory) conflicts of interest. We conducted descriptive and regression analyses. Of the 200 systematic reviews, 194 (97%) reported authors' conflicts of interest disclosures, typically in the main document, and in a few cases either online (2%) or on request (5%). Of the 194 Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews, 49% and 33%, respectively, had at least one author reporting any type of conflict of interest (p=0.023). Institutional conflicts of interest were less frequently reported than individual conflicts of interest, and Cochrane reviews were more likely to report individual intellectual conflicts of interest compared with non-Cochrane reviews (19% and 5%, respectively, p=0.004). Regression analyses showed a positive association between reporting of conflicts of interest (at least one type of conflict of interest, individual financial conflict of interest, institutional financial conflict of interest) and journal impact factor and between reporting individual financial conflicts of interest and pharmacological versus non-pharmacological intervention. Although close to half of the published systematic reviews report that authors (typically many) have conflicts of interest, more than half report that they do not. Authors reported individual conflicts of interest more frequently than institutional and

  12. Five indicators were developed to assess the quality of reviews on preventive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaouat, Sara; Roustaei, Zahra; Verbeek, Jos; Ruotsalainen, Jani

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the study was to develop quality indicators for preventive effectiveness and to evaluate their use with Cochrane Reviews of primary preventive interventions. Based on the quality of care framework, we searched the literature to develop a set of quality indicators. Two authors applied the quality indicators independently to a sample of Cochrane systematic reviews of primary prevention. Five quality indicators were developed: sample size, directness of evidence, adherence, harm, and costs. We applied the quality indicators to a random sample of 84 of a total of 264 Cochrane reviews of primary preventive interventions. Only 70% reviews (n = 59) complied with the indicator sample size, whereas 61% (n = 51) complied with directness of the outcome, 48% (n = 40) with adherence, 76% (n = 64) with harm, and 46% (n = 39) with the indicator cost. Applying the five quality indicators is feasible. The quality of evidence in reviews of primary prevention can be substantially improved. Trialists and review authors should provide more information especially on adherence, costs, and indirectness of the outcome. Methodological research is needed on how to incorporate cost information in systematic reviews and how to better deal with indirectness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tachykinin receptors antagonism for asthma: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couto Nuno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tachykinins substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B seem to account for asthma pathophysiology by mediating neurogenic inflammation and several aspects of lung mechanics. These neuropeptides act mainly by their receptors NK1, NK2 and NK3, respectively which may be targets for new asthma therapy. Methods This review systematically examines randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of tachykinins receptors antagonism on asthma. Symptoms, airway inflammation, lung function and airway inflammation were considered as outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialized Register of Asthma Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE. The search is as current as June 2010. Quality rating of included studies followed the Cochrane Collaboration and GRADE Profiler approaches. However, data were not pooled together due to different measures among the studies. Results Our systematic review showed the potential of NK receptor antagonist to decrease airway responsiveness and to improve lung function. However, effects on airway inflammation and asthma symptoms were poorly or not described. Conclusion The limited available evidence suggests that tachykinin receptors antagonists may decrease airway responsiveness and improve lung function in patients with asthma. Further large randomized trials are still required.

  14. Scientific Secretariat of The Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders, Carragee E, Carroll L, Guzman J, Haldeman S, Holm L, Hurwitz E, Nordin M, Peloso P. The sensitivity of review results to methods used to appraise and incorporate trial quality into data synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, G..; van Tulder, M.W.; Cote, P.; Hogg-Johnson, S.; Aker, P.; Cassidy, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Systematic review. OBJECTIVE. To determine whether results and conclusions on the effectiveness of exercise for workers with neck pain vary with the Cochrane Back Review Group Guidelines and best-evidence synthesis review methods. To identify methodologic weaknesses associated with

  15. Frankincense: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess evidence from randomised clinical trials about the effectiveness of extracts of Boswellia serrata (frankincense). Design Systematic review. Data sources Electronic searches on Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Amed, and Cochrane Library. Hand searches of conference proceedings, bibliographies, and departmental files. Review methods All randomised clinical trials of B serrata extract as a treatment for any human medical condition were included and studies of B serrata preparations combined with other ingredients were excluded. Titles and abstracts of all retrieved articles were read and hard copies of all relevant articles were obtained. Selection of studies, data extraction and validation were done by the author. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality of all included trials. Results Of 47 potentially relevant studies, seven met all inclusion criteria (five placebo controlled, two with active controls). The included trials related to asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease, osteoarthritis, and collagenous colitis. Results of all trials indicated that B serrata extracts were clinically effective. Three studies were of good methodological quality. No serious safety issues were noted. Conclusions The evidence for the effectiveness of B serrata extracts is encouraging but not compelling. PMID:19091760

  16. Racecadotril for acute diarrhoea in children: systematic review and meta-analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Morris; Akobeng, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE\\ud Racecadotril is an antisecretory agent that can prevent fluid/electrolyte depletion from the bowel as a result of acute diarrhoea, without affecting intestinal motility. An up-to-date systematic review is indicated to summarise the evidence on Racecadotril for the treatment of acute diarrhoea in children.\\ud DESIGN\\ud A Cochrane format systematic review of Randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data extraction and assessment of methodological quality were performed independently by...

  17. Invasive fungal sinusitis in the pediatric population: Systematic review with quantitative synthesis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron; Thimmappa, Vikrum; Shepherd, Brandon; Ray, Meredith; Sheyn, Anthony; Thompson, Jerome

    2016-11-01

    Invasive fungal sinusitis (IFS) represents an often fatal condition within the pediatric population. In an effort to characterize demographics, treatment modalities, and prognostic factors, we performed a systematic review. We systematically reviewed EMBASE, Medline, TRIPdatabase, SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for invasive fungal nasal and sinus infections limited to individuals sinusitis; however, approximately one seventh presented with only nasal findings and half overall had nasal involvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of Mediterranean Diet on Cardiovascular diseases: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Annalisa Ricco; Giacomina Chiaradia; Mariantonietta Piscitelli; Giuseppe La Torre

    2007-01-01

    Background: Diet and lifestyle-related factors may be responsible for the different geographical distribution of cardiovascular disease incidence. The aim of our study is to conduct a systematic review of the effect of Mediterranean Diet on cardiovascular diseases (CVD), in terms of prevention of both cardiovascular mortality and cardiovascular events. Methods: We undertook a scientific literature search using MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane database for systematic reviews. We selected studi...

  19. The health and socioeconomic impacts of major multi-sport events: systematic review (1978-2008)

    OpenAIRE

    McCartney, G.; Thomas, S.; Thomson, H; Scott, J; Hamilton, V.; Hanlon, P.; Morrison, D.S.; Bond, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of major multi-sport events on health and socioeconomic determinants of health in the population of the city hosting the event.\\ud \\ud Design Systematic review.\\ud \\ud Data sources We searched the following sources without language restrictions for papers published between 1978 and 2008: Applied Social Science Index and Abstracts (ASSIA), British Humanities Index (BHI), Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Econlit database, Embase, Education Resources Infor...

  20. Effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise following total knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Artz, Neil; Elvers, Karen T.; Lowe, Catherine Minns; Sackley, Cath; Jepson, Paul; Beswick, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation, with an emphasis on physiotherapy and exercise, is widely promoted after total knee replacement. However, provision of services varies in content and duration. The aim of this study is to update the review of Minns Lowe and colleagues 2007 using systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of post-discharge physiotherapy exercise in patients with primary total knee replacement. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Cochrane C...

  1. Mandibular Third Molar Impaction: Review of Literature and a Proposal of a Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Gintaras Juodzbalys; Povilas Daugela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review impacted mandibular third molar aetiology, clinical anatomy, radiologic examination, surgical treatment and possible complications, as well as to create new mandibular third molar impaction and extraction difficulty degree classification based on anatomical and radiologic findings and literature review results. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The ...

  2. Adherence to Diet and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines and Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, Lindsay N.; Garcia, David O.; Harris, Robin B.; Oren, Eyal; Roe, Denise J.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have reported that adherence to health promotion guidelines for diet, physical activity, and maintenance of healthy body weight may decrease cancer incidence and mortality. A systematic review was performed to examine associations between adherence to established cancer prevention guidelines for diet and physical activity and overall cancer incidence and mortality. PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews databases were searched following the current recommendations of Prefer...

  3. Motivational Interviewing As an Adjunct to Periodontal Therapy?A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Svenja L.; Ramseier, Christoph A.; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Woelber, Johan P.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Periodontal therapy is highly dependent on a patient's long-term adherence with regard to oral hygiene, diet, and regular check-ups at the dentist. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a client-centered, directive method for encouraging a patients' behavioral health change. The aim of this systematic review was to reveal the effects of MI as an adjunct to periodontal therapy. Methods: Three databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science) were reviewed for randomized controlled c...

  4. The Effectiveness of the Feldenkrais Method: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Hillier; Anthea Worley

    2015-01-01

    The Feldenkrais Method (FM) has broad application in populations interested in improving awareness, health, and ease of function. This review aimed to update the evidence for the benefits of FM, and for which populations. A best practice systematic review protocol was devised. Included studies were appraised using the Cochrane risk of bias approach and trial findings analysed individually and collectively where possible. Twenty RCTs were included (an additional 14 to an earlier systematic rev...

  5. Computerised decision support systems for healthcare professionals: an interpretative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin; Majeed, Azeem; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Computerised decision support systems are designed to support clinicians in making decisions and thereby enhance the quality and safety of care. We aimed to undertake an interpretative review of the empirical evidence on computerised decision support systems, their contexts of use, and summarise evidence on the effectiveness of these tools and insights into how these can be successfully implemented and adopted. We systematically searched the empirical literature to identify systematic literature reviews on computerised decision support applications and their impact on the quality and safety of healthcare delivery over a 13-year period (1997-2010). The databases searched included: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Methodology Register, The Health Technology Assessment Database, and The National Health Service (NHS) Economic Evaluation Database. To be eligible for inclusion, systematic reviews needed to address computerised decision support systems, and at least one of the following: impact on safety; quality; or organisational, implementation or adoption considerations. Our searches yielded 121 systematic reviews relating to eHealth, of which we identified 41 as investigating computerised decision support systems. These indicated that, whilst there was a lack of investigating potential risks, such tools can result in improvements in practitioner performance in the promotion of preventive care and guideline adherence, particularly if specific information is available in real time and systems are effectively integrated into clinical workflows. However, the evidence regarding impact on patient outcomes was less clear-cut with reviews finding either no, inconsistent or modest benefits. Whilst the potential of clinical decision support systems in improving, in particular, practitioner performance is considerable, such technology may

  6. Nonmedical Treatments of Vocal Fold Nodules: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuri, Banafshe; Tohidast, Seyed Abolfazl; Soltaninejad, Nasibe; Kamali, Mohammad; Ghelichi, Leila; Azimi, Hadi

    2017-10-11

    The aim of the present systematic review was to investigate the nonmedical treatments of vocal fold nodules (VFNs). The present study is a systematic review. The following electronic databases were searched from inception until August 2016: PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Ovid, ISI (Web of Sciences), Cochrane, PsychINFO, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar. Reference lists of included articles were evaluated for additional data. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guidelines were used to carry out and report the review. The methodological quality of the articles included was evaluated using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. Due to the heterogeneity of the studies, a narrative synthesis of the evidence was performed to summarize the evidence. Out of 2,099 records identified, 21 articles met the inclusion criteria and thus were included in the review. The studies investigated in the present review were different in terms of study design, participant characteristics, types of assessments and treatments, and treatment delivery. However, nonmedical treatments of VFNs were found to be successful in improving vocal quality, decreasing VFN sizes, and resolving these nodules. The results of the present review could provide primary evidence related to the effectiveness of nonmedical treatment of VFNs. Yet further studies with a high level of evidence, a rigorous methodological quality, and long-term follow-up evaluations are required to make stronger claims. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Accuracy of mean arterial pressure and blood pressure measurements in predicting pre-eclampsia: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Jeltsje S.; Vollebregt, Karlijn C.; de Vrieze, Nynke; ter Riet, Gerben; Mol, Ben W. J.; Franx, Arie; Khan, Khalid S.; van der Post, Joris A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the accuracy of using systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, and increase of blood pressure to predict pre-eclampsia. Design Systematic review with meta-analysis of data on test accuracy. Data sources Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Medion, checking

  8. The effects of psychosocial methods on depressed, aggressive and apathetic behaviors of people with dementia: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; van Weert, J.C.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review seeks to establish the extent of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of 13 psychosocial methods for reducing depressed, aggressive or apathetic behaviors in people with dementia. METHODS: The guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration were followed. Using a

  9. The effects of psychosocial methods on depressed, aggressive and apathetic behaviors of people with dementia: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, R.; Weert, J.C.M. van; Francke, A.L.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This systematic review seeks to establish the extent of scientific evidence for the effectiveness of 13 psychosocial methods for reducing depressed, aggressive or apathetic behaviors in people with dementia. METHODS: The guidelines of the Cochrane Collaboration were followed. Using a

  10. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Anxiety and Depressive Disorders after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Annemieke C.; Haagsma, Juanita A.; Cnossen, Maryse C.; Olff, Miranda; van Beeck, Ed F.; Polinder, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    This review examined pre- and post-injury prevalence of, and risk factors for, anxiety disorders and depressive disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI), based on evidence from structured diagnostic interviews. A systematic literature search was conducted in EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central,

  11. Risk of malignant paraganglioma in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsteijn, L.T. van; Dekkers, O.M.; Hes, F.J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the risk of developing malignant paraganglioma (PGL) in SDHB-mutation and SDHD-mutation carriers. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, COCHRANE and Academic Search Premier (2000-August 2011) and references of key

  12. The effect of sugar-free chewing gum on plaque and clinical parameters of gingival inflammation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keukenmeester, R.S.; Slot, D.E.; Putt, M.S.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to systematically review the current literature on the clinical effects of sugar-free chewing gum on plaque indices and parameters of gingival inflammation. Material and methods The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to 20 April

  13. Effect of Cardiorespiratory Training on Aerobic Fitness and Carryover to Activity In Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jane M.; Scianni, Aline; Ada, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The question under consideration was does cardiorespiratory training improve aerobic fitness in children with cerebral palsy and is there any carryover into activity? The study design consisted of a systematic review of randomized trials using the Cochrane Collaboration guidelines. Participants were children of school age with cerebral palsy.…

  14. The effect of medicated, sugar-free chewing gum on plaque and clinical parameters of gingival inflammation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keukenmeester, R.S.; Slot, D.E.; Putt, M.S.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to systematically review the present literature to establish the clinical effect of medicated, sugar-free chewing gum on plaque indices and parameters of gingival inflammation. Materials and methods MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched up to

  15. Essential oils compared to chlorhexidine with respect to plaque and parameters of gingival inflammation: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, M.P.C.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to systematically evaluate the effects of an essential-oil mouthwash (EOMW) compared to a chlorhexidine mouthwash with respect to plaque and parameters of gingival inflammation. Methods: PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane CENTRAL databases were searched for studies

  16. Antiplatelet treatment for prevention of cerebrovascular events in patients with vascular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouya, G.; Arrich, J.; Wolzt, M.; Huber, K.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Gurbel, P.A.; Pirker-Kees, A.; Siller-Matula, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The efficacy and safety of different antiplatelet regimes for prevention of stroke in patients at high risk were investigated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and Web of Science.

  17. [227-POS]: Thromboelastography (TEG((R))) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM((R))) in pregnancy: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolte, A.C.; Hermans, F.J.; Rheenen-Flach, L.E. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the current position of thromboelastography (TEG) and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) in clinical obstetric practice. METHODS: A search of the literature was performed on the following databases PubMed MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews. All

  18. Uptake of systematic reviews and meta-analyses based on individual participant data in clinical practice guidelines: descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vale, C.L.; Rydzewska, L.H.; Rovers, M.M.; Emberson, J.R.; Gueyffier, F.; Stewart, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the extent to which systematic reviews and meta-analyses of individual participant data (IPD) are being used to inform the recommendations included in published clinical guidelines. DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Database maintained by the Cochrane IPD Meta-analysis

  19. Uptake of systematic reviews and meta-analyses based on individual participant data in clinical practice guidelines: descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vale, Claire L.; Rydzewska, Larysa H. M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Emberson, Jonathan R.; Gueyffier, François; Stewart, Lesley A.; Alderson, P.; Askie, L.; Bennett, D.; Burdett, S.; Clarke, M.; Dias, S.; Emberson, J.; Gueyffier, F.; Iorio, A.; Macleod, M.; Mol, B. W.; Moons, C.; Parmar, M.; Perera, R.; Phillips, R.; Pignon, J. P.; Rees, J.; Reitsma, H.; Riley, R.; Rovers, M.; Rydzewska, L.; Schmid, C.; Shepperd, S.; Stenning, S.; Stewart, L.; Tierney, J.; Tudur Smith, C.; Vale, C.; Welge, J.; White, I.; Whiteley, W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To establish the extent to which systematic reviews and meta-analyses of individual participant data (IPD) are being used to inform the recommendations included in published clinical guidelines. DESIGN Descriptive study. SETTING Database maintained by the Cochrane IPD Meta-analysis Methods

  20. Relationship of isolated single umbilical artery to fetal growth, aneuploidy and perinatal mortality : systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskamp, B. J.; Fleurke-Rozema, H.; Oude-Rengerink, K.; Snijders, R. J. M.; Bilardo, C. M.; Mol, B. W. J.; Pajkrt, E.

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveTo review the available literature on outcome of pregnancy when an isolated single umbilical artery (iSUA) is diagnosed at the time of the mid-trimester anomaly scan. MethodsWe searched MEDLINE (1948-2012), EMBASE (1980-2012) and the Cochrane Library (until 2012) for relevant citations

  1. Cochlear implantation for patients with single-sided deafness or asymmetrical hearing loss : A systematic review of the evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zon, Alice; Peters, Jeroen P M; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L.; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A systematic review of the literature to evaluate the clinical outcome of cochlear implantation for patients with single-sided deafness (SSD) or asymmetrical hearing loss (AHL). DATA SOURCES: We searched the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL databases from their inception up to

  2. Systematic Review on the Trial Period for Bone Conduction Devices in Single-Sided Deafness : Rates and Reasons for Rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, Anne W.; Kroese, Tiuri E.; Peters, Jeroen P.M.; Cattani, Guido; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the literature to evaluate the trial period of bone conduction devices (BCDs) for adult patients with single-sided deafness (SSD). Data Sources: The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception up to August 15, 2016 for SSD,

  3. Sleep and circadian rhythmicity in adult ADHD and the effect of stimulants: A review of the current literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snitselaar, M.A.; Smits, M.G.; Heijden, K.B. van der; Spijker, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This review updates information on sleep and circadian rhythmicity in adult ADHD, especially circadian rhythmicity and the influence of stimulants. Method: Investigations into sleep, chronotype, and circadian rhythm in adult ADHD were searched in the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, and

  4. Does patient coaching make a difference in patient-physician communication during specialist consultations? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alders, Iren; Smits, Carolien; Brand, Paul; van Dulmen, Sandra

    Objective: To systematically review the literature on the effectiveness of a patient coach intervention on patient - physician communication in specialists consultations. Methods: PubMed, Cochrane, PsycInfo, Cinahl and Embase were searched until November 2015. Included were papers describing

  5. Pain and the Risk for Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbs, B.; Binnekade, T.T.; Eggermont, L.H.P.; Sepehry, A.; Patchay, S.; Schofield, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the association between pain and falls in community-dwelling older adults. Data Sources: Electronic databases from inception until March 1, 2013, including Cochrane Library, CINAHL, EBSCO, EMBASE, PubMed, and PsycINFO. Study

  6. What is the optimal number of implants for removable reconstructions? A systematic review on implant-supported overdentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccuzzo, Mario; Bonino, Francesca; Gaudioso, Luigi; Zwahlen, Marcel; Meijer, Henny J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this systematic review was to assess the optimal number of implants for removable reconstructions. Material and methods Medline and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched and complemented by hand searching. All trials published in English to October

  7. A systematic review of sacroiliac joint interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie-Brown, Ann Marie; Shah, Rinoo V; Sehgal, Nalini; Everett, Clifford R

    2005-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint is an accepted source of low back pain with or without associated lower extremity symptoms. The diagnosis and management of sacroiliac joint pain and the role of interventional techniques have been controversial. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of sacroiliac joint interventions in the diagnosis and management of sacroiliac joint pain. A systematic review using the criteria as outlined by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Cochrane Review Group Criteria, and QUADAS criteria for diagnostic studies. The databases of EMBASE and MEDLINE (1966 to November 2004), and Cochrane Review were searched. The searches included systematic reviews, narrative reviews, prospective and retrospective studies, and cross-references from articles reviewed. The search strategy included sacroiliac joint pain and dysfunction, sacroiliac joint injections, interventions, and radiofrequency. The results of this systematic evaluation showed that for diagnostic purposes, there is moderate evidence showing the accuracy of comparative, controlled local anesthetic blocks. Prevalence of sacroiliac joint pain was demonstrated to be 10% to 19% by a double block paradigm. The false-positive rate of single, uncontrolled, sacroiliac joint injections was reported as 20%.For therapeutic purposes intraarticular sacroiliac joint injections with steroid and radiofrequency neurotomy were evaluated. Based on this review, there was moderate evidence for short-term and limited evidence for long-term relief with intraarticular sacroiliac joint injections. Evidence for radiofrequency neurotomy in managing sacroiliac joint pain was limited or inconclusive. The evidence for the specificity and validity of diagnostic sacroiliac joint injections was moderate.The evidence for therapeutic intraarticular sacroiliac joint injections was limited to moderate. The evidence for radiofrequency neurotomy in managing chronic sacroiliac joint pain was limited.

  8. Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Thomas; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2016-01-01

    state that searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL should be considered mandatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MECIR recommendations to use MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined, and examine the yield of using these to find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the area...... of musculoskeletal disorders. METHODS: Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible...... recall was calculated for MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined followed by the databases yielding additional studies. RESULTS: Deemed eligible was twenty-three systematic reviews and the databases included other than MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was AMED, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, MANTIS, OT-Seeker, PEDro...

  9. Science & Technology Review March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2005-01-25

    This issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Enhanced National Security through International Research Collaborations--Commentary by Stephen G. Cochran; (2) Building Networks of Trust through Collaborative Science--Livermore scientists are leading collaborative science and technology projects with colleagues from Central and South Asia and the Middle East; (3) Tracing the Steps in Nuclear Material Trafficking--The Laboratory.s nuclear science expertise is helping to thwart the illicit trafficking of nuclear material; (4) Looking at Earth in Action--Geophysicists at Livermore are using laboratory experiments to examine such issues as how best to store nuclear wastes and how to mitigate the effects of greenhouse gases; and (5) Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals--Computer models indicate that gamma-ray bursts from dying stars may be important sources of elements such as iron, zinc, titanium, and copper.

  10. Quality of systematic reviews: an example of studies comparing artificial disc replacement with fusion in the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashani, Osama A; El-Tumi, Hanan; Aneiba, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) is now an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Many studies have evaluated the efficacy of C-ADR compared with ACDF. This led to a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to evaluate the evidence of the superiority of one intervention against the other. The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the quality of these reviews and meta-analyses. Medline via Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched using the keywords: (total disk replacement, prosthesis, implantation, discectomy, and arthroplasty) AND (cervical vertebrae, cervical spine, and spine) AND (systematic reviews, reviews, and meta-analysis). Screening and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Two reviewers then assessed the quality of the selected reviews and meta-analysis using 11-item AMSTAR score which is a validated measurement tool to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Screening of full reports of 46 relevant abstracts resulted in the selection of 15 systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses as eligible for this study. The two reviewers' inter-rater agreement level was high as indicated by kappa of >0.72. The AMSTAR score of the reviews ranged from 3 to 11. Only one study (a Cochrane review) scored 100% (AMSTAR 11). Five studies scored below (AMSTAR 5) indicating low-quality reviews. The most significant drawbacks of reviews of a score below 5 were not using an extensive search strategy, failure to use the scientific quality of the included studies appropriately in formulating a conclusion, not assessing publication bias, and not reporting the excluded studies. With a significant exception of a Cochrane review, the methodological quality of systematic reviews evaluating the evidence of C-ADR versus ACDF has to be improved.

  11. A systematic literature review on reviews and meta-analyses of biologically based CAM-practices for cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christine; Lunde, Anita; Johannessen, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To provide an overview and evaluate the evidence of biologically based CAM-practices for cancer patients. Methods Pubmed, Social Science Citation Index, AMED and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for reviews on effects of biologically based CAM-practices, including herbal...... levels of evidence and were excluded from further evaluation. Among the 32 high-quality reviews the most reviewed practices were soy/plant hormones (7), Chinese herbal medicine (7), antioxidants (5) and mistletoe (4). Fifteen of the 32 reviews included data on the efficacy of biologically-based CAM...... or interference with treatment. Conclusions Thirty-two reviews provided reliable information on the evidence for biologically based CAM-practices for cancer or cancer related symptoms. None of the reviews concluded a positive effect on the cancer, despite the widespread use of these CAM-practices among cancer...

  12. Impact of childhood chronic illnesses on siblings: a literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Brien, Irene

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood illness can have a significant impact on families, particularly on the ill child\\'s siblings. There is a dearth of published literature focusing on the needs of siblings of ill children. AIM: This literature review aims to provide an overview of the current healthcare literature in relation to the impact of childhood chronic illness or disability on siblings. METHOD: A literature review was undertaken by searching the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest and Cochrane Library for relevant articles in English using the search terms: \\'siblings\\

  13. Trial Sequential Analysis in systematic reviews with meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most meta-analyses in systematic reviews, including Cochrane ones, do not have sufficient statistical power to detect or refute even large intervention effects. This is why a meta-analysis ought to be regarded as an interim analysis on its way towards a required information size...... from traditional meta-analyses using unadjusted naïve 95% confidence intervals and 5% thresholds for statistical significance. Spurious conclusions in systematic reviews with traditional meta-analyses can be reduced using Trial Sequential Analysis. Several empirical studies have demonstrated...

  14. A scoping review protocol on the roles and tasks of peer reviewers in the manuscript review process in biomedical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glonti, Ketevan; Cauchi, Daniel; Cobo, Erik; Boutron, Isabelle; Moher, David; Hren, Darko

    2017-10-22

    The primary functions of peer reviewers are poorly defined. Thus far no body of literature has systematically identified the roles and tasks of peer reviewers of biomedical journals. A clear establishment of these can lead to improvements in the peer review process. The purpose of this scoping review is to determine what is known on the roles and tasks of peer reviewers. We will use the methodological framework first proposed by Arksey and O'Malley and subsequently adapted by Levac et al and the Joanna Briggs Institute. The scoping review will include all study designs, as well as editorials, commentaries and grey literature. The following eight electronic databases will be searched (from inception to May 2017): Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Educational Resources Information Center, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science. Two reviewers will use inclusion and exclusion criteria based on the 'Population-Concept-Context' framework to independently screen titles and abstracts of articles considered for inclusion. Full-text screening of relevant eligible articles will also be carried out by two reviewers. The search strategy for grey literature will include searching in websites of existing networks, biomedical journal publishers and organisations that offer resources for peer reviewers. In addition we will review journal guidelines to peer reviewers on how to perform the manuscript review. Journals will be selected using the 2016 journal impact factor. We will identify and assess the top five, middle five and lowest-ranking five journals across all medical specialties. This scoping review will undertake a secondary analysis of data already collected and does not require ethical approval. The results will be disseminated through journals and conferences targeting stakeholders involved in peer review in biomedical research. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  15. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of an ankle-foot orthosis on gait biomechanics after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Tyson, S. F.; Sadeghi-Demneh, E.; Nester, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the evidence on the effects of an ankle-foot orthosis on gait biomechanics after stroke Data sources: The following databases were searched; AMED, CINHAL, Cochrane Library (Stroke section), Medline, PubMed, Science Direct and Scopus. Previous reviews, reference lists and citation tracking of the selected articles were screened and the authors of selected trials contacted for any further unpublished data. Review methods: Controlled trials of an ankle-foot or...

  16. Gaps in the evidence for prevention and treatment of maternal anaemia: a review of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jacqui A; Barroso, Filipa; Stanworth, Simon J; Spiby, Helen; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn J; Renfrew, Mary J; Allard, Shubha

    2012-06-24

    Anaemia, in particular due to iron deficiency, is common in pregnancy with associated negative outcomes for mother and infant. However, there is evidence of significant variation in management. The objectives of this review of systematic reviews were to analyse and summarise the evidence base, identify gaps in the evidence and develop a research agenda for this important component of maternity care. Multiple databases were searched, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library. All systematic reviews relating to interventions to prevent and treat anaemia in the antenatal and postnatal period were eligible. Two reviewers independently assessed data inclusion, extraction and quality of methodology. 27 reviews were included, all reporting on the prevention and treatment of anaemia in the antenatal (n = 24) and postnatal periods (n = 3). Using AMSTAR as the assessment tool for methodological quality, only 12 of the 27 were rated as high quality reviews. The greatest number of reviews covered antenatal nutritional supplementation for the prevention of anaemia (n = 19). Iron supplementation was the most extensively researched, but with ongoing uncertainty about optimal dose and regimen. Few identified reviews addressed anaemia management post-partum or correlations between laboratory and clinical outcomes, and no reviews reported on clinical symptoms of anaemia. The review highlights evidence gaps including the management of anaemia in the postnatal period, screening for anaemia, and optimal interventions for treatment. Research priorities include developing standardised approaches to reporting of laboratory outcomes, and information on clinical outcomes relevant to the experiences of pregnant women.

  17. Public health interventions in midwifery: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternity care providers, particularly midwives, have a window of opportunity to influence pregnant women about positive health choices. This aim of this paper is to identify evidence of effective public health interventions from good quality systematic reviews that could be conducted by midwives. Methods Relevant databases including MEDLINE, Pubmed, EBSCO, CRD, MIDIRS, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library and Econlit were searched to identify systematic reviews in October 2010. Quality assessment of all reviews was conducted. Results Thirty-six good quality systematic reviews were identified which reported on effective interventions. The reviews were conducted on a diverse range of interventions across the reproductive continuum and were categorised under: screening; supplementation; support; education; mental health; birthing environment; clinical care in labour and breast feeding. The scope and strength of the review findings are discussed in relation to current practice. A logic model was developed to provide an overarching framework of midwifery public health roles to inform research policy and practice. Conclusions This review provides a broad scope of high quality systematic review evidence and definitively highlights the challenge of knowledge transfer from research into practice. The review also identified gaps in knowledge around the impact of core midwifery practice on public health outcomes and the value of this contribution. This review provides evidence for researchers and funders as to the gaps in current knowledge and should be used to inform the strategic direction of the role of midwifery in public health in policy and practice. PMID:23134701

  18. Systematic review protocol of interventions to improve the psychological well-being of general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Marylou; Murray, Lois; Donnelly, Michael

    2015-09-22

    The challenges and complexities faced by general practitioners are increasing, and there are concerns about their well-being. Consequently, attention has been directed towards developing and evaluating interventions and strategies to improve general practitioner well-being and their capacity to cope with workplace challenges. This systematic review aims to evaluate research evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve general practitioner well-being. Eligible studies will include programmes developed to improve psychological well-being that have assessed outcomes using validated tools pertaining to well-being and related outcomes. Only programmes that have been evaluated using controlled study designs will be reviewed. An appropriately developed search strategy will be applied to six electronic databases: the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Studies will be screened in two stages by two independent reviewers. A third reviewer will arbitrate when required. Pre-specified inclusion and exclusion criteria will be assessed during a pilot phase early on in the review process. The Cochrane data extraction form will be adapted and applied to each eligible study by two independent reviewers, and each study will be appraised critically using standardised checklists from the Cochrane Handbook. Methodological quality will be taken into account in the analysis of the data and the synthesis of results. A narrative synthesis will be undertaken if data is unsuited to a meta-analysis. The systematic review will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidance. This will be the first systematic review on this topic, and the evidence synthesis will aid decision-making by general practitioners, policy makers and planners regarding ways in which to improve GP well-being. Findings will be disseminated at general practitioner meetings

  19. A comparison of the performance of seven key bibliographic databases in identifying all relevant systematic reviews of interventions for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbone, John; Carter, Matt; Hoffmann, Tammy; Glasziou, Paul

    2016-02-09

    Bibliographic databases are the primary resource for identifying systematic reviews of health care interventions. Reliable retrieval of systematic reviews depends on the scope of indexing used by database providers. Therefore, searching one database may be insufficient, but it is unclear how many need to be searched. We sought to evaluate the performance of seven major bibliographic databases for the identification of systematic reviews for hypertension. We searched seven databases (Cochrane library, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Epistemonikos, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), PubMed Health and Turning Research Into Practice (TRIP)) from 2003 to 2015 for systematic reviews of any intervention for hypertension. Citations retrieved were screened for relevance, coded and checked for screening consistency using a fuzzy text matching query. The performance of each database was assessed by calculating its sensitivity, precision, the number of missed reviews and the number of unique records retrieved. Four hundred systematic reviews were identified for inclusion from 11,381 citations retrieved from seven databases. No single database identified all the retrieved systematic reviews for hypertension. EMBASE identified the most reviews (sensitivity 69 %) but also retrieved the most irrelevant citations with 7.2 % precision (Pr). The sensitivity of the Cochrane library was 60 %, DARE 57 %, MEDLINE 57 %, PubMed Health 53 %, Epistemonikos 49 % and TRIP 33 %. EMBASE contained the highest number of unique records (n = 43). The Cochrane library identified seven unique records and had the highest precision (Pr = 30 %), followed by Epistemonikos (n = 2, Pr = 19 %). No unique records were found in PubMed Health (Pr = 24 %) DARE (Pr = 21 %), TRIP (Pr = 10 %) or MEDLINE (Pr = 10 %). Searching EMBASE and the Cochrane library identified 88 % of all systematic reviews in the reference set, and

  20. A systematic review of the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, back and low back pain in people with spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, C.; Marston, L; Desouza, LH; Sutherland, I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review and summarise the prevalence of chronic back pain (CBP), chronic low back pain (CLBP) and chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMSKP) in people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and evaluate how pain is assessed. Method: A systematic literature review between 1990 and 2012 in English language journals. Twelve databases were searched including CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed and Science direct. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results: ...