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Sample records for cobalt ferrite nanodot

  1. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prepared material. It was observed that surface modification such as with silica coating on the cobalt ferrite will have significant effect on the structural and magnetic properties. It is also observed that, silica coated nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications (Hong et al., 2013). In this work we have chosen sol-gel ...

  3. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  4. Enhancement of electrical conductivity in gamma irradiated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawpute, Asha A.; Raut, A.V.; Babrekar, M.K.; Kale, C.M.; Jadhav, K.M.; Shinde, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel auto- combustion method, in which L-ascorbic acid was used as a fuel. The effect of gamma irradiation on the electrical resistivity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been studied. The ferrite powder annealed at 550℃ was irradiated by gamma source 137 Cs. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and DC resistivity. (author)

  5. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. ► They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. ► Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. ► They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Temperature dependent viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Prashant B.; Somvanshi, Sandeep B.; Kounsalye, Jitendra S.; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Khirade, Pankaj P.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    In the present work, cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluid is prepared in 0 to 1 (in the step of 0.2) volume fraction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method. The XRD results confirmed the formation of single phase spinel structure. The Raman spectra have been deconvoluted into individual Lorentzian peaks. Cobalt ferrite has cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group. FT-IR spectra consist of two major absorption bands, first at about 586 cm-1 (υ1) and second at about 392 cm-1 (υ2). These absorption bands confirm the formation of spinel-structured cobalt ferrite. Brookfield DV-III viscometer and programmable temperature-controlled bath was used to study the relationship between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity behavior with respect to temperature has been studied and it is revealed that the viscosity of cobalt ferrite / ethylene glycol ferrofluids increases with an increase in volume fraction of cobalt ferrite. The viscosity of the present ferrofluid was found to decrease with increase in temperature.

  7. Effect of rare earth substitution in cobalt ferrite bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulai, G.; Diamandescu, L.; Dumitru, I.; Gurlui, S.; Feder, M.; Caltun, O.F.

    2015-01-01

    The study was focused on the influence of small amounts of rare earth (RE=La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) addition on the microstructure, phase content and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite bulk materials. The X-Ray diffraction measurements confirmed the formation of the spinel structure but also the presence of secondary phases of RE oxides or orthoferrite in small percentages (up to 3%). Density measurements obtained by Archimedes method revealed a ~1 g cm −3 decrease for the RE doped cobalt ferrite samples compared with stoichiometric one. Both the Mössbauer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrocopy analysis results confirmed the formation of the spinel phase. The saturation magnetization and coercive field values of the doped samples obtained by Vibrating Sample Magnetometry were close to those of the pure cobalt ferrite. For magnetostrictive property studies the samples were analyzed using the strain gauge method. Higher maximum magnetostriction coefficients were found for the Ho, Ce, Sm and Yb doped cobalt ferrite bulk materials as related to the stoichiometric CoFe 2 O 4 sample. Moreover, improved strain derivative was observed for these samples but at higher magnetic fields due to the low increase of the coercive field values for doped samples. - Highlights: • Substitution by a large number of rare earth elements was investigated. • First reported results on magnetostriction measurements of RE doped cobalt ferrite. • The doped samples presented an increased porosity and a decreased grain size. • Increased magnetostrctive response was observed for several doped samples

  8. Cobalt Ferrite Nanocrystallites for Sustainable Hydrogen Production Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra S. Gaikwad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite, CoFe2O4, nanocrystalline films were deposited using electrostatic spray method and explored in sustainable hydrogen production application. Reflection planes in X-ray diffraction pattern confirm CoFe2O4 phase. The surface scanning microscopy photoimages reveal an agglomeration of closely-packed CoFe2O4 nanoflakes. Concentrated solar-panel, a two-step water splitting process, measurement technique was preferred for measuring the hydrogen generation rate. For about 5 hr sustainable, 440 mL/hr, hydrogen production activity was achieved, confirming the efficient use of cobalt ferrite nanocrystallites film in hydrogen production application.

  9. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, S.; Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are one of the most important materials for nanomedicine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They have high coercivity and moderate saturation magnetization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized easily. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They are a good candidate for hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  11. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe_6_6Co_3_4) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe_2O_4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  12. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, B. [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Andrew, J. S. [University of Florida, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Arnold, D. P., E-mail: darnold@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain (~100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe{sub 66}Co{sub 34}) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  13. Optimization of the behavior of CTAB coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mukesh; Bhatnagar, Mukesh Chander

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we have synthesized cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) mixed cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) using sol-gel auto-combustion method taking a different weight percent ratio of CTAB i.e., 0%, 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% with respect to metal nitrates. The morphological, structural and magnetic properties of these NPs are characterized by high resolution transmitted electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrometer and physical property measurement system (PPMS). It has been found that saturation magnetization of cobalt ferrite increases with increase in crystalline size of the NPs. Saturation magnetization and crystallite size both were found to be lowest in the case of sample containing 2% CTAB.

  14. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Hemaunt, E-mail: hvatsal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Srivastava, R.C. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Pal Singh, Jitendra [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Negi, P. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Agrawal, H.M. [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR Kolkata Centre, Kolkata 700098 (India); Hwa Chae, Keun [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy{sup 3+}concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution. - Highlights: • Slight decrease in crystallite size after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in the samples.

  15. Manganese substituted cobalt ferrite magnetostrictive materials for magnetic stress sensor applications

    OpenAIRE

    Paulsen, J. A.; Ring, A. P.; Lo, C. C. H.; Snyder, John Evan; Jiles, David

    2005-01-01

    Metal bonded cobalt ferrite composites have been shown to be promising candidate materials for use in magnetoelastic stress sensors, due to their large magnetostriction and high sensitivity of magnetization to stress. However previous results have shown that below 60 °C the cobalt ferrite material exhibits substantial magnetomechanical hysteresis. In the current study, measurements indicate that substituting Mn for some of the Fe in the cobalt ferrite can lower the Curie temperature of the ma...

  16. Magnetic and Structural Investigations of Nanocrystalline Cobalt-Ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sharifi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite is an important magnetic material due to their large magneto-crystalline anisotropy, high cohercivity, moderate saturation magnetization and chemical stability.In this study, cobalt ferrites Nanoparticles have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and a new microemulsion route. We examined the cation occupancy in the spinel structure based on the “Rietveld with energies” method. The Xray measurements revealed the production of a broad single ferrite cubic phase with the average particle sizes of about 12 nm and 7nm, for co-precipitation and micro-emulsion methods, respectively. The FTIR measurements between 400 and 4000 cm-1 confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of the spinelstructure for the two methods. Furthermore, the Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM was carried out at room temperature to study the structural and magnetic properties. The results revealed that by changing the method from co-precipitation to the reverse micelle the material exhibits a softer magnetic behavior in such a way that both saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease from 58 to 29 emu/g and from 286 to 25 Oe, respectively.

  17. Microstructure characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Y.M., E-mail: ymabbas@live.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Mansour, S.A.; Ibrahim, M.H. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Ali, Shehab E., E-mail: shehab_physics@yahoo.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2011-11-15

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite has been synthesized using two different methods: ceramic and co-precipitation techniques. The nanocrystalline ferrite phase has been formed after 3 h of sintering at 1000 deg. C. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer. - Highlights: > The refinement result showed that the cationic distribution over the sites in the lattice is partially an inverse spinel. > The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. > The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  18. Microstructure characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Y.M.; Mansour, S.A.; Ibrahim, M.H.; Ali, Shehab E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite has been synthesized using two different methods: ceramic and co-precipitation techniques. The nanocrystalline ferrite phase has been formed after 3 h of sintering at 1000 deg. C. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer. - Highlights: → The refinement result showed that the cationic distribution over the sites in the lattice is partially an inverse spinel. → The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. → The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  19. Remanence properties of Co-precipitated cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno-Baques, D.; Medina-Boudri, Angela; Matutes-Aquino, J.

    2001-01-01

    Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and DC demagnetization (DCD) curves of a co-precipitated cobalt ferrite sample were obtained. From the IRM and DCD data, the Henkel plot was obtained and analyzed in the Preisach model framework. The Henkel plot data are below the Wohlfarth line that indicates a dominant local disorder (demagnetizing-like effect). Forward and reverse switching field distribution curves were obtained from differentiation of the IRM and DCD curves. The peak values of these switching field distributions differ by a factor of about 2.7

  20. Self-biased cobalt ferrite nanocomposites for microwave applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannour, Abdelkrim, E-mail: abdelkrim.hannour@hotmail.com [LT2C Laboratory, Jean-Monnet University, 25 rue Dr. Rémy Annino, F-42000, Saint-Etienne (France); Vincent, Didier; Kahlouche, Faouzi; Tchangoulian, Ardaches [LT2C Laboratory, Jean-Monnet University, 25 rue Dr. Rémy Annino, F-42000, Saint-Etienne (France); Neveu, Sophie; Dupuis, Vincent [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7195, PECSA, F-75005, Paris (France)

    2014-03-15

    Oriented CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, dispersed in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix, were fabricated by magnetophoretic deposition of functionalized nanocolloidal cobalt ferrite particles into porous alumina membrane. Their magnetic behavior exhibits an out-of-plane easy axis with a large remanent magnetization and coercitivity. This orientation allows high effective internal magnetic anisotropy that contributes to the permanent bias along the wire axis. The microwave studies reveal a ferromagnetic resonance at 46.5 and 49.5 GHz, depending on the filling ratio of the membrane. Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator (Ansoft HFSS) simulations are in good agreement with experimental results. Such nanocomposite is presented as one of the promising candidates for microwave devices (circulators, isolators, noise suppressors etc.). - Highlights: • Oriented magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were fabricated by magnetophoretic deposition of functionalized cobalt ferrite particles into porous alumina membrane. • The nanocomposite obtained presents an out-of-plane easy axis with a large remanent magnetization and coercitivity. • The high effective internal magnetic anisotropy contributes to the permanent bias along the wire axis. • The frequency ferromagnetic resonance ranges from 46.5 to 49.5 GHz, depending on the filling ratio of the membrane. • We have obtained a good agreement between Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator simulations and experimental results.

  1. Self-biased cobalt ferrite nanocomposites for microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannour, Abdelkrim; Vincent, Didier; Kahlouche, Faouzi; Tchangoulian, Ardaches; Neveu, Sophie; Dupuis, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Oriented CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles, dispersed in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix, were fabricated by magnetophoretic deposition of functionalized nanocolloidal cobalt ferrite particles into porous alumina membrane. Their magnetic behavior exhibits an out-of-plane easy axis with a large remanent magnetization and coercitivity. This orientation allows high effective internal magnetic anisotropy that contributes to the permanent bias along the wire axis. The microwave studies reveal a ferromagnetic resonance at 46.5 and 49.5 GHz, depending on the filling ratio of the membrane. Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator (Ansoft HFSS) simulations are in good agreement with experimental results. Such nanocomposite is presented as one of the promising candidates for microwave devices (circulators, isolators, noise suppressors etc.). - Highlights: • Oriented magnetic CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were fabricated by magnetophoretic deposition of functionalized cobalt ferrite particles into porous alumina membrane. • The nanocomposite obtained presents an out-of-plane easy axis with a large remanent magnetization and coercitivity. • The high effective internal magnetic anisotropy contributes to the permanent bias along the wire axis. • The frequency ferromagnetic resonance ranges from 46.5 to 49.5 GHz, depending on the filling ratio of the membrane. • We have obtained a good agreement between Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator simulations and experimental results

  2. hermo-Physical and Mechanical Properties of Unsaturated Polyester /Cobalt Ferrite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamees Salam Faiq

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Unsaturated polyester was used as a matrix which was filled with different percentages of cobalt ferrite using hand lay-up method. Cobalt ferrite was synthesized using solid state ceramic method with reagent of CoO and Fe2O3. Mechanical properties such tensile strength, Young's modulus and shore D hardness of the composite have been studied. All these properties have increased by 10% with increasing cobalt ferrite contents. Also the thermal properties such thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity are highly increased as the ferrite content increased, while the thermal diffusivity increased by 22 %. On the other hand dielectric strength of composite has been measured which increased by 50% by increasing the cobalt ferrite content.

  3. In situ fabrication and characterization of cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Min; Jiao, Qingze; Zhao, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites were prepared by a one-step hydrothermal process using NaHSO 3 as the reducing agent and 1-propyl-3-hexadecylimidazolium bromide as the structure growth-directing template. The reduction of graphene oxide and the in situ formation of cobalt ferrite nanorods were accomplished in a one-step reaction. The structure and morphology of as-obtained composites were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Uniform rod-like cobalt ferrites with diameters of about 100 nm and length of about 800 nm were homogeneously distributed on the graphene sheets. The hybrid materials showed a saturation magnetization of 42.5 emu/g and coercivity of 495.1 Oe at room temperature. The electromagnetic parameters were measured using a vector network analyzer. A minimum reflection loss (RL) of − 25.8 dB was observed at 16.1 GHz for the cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites with a thickness of 2 mm, and the effective absorption frequency (RL < − 10 dB) ranged from 13.5 to 18.0 GHz. The composites exhibited better absorbing properties than the cobalt ferrite nanorods and the mixture of cobalt ferrite nanorods and graphene. - Highlights: • Reduction of GO and formation of ferrites were accomplished in a one-step reaction. • Ionic liquid was used to control 1D growth of ferrite nanorods for the first time. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites showed dielectric and magnetic loss. • Cobalt ferrite nanorods/graphene composites exhibited better absorbing properties

  4. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas [State Research Institute Center for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania); Paškevičius, Algimantas [Nature Research Centre, Laboratory of Biodeterioration Research (Lithuania); Kurtinaitiene, Marija; Jagminas, Arūnas, E-mail: arunas.jagminas@ftmc.lt [State Research Institute Center for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania)

    2016-10-15

    The growing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics elicited considerable interest to non-typical drugs. In this study, antimicrobial investigations were performed on low-size dispersion cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by co-precipitation approach in several average sizes, in particular, 15.0, 5.0, and 1.65 nm. A variety of experimental tests demonstrated that the size of these Nps is determinant for antimicrobial efficiency against S. cerevisiae and several Candida species, in particular, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. albicans. The small and ultra-small fractions of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} Nps possess especially strong antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. The possible reasons are discussed. Nps were characterized by means of transmission and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, chemical analysis and magnetic measurements.Graphical Abstract.

  5. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Kurtinaitiene, Marija; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2016-10-01

    The growing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics elicited considerable interest to non-typical drugs. In this study, antimicrobial investigations were performed on low-size dispersion cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by co-precipitation approach in several average sizes, in particular, 15.0, 5.0, and 1.65 nm. A variety of experimental tests demonstrated that the size of these Nps is determinant for antimicrobial efficiency against S. cerevisiae and several Candida species, in particular, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. albicans. The small and ultra-small fractions of CoFe2O4 Nps possess especially strong antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. The possible reasons are discussed. Nps were characterized by means of transmission and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, chemical analysis and magnetic measurements.

  6. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Kurtinaitiene, Marija; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2016-01-01

    The growing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics elicited considerable interest to non-typical drugs. In this study, antimicrobial investigations were performed on low-size dispersion cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by co-precipitation approach in several average sizes, in particular, 15.0, 5.0, and 1.65 nm. A variety of experimental tests demonstrated that the size of these Nps is determinant for antimicrobial efficiency against S. cerevisiae and several Candida species, in particular, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. albicans. The small and ultra-small fractions of CoFe_2O_4 Nps possess especially strong antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. The possible reasons are discussed. Nps were characterized by means of transmission and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, chemical analysis and magnetic measurements.Graphical Abstract

  7. Homogeneous Precipitation Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation route using hexamethylenetetramine (HMT as the precipitant. The particle size, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the synthesized particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NPs are of cubic inverse spinel structure and nearly spherical shape. With the increase of oxidation time from 30 to 180 minutes in the reaction solution at 90∘C, the average particle size increases from ~30 nm to ~45 nm. The as-synthesized NPs ~30 nm in size show higher Ms (61.5 emu/g and moderate Hc (945 Oe and Mr/Ms (0.45 value compared with the materials synthesized by coprecipitation method using NaOH as precipitate at high pH value.

  8. Magnetic and magnetoelastic properties of M-substituted cobalt ferrites (M=Mn, Cr, Ga, Ge)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sang-Hoon [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Magnetic and magnetoelastic properties of a series of M-substituted cobalt ferrites, CoMxFe2-xO4 (M=Mn, Cr, Ga; x=0.0 to 0.8) and Ge-substituted cobalt ferrites Co1+xGexFe2-2xO4 (x=0.0 to 0.6) have been investigated.

  9. A comparison study of polymer/cobalt ferrite nano-composites synthesized by mechanical alloying route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Rashidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effect of different biopolymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG and polyvinylalcohol (PVA on synthesis and characterization of polymer/cobalt ferrite (CF nano-composites bymechanical alloying method has been systematically investigated. The structural, morphological andmagnetic properties changes during mechanical milling were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, fieldemission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer techniques(VSM, respectively. The polymeric cobalt ferrite nano-composites were obtained by employing atwo-step procedure: the cobalt ferrite of 20 nm mean particle size was first synthesized by mechanicalalloying route and then was embedded in PEG or PVA biopolymer matrix by milling process. Theresults revealed that PEG melted due to the local temperature raise during milling. Despite thisphenomenon, cobalt ferrite nano-particles were entirely embedded in PEG matrix. It seems, PAV is anappropriate candidate for producing nano-composite samples due to its high melting point. InPVA/CF nano-composites, the mean crystallite size and milling induced strain decreased to 13 nm and0.48, respectively. Moreover, milling process resulted in well distribution of CF in PVA matrix eventhough the mean particle size of cobalt ferrite has not been significantly affecetd. FTIR resultconfirmed the attachment of PVA to the surface of nano-particles. Magnetic properties evaluationshowed that saturation magnetization and coercivity values decreased in nano-composite samplecomparing the pure cobalt ferrite.

  10. Magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite-silica nanocomposites prepared by a sol-gel autocombustion technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannas, C.; Musinu, A.; Piccaluga, G.

    2006-01-01

    The magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite-silica nanocomposites with different concentrations (15, 30, and 50 wt %) and sizes (7, 16, and 28 nm) of ferrite particles have been studied by static magnetization measurements and Mossbauer spectroscopy. The results indicate a superparamagnetic behavio...

  11. Effect of preparation conditions on physicochemical, surface and catalytic properties of cobalt ferrite prepared by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shobaky, G.A., E-mail: elshobaky@yahoo.co [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Turky, A.M.; Mostafa, N.Y.; Mohamed, S.K. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt)

    2010-03-18

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via thermal treatment of cobalt-iron mixed hydroxides at 400-600 {sup o}C. The mixed hydroxides were coprecipitated from their nitrates solutions using NaOH as precipitating agent. The effects of pH and temperature of coprecipitation and calcination temperature on the physicochemical, surface and catalytic properties of the prepared ferrites were studied. The prepared systems were characterized using TG, DTG, DTA, chemical analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) as well as surface and texture properties based on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The prepared cobalt ferrites were found to be mesoporous materials that have crystallite size ranges between 8 and 45 nm. The surface and catalytic properties of the produced ferrite phase were strongly dependent on coprecipitation conditions of the mixed hydroxides and on their calcination temperature.

  12. Immobilization of cellulase on functionalized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohara, Raghvendra Ashok; Thorat, Nanasaheb Devappa; Pawar, Shivaji Hariba

    2016-01-01

    Amine functionalized cobalt ferrite (AF-CoFe 2 O 4 ) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for immobilization of cellulase enzyme via 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDS) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) coupling reaction. The structural, morphological and magnetic properties of AF-CoFe 2 O 4 were determined. TEM micrograph revealed a mean diameter of -8 nm and showed that the AF-CoFe 2 O 4 remain distinct with no significant change in size after binding with cellulase. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of cellulase to AF-CoFe 2 O 4 . The properties of immobilized cellulase were investigated by optimizing binding efficiency, pH, temperature and reusability. The results showed that the immobilized cellulase has higher thermal stability than free cellulase, which might be due to covalent interaction between cellulase and AF-CoFe 2 O 4 surface. The immobilized cellulase also showed good reusability after recovery. Therefore, AF-CoFe 2 O 4 MNPs can be considered as promising candidate for enzyme immobilization.

  13. Immobilization of cellulase on functionalized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohara, Raghvendra Ashok; Thorat, Nanasaheb Devappa; Pawar, Shivaji Hariba [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur (India)

    2016-01-15

    Amine functionalized cobalt ferrite (AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for immobilization of cellulase enzyme via 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDS) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) coupling reaction. The structural, morphological and magnetic properties of AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were determined. TEM micrograph revealed a mean diameter of -8 nm and showed that the AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} remain distinct with no significant change in size after binding with cellulase. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of cellulase to AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The properties of immobilized cellulase were investigated by optimizing binding efficiency, pH, temperature and reusability. The results showed that the immobilized cellulase has higher thermal stability than free cellulase, which might be due to covalent interaction between cellulase and AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} surface. The immobilized cellulase also showed good reusability after recovery. Therefore, AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} MNPs can be considered as promising candidate for enzyme immobilization.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and thermal analysis of polyimide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazuera, David; Perales, Oscar; Suarez, Marcelo; Singh, Surinder

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: · Polyimide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposites were successfully produced. · Produced nanocomposites are suitable for use at temperatures below 80 deg. C. · Magnetic properties of nanocomposites were no sensitive to particle agglomeration. · Good distribution of clustered nanoparticles was achieved in produced composites. - Abstract: Cobalt ferrite nanocrystals were synthesized under size-controlled conditions in aqueous phase and incorporated into a polyimide matrix at various volumetric loads. Synthesized 20 nm cobalt ferrite single crystals, which exhibited a room-temperature coercivity of 2.9 kOe, were dispersed in polyimide precursor using two techniques: homogenizer and ball milling. These suspensions were then cured to develop the polyimide structure in the resulting nanocomposites. Produced films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometry, which confirmed the formation of the desired phases. As expected, the saturation magnetization in the nanocomposites varied according to the polyimide/ferrite weight ratio, while coercivity remained at the value corresponding to pure cobalt ferrite nanocrystals. Thermal degradation, thermal stability and dynamic mechanical analyses tests were also carried out to assess the effect of the concentration of the ferrite disperse phase on the thermo-mechanical behavior of the corresponding nanocomposites as well as the used dispersion techniques.

  15. FTIR and structural properties of co-precipitated cobalt ferrite nano particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutamaningtyas, E.; Utari; Suharyana; Purnama, B.; Wijayanta, A. T.

    2016-01-01

    The FTIR and structural properties in co-precipitated cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles are discussed in this paper. The synthesis was conducted at temperatures of 75°C and 95°C following post annealing at 1200°C for 5 hours. Other modification samples were synthesis at temperature of 95°C and then annealing at temperature of 1000°C and 1200°C for 5 hours. For both modification of synthesis and annealing temperature, FTIR result showed a metal oxide at a wave number of 590 cm -1 which indicated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. The crystalline structure was confirmed using x-ray diffraction that the high purity of cobalt ferrite was realized. Calculation of the cation distribution by using comparison I 220 /I 222 and I 422 /I 222 show that the synthesis and annealing temperature succesfully modify cation occupy the site octahedral and tetrahedral. (paper)

  16. Variation in band gap energy and electrical analysis of double doped cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Azra; Agrawal, Shraddha; Azam, Ameer

    2018-05-01

    The Ca and Cr doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Co0.9Ca0.1) (Fe0.8 Cr0.2)2O4 were synthesized by microwave gel combustion method. Microstructural studies were carried out by XRD and SEM. Structural studies suggest that the crystal system remains spinal even with the doping of calcium and chromium. The SEM image shows the spherical morphology of surface of the sample. Optical properties of Ca and Cr doped cobalt ferrite were studied by UV-visible technique in the range of 400-600 nm. The electrical conductivity of pure and doped cobalt ferrite were studied as a function of frequency and were explained on the basis of electron hopping.

  17. Magnetic hyperthermia heating of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles prepared by low temperature ferrous sulfate based method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile low temperature co-precipitation method for the synthesis of crystalline cobalt ferrite nanostructures using ferrous sulfate salt as the precursor has been discussed. The prepared samples were compared with nanoparticles prepared by conventional co-precipitation and hydrothermal methods using ferric nitrate as the precursor. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of cubic spinel cobalt ferrites when dried at 110 °C as opposed to conventional methods which required higher temperatures/pressure for the formation of the same. Field emission scanning electron microscope studies of these powders revealed the formation of nearly spherical nanostructures in the size range of 20-30 nm which were comparable to those prepared by conventional methods. Magnetic measurements confirmed the ferromagnetic nature of the cobalt ferrites with low magnetic remanance. Further magnetic hyperthermia studies of nanostructures prepared by low temperature method showed a rise in temperature to 50 °C in 600 s.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of graphene quantum dots/cobalt ferrite nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Shilpa; Sathishkumar, M.; Kothurkar, Nikhil K.; Senthilkumar, R.

    2018-02-01

    A facile method has been developed for the synthesis of a graphene quantum dots/cobalt ferrite nanocomposite. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were synthesized by a simple bottom-up method using citric acid, followed by the co-precipitation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles on the graphene quantum dots. The morphology, structural analysis, optical properties, magnetic properties were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) measurements. The synthesized nanocomposite showed good fluorescence and superparamagnetic properties, which are important for biomedical applications.

  19. Microstructural and optical properties of Ca and Cr doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by auto combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shraddha; Parveen, Azra; Azam, Ameer

    2018-05-01

    The Ca and Cr doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Co0.8Ca0.2) (Fe0.8 Cr0.2)2O4 were synthesized by auto combustion method. Microstructural studies were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystalline size of synthesized nanoparticles as determined by the XRD was found to be 17.6 nm. These structural studies suggest that the crystal system remains spinal even with the doping of calcium and chromium. Optical properties of Ca and Cr doped cobalt ferrite were studied by UV-visible technique in the range of 200-800 nm. The energy band gap was calculated with the help of Tauc relationship. Ca and Cr doped cobalt ferrite annealed at 600°C exhibit significant dispersion in complex permeability. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of cobalt ferrite were studied as a function of frequency and were explained on the basis of Koop's theory based on Maxwell Wagner two layer models and electron hopping.

  20. and aluminum-substituted cobalt ferrite prepared by co-precipitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Structural and magnetic properties of zinc- and aluminum-substituted cobalt ferrite prepared by co-precipitation method. S T ALONE1,∗ and K M JADHAV2. 1Shiv Chhatrapati College, Aurangabad 431 004, India. 2Department of Physics, Dr. B. A. Marathwada University, Aurangabad 431 004, India. ∗Corresponding author.

  1. Spin canting phenomenon in cadmium doped cobalt ferrites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Abstract. Synthesis of non-collinear (spin canted) ferrites having the formula, CoCdFe2−O4 ( = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0), has been carried out using the sol–gel auto combustion method. The ferrite samples show an interesting magnetic transition from Neel to Yafet–Kittel configuration, as the Cd2+ ...

  2. Characterization and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swatsitang, Ekaphan [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Phokha, Sumalin, E-mail: sumalinphokha@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, Udon Thani, 41000 Thailand (Thailand); Hunpratub, Sitchai; Usher, Brian [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, Udon Thani, 41000 Thailand (Thailand); Bootchanont, Atipong [Division of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi (RMUTT), Pathumthani 12110 (Thailand); Maensiri, Santi [School of Physics, Institute of Science, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, 30000 Thailand (Thailand); Chindaprasirt, Prinya [Sustainable Infrastructure Research and Development Center, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand)

    2016-04-15

    Inverse spinel cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were synthesized by a polymer pyrolysis method and calcined at various temperatures from 800 to 1000 °C. The structure, morphology, valence states and magnetic properties of the calcined samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). All calcined samples had the cubic spinel type structure with average crystallite sizes increasing from 80 ± 2 to 100 ± 3 nm with increasing calcination temperature. The XANES spectra allowed the valence states of the Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions in the samples to be established and simulation of the XANES spectra suggested that the site occupancy of Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions was mixed, with the majority of Co{sup 2+} ions occupying octahedral sites and the majority of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupying tetrahedral sites within the spinel structure. All samples exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature with a maximum saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) of 3.42 μ{sub B} and a coercivity (H{sub C}) of 1100 Oe for crystallite sizes of 100 nm. The origin of the ferromagnetism is discussed in relation to the distribution of Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions within the lattice and the crystallite sizes. - Graphical abstract: In Figure shows ferromagnetism (FM) at room temperature (RT), simulation of the XANES spectra of (a) Fe and (b) Co edges (inset in the right) and TEM image (inset in the left) of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles prepared by polymer pyrolysis method. The bright field TEM image showed the aggregated particles. The simulation showed a cation combination with the majority of Co{sup 2+} ions occupying octahedral sites and the majority of Fe{sup 3+} ions occupying tetrahedral sites within the spinel structure. The distribution of Fe{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions within the lattice and the crystallite sizes is discussed on

  3. Fe(II)-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles against multidrug resistant microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Mažeika, Kęstutis; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2018-03-01

    The present study is focused on the determination the influence of cobalt content in the magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) on their antibacterial efficiency against gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and several Candida species, in particular C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. For the synthesis of Fe(II) substituted cobalt ferrite Nps by co-precipitation way, the L-lysine was used as the capping biocompatible agent and the particle size was successfully controlled to be in the range of 5-6.4 nm. The antimicrobial efficiencies of the CoxFe1-xFe2O4@Lys Nps, where x varies from 0.2 to 1.0, were evaluated through the quantitative analysis by comparing with that of Fe3O4@Lys Nps and L-lysine. In this way, it was evidenced that increase in the Co2+ content in the similar sized cobalt ferrite Nps resulted in an increase in their antimicrobial potency into 93.1-86.3 % for eukaryotic and into 96.4-42.7 % for prokaryotic strains. For characterization the composition, structure, and morphology of the tested herein Nps inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer, and FTIR spectroscopy techniques were conferred.

  4. Spin canting phenomenon in cadmium doped cobalt ferrites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O4 ( = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0), has been carried out using the sol–gel auto combustion method. The ferrite samples show an interesting magnetic transition from Neel to Yafet–Kittel configuration, as the Cd2+ concentration is increased ...

  5. Investigations of cations distributions and morphology of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandekar, Kamlesh V., E-mail: chandekar.kamlex@gmail.com; Kant, K. Mohan [Dept. of Applied Physics, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur, - 440010 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method and structural properties was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data was used to determine lattice parameter, X-ray density, distributions of cations among tetrahedral and octahedral sites, site radii, ionic radii and bond length of inverse spinel cobalt ferrite. XRD analysis revealed crystallinity and high intense peak correspond to cubic inverse spinel structure with average crystalline size measured by X-ray line profile fitting was found to be 13nm for most intense peak (311). The surface morphology and microstructural feature was investigated by TEM analysis which revealed that particle size varying from 12-22 nm with selected electron diffraction pattern (SAED).

  6. Water-assisted and surfactant-free synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanospheres via solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Yiqing [CAS Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ren, Yanan [CAS Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); Bi, Feng [CAS Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); He, Tao, E-mail: het@nanoctr.cn [CAS Laboratory of Nanosystem and Hierarchical Fabrication, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-10-15

    With ethylene glycol as the solvent, monodispersed cobalt ferrite nanospheres were prepared via a solvothermal method assisted by water. The samples were mainly characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The size of as-prepared products ranges from 10 nm to 200 nm. Size distribution and chemical composition were controlled by the amount of water and pH value in the reaction system. More important, suitable amount of water can avoid the use of surfactant. - Highlights: • Cobalt ferrite nanospheres were synthesized via solvothermal method assisted by water. • An introduction of suitable amount of water can avoid the use of surfactant. • The pH value of the precursor can be used to adjust the product composition.

  7. Tailoring the magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite by varying annealing temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlacik, M.; Pavlinek, V.; Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 43 (2014), s. 6919-6924 ISSN 1477-9226 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite * nanoparticles * magnetorheological effect Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  8. Effect of sintering temperature on magnetization and Mössbauer parameters of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Grish, E-mail: grishphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, DSB Campus Kumaun University, Nainital 263002, Uttarakhand (India); Srivastava, R.C. [Department of Physics, GB Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand (India); Reddy, V.R. [UGC-DAE CSR, Khandwa Road, DAVV Campus, Indore 452017, Madhya Pradesh (India); Agrawal, H.M. [Department of Physics, GB Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand (India)

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite of different particle size were prepared using sol-gel method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques were employed for characterization of nanoparticles for structural and magnetic properties. The particle size and saturation magnetization increase with the increase of sintering temperature. The saturation magnetization increases from 53 to 85 emu/g as the sintering temperature increases from 300 to 900 °C. The remanence increases while the coercivity decreases slightly with the increase of sintering temperature. Mössbauer spectra show the ferrimagnetic nature of all the samples and the cation distribution strictly depends on the sintering temperature. The stoichiometry of the cobalt ferrite formed was estimated to be (Co{sup 2+}{sub x}Fe{sup 3+}{sub 1−x})[Co{sup 2+}{sub 1−x}Fe{sup 3+}{sub 1+x}]O{sub 4}, based on our Mössbauer analysis. The inverse spinel structure gradually transforms towards the normal spinel structure as the sintering temperature increases. - Highlights: • After 500 °C sintering the cobalt ferrite shows complete crystallization. • An inversion sintering temperature between 900 °C and 1200 °C is proposed where the Fe{sup +3} again starts migration from B site to A site. • Sintering temperature is one of the prime factors which effect the magnetization and cation distribution between two sites A and B.

  9. Development of cobalt ferrite powder preparation employing the sol-gel technique and its structural characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjia, M.; Oubaha, M.; Prescott, T.; Olabi, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: This work focuses on the sol-gel process and the effects that the initial parameters have on the final product, which is the cobalt ferrite powder, in addition to the heat treatment. Particular interest is devoted to understand how the crosslinker and the chelating agent work and affect the final product. - Abstract: This work focuses on the development of a method to make cobalt ferrite powder using the sol-gel process. A particular emphasis is devoted to the understanding of the role of the chemical parameters involved in the sol-gel technique, and of the heat treatment on the structures and morphologies of the materials obtained. Several samples of cobalt ferrite powder were obtained by varying the initial parameters of the process in addition to the heat treatment temperature. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to identify the structure and morphology of samples demonstrating the influence of the initial parameters. DTA/TGA was carried out on two standard samples to identify important reaction temperatures during the heat treatment. The average size of the nano crystallites was estimated for a sample by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the strongest X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak. It has been found that the chelating agent and the crosslinker have a critical influence on the resultant structure, the particle size and the particle size distribution.

  10. Microstructural development of cobalt ferrite ceramics and its influence on magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Yeop; Jeon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Myong-Ho; Suvorov, Danilo; Choi, Si-Young

    2013-11-01

    The microstructural evolution and its influence on magnetic properties in cobalt ferrite were investigated. The cobalt ferrite powders were prepared via a solid-state reaction route and then sintered at 1200 °C for 1, 2, and 16 h in air. The microstructures from sintered samples represented a bimodal distribution of grain size, which is associated with abnormal grain growth behavior. And thus, with increasing sintering time, the number and size of abnormal grains accordingly increased but the matrix grains were frozen with stagnant grain growth. In the sample sintered for 16 h, all of the matrix grains were consumed and the abnormal grains consequently impinged on each other. With the appearance of abnormal grains, the magnetic coercivity significantly decreased from 586.3 Oe (1 h sintered sample) to 168.3 Oe (16 h sintered sample). This is due to the magnetization in abnormal grains being easily flipped. In order to achieve high magnetic coercivity of cobalt ferrite, it is thus imperative to fabricate the fine and homogeneous microstructure.

  11. Inversion degree and saturation magnetization of different nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concas, G.; Spano, G.; Cannas, C.; Musinu, A.; Peddis, D.; Piccaluga, G.

    2009-01-01

    The inversion degree of a series of nanocrystalline samples of CoFe 2 O 4 ferrites has been evaluated by a combined study, which exploits the saturation magnetization at 4.2 K and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. The samples, prepared by sol-gel autocombustion, have different thermal history and particle size. The differences observed in the saturation magnetization of these samples are explained in terms of different inversion degrees, as confirmed by the analysis of the components in the Moessbauer spectra. It is notable that the inversion degrees of the samples investigated are set among the highest values reported in the literature.

  12. Magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles used as seeds for acid mine drainage treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kefeni, Kebede K., E-mail: kkefeni@gmail.com; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A.M.

    2017-07-05

    Highlights: • Presence of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in AMD resulted in formation of crystalline ferrite. • Increasing settling time improved removal of Mg, Ca, Mn and Na from AMD. • Mixtures of ferrite nanoparticles were produced from AMD. • Formations of crystalline ferrite were more favored in the presence of heat. - Abstract: In this study, magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were used as seeds for acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment at pH of 7.05 ± 0.35. Duplicate samples of AMD, one without heating and another with heating at 60 °C was treated under continuous stirring for 1 h. The filtrate analysis results from ICP-OES have shown complete removal of Al, Mg, and Mn, while for Fe, Ni and Zn over 90% removals were recorded. Particularly, settling time has significant effect on the removal of Mg, Ca and Na. The results from SQUID have shown superparamagnetic properties of the synthesised magnetic nanoparticles and ferrite sludge. The recovered nanoparticles from AMD are economically important and reduce the cost of waste disposal.

  13. Chemical bonding and magnetic properties of gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas; Adireddy, Shiva; Ramana, C.V.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Room temperature Raman spectra of CoFe 2−x Gd x O 4 (CFGO, x = 0.0–0.3) compounds as a function of wavenumber (cm −1 ). - Highlights: • Gd substituted ferrites were synthesized under controlled concentration. • Gd ion induced lattice dynamical changes are significant. • Enhanced magnetization is observed upon Gd-incorporation in cobalt ferrite. • A correlation between lattice dynamics and magnetic properties is established. - Abstract: Polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe 2−x Gd x O 4 ; x = 0–0.3, referred to CFGO) ceramics have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. Chemical bonding, crystal structure and magnetic properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated as a function of Gd-content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic analyses confirmed the formation of inverse spinel cubic structure. However, a secondary ortho-ferrite phase (GdFeO 3 ) nucleates for higher values of Gd-content. A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization has been observed upon the initial substitution of Gd (x = 0.1). The saturation magnetization drastically decreases at higher Gd content (x ⩾ 0.3). No contribution from ortho-ferrite GdFeO 3 phase is noted to the magnetic properties. The increase in the magnetic saturation magnetization is attributed to the higher magnetic moment of Gd 3+ (4f 7 ) residing in octahedral sites is higher when compared to that of Fe 3+ (3d 5 ) and as well due to the migration of Co 2+ (3d 7 ) ions from the octahedral to the tetrahedral sites with a magnetic moment aligned anti-parallel to those of rare earth (RE 3+ ) ions in the spinel lattice. Increase in coercivity with increase in Gd 3+ is content is attributed to magnetic anisotropy in the ceramics

  14. Structural and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline stannic substituted cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Y.M., E-mail: ymabbas@live.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Mansour, S.A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, King AbdulAziz University, Rabegh (Saudi Arabia); Ibrahim, M.H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, King AbdulAziz University (Saudi Arabia); Ali, Shehab. E., E-mail: shehab_ali@science.suez.edu.eg [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2012-09-15

    The structural and magnetic properties of the spinel ferrite system Co{sub 1+x}Fe{sub 2-2x}Sn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0-1.0) have been studied. Samples in the series were prepared by the ceramic technique. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. Far infrared absorption spectra show two significant absorption bands, around 600 cm{sup -1} and 425 cm{sup -1}, which are respectively attributed to tetrahedral (A) and octahedral [B] vibrations of the spinel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study surface morphology. SEM images reveal particles in the nanosize range. The transmission electronic microscope (TEM) reveals that the grains are spherical in shape. TEM analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were characterized by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The spinel ferrite system has been formed at 1000 Degree-Sign C by using ceramic techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural and microstructural evolutions have been studied using XRD and the Rietveld method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The refinement result showed cationic distribution in the lattice is partially an inverse spinel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties of the samples were characterized by using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  15. Structural and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline stannic substituted cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Y.M.; Mansour, S.A.; Ibrahim, M.H.; Ali, Shehab. E.

    2012-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of the spinel ferrite system Co 1+x Fe 2−2x Sn x O 4 (x=0.0–1.0) have been studied. Samples in the series were prepared by the ceramic technique. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. Far infrared absorption spectra show two significant absorption bands, around 600 cm −1 and 425 cm −1 , which are respectively attributed to tetrahedral (A) and octahedral [B] vibrations of the spinel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to study surface morphology. SEM images reveal particles in the nanosize range. The transmission electronic microscope (TEM) reveals that the grains are spherical in shape. TEM analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were characterized by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. - Highlights: ► The spinel ferrite system has been formed at 1000 °C by using ceramic techniques. ► Structural and microstructural evolutions have been studied using XRD and the Rietveld method. ► The refinement result showed cationic distribution in the lattice is partially an inverse spinel. ► The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. ► Magnetic properties of the samples were characterized by using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  16. Synthesis of surfactant-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for adsorptive removal of acid blue 45 dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed Mushtaq, Muhammad; Kanwal, Farah; Imran, Muhammad; Ameen, Naila; Batool, Madeeha; Batool, Aisha; Bashir, Shahid; Mustansar Abbas, Syed; Rehman, Ata ur; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Ullah, Zaka

    2018-03-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized by wet chemical coprecipitation method using metal chlorides as precursors and potassium hydroxide (KOH) as a precipitant. The tergitol-1x (T-1x) and didecyldimethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) are used as capping agents and their effect is investigated on particle size, size distribution and morphology of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CFNPs). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the synthesis of CFNPs and formation of metal-oxygen (M-O) bond. The spinel phase structure, morphology, polydispersity and magnetic properties of ferrite nanoparticles are investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometry analyses, respectively. The addition of capping agents effects the secondary growth of CFNPs and reduces their particle size, as is investigated by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. The results evidence that the DDAB is more promising surfactant to control the particle size (∼13 nm), polydispersity and aggregation of CFNPs. The synthesized CFNPs, CFNPs/T-1x and CFNPs/DDAB are used to study their adsorption potential for removal of acid blue 45 dye, and a maximum adsorptive removal of 92.25% is recorded by 0.1 g of CFNPs/DDAB at pH 2.5 and temperature 20 ± 1 °C. The results show that the dye is physically adsorbed by magnetic NPs and follows the Langmuir isotherm model.

  17. Structural and magnetic properties correlated with cation distribution of Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiba, Z.K. [Faculty of Science, Taif University, P.O. Box: 888, Al-Haweiah, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Mostafa, Nasser Y., E-mail: nmost69@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Taif University, P.O. Box: 888, Al-Haweiah, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Abd-Elkader, Omar H. [Department of Zoology, Science College, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Electron Microscope and Thin Films Department, National Research Center (NRC), El-Behooth Street, Dokki, Cairo 12622 (Egypt)

    2014-11-15

    Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles; CoFe{sub 2−2x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≤0.3) were prepared by a one-step solution combustion synthesis technique. The reactants were metal nitrates and glycine as a fuel. The samples were characterized using an X-ray diffraction (XRD), a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD analysis revealed a pure single phase of cubic spinel ferrites for all samples with x up to 0.3. The lattice parameter decreases with Mo{sup 6+} substitution linearly up to x=0.15, then nonlinearly for x≥0.2. Rietveld analysis and saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) revealed that Mo{sup 6+} replaced Fe{sup 3+} in the tetrahedral A-sites up to x=0.15, then it replaced Fe{sup 3+} in both A-sites and B-sites for x≥0.2. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) increases with increasing Mo{sup 6+} substitution up to x=0.15 then decreases. The crystallite size decreased while the microstrain increased with increasing Mo{sup 6+} substitution. Inserting Mo{sup 6+} produces large residents of defects and cation vacancies. - Highlights: • Nano-sized Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite CoFe{sub 2−2x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≤0.3) were prepared by solution combustion. • The change in M{sub s} with increasing Mo-substitution was investigated. • The cations distributions of ferrites were obtained from Rietveld analysis. • Inserting Mo{sup 6+} produces large residents of defects and cation vacancies.

  18. Deposition of Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite (LSCF) Using Suspension Plasma Spraying for Oxygen Transport Membrane Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, E. S. C.; Kesler, O.

    2015-08-01

    Suspension plasma spray deposition was utilized to fabricate dense lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) on porous metal substrates for mechanical support. The as-sprayed membranes had negligible and/or reversible material decomposition. At the longer stand-off distance (80 mm), smooth and dense membranes could be manufactured using a plasma with power below approximately 81 kW. Moreover, a membrane of 55 μm was observed to have very low gas leakage rates desirable for OSM applications. This thickness could potentially be decreased further to improve oxygen diffusion by using metal substrates with finer surface pores.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-chitosan-coated cobalt ferrite core/shell nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runhua, Qin [Department of Physics, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University Science and Technology, Xiaolingwei 200, Nanjing 210094 (China); Li Fengsheng, E-mail: qinrunh@126.com [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University Science and Technology, Xiaolingwei 200, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wei, Jiang; Mingyue, Chen [National Special Superfine Powder Engineering Research Center, Nanjing University Science and Technology, Xiaolingwei 200, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2010-08-01

    Special diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-chitosan-coated cobalt ferrite core/shell nanoparticles have been synthesized via a novel zero-length emulsion crosslinking process and characterized via crosslinking degree, simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and vibration sample magnetometry. The experimental results showed that the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were really encapsulated with a DTPA-chitosan hybrid layer and the nanocomposites were proved to be nearly superparamagnetic with saturation magnetization of 26.6 emu g{sup -1}.

  20. Effects of nickel and cobalt addition on creep strength and microstructure of the precipitation-strengthened 15Cr ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibuya, Masachika; Toda, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Kota; Kushima, Hideaki; Kimura, Kazuhiro [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Creep strength of 15Cr ferritic steel with ferrite matrix was increased by precipitation strengthening of intermetallic compounds. It was higher than those of 9-12Cr ferritic steels with a tempered martensitic microstructure strengthened by carbide and carbonitride. Addition of nickel was confirmed to improve Charpy impact toughness of the 15Cr steels, however, creep strength was slightly reduced by the addition of nickel. Microstructure of the 15Cr steel changes from ferrite single phase to dual phases of ferrite and martensite with the addition of nickel which is an austenite stabilizing element. The 15Cr steels investigated in the previous study, contain 3mass% of cobalt which is also an austenite stabilizing element, therefore, the influence of nickel and cobalt combination on mechanical properties and microstructure of the 15Cr-1Mo-6W-V-Nb steel is investigated in this study. Creep strength, Charpy impact toughness and microstructure of the steel were strongly influenced by the composition of nickel and cobalt. Design guideline of the 15Cr steel is discussed with respect to a role of microstructure and combination of nickel and cobalt addition. (orig.)

  1. Tailoring the magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite by varying annealing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacik, Michal; Pavlinek, Vladimir; Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2014-05-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite were synthesized via the sol-gel method and subsequent annealing. The influence of the annealing temperature on the structure, magnetic properties, and magnetorheological effect was investigated. The finite crystallite size of the particles, determined by X-ray diffraction and the particle size observed via transmission electron microscopy, increased with the annealing temperature. The magnetic properties observed via a vibrating sample magnetometer showed that an increase in the annealing temperature leads to the increase in the magnetization saturation and, in contrast, a decrease in the coercivity. The effect of annealing on the magnetic properties of ferrite particles has been explained by the recrystallization process at high temperatures. This resulted in grain size growth and a decrease in an imposed stress relating to defects in the crystal lattice structure of the nanoparticles. The magnetorheological characteristics of suspensions of ferrite particles in silicone oil were measured using a rotational rheometer equipped with a magnetic field generator in both steady shear and small-strain oscillatory regimes. The magnetorheological performance expressed as a relative increase in the magnetoviscosity appeared to be significantly higher for suspensions of particles annealed at 1000 °C.

  2. Chemical bonding and magnetic properties of gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Venkata Sreenivas, E-mail: vspuli@utep.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Adireddy, Shiva [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Ramana, C.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Graphical abstract: Room temperature Raman spectra of CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4} (CFGO, x = 0.0–0.3) compounds as a function of wavenumber (cm{sup −1}). - Highlights: • Gd substituted ferrites were synthesized under controlled concentration. • Gd ion induced lattice dynamical changes are significant. • Enhanced magnetization is observed upon Gd-incorporation in cobalt ferrite. • A correlation between lattice dynamics and magnetic properties is established. - Abstract: Polycrystalline gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}; x = 0–0.3, referred to CFGO) ceramics have been synthesized by solid state reaction method. Chemical bonding, crystal structure and magnetic properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated as a function of Gd-content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic analyses confirmed the formation of inverse spinel cubic structure. However, a secondary ortho-ferrite phase (GdFeO{sub 3}) nucleates for higher values of Gd-content. A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization has been observed upon the initial substitution of Gd (x = 0.1). The saturation magnetization drastically decreases at higher Gd content (x ⩾ 0.3). No contribution from ortho-ferrite GdFeO{sub 3} phase is noted to the magnetic properties. The increase in the magnetic saturation magnetization is attributed to the higher magnetic moment of Gd{sup 3+} (4f{sup 7}) residing in octahedral sites is higher when compared to that of Fe{sup 3+} (3d{sup 5}) and as well due to the migration of Co{sup 2+} (3d{sup 7}) ions from the octahedral to the tetrahedral sites with a magnetic moment aligned anti-parallel to those of rare earth (RE{sup 3+}) ions in the spinel lattice. Increase in coercivity with increase in Gd{sup 3+} is content is attributed to magnetic anisotropy in the ceramics.

  3. Improved electrical properties of cadmium substituted cobalt ferrites nano-particles for microwave application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Rabia [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Gomal University, D. I. Khan (Pakistan); Hussain Gul, Iftikhar, E-mail: iftikhar.gul@scme.nust.edu.pk [Thermal Transport Laboratory (TTL), Materials Engineering Department, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering (SCME), National University of Sciences and Technology - NUST, H-12 Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Zarrar, Muhammad [Thermal Transport Laboratory (TTL), Materials Engineering Department, School of Chemical and Materials Engineering (SCME), National University of Sciences and Technology - NUST, H-12 Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Anwar, Humaira [Islamabad Model College for Girls G-10/2, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan Niazi, Muhammad Bilal [Department of Chemicals Engineering, SCME, NUST, H-12 Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, Azim [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Gomal University, D. I. Khan (Pakistan)

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium substituted cobalt ferrites with formula Cd{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.35, 0.5), have been synthesized by wet chemical co-precipitation technique. Electrical, morphological and Structural properties of the samples have been studied using DC electrical resistivity and Impedance analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. XRD, SEM and AFM have been used to study the structural parameters such as measured density, lattice constant, X-ray density, crystallite size and morphology of the synthesized nano-particles. Debye–Scherrer formula has been used for the estimation of crystallite sizes. The estimated crystallite sizes were to be 15–19±2 nm. Hopping length of octahedral and tetrahedral sites have been calculated using indexed XRD data. The porosity and lattice constant increased as Cd{sup 2+}concentration increases. DC electrical resistivity was performed using two probe technique. The decrease of resistivity with temperature confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. The dielectric properties variation has been studied at room temperature as a function of frequency. Variation of dielectric properties from 100 Hz to 5 MHz has been explained on the basis of Maxwell and Wagner’s model and hoping of electrons on octahedral sites. To separates the grains boundary and grains of the system Cd{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} the impedance analysis were performed. - Highlights: • Preparation of homogeneous, spherical and single phase well crystallized cobalt ferrites. • A simple and economical PEG assisted wet chemical co-precipitation method has been used. • Increased in DC electrical resistivity and activation energy. • Decease in dielectric constant used for microwave absorber. • AC conductivity of Cd{sup 2+} substituted Co-ferrites increases.

  4. Improved electrical properties of cadmium substituted cobalt ferrites nano-particles for microwave application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Rabia; Hussain Gul, Iftikhar; Zarrar, Muhammad; Anwar, Humaira; Khan Niazi, Muhammad Bilal; Khan, Azim

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium substituted cobalt ferrites with formula Cd x Co 1−x Fe 2 O 4 (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.35, 0.5), have been synthesized by wet chemical co-precipitation technique. Electrical, morphological and Structural properties of the samples have been studied using DC electrical resistivity and Impedance analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. XRD, SEM and AFM have been used to study the structural parameters such as measured density, lattice constant, X-ray density, crystallite size and morphology of the synthesized nano-particles. Debye–Scherrer formula has been used for the estimation of crystallite sizes. The estimated crystallite sizes were to be 15–19±2 nm. Hopping length of octahedral and tetrahedral sites have been calculated using indexed XRD data. The porosity and lattice constant increased as Cd 2+ concentration increases. DC electrical resistivity was performed using two probe technique. The decrease of resistivity with temperature confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. The dielectric properties variation has been studied at room temperature as a function of frequency. Variation of dielectric properties from 100 Hz to 5 MHz has been explained on the basis of Maxwell and Wagner’s model and hoping of electrons on octahedral sites. To separates the grains boundary and grains of the system Cd x Co 1−x Fe 2 O 4 the impedance analysis were performed. - Highlights: • Preparation of homogeneous, spherical and single phase well crystallized cobalt ferrites. • A simple and economical PEG assisted wet chemical co-precipitation method has been used. • Increased in DC electrical resistivity and activation energy. • Decease in dielectric constant used for microwave absorber. • AC conductivity of Cd 2+ substituted Co-ferrites increases.

  5. Investigation of Structural, Morphological, Magnetic Properties and Biomedical applications of Cu2+ Substituted Uncoated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Margabandhu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present work, Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite (Co1-xCuxFe2O4, x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 magnetic nanopowders were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared powders were investigated by various characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM, vibrating sample magnetometer analysis (VSM and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR. The XRD analysis reveals that the synthesized nanopowders possess single phase centred cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size of the particles ranging from 27-49 nm was calculated by using Debye-scherrer formula. Magnetic properties of the synthesized magnetic nanoparticles are studied by using VSM. The VSM results shows the magnetic properties such as coercivity, magnetic retentivity decreases with increase in copper substitution whereas the saturation magnetization shows increment and decrement in accordance with Cu2+ substitution in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. SEM analysis reveals the morphology of synthesized magnetic nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were recorded in the frequency range 4000-400cm-1. The spectrum shows the presence of water adsorption and metal oxygen bonds. The adhesion nature of Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with bacteria in reviewed results indicates that the synthesized nanoparticles could be used in biotechnology and biomedical applications.

  6. Topotactic Synthesis of Porous Cobalt Ferrite Platelets from a Layered Double Hydroxide Precursor and Their Application in Oxidation Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Klaus Friedel; Anke, Sven; Salamon, Soma; Özcan, Fatih; Heese, Justus; Andronescu, Corina; Landers, Joachim; Wende, Heiko; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Muhler, Martin; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Behrens, Malte

    2017-09-12

    Monocrystalline, yet porous mosaic platelets of cobalt ferrite, CoFe 2 O 4 , can be synthesized from a layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor by thermal decomposition. Using an equimolar mixture of Fe 2+ , Co 2+ , and Fe 3+ during co-precipitation, a mixture of LDH, (Fe II Co II ) 2/3 Fe III 1/3 (OH) 2 (CO 3 ) 1/6 ⋅m H 2 O, and the target spinel CoFe 2 O 4 can be obtained in the precursor. During calcination, the remaining Fe II fraction of the LDH is oxidized to Fe III leading to an overall Co 2+ :Fe 3+ ratio of 1:2 as required for spinel crystallization. This pre-adjustment of the spinel composition in the LDH precursor suggests a topotactic crystallization of cobalt ferrite and yields phase pure spinel in unusual anisotropic platelet morphology. The preferred topotactic relationship in most particles is [111] Spinel ∥[001] LDH . Due to the anion decomposition, holes are formed throughout the quasi monocrystalline platelets. This synthesis approach can be used for different ferrites and the unique microstructure leads to unusual chemical properties as shown by the application of the ex-LDH cobalt ferrite as catalyst in the selective oxidation of 2-propanol. Compared to commercial cobalt ferrite, which mainly catalyzes the oxidative dehydrogenation to acetone, the main reaction over the novel ex-LDH cobalt is dehydration to propene. Moreover, the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity of the ex-LDH catalyst was markedly higher compared to the commercial material. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Synthesis of ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Influence of reaction time on structural, morphological and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabadizadeh, Ahmad; Salighe, Zohre; Sarhaddi, Reza, E-mail: reza.sarhaddi@birjand.ac.ir; Lotfollahi, Zahra

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • The crystallite and particle size of cobalt ferrite can be controlled effectively by reaction time. • The ferrofluids have lower values of saturation magnetization and coercivity as compared to nanoparticles. • By increasing the size of nanoparticles, the narrower and sharper spikes of ferrofluids are formed. - Abstract: In this work, for first time the ferrofluids based on the cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method at different reaction times (0.5–6.5 h). Crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids based on the nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized at different reaction times indicated that all samples are single phase in accordance with inverse cubic spinel structure with space group Fd-3m, and no impurity phase was observed. By increasing the reaction time to 3.5 h, the lattice parameter and the average crystallites size increased and then afterwards decreased by increasing the reaction time. The microscopic studies indicated the formation of nanosized particles with nearly spherical in shape, whereas the average particle size for all samples is found to be less than 50 nm. The results of VSM also showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity field of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids were influenced by reaction time, whereas the ferrofluids have lower values of magnetic parameters than that of nanoparticles.

  8. A comparative study of NiZn ferrites modified by the addition of cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira S.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Off-stoichiometric NiZn ferrite was obtained by hydrothermal process and compacted in torus form under different pressures. Two samples A1 and A2 - cobalt doped (0.5 % were sintered at 1573 K in air atmosphere during 3 h. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy and complex impedanciometry. X-ray diffraction and Hg porosimetry were used in order to determine the average grain size and the type of packing in the samples. Both samples exhibited superparamagnetic behavior in the hysteresis loop. This effect does not agree with Mössbauer results, which were fitted using Normos, a commercial computer program. All samples parameters were compared.

  9. Improvement of drug delivery by hyperthermia treatment using magnetic cubic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Chaitali, E-mail: chaitalidey29@gmail.com [Centre for Research in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology, Block-JD-2, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Baishya, Kaushik [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Ghosh, Arup [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Pune, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Goswami, Madhuri Mandal, E-mail: madhuri@bose.res.in [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Ghosh, Ajay [Dept. of Applied Optics and Photonics, University of Calcutta, Block-JD-2, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India); Mandal, Kalyan [S.N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700106 (India)

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we report a novel synthesis method, characterization and application of a new class of ferromagnetic cubic cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for hyperthermia therapy and temperature triggered drug release. The MNPs are characterized by XRD, TEM, FESEM, AC magnetic hysteresis and VSM. These MNPs were coated with folic acid and loaded with an anticancer drug. The drug release studies were done at two different temperatures (37 °C and 44 °C) with progress of time. It was found that higher release of drug took place at elevated temperature (44 °C). We have developed a temperature sensitive drug delivery system which releases the heat sensitive drug selectively as the particles are heated up under AC magnetic field and controlled release is possible by changing the external AC magnetic field.

  10. Chemical modification of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with possible application as asphaltene flocculant agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, G.E.; Clarindo, J.E.S.; Santo, K.S.E., E-mail: geiza.oliveira@ufes.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCE/DQUI/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Souza Junior, F.G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoleculas

    2013-11-01

    Asphaltenes can cause enormous losses in the oil industry, because they are soluble only in aromatic solvents. Therefore, they must be removed from the petroleum before it is refined, using flocculant agents. Aiming to find new materials that can work as flocculant agents to asphaltenes, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were chemically modified through acid-base reactions using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) to increase their lipophilicity. Nanoparticle synthesis was performed using the co-precipitation method followed by annealing of these nanoparticles, aiming to change the structural phase. Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were tested by FTIR-ATR, XRD and TGA/DTA. In addition, precipitation onset of the asphaltenes was performed using modified and unmodified nanoparticles. These tests showed that modified nanoparticles have a potential application as flocculant agents used to remove asphaltenes before oil refining, since the presence of nanoparticles promotes the asphaltene precipitation onset with the addition of a small amount of non-solvent (author)

  11. Influence of the preparation route on the magnetic and structural properties of cobalt ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revoredo Junior, Frederico Alves; Silva Junior, Jose Holanda da; Hernandez, Eduardo Padron

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were produced using two methods of preparation, co-precipitation and reaction in the solid state. In synthesis made by solid state reaction was performed by heat treatment at 1200 ° C for four hours alternating with triturations to increase the efficiency of the process. The synthesis by coprecipitation was made with different flows of addition of alkali (NaOH). All samples were structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction and the average size of the crystals was obtained by Scherrer's formula and the Williamson-Hall method. The magnetic measurements were made as a function of applied magnetic field and temperature. Qualitative analyzes of energy dispersive spectroscopy defined the elements of sampling and analysis. Finally, Mössbauer spectroscopy analysis defined the magnetic character of the samples. (author)

  12. Synthesis Characterization and Photocatalytic Studies of Cobalt Ferrite-Silica-Titania Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Greene

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, CoFe2O4@SiO2@TiO2 core-shell magnetic nanostructures have been prepared by coating of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with the double SiO2/TiO2 layer using metallorganic precursors. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX, Vibrational Sample Magnetometer (VSM measurements and Raman spectroscopy results confirm the presence both of the silica and very thin TiO2 layers. The core-shell nanoparticles have been sintered at 600 °C and used as a catalyst in photo-oxidation reactions of methylene blue under UV light. Despite the additional non-magnetic coatings result in a lower value of the magnetic moment, the particles can still easily be retrieved from reaction mixtures by magnetic separation. This retention of magnetism was of particular importance allowing magnetic recovery and re-use of the catalyst.

  13. Chemical modification of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with possible application as asphaltene flocculant agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, G.E.; Clarindo, J.E.S.; Santo, K.S.E.; Souza Junior, F.G.

    2013-01-01

    Asphaltenes can cause enormous losses in the oil industry, because they are soluble only in aromatic solvents. Therefore, they must be removed from the petroleum before it is refined, using flocculant agents. Aiming to find new materials that can work as flocculant agents to asphaltenes, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were chemically modified through acid-base reactions using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) to increase their lipophilicity. Nanoparticle synthesis was performed using the co-precipitation method followed by annealing of these nanoparticles, aiming to change the structural phase. Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were tested by FTIR-ATR, XRD and TGA/DTA. In addition, precipitation onset of the asphaltenes was performed using modified and unmodified nanoparticles. These tests showed that modified nanoparticles have a potential application as flocculant agents used to remove asphaltenes before oil refining, since the presence of nanoparticles promotes the asphaltene precipitation onset with the addition of a small amount of non-solvent (author)

  14. The Effect of Catalyst Type on The Microstructure and Magnetic Properties of Synthesized Hard Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaima'a Jaber Kareem

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A sol-gel process prepared the nanoparticles of hard cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4. Cobalt nitrate hexahydrate (Co (NO32⋅6H2O, iron nitrate nonahydrate (Fe (NO33⋅9H2O with using two catalysis acid (citric acid and alkaline (hydroxide ammonium were used as precursor materials. Crystallization behavior of the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Nanoparticles phases can change from amorphous to spinel ferrite crystalline depending on the calcinated temperature at 600°C, with using citric acid as a catalysis without finding forgone phase, while using hydroxide ammonium was shown second phase (α-Fe2O3 with CoFe2O4. Crystallite size was measured by Scherrer’s formula about (25.327 nm and (27.119 nm respectively. Structural properties were investigated by FTIR, which was appeared main bond of (Fe-O, (Co-O, (C-O, and (H-O. Scanning electron microscopy (FE- SEM was shown the microstructure observation of cobalt ferrite and the particle size at the range about (28.77-42.97 nm. Magnetization measurements were carried out on a vibrating sample magenometer (VSM that exhibited hard spinel ferrite.

  15. Dynamic magnetoelectric effects in bulk and layered composites of cobalt zinc ferrite and lead zirconate titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, G.; Hayes, R.; DeVreugd, C.P. [Oakland University, Physics Department, Rochester, MI (United States); Laletsin, V.M.; Paddubnaya, N. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Technical Acoustics, Vitebsk (Belarus)

    2005-02-01

    Low-frequency magnetoelectric (ME) coupling is investigated in bulk samples and multilayers of cobalt zinc ferrite, Co{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0-0.6), and lead zirconate titanate. In bulk samples, the transverse and longitudinal couplings are weak and of equal magnitude. A substantial strengthening of ME interactions is evident in layered structures, with the ME voltage coefficient a factor of 10-30 higher than in bulk samples. Important findings of our studies of layered composites are as follows. (i) The transverse coupling is stronger than the longitudinal coupling. (ii) The strength of ME interactions is dependent on Zn substitution, with a maximum for x=0.4. (iii) A weak coupling exists at the ferromagnetic-piezoelectric interface, as revealed by an analysis of the volume and static magnetic field dependence of ME voltage coefficients. (iv) The interface coupling k increases with Zn substitution and the k versus x profile shows a maximum centered at x=0.4. (v) The Zn-assisted enhancement can be attributed to efficient magneto-mechanical coupling in the ferrite. (orig.)

  16. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at the interface between platinum and cobalt ferrite thin films with large magnetic anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tainosho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently discovered spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR effect is a useful means to obtain information on the magnetization process at the interface between a nonmagnetic metal and ferromagnetic insulators. We report the SMR measurements at the interface between platinum and cobalt ferrite thin films for samples with two different preferential directions of magnetization (out-of-plane and in-plane. The directional difference of the magnetic easy axis does not seem to influence the value of SMR.

  17. Chemical synthesis of spinel cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nano-flakes for supercapacitor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumbhar, V.S.; Jagadale, A.D.; Shinde, N.M.; Lokhande, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The first time preparation of cobalt ferrite material in thin film form, using chemical method at low temperature. ► A nano-flake like morphology of the cobalt ferrite thin film. ► An application of the film as an electrode in supercapacitor cell. - Abstract: The present paper reveals the formation of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) thin film on stainless steel substrate by simple chemical route from an alkaline bath containing Co 2+ and Fe 2+ ions. The films are characterised for structural, surface morphological and FT-IR properties. The XRD and FT-IR studies revealed formation of single phase of CoFe 2 O 4 . The formation of nano-flakes-like morphology is observed from scanning electron microscope. The electrochemical behaviour of CoFe 2 O 4 film has been studied using cyclic voltammetry in 1 M NaOH electrolyte. The maximum specific capacitance of 366 F g −1 is obtained at the scan rate of 5 mV s −1 . Using AC impedance technique equivalent series resistance (ESR) value is found to be 1.1 Ω.

  18. Synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite through soft chemistry methods: A green chemistry approach using sesame seed extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingasu, Dana [Ilie Murgulescu Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Mindru, Ioana, E-mail: imandru@yahoo.com [Ilie Murgulescu Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Mocioiu, Oana Catalina; Preda, Silviu; Stanica, Nicolae; Patron, Luminita [Ilie Murgulescu Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Ianculescu, Adelina; Oprea, Ovidiu [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Chemistry, 1-7 Polizu Street, 011061, Bucharest (Romania); Nita, Sultana; Paraschiv, Ileana [National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical Research and Development, 112 Calea Vitan, 031299, Bucharest (Romania); Popa, Marcela; Saviuc, Crina [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Biology, Microbiology Department, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest-ICUB, Life, Environmental and Earth Sciences Division, 91-95 Splaiul Independentei, Bucharest (Romania); Bleotu, Coralia [Stefan S. Nicolau Institute of Virology, Cellular and Molecular Pathology Department, 285 Mihai Bravu Avenue, Bucharest (Romania); Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Biology, Microbiology Department, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest-ICUB, Life, Environmental and Earth Sciences Division, 91-95 Splaiul Independentei, Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-10-01

    The nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were obtained through self-combustion and wet ferritization methods using aqueous extracts of sesame (Sesamum indicum L) seeds. The multimetallic complex compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-VIS spectroscopy and thermal analysis. Phase identification, morphological evolution and magnetic properties of the obtained cobalt ferrites were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), FTIR and magnetic measurements. FE-SEM investigations revealed the particle size of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} obtained by wet ferritization method ranged between 3 and 20.45 nm. Their antimicrobial, anti-biofilm and cytotoxic properties were evaluated. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were obtained by two chemical synthesis methods. • Sesame seed extract was used as gelling or chelating agent. • The morphological features of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were evaluated. • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} exhibited good microbicidal and anti-biofilm features.

  19. Influence of synthesis method on structural and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyergyek, Saso; Makovec, Darko; Kodre, Alojz; Arcon, Iztok; Jagodic, Marko; Drofenik, Miha

    2010-01-01

    The Co-ferrite nanoparticles having a relatively uniform size distribution around 8 nm were synthesized by three different methods. A simple co-precipitation from aqueous solutions and a co-precipitation in an environment of microemulsions are low temperature methods (50 o C), whereas a thermal decomposition of organo-metallic complexes was performed at elevated temperature of 290 o C. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed spinel structure, and the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) a good crystallinity of all the nanoparticles. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed the composition close to stoichiometric (∼CoFe 2 O 4 ) for both co-precipitated nanoparticles, whereas the nanoparticles prepared by the thermal decomposition were Co-deficient (∼Co 0.6 Fe 2.4 O 4 ). The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis showed Co valence of 2+ in all the samples, Fe valence 3+ in both co-precipitated samples, but average Fe valence of 2.7+ in the sample synthesized by thermal decomposition. The variations in cation distribution within the spinel lattice were observed by structural refinement of X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Like the bulk CoFe 2 O 4 , the nanoparticles synthesized at elevated temperature using thermal decomposition displayed inverse spinel structure with the Co ions occupying predominantly octahedral lattice sites, whereas co-precipitated samples showed considerable proportion of cobalt ions occupying tetrahedral sites (nearly 1/3 for the nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation from aqueous solutions and almost 1/4 for the nanoparticles synthesized in microemulsions). Magnetic measurements performed at room temperature and at 10 K were in good agreement with the nanoparticles' composition and the cation distribution in their structure. The presented study clearly shows that the distribution of the cations within the spinel lattice of the ferrite nanoparticles, and consequently their magnetic

  20. Synthesis of cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetostriction properties by the sol−gel−hydrothermal route using spent Li-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lu; Xi, Yuebin; Xi, Guoxi; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The combination of a sol–gel method and a hydrothermal method was successfully used for synthesizing the nano-crystalline cobalt ferrite powders with a spinel structure using spent Li-ion batteries as the raw materials. The phase composition, microstructure, magnetic properties and magnetostriction coefficient of cobalt ferrite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), magnetometer and magnetostrictive measurement instrument. The microstructure of the products exhibited hedgehog-like microspheres with particle size of approximately 5 μm. The different crystalline sizes and the microstructure of cobalt ferrites precursor were controlled by varying the hydrothermal time, which significantly affected the super-exchange and the deflection direction of the magnetic domain, and led to the change of the magnetic properties of sintered cylindrical samples. The saturation magnetization and maximum magnetostriction coefficient were 81.7 emu/g and −158.5 ppm, respectively, which was larger than that of products prepared by the sol-gel sintered method alone. - Graphical abstract: The magnetostriction of cobalt ferrites with a spinel structure was successfully prepared using the sol–gel–hydrothermal route using spent Li-ion batteries. On the basis of the aforementioned SEM observation, the formation of a hedgehog-like microsphere structure might involve two important steps: Ostwald ripening and self-assembly. - Highlights: • The cobalt ferrites were prepared by the sol–gel–hydrothermal route. • The cobalt ferrites show hedgehog-like microsphere particles in shape. • The microspheres size increased with increasing hydrothermal time. • The magnetostriction properties of the cobalt ferrite were enhanced.

  1. Correlation of reactivity with structural factors in a series of Fe(II) substituted cobalt ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sileo, Elsa E.; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; Paiva-Santos, Carlos O.; Stephens, Peter W.; Morando, Pedro J.; Blesa, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    A series of powdered cobalt ferrites, Co x Fe 3- x O 4 with 0.66≤x II , were synthesized by a mild procedure, and their Fe and Co site occupancies and structural characteristics were explored using X-ray anomalous scattering and the Rietveld refinement method. The dissolution kinetics, measured in 0.1 M oxalic acid aqueous solution at 70 deg. C, indicate in all cases the operation of a contracting volume rate law. The specific rates increased with the Fe II content following approximately a second-order polynomial expression. This result suggests that the transfer of Fe III controls the dissolution rate, and that the leaching of a first layer of ions Co II and Fe II leaves exposed a surface enriched in slower dissolving octahedral Fe III ions. Within this model, inner vicinal lattice Fe II accelerates the rate of Fe III transfer via internal electron hopping. A chain mechanism, involving successive electron transfers, fits the data very well. - Graphical abstract: The electron exchange between octahedral Fe II and Fe III ions has important consequences on the specific dissolution rates. Display Omitted

  2. Evidence of exchange-coupled behavior in chromium-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanbir, Kamar; Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Aakash; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Choubey, Ravi Kant; Mukherjee, Samrat

    2018-06-01

    Cr doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized with the generic formula Co1-xCrxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.05, 0.15, 0.25) through standard chemical co-precipitation method. XRD studies confirmed the pure spinel cubic structure belonging to Fd 3 bar m space group. From the Williamson-Hall plots, crystallite sizes were found to lie within the range (42 ± 1) nm for the different doped samples. The lattice parameter was found to decrease linearly with increase in the concentration of Cr3+ ion. The magnetic behavior of the samples was determined by M-H studies at 300 K, field cooled (5 T) at 5 K and temperature dependent studies. The M-H at 300 K show soft magnetic behavior whereas the M-H plots at 5 K predict the existence of in-homogeneity of the exchange interactions due to strong exchange coupling between the spins at the core and the surface of the nanoparticles.

  3. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite prepared using auto combustion and ceramic route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murugesan, C.; Perumal, M.; Chandrasekaran, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite is synthesized by using low temperature auto combustion and high temperature ceramic methods. The prepared samples have values of lattice constant equal to 8.40 Å and 8.38 Å for auto combustion and ceramic methods respectively. The FTIR spectrum of samples of the auto combustion method shows a high frequency vibrational band at 580 cm −1 assigned to tetrahedral site and a low frequency vibrational band at 409 cm −1 assigned to octahedral site which are shifted to 590 cm −1 and 412 cm −1 for the ceramic method sample. SEM micrographs of samples show a substantial difference in surface morphology and size of the grains between the two methods. The frequency dependent dielectric constant and ac conductivity of the samples measured from 1 Hz to 2 MHz at room temperature are reported. The room temperature magnetic hysteresis parameters of the samples are measured using VSM. The measured values of saturation magnetization, coercivity and remanent magnetization are 42 emu/g, 1553 Oe, 18.5 emu/g for the auto combustion method, 66.7 emu/g, 379.6 Oe, and 17.3 emu/g for the ceramic method, respectively. The difference in preparation methods and size of the grains causes interesting changes in electrical and magnetic properties

  4. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  5. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesize nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of ∼ 10 6 erg cm -3 can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure

  6. Magnetic hyperthermia studies on water-soluble polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Surendra, M. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India); Annapoorani, S. [Anna University of Technology, Department of Nanotechnology (India); Ansar, Ereath Beeran; Harikrishna Varma, P. R. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Bioceramics Laboratory (India); Ramachandra Rao, M. S., E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India)

    2014-12-15

    We report on synthesis and hyperthermia studies in the water-soluble ferrofluid made of polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with different particle sizes. Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method and particle size was varied as 6, 10, and 14 nm by varying the precursor to surfactant concentration. PAA surfactant bonding and surfactant thickness were studied by FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis. At room temperature, nanoparticles show superparamagnetism and saturation magnetization was found to vary from 33 to 44 emu/g with increase in the particle size from 6 to 14 nm, and this increase was attributed to the presence of a magnetic inert layer of 4 Å thick. Effect of particle size, concentration, and alternating magnetic field strength at 275 kHz on specific absorption rate were studied by preparing ferrofluids in deionized water at different concentrations. Ferrofluids at a concentration of 1.25 g/L, with 10 min of AMF exposure of strength ∼15.7 kA/m show stable temperatures ∼48, 58, and 68 °C with increase in the particle sizes 6, 10, and 14 nm. A maximum specific absorption rate of 251 W/g for ferrofluid with a particle size of 10 nm at 1.25 g/L, 15.7 kA/m, and 275 kHz was observed. Viability of L929 fibroblasts is measured by MTT assay cytotoxicity studies using the polyacrylic acid-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  7. Effect of Cr{sup 3+} substitution on electric and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, R.K., E-mail: physics.panda@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, 769 008 (India); Muduli, R. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, 769 008 (India); Jayarao, G. [Department of Ceramic Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, 769 008 (India); Sanyal, D. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, 700064 (India); Behera, D. [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, 769 008 (India)

    2016-06-05

    This work describes the effect of incorporation of Cr{sup 3+} into CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on its magnetic and electric properties, prepared by auto combustion method. The samples of CoFe{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x}O4 (x = 0, 0.15, 0.3) series were characterized by x-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy to find out the average particle size. The substitution of Cr{sup 3+} caused a significant reduction in particle size of the modified systems. Room temperature Moessbauer spectroscopy and magnetic characterization were performed. Analysis of extracted parameters concluded that Cr{sup 3+} replaced the Fe{sup 3+} at B-site (octahedral). The decrease in magnetization at B-site was found responsible for the observed reduced saturation magnetization and coercivity. Impedance spectroscopic analysis has revealed the suppression of electrode-sample surface conduction effect and enhancement of material resistivity. The latter was confirmed by dc resistivity measurement. All these results were explained on the basis of occupancy of Cr{sup 3+} at B-site, surface anisotropy potential and reduced particle size. - Highlights: • Cr substitution reduced the particle size in nano-cobalt ferrite. • Mossbauer study revealed that the Cr{sup 3+} replaced the Fe{sup 3+} at B-site. • Decrease in saturation magnetization and coercivity with the addition of Cr{sup 3+}. • Reduction of surface conduction and rise in resistance observed in modified systems.

  8. Thermal effect on magnetic parameters of high-coercivity cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagas, E. F., E-mail: efchagas@fisica.ufmt.br; Ponce, A. S.; Prado, R. J.; Silva, G. M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78060-900 Cuiabá-MT (Brazil); Bettini, J. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais, 13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150 Urca. Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-07-21

    We prepared very high-coercivity cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by a combustion method and using short-time high-energy mechanical milling to increase strain and the structural defects density. The coercivity (H{sub C}) of the milled sample reached 3.75 kOe—a value almost five times higher than that obtained for the non-milled material (0.76 kOe). To investigate the effect of the temperature on the magnetic behavior of the milled sample, we performed a thermal treatment on the milled sample at 300, 400, and 600 °C for 30 and 180 min. We analyzed the changes in the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles due to the thermal treatment using the hysteresis curves, Williamson-Hall analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal treatment at 600 °C causes decreases in the microstructural strain and density of structural defects resulting in a significant decrease in H{sub C}. Furthermore, this thermal treatment increases the size of the nanoparticles and, as a consequence, there is a substantial increase in the saturation magnetization (M{sub S}). The H{sub C} of the samples treated at 600 °C for 30 and 180 min were 2.24 and 1.93 kOe, respectively, and the M{sub S} of these same samples increased from 57 emu/g to 66 and 70 emu/g, respectively. The H{sub C} and the M{sub S} are less affected by the thermal treatment at 300 and 400 °C.

  9. The role of pH on the particle size and magnetic consequence of cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safi, Rohollah, E-mail: r.safi@gmx.com; Ghasemi, Ali; Shoja-Razavi, Reza; Tavousi, Majid

    2015-12-15

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with various size distributions were prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method at different pH condition from 8 to 13. The structural characterizations of the prepared samples were carried out using powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope. The XRD results revealed that a single cubic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase with the average crystallite sizes of about 5–24 nm were formed. Cation distribution occupancy in tetrahedral and octahedral sites were estimated by employing Rietveld refinement technique. The results showed that the whole series of samples contain a partial inverse spinel structure. FTIR measurements between 370 and 4000 cm{sup −1} confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of spinel structure of the samples. The room temperature magnetic properties of the samples have been examined using vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that with increasing the pH of reaction, the magnetization and coercive field could be increased. The sample synthesized at pH~8 and 9 showed superparamagnetic behavior and highest coercive field up to 650 Oe is attributed to the sample synthesized with pH~13. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method at different pH. • Τhe single cubic phase with the average crystallite sizes of 5–24 nm were formed. • Cation distribution in tetrahedral and octahedral sites was estimated using XRD data. • The sample synthesized at pH~8 and 9 showed superparamagnetic behavior. • The crystallinity and crystallite size were increased by increasing the pH.

  10. The role of pH on the particle size and magnetic consequence of cobalt ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safi, Rohollah; Ghasemi, Ali; Shoja-Razavi, Reza; Tavousi, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) nanoparticles with various size distributions were prepared by a chemical co-precipitation method at different pH condition from 8 to 13. The structural characterizations of the prepared samples were carried out using powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope. The XRD results revealed that a single cubic CoFe 2 O 4 phase with the average crystallite sizes of about 5–24 nm were formed. Cation distribution occupancy in tetrahedral and octahedral sites were estimated by employing Rietveld refinement technique. The results showed that the whole series of samples contain a partial inverse spinel structure. FTIR measurements between 370 and 4000 cm −1 confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of spinel structure of the samples. The room temperature magnetic properties of the samples have been examined using vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that with increasing the pH of reaction, the magnetization and coercive field could be increased. The sample synthesized at pH~8 and 9 showed superparamagnetic behavior and highest coercive field up to 650 Oe is attributed to the sample synthesized with pH~13. - Highlights: • CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method at different pH. • Τhe single cubic phase with the average crystallite sizes of 5–24 nm were formed. • Cation distribution in tetrahedral and octahedral sites was estimated using XRD data. • The sample synthesized at pH~8 and 9 showed superparamagnetic behavior. • The crystallinity and crystallite size were increased by increasing the pH

  11. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation at increasing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, C. R.; Bezerra, M. T. S.; Holanda, G. H. A.; André-Filho, J.; Morais, P. C.

    2018-05-01

    This study reports on the synthesis and characterization of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by chemical co-precipitation in alkaline medium at increasing temperatures in the range of 27 °C to 100 °C. High-quality samples in the size range of 5 to 10 nm were produced using very low stirring speed (250 rpm) and moderate alkaline aqueous solution concentration (4.8 mol/L). Three samples were synthesized and characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and room-temperature (RT) magnetization measurements. All samples present superparamagnetic (SPM) behavior at RT and Rietveld refinements confirm the inverse cubic spinel structure (space group Fd-3m (227)) with minor detectable impurity phase. As the synthesis temperature increases, structural parameters such as lattice constant and grain size change monotonically from 8.385 to 8.383 Å and from 5.8 to 7.4 nm, respectively. Likewise, as the synthesis temperature increases the NPs' magnetic moment and saturation magnetization increases monotonically from 2.6 ×103 to 16×103 μB and from 37 to 66 emu/g, respectively. The RT magnetization (M) versus applied field (H) curves were analyzed by the first-order Langevin function averaged out by a lognormal distribution function of magnetic moments. The excellent curve-fitting of the M versus H data is credited to a reduced particle-particle interaction due to both the SPM behavior and the existence of a surface amorphous shell layer (dead layer), the latter reducing systematically as the synthesis temperature increases.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of mixed zinc–cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, P. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Silva, F. G. da [Univ. de Brasília, Laboratório de Nanociência Ambiental e Aplicada - LNAA, Faculdade UnB Planaltina (Brazil); Gomide, G.; Paula, F. L. O. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Campos, A. F. C. [Univ. de Brasília, Laboratório de Nanociência Ambiental e Aplicada - LNAA, Faculdade UnB Planaltina (Brazil); Perzynski, R. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, Laboratoire PHENIX (France); Kern, C. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Depeyrot, J. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Aquino, R., E-mail: reaquino@unb.br [Univ. de Brasília, Laboratório de Nanociência Ambiental e Aplicada - LNAA, Faculdade UnB Planaltina (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    We synthesize Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite (Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) magnetic nanoparticles by a hydrothermal co-precipitation method in alkaline medium. The chemical composition is evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The structure and morphology of the nanopaticles are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. XRD Rietveld refinements reveal the cation distribution among the tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites. It shows that up to x ~0.5 zinc ions occupy preferably A-sites, above which Zn ions begin also a gradual occupancy of B-sites. TEM images show nanoparticles with different shapes varying from spheres, cubes, to octahedrons. Hysteresis loop properties are studied at 300 and 5 K. These properties are strongly influenced by the Zn and Co proportion in the nanoparticle composition. At 300 K, only samples with high Co content present hysteresis. At 5 K, the reduced remanent magnetization ratio (M{sub R}/M{sub S}) and the coercivity (H{sub C}) suggest that nanoparticles with x < 0.5 have cubic anisotropy. A kink on the hysteresis loop, close to the remanence, is observed at low temperature. This feature is presumably associated to interplay between hard and soft anisotropy regimes in the powder samples.Graphical Abstract.

  13. Design and synthesis of ternary cobalt ferrite/graphene/polyaniline hierarchical nanocomposites for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Pan; Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A ternary cobalt ferrite/graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite (CGP) is designed and fabricated via a facile two-step approach: cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed on graphene sheets are achieved by a hydrothermal method, followed by coating with polyaniline (PANI) through in situ polymerization process. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the specific capacitance of the resulting ternary hybrid (CGP) is up to 1133.3 F g-1 at a scan rate of 1 mV s-1 and 767.7 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 using a three-electrode system, while 716.4 F g-1 at a scan rate of 1 mV s-1 and 392.3 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 using a two-electrode system, which are significantly higher than those of pure CoFe2O4, graphene and PANI, or binary CoFe2O4/graphene, CoFe2O4/PANI and graphene/PANI hybrids. In addition, over 96% of the initial capacitance can be retained after repeating test for 5000 cycles, demonstrating a high cycling stability. The extraordinary electrochemical performance of the ternary CGP nanocomposite can be attributed to its well-designed nanostructure and the synergistic effects of the individual components.

  14. Evaluation of humidity sensing properties of TMBHPET thin film embedded with spinel cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, Qayyum; Azmer, Mohamad Izzat; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G.; Al-Assiri, Mohammad S.; Kalam, Abul; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the enhanced sensing parameters of previously reported TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Significant improved sensing performance has been demonstrated by coupling of TMBHPET moisture sensing thin film with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (synthesized by eco-benign ultrasonic method). The mean size of CoFe_2O_4 nanoparticles has been estimated to be ~ 6.5 nm. It is assumed that the thin film of organic–ceramic hybrid matrix (TMBHPET:CoFe_2O_4) is a potential candidate for humidity sensing utility by virtue of its high specific surface area and porous surface morphology (as evident from TEM, FESEM, and AFM images). The hybrid suspension has been drop-cast onto the glass substrate with preliminary deposited coplanar aluminum electrodes separated by 40 µm distance. The influence of humidity on the capacitance of the hybrid humidity sensor (Al/TMBHPET:CoFe_2O_4/Al) has been investigated at three different frequencies of the AC applied voltage (V_r_m_s ~ 1 V): 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz. It has been observed that at 100 Hz, under a humidity of 99 % RH, the capacitance of the sensor increased by 2.61 times, with respect to 30 % RH condition. The proposed sensor exhibits significantly improved sensitivity ~560 fF/ % RH at 100 Hz, which is nearly 7.5 times as high as that of pristine TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Further, the capacitive sensor exhibits improved dynamic range (30–99 % RH), small hysteresis (~2.3 %), and relatively quicker response and recovery times (~12 s, 14 s, respectively). It is assumed that the humidity response of the sensor is associated with the diffusion kinetics of water vapors and doping of the semiconductor nanocomposite by water molecules.

  15. Influence of pH on structural morphology and magnetic properties of ordered phase cobalt doped lithium ferrites nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Manish; Ojha, Animesh K.; Chaubey, S.; Sharma, Prashant K.; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt doped lithium ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized at different pH by sol-gel method. The effect of pH on the physical properties of cobalt doped lithium ferrite nanoparticles has been investigated. The nanoparticles synthesized at different pH were characterized through X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy (RS), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns were analyzed to determine the crystal phase of cobalt doped lithium ferrites nanoparticles synthesized at different pH. The XRD results show the formation of impurity free cobalt doped lithium ferrites having ordered phase spinel structure. A similar kind of conclusion was also drawn through the analysis of Raman spectra of the nanoparticles synthesized at different pH. SEM micrographs show that the structural morphology of the nanoparticles is highly sensitive to the pH during the synthesis process. The magnetic properties such as; saturation magnetization (Ms), remnant magnetization (Mr) and coercivety (Hc) have been also investigated and found to be different for the nanoparticles synthesized at different pH, which may be attributed to the different size and surface morphology of the nanoparticles.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of structural and magnetic properties of polyaniline-cobalt ferrite (PA-CoFe) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Sonika; Kaur, Parminder; Singh, Lakhwant

    2018-05-01

    The growing interest in the investigation of the properties of modified conducting polymers stems from their potential applications in various fields such as in sensing and catalytic devices. The present work reports the modification of conducting polymer polyaniline with cobalt ferrite (CoFe) nanoparticles, where CoFe nanoparticles are added in different successive weight percents. The composite samples were synthesized by in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization technique. The density of the samples has been found to increase with an increase in the CoFe content. Structural analysis of the synthesized sample has been done using X-ray diffraction studies. Perusal of the hysteresis curves of the prepared samples depicts that the introduction of CoFe into the polymer matrix leads to enhancement in the ferromagnetic behavior of the synthesized samples, suggesting that these nanocomposites have excellent microwave absorbing capacity.

  17. Synthesis, structural investigation and magnetic properties of Zn2+ substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles prepared by the sol–gel auto-combustion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raut, A.V.; Barkule, R.S.; Shengule, D.R.; Jadhav, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Structural morphology and magnetic properties of the Co 1−x Zn x Fe 2 O 4 (0.0≤x≥1.0) spinel ferrite system synthesized by the sol–gel auto-combustion technique using nitrates of respective metal ions have been studied. The ratio of metal nitrates to citric acid was taken at 1:3. The as prepared powder of cobalt zinc ferrite was sintered at 600 °C for 12 h after TG/DTA thermal studies. Compositional stoichiometry was confirmed by energy dispersive analysis of the X-ray (EDAX) technique. Single phase cubic spinel structure of Co–Zn nanoparticles was confirmed by XRD data. The average crystallite size (t), lattice constant (a) and other structural parameters of zinc substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were calculated from XRD followed by SEM and FTIR. It is observed that the sol–gel auto-combustion technique has many advantages for the synthesis of technologically applicable Co–Zn ferrite nanoparticles. The present investigation clearly shows the effect of the synthesis method and possible relation between magnetic properties and microstructure of the prepared samples. Increase in nonmagnetic Zn 2+ content in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is followed by decrease in n B , M s and other magnetic parameters. Squareness ratio for the Co-ferrite was 1.096 at room temperature. - Highlights: • Co–Zn nanoparticles are prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion method. • Structural properties were characterized by XRD, SEM, and FTIR. • Compositional stoichiometry was confirmed by EDAX analysis. • Magnetic parameters were measured by the pulse field hysteresis loop technique

  18. Synthesis, structural investigation and magnetic properties of Zn{sup 2+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles prepared by the sol–gel auto-combustion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, A.V., E-mail: nano9993@gmail.com [Vivekanand Arts and Sardar Dalipsingh Commerce and Science College, Aurangabad, 431004 Maharastra (India); Barkule, R.S.; Shengule, D.R. [Vivekanand Arts and Sardar Dalipsingh Commerce and Science College, Aurangabad, 431004 Maharastra (India); Jadhav, K.M., E-mail: drjadhavkm@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad, 431004 Maharastra (India)

    2014-05-01

    Structural morphology and magnetic properties of the Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≥1.0) spinel ferrite system synthesized by the sol–gel auto-combustion technique using nitrates of respective metal ions have been studied. The ratio of metal nitrates to citric acid was taken at 1:3. The as prepared powder of cobalt zinc ferrite was sintered at 600 °C for 12 h after TG/DTA thermal studies. Compositional stoichiometry was confirmed by energy dispersive analysis of the X-ray (EDAX) technique. Single phase cubic spinel structure of Co–Zn nanoparticles was confirmed by XRD data. The average crystallite size (t), lattice constant (a) and other structural parameters of zinc substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were calculated from XRD followed by SEM and FTIR. It is observed that the sol–gel auto-combustion technique has many advantages for the synthesis of technologically applicable Co–Zn ferrite nanoparticles. The present investigation clearly shows the effect of the synthesis method and possible relation between magnetic properties and microstructure of the prepared samples. Increase in nonmagnetic Zn{sup 2+} content in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is followed by decrease in n{sub B}, M{sub s} and other magnetic parameters. Squareness ratio for the Co-ferrite was 1.096 at room temperature. - Highlights: • Co–Zn nanoparticles are prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion method. • Structural properties were characterized by XRD, SEM, and FTIR. • Compositional stoichiometry was confirmed by EDAX analysis. • Magnetic parameters were measured by the pulse field hysteresis loop technique.

  19. Synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt-iron/cobalt-ferrite soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro Londoño-Calderón, César; Moscoso-Londoño, Oscar; Muraca, Diego; Arzuza, Luis; Carvalho, Peterson; Pirota, Kleber Roberto; Knobel, Marcelo; Pampillo, Laura Gabriela; Martínez-García, Ricardo

    2017-06-01

    A straightforward method for the synthesis of CoFe2.7/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanowires is described. The proposed method starts with a conventional pulsed electrodeposition procedure on alumina nanoporous template. The obtained CoFe2.7 nanowires are released from the template and allowed to oxidize at room conditions over several weeks. The effects of partial oxidation on the structural and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray spectrometry, magnetometry, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the final nanowires are composed of 5 nm iron-cobalt alloy nanoparticles. Releasing the nanowires at room conditions promoted surface oxidation of the nanoparticles and created a CoFe2O4 shell spinel-like structure. The shell avoids internal oxidation and promotes the formation of bi-magnetic soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires. The magnetic properties of both the initial single-phase CoFe2.7 nanowires and the final core/shell nanowires, reveal that the changes in the properties from the array are due to the oxidation more than effects associated with released processes (disorder and agglomeration).

  20. and aluminum-substituted cobalt ferrite prepared by co-precipitation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spinal ferrites having the general formula Co1-ZnFe2-AlO4 ( = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6) were prepared using the wet chemical co-operation technique. The samples were annealed at 800°C for 12 h and were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, magnetization and low field AC susceptibility measurements.

  1. Cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, John F.; Kimball, Bryn E.; Shedd, Kim B.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Cobalt is a silvery gray metal that has diverse uses based on certain key properties, including ferromagnetism, hardness and wear-resistance when alloyed with other metals, low thermal and electrical conductivity, high melting point, multiple valences, and production of intense blue colors when combined with silica. Cobalt is used mostly in cathodes in rechargeable batteries and in superalloys for turbine engines in jet aircraft. Annual global cobalt consumption was approximately 75,000 metric tons in 2011; China, Japan, and the United States (in order of consumption amount) were the top three cobalt-consuming countries. In 2011, approximately 109,000 metric tons of recoverable cobalt was produced in ores, concentrates, and intermediate products from cobalt, copper, nickel, platinum-group-element (PGE), and zinc operations. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo [Kinshasa]) was the principal source of mined cobalt globally (55 percent). The United States produced a negligible amount of byproduct cobalt as an intermediate product from a PGE mining and refining operation in southeastern Montana; no U.S. production was from mines in which cobalt was the principal commodity. China was the leading refiner of cobalt, and much of its production came from cobalt ores, concentrates, and partially refined materials imported from Congo (Kinshasa).The mineralogy of cobalt deposits is diverse and includes both primary (hypogene) and secondary (supergene) phases. Principal terrestrial (land-based) deposit types, which represent most of world’s cobalt mine production, include primary magmatic Ni-Cu(-Co-PGE) sulfides, primary and secondary stratiform sediment-hosted Cu-Co sulfides and oxides, and secondary Ni-Co laterites. Seven additional terrestrial deposit types are described in this chapter. The total terrestrial cobalt resource (reserves plus other resources) plus past production, where available, is calculated to be 25.5 million metric tons. Additional resources of

  2. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles covered with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane for use as hybrid material in nano technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth Luqueze

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays with the appear of nano science and nano technology, magnetic nanoparticles have been finding a variety of applications in the fields of biomedicine, diagnosis, molecular biology, biochemistry, catalysis, etc. The magnetic functionalized nanoparticles are constituted of a magnetic nucleus, involved by a polymeric layer with active sites, which ones could anchor metals or selective organic compounds. These nanoparticles are considered organic inorganic hybrid materials and have great interest as materials for commercial applications due to the specific properties. Among the important applications it can be mentioned: magneto hyperthermia treatment, drugs delivery in specific local of the body, molecular recognition, biosensors, enhancement of nuclear magnetic resonance images quality, etc. This work was developed in two parts: 1) the synthesis of the nucleus composed by superparamagnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite and, 2) the recovering of nucleus by a polymeric bifunctional 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The parameters studied in the first part of the research were: pH, hydroxide molar concentration, hydroxide type, reagent order of addition, reagent way of addition, speed of shake, metals initial concentrations, molar fraction of cobalt and thermal treatment. In the second part it was studied: pH, temperature, catalyst type, catalyst concentration, time of reaction, relation ratios of H 2 O/silane, type of medium and the efficiency of the recovering regarding to pH. The products obtained were characterized using the following techniques X-ray powder diffraction (DRX), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), spectroscopy of scatterbrained energy spectroscopy (DES), atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and magnetization curves (VSM). (author)

  3. Fabrication of Lanthanum Strontium Cobalt Ferrite-Gadolinium-Doped Ceria Composite Cathodes Using a Low-Price Inkjet Printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gwon Deok; Choi, Hyung Jong; Bae, Kiho; Choi, Hyeon Rak; Jang, Dong Young; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2017-11-15

    In this work, we have successfully fabricated lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF)-gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) composite cathodes by inkjet printing and demonstrated their functioning in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The cathodes are printed using a low-cost HP inkjet printer, and the LSCF and GDC source inks are synthesized with fluidic properties optimum for inkjet printing. The composition and microstructure of the LSCF and GDC layers are successfully controlled by controlling the color level in the printed images and the number of printing cycles, respectively. Anode-support type SOFCs with optimized LSCF-GDC composite cathodes synthesized by our inkjet printing method have achieved a power output of over 570 mW cm -2 at 650 °C, which is comparable to the performance of a commercial SOFC stack. Electrochemical impedance analysis is carried out to establish a relationship between the cell performance and the compositional and structural characteristics of the printed LSCF-GDC composite cathodes.

  4. As-grown enhancement of spinodal decomposition in spinel cobalt ferrite thin films by Dynamic Aurora pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debnath, Nipa [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Physics, Jagannath University, Dhaka 1100 (Bangladesh); Kawaguchi, Takahiko; Kumasaka, Wataru [Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Das, Harinarayan [Materials Science Division, Atomic Energy Centre, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); Shinozaki, Kazuo [School of Materials and Chemical Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sakamoto, Naonori [Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Suzuki, Hisao [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Wakiya, Naoki, E-mail: wakiya.naoki@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • As-grown enhancement of spinodal decomposition (SD) in Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} film is observed. • Magnetic-field-induced ion-impingement enhances SD without any post-annealing. • The enhancement of SD is independent of the lattice-mismatch-induced strain. • This approach can promote SD in any thin film without post-deposition annealing. - Abstract: Cobalt ferrite Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} thin films with composition within the miscibility gap were grown using Dynamic Aurora pulsed laser deposition. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal as-grown phase separation to Fe-rich and Co-rich phases with no post-deposition annealing. The interconnected surface microstructure of thin film shows that this phase separation occurs through spinodal decomposition enhanced by magnetic-field-induced ion-impingement. The lattice parameter variation of the thin films with the magnetic field indicates that the composition fluctuations can be enhanced further by increasing the magnetic field. Results show that spinodal decomposition enhancement by magnetic-field-induced ion-impingement is independent of the lattice-mismatch-induced strain. This approach can promote spinodal decomposition in any thin film with no post-deposition annealing process.

  5. Investigate the ultrasound energy assisted adsorption mechanism of nickel(II) ions onto modified magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Multivariate optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Fatemeh; Alipanahpour Dil, Ebrahim

    2017-07-01

    In present study, magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles modified with (E)-N-(2-nitrobenzylidene)-2-(2-(2-nitrophenyl)imidazolidine-1-yl) ethaneamine (CoFe 2 O 4 -NPs-NBNPIEA) was synthesized and applied as novel adsorbent for ultrasound energy assisted adsorption of nickel(II) ions (Ni 2+ ) from aqueous solution. The prepared adsorbent characterized by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The dependency of adsorption percentage to variables such as pH, initial Ni 2+ ions concentration, adsorbent mass and ultrasound time were studied with response surface methodology (RSM) by considering the desirable functions. The quadratic model between the dependent and independent variables was built. The proposed method showed good agreement between the experimental data and predictive value, and it has been successfully employed to adsorption of Ni 2+ ions from aqueous solution. Subsequently, the experimental equilibrium data at different concentration of Ni 2+ ions and 10mg amount of adsorbent mass was fitted to conventional isotherm models like Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and it was revealed that the Langmuir is best model for explanation of behavior of experimental data. In addition, conventional kinetic models such as pseudo-first and second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion were applied and it was seen that pseudo-second-order equation is suitable to fit the experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stress-dependent crystal structure of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Philipp T.; Khansur, Neamul H.; Riess, Kevin; Martin, Alexander; Hinterstein, Manuel; Webber, Kyle G.

    2018-02-01

    Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite La1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ (LSCF) is one of the most studied mixed ionic-electronic conductor materials due to electrical and transport properties, which are attractive for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen permeation membranes, and catalysis. The integration of such materials, however, depends on the thermal as well as mechanical behavior. LSCF exhibits nonlinear hysteresis during compressive stress-strain measurements, marked by a remanent strain and coercive stress, i.e., ferroelasticity. However, the origin of ferroelastic behavior has not been investigated under high compressive stress. This study, therefore, investigates the microscopic origin of stress-induced mechanical behavior in polycrystalline (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The data presented here reveals that the strain response originates from the intrinsic lattice strain as well as the extrinsic domain switching strain without any apparent change in crystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the calculated microscopic strain contribution with that of a macroscopic measurement indicates a significant change in the relative contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic strain depending on the applied stress state, i.e., under maximum stress and after unloading. Direct evidence of the microscopic origin of stress-strain response outlined in this paper may assist in guiding materials design with the improved mechanical reliability of SOFCs.

  7. Study of magnetic and structural properties of ferrofluids based on cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, J., E-mail: javierlo21@gmail.com [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Gonzalez-Bahamon, L.F. [Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Prado, J.; Caicedo, J.C.; Zambrano, G.; Gomez, M.E. [Thin Film Group, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360, Cali (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Prieto, P. [Center of Excellence for Novel Materials, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia)

    2012-02-15

    Ferrofluids are colloidal systems composed of a single domain of magnetic nanoparticles with a mean diameter around 30 nm, dispersed in a liquid carrier. Magnetic Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.25, 0.50, 0.75) ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via co-precipitation method from aqueous salt solutions in an alkaline medium. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized through Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies permitted determining nanoparticle size; grain size of nanoparticle conglomerates was established via Atomic Force Microscopy. The magnetic behavior of ferrofluids was characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM); and finally, a magnetic force microscope was used to visualize the magnetic domains of Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction patterns of Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} show the presence of the most intense peak corresponding to the (311) crystallographic orientation of the spinel phase of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the bonds associated to the spinel structures; particularly for ferrites. The mean size of the crystallite of nanoparticles determined from the full-width at half maximum of the strongest reflection of the (311) peak by using the Scherrer approximation diminished from (9.5{+-}0.3) nm to (5.4{+-}0.2) nm when the Zn concentration increases from 0.21 to 0.75. The size of the Co-Zn ferrite nanoparticles obtained by TEM is in good agreement with the crystallite size calculated from X-ray diffraction patterns, using Scherer's formula. The magnetic properties investigated with the aid of a VSM at room temperature presented super-paramagnetic behavior, determined by the shape of the hysteresis loop. In this study, we established that the coercive field of Co{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic

  8. Study of magnetic and structural properties of ferrofluids based on cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.; Gonzalez-Bahamon, L.F.; Prado, J.; Caicedo, J.C.; Zambrano, G.; Gomez, M.E.; Esteve, J.; Prieto, P.

    2012-01-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal systems composed of a single domain of magnetic nanoparticles with a mean diameter around 30 nm, dispersed in a liquid carrier. Magnetic Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 (x=0.25, 0.50, 0.75) ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via co-precipitation method from aqueous salt solutions in an alkaline medium. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized through Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) studies permitted determining nanoparticle size; grain size of nanoparticle conglomerates was established via Atomic Force Microscopy. The magnetic behavior of ferrofluids was characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM); and finally, a magnetic force microscope was used to visualize the magnetic domains of Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction patterns of Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 show the presence of the most intense peak corresponding to the (311) crystallographic orientation of the spinel phase of CoFe 2 O 4 . Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the bonds associated to the spinel structures; particularly for ferrites. The mean size of the crystallite of nanoparticles determined from the full-width at half maximum of the strongest reflection of the (311) peak by using the Scherrer approximation diminished from (9.5±0.3) nm to (5.4±0.2) nm when the Zn concentration increases from 0.21 to 0.75. The size of the Co-Zn ferrite nanoparticles obtained by TEM is in good agreement with the crystallite size calculated from X-ray diffraction patterns, using Scherer's formula. The magnetic properties investigated with the aid of a VSM at room temperature presented super-paramagnetic behavior, determined by the shape of the hysteresis loop. In this study, we established that the coercive field of Co (1-x) Zn x Fe 2 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles, the crystal and nanoparticle sizes determined by X-ray Diffraction and TEM

  9. Enhanced magneto-optical Kerr effect in rare earth substituted nanostructured cobalt ferrite thin film prepared by sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avazpour, L.; Toroghinejad, M.R. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrollahi, H., E-mail: Shokrollahi@sutech.ac.ir [Electroceramics Group, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz 13876-71557 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The nanostructured rare earth doped Co-ferrite thin film was synthesized by the sol–gel method. • The coercivity of as high as 1.8 kOe is achieved for 20% substituted cobalt ferrite. • The average particle diameter of particulate film is decreasing by increasing substitute content. • Kerr spectra of films shifted to higher energies. • Kerr rotation angle increased to 1.65° for 0.1 Eu doped thin film. - Abstract: A series of rare-earth (RE)-doped nanocrystalline Co{sub x} RE{sub (1−x)} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and RE: Nd, Eu) thin films were prepared on silicon substrates by a sol–gel process, and the influences of different RE{sup 3+} ions on the microstructure, magnetism and polar magneto-optical Kerr effect of the deposited films were investigated. Also this research presents the optimization process of cobalt ferrite thin films deposited via spin coating, by studying their structural and morphological properties at different thicknesses (200, 350 nm) and various heat treatment temperatures 300–850 °C. Nanoparticulate polycrystalline thin film were formed with heat treatment above 400 °C but proper magnetic properties due to well crystallization of the film were achieved at about 650 °C. AFM results indicated that the deposited thin films were crack-free exhibiting a dense nanogranular structure. The root-mean square (RMS) roughness of the thin films was in the range of 0.2–3.2 nm. The results revealed that both of the magnetism and magneto optical Kerr (MOKE) spectra of Co{sub x} RE{sub (1−x)} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films could be mediated by doping with various RE ions. The Curie temperature of substituted samples was lower than pristine cobalt ferrite thin films. In MOKE spectra both dominant peaks were blue shifted with addition of RE ions. For low concentration dopant the inter-valence charge transfer related rotation was enhanced and for higher concentration dopant the crystal field rotation peak was enhanced

  10. Preparation of cobalt-zinc ferrite (Co0.8Zn0.2Fe2O4) nanopowder via combustion method and investigation of its magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefi, M.H.; Manouchehri, S.; Arab, A.; Mozaffari, M.; Amiri, Gh. R.; Amighian, J.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cobalt-zinc ferrite was prepared by combustion method. → Properties of the sample were characterized by several techniques. → Curie temperature was determined to be 350 o C. -- Abstract: Cobalt-zinc ferrite (Co 0.8 Zn 0.2 Fe 2 O 4 ) was prepared by combustion method, using cobalt, zinc and iron nitrates. The crystallinity of the as-burnt powder was developed by annealing at 700 o C. Crystalline phase was investigated by XRD. Using Williamson-Hall method, the average crystallite sizes for nanoparticles were determined to be about 27 nm before and 37 nm after annealing, and residual stresses for annealed particles were omitted. The morphology of the annealed sample was investigated by TEM and the mean particle size was determined to be about 30 nm. The final stoichiometry of the sample after annealing showed good agreement with the initial stoichiometry using atomic absorption spectrometry. Magnetic properties of the annealed sample such as saturation magnetization, remanence magnetization, and coercivity measured at room temperature were 70 emu/g, 14 emu/g, and 270 Oe, respectively. The Curie temperature of the sample was determined to be 350 o C using AC-susceptibility technique.

  11. Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarova, I.A.; Bunakova, N.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The neutron-activation method for determining cobalt in rocks, polymetallic and iron ores and rockforming minerals at 2x10 -6 -5x10 -3 % content is developed. Cobalt determination is based on the formation under the effect of thermal neutrons of nuclear reactor of the 60 Co radioactive isotope by the 59 Co (n, γ) 60 Co reaction with radiation energy of the most intensive line of 1333 keV. Cobalt can be determined by the scheme of the multicomponent analysis from the sample with other elements. Co is determined in the solution after separation of all determinable by the scheme elements. The 60 Co intensity is measured by the mUltichannel gamma-spectrometer with Ge(Li)-detector

  12. Influence of aging time of oleate precursor on the magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Polo-Corrales, Liliana; Chavez, Ermides; Cabarcas-Bolivar, Jari; Uwakweh, Oswald N.C.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are of interest because of their room temperature coercivity and high magnetic anisotropy constant, which make them attractive in applications such as sensors based on the Brownian relaxation mechanism and probes to determine the mechanical properties of complex fluids at the nanoscale. These nanoparticles can be synthesized with a narrow size distribution by the thermal decomposition of an iron–cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point solvent. We studied the influence of aging time of the iron–cobalt oleate precursor on the structure, chemical composition, size, and magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and thermal behavior of the iron–cobalt oleate was studied during the aging process. Infrared spectra indicated a shift in the coordination state of the oleate and iron/cobalt ions from bidentate to bridging coordination. Aging seemed to influence the thermal decomposition of the iron–cobalt oleate as determined from thermogravimmetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, where shifts in the temperatures corresponding to decomposition events and a narrowing of the endotherms associated with these events were observed. Aging promoted formation of the spinel crystal structure, as determined from X-ray diffraction, and influenced the nanoparticle magnetic properties, resulting in an increase in blocking temperature and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Mossbauer spectra also indicated changes in the magnetic properties resulting from aging of the precursor oleate. Although all samples exhibited some degree of Brownian relaxation, as determined from complex susceptibility measurements in a liquid medium, aging of the iron–cobalt oleate precursor resulted in crossing of the in-phase χ′and out-of-phase χ″ components of the complex susceptibility at the frequency of the Brownian magnetic relaxation peak, as expected for nanoparticles

  13. Synthesis and magnetic properties study of a Nickel Cobalt Zinc Ferrite with low Zn O content

    CERN Document Server

    Hoor, M

    2003-01-01

    Attempt is made, in this work, to prepare and study the microstructure and magnetic properties of a Ni CO Zn ferrite compound with very low Zn O content of Ni sub 0 sub . sub 4 sub 6 sub 7 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 0 7 Co sub 0.015 Fe sub 0 sub . sub 5 sub 1 sub 1 O sub 4 composition. All of the samples were prepared by conventional ceramic route and the samples were sintered at 1150, 1200, 1250 and 1300 sup d eg sup C for 2 hr s. It was shown that, the higher the sintering temperature, the higher was saturation magnetisation, the measured relative permeability and the lower was H sub c of the samples. These were related to the increased sintered densities and grain size observed. Further, the highest quality factor (Q-factor) was obtained for the sample sintered at 1250 sup d eg sup C. The observed magnetic properties are assessed in relation with microstructure.

  14. Cu{sup 2+}-modified physical properties of Cobalt-Nickel ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekhar Babu, K.; Rao, K. Rama [Department of Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh 530003 (India); Rajesh Babu, B., E-mail: rajeshbabu.bitra@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GVP College of Engineering for Women, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh 530048 (India)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • In this work, Influence of Cu and cation redistribution is discussed in detail. • Theoretical and experimental results related to distribution, lattice constant are found to be consistent. • Substitution of Cu significantly modifies the magnetization, permeability, grain size and resistivity. - Abstract: The present study focused on structural, magnetic and electrical properties of Cu substituted Co-Ni ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by sol-gel combustion method. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), magnetization, magnetic permeability and resistivity measurements were carried out to study the structural, magnetic and electrical properties. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms single phase spinel formation. Crystallite size determined from Scherer’s method increases with Cu concentration. Distribution of cations was estimated from X-ray line intensity calculations, suggest that the majority of Cu{sup 2+} ions occupy octahedral (B) site. Saturation magnetization exhibit increasing trend from 40 emu/g (x = 0.0) to 60 emu/g (x = 0.4) with Cu concentration, though higher magnetic moment Ni ions are replaced by lower magnetic moment Cu ions. Magnetic permeability increases with increasing Cu concentration and shows a flat profile in the frequency range 1–50 MHz. Significant modification in DC electrical resistivity and activation energy are explained on the basis of hopping mechanism.

  15. Comparison of drug delivery potentials of surface functionalized cobalt and zinc ferrite nanohybrids for curcumin in to MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, V.J., E-mail: v11131@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Smt.K.W.College, Sangli, MS 416416 (India); Bamane, S.R. [Department of Chemistry, Raja Shripatrao Bhagwantrao College, Aundh, Satara, MS (India); Shejwal, R.V. [L.B.S. College, Satara, MS (India); Patil, S.B. [A.Birnale College of Pharmacy, Sangli, MS (India)

    2016-11-01

    The functionalization and surface engineering of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were performed by coating with PEG and Chitosan respectively using simple wet co-precipitation. Then multiactive therapeutic drug curcumin was loaded to form drug delivery nanohybrids by precipitation. These nanohybrids were characterized separately using UV–vis, FTIR, PL spectroscopy, XRD, VSM, SEM and TEM analysis. The moderate antibacterial activities of the nanohybrids were elaborated by in vitro antibacterial screening on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The anticancer potentials, apoptotic effects and enhanced drug delivery properties of these nanohybrids were confirmed and compared on MCF-7 cells by in vitro MTT assay. The drug delivery activities for hydrophobic drug and anticancer effects of chitosan coated zinc ferrite functionalized nanoparticles were higher than PEG coated cobalt ferrite nanohybrids. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were surface functionalized with PEG and Chitosan respectively. • Hydrophobic multi therapeutic anticancer drug curcumin was loaded into these nanohybrids and their structure, morphologies were confirmed. • The effects of PEG and Chitosan coating over ferrites for curcumin release have been elaborated, and the Chitosan coated curcumin loaded Zinc ferrite nanohybrid exhibited higher drug delivery and anticancer effects.

  16. Comparison of drug delivery potentials of surface functionalized cobalt and zinc ferrite nanohybrids for curcumin in to MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawant, V.J.; Bamane, S.R.; Shejwal, R.V.; Patil, S.B.

    2016-01-01

    The functionalization and surface engineering of CoFe 2 O 4 and ZnFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were performed by coating with PEG and Chitosan respectively using simple wet co-precipitation. Then multiactive therapeutic drug curcumin was loaded to form drug delivery nanohybrids by precipitation. These nanohybrids were characterized separately using UV–vis, FTIR, PL spectroscopy, XRD, VSM, SEM and TEM analysis. The moderate antibacterial activities of the nanohybrids were elaborated by in vitro antibacterial screening on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The anticancer potentials, apoptotic effects and enhanced drug delivery properties of these nanohybrids were confirmed and compared on MCF-7 cells by in vitro MTT assay. The drug delivery activities for hydrophobic drug and anticancer effects of chitosan coated zinc ferrite functionalized nanoparticles were higher than PEG coated cobalt ferrite nanohybrids. - Highlights: • CoFe 2 O 4 and ZnFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles were surface functionalized with PEG and Chitosan respectively. • Hydrophobic multi therapeutic anticancer drug curcumin was loaded into these nanohybrids and their structure, morphologies were confirmed. • The effects of PEG and Chitosan coating over ferrites for curcumin release have been elaborated, and the Chitosan coated curcumin loaded Zinc ferrite nanohybrid exhibited higher drug delivery and anticancer effects.

  17. Modified solvothermal synthesis of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles photocatalysts for degradation of methylene blue with H2O2/visible light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Kalam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Different grads of magnetic nano-scaled cobalt ferrites (CoFe2O4 photocatalysts were synthesized by modified Solvothermal (MST process with and without polysaccharide. The indigenously synthesized photocatalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR, UV–visible (UV–vis spectroscopy and N2 adsorption–desorption isotherm method. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study showed the Fe-O stretching vibration 590–619 cm−1, confirming the formation of metal oxide. The crystallite size of the synthesized photocatalysts was found in the range between 20.0 and 30.0 nm. The surface area of obtained magnetic nanoparticles is found to be reasonably high in the range of 63.0–76.0 m2/g. The results shown that only MST-2 is the most active catalyst for photo-Fenton like scheme for fast photodegradation action of methylene blue dye, this is possible due to optical band gap estimated of 2.65 eV. Captivatingly the percentage of degradation efficiency increases up to 80% after 140 min by using MST-2 photocatalyst. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB dye under visible light irradiation with cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles followed first order kinetic constant and rate constant of MST-2 is almost 2.0 times greater than MST-1 photocatalyst. Keywords: Cobalt ferrite, Photocatalysis, Kinetics, Optical properties, Surface area studies

  18. Electromagnetic interference shielding and microwave absorption properties of cobalt ferrite CoFe2O4/polyaniline composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mukhils M.; Rafeeq, Sewench N.; Sulaiman, Jameel M. A.; Mandal, Avinandan

    2018-05-01

    Improvement of microwave-absorbing materials (MAMs) is the most important research area in various applications, such as in communication, radiation medical exposure, electronic warfare, air defense, and different civilian applications. Conducting polymer, polyaniline doped with para toluene sulphonic acid (PANI-PTSA) as well as cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) is synthesized by sol-gel method and intensely blends in different ratios. The characterization of the composite materials, CoFe2O4/PANI-PTSA (CFP1, CFP2, CFP3 and CFP4), was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The microwave-absorbing properties' reflection loss (dB) and important parameters, such as complex relative permittivity ( ɛ r '- jɛ r ″) and complex relative permeability ( µ r '- jµ r ″) were measured in different microwave frequencies in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) region. The composite material CFP3 showed a wider absorption frequency range and maximum reflection loss of - 28.4 dB (99.8% power absorption) at 8.1 GHz and - 9.6 dB (> 90% power absorption) at 11.2 GHz, and so the composite can be used as a microwave absorber; however, it can be more suitable for application in daily life for making cell phones above 9 GHz. Also the results showed that the thicker composites like CFP3 (4 mm) exhibit obviously better EMI SE as compared with the thinner ones (0.19, 0.19, 0.3 mm); this may be related to the low transmission of the EM wave from the composites.

  19. Ultradispersed Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Graphene Aerogel for Continuous Photo-Fenton Reaction and Enhanced Lithium Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bocheng; Deng, Yuanxin; Du, Mengmeng; Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-07-04

    The Photo-Fenton reaction is an advanced technology to eliminate organic pollutants in environmental chemistry. Moreover, the conversion rate of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and utilization rate of H2O2 are significant factors in Photo-Fenton reaction. In this work, we reported three dimensional (3D) hierarchical cobalt ferrite/graphene aerogels (CoFe2O4/GAs) composites by the in situ growing CoFe2O4 crystal seeds on the graphene oxide (GO) followed by the hydrothermal process. The resulting CoFe2O4/GAs composites demonstrated 3D hierarchical pore structure with mesopores (14~18 nm), macropores (50~125 nm), and a remarkable surface area (177.8 m(2 )g(-1)). These properties endowed this hybrid with the high and recyclable Photo-Fenton activity for methyl orange pollutant degradation. More importantly, the CoFe2O4/GAs composites can keep high Photo-Fenton activity in a wide pH. Besides, the CoFe2O4/GAs composites also exhibited excellent cyclic performance and good rate capability. The 3D framework can not only effectively prevent the volume expansion and aggregation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles during the charge/discharge processes for Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), but also shorten lithium ions and electron diffusion length in 3D pathways. These results indicated a broaden application prospect of 3D-graphene based hybrids in wastewater treatment and energy storage.

  20. Evaluation of superparamagnetic and biocompatible properties of mesoporous silica coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized via microwave modified Pechini method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibshahian, M. [Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzaee, O., E-mail: O_mirzaee@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourbakhsh, M.S. [Faculty of New Sciences and Technologies, Semnan University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-01

    Cobalt ferrite nano particles were synthesized by Pechini sol-gel method and calcined at 700 °C in electrical and microwave furnace. The microwave calcined sample was coated with mesoporous silica by hydrothermal method. Characterization was performed by XRD, FESEM, TEM, VSM, BET and FTIR analysis. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay with 3T3 fibroblast cells. The XRD and FTIR results confirmed spinal formation in both cases and verified the formation of silica coating on the nanoparticles. For microwave calcination, The XRD and SEM results demonstrated smaller and flat adhesion forms of nanoparticles with the average size of 15 nm. The VSM results demonstrated nearly superparamagnetic nanoparticles with significant saturation magnetization equal to 64 emu/g. By coating, saturation magnetization was decreased to 36 emu/g. Moreover, the BET results confirmed the formation of mesoporous coating with the average pore diameters of 2.8 nm and average pore volume of 0.82 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. Microwave calcined nanoparticles had the best structural and magnetic properties. - Highlights: • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized using the microwave modified Pechini method. • The Effect of calcination route and silica coating on NPs properties was studied. • The nearly superparamagnetic nanoparticles were achieved by microwave calcination. • MFC NPs had the best magnetic properties and MTT assay showed no toxicity for MFC-MSC NPs. • A useful scheme was designed to achieve biological superparamagnetic core/shell NPs.

  1. Temperature dependent and applied field strength dependent magnetic study of cobalt nickel ferrite nano particles: Synthesized by an environmentally benign method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontu, Uday Bhasker; G, Narsinga Rao; Chou, F. C.; M, V. Ramana Reddy

    2018-04-01

    Spinel ferrites have come a long way in their versatile applications. The ever growing applications of these materials demand detailed study of material properties and environmental considerations in their synthesis. In this article, we report the effect of temperature and applied magnetic field strength on the magnetic behavior of the cobalt nickel ferrite nano powder samples. Basic structural properties of spinel ferrite nano particles, that are synthesized by an environmentally benign method of auto combustion, are characterized through XRD, TEM, RAMAN spectroscopy. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) is done to understand the nickel substitution effect on the optical properties of cobalt ferrite nano particles. Thermo magnetic studies using SQUID in the temperature range 5 K to 400 K and room temperature (300 K) VSM studies are performed on these samples. Fields of 0Oe (no applied field: ZF), 1 kOe (for ZFC and FC curves), 5 kOe (0.5 T), 50 kOe (5T) (for M-H loop study) are used to study the magnetic behavior of these nano particles. The XRD,TEM analysis suggest 40 nm crystallites that show changes in the cation distribution and phase changes in the spinel structure with nickel substitution. Raman micrographs support phase purity changes and cation redistributions with nickel substitution. Diffuse reflectance study on powder samples suggests two band gap values for nickel rich compounds. The Magnetic study of these sample nano particles show varied magnetic properties from that of hard magnetic, positive multi axial anisotropy and single-magnetic-domain structures at 5 K temperature to soft magnetic core shell like structures at 300 K temperature. Nickel substitution effect is non monotonous. Blocking temperature of all the samples is found to be higher than the values suggested in the literature.

  2. Modified solvothermal synthesis of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticles photocatalysts for degradation of methylene blue with H2O2/visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalam, Abul; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G.; Assiri, Mohammed; Du, Gaohui; Ahmad, Tokeer; Ahmad, Irfan; Pannipara, M.

    2018-03-01

    Different grads of magnetic nano-scaled cobalt ferrites (CoFe2O4) photocatalysts were synthesized by modified Solvothermal (MST) process with and without polysaccharide. The indigenously synthesized photocatalysts were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm method. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy study showed the Fe-O stretching vibration 590-619 cm-1, confirming the formation of metal oxide. The crystallite size of the synthesized photocatalysts was found in the range between 20.0 and 30.0 nm. The surface area of obtained magnetic nanoparticles is found to be reasonably high in the range of 63.0-76.0 m2/g. The results shown that only MST-2 is the most active catalyst for photo-Fenton like scheme for fast photodegradation action of methylene blue dye, this is possible due to optical band gap estimated of 2.65 eV. Captivatingly the percentage of degradation efficiency increases up to 80% after 140 min by using MST-2 photocatalyst. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under visible light irradiation with cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles followed first order kinetic constant and rate constant of MST-2 is almost 2.0 times greater than MST-1 photocatalyst.

  3. Field dependent transition to the non-linear regime in magnetic hyperthermia experiments: Comparison between maghemite, copper, zinc, nickel and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Verde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Further advances in magnetic hyperthermia might be limited by biological constraints, such as using sufficiently low frequencies and low field amplitudes to inhibit harmful eddy currents inside the patient's body. These incite the need to optimize the heating efficiency of the nanoparticles, referred to as the specific absorption rate (SAR. Among the several properties currently under research, one of particular importance is the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime that takes place as the field amplitude is increased, an aspect where the magnetic anisotropy is expected to play a fundamental role. In this paper we investigate the heating properties of cobalt ferrite and maghemite nanoparticles under the influence of a 500 kHz sinusoidal magnetic field with varying amplitude, up to 134 Oe. The particles were characterized by TEM, XRD, FMR and VSM, from which most relevant morphological, structural and magnetic properties were inferred. Both materials have similar size distributions and saturation magnetization, but strikingly different magnetic anisotropies. From magnetic hyperthermia experiments we found that, while at low fields maghemite is the best nanomaterial for hyperthermia applications, above a critical field, close to the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime, cobalt ferrite becomes more efficient. The results were also analyzed with respect to the energy conversion efficiency and compared with dynamic hysteresis simulations. Additional analysis with nickel, zinc and copper-ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes confirmed the importance of the magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor. Further, the analysis of the characterization parameters suggested core-shell nanostructures, probably due to a surface passivation process during the nanoparticle synthesis. Finally, we discussed the effect of particle-particle interactions and its consequences, in particular regarding discrepancies between estimated

  4. Investigation of structure and magnetic properties of cobalt-nickel and manganese ferrites nanoparticles synthesized in direct micelles of sodium dodecyl sulphate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedosyuk, V.M.; Mirgorod, Yu.A.

    2016-01-01

    Results of investigation of the crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles of transition metals ferrites (cobalt, nickel, manganese) synthesized by unified methods using direct sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles are presented. Crystal structure of the samples was investigated by X-ray diffraction on DRON-3M (in the CuKa-radiation). Particle size was investigated by transmission electron microscopy on microscope JEOL JEM-1011 (accelerating voltage 100 kV). All powders contain nanoparticles of the same size in the range 2-6 nm. Magnetic properties of the samples were estimated from temperature and field dependences of the magnetization. All samples exhibit properties of superparamagnets with different blocking temperatures below 45 K. (authors).

  5. Experimental demonstration of all-optical weak magnetic field detection using beam-deflection of single-mode fiber coated with cobalt-doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Somarpita; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy

    2015-07-10

    We experimentally demonstrate single-mode optical-fiber-beam-deflection configuration for weak magnetic-field-detection using an optimized (low coercive-field) composition of cobalt-doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles. Devising a fiber-double-slit type experiment, we measure the surrounding magnetic field through precisely measuring interference-fringe yielding a minimum detectable field ∼100  mT and we procure magnetization data of the sample that fairly predicts SQUID measurement. To improve sensitivity, we incorporate etched single-mode fiber in double-slit arrangement and recorded a minimum detectable field, ∼30  mT. To further improve, we redefine the experiment as modulating fiber-to-fiber light-transmission and demonstrate the minimum field as 2.0 mT. The device will be uniquely suited for electrical or otherwise hazardous environments.

  6. Structural, electrical, magnetic and dielectric properties of rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikumbh, A.K., E-mail: aknik@chem.unipune.ac.in; Pawar, R.A.; Nighot, D.V.; Gugale, G.S.; Sangale, M.D.; Khanvilkar, M.B.; Nagawade, A.V.

    2014-04-15

    Pure nanoparticles of the rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites CoRE{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (where RE=Nd, Sm and Gd and x=0.1 and 0.2) were prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), d.c. electrical conductivity, Magnetic hysteresis and Thermal analysis are utilized in order to study the effect of variation in the rare-earth substitution and its impact on particle size, magnetic properties like M{sub S}, H{sub C} and Curie temperature. The phase identification of the materials by X-ray diffraction reveals the single-phase nature of the materials. The lattice parameter increased with rare-earth content for x≤0.2. The Transmission electron micrographs of Nd-, Sm- and Gd-substituted CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} exhibit the particle size 36.1 to 67.8 nm ranges. The data of temperature variation of the direct current electrical conductivity showed definite breaks, which corresponds to ferrimagnetic to paramagnetic transitions. The thermoelectric power for all compound are positive over the whole range of temperature. The dielectric constant decreases with frequency and rare-earth content for the prepared samples. The magnetic properties of rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites showed a definite hysteresis loop at room temperature. The reduction of coercive force, saturation magnetization, ratio M{sub R}/M{sub S} and magnetic moments may be due to dilution of the magnetic interaction.

  7. Development of a suppression method for deposition of radioactive cobalt after chemical decontamination: Confirmation of the Suppression Mechanism with Preoxidized Ferrite Film for Deposition of Radioactive Cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Nagase, Makoto; Aizawa, Motohiro; Fuse, Motomasa

    2012-09-01

    Recently, chemical decontamination at the beginning of a periodical inspection is applied to many Japanese boiling water reactor (BWR) plants in order to reduce radiation exposure. In the chemical decontamination, the oxides that have incorporated 60 Co are dissolved using reductive and oxidative chemical reagents. Some of the piping stainless steel (SS) base metal is exposed to the reactor water after this decontamination. The oxide film growth rate of the piping during plant operation just after the decontamination is higher than that just before it. Therefore, there is a possibility that the deposition amount of 60 Co on the piping just after decontamination is higher than that just before the chemical decontamination. The Hi-F Coat (Hitachi ferrite coating) process has been developed to lower recontamination after the chemical decontamination. In this process, a fine Fe 3 O 4 coating film is formed on the piping SS base metal in aqueous solution at 363 K using three chemical reagents: ferrous ion, oxidant, and pH adjuster. The growth rate of the corrosion oxide film that incorporated 60 Co on the piping during plant operation is suppressed by the fine ferrite film that blocks both diffusion of oxidant in the reactor water to the SS base metal and metal ions in the oxide film to the reactor water. As a result, the amount of 60 Co deposition is suppressed by the Hi-F coating film. In a previous report, we found that the Hi-F Coat process lowered the amount of 60 Co to 1/3 that for non-coated specimens. To improve the suppression of 60 Co deposition further, we combined the Hi-F Coat process with a pre-oxidation step which we named the pre-oxidized Hi-F Coat process. In laboratory experiments, using the pre-oxidized Hi-F Coat process we found the deposited amount of 60 Co was 1/10 that for non-coated specimens. By combining the Hi-F Coat process with the pre-oxidation step, the suppression effect of 60 Co deposition was three times higher than that of the Hi

  8. Dielectric properties of Al-substituted Co ferrite nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The particle size, D, decreases with increase in Al-content. The lattice parameter, a ... a significant saving in time and energy consumption over the traditional methods. ... electrical, and magnetic properties of spinel ferrites. Cobalt ferrite based ...

  9. Assessment of thyroid endocrine system impairment and oxidative stress mediated by cobalt ferrite (CoFe2 O4 ) nanoparticles in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farooq; Liu, Xiaoyi; Zhou, Ying; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhao, Fangfang; Ling, Zhaoxing; Xu, Chao

    2016-12-01

    Fascinating super paramagnetic uniqueness of iron oxide particles at nano-scale level make them extremely useful in the state of the art therapies, equipments, and techniques. Cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are extensively used in nano-based medicine and electronics, results in extensive discharge and accumulation into the environment. However, very limited information is available for their endocrine disrupting potential in aquatic organisms. In this study, the thyroid endocrine disrupting ability of CoFe 2 O 4 NPs in Zebrafish larvae for 168-h post fertilization (hpf) was evaluated. The results showed the elevated amounts of T4 and T3 hormones by malformation of hypothalamus pituitary axis in zebrafish larvae. These elevated levels of whole body THs leads to delayed hatching, head and eye malformation, arrested development, and alterations in metabolism. The influence of THs disruption on ROS production and change in activities of catalase (CAT), mu-glutathione s-transferase (mu-GST), and acid phosphatase (AP) were also studied. The production of significantly higher amounts of in vivo generation of ROS leads to membrane damage and oxidative stress. Presences of NPs and NPs agglomerates/aggregates were also the contributing factors in mechanical damaging the membranes and physiological structure of thyroid axis. The increased activities of CAT, mu-GST, and AP confirmed the increased oxidative stress, possible DNA, and metabolic alterations, respectively. The excessive production of in vivo ROS leads to severe apoptosis in head, eye, and heart region confirming that malformation leads to malfunctioning of hypothalamus pituitary axis. ROS-induced oxidative DNA damage by formation of 8-OHdG DNA adducts elaborates the genotoxicity potential of CoFe 2 O 4 NPs. This study will help us to better understand the risk and assessment of endocrine disrupting potential of nanoparticles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 2068

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  11. Ultrasound assisted extraction of Maxilon Red GRL dye from water samples using cobalt ferrite nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as sorbent: Optimization and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, Fatemeh; Vafaei, Azam; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Ghaedi, Abdol Mohammad; Alipanahpour Dil, Ebrahim; Asfaram, Arash

    2017-09-01

    In this research, a selective, simple and rapid ultrasound assisted dispersive solid-phase micro-microextraction (UA-DSPME) was developed using cobalt ferrite nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (CoFe 2 O 4 -NPs-AC) as an efficient sorbent for the preconcentration and determination of Maxilon Red GRL (MR-GRL) dye. The properties of sorbent are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Vibrating sample magnetometers (VSM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Particle size distribution (PSD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) techniques. The factors affecting on the determination of MR-GRL dye were investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) and artificial neural networks based on genetic algorithm (ANN-GA). CCD and ANN-GA were used for optimization. Using ANN-GA, optimum conditions were set at 6.70, 1.2mg, 5.5min and 174μL for pH, sorbent amount, sonication time and volume of eluent, respectively. Under the optimized conditions obtained from ANN-GA, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 30-3000ngmL -1 with a detection limit of 5.70ngmL -1 . The preconcentration factor and enrichment factor were 57.47 and 93.54, respectively with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 4.0% (N=6). The interference effect of some ions and dyes was also investigated and the results show a good selectivity for this method. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the preconcentration and determination of Maxilon Red GRL in water and wastewater samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of cobalt-chromium co-substituted magnesium ferrite nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed, E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Meydan, Turgut; Melikhov, Yevgen [Wolfson Center for Magnetics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    The temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of Co-Cr co-substituted magnesium ferrite, Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0-0.5), prepared by novel polyethylene glycol assisted microemulsion method, are studied. The synthesized materials are characterized by the Moessbauer spectrometer and standard magnetic measurements. Major hysteresis loops are measured up to the magnetic field of 50 kOe at 300, 200 and 100 K. The high field regimes of these loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation to determine the first-order cubic anisotropy coefficient and saturation magnetization. Both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient are observed to increase with the decrease in temperature for all Co-Cr co-substitution levels. Also, both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient achieved maximum value at x=0.3 and x=0.2, respectively. Explanation of the observed behavior is proposed in terms of the site occupancy of the co-substituent, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the cubic spinel lattice. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} are synthesized by novel PEG assisted microemulsion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Cr occupied octahedral site confirmed by the Moessbauer analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High field regime of M-H loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of M{sub S}, M{sub r}, H{sub C} and K{sub 1} are found to increase with decreasing temperature.

  13. Effect of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles on the growth and development of Lycopersicon lycopersicum (tomato plants).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Martha L; Avilés, Leany Lugo; Pérez, Nitza Guzmán; Irizarry, Bianca Álamo; Perales, Oscar; Cedeno-Mattei, Yarilyn; Román, Félix

    2016-04-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthetized and studied to be incorporated in many industrial and medical applications in recent decades. Due to their different physical and chemical properties compared with bulk materials, researchers are focused to understand their interactions with the surroundings. Living organisms such as plants are exposed to these materials and they are able to tolerate different concentrations and types of NPs. Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) NPs are being studied for their application in medical sciences because of their high coercivity, anisotropy, and large magnetostriction. These properties are desirable in magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, and cell labeling. This study is aimed to explore the tolerance of Solanum lycopersicum L. (tomato) plants to CoFe2O4 NPs. Tomato plants were grown in hydroponic media amended with CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in a range from 0 to 1000mgL(-1). Exposure to CoFe2O4 NPs did not affect germination and growth of plants. Uptake of Fe and Co inside plant tissues increased as CoFe2O4 nanoparticle concentration was increased in the media. Mg uptake in plant leaves reached its maximum level of 4.9mgg(-1) DW (dry weight) at 125mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs exposure and decreased at high CoFe2O4 NPs concentrations. Similar pattern was observed for Ca uptake in leaves where the maximum concentration found was 10mgg(-1) DW at 125mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs exposure. Mn uptake in plant leaves was higher at 62.5mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs compared with 125 and 250mgL(-1) treatments. Catalase activity in tomato roots and leaves decreased in plants exposed to CoFe2O4 NPs. Tomato plants were able to tolerate CoFe2O4 NPs concentrations up to 1000mgL(-1) without visible toxicity symptoms. Macronutrient uptake in plants was affected when plants were exposed to 250, 500 and 1000mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A study of magnetoplumbite-type (M-type) cobalt-titanium-substituted barium ferrite, BaCoxTixFe12-2xO19 (x = 1-6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teh, G.B.; Saravanan, N.; Jefferson, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt(II)-titanium(IV)-substituted barium ferrite forming the chemical formula of BaCo x Ti x Fe 12-2x O 19 (x = 1-6) have been investigated using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The specimen of magnetoplumbite (M-type) Co-Ti-substituted BaFe 12 O 19 were synthesised via sol-gel method using ethylene glycol as precursor. Significant increase in line broadening of the XRD patterns were observed indicating the decrease of particle sizes due to the Co(II)-Ti(IV) substitution. BaCo 3 Ti 3 Fe 6 O 19 showed the highest coercivity but moderate saturation and remnant magnetisations. HRTEM imaging showed that Co(II)-Ti(IV) substitution in the system of BaCo x Ti x Fe 12-2x O 19 (x = 1-6) produced no drastic change in the structure of the M-type ferrites. Most of the M-types crystals examined by HRTEM displayed a long axis perpendicular to the c-axis of the M-type structure. Disordered crystals showing the intergrowth between Co-Ti-substituted barium ferrite and the spinel-structured iron oxide were detected

  15. A study of magnetoplumbite-type (M-type) cobalt-titanium-substituted barium ferrite, BaCo{sub x}Ti{sub x}Fe{sub 12-2x}O{sub 19} (x = 1-6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, G.B. [Department of Bioscience and Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 53300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: tehgb@mail.utar.edu.my; Saravanan, N. [Department of Bioscience and Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 53300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jefferson, D.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    Cobalt(II)-titanium(IV)-substituted barium ferrite forming the chemical formula of BaCo{sub x}Ti{sub x}Fe{sub 12-2x}O{sub 19} (x = 1-6) have been investigated using X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The specimen of magnetoplumbite (M-type) Co-Ti-substituted BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} were synthesised via sol-gel method using ethylene glycol as precursor. Significant increase in line broadening of the XRD patterns were observed indicating the decrease of particle sizes due to the Co(II)-Ti(IV) substitution. BaCo{sub 3}Ti{sub 3}Fe{sub 6}O{sub 19} showed the highest coercivity but moderate saturation and remnant magnetisations. HRTEM imaging showed that Co(II)-Ti(IV) substitution in the system of BaCo{sub x}Ti{sub x}Fe{sub 12-2x}O{sub 19} (x = 1-6) produced no drastic change in the structure of the M-type ferrites. Most of the M-types crystals examined by HRTEM displayed a long axis perpendicular to the c-axis of the M-type structure. Disordered crystals showing the intergrowth between Co-Ti-substituted barium ferrite and the spinel-structured iron oxide were detected.

  16. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe2O4-SiO2) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharagozlou, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Baradaran, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanopigment dispersed in silica matrix was synthesized. • The nanopigment showed proper inhibition performance in solution study. • The nanopigment significantly improved the corrosion resistance of the epoxy coating. - Abstract: This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe 2 O 4 -SiO 2 ) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe 2 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 -SiO 2 nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe 2 O 4 -SiO 2 ) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe 2 O 4 -SiO 2 nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  17. Synthesis of zinc substituted cobalt ferrites via reverse micelle technique involving in situ template formation: A study on their structural, magnetic, optical and catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Charanjit; Jauhar, Sheenu [Department of Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Kumar, Vinod [ICON Analytical Equipment (P) Ltd., Mumbai 400018 (India); Singh, Jagdish [Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology–Roorkee (India); Singhal, Sonal, E-mail: sonal1174@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2015-04-15

    Nano-crystalline particles of visible light responsive Zn–Co ferrites having formula Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0) were successfully synthesized via reverse micelle technique. Sodium dodecyl sulfate was used as a surfactant/templating agent. The ferrite formation was confirmed using powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The spherical shape of the ferrite particles was established by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HR-TEM) analysis. From the magnetic studies, the ferromagnetic nature of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was known. However, the nano-particles exhibited a transition from ferromagnetic to super-paramagnetic upon increasing the zinc concentration. In addition, the photo-Fenton activity of ferrites was also studied by carrying out degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) dye under visible light irradiation. The catalytic activity increased with increase in zinc ion concentration. - Highlights: • Controlled dimensions of Zn–Co ferrite nanoparticles by microemulsion technique. • Spherical shape with uniform size distribution of ∼5 nm was achieved. • Significant shift from ferromagnetic to superparamagnetic with Zn{sup 2+} ion doping. • Improved photocatalytic activity with Zn{sup 2+} ion doping.

  18. Cobalt ferrite nano-composite coated on glass by Doctor Blade method for photo-catalytic degradation of an azo textile dye Reactive Red 4: XRD, FESEM and DRS investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mohammad Hossein; Parhizkar, Janan

    2015-11-05

    Cobalt ferrite nano-composite was prepared by hydrothermal route using cobalt nitrate, iron nitrate and ethylene glycol as chelating agent. The nano-composite was coated on glass by Doctor Blade method and annealed at 300 °C. The structural, optical, and photocatalytic properties have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). Powder XRD analysis confirmed formation of CoFe2O4 spinel phase. The estimated particle size from FESEM data was 50 nm. The calculated energy band gaps, obtained by Tauc relation from UV-Vis absorption spectra was 1.3 eV. Photocatalytic degradation of Reactive Red 4 as an azo textile was investigated in aqueous solution under irradiation showed 68.0% degradation of the dye within 100 min. The experimental enhanced activity compare to pure Fe2O3 can be ascribed to the formation of composite, which was mainly attributable to the transfer of electron and hole to the surface of composite and hinder the electron hole recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Studies on structural and magnetic properties of ternary cobalt magnesium zinc (CMZ) Co{sub 0.6-x}Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 0.4} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6) ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manpreet, E-mail: manpreetchem@pau.edu; Jain, Palak; Singh, Mandeep

    2015-07-15

    In this paper we report the variation in structural and magnetic properties of ternary ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) having stoichiometery Co{sub 0.6-x}Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 0.4} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6) and pure spinel ferrites MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Mg, Co). NPs with average particle diameter of 25–45 nm were synthesized employing self-propagating oxalyl dihydrazide - metal nitrate combustion method. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and FT-IR spectroscopy. FT-IR spectral analysis revealed two bands centered at 560 and 440 cm{sup −1} for tetrahedral and octahedral metal–oxygen bond stretching. Zinc doping caused red shift in the frequency band of tetrahedral M−O stretching. XRD powder diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of spinel ferrite nanoparticles, expansion of the lattice on zinc doping and enhancement of spinel phase purity in the doped ferrites. Cobalt ferrite displayed lowering of the magnetic parameters on zinc doping which further decreased in ternary ferrites Co{sub 0.6-x}Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on replacing cobalt ions with non-magnetic magnesium ions up to x = 0.4. At x = 0.6 reverse trend was observed and Ms was enhanced. Magnesium zinc ferrite Mg{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0.4} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high value of Ms was obtained. Combustion process employed in the present studies serves as a low temperature facile route for the synthesis and structural analysis of ternary doped ferrite nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Ternary doped cobalt magnesium zinc ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized. • FT-IR displayed red shift in tetrahedral stretching band on Zinc doping. • Expansion of lattice and enhancement of spinel phase purity on zinc doping. • The variation in saturation magnetization (Ms) on doping is explained.

  20. Modeling of Toroidal Ordering in Ferroelectric Nanodots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crone, Joshua C; Chung, Peter W

    2007-01-01

    .... Beginning with an introduction of basic concepts, the report reviews the current state-of-the-art of ferroelectric nanodot technology through a literature review and identifies areas of need for continued study...

  1. Nanodot deposition and its application with atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Zenglei, E-mail: liuzenglei@sia.cn; Jiao Niandong, E-mail: ndjiao@sia.cn [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation (China); Xu Ke [Shenyang Jianzhu University (China); Wang, Zhidong [Chiba Institute of Technology (Japan); Dong Zaili; Liu Lianqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation (China)

    2013-06-15

    Nanodot deposition using atomic force microscope (AFM) is investigated. To realize repeatable and precise deposition of nanodots, the detailed control method is discussed. The electric field between AFM tip and substrate is analyzed, and a convenient method to control tip-substrate separation is proposed. In experiments, two nanodot matrixes are fabricated and the heights of the nanodots are analyzed. Experimental results testify that the control method can lead to repeatable and precise fabrication of deposited nanodots. As an application of deposited nanodots, a carbon nanotube (CNT) is soldered on gold electrodes with deposited Au nanodots. After soldering, the contact resistances between the CNT and the electrodes decrease greatly. AFM-based nanodot deposition can be used to fabricate special nanopatterns; also it can be used to solder nanomaterials on substrates to improve the electrical connection, which has a promising future for nanodevice fabrication.

  2. Blue photoluminescent carbon nanodots from limeade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvarnaphaet, Phitsini [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayuthaya Rd (Thailand); Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar [Department of Materials Science and Nano Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 7005 (United States); Wetcharungsri, Jutaphet; Porntheeraphat, Supanit [NECTEC, National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Hoonsawat, Rassmidara [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayuthaya Rd (Thailand); Ajayan, Pulickel Madhavapanicker [Department of Materials Science and Nano Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 7005 (United States); Tang, I-Ming [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Department of Material Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayuthaya Rd (Thailand); Asanithi, Piyapong, E-mail: asanithi@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayuthaya Rd (Thailand)

    2016-12-01

    Carbon-based photoluminescent nanodot has currently been one of the promising materials for various applications. The remaining challenges are the carbon sources and the simple synthetic processes that enhance the quantum yield, photostability and biocompatibility of the nanodots. In this work, the synthesis of blue photoluminescent carbon nanodots from limeade via a single-step hydrothermal carbonization process is presented. Lime carbon nanodot (L-CnD), whose the quantum yield exceeding 50% for the 490 nm emission in gram-scale amounts, has the structure of graphene core functionalized with the oxygen functional groups. The micron-sized flake of the as-prepared L-CnD powder exhibits multicolor emission depending on an excitation wavelength. The L-CnDs are demonstrated for rapidly ferric-ion (Fe{sup 3+}) detection in water compared to Fe{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} ions. The photoluminescence quenching of L-CnD solution under UV light is used to distinguish the Fe{sup 3+} ions from others by naked eyes as low concentration as 100 μM. Additionally, L-CnDs provide exceptional photostability and biocompatibility for imaging yeast cell morphology. Changes in morphology of living yeast cells, i.e. cell shape variation, and budding, can be observed in a minute-period until more than an hour without the photoluminescent intensity loss. - Highlights: • Photoluminescent carbon nanodots are synthesized from limeade. • The quantum yield of lime carbon nanodots is higher than 50%. • The lime carbon nanodots can be applied for detecting of Fe{sup 3+} ions and for imaging living yeast cells.

  3. The effect of the volume fraction and viscosity on the compression and tension behavior of the cobalt-ferrite magneto-rheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of the volume fraction and bimodal distribution of solid particles on the compression and tension behavior of the Co-ferrite-based magneto-rheological fluids (MRFs containing silicon oil as a carrier. Hence, Co-ferrite particles (CoFe2O4 with two various sizes were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and mixed so as to prepare the bimodal MRF. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM were conducted to examine the structural and magnetic properties, respectively. The results indicated that the increase of the volume fraction has a direct increasing influence on the values of the compression and tension strengths of fluids. In addition, the compression and tension strengths of the mixed MRF sample (1.274 and 0.647 MPa containing 60 and 550 nm samples were higher than those of the MRF sample with the same volume fraction and uniform particle size of 550 nm.

  4. Cation distribution controlled dielectric, electrical and magnetic behavior of In{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrites synthesized via solid-state reaction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandit, Rabia, E-mail: rabiabest@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P 177 005 (India); Sharma, K.K., E-mail: kk.gautam@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P 177 005 (India); Kaur, Pawanpreet [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P 177 005 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Centre for Material Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, H.P 177 005 (India)

    2014-12-15

    We report the structural, cation distribution, dielectric, electrical and magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2−x}In{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) ferrites. Rietveld fitted X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirm the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure with Fd3m space group for all the samples. The comprehensive analysis of XRD based cation distribution has been performed to see the effect of In{sup 3+} ions substitution on various structural parameters such as site ionic radii, edge and bond lengths, interionic distances etc. The dielectric constant and tangent loss have been studied as a function of temperature and frequency. The dielectric data presented in electric modulus form reveals the presence of non-Debye relaxation behavior in considered ferrites. Both the AC and DC conductivities as a function of temperature are found to decrease with increasing In{sup 3+} content. The power law behavior of AC-conductivity indicates a strong correlation among electrons in these systems. The isothermal magnetization versus applied field curves with high field slope and significant coercivity suggest that studied materials are highly anisotropic with canted spin structures and exhibit ferrimagnetic behavior at 300 K. Magnetization gets enhanced up to 40% of In{sup 3+} substitution. The observed low dielectric losses and high resistivity can find their application in power transformers at high frequencies. - Highlights: • Rietveld refinement of CoIn{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} samples shows single phase cubic spinel structure. • Cation distribution matches well with experimental integrated intensity ratios. • Strength of magnetic interactions is found to increase with increasing In{sup 3+} substitution. • The present systems are highly correlated. • These material are promising candidate for power transformers at high frequencies.

  5. Equilibrium shapes of polycrystalline silicon nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzec, M. D., E-mail: korzec@math.tu-berlin.de; Wagner, B., E-mail: bwagner@math.tu-berlin.de [Department of Mathematics, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Roczen, M., E-mail: maurizio.roczen@physik.hu-berlin.de [Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schade, M., E-mail: martin.schade@physik.uni-halle.de [Zentrum für Innovationskompetenz SiLi-nano, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Karl-Freiherr-von-Fritsch-Straße 3, 06120 Halle (Germany); Rech, B., E-mail: bernd.rech@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Institute for Silicon Photovoltaics, Kekuléstraße 5, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-02-21

    This study is concerned with the topography of nanostructures consisting of arrays of polycrystalline nanodots. Guided by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements of crystalline Si (c-Si) nanodots that evolved from a “dewetting” process of an amorphous Si (a-Si) layer from a SiO{sub 2} coated substrate, we investigate appropriate formulations for the surface energy density and transitions of energy density states at grain boundaries. We introduce a new numerical minimization formulation that allows to account for adhesion energy from an underlying substrate. We demonstrate our approach first for the free standing case, where the solutions can be compared to well-known Wulff constructions, before we treat the general case for interfacial energy settings that support “partial wetting” and grain boundaries for the polycrystalline case. We then use our method to predict the morphologies of silicon nanodots.

  6. Crystal field splitting and spin states of Co ions in cobalt ferrite with composition Co1.5Fe1.5O4 using magnetization and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A. K.; Singh, M. N.; Achary, S. N.; Sagdeo, A.; Shukla, D. K.; Phase, D. M.

    2017-08-01

    Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of partially inverted Cobalt Ferrite with composition Co1.5Fe1.5O4 is discussed in the present work. Single phase (SG: Fd3m) sample is synthesized by co-precipitation technique and subsequent air annealing. The values of saturation magnetization obtained from careful analysis of approach to saturation in initial M(H) curves are used to determine spin states of Co ions in tetrahedral (TH) and octahedral (OH) sites. Spin states of Co3+ ions in TH sites, which has not been reported in literature, were found to be in high spin state. Temperature variation of magnetic parameters has been studied. The sample shows magneto-crystalline anisotropy with two clearly distinct pinning centers. Oxygen K-edge and Fe as well as Co L2,3-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) spectra have been used as complementary measurements to study crystal field splitting and core hole effects on transition metal (TM) 3d orbitals. The ratio of intensities of t2g and eg absorption bands in O-K edge XAS spectrum is used to estimate the spin states of Co ions at OH and TH sites. The results are in agreement with those obtained from magnetization data, and favors Co3+ ions in TH sites in high spin states. Normalized areas of the satellite peaks in TM L2,3-edge XAS spectra have been used to estimate 3dn+1L contribution in ground state wave function and the contributions were found to be significant.

  7. Solubility of cobalt in primary circuit solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.; Joyer, F.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2 O 4 ) was measured in PWR primary circuit conditions, in the temperature range 250-350 deg C, and the results were compared with the ones obtained on magnetite and nickel ferrite. As in the former cases, it was found that, in the prevailing primary circuit conditions, the solubility of the cobalt ferrite was minimum at temperatures around 300 deg C, for cobalt as well as for iron. The equilibrium iron concentration is significantly lower than in the case of magnetite. The results are discussed in relation with the POTHY code, based only on thermodynamic laws and data, used for the prediction of the primary circuit chemistry

  8. Crystal field splitting and spin states of Co ions in cobalt ferrite with composition Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} using magnetization and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, A.K., E-mail: anil@rrcat.gov.in [HXAL, Synchrotrons Utilization Section, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Singh, M.N. [HXAL, Synchrotrons Utilization Section, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Achary, S.N. [Chemistry Division, BARC, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sagdeo, A. [HXAL, Synchrotrons Utilization Section, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, RRCAT, Indore 452013 (India); Shukla, D.K.; Phase, D.M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore 452010 (India)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Co ions in Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} are found to be in high spin states. • XAS measurements have been used to estimate TM crystal field and core hole contributions to 3d orbital splitting. • The polycrystalline Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} sample show two pinning centers and large magneto crystalline anisotropy. - Abstract: Structural, magnetic and electronic properties of partially inverted Cobalt Ferrite with composition Co{sub 1.5}Fe{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} is discussed in the present work. Single phase (SG: Fd3m) sample is synthesized by co-precipitation technique and subsequent air annealing. The values of saturation magnetization obtained from careful analysis of approach to saturation in initial M(H) curves are used to determine spin states of Co ions in tetrahedral (T{sub H}) and octahedral (O{sub H}) sites. Spin states of Co{sup 3+} ions in T{sub H} sites, which has not been reported in literature, were found to be in high spin state. Temperature variation of magnetic parameters has been studied. The sample shows magneto-crystalline anisotropy with two clearly distinct pinning centers. Oxygen K-edge and Fe as well as Co L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) spectra have been used as complementary measurements to study crystal field splitting and core hole effects on transition metal (TM) 3d orbitals. The ratio of intensities of t{sub 2g} and e{sub g} absorption bands in O-K edge XAS spectrum is used to estimate the spin states of Co ions at O{sub H} and T{sub H} sites. The results are in agreement with those obtained from magnetization data, and favors Co{sup 3+} ions in T{sub H} sites in high spin states. Normalized areas of the satellite peaks in TM L{sub 2},{sub 3}-edge XAS spectra have been used to estimate 3d{sub n+1}L contribution in ground state wave function and the contributions were found to be significant.

  9. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air......A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  10. Leakage current characteristics of the multiple metal alloy nanodot memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gae Hun; Lee, Jung Min; Yang, Hyung Jun; Song, Yun Heub; Bea, Ji Chel; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2010-01-01

    The leakage current characteristics of a multiple metal alloy nanodot device for a nonvolatile random access memory using FePt materials are investigated. Several annealing conditions are evaluated and optimized to suppress the leakage current and to better the memory characterisctics. This work confirmed that the annealing condition of 700 .deg. C in a high vacuum ambience (under 1 x 10 -5 Pa) simultaneously provided good cell characteristics from a high dot density of over 1 x 10 13 /cm 2 and a low leakage current. In addition, a smaller nanodot diameter was found to give a lower leakage current for the multiple nanodot memory. Finally, for the proposed annealing condition, the quadruple FePt multiple nanodot memory with a 2-nm dot diameter provided good leakage current characteristics, showing a threshold voltage shift of under 5% at an initial retention stage of 1000 sec.

  11. Scanning probe lithography for fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, B.; Jo, W.; Gwon, M.J.; Lee, E.; Kim, D.-W.

    2010-01-01

    We report fabrication of Ti metal nanodot arrays by scanning probe microscopic indentation. A thin poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer was spin-coated on Si substrates with thickness of 70 nm. Nanometer-size pore arrays were formed by indenting the PMMA layer using a cantilever of a scanning probe microscope. Protuberances with irregular boundaries appeared during the indentation process. Control of approach and pulling-out speed during indentation was able to dispose of the protrusions. Ti metal films were deposited on the patterned PMMA layers by a radio-frequency sputtering method and subsequently lifted off to obtain metal nanodot arrays. The fabricated metal nanodot arrays have 200 nm of diameter and 500 nm of interdistance, which corresponds to a density of 4x10 8 /cm 2 . Scanning probe-based measurement of current-voltage (I-V) behaviors for a single Ti metal nanodot showed asymmetric characteristics. Applying external bias is likely to induce oxidation of Ti metal, since the conductance decreased and volume change of the dots was observed. I-V behaviors of Ti metal nanodots by conventional e-beam lithography were also characterized for comparison.

  12. SU-F-BRE-14: Uncertainty Analysis for Dose Measurements Using OSLD NanoDots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, S; Alvarez, P; Stingo, F; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLD) are an increasingly popular dosimeter for research and clinical applications. It is also used by the Radiological Physics Center for remote auditing of machine output. In this work we robustly calculated the reproducibility and uncertainty of the OSLD nanoDot. Methods: For the RPC dose calculation, raw readings are corrected for depletion, element sensitivity, fading, linearity, and energy. System calibration is determined for the experimental OSLD irradiated at different institutions by using OSLD irradiated by the RPC under reference conditions (i.e., standards): 1 Gy in a Cobalt beam. The intra-dot and inter-dot reproducibilities (coefficient of variation) were determined from the history of RPC readings of these standards. The standard deviation of the corrected OSLD signal was then calculated analytically using a recursive formalism that did not rely on the normality assumption of the underlying uncertainties, or on any type of mathematical approximation. This analytical uncertainty was compared to that empirically estimated from >45,000 RPC beam audits. Results: The intra-dot variability was found to be 0.59%, with only a small variation between readers. Inter-dot variability was found to be 0.85%. The uncertainty in each of the individual correction factors was empirically determined. When the raw counts from each OSLD were adjusted for the appropriate correction factors, the analytically determined coefficient of variation was 1.8% over a range of institutional irradiation conditions that are seen at the RPC. This is reasonably consistent with the empirical observations of the RPC, where the coefficient of variation of the measured beam outputs is 1.6% (photons) and 1.9% (electrons). Conclusion: OSLD nanoDots provide sufficiently good precision for a wide range of applications, including the RPC remote monitoring program for megavoltage beams. This work was supported by PHS grant CA10953 awarded by

  13. A distributed charge storage with GeO2 nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, T.C.; Yan, S.T.; Hsu, C.H.; Tang, M.T.; Lee, J.F.; Tai, Y.H.; Liu, P.T.; Sze, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a distributed charge storage with GeO 2 nanodots is demonstrated. The mean size and aerial density of the nanodots embedded in SiO 2 are estimated to be about 5.5 nm and 4.3x10 11 cm -2 , respectively. The composition of the dots is also confirmed to be GeO 2 by x-ray absorption near-edge structure analyses. A significant memory effect is observed through the electrical measurements. Under the low voltage operation of 5 V, the memory window is estimated to ∼0.45 V. Also, a physical model is proposed to demonstrate the charge storage effect through the interfacial traps of GeO 2 nanodots

  14. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2014-09-04

    Time dependent density functional theory and the hybrid B3LYP functional are used to investigate the structural and optical properties of pristine and carbon doped hexagonal boron nitride nanodots. In agreement with recent experiments, the embedded carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical response in a wide energy window. We identify cluster sizes and shapes with optimal conversion efficiency for solar radiation and a wide absorption range form infrared to ultraviolet. This journal is

  15. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles covered with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane for use as hybrid material in nano technology; Sintese e caracterizacao de nanoparticulas magneticas de ferrita de cobalto recobertas por 3-aminopropiltrietoxissilano para uso como material hibrido em nanotecnologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilo, Ruth Luqueze

    2006-07-01

    Nowadays with the appear of nano science and nano technology, magnetic nanoparticles have been finding a variety of applications in the fields of biomedicine, diagnosis, molecular biology, biochemistry, catalysis, etc. The magnetic functionalized nanoparticles are constituted of a magnetic nucleus, involved by a polymeric layer with active sites, which ones could anchor metals or selective organic compounds. These nanoparticles are considered organic inorganic hybrid materials and have great interest as materials for commercial applications due to the specific properties. Among the important applications it can be mentioned: magneto hyperthermia treatment, drugs delivery in specific local of the body, molecular recognition, biosensors, enhancement of nuclear magnetic resonance images quality, etc. This work was developed in two parts: 1) the synthesis of the nucleus composed by superparamagnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite and, 2) the recovering of nucleus by a polymeric bifunctional 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The parameters studied in the first part of the research were: pH, hydroxide molar concentration, hydroxide type, reagent order of addition, reagent way of addition, speed of shake, metals initial concentrations, molar fraction of cobalt and thermal treatment. In the second part it was studied: pH, temperature, catalyst type, catalyst concentration, time of reaction, relation ratios of H{sub 2}O/silane, type of medium and the efficiency of the recovering regarding to pH. The products obtained were characterized using the following techniques X-ray powder diffraction (DRX), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), spectroscopy of scatterbrained energy spectroscopy (DES), atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and magnetization curves (VSM). (author)

  16. Neutron diffraction studies on cobalt substituted BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J.; Biswal, A. K.; Acharya, S.; Babu, P. D.; Siruguri, V.; Vishwakarma, P. N.

    2013-02-01

    A dilute concentration of single phase Cobalt substituted Bismuth ferrite, BiFe1-XCoXO3; (x=0, 0.02) is prepared by sol-gel auto combustion method. Room temperature neutron diffraction patterns show no change in the crystal and magnetic structure upon cobalt doping. The calculation of magnetic moments shows 3.848 μB for Fe+ and 2.85 μB for Co3+. The cobalt is found to be in intermediate spin state.

  17. Ferrites and ceramic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Jotania, Rajshree B

    2013-01-01

    The Ferrite term is used to refer to all magnetic oxides containing iron as major metallic component. Ferrites are very attractive materials because they simultaneously show high resistivity and high saturation magnetization, and attract now considerable attention, because of the interesting physics involved. Typical ferrite material possesses excellent chemical stability, high corrosion resistivity, magneto-crystalline anisotropy, magneto-striction, and magneto-optical properties. Ferrites belong to the group of ferrimagnetic oxides, and include rare-earth garnets and ortho-ferrites. Several

  18. Tuning the optical response in carbon doped boron nitride nanodots

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    carbon atoms are found to favor nucleation. Our results demonstrate that carbon clusters of different shapes promote an early onset of absorption by generating in-gap states. The nanodots are interesting for opto-electronics due to their tunable optical

  19. Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Cobalt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    7

    synthesis methods of shape, size, magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite ... substance was then ground into a fine powder and calcined at 600oC for 10 hours and .... From the particles distribution pattern of CFO nanoparticles in Figure 2(a), it is.

  20. Shape induced magnetic vortex state in hexagonal ordered cofe nanodot arrays using ultrathin alumina shadow mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellarajan, B.; Saravanan, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Barshilia, Harish C.; Chowdhury, P.

    2018-04-01

    The magnetization reversal process of hexagonal ordered CoFe nanodot arrays was investigated as a function of nanodot thickness (td) varying from 10 to 30 nm with fixed diameter. For this purpose, ordered CoFe nanodots with a diameter of 80 ± 4 nm were grown by sputtering using ultra-thin alumina mask. The vortex annihilation and the dynamic spin configuration in the ordered CoFe nanodots were analyzed by means of magnetic hysteresis loops in complement with the micromagnetic simulation studies. A highly pinched hysteresis loop observed at 20 nm thickness suggests the occurrence of vortex state in these nanodots. With increase in dot thickness from 10 to 30 nm, the estimated coercivity values tend to increase from 80 to 175 Oe, indicating irreversible change in the nucleation/annihilation field of vortex state. The measured magnetic properties were then corroborated with the change in the shape of the nanodots from disk to hemisphere through micromagnetic simulation.

  1. Tuning the metal-insulator transition in manganite films through surface exchange coupling with magnetic nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, T Z; Gai, Z; Xu, X Y; Guo, H W; Yin, L F; Shen, J

    2011-04-15

    In strongly correlated electronic systems, the global transport behavior depends sensitively on spin ordering. We show that spin ordering in manganites can be controlled by depositing isolated ferromagnetic nanodots at the surface. The exchange field at the interface is tunable with nanodot density and makes it possible to overcome dimensionality and strain effects in frustrated systems to greatly increasing the metal-insulator transition and magnetoresistance. These findings indicate that electronic phase separation can be controlled by the presence of magnetic nanodots.

  2. Controlling vortex chirality and polarity by geometry in magnetic nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    Agramunt Puig, Sebastià

    2014-01-01

    The independent control of both vortex chirality and polarity is a significant challenge in magnetic devices based on nano-sized magnetic vortex structures. By micromagnetic simulations here, we show that in soft ferromagnetic nanodots with an adequate modulated thickness, the desired combination of chirality and polarity can be achieved just by changing the direction of the in-plane applied magnetic field. Despite the complex behavior, the vortex chirality and polarity control can be summari...

  3. XXIst Century Ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaleyrat, F; Zehani, K; Pasko, A; Loyau, V; LoBue, M

    2012-01-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Oersted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the down sizing of ceramics microstructure to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba 2+ Fe 12 O 19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  4. Rapid fabrication of an ordered nano-dot array by the combination of nano-plastic forming and annealing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Ohsawa, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Akinori

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new fabrication method for an ordered nano-dot array is developed. Combination of coating, nano-plastic forming and annealing processes is studied to produce uniformly sized and ordered gold nano-dot array on a quartz glass substrate. The experimental results reveal that patterning of a groove grid on the gold-coated substrate with NPF is effective to obtain the ordered gold nano-dot array. In the proposed fabrication process, the size of the gold nano-dot can be controlled by adjusting the groove grid size. A minimum gold nano-dot array fabricated on a quartz-glass substrate was 93 nm in diameter and 100 nm in pitch. Furthermore, the mechanism of nano-dot array generation by the presented process is investigated. Using a theoretical model it is revealed that the proposed method is capable of fabrication of smaller nano-dots than 10 nm by controlling process conditions adequately.

  5. Facile preparation of luminescent and intelligent gold nanodots based on supramolecular self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yunfeng; Li Sujuan; Zhou Yahui; Zhai Qingpan; Hu Mengyue; Cai Fensha; Du Jimin; Liang Jiamiao; Zhu Xinyuan

    2012-01-01

    A new strategy for preparing luminescent and intelligent gold nanodots based on supramolecular self-assembly is described in this paper. The supramolecular self-assembly was initiated through electrostatic interactions and ion pairing between palmitic acid and hyperbranched poly(ethylenimine). The resulting structures not only have the dynamic reversible properties of supramolecules but also possess torispherical and highly branched architectures. Thus they can be regarded as a new kind of ideal nanoreactor for preparing intelligent Au nanodots. By preparing Au nanodots within this kind of supramolecular self-assembly, the environmental sensitivity of intelligent polymers and the optical, electrical properties of Au nanodots can be combined, endowing the Au nanodots with intelligence. In this paper, a supramolecular self-assembly process based on dendritic poly(ethylenimine) and palmitic acid was designed and then applied to prepare fluorescent and size-controlled Au nanodots. The pH response of Au nanodots embodied by phase transfer from oil phase to water phase was also investigated. (paper)

  6. Observation and manipulation of magnetic domains in sol gel derived thin films of spinel ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ashwini A.; Mathe, Vikas L.

    2017-12-01

    Thin films of spinel ferrites, namely zinc substituted nickel, cobalt ferrite, and manganese substituted cobalt ferrite, were synthesized using sol-gel derived spin-coating techniques. The films were characterized using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques for the analysis of structural, morphological and vibrational band transition properties, which confirm the spinel phase formation of the films. The magnetic force microscopy (MFM) technique was used to observe the magnetic domain structure present in the synthesized films. Further, the films were subjected to an external DC magnetic field of 2 kG to orient the magnetic domains and analyzed using an ex situ MFM technique.

  7. Ferrite materials for memory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saravanan, R

    2017-01-01

    The book discusses the synthesis and characterization of various ferrite materials used for memory applications. The distinct feature of the book is the construction of charge density of ferrites by deploying the maximum entropy method (MEM). This charge density gives the distribution of charges in the ferrite unit cell, which is analyzed for charge related properties.

  8. Enhanced field emission from PbTiO{sub 3} nanodots prepared by phase separation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Jinna; Luo Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Weng Wenjian, E-mail: wengwj@zju.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Cheng Kui; Du Piyi; Shen Ge; Han Gaorong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2009-10-15

    Uniformly distributed PbTiO{sub 3} nanodots were successfully prepared by phase separation approach. A precursor sol film was first spin-coated on Si wafer and then spontaneously separated into two distinct phases owing to the Marangoni instability. PT nanodots with tailorable size and density were obtained after further heat treatment. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that these nanodots showed a perovskite structure. An excellent room temperature field emission property of PbTiO{sub 3} nanodots was observed: the minimum turn-on voltage was about 5.3 V/{mu}m; while the emission current density reached about 270 {mu}A cm{sup -2} at an applied field of about 9.25 V/{mu}m.

  9. Fe nanodot system fabricated by non-lithographic method and its structural properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Van Chiem; Nguyen Thi Thu Ha; Ngo Thi Thanh Tam; Nguyen Van Chuc; Phan Ngoc Minh; Li Huying; Seo Jae Muyng

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study the magnetic structure and morphology of the Fe nanodot system fabricated by the non-lithographic method, using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. By the two-steps aluminum anodization, the AAO patterns with the hexagonal pore arrangement have been achieved. Using AAO pattern as a template, under suitable conditions we successfully deposited the iron metal in the pores by the thermal vacuum evaporation. By the exposure of the deposited system from the bottom of the AAO membrane, the hexagonal ordered Fe nanodot system has been obtained. The morphologies of the nanodot system were imaged by the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM) methods. The magnetic structures were investigated by the Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDS) and Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) methods. Experimental results confirmed that the MFM image of the fabricated Fe nanodot system is similar to their AFM image.

  10. Fe nanodot system fabricated by non-lithographic method and its structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiem, Chu Van; Thu Ha, Nguyen Thi; Thanh Tam, Ngo Thi; Chuc, Nguyen Van; Minh, Phan Ngoc [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay Distr., Hanoi (Viet Nam); Huying, Li; Seo Jae Muyng [Physics department, Chonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chucnv@ims.vast.ac.vn

    2009-09-01

    In this work, we study the magnetic structure and morphology of the Fe nanodot system fabricated by the non-lithographic method, using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. By the two-steps aluminum anodization, the AAO patterns with the hexagonal pore arrangement have been achieved. Using AAO pattern as a template, under suitable conditions we successfully deposited the iron metal in the pores by the thermal vacuum evaporation. By the exposure of the deposited system from the bottom of the AAO membrane, the hexagonal ordered Fe nanodot system has been obtained. The morphologies of the nanodot system were imaged by the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM) methods. The magnetic structures were investigated by the Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDS) and Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) methods. Experimental results confirmed that the MFM image of the fabricated Fe nanodot system is similar to their AFM image.

  11. Impact of Nd{sup 3+} in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel ferrite nanoparticles on cation distribution, structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Raghvendra Singh, E-mail: yadav@fch.vutbr.cz [Materials Research Centre, Brno University of Technology, Purkyňova 464/118, 61200 Brno (Czech Republic); Havlica, Jaromir; Masilko, Jiri; Kalina, Lukas; Wasserbauer, Jaromir; Hajdúchová, Miroslava; Enev, Vojtěch [Materials Research Centre, Brno University of Technology, Purkyňova 464/118, 61200 Brno (Czech Republic); Kuřitka, Ivo; Kožáková, Zuzana [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Nad Ovčírnou 3685, 760 01 Zlín (Czech Republic)

    2016-02-01

    Nd{sup 3+} doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been synthesized by starch-assisted sol–gel auto-combustion method. The significant role played by Nd{sup 3+} added to cobalt ferrite in changing cation distribution and further in influencing structural and magnetic properties, was explored and reported. The crystal structure formation and crystallite size were studied from X-ray diffraction studies. The microstructural features were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy that demonstrates the nanocrystalline grain formation with spherical morphology. An infrared spectroscopy study shows the presence of two absorption bands related to tetrahedral and octahedral group complexes within the spinel ferrite lattice system. The change in Raman modes in synthesized ferrite system were observed with Nd{sup 3+} substitution, particle size and cation redistribution. The impact of Nd{sup 3+} on cation distribution of Co{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} at octahedral and tetrahedral sites in spinel ferrite cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Room temperature magnetization measurements showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity increase with addition of Nd{sup 3+} substitution in cobalt ferrite. - Highlights: • Nd{sup 3+} doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by starch-assisted sol–gel auto-combustion method. • The change in Raman modes with Nd{sup 3+} substitution. • Presence of absorption infrared bands related to octahedral and tetrahedral site. • The impact of Nd{sup 3+} on cation distribution at octahedral and tetrahedral sites. • Influence of Nd{sup 3+} substitution in cobalt ferrite on magnetic properties.

  12. Formation of FePt nanodots by wetting of nanohole substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abdelgawad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large area arrays of FePt nanodots are fabricated on patterned substrates made of SiOx, SiNx and TiNx. The templates have a depth of ∼10 nm and a pitch of ∼20 nm with 18 nm wide holes. FePt is sputtered on the nanohole arrays, then back-etched, leaving a highly ordered array of FePt nanodots behind. To promote phase transformation to the L10 phase, the samples are annealed at temperatures of 550-650° C. During annealing, the FePt strongly dewets SiOx and SiNx substrates, causing sintering and coalescence of the FePt nanodots, but the nanodots remain highly ordered on the TiNx substrate. The nanodot arrays on TiNx are characterized magnetically before and after annealing. The out-of-plane coercivity increases by ∼1 kOe, suggesting partial transformation to the L10 phase. We also show that a capping layer can be sputtered on top of the nanodot arrays prior to annealing to prevent dewetting.

  13. Non-toxic lead sulfide nanodots as efficient contrast agents for visualizing gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Ran, Xiang; Liu, Jianhua; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive imaging of gastrointestinal (GI) tract using novel but efficient contrast agents is of the most important issues in the diagnosis and prognosis of GI diseases. Here, for the first time, we reported the design and synthesis of biothiol-decorated lead sulfide nanodots, as well as their usages in functional dual-modality imaging of GI tract in vivo. Due to the presence of glutathione on the surface of the nanodots, these well-prepared contrast agents could decrease the unwanted ion leakage, withstand the harsh conditions in GI tract, and avoid the systemic absorption after oral administration. Compared with clinical barium meal and iodine-based contrast agents, these nanodots exhibited much more significant enhancement in contrast efficiency during both 2D X-ray imaging and 3D CT imaging. Different from some conventional invasive imaging modalities, such as gastroscope and enteroscope, non-invasive imaging strategy by using glutathione modified PbS nanodots as contrast agents could reduce the painfulness towards patients, facilitate the imaging procedure, and economize the manipulation period. Moreover, long-term toxicity and bio-distribution of these nanodots after oral administration were evaluated in detail, which indicated their overall safety. Based on our present study, these nanodots could act as admirable contrast agents to integrate X-ray imaging and CT imaging for the direct visualization of GI tract. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell characteristics of a multiple alloy nano-dots memory structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bea, Ji Chel; Lee, Kang-Wook; Tanaka, Tetsu; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Song, Yun Heub; Lee, Gae-Hun

    2009-01-01

    A multiple alloy metal nano-dots memory using FN tunneling was investigated in order to confirm its structural possibility for future flash memory. In this work, a multiple FePt nano-dots device with a high work function (∼5.2 eV) and extremely high dot density (∼1.2 × 10 13 cm −2 ) was fabricated. Its structural effect for multiple layers was evaluated and compared to the one with a single layer in terms of the cell characteristics and reliability. We confirm that MOS capacitor structures with two to four multiple FePt nano-dot layers provide a larger threshold voltage window and better retention characteristics. Furthermore, it was also revealed that several process parameters for block oxide and inter-tunnel oxide between the nano-dot layers are very important to improve the efficiency of electron injection into multiple nano-dots. From these results, it is expected that a multiple FePt nano-dots memory using Fowler–Nordheim (FN) tunneling could be a candidate structure for future flash memory

  15. Mössbauer effect studies and X-ray diffraction analysis of cobalt ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 5. Mössbauer effect studies and X-ray diffraction analysis of cobalt ferrite prepared in powder form by thermal decomposition method. M D Joseph Sebastian B Rudraswamy M C Radhakrishna Ramani. Magnetic Materials Volume 26 Issue 5 August 2003 pp ...

  16. High strength ferritic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic steel is specified in which the major alloying elements are chromium and molybdenum, with smaller quantities of niobium, vanadium, silicon, manganese and carbon. The maximum swelling is specified for various irradiation conditions. Rupture strength is also specified. (U.K.)

  17. Bioorganic nanodots for non-volatile memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amdursky, Nadav; Shalev, Gil; Handelman, Amir; Natan, Amir; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Litsyn, Simon; Szwarcman, Daniel; Rosenman, Gil; Roizin, Yakov

    2013-01-01

    In recent years we are witnessing an intensive integration of bio-organic nanomaterials in electronic devices. Here we show that the diphenylalanine bio-molecule can self-assemble into tiny peptide nanodots (PNDs) of ∼2 nm size, and can be embedded into metal-oxide-semiconductor devices as charge storage nanounits in non-volatile memory. For that purpose, we first directly observe the crystallinity of a single PND by electron microscopy. We use these nanocrystalline PNDs units for the formation of a dense monolayer on SiO 2 surface, and study the electron/hole trapping mechanisms and charge retention ability of the monolayer, followed by fabrication of PND-based memory cell device

  18. Bioorganic nanodots for non-volatile memory devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amdursky, Nadav; Shalev, Gil; Handelman, Amir; Natan, Amir; Rosenwaks, Yossi [School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Litsyn, Simon; Szwarcman, Daniel; Rosenman, Gil, E-mail: rgil@post.tau.ac.il [School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); StoreDot LTD, 16 Menahem Begin St., Ramat Gan (Israel); Roizin, Yakov [School of Electrical Engineering, Iby and Aladar Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); TowerJazz, P.O. Box 619, Migdal HaEmek 23105 (Israel)

    2013-12-01

    In recent years we are witnessing an intensive integration of bio-organic nanomaterials in electronic devices. Here we show that the diphenylalanine bio-molecule can self-assemble into tiny peptide nanodots (PNDs) of ∼2 nm size, and can be embedded into metal-oxide-semiconductor devices as charge storage nanounits in non-volatile memory. For that purpose, we first directly observe the crystallinity of a single PND by electron microscopy. We use these nanocrystalline PNDs units for the formation of a dense monolayer on SiO{sub 2} surface, and study the electron/hole trapping mechanisms and charge retention ability of the monolayer, followed by fabrication of PND-based memory cell device.

  19. Silver electrodeposition on nanostructured gold: from nanodots to nanoripples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, P C dos Santos; Fonticelli, M; BenItez, G; Azzaroni, O; Schilardi, P L; Luque, N B; Leiva, E; Salvarezza, R C

    2006-01-01

    Silver nanodots and nanoripples have been grown on nanocavity-patterned polycrystalline Au templates by controlled electrodeposition. The initial step is the growth of a first continuous Ag monolayer followed by preferential deposition at nanocavities. The Ag-coated nanocavities act as preferred sites for instantaneous nucleation and growth of the three-dimensional metallic centres. By controlling the amount of deposited Ag, dots of ∼50 nm average size and ∼4 nm average height can be grown with spatial and size distributions dictated by the template. The dots are in a metastable state. Further Ag deposition drives the dot surface structure to nanoripple formation. Results show that electrodeposition on nanopatterned electrodes can be used to prepare a high density of nanostructures with a narrow size distribution and spatial order

  20. Nano copper and cobalt ferrites as heterogeneous catalysts for the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    logically active natural products were found to contain substituted ... pH of the solution was increased to ... weak which indicate that the residual carbon has mostly burnt away .... imidazole. 3.1a Comparison of effect of the present catalysts with.

  1. Cu 2 + and Al 3 + co-substituted cobalt ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emissionscanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) are used for studying the effect of variation in the Cu–Al substitution and its impact on particle size, magnetic properties such as Ms and Hc.

  2. Spin canting phenomenon in cadmium doped cobalt ferrites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    multi-layer chip inductors and health and medicine e.g. mag- netically guided drug ... puter and as inductor surface mount devices in electronic products such as .... (H-7500) TEM operated at 120 kV has been used to record micrographs of the ...

  3. Cu and Al co-substituted cobalt ferrite: structural analysis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... 400 cm−1 (v2). They are attributed to the tetrahedral and octahedral group complexes of the spinel .... Intensity (a.u.). 2 (degree) ... Heating iron-hydroxides in air is known to yield haematite ... M–O distance in tetrahedral and octahedral sites.

  4. Angular dependence of the nanoDot OSL dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, James R.; Kry, Stephen F.; Sahoo, Narayan; Followill, David S.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs) are quickly gaining popularity as passive dosimeters, with applications in medicine for linac output calibration verification, brachytherapy source verification, treatment plan quality assurance, and clinical dose measurements. With such wide applications, these dosimeters must be characterized for numerous factors affecting their response. The most abundant commercial OSLD is the InLight/OSL system from Landauer, Inc. The purpose of this study was to examine the angular dependence of the nanoDot dosimeter, which is part of the InLight system. Methods: Relative dosimeter response data were taken at several angles in 6 and 18 MV photon beams, as well as a clinical proton beam. These measurements were done within a phantom at a depth beyond the build-up region. To verify the observed angular dependence, additional measurements were conducted as well as Monte Carlo simulations in MCNPX. Results: When irradiated with the incident photon beams parallel to the plane of the dosimeter, the nanoDot response was 4% lower at 6 MV and 3% lower at 18 MV than the response when irradiated with the incident beam normal to the plane of the dosimeter. Monte Carlo simulations at 6 MV showed similar results to the experimental values. Examination of the results in Monte Carlo suggests the cause as partial volume irradiation. In a clinical proton beam, no angular dependence was found. Conclusions: A nontrivial angular response of this OSLD was observed in photon beams. This factor may need to be accounted for when evaluating doses from photon beams incident from a variety of directions.

  5. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    . Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future......Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items...

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan K

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaliyamoorthy Venkatesan,1 Dhanakotti Rajan Babu,1 Mane Prabhu Kavya Bai,2 Ravi Supriya,2 Radhakrishnan Vidya,2 Saminathan Madeswaran,1 Pandurangan Anandan,3 Mukannan Arivanandhan,3 Yasuhiro Hayakawa3 1School of Advanced Sciences, 2School of Bio Sciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India; 3Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan Abstract: Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311 of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed. Keywords: cytotoxicity, HR-TEM, magnetic nanoparticles, VSM 

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Kaliyamoorthy; Rajan Babu, Dhanakotti; Kavya Bai, Mane Prabhu; Supriya, Ravi; Vidya, Radhakrishnan; Madeswaran, Saminathan; Anandan, Pandurangan; Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311) of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed.

  8. Structural control of ultra-fine CoPt nanodot arrays via electrodeposition process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodarz, Siggi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Hasegawa, Takashi; Ishio, Shunji [Department of Materials Science, Akita University, Akita City 010-8502 (Japan); Homma, Takayuki, E-mail: t.homma@waseda.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    CoPt nanodot arrays were fabricated by combining electrodeposition and electron beam lithography (EBL) for the use of bit-patterned media (BPM). To achieve precise control of deposition uniformity and coercivity of the CoPt nanodot arrays, their crystal structure and magnetic properties were controlled by controlling the diffusion state of metal ions from the initial deposition stage with the application of bath agitation. Following bath agitation, the composition gradient of the CoPt alloy with thickness was mitigated to have a near-ideal alloy composition of Co:Pt =80:20, which induces epitaxial-like growth from Ru substrate, thus resulting in the improvement of the crystal orientation of the hcp (002) structure from its initial deposition stages. Furthermore, the cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis of the nanodots deposited with bath agitation showed CoPt growth along its c-axis oriented in the perpendicular direction, having uniform lattice fringes on the hcp (002) plane from the Ru underlayer interface, which is a significant factor to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Magnetic characterization of the CoPt nanodot arrays showed increase in the perpendicular coercivity and squareness of the hysteresis loops from 2.0 kOe and 0.64 (without agitation) to 4.0 kOe and 0.87 with bath agitation. Based on the detailed characterization of nanodot arrays, the precise crystal structure control of the nanodot arrays with ultra-high recording density by electrochemical process was successfully demonstrated. - Highlights: • Ultra-fine CoPt nanodot arrays were fabricated by electrodeposition. • Crystallinity of hcp (002) was improved with uniform composition formation. • Uniform formation of hcp lattices leads to an increase in the coercivity.

  9. Crystal Structures of GaN Nanodots by Nitrogen Plasma Treatment on Ga Metal Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Zhe Su

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium nitride (GaN is one of important functional materials for optoelectronics and electronics. GaN exists both in equilibrium wurtzite and metastable zinc-blende structural phases. The zinc-blende GaN has superior electronic and optical properties over wurtzite one. In this report, GaN nanodots can be fabricated by Ga metal droplets in ultra-high vacuum and then nitridation by nitrogen plasma. The size, shape, density, and crystal structure of GaN nanodots can be characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The growth parameters, such as pre-nitridation treatment on Si surface, substrate temperature, and plasma nitridation time, affect the crystal structure of GaN nanodots. Higher thermal energy could provide the driving force for the phase transformation of GaN nanodots from zinc-blende to wurtzite structures. Metastable zinc-blende GaN nanodots can be synthesized by the surface modification of Si (111 by nitrogen plasma, i.e., the pre-nitridation treatment is done at a lower growth temperature. This is because the pre-nitridation process can provide a nitrogen-terminal surface for the following Ga droplet formation and a nitrogen-rich condition for the formation of GaN nanodots during droplet epitaxy. The pre-nitridation of Si substrates, the formation of a thin SiNx layer, could inhibit the phase transformation of GaN nanodots from zinc-blende to wurtzite phases. The pre-nitridation treatment also affects the dot size, density, and surface roughness of samples.

  10. Carbon Nanodots: Dual‐Color‐Emitting Carbon Nanodots for Multicolor Bioimaging and Optogenetic Control of Ion Channels (Adv. Sci. 11/2017)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyemin; Park, Yoonsang; Beack, Songeun; Han, Seulgi; Jung, Dooyup; Cha, Hyung Joon; Kwon, Woosung; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanodots (CNDs) have been widely investigated for theranostic applications including fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, photothermal therapy, and photodynamic therapy. In article number 1700325, Sei Kwang Hahn, Woosung Kwon, and co‐workers develop dual‐color‐emitting CNDs uniquely designed by the electronic structure engineering for both futuristic multi‐color bioimaging and optogenetic control of ion channels.

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. Preparing magnetic yttrium iron garnet nanodot arrays by ultrathin anodic alumina template on silicon substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Hui; Han, Mangui, E-mail: han-mangui@yahoo.com; Deng, Longjiang [National Engineering Research Center of Electromagnetic Radiation Control Materials, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zheng, Liang; Zheng, Peng; Qin, Huibin [Institute of Electron Device and Application, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310008 (China); Wu, Qiong [Magnetism Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-08-10

    Ultrahigh density periodically ordered magnetic yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, YIG) nanodot arrays have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition through an ultrathin alumina mask (UTAM). UTAM having periodically ordered circularly shaped holes with 350 nm in diameter, 450 nm in inter-pore distance, and 700 nm in height has been prepared on silicon substrate. Furthermore, the microstructure and magnetic properties of YIG nanodot arrays have been characterized. Nanodot arrays with a sharp distribution in diameter centered at 340 nm with standard deviation of 10 nm have been fabricated. Moreover, typical hysteresis loops and ferromagnetic resonance spectra in in-plane and out-of-plane revealed that this unique structure greatly influences the magnetics properties of YIG. First, coercivity of YIG nanodot arrays in in-plane was increased about from 15 Oe of YIG films to 500 Oe. Then, the degree of uniformity about nanodot height decided that two or more resonance peaks in out-of-plane were detected in the spectra. The peak-to-peak linewidth values were about 94 Oe and 40 Oe in the parallel and perpendicular directions, respectively, which indicated that the values were larger by the two-magnon scattering. Consequently, this pattering method creates opportunities for studying physics in oxide nanomagnets and may be applied in spin-wave devices.

  13. Fabrication of biomolecules self-assembled on Au nanodot array for bioelectronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Kumar, Ajay Yagati; Yoo, Si-Youl; Jung, Mi; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, an nano-platform composed of Au nanodot arrays on which biomolecules could be self-assembled was developed and investigated for a stable bioelectronic device platform. Au nanodot pattern was fabricated using a nanoporous alumina template. Two different biomolecules, a cytochrome c and a single strand DNA (ssDNA), were immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays. Cytochorme c and single stranded DNA could be immobilized on the Au nanodot using the chemical linker 11-MUA and thiol-modification by covalent bonding, respectively. The atomic structure of the fabricated nano-platform device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of biomolecules immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays was confirmed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). To investigate the activity of biomolecule-immobilized Au-nano dot array, the cyclic voltammetry was carried out. This proposed nano-platform device, which is composed of biomolecules, can be used for the construction of a novel bioelectronic device.

  14. Fabrication of three-dimensional ordered nanodot array structures by a thermal dewetting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhenxing; Yoshino, Masahiko; Yamanaka, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    A new fabrication method for three-dimensional nanodot arrays with low cost and high throughput is developed in this paper. In this process, firstly a 2D nanodot array is fabricated by combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches. A nanoplastic forming technique is utilized as the top-down approach to fabricate a groove grid pattern on an Au layer deposited on a substrate, and self-organization by thermal dewetting is employed as the bottom-up approach. On the first-layer nanodot array, SiO 2 is deposited as a spacer layer. Au is then deposited on the spacer layer and thermal dewetting is conducted to fabricate a second-layer nanodot array. The effective parameters influencing dot formation on the second layer, including Au layer thickness and SiO 2 layer thickness, are studied. It is demonstrated that a 3D nanodot array of good vertical alignment is obtained by repeating the SiO 2 deposition, Au deposition and thermal dewetting. The mechanism of the dot agglomeration process is studied based on geometrical models. The effects of the spacer layer thickness and Au layer thickness on the morphology and alignment of the second-layer dots are discussed. (paper)

  15. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarboro, Sarah B. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cody, Dianna; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: SFKry@mdanderson.org [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Alvarez, Paola [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Zhang, Di [Biomedical Physics Graduate Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 and Toshiba American Medical Systems, Tustin, California 92780 (United States); McNitt-Gray, Michael [The Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80–140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ∼5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due

  16. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Cody, Dianna; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Zhang, Di; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80–140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ∼5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due

  17. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...

  18. The fabrication of metal silicide nanodot arrays using localized ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jin; Kim, Tae-Gon; Min, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Sang Jo

    2010-01-01

    We propose a process for fabricating nanodot arrays with a pitch size of less than 25 nm. The process consists of localized ion implantation in a metal thin film on a Si wafer using a focused ion beam (FIB), followed by chemical etching. This process utilizes the etching resistivity changes of the ion beam irradiated region that result from metal silicide formation by ion implantation. To control the nanodot diameter, a threshold ion dose model is proposed using the Gaussian distribution of the ion beam intensities. The process is verified by fabricating nanodots with various diameters. The mechanism of etching resistivity is investigated via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  19. Independent control of the vortex chirality and polarity in a pair of magnetic nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junqin; Wang, Yong, E-mail: wangyong@sinap.ac.cn; Cao, Jiefeng; Meng, Xiangyu; Zhu, Fangyuan; Wu, Yanqing; Tai, Renzhong

    2017-08-01

    Independent control of the vortex chirality and polarity is realized by changing the in-plane magnetic field direction in nanodot pair through Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF) simulation. The two magnetic circles are close to each other and have magnetic interaction. The two circles always have the same polarity and opposite chirality at every remanent state. There are totally four predictable magnetic states in the nanodot pair which can be obtained in the remanent state relaxed from the saturation state along all possible directions. An explanation on the formation of vortex states is given by vortex dynamics. The vortex states are stable in large out-of-plane magnetic field which is in a direction opposite to the vortex polarity. The geometry of the nanodot pair gives a way to easily realize a vortex state with specific polarity and chirality.

  20. Magnetic bubbles and domain evolution in Fe/Gd multilayer nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. T.; Liu, W.; Dai, Z. M.; Zhao, X. T.; Zhao, X. G.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2018-04-01

    The formation of magnetic bubbles and the domain-evolution processes, induced by a perpendicular magnetic field in Fe/Gd multilayer films and nanodots, have been investigated. At room temperature, the stripe domains in a continuous film transform into magnetic bubbles in an external field, while bubbles form spontaneously in nanodots due to the existence of shape anisotropy. When the temperature decreases to 20 K, the enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the samples results in an increase of the domain size in the continuous film and the magnetization-reversal behavior of each nanodot becomes independent, and most reversed dots do not depend on each other, indicating the magnetic characteristics of a single domain. The present research provides further understanding of the evolution of magnetic bubbles in the Fe/Gd system and suggests their promising applications in patterned recording materials.

  1. Micromagnetics of thermally activated switching in nonuniformly magnetized nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Moro, E.; Francisco, C. de; Alejos, O.

    2001-01-01

    Patterned magnetic elements are being proposed as media for the future ultrahigh density storage systems. The equilibrium states of different patterned magnetic dots at zero temperature have been studied in numerous micromagnetic works while in the last year some studies have begun to include the effect of temperature in the computations. In this research a stochastic dynamic micromagnetic study is carried out for rectangular magnetic dots with size 10 by 3.1 times the exchange length, patterned in a film with a thickness of 5 times the exchange length. Two kinds of nonuniform magnetized nanodots are studied in detail: those in which the state prior to the switching follows the shape of a 'C' and those following an 'S'. In both cases a field near to the zero-temperature switching field is applied and then the thermally activated switching is observed. The dependence of the switching time on temperature is analyzed. It is observed how for the 'C' configuration an Arrhenius-like behavior is obtained in a large temperature window while this is not the case for the 'S' configuration. The micromagnetic structure of the switching thermally activated modes leading to these behaviors is also studied

  2. Distribution of cations in nanosize and bulk Co-Zn ferrites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veverka, Miroslav; Jirák, Zdeněk; Kaman, Ondřej; Knížek, Karel; Maryško, Miroslav; Pollert, Emil; Závěta, K.; Lančok, Adriana; Dlouhá, M.; Vratislav, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 34 (2011), 345701/1-345701/7 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0035; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0807 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : cobalt zinc ferrites * nanoparticles distribution of cations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.979, year: 2011

  3. High performance electrical, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit , Kang; Sukill, [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-21

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  4. High performance superconducting devices enabled by three dimensionally ordered nanodots and/or nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit

    2013-09-17

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  5. High performance devices enabled by epitaxial, preferentially oriented, nanodots and/or nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN

    2011-10-11

    Novel articles and methods to fabricate same with self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods of a single or multicomponent material within another single or multicomponent material for use in electrical, electronic, magnetic, electromagnetic, superconducting and electrooptical devices is disclosed. Self-assembled nanodots and/or nanorods are ordered arrays wherein ordering occurs due to strain minimization during growth of the materials. A simple method to accomplish this when depositing in-situ films is also disclosed. Device applications of resulting materials are in areas of superconductivity, photovoltaics, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistance, high density storage, solid state lighting, non-volatile memory, photoluminescence, thermoelectrics and in quantum dot lasers.

  6. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    : On the basis of five included studies, the ED10 values of aqueous cobalt chloride ranged between 0.0663 and 1.95 µg cobalt/cm(2), corresponding to 30.8-259 ppm. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis provides an overview of the doses of cobalt that are required to elicit allergic cobalt contactdermatitis in sensitized...

  7. Sol-Gel Synthesis and Characterization of Selected Transition Metal Nano-Ferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelija GATELYTĖ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the sinterability and formation of nanosized yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12, yttrium perovskite ferrite (YFeO3, cobalt, nickel and zinc iron spinel (CoFe2O4, NiFe2O4 and ZnFe2O4, respectively powders by an aqueous sol-gel processes are investigated. The metal ions, generated by dissolving starting materials of transition metals in the diluted acetic acid were complexed by 1,2-ethanediol to obtain the precursors for the transition metal ferrite ceramics. The phase purity of synthesized nano-compounds was characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR and powder X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The microstructural evolution and morphological features of obtained transition metal ferrites were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.3.598

  8. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples...

  9. Synthesis, electrical and magnetic properties of sodium borosilicate glasses containing Co-ferrites nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, H.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32511, Menoufia (Egypt); Eltabey, M.M. [Department of Basic Engineering Science, Faculty of Engineering, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom, Menoufia (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University (Saudi Arabia); Ibrahim, Samia E.; El-Deen, L.M. Sharaf; Elkholy, M.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32511, Menoufia (Egypt)

    2017-02-01

    Co-ferrites nanoparticles that have been prepared by the co-precipitation method were added to sodium borosilicate (Na{sub 2}O–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2}) glass matrix by the solid solution method and they were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and magnetization measurements. (XRD) revealed the formation of the Co-ferrite magnetic crystalline phase embedded in an amorphous matrix in all the samples. The investigated samples by (TEM) showed the formation of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with a spherical shape and highly monodispersed with an average size about 13 nm. IR data revealed that the BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these samples network. IR spectra of the investigated samples showed the characteristic vibration bands of Co-ferrite. Composition and frequency dependent dielectric properties of the prepared samples were measured at room temperature in the frequency range 100–100 kHz. The conductivity was found to increase with increasing cobalt ferrite content. The variations of conductivity and dielectric properties with frequency and composition were discussed. Magnetic hysteresis loops were traced at room temperature using VSM and values of saturation magnetization M{sub S} and coercive field H{sub C} were determined. The obtained results revealed that a ferrimagnetic behavior were observed and as Co-ferrite concentration increases the values of M{sub S} and H{sub C} increase from 2.84 to 8.79 (emu/g) and from 88.4 to 736.3 Oe, respectively.

  10. Angular dependence of dose sensitivity of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters in different radiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jursinic, Paul A., E-mail: pjursinic@wmcc.org [West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: A type of in vivo dosimeter, an optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter, OSLD, may have dose sensitivity that depends on the angle of incidence of radiation. This work measures how angular dependence of a nanoDot changes with the geometry of the phantom in which irradiation occurs and with the intrinsic structure of the nanoDot. Methods: The OSLDs used in this work were nanoDot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL), which were read with a MicroStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose to the OSLDs was delivered by 6 MV x-rays. NanoDots with various intrinsic sensitivities were irradiated in numerous phantoms that had geometric shapes of cylinders, rectangles, and a cube. Results: No angular dependence was seen in cylindrical phantoms, cubic phantoms, or rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width ratio of 0.3 or 1.5. An angular dependence of 1% was observed in rectangular phantoms with a thickness to width of 0.433–0.633. A group of nanoDots had sensitive layers with mass density of 2.42–2.58 g/cm{sup 3} and relative sensitivity of 0.92–1.09 and no difference in their angular dependence. Within experimental uncertainty, nanoDot measurements agree with a parallel-plate ion chamber at a depth of maximum dose. Conclusions: When irradiated in cylindrical, rectangular, and cubic phantoms, nanoDots show a maximum angular dependence of 1% or less at an incidence angle of 90°. For a sample of 78 new nanoDots, the range of their relative intrinsic sensitivity is 0.92–1.09. For a sample of ten nanoDots, on average, the mass in the sensitive layer is 73.1% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and 26.9% polyester. The mass density of the sensitive layer of a nanoDot disc is between 2.42 and 2.58 g/cm{sup 3}. The angular dependence is not related to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C loading of the nanoDot disc. The nanoDot at the depth of maximum dose has no more angular dependence than a parallel-plate ion chamber.

  11. Green synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride nanodots using sodium chloride template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Bo [National University of Defense Technology, College of Science (China); Zou, Xianshuai; Yan, Tingnan; Fei, Junjie [Xiangtan University, College of Chemistry (China); Chu, Zengyong, E-mail: chuzy@nudt.edu.cn [National University of Defense Technology, College of Science (China)

    2016-05-15

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) nanodots are simply prepared by a thermal treatment of dicyandiamide (DCDA) confined within NaCl templates. Cyano groups are introduced to the nanodots due to the catalytic effect of NaCl. NaCl could facilitate the polymerization of DCDA at lower temperatures, but will promote the decomposition when the temperature is above 550 °C. Thermal treatment at 600 °C for 30 min is the optimal condition for the scalable synthesis of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodots with an average diameter of ~9 nm. g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanodots have a higher band gap of 3.1 eV, which can emit bright blue light due to the decreased diameter, the introduction of cyano groups, and the incorporation of some sodium ions. The residue sodium ions and the cyano groups might lead to the local distortion of the graphitic crystals, or act as recombination centers for the enhanced photoluminescence.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Silicon nanodot layers for photovoltaic application: size/density control and electrical properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stegemann, B.; Čermák, Jan; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kočka, Jan; Schmidt, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 228, 4-5 (2014), 543-556 ISSN 0942-9352 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon nanodots * Kelvin probe force microscopy * current-sensing AFM * photovoltaic s Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.356, year: 2014

  13. Fabrication of Gold Nanodot Array for the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR is a promising method for detecting antigen-antibody binding in label-free biosensors. In this study, the fabrication of a LSPR substrate with a gold nanodot array through the lift-off process of an alumina mask is reported. The substrate showed an extinction peak in its extinction spectrum, and the peak position was dependent on the height of the gold nanodot array, and the change of extinction peak with the height could be predicted by the numerical simulation. In addition, the peak position was observed to be red-shifted with the increasing RIU value of the medium surrounding the gold nanodot array. In particular, the peak position in the 10 nm thick gold nanodot array was approximately 710 nm in air, and the sensitivity, defined as the ratio of the shift of peak position to the RIU of the medium, was 323.6 nm/RIU. The fabrication procedure could be applied to fabricate the LSPR substrates with a large area.

  14. Hierarchical ultrathin alumina membrane for the fabrication of unique nanodot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuyang; Wang, Yi; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Xinnan; Cong, Ming; Xu, Weiqing; Xu, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin alumina membranes (UTAMs) as evaporation masks have been a powerful tool for the fabrication of high-density nanodot arrays and have received much attention in magnetic memory devices, photovoltaics, and nanoplasmonics. In this paper, we report the fabrication of a hierarchical ultrathin alumina membrane (HUTAM) with highly ordered submicro/nanoscale channels and its application as an evaporation mask for the realization of unique non-hexagonal nanodot arrays dependent on the geometrical features of the HUTAM. This is the first report of a UTAM with a hierarchical geometry, breaking the stereotype that only limited sets of nanopatterns can be realized using the UTAM method (with typical inter-pore distance of 100 nm). The fabrication of a HUTAM is discussed in detail. An improved, longer wet etching time than previously reported is found to effectively remove the barrier layer and widen the pores of a HUTAM. A growth sustainability issue brought about by pre-patterning is discussed. Spectral comparison was made to distinguish the UTAM nanodots and HUTAM nanodots. Our results can be an inspiration for more sophisticated applications of pre-patterned anodized aluminum oxide in photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and nanoplasmonics. (paper)

  15. Fabrication of ferromagnetic Co/Pt nanodots on NaCl-crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caylioglu, Mahmut; Rathjen, Andreas; Neumann, Alexander; Kobs, Andre; Froemter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Recently, we have successfully studied the growth of ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy on various substrates. Utilizing SiO{sub 2} cores of micelles as shadow mask we could create ferromagnetic nanodots in the range < 20 nm. For the purpose of producing nanodots in solution we have investigated the growth and nanodot fabrication on NaCl. In this talk we report on the preparation of cleaved NaCl surfaces that is necessary to get a layer-by-layer growth of the multilayer and a monomicel lar coverage via spin coating of the micelles. In contradiction to the results obtained with Si and SiO{sub 2}, multilayers of composition (Co{sub 0.8nm}/Pt{sub 2nm}){sub 4} have an in-plane easy plane behavior. This indicates that the interface roughness is increased resulting in a reduced interface anisotropy. In the light of our proposed study we have also produced thicker single Co films sandwiched between Pt. Nanodots made of such films are ferromagnetic and could be dissolved in water and imaged via scanning electron microscopy.

  16. On the resonant state of magnetization in array of interacting nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, P. D.; Orlov, V. A.; Rudenko, R. Yu.; Prokopenko, V. S.; Orlova, I. N.; Kobyakov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    Development of the interpretation of the phenomenon of the lift of the magnetic resonance frequencies degeneracy caused by the magnetostatic interaction in assemblies of nanodisks has been done. The difference of the resonance behavior of magnetic vortexes in a round and rectangular nanodots has been studied experimentally and explained.

  17. DLC nano-dot surfaces for tribological applications in MEMS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Na, Kyounghwan; Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2011-01-01

    With the invention of miniaturized devices like micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), tribological studies at micro/nano-scale have gained importance. These studies are directed towards understanding the interactions between surfaces at micro/nano-scales, under relative motion. In MEMS devices, the critical forces, namely adhesion and friction restrict the smooth operation of the elements that are in relative motion. These miniaturized devices are traditionally made from silicon (Si), whose tribological properties are not good. In this paper, we present a short investigation of nano- and micro-tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) nano-dot surfaces. The investigation was undertaken to evaluate the potential of these surfaces for their possible application to the miniaturized devices. The tribological evaluation of the DLC nano-dot surfaces was done in comparison with bare Si (1 0 0) surfaces and DLC coated silicon surfaces. A commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure adhesion and friction properties of the test materials at the nano-scale, whereas a custom-built micro-tribotester was used to measure their micro-friction property. Results showed that the DLC nano-dot surfaces exhibited superior tribological properties with the lowest values of adhesion force, and friction force both at the nano- and micro-scales, when compared to the bare Si (1 0 0) surfaces and DLC coated silicon surfaces. In addition, the DLC nano-dot surfaces showed no observable wear at the micro-scale, unlike the other two test materials. The superior tribological performance of the DLC nano-dot surfaces is attributed to their hydrophobic nature and the reduced area of contact projected by them.

  18. DLC nano-dot surfaces for tribological applications in MEMS devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Na, Kyounghwan [Nano-Bio Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1, Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol [Computational Science Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1, Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui-Sung, E-mail: esyoon@kist.re.kr [Nano-Bio Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1, Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-01

    With the invention of miniaturized devices like micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), tribological studies at micro/nano-scale have gained importance. These studies are directed towards understanding the interactions between surfaces at micro/nano-scales, under relative motion. In MEMS devices, the critical forces, namely adhesion and friction restrict the smooth operation of the elements that are in relative motion. These miniaturized devices are traditionally made from silicon (Si), whose tribological properties are not good. In this paper, we present a short investigation of nano- and micro-tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) nano-dot surfaces. The investigation was undertaken to evaluate the potential of these surfaces for their possible application to the miniaturized devices. The tribological evaluation of the DLC nano-dot surfaces was done in comparison with bare Si (1 0 0) surfaces and DLC coated silicon surfaces. A commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure adhesion and friction properties of the test materials at the nano-scale, whereas a custom-built micro-tribotester was used to measure their micro-friction property. Results showed that the DLC nano-dot surfaces exhibited superior tribological properties with the lowest values of adhesion force, and friction force both at the nano- and micro-scales, when compared to the bare Si (1 0 0) surfaces and DLC coated silicon surfaces. In addition, the DLC nano-dot surfaces showed no observable wear at the micro-scale, unlike the other two test materials. The superior tribological performance of the DLC nano-dot surfaces is attributed to their hydrophobic nature and the reduced area of contact projected by them.

  19. Phase equilibria in the iron oxide-cobalt oxide-phosphorus oxide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Prasanna, T. R. S.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    Two novel ternary compounds are noted in the present study of 1000 C solid-state equilibria in the Fe-Co-P-O system's Fe2O3-FePO4-Co3(Po4)2-CoO region: CoFe(PO4)O, which undergoes incongruent melting at 1130 C, and Co3Fe4(PO4)6, whose incongruent melting occurs at 1080 C. The liquidus behavior-related consequences of rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite formation from cobalt ferrite-phosphate melts are discussed with a view to spinel formation. It is suggested that quenching from within the spinel-plus-liquid region may furnish an alternative to quenching a homogeneous melt.

  20. Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Crystallization of -type hexagonal ferrites from mechanically activated mixtures of barium carbonate and goethite ... Abstract. -type hexagonal ferrite precursor was prepared by a soft mechanochemical ... Bulletin of Materials Science | News.

  1. Synthesis and magnetic properties of CoFe2O4 spinel ferrite nanoparticles doped with lanthanide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Myrtil L.; Zhang, Z. John

    2001-01-01

    Lanthanide ions have been doped into cobalt spinel ferrites using an oil-in-water micellar method to form CoLn 0.12 Fe 1.88 O 4 nanoparticles with Ln=Ce, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, or Er. Doping with lanthanide ions (Ln III ) modulates the magnetic properties of cobalt spinel ferrite nanoparticles. In particular cases of Gd 3+ or Dy 3+ ions, a dramatic increase in the blocking temperature and coercivity is observed. Indeed, the introduction of only 4% of Gd 3+ ions increases the blocking temperature ∼100 K and the coercivity 60%. Initial studies on the magnetic properties of these doped nanoparticles clearly demonstrate that the relationship between the modulation of magnetic properties and the nature of doped Ln III ions is interesting but very complex. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured nickel ferrite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Nickel ferrite is one of the important ferrites used in microwave devices. In the present work, we have synthesized nanoparticles of nickel ferrite using chemical precipitation technique. The crystal structure and grain size of the particles are studied using XRD. The microwave dielectric properties of nanostructured.

  3. SiO{sub 2} nanodot arrays using functionalized block copolymer templates and selective silylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Min; Ku, Se Jin; Kim, Jin-Baek, E-mail: kjb@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 373-1, Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-11

    Silicon oxide nanodot arrays were fabricated using functionalized block copolymer templates and selective silylation. A polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid/acrylic anhydride) (PS-b-PAA/AN) thin film containing spherical nanodomains was used as a template to build nanoscopic silica structures. A PS-b-PAA/AN thin film was prepared by acid-catalyzed thermal deprotection of polystyrene-b-poly(tert-butyl acrylate) on an SU-8 resist film containing a photoacid generator. This resulting film has excellent solvent and thermal resistance due to crosslinked anhydride linkages in carboxyl-functionalized PAA/AN block domains. Silicon was introduced by spin-spraying of hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) over the entire surface of a self-assembled PS-b-PAA/AN thin film. HMDS was selectively reacted with carboxylic acid groups in spherical domains of a PAA/AN block. SiO{sub 2} nanodot arrays were generated by oxygen reactive ion etching.

  4. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Department of Chemistry Bayero University, P. M. B. 3011, Kano, Nigeria. E-mail: hnuhu2000@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and .... water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in acetone. The molar conductance measurement [Table 3] of the complex compounds in.

  5. Naked eye and smartphone applicable detection of toxic mercury ions using fluorescent carbon nanodots

    OpenAIRE

    BAÇ, BURCU; GENÇ, RÜKAN

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan passivated carbon nanodots (C-Dots$_{CHIT})$ were synthesized from expired molasses via a simple and green thermal synthesis procedure. As-synthesized C-Dots were nitrogen-doped (NC-Dots$_{CHIT})$ by posttreatment with liquid ammonia and used as nanoprobes for fluorometric detection of mercury ions (Hg(II)$_{aq.})$. Fluorescence response of NC-Dots$_{CHIT}$ in the presence of mercury was evaluated and compared with that of the polyethylene glycol passivated C-Dots$_{PEG}$. This sensi...

  6. Magnetic Field Effects on Pure-state and Thermal Entanglement of Anisotropic Magnetic Nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, Andrei Y.

    2005-05-01

    Anisotropic magnetic nanodots have recently been proposed as promising candidates for qubits for scalable quantum computing [1,2]. The main advantages of such magnetic qubits are their well-separated energy levels (which may allow operation at temperature of the order of a few K), nanometer size (which simplifies fabrication), and large spin values (which facilitates measurement of qubit states). The entanglement properties of eigenstates of a pair of Heisenberg-interacting nanodots have been analyzed in [2], where we have shown that ferromagnetic (FM) coupling produces two significantly entangled excited states. Here we investigate the magnetic field effects on the entanglement of these and other states. We show that entanglement of excited FM eigenstates of two non-identical nanodots can be tuned to its maximum value by applying a relatively weak non-uniform magnetic field. [1] J. Tejada, E.M. Chudnovsky, E. del Barco, J.M. Hernandez, and T.P. Spiller, Nanotechnology 12, 181 (2001). [2] R. Skomski, A.Y. Istomin, A.F. Starace, and D.J. Sellmyer, Phys. Rev. A 70, 062307 (2004).

  7. Effects of annealing temperature in a metal alloy nano-dot memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Gae Hun; Song, Yun Heub; Bea, Ji Cheol; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2011-01-01

    The annealing temperature dependence of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristic has been studied in a metal-oxide semiconductor structure containing FePt nano-dots. Several in-situ annealing temperatures from 400 to ∼700 .deg. C in a high vacuum ambience (under 1 x 10 -5 Pa) were evaluated in view of the cell's characteristics and its reliability. Here, we demonstrate that the annealing temperature is significant for memory performance in an alloy metal nano-dot structure. A higher in-situ temperature provides better retention and a more reliable memory window. In the sample with an in-situ annealing condition of 700 .deg. C for 30 min, a memory window of 9.2 V at the initial stage was obtained, and a memory window of 6.2 V after 10 years was estimated, which is reliable for a non-volatile memory. From these results, the annealing condition for an alloy metal nano-dot memory is one of the critical parameters for the memory characteristics, and should be optimized for better memory performance.

  8. Initial Study on Thin Film Preparation of Carbon Nanodots Composites as Luminescence Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskandar, F.; Aimon, A. H.; Akmaluddin, A. R.; Nuryadin, B. W.; Abdullah, M.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, the developments of phosphors materials require elements without noble metals and simple production process. Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are one of phosphor materials with wide range of emission band, and high biocompatibility. In this research thin film carbon nanodots composite have been prepared by spin coating method. Prior deposition, powder carbon nanodots were synthesized from a mixture of commercial urea as the nitrogen sources and citric acid as a carbon source by using hydrothermal and microwave-assisted heating method. The prepared powder was dispersed in transparent epoxy resin and then coated on glass substrate. The photoluminescence result for sample with 0.035 g citric acid exhibited an intense, single, homogeneous and broad spectrum with yellowish emission upon excitation at 365 nm. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) result showed the existences of C=C, C-H, C=O, N-H and O-H functional groups which confirmed the quality of the sample. Further, based on UV-Vis measurement, the prepared thin film was highly transparent (transmittance 90%) with estimated film thickness around 764 nm. This result may open an opportunity for optoelectronic devices.

  9. Initial Study on Thin Film Preparation of Carbon Nanodots Composites as Luminescence Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskandar, F; Aimon, A H; Akmaluddin, A R; Abdullah, M; Nuryadin, B W

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the developments of phosphors materials require elements without noble metals and simple production process. Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are one of phosphor materials with wide range of emission band, and high biocompatibility. In this research thin film carbon nanodots composite have been prepared by spin coating method. Prior deposition, powder carbon nanodots were synthesized from a mixture of commercial urea as the nitrogen sources and citric acid as a carbon source by using hydrothermal and microwave-assisted heating method. The prepared powder was dispersed in transparent epoxy resin and then coated on glass substrate. The photoluminescence result for sample with 0.035 g citric acid exhibited an intense, single, homogeneous and broad spectrum with yellowish emission upon excitation at 365 nm. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) result showed the existences of C=C, C-H, C=O, N-H and O-H functional groups which confirmed the quality of the sample. Further, based on UV-Vis measurement, the prepared thin film was highly transparent (transmittance 90%) with estimated film thickness around 764 nm. This result may open an opportunity for optoelectronic devices. (paper)

  10. High-performance cobalt carbonate hydroxide nano-dot/NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 electrode for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Damin; Xia, Qi Xun; Yun, Je Moon; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2018-03-01

    Binder-free mesoporous NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 nanowire arrays were grown using a facile hydrothermal technique. The Co2(CO3)(OH)2 in NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 nanowire arrays was well-decorated as nano-dot scale (a few nanometer). In addition, increasing cobalt content in nickel compound matrix, NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 nanowire arrays were separately uniformly grown without agglomeration on Ni foam, providing a high specific surface area to help electrolyte access and ion transfer. The enticing composition and morphology of the NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 nanowire exhibit a superior specific capacity of 1288.2 mAh g-1 at a current density of 3 A g-1 and excellent cycling stability with the capacity retention of 80.7% after 10,000 cycles. Furthermore, an asymmetric supercapacitor composed of the NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 composite as a positive electrode and the graphene as a negative electrode presented a high energy density of 35.5 W h kg-1 at a power density of 2555.6 W kg-1 and satisfactory cycling stability with 71.3% capacity retention after 10,000 cycles. The great combination of the active nano-dot Co2(CO3)(OH)2 and the individually grown NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 nanowires made it a promising electrode material for asymmetric supercapacitors. A well-developed nanoarchitecture of the nano-dot Co2(CO3)(OH)2 decorated NiCo(CO3)(OH)2 composite could pave the way for an excellent electrode design for high-performance supercapacitors.

  11. Heteroepitaxy of zinc-blende SiC nano-dots on Si substrate by organometallic ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Kiuchi, M.; Sugimoto, S.; Goto, S.

    2006-01-01

    The self-assembled SiC nano-dots were fabricated on Si(111) substrate at low-temperatures using the organometallic ion beam deposition technique. The single precursor of methylsilicenium ions (SiCH 3 + ) with the energy of 100 eV was deposited on Si(111) substrate at 500, 550 and 600 deg. C. The characteristics of the self-assembled SiC nano-dots were analyzed by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). The RHEED patterns showed that the crystal structure of the SiC nano-dots formed on Si(111) substrate was zinc-blende SiC (3C-SiC) and it was heteroepitaxy. The self-assembled SiC nano-dots were like a dome in shape, and their sizes were the length of 200-300 nm and the height of 10-15 nm. Despite the low-temperature of 500 deg. C as SiC crystallization the heteroepitaxial SiC nano-dots were fabricated on Si(111) substrate using the organometallic ion beam

  12. Ytterbium oxide nanodots via block copolymer self-assembly and their efficacy to dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang-Won; Ahn, Sungwoo; Lim, Sung-Hwan; Jin, Ming Hao; Song, Jeemin; Yun, Seung-Young [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, 84 Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Mo; Kim, Gi Jeong [Sooyang Chemtec Co., Ltd., Digital-ro 32-gil, Guro-gu, Seoul 152-777 (Korea, Republic of); Ok, Kang Min [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, 84 Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jongin, E-mail: hongj@cau.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Chung-Ang University, 84 Heukseok-ro, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A novel phosphor, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, was developed as a UV-absorbing spectral converter for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). • The ordered Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanodots trap more light and prevent charge recombination at the interfaces. • Their multifunctionality improves DSSC performance for both Ru-based and organic dyes. - Abstract: In this study, we develop a novel phosphor, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, to be used as the spectral converter in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) for the efficient capture of ultraviolet light via down-conversion. These zero-dimensional nanodots with a high refractive index also allow more light to be trapped and can prevent charge recombination at the interfaces in the DSSCs. Compared to DSSCs without the nanodots, the DSSCs fabricated with the Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanodots exhibits higher power-conversion efficiencies for both the N719 (10.5%) and CSD-01 (20.5%) dyes. The multifunctionality of the Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanodots provides a new route for improving the performance of DSSCs.

  13. Influences of Mg Doping on the Electrochemical Performance of TiO2 Nanodots Based Biosensor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. H. Al-Furjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical biosensors are essential for health monitors to help in diagnosis and detection of diseases. Enzyme adsorptions on biosensor electrodes and direct electron transfer between them have been recognized as key factors to affect biosensor performance. TiO2 has a good protein adsorption ability and facilitates having more enzyme adsorption and better electron transfer. In this work, Mg ions are introduced into TiO2 nanodots in order to further improve electrode performance because Mg ions are considered to have good affinity with proteins or enzymes. Mg doped TiO2 nanodots on Ti substrates were prepared by spin-coating and calcining. The effects of Mg doping on the nanodots morphology and performance of the electrodes were investigated. The density and size of TiO2 nanodots were obviously changed with Mg doping. The sensitivity of 2% Mg doped TiO2 nanodots based biosensor electrode increased to 1377.64 from 897.8 µA mM−1 cm−2 and its KMapp decreases to 0.83 from 1.27 mM, implying that the enzyme achieves higher catalytic efficiency due to better affinity of the enzyme with the Mg doped TiO2. The present work could provide an alternative to improve biosensor performances.

  14. Fabrication of gold nanodot arrays on a transparent substrate as a nanobioplatform for label-free visualization of living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi; El-Said, Waleed Ahmed; Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-10

    Two-dimensional gold (Au) nanodot arrays on a transparent substrate were fabricated for imaging of living cells. A nanoporous alumina mask with large-area coverage capability was prepared by a two-step chemical wet etching process after a second anodization. Highly ordered Au nanodot arrays were formed on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass using very thin nanoporous alumina of approximately 200 nm thickness as an evaporation mask. The large-area Au nanodot arrays on ITO glass were modified with RGD peptide (arginine; glycine; aspartic acid) containing a cysteine (Cys) residue and then used to immobilize human cancer HeLa cells, the morphology of which was observed by confocal microscopy. The confocal micrographs of living HeLa cells on Au nanodot arrays revealed enhanced contrast and resolution, which enabled discernment of cytoplasmic organelles more clearly. These results suggest that two-dimensional Au nanodot arrays modified with RGD peptide on ITO glass have potential as a biocompatible nanobioplatform for the label-free visualization and adhesion of living cells.

  15. Irradiation creep in ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeulen, W.; Bremaecker, A. de; Burbure, S. de; Huet, J.J.; Asbroeck, P. van

    Pressurized and non-pressurized capsules of several ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie between 400 and 500 0 C up to 3.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). Results of the diameter measurements are presented and show that the total in-pile deformation is lower than for austenitic steels

  16. Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

  17. Analysis of radioactive cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This is a manual published by Science and Technology Agency, Japan, which prescribes on the analysis method for radioactive cobalt which is a typical indexing nuclide among the radioactive nuclides released from nuclear facilities. Since the released cobalt is mainly discharged to coastal region together with waste water, this manual is written for samples of sea water, sea bottom sediments and marine organisms. Radioactive cobalt includes the nuclides of 57 co, 58 Co, 60 Co, etc., the manual deals with them as a whole as 60 Co of long half life. Though 60 Co analysis has become feasible comparatively simply due to scintillation or semi-conductor spectrometry, trace 60 Co analysis is performed quantitatively by co-precipitation or collection into alumina and scintillation spectrometry. However, specific collecting operation and γ-γ coincidence measurement have been required so far. This manual employs 60 Co collection by means of ion-exchange method and measurement with low background GM counting system, to analyze quantitatively and rapidly low level 60 Co. It is primarily established as the standard analyzing method for the survey by local autonomous bodies. It is divided into 4 chapters including introduction sea water, marine organisms, and sea bottom sediments. List of required reagents is added in appendix. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Near-infrared electroluminescence emission from an n-InN nanodots/p-Si heterojunction structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guoguang; Du Guotong; Gao Fubin; Shen Chunsheng; Li Wancheng; Wang Hui

    2012-01-01

    An n-InN nanodots/p-Si(1 1 1) heterojunction diode was fabricated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The device shows clear rectifying behaviour with a turn-on voltage of approximately 1.2 V at room temperature. The near-infrared electroluminescence (EL) can be observed under forward bias, which covers a wide wavelength range. In comparison with the photoluminescence spectra, the maximum of the EL spectra has a blueshift which is probably due to the size quantization effect of small-sized InN nanodots and their stronger contribution to the EL intensity. On the other hand, there is an obvious enhancement of the less dominant transitions on the short wavelength side of the EL spectra, which may arise from the recombination of the injected holes with the extremely high-density surface electrons of InN nanodots. (paper)

  19. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidi Gian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice

  20. Structural, morphological and magnetic properties of Eu-doped CoFe2O4 nano-ferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Zubair

    Full Text Available Europium (Eu doped spinel cobalt ferrites having composition CoEuxFe2−xO4 where x = 0.00, 0.03, 0.06, 0.09, 0.12 were fabricated by co-precipitation route. In order to observe the phase development of the ferrite samples, thermo-gravimetric analysis was carried out. The synthesized samples were subjected to X-ray diffraction analysis for structural investigation. All the samples were found to constitute face centered cubic (FCC spinel structure belonging to Fd3m space group. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of nanocrystalline grains with spherical shape. Energy dispersive X-ray spectra confirmed the presence of Co, Eu, Fe and O elements with no existence of any impurity. The magnetic hysteresis curves measured at room temperature exhibited ferrimagnetic behavior with maximum saturation magnetization (Ms of 65 emu/g and coercivity (Hc of 966 Oe. The origin of ferrimagnetism in Eu doped cobalt ferrites was discussed in detail with reverence to the allocation of Co2+ and Fe3+ ions within the spinel lattice. The overall coercivity was increased (944–966 Oe and magnetization was decreased (65–46 emu/g with the substitution of Eu3+. The enhancement of former is ascribed to the transition from multi domain to single domain state and reduction in lateral is attributed to the incorporation of nonmagnetic Eu ions for Fe, resulting in weak superexchange interactions. Keywords: Europium doped cobalt ferrites, Co-precipitation, X-ray diffraction, Scanning electron microscopy, Magnetic properties

  1. Ferrite measurements for SNS accelerating cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendall, R.G.; Church, R.A.

    1979-03-01

    The RF system for the SNS has six double accelerating cavities each containing seventy ferrite toroids. Difficulties experienced in obtaining toroids to the required specifications are discussed and the two toroid test cavity built to test those supplied is described. Ferrite measurements are reported which were undertaken to measure; (a) μQf as a function of frequency and RF field level and (b) bias current as a function of frequency for different ranges of ferrite permeability μ. (U.K.)

  2. The mechanism of vortex switching in magnetic nanodots under circular magnetic field. I. The resonance action of the field on the nanodot eigenmodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, A S

    2002-01-01

    The resonance activation of eigenmodes for a finite 2D easy-plane ferromagnet is considered to treat theoretically by the vortex switching in magnetic nanodots due to the action of external circular magnetic field. It is shown analytically that if the anisotropy is weak, i.e. the vortex has a nonzero polarity (total magnization along the z-axis), the process of the field action has a complicated nature. The circular field acts in a resonance way upon azimuthal system eigenmodes, in which magnetization depends on the azimuthal coordinate (as a direct resonance at the eigenfrequencies of these modes). The interaction of the azimuthal and symmetric modes (in which the magnetization does not depend on the azimuthal coordinate) via the applied field gives rise to complex parametric resonance at multifrequencies. The results obtained are compared with the data of previous numerical calculations.

  3. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-20

    guide growth of the epitaxial YIG films. Aluminum or gallium substitu- tions for iron were used in combination with lanthanum substitutions for yttrium... gallate spinel sub- strates. There was no difficulty with nucleation in the melt and film quality appeared to be similar to that observed previously...hexagonal ferrites. We succeeded in growing the M-type lead hexaferrite (magnetoplumbite) on gallate spinel substrates. We found that the PbO-based

  4. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  5. Silicon nanodot formation and self-ordering under bombardment with heavy Bi3 ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, Roman; Heinig, Karl-Heinz; Bischoff, Lothar; Liedke, Bartosz; Huebner, Rene; Pilz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Si nanodots of high density and hexagonal short-range order are observed upon normal-incidence bombardment of hot, crystalline Si with Bi 3 + ions having a kinetic energy of a few tens of keV. The heights of nanodots are comparable to their widths of ∝20 nm. The implanted Bi accumulates in tiny Bi nanocrystals in a thin Si top layer which is amorphous due to implantation damage. Light and heavy ions up to Xe cause smoothing of surfaces, but Bi 3 + ions considered here have a much higher mass. Atomistic simulations prove that each Bi 3 + impact deposits an extremely high energy density resulting in a several nanometer large melt pool, which resolidifies within a few hundreds of picoseconds. Experiments confirm that dot patterns form only if the deposited energy density exceeds the threshold for melting. Comparing monatomic and polyatomic Bi ion irradiation, Bi-Si phase separation and preferential ion erosion are ruled out as driving forces of pattern formation. A model based on capillary forces in the melt pool explains the pattern formation consistently. High-density Si nanodots are formed by polyatomic Bi ion irradiation of hot Si surfaces. Each impact causes local transient melt pools smaller than the dots. Hexagonally ordered patterns evolve by self-organization driven by repeated ion-induced melting of tiny volumes. Homogeneously distributed Bi nanocrystals are found in the a-Si film. These nanocrystals are related to particularities of the Si-Bi phase diagram. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Ferrite-guided cyclotron-resonance maser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerby, Eli; Kesar, A.; Aharony, A.; Breitmeier, G.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of a cyclotron-resonance maser (CRM) with a ferrite loading incorporated in its waveguide is proposed. The CRM interaction occurs between the rotating electron beam and the em wave propagating along a longitudinally magnetized ferrite medium. The ferrite anisotropic permeability resembles the CRM susceptibility in many aspects, and particularly in their similar response to the axial magnetic field (the ferrite susceptibility can be regarded as a passive analog of the active CRM interaction). The ferrite loading slows down the phase velocity of the em wave and thus the axial (Weibel) mechanism of the CRM interaction dominates. The ferrite loading enables also a mechanism of spectral tunability for CRM's. The ferrite loading is proposed, therefore, as a useful ingredient for high-power CRM devices. A linear model of the combined ferrite-guided CRM interaction reveals its useful features. Future schemes may also incorporate ferrite sections functioning as isolators, gyrators, or phase shifters within the CRM device itself for selective suppression of backward waves and spurious oscillations, and for gain and efficiency enhancement

  7. Cobalt source calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10 5 rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10 5 rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10 5 rad/h to 1.073 x 10 5 rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10 6 to 9.27 x 10 5 . This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10 7 rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe 2+ ions ionize to Fe 3+ . When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate

  8. Unithiol - a cobalt antidote

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherkes, A.I.; Braver-Chernobul'skaya, B.S.

    1977-06-01

    The blockade of the sulfhydryl groups of the proteins leads to a disturbance of the normal activity of many enzymes and thus of the functioning of the organs and tissue. The search for antidotes against these substances which inactivate the enzymes led to the synthesis of a large group of thiols in the Ukrainian Scientific Research Sanitary Chemical Institute. The most active is sodium dithiol-2,3-dimercaptonpropansulphonate CH 2 SH-CHSH-CH 2 SO 3 Na x H 2 O, named unithiol. Its antidote activity is discussed in detail, especially concerning cobalt intoxication. (HK) [de

  9. Effect of pH value on electromagnetic loss properties of Co–Zn ferrite prepared via coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaogu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Sang, Tianyi; Song, Bo; Zhu, Hongli; Rao, Weifeng; Wong, Chingping

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the cobalt zinc ferrite was prepared by coprecipitation method at different pH conditions. The influence of pH values on the coprecipitation reaction was theoretically analyzed at first. The calculated results showed that the pH values should be controlled in the range of 9–11 to form the stable precipitation. The XRD investigation was used to further confirm the formation of the composite on specific pH values. In addition, the morphological study revealed that the average particle size of the composite decreased from 40 nm to 30 nm when the pH value increased from 9–11. The variation of microstructure plays a critical role in controlling the electromagnetic properties. From the electromagnetic analysis, the dielectric loss factor was 0.02–0.07 and magnetic loss factor was 0.2–0.5 for the composite synthesized at pH of 9, which presents dramatically improved dielectric loss and magnetic loss properties than the samples prepared at pH of 10 and 11. The as-prepared cobalt zinc ferrite are highly promising to be used as microwave absorption materials. - Highlights: • Co–Zn ferrite was prepared by coprecipitation method with different pH values. • To obtain pure Co–Zn ferrite, the theoretical pH values were 9–11. • Microstructure and electromagnetic properties can be tuned by varying pH values. • Co–Zn ferrite prepared with pH=9 performed well electromagnetic loss properties.

  10. Trap-assisted tunneling in aluminum-doped ZnO/indium oxynitride nanodot interlayer Ohmic contacts on p-GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: wcke@mail.ntust.edu.tw; Yang, Cheng-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lee, Fang-Wei; Chen, Wei-Kuo [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsin-Chu 300, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hao-Ping [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 320, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-21

    This study developed an Ohmic contact formation method for a ZnO:Al (AZO) transparent conductive layer on p-GaN films involving the introduction of an indium oxynitride (InON) nanodot interlayer. An antisurfactant pretreatment was used to grow InON nanodots on p-GaN films in a RF magnetron sputtering system. A low specific contact resistance of 1.12 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm{sup 2} was achieved for a sample annealed at 500 °C for 30 s in nitrogen ambient and embedded with an InON nanodot interlayer with a nanodot density of 6.5 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2}. By contrast, a sample annealed in oxygen ambient exhibited non-Ohmic behavior. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy results showed that the oxygen vacancy (V{sub o}) in the InON nanodots played a crucial role in carrier transport. The fitting I–V characteristic curves indicated that the hopping mechanism with an activation energy of 31.6 meV and trap site spacing of 1.1 nm dominated the carrier transport in the AZO/InON nanodot/p-GaN sample. Because of the high density of donor-like oxygen vacancy defects at the InON nanodot/p-GaN interface, positive charges from the underlying p-GaN films were absorbed at the interface. This led to positive charge accumulation, creating a narrow depletion layer; therefore, carriers from the AZO layer passed through InON nanodots by hopping transport, and subsequently tunneling through the interface to enter the p-GaN films. Thus, AZO Ohmic contact can be formed on p-GaN films by embedding an InON nanodot interlayer to facilitate trap-assisted tunneling.

  11. Some of Physical Properties of Nanostructured (Mg1-xCoxFe2O4 Ferrites Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abdul Ammer Alsherefi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel auto combustion technique was used to prepare nanoparticles of magnesium-cobalt ferrites with the chemical formula Mg1-xCoxFe2O4 for  (x=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1, where x added as weight  percentages, and sintering  at temperature (1100 oC. The X-ray patterns of prepared powder has confirmed the structure of cubic spinel structure (fcc. The prepared samples were composed of nearly spherical nano particles .An average particle size of  magnesium-cobalt ferrite  were  calculated  using  Debye Scherer’s relation is equal 53.12 nm. The surface structure of the samples was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscope(SEM. The electromagnetic properties for prepared samples were investigated using Vector Network Analyzer (VNA in X-band microwave region.

  12. PLD synthesis of GaN nanowires and nanodots on patterned catalyst surface for field emission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, D.K.T.; Hong, M.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Data Storage Institute, Singapore (Singapore); Tan, L.S. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Zhu, Y.W.; Sow, C.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore). Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative; National University of Singapore (Singapore). Department of Physics

    2008-11-15

    Patterned gallium nitride nanowires and nanodots have been grown on n-Si(100) substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The nanostructures are patterned using a physical mask, resulting in regions of nanowire growth of different densities. The field emission (FE) characteristics of the patterned gallium nitride nanowires show a turn-on field of 9.06 V/{mu}m to achieve a current density of 0.01 mA/cm{sup 2} and an enhanced field emission current density as high as 0.156 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 11 V/{mu}m. Comparing the peak FE current densities of both the nanowires and nanodots, the peak FE current density of nanowires is around 700 times higher than that of the peak FE current density of nanodots since nanodots have a lower aspect ratio compared to nanowires. The field emission results indicate that, besides density difference, crystalline quality as well as the low electron affinity of gallium nitride, high aspect ratio of gallium nitride nanostructures will greatly enhance their field emission properties. (orig.)

  13. Silver nanoparticles on GaSb nanodots: a LSPR-boosted binary platform for broadband light harvesting and SERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Mukul, E-mail: mkbh10@gmail.com; Ranjan, Mukesh; Mukherjee, Subroto [FCIPT, Institute for Plasma Research (India)

    2015-02-15

    We report the LSPR-augmented optical response of silver nanoparticle-topped GaSb nanodots produced by low-energy ion beam irradiation. Nanostructure ordering and interdot gap play crucial roles for inducing the LSPR effect, enhancing the absorbing capacity of the structure as validated by reflection measurements. The measured size of silver-capped GaSb nanodot varies from 28 to 48 nm. Enhanced plasmon coupling for the 600 eV configuration initiates the presence of giant electromagnetic fields as confirmed by LSPR and SERS measurements. Anisotropic Bruggeman effective medium approximation was performed to match the experimentally observed optical response of the nanostructure. Calculated screening factor values of 0.29 and 0.23 for 600 and 800 eV ion energy produced nanodot configurations were obtained, respectively, which are in tune with the measured reflected and SERS signal. The calculated dielectric constants confirm the directional anisotropy along the length of the silver-capped GaSb nanodots. The proposed model successfully matches the void fraction and nanostructure height in accordance with SEM and reported TEM measurements. Thus, the model developed can be used to optimize the maximum plasmonic coupling efficiency among the dots. We propose two key applications for this nanostructure, first as an absorptive substrate for deep space photovoltaics and second to act as an effective SERS substrate.

  14. Facile fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) nanodot arrays for organic ferroelectric memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Huajing [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) Hunghom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yan, Qingfeng, E-mail: yanqf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: jiyan.dai@polyu.edu.hk; Geng, Chong; Li, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chan, Ngai Yui; Au, Kit; Ng, Sheung Mei; Leung, Chi Wah; Wa Chan, Helen Lai; Dai, Jiyan, E-mail: yanqf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: jiyan.dai@polyu.edu.hk [Department of Applied Physics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) Hunghom, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Yao, Jianjun [Asylum Research, Oxford Instruments, Shanghai 200233 (China); Guo, Dong [Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-07

    Nano-patterned ferroelectric materials have attracted significant attention as the presence of two or more thermodynamically equivalent switchable polarization states can be employed in many applications such as non-volatile memory. In this work, a simple and effective approach for fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene) P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays is demonstrated. By using a soft polydimethylsiloxane mold, we successfully transferred the 2D array pattern from the initial monolayer of colloidal polystyrene nanospheres to the imprinted P(VDF-TrFE) films via nanoimprinting. The existence of a preferred orientation of the copolymer chain after nanoimprinting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Local polarization switching behavior was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy, and each nanodot showed well-formed hysteresis curve and butterfly loop with a coercive field of ∼62.5 MV/m. To illustrate the potential application of these ordered P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays, the writing and reading process as non-volatile memory was demonstrated at a relatively low voltage. As such, our results offer a facile and promising route to produce arrays of ferroelectric polymer nanodots with improved piezoelectric functionality.

  15. A Nanodot Array Modulates Cell Adhesion and Induces an Apoptosis-Like Abnormality in NIH-3T3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Yao-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Micro-structures that mimic the extracellular substratum promote cell growth and differentiation, while the cellular reaction to a nanostructure is poorly defined. To evaluate the cellular response to a nanoscaled surface, NIH 3T3 cells were grown on nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. The nanodot arrays were fabricated by AAO processing on TaN-coated wafers. A thin layer of platinum, 5 nm in thickness, was sputtered onto the structure to improve biocompatibility. The cells grew normally on the 10-nm array and on flat surfaces. However, 50-nm, 100-nm, and 200-nm nanodot arrays induced apoptosis-like events. Abnormality was triggered after as few as 24 h of incubation on a 200-nm dot array. For cells grown on the 50-nm array, the abnormality started after 72 h of incubation. The number of filopodia extended from the cell bodies was lower for the abnormal cells. Immunostaining using antibodies against vinculin and actin filament was performed. Both the number of focal adhesions and the amount of cytoskeleton were decreased in cells grown on the 100-nm and 200-nm arrays. Pre-coatings of fibronectin (FN or type I collagen promoted cellular anchorage and prevented the nanotopography-induced programed cell death. In summary, nanotopography, in the form of nanodot arrays, induced an apoptosis-like abnormality for cultured NIH 3T3 cells. The occurrence of the abnormality was mediated by the formation of focal adhesions.

  16. Facile fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) nanodot arrays for organic ferroelectric memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Huajing; Yan, Qingfeng; Geng, Chong; Li, Qiang; Chan, Ngai Yui; Au, Kit; Ng, Sheung Mei; Leung, Chi Wah; Wa Chan, Helen Lai; Dai, Jiyan; Yao, Jianjun; Guo, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Nano-patterned ferroelectric materials have attracted significant attention as the presence of two or more thermodynamically equivalent switchable polarization states can be employed in many applications such as non-volatile memory. In this work, a simple and effective approach for fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene) P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays is demonstrated. By using a soft polydimethylsiloxane mold, we successfully transferred the 2D array pattern from the initial monolayer of colloidal polystyrene nanospheres to the imprinted P(VDF-TrFE) films via nanoimprinting. The existence of a preferred orientation of the copolymer chain after nanoimprinting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Local polarization switching behavior was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy, and each nanodot showed well-formed hysteresis curve and butterfly loop with a coercive field of ∼62.5 MV/m. To illustrate the potential application of these ordered P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays, the writing and reading process as non-volatile memory was demonstrated at a relatively low voltage. As such, our results offer a facile and promising route to produce arrays of ferroelectric polymer nanodots with improved piezoelectric functionality

  17. Electrochemically decorated ZnTe nanodots on single-walled carbon nanotubes for room-temperature NO2 sensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donguk; Park, Ki-Moon; Shanmugam, Rajakumar; Yoo, Bongyoung

    2014-11-01

    A gas sensor with ZnTe nanodot-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is demonstrated for NO2 detection at room temperature. ZnTe nanodots are electrochemically deposited in an aqueous solution containing ZnSO4, TeO2 and citrate. A deposition potential range of ZnTe formation of -0.65 to -0.9 V is determined by cyclic voltammetry, and an intermetallic ZnTe compound is formed at above 50 degrees C bath. SWCNT-based sensors show the highly sensitive response down to 1 ppm NO2 gas at room temperature. In particular, the sensitivity of ZnTe nanodot-modified SWCNTs is increased by 6 times as compared to that of pristine SWCNT sensors. A selectivity test of SWCNT-ZnTe nanodots sensors is carried out with ammonia gas (NH3) and methanol vapor (MeOH), and the result confirms an excellent selectivity to NO2 gas.

  18. Endotaxially stabilized B2-FeSi nanodots in Si (100) via ion beam co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Cathal, E-mail: c.cassidy@oist.jp; Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Onna-Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Kioseoglou, Joseph [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lal, Chhagan [Department of Physics, University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, Rajasthan 302005 (India); Sowwan, Mukhles, E-mail: mukhles@oist.jp [Nanoparticles by Design Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University, 1919-1 Onna-Son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Nanotechnology Research Laboratory, Al-Quds University, East Jerusalem, P.O. Box 51000, Palestine (Country Unknown)

    2014-04-21

    We report on the formation of embedded B2-FeSi nanodots in [100]-oriented Si substrates, and investigate the crystallographic mechanism underlying the stabilization of this uncommon, bulk-unstable, phase. The nanodots were approximately 10 nm in size, and were formed by iron thin film deposition and subsequent annealing. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, energy loss spectroscopy mapping, and quantitative image simulation and analysis were utilized to identify the phase, strain, and orientational relationship of the nanodots to the host silicon lattice. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to analyze the surface composition and local bonding. Elasticity calculations yielded a nanodot residual strain value of −18%. Geometrical phase analysis graphically pinpointed the positions of misfit dislocations, and clearly showed the presence of pinned (11{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}){sub Si}//(100){sub FeSi}, and unpinned (2{sup ¯}42){sub Si}//(010){sub FeSi}, interfaces. This partial endotaxy in the host silicon lattice was the mechanism that stabilized the B2-FeSi phase.

  19. Facile fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) nanodot arrays for organic ferroelectric memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huajing; Yan, Qingfeng; Geng, Chong; Chan, Ngai Yui; Au, Kit; Yao, Jianjun; Ng, Sheung Mei; Leung, Chi Wah; Li, Qiang; Guo, Dong; Wa Chan, Helen Lai; Dai, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Nano-patterned ferroelectric materials have attracted significant attention as the presence of two or more thermodynamically equivalent switchable polarization states can be employed in many applications such as non-volatile memory. In this work, a simple and effective approach for fabrication of highly ordered poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays is demonstrated. By using a soft polydimethylsiloxane mold, we successfully transferred the 2D array pattern from the initial monolayer of colloidal polystyrene nanospheres to the imprinted P(VDF-TrFE) films via nanoimprinting. The existence of a preferred orientation of the copolymer chain after nanoimprinting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectra. Local polarization switching behavior was measured by piezoresponse force microscopy, and each nanodot showed well-formed hysteresis curve and butterfly loop with a coercive field of ˜62.5 MV/m. To illustrate the potential application of these ordered P(VDF-TrFE) nanodot arrays, the writing and reading process as non-volatile memory was demonstrated at a relatively low voltage. As such, our results offer a facile and promising route to produce arrays of ferroelectric polymer nanodots with improved piezoelectric functionality.

  20. Effects of RGD immobilization on light-induced cell sheet detachment from TiO{sub 2} nanodots films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kui; Wang, Tiantian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, Mengliu [The Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China); Wan, Hongping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lin, Jun [The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China); Weng, Wenjian, E-mail: wengwj@zju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); The Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, Huiming, E-mail: hmwang1960@hotmail.com [The Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Light-induced cell detachment is reported to be a safe and effective cell sheet harvest method. In the present study, the effects of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) immobilization on cell growth, cell sheet construction and cell harvest through light illumination are investigated. RGD was first immobilized on TiO{sub 2} nanodots films through simple physical adsorption, and then mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the films. It was found that RGD immobilization promoted cell adhesion and proliferation. It was also observed that cells cultured on RGD immobilized films showed relatively high level of pan-cadherin. Cells harvested with ultraviolet illumination (365 nm) showed good viability on both RGD immobilized and unmodified TiO{sub 2} nanodot films. Single cell detachment assay showed that cells detached more quickly on RGD immobilized TiO{sub 2} nanodot films. That could be ascribed to the RGD release after UV365 illumination. The current study demonstrated that RGD immobilization could effectively improve both the cellular responses and light-induced cell harvest. - Highlights: • RGD immobilization on TiO{sub 2} nanodots film favors light-induced cell sheet detachment. • Physically adsorbed RGD detaches from the film through ultraviolet illumination. • RGD detachment promotes cells and cell sheets detachment.

  1. A new process for fabricating nanodot arrays on selective regions with diblock copolymer thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Polymer Research Institute, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Nam-Gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-12

    A procedure for micropatterning a single layer of nanodot arrays in selective regions is demonstrated by using thin films of polystyrene-b-poly(t-butyl acrylate) (PS-b-PtBA) diblock copolymer. The thin-film self-assembled into hexagonally arranged PtBA nanodomains in a PS matrix on a substrate by solvent annealing with 1,4-dioxane. The PtBA nanodomains were converted into poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) having carboxylic-acid-functionalized nanodomains by exposure to hydrochloric acid vapor, or were removed by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation to generate vacant sites without any functional groups due to the elimination of PtBA domains. By sequential treatment with aqueous sodium bicarbonate and aqueous zinc acetate solution, zinc cations were selectively loaded only on the carboxylic-acid-functionalized nanodomains prepared via hydrolysis. Macroscopic patterning through a photomask via UV irradiation, hydrolysis, sequential zinc cation loading and calcination left a nanodot array of zinc oxide on a selectively UV-shaded region.

  2. Nanoarchitectonics for Controlling the Number of Dopant Atoms in Solid Electrolyte Nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Alpana; Unayama, Satomi; Tai, Seishiro; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Waser, Rainer; Aono, Masakazu; Valov, Ilia; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    Controlling movements of electrons and holes is the key task in developing today's highly sophisticated information society. As transistors reach their physical limits, the semiconductor industry is seeking the next alternative to sustain its economy and to unfold a new era of human civilization. In this context, a completely new information token, i.e., ions instead of electrons, is promising. The current trend in solid-state nanoionics for applications in energy storage, sensing, and brain-type information processing, requires the ability to control the properties of matter at the ultimate atomic scale. Here, a conceptually novel nanoarchitectonic strategy is proposed for controlling the number of dopant atoms in a solid electrolyte to obtain discrete electrical properties. Using α-Ag 2+ δ S nanodots with a finite number of nonstoichiometry excess dopants as a model system, a theory matched with experiments is presented that reveals the role of physical parameters, namely, the separation between electrochemical energy levels and the cohesive energy, underlying atomic-scale manipulation of dopants in nanodots. This strategy can be applied to different nanoscale materials as their properties strongly depend on the number of doping atoms/ions, and has the potential to create a new paradigm based on controlled single atom/ion transfer. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Radio cobalt in French rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrechts, A.; Baudin-Jaulent, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The isotopes 58 and 60 of cobalt present in liquid wastes from nuclear plants or from fuel reprocessing plant of Marcoule are fixed in the different compartments of French rivers. The activity levels of radio-cobalt vary according to the sampled compartments nature (bryophyta > immersed plants > sediment > fish). Elsewhere, laboratory experimentations show that the contamination of fish occurs essentially from the water way rather than from food. Cobalt is mainly fixed by kidneys; muscles is no more than 30 % of the total fish activity. (author)

  4. Microwave Measurements of Ferrite Polymer Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the microwave measurements performed on the nickel-zinc sintered ferrite with the chemical formula Ni0.3Zn0.7Fe2O4 produced by the ceramic technique and composite materials based on this ferrite and a non-magnetic polymer (polyvinyl chloride matrix. The prepared composite samples had the same particle size distribution 0-250um but different ferrite particle concentrations between 23 vol% and 80 vol%. The apparatus for measurement of the signal proportional to the absolute value of scattering parameter S11 (reflexion coefficient is described and the dependence of measured reflected signal on a bias magnetic field has been studied. By means of experiments, the resonances to be connected with the geometry of microwave experimental set-up were distinguished from ferromagnetic resonance arising in ferrite particles of composite structure. The role of local interaction fields of ferrite particles in composite material has been discussed.

  5. Effect of zinc concentration on the structural and magnetic properties of mixed Co–Zn ferrites nanoparticles synthesized by sol/gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ali, M., E-mail: m.benali06@gmail.com [MAScIR Foundation, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, Materials & Nanomaterials Center, B.P., 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Laboratory of Magnetism and the Physics of the high Energies, URAC 12, Department of Physics, B.P. 1014, Faculty of Science, Mohammed V University, Rabat (Morocco); El Maalam, K. [MAScIR Foundation, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, Materials & Nanomaterials Center, B.P., 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Laboratory of Magnetism and the Physics of the high Energies, URAC 12, Department of Physics, B.P. 1014, Faculty of Science, Mohammed V University, Rabat (Morocco); El Moussaoui, H.; Mounkachi, O. [MAScIR Foundation, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, Materials & Nanomaterials Center, B.P., 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Hamedoun, M., E-mail: m.hamedoun@mascir.com [MAScIR Foundation, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, Materials & Nanomaterials Center, B.P., 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Masrour, R. [Laboratory of Materials, Processes, Environment and Quality, Cady Ayyed University, National School of Applied Sciences, PB 63 46000, Safi (Morocco); Hlil, E.K. [Institut Néel, CNRS-UJF, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Benyoussef, A. [MAScIR Foundation, Institute of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies, Materials & Nanomaterials Center, B.P., 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Laboratory of Magnetism and the Physics of the high Energies, URAC 12, Department of Physics, B.P. 1014, Faculty of Science, Mohammed V University, Rabat (Morocco)

    2016-01-15

    Synthesization of zinc-substituted cobalt ferrites nano-particles Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.0–0.3) has been achieved by the sol/gel method. The characterization of the synthesized nano-particles has been done by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FITR). The relation between the composition and magnetic properties has been investigated by Magnetic Properties Measurement System (MPMS). The results revealed that the nanoparticles size is in the range of 11–28 nm. It was found that the zinc substitution in cobalt ferrite increases saturation magnetization from 60.92 emu/g (x=0) to 74.67 emu/g (x=0.3). Nevertheless, zinc concentrations cause a significant decrease in coercivity.▪ - Highlights: • The nanocrystals size of synthesized of Co{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is of 11–28 nm. • The zinc substitution in cobalt ferrite increase saturation magnetization. • The increase of zinc concentration causes a significant decrease in coercivity.

  6. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sam, Shiju, E-mail: shiju@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India); Das, C.R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Jayakumar, T. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  7. Structural and magnetic properties of Ni0.8M0.2Fe2O4 (M = Cu, Co) nano-crystalline ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaya Babu, K.; Satyanarayana, G.; Sailaja, B.; Santosh Kumar, G. V.; Jalaiah, K.; Ravi, M.

    2018-06-01

    Nano-crystalline nickel ferrites are interesting materials due to their large physical and magnetic properties. In the present work, two kinds of spinel ferrites Ni0.8M0.2Fe2O4 (M = Cu, Co) are synthesized by using sol-gel auto-combustion method and the results are compared with NiFe2O4. The structural properties of synthesized ferrites are determined by using X-ray powder diffraction; scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cation distribution obtained from X-ray diffraction show that cobalt/copper occupies only tetrahedral site in spinel lattice. The lattice constant increases with the substitution of cobalt/copper. The structural parameters like bond lengths, tetrahedral and octahedral edges have been varied with the substitution. The microstructural study is carried out by using SEM technique and the average grain size is increased with nickel ferrite. The initial permeability (μi) is improving with the substitution. The observed g-value from ESR is approximately equal to standard value.

  8. Cobalt: for strength and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  9. Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menne, Torkil; Liden, Carola

    2012-01-01

    -containing dental alloys and revised hip implant components.Results. Six of eight dental alloys and 10 of 98 revised hip implant components released cobalt in the cobalt spot test, whereas none of 50 mobile phones gave positive reactions. The clinical relevance of positive cobalt test reactions was difficult......-tested dermatitis patients in an attempt to better understand cobalt allergy.Materials and methods. 19 780 dermatitis patients aged 4-99 years were patch tested with nickel, chromium or cobalt between 1985 and 2010. The cobalt spot test was used to test for cobalt ion release from mobile phones as well as cobalt...

  10. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved

  11. Electroplated zinc-cobalt alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.E.O.S.; Farr, J.P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the deposition and use of ectrodeposited zinc-cobalt alloys is surveyed. Alloys containing lower of Nuclear quantities of cobalt are potentially more useful. The structures of the deposits is related to their chemical and mechanical properties. The inclusion of oxide and its role in the deposition mechanism may be significant. Chemical and engineering properties relate to the metallurgical structure of the alloys, which derives from the mechanism of deposition. The inclusion of oxides and hydroxides in the electroplate may provide evidence for this mechanism. Electrochemical impedance measurements have been made at significant deposition potentials, in alkaline electrolytes. These reveal a complex electrode behaviour which depends not only on the electrode potential but on the Co content of the electrolyte. For the relevant range of cathodic potential zinc-cobalt alloy electrodeposition occurs through a stratified interface. The formation of an absorbed layer ZnOH/sup +/ is the initial step, this inhibits the deposition of cobalt at low cathodic potentials, so explaining its 'anomalous deposition'. A porous layer of zinc forms on the adsorbed ZnOH/sup +/ at underpotential. As the potential becomes more cathodic, cobalt co- deposits from its electrolytic complex forming a metallic solid solution of Co in Zn. In electrolytes containing a high concentration of cobalt a mixed entity (ZnCo)/sub +/ is assumed to adsorb at the cathode from which a CoZn intermetallic deposits. (author)

  12. Growth modes of individual ferrite grains in the austenite to ferrite transformation of low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.Z.; Xiao, N.M.; Lan, Y.J.; Zheng, C.W.; Li, Y.Y.

    2007-01-01

    The mesoscale deterministic cellular automaton (CA) method and probabilistic Q-state Potts-based Monte Carlo (MC) model have been adopted to investigate independently the individual growth behavior of ferrite grain during the austenite (γ)-ferrite (α) transformation. In these models, the γ-α phase transformation and ferrite grain coarsening induced by α/α grain boundary migration could be simulated simultaneously. The simulations demonstrated that both the hard impingement (ferrite grain coarsening) and the soft impingement (overlapping carbon concentration field) have a great influence on the individual ferrite growth behavior. Generally, ferrite grains displayed six modes of growth behavior: parabolic growth, delayed nucleation and growth, temporary shrinkage, partial shrinkage, complete shrinkage and accelerated growth in the transformation. Some modes have been observed before by the synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiment. The mesoscopic simulation provides an alternative tool for investigating both the individual grain growth behavior and the overall transformation behavior simultaneously during transformation

  13. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  14. Fluorescent carbon nanodots facilely extracted from Coca Cola for temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feiming; Chen, Qiaoling; Cai, Zhixiong; Lin, Fangyuan; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2017-12-01

    A novel method for the fabrication of carbon nanodots (CDs) is introduced: extracting CDs from the well-known soft drink Coca Cola via dialysis. The obtained CDs are of good monodispersity with a narrow size distribution (average diameter of 3.0 nm), good biocompatibility, high solubility (about 180 mg ml-1) and stable fluorescence even at a high salt concentration. Furthermore, they are sensitive to the temperature change with a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and temperature from 5 °C-95 °C. The CDs have been applied in high stable temperature sensing. This protocol is quite simple, green, cost-effective and technologically simple, which might be used for a range of applications including sensing, catalysts, drug and gene delivery, and so on.

  15. Photoswitching in azobenzene self-assembled monolayers capped on zinc oxide: nanodots vs nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Syed Mujtaba; Martini, Cyril; Ackermann, Jörg; Fages, Frédéric

    2012-02-01

    We report the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of nanohybrid structures consisting of an azobenzene compound grafted on the surface of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Characteristic bathochromic shifts indicate that the azobenzene photochromic molecules self-assemble onto the surface of the nanocrystals. The extent of packing is dependent on the shape of the nanoparticle. ZnO nanorods, with flat facets, enable a tighter organization of the molecules in the self-assembled monolayer than in the case of nanodots that display a more curvated shape. Consistently, the efficiency of photochromic switching of the self-assembled monolayer on ZnO nanoparticles is also shown to be strongly affected by nanoparticle shape. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of Sn(II) ions via quenching of the fluorescence of carbon nanodots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Yazid, S.N.A.; Chin, S.F.; Pang, S.C.; Ng, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report that fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) can act as an optical probe for quantifying Sn(II) ions in aqueous solution. C-dots are synthesized by carbonization and surface oxidation of preformed sago starch nanoparticles. Their fluorescence is significantly quenched by Sn(II) ions, and the effect can be used to determine Sn(II) ions. The highest fluorescence intensity is obtained at a concentration of 1.75 mM of C-dots in aqueous solution. The probe is highly selective and hardly interfered by other ions. The quenching mechanism appears to be predominantly of the static (rather than dynamic) type. Under optimum conditions, there is a linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and Sn(II) ions concentration up to 4 mM, and with a detection limit of 0.36 μM. (author)

  17. Self-assembly and optical properties of patterned ZnO nanodot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yijian; Zheng Maojun; Ma Li

    2007-01-01

    Patterned ZnO nanodot (ND) arrays and a ND-cavity microstructure were realized on an anodic alumina membrane (AAM) surface through a spin-coating sol-gel process, which benefits from the morphology and localized negative charge surface of AAM as well as the optimized sol concentration. The growth mechanism is believed to be a self-assembly process. This provides a simple approach to fabricate semiconductor quantum dot (QD) arrays and a QD-cavity system with its advantage in low cost and mass production. Strong ultra-violet emission, a multi-phonon process, and its special structure-related properties were observed in the patterned ZnO ND arrays

  18. Room-temperature Synthesis of Amorphous Molybdenum Oxide Nanodots with Tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chuanhui; Xu, Qun; Ji, Liang; Ren, Yumei; Fang, Mingming

    2017-12-05

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors have recently emerged as a remarkable class of plasmonic alternative to conventional noble metals. However, tuning of their plasmonic resonances towards different wavelengths in the visible-light region with physical or chemical methods still remains challenging. In this work, we design a simple room-temperature chemical reaction route to synthesize amorphous molybdenum oxide (MoO 3-x ) nanodots that exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPR) in the visible and near-infrared region. Moreover, tunable plasmon resonances can be achieved in a wide range with the changing surrounding solvent, and accordingly the photoelectrocatalytic activity can be optimized with the varying LSPR peaks. This work boosts the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale and could enable photodetectors, sensors, and photovoltaic devices in the future. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Dynamic micromagnetic simulation of the magnetic spectrum of permalloy nanodot array with vortex state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Y. [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu 610066 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Zhao, G.P., E-mail: zhaogp@uestc.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu 610066 (China); Morvan, F.J.; Wu, S.Q. [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Sichuan Normal University, Chengdu 610066 (China); Yue, M. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Due to its potential applications in high-density magnetic storage and spin electronic devices, the ferromagnetic resonance absorption phenomenon has recently drawn much attention. By studying the influence of different materials with various shapes on this phenomenon, the new understandings gained could lead to other applications in the future. In this paper, dynamic magnetic susceptibilities of the vortex state in permalloy nanodot arrays have been investigated using a three-dimensional object oriented micromagnetic framework (OOMMF) code with a two-dimensional periodic boundary condition (2D-PBC) extension and compared with those of a single dot carefully. The resonance mode is excited in the vortex state of nanodot arrays by the microwave magnetic field perpendicular to the dot plane. In this case only radially symmetric spin wave modes can be excited. The influence of the geometric parameters on the resonance frequency has been studied systemically, including the dot radius, the number of repeating elements, and the dot distance. One can see that the resonance peak of the dot array is higher than that of a single dot because of the induced stronger magnetostatic coupling. A critical dot distance exists at which the dot array may be treated as a single dot. There is only one resonance peak for both the dot array and the single dot, as the radius changes. - Highlights: • Resonance peak of the dot array is higher than that of a single dot because of the induced stronger magnetostatic coupling. • A critical dot distance exists at which the dot array may be treated as a single dot. • There is only one resonance peak for both the dot array and the single dot, as the radius changes.

  20. Dynamic micromagnetic simulation of the magnetic spectrum of permalloy nanodot array with vortex state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.; Zhao, G.P.; Morvan, F.J.; Wu, S.Q.; Yue, M.

    2017-01-01

    Due to its potential applications in high-density magnetic storage and spin electronic devices, the ferromagnetic resonance absorption phenomenon has recently drawn much attention. By studying the influence of different materials with various shapes on this phenomenon, the new understandings gained could lead to other applications in the future. In this paper, dynamic magnetic susceptibilities of the vortex state in permalloy nanodot arrays have been investigated using a three-dimensional object oriented micromagnetic framework (OOMMF) code with a two-dimensional periodic boundary condition (2D-PBC) extension and compared with those of a single dot carefully. The resonance mode is excited in the vortex state of nanodot arrays by the microwave magnetic field perpendicular to the dot plane. In this case only radially symmetric spin wave modes can be excited. The influence of the geometric parameters on the resonance frequency has been studied systemically, including the dot radius, the number of repeating elements, and the dot distance. One can see that the resonance peak of the dot array is higher than that of a single dot because of the induced stronger magnetostatic coupling. A critical dot distance exists at which the dot array may be treated as a single dot. There is only one resonance peak for both the dot array and the single dot, as the radius changes. - Highlights: • Resonance peak of the dot array is higher than that of a single dot because of the induced stronger magnetostatic coupling. • A critical dot distance exists at which the dot array may be treated as a single dot. • There is only one resonance peak for both the dot array and the single dot, as the radius changes.

  1. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  2. Focused Application Software for Ferrite Patch Antennas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trott, Keith

    1999-01-01

    ... (brick and tetrahedral elements) are combined by MRC via a graphical user interface (GUI) into a user friendly code capable of modeling conformal antennas with ferrite sub and superstrates recessed in planar surfaces.

  3. Oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbroeck, P. van.

    1976-10-01

    The publication gives the available data on the DTO2 dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloy developed at C.E.N./S.C.K. Mol, Belgium. DTO2 is a Fe-Cr-Mo ferritic alloy, strengthened by addition of titanium oxide and of titanium leading to the formation of Chi phase. It was developed for use as canning material for fast breeder reactors. (author)

  4. Phosphorus introduction mechanism in electrodeposited cobalt films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtchenko, Jean-Francois

    1973-01-01

    The cathodic reduction of hypophosphite, phosphite and phosphate ions was studied using chrono-potentiometry and voltammetry. Then cobalt was deposited at constant current from a bath containing one of these three compounds. The current, while giving an electrodeposition of cobalt, also enhances at the same time a chemical deposition of cobalt. It is shown that high coercive forces in cobalt films are much more related to this chemical deposition than to the simple fact that the films contain some phosphorus. (author) [fr

  5. Micromagnetic simulations of spinel ferrite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Christine C.; Gama, Adriana M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulations of the magnetization field ac response (at 2-12 GHz) of various submicron ferrite particles (cylindrical dots). The ferrites in the present simulations have the spinel structure, expressed here by M 1 - n Zn n Fe 2 O 4 (where M stands for a divalent metal), and the parameters chosen were the following: (a) for n=0: M={Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg, Cu }; (b) for n=0.1: M = {Fe, Mg} (mixed ferrites). These runs represent full 3D micromagnetic (one-particle) ferrite simulations. We find evidences of confined spin waves in all simulations, as well as a complex behavior nearby the main resonance peak in the case of the M = {Mg, Cu} ferrites. A comparison of the n=0 and n=0.1 cases for fixed M reveals a significant change in the spectra in M = Mg ferrites, but only a minor change in the M=Fe case. An additional larger scale simulation of a 3 by 3 particle array was performed using similar conditions of the Fe 3 O 4 (magnetite; n=0, M = Fe) one-particle simulation. We find that the main resonance peak of the Fe 3 O 4 one-particle simulation is disfigured in the corresponding 3 by 3 particle simulation, indicating the extent to which dipolar interactions are able to affect the main resonance peak in that magnetic compound.

  6. Formation of nanodots and enhancement of thermoelectric power induced by ion irradiation in PbTe:Ag composite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Manju, E-mail: manjubala474@gmail.com [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Meena, Ramcharan; Gupta, Srashti; Pannu, Compesh [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tripathi, Tripurari S. [Aalto University, Värmemansgränden 2, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Varma, Shikha [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneshwar, Odisha 751005 (India); Tripathi, Surya K. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014 (India); Asokan, K., E-mail: asokaniuac@gmail.com [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Avasthi, Devesh K. [Amity University, Noida 201313, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2016-07-15

    Present study demonstrates an enhancement in thermoelectric power of 10% Ag doped PbTe (PbTe:Ag) thin films when irradiated with 200 keV Ar ion. X-ray diffraction showed an increase in crystallinity for both PbTe and PbTe:10Ag nano-composite films after Ar ion irradiation due to annealing of defects in the grain boundaries. The preferential sputtering of Pb and Te ions in comparison to Ag ions resulted in the formation of nano-dots. This was further confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Such an enhancement in thermoelectric power of irradiated PbTe:10Ag films in comparison to pristine PbTe:10Ag film is attributed to the decrease in charge carrier concentration that takes part in the transport process via restricting the tunneling of carriers through the wider potential barrier formed at the interface of nano-dots.

  7. Multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films and nanodots grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Wook; Son, Jong Yeog

    2017-12-01

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) thin films and nanodots are deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates via a pulsed laser deposition technique, where the HOPG surface has a honeycomb lattice structure made of carbon atoms, similar to graphene. A graphene/BFO/HOPG capacitor exhibited multiferroic properties, namely ferroelectricity (a residual polarization of 26.8 μC/cm2) and ferromagnetism (a residual magnetization of 1.1 × 10-5 emu). The BFO thin film had high domain wall energies and demonstrated switching time of approximately 82 ns. An 8-nm BFO nanodot showed a typical piezoelectric hysteresis loop with an effective residual piezoelectric constant of approximately 110 pm/V and exhibited two clearly separated current curves depending on the ferroelectric polarization direction.

  8. Molecular mechanics calculations on cobalt phthalocyanine dimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, J.P.A.; Schipper, E.T.W.M.; Piet, P.; German, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to obtain insight into the structure of cobalt phthalocyanine dimers, molecular mechanics calculations were performed on dimeric cobalt phthalocyanine species. Molecular mechanics calculations are first presented on monomeric cobalt(II) phthalocyanine. Using the Tripos force field for the

  9. Transport of cobalt-60 industrial radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Gibson, Wayne

    This paper will deal with safety aspects of the handling of Cobalt-60, the most widely used industrial radio-isotope. Cobalt-60 is a man-made radioisotope of Cobalt-59, a naturally occurring non radioactive element, that is made to order for radiation therapy and a wide range of industrial processing applications including sterilization of medical disposables, food irradiation, etc.

  10. Accumulation of cobalt by cephalopods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Motokazu

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation of cobalt by cephalopod mollusca was investigated by radiotracer experiments and elemental analysis. In the radiotracer experiments, Octopus vulgaris took up cobalt-60 from seawater fairly well and the concentration of the nuclide in whole body attained about 150 times the level of seawater at 25th day at 20 0 C. Among the tissues and organs measured, branchial heart which is the specific organ of cephalopods showed the highest affinity for the nuclide. The organ accumulated about 50% of the radioactivity in whole body in spite of its little mass as 0.2% of total body weight. On the other hand, more than 90% of the radioactivity taken up from food (soft parts of Gomphina melanaegis labelled with cobalt-60 previously in an aquarium) was accumulated in liver at 3rd day after the single administration and then the radioactivity in the liver seemed to be distributed to other organs and tissues. The characteristic elution profiles of cobalt-60 was observed for each of the organs and tissues in Sephadex gel-filtration experiment. It was confirmed by the gel-filtration that most of cobalt-60 in the branchial heart was combined with the constituents of low molecular weights. The average concentration of stable cobalt in muscle of several species of cephalopods was 5.3 +- 3.0 μg/kg wet and it was almost comparable to the fish muscle. On the basis of soft parts, concentration of the nuclide closed association among bivalve, gastropod and cephalopod except squid that gave lower values than the others. (author)

  11. Nano-dot and nano-pit fabrication on a GaAs substrate by a pulse applied AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H C; Yu, J S; Ryu, S H

    2012-01-01

    The nano-patterning characteristics of GaAs is investigated using a pulse applied atomic force microscope (AFM). Very short range voltage pulses of micro to nano-seconds’ duration are applied to a conductive diamond-coated silicon (Si) tip in contact mode, to regulate the created feature size. The effects of pulse conditions such as pulse voltage, duration, frequency, offset voltage, anodization time, and applied tip pressure on nano-dot generation are characterized, based on the experiments. An interesting phenomenon, nano-pit creation instead of nano-dot creation, is observed when the applied pulse duration is less than 100 μs. Pulse frequency and offset voltage are also involved in nano-pit generation. The electrical spark discharge between the tip and the GaAs's surface is the most probable cause of the nano-pit creation and its generation mechanism is explained by considering the relevant pulse parameters. Nano-pits over 15 nm in depth are acquired on the GaAs substrate by adjusting the pulse conditions. This research facilitates the fabrication of more complex nano-structures on semiconductor materials since nano-dots and nano-pits could be easily made without any additional post-processes. (paper)

  12. Cobalt production in RAPS-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, P.D.; Purandare, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    At present in RAPS-1 radioisotope Co 60 is produced by irradiating Co 59 in the adjusters which perform the function of regulation of reactivity, power and xenon override. But the manrem expenditure of the crew handling the charge and discharge of the adjusters is going to be prohibitively high. It is therefore proposed to irradiate Co 59 in the fuel channel positions. The physics optimisation study for such irradiation is presented. The burnup penalty and loss of power are estimated to produce the required quantity of Co 60 after optimising the number of cobalt pencils in a bundle and the positions of the cobalt producing channels in the reactor core. (author)

  13. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  14. Characterization of Austempered Ferritic Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakre, Vinayak S.; Peshwe, D. R.; Pathak, S. U.; Likhite, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The ductile iron (DI) has graphite nodules enclose in ferrite envelop in pearlitic matrix. The pearlitic matrix in DI was converted to ferritic matrix through heat treatment. This heat treatment includes austenitization of DI at 900°C for 1h, followed by furnace cooling to 750°C & hold for 1h, then again furnace cooling to 690°C hold for 2h, then samples were allowed to cool in furnace. The new heat treated DI has graphite nodules in ferritic matrix and called as ferritic ductile iron (FDI). Both DIs were austenitized at 900°C for 1h and then quenched into salt bath at 325°C. The samples were soaked in salt bath for 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 min followed by air cooling. The austempered samples were characterized with help of optical microscopy, SEM and X-ray diffraction analysis. Austempering of ferritic ductile iron resulted in finer ausferrite matrix as compared to ADI. Area fraction of graphite, ferrite and austenite were determining using AXIOVISION-SE64 software. Area fraction of graphite was more in FDI than that of as cast DI. The area fraction of graphite remains unaffected due to austempering heat treatment. Ausferritic matrix coarsened (feathered) with increasing in austempering time for both DI and FDI. Bulk hardness test was carried on Rockwell Hardness Tester with load of 150 kgf and diamond indenter. Hardness obtained in as cast DI is 28 HRC which decreased to 6 HRC in FDI due conversion of pearlitic matrix to ferritic matrix. Hardness is improved by austempering process.

  15. SU-F-P-50: Performance Evaluation of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) NanoDots in Therapy and Imaging In-Vivo Dose Measurement During Patient Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S; Sarkar, B; Kaur, H; Rathinamuthu, S; Giri, U; Jassal, K; Ganesh, T; Munshi, A; Mohanti, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathiya, J [Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the performance of optically stimulated Luminescence (OSL) nanoDots as in-vivo dosimeter. For the measurements of surface doses as well as scattered plus leakage doses, nanoDots were used during the setup verification as well as during the treatment delivery. Methods: For a total seven patients undergoing radiotherapy by volumetric modulated arc therapy, surface doses from image guidance and scattered plus leakage doses from treatment delivery were measured. Two sets of calibration curves were generated – one for therapy and another for imaging. Two different nanoDots were used for imaging and therapy doses. Imaging nanoDots were placed at the isocenter only at the time of CBCT and therapy nanoDots were placed at 25 cm away from the isocenter (either in cranial or in caudal direction) only at the time of treatment delivery. During the entire course, nanoDots were placed at the same measurement points. NanoDots were read after 15 minutes of their exposure. For the next fraction, nanoDots were corrected for the residual doses from the previous fractions. Results: Measured surface doses during imaging were 0.14±0.32 cGy, 0.11±0.04 cGy, 0.12±0.53 cGy, 0.04±0.02 cGy, 0.13±0.23 cGy, 0.11±0.43 cGy, 0.10±0.04 cGy with overall mean dose of 0.08±0.1 cGy. Measured doses during treatment delivery, indicative of scattered and leakage dose, were 0.84±0.43 cGy, 1.3±0.4 cGy, 1.4±0.4 cGy, 0.18±0.48 cGy, 0.78±0.29 cGy, 0.27±0.08 cGy, 0.78±0.07 cGy with overall mean dose of 0.61±1.3 cGy. Conclusion: This dosimeter can be used as supplementary unit to verify the doses. No change in the prescription is recommended based on nanoDots measurement. This study is on-going therefore we are presenting only mere number of patients. A large volume data will be presented after completion of the study with proper statistical analysis.

  16. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jigang, A.; Liye, Z.; Yisi, L.; Haifeng, W.; Zhifang, W.; Liqiang, W.; Yuanshi, Z.; Xincheng, X.; Furong, L.; Baozeng, G.; Chunfa, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  17. Cobalt 60 commercial irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1985-01-01

    The advantage of using cobalt 60 for ionizing treatment is that it has excellent penetration. Gamma plants are also very efficient, in as much as there is very little mechanical or electrical equipment in a gamma irradiation facility. The average efficiency of a gamma plant is usually around 95% of all available processing time

  18. Ferritic steels for French LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Mathieu, B.; Petrequin, P.

    1983-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many components of the French LMFBR. Up to now, ferritic steels have not been considered for these components, mainly due to their relatively low creep properties. Some ferritic steels are usable when the maximum temperatures in service do not exceed about 530 0 C. It is the case of the steam generators of the Phenix plant, where the exchange tubes of the evaporator are made of 2,25% Cr-1% Mo steel, stabilized or not by addition of niobium. These ferritic alloys have worked successfully since the first steam production in October 1973. For the SuperPhenix power plant, an ''all austenitic stainless alloy'' apparatus has been chosen. However, for the future, ferritic alloys offer potential for use as alternative materials in the evaporators: low alloys steels type 2,25% Cr-1% Mo (exchange tubes, tube-sheets, shells), or at higher chromium content type 9% Cr-2% Mo NbV (exchange tubes) or 12M Cr-1% Mo-V (tube-sheets). Most of these steels have already an industrial background, and are widely used in similar applications. The various potential applications of these steels are reviewed with regards to the French LMFBR steam generators, indicating that some points need an effort of clarification, for instance the properties of the heterogeneous ferritic/austenitic weldments

  19. Von Neumann entropy in a Rashba-Dresselhaus nanodot; dynamical electronic spin-orbit entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaiee, Rosa; Golshan, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-06-01

    The main purpose of the present article is to report the characteristics of von Neumann entropy, thereby, the electronic hybrid entanglement, in the heterojunction of two semiconductors, with due attention to the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. To this end, we cast the von Neumann entropy in terms of spin polarization and compute its time evolution; with a vast span of applications. It is assumed that gate potentials are applied to the heterojunction, providing a two dimensional parabolic confining potential (forming an isotropic nanodot at the junction), as well as means of controlling the spin-orbit couplings. The spin degeneracy is also removed, even at electronic zero momentum, by the presence of an external magnetic field which, in turn, leads to the appearance of Landau states. We then proceed by computing the time evolution of the corresponding von Neumann entropy from a separable (spin-polarized) initial state. The von Neumann entropy, as we show, indicates that electronic hybrid entanglement does occur between spin and two-dimensional Landau levels. Our results also show that von Neumann entropy, as well as the degree of spin-orbit entanglement, periodically collapses and revives. The characteristics of such behavior; period, amplitude, etc., are shown to be determined from the controllable external agents. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the phenomenon of collapse-revivals' in the behavior of von Neumann entropy, equivalently, electronic hybrid entanglement, is accompanied by plateaus (of great importance in quantum computation schemes) whose durations are, again, controlled by the external elements. Along these lines, we also make a comparison between effects of the two spin-orbit couplings on the entanglement (von Neumann entropy) characteristics. The finer details of the electronic hybrid entanglement, which may be easily verified through spin polarization measurements, are also accreted and discussed. The novel results of the present

  20. Investigation of structural, magnetic and dielectric properties of Cr3+ substituted Cu0.75Co0.25Fe2-xO4 ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, M. Sushma; Ramesh, M.; Sreenivasu, T.; Rao, G. S. N.; Samatha, K.

    2018-05-01

    Chromium doped Copper-Cobalt ferrite Nanoparticles were obtained by sol-gel auto-combustion method using citric acid as a fuel. The metal nitrates to citric acid ratio was taken as 1:1. The prepared powder of Cr3+ doped copper-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is annealed at 600°C for 5 hrs and the same powder was used for characterization and investigations of structural properties. The phase composition, micro-structural, micro morphological and elemental analysis studies were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) technique and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The FTIR spectra of these samples are recorded to ensure the presence of the metallic compounds. The average crystallite size obtained by Scherrer's formula is of the order of 19.28 nm to 32.92 nm. The dielectric properties are investigated as a function of frequency at room temperature using LCR-Q meter. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of the Cr3+ substituted Cu-Co ferrite sintered at 1100°C lies in the range of 5.4136-28.9943 emu/g, the coercivity (Hc) dropped desperately from about 2091.3-778.53Oe as Cr3+ composition increases from 0.0 to 0.25.

  1. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  2. Ferrite LTCC based phased array antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Two phased array antennas realized in multilayer ferrite LTCC technology are presented in this paper. The use of embedded bias windings in these designs allows the negation of external magnets which are conventionally employed with bulk ferrite medium. This reduces the required magnetostatic field strength by 90% as compared to the traditional designs. The phase shifters are implemented using the SIW technology. One of the designs is operated in the half mode waveguide topology while the other design is based on standard full mode waveguide operation. The two phase shifter designs are integrated with two element patch antenna array and slotted SIW array respectively. The array designs demonstrate a beam steering of 30° and ±19° respectively for a current excitation of 200 mA. The designs, due to their small factor can be easily integrated in modern communication systems which is not possible in the case of bulk ferrite based designs.

  3. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil; Lidén, Carola; Julander, Anneli; Møller, Per; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2010-08-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure. The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items. Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these. This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future. Industries may not be fully aware of the potential cobalt allergy problem.

  4. Recrystallization induced plasticity in austenite and ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mingxin; Pineau, André; Bouaziz, Olivier; Vu, Trong-Dai

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Plasticity can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite. ► Strain rate is proportional to recrystallization kinetics. ► Overall atomic flux selects a preferential direction may be the origin. - Abstract: New experimental evidences are provided to demonstrate that plastic strain can be induced by recrystallization in austenite and ferrite under an applied stress much smaller than their yield stresses. Such Recrystallization Induced Plasticity (RIP) phenomenon occurs because the overall atomic flux during recrystallization follows a preferential direction imposed by the applied stress.

  5. Influence of cobalt doping on structural and magnetic properties of BiFeO3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, U.; Adeela, N.; Javed, K.; Riaz, S.; Ali, H.; Iqbal, M.; Han, X. F.; Naseem, S.

    2015-11-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt-doped bismuth ferrites with general formula of BiFe1- δ Co δ O3 (0 ≤ δ ≤ 0.1) have been synthesized using solution evaporation method. Structure and phase identification was performed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The results confirm the formation of rhombohedral-distorted Perovskite structure with R3c symmetry. A decrease in lattice parameters and an increase in X-ray density have been observed with increasing cobalt concentration in BiFeO3. Particle size determined by transmission electron microscope was in good agreement with XRD, i.e., 39 nm. Room-temperature coercivity and saturation magnetization of nanoparticles were increased up to 7.5 % of cobalt doping. Low-temperature magnetic measurements of selected sample showed increasing behavior in saturation magnetization, coercivity, effective magnetic moments, and anisotropy constant. An increase in coercivity with decrease in temperature followed theoretical model of Kneller's law, while modified Bloch's model was employed for saturation magnetization in temperature range of 5-300 K.

  6. Carbon Nanodots as Dual-Mode Nanosensors for Selective Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cheng-Long; Su, Li-Xia; Zang, Jin-Hao; Li, Xin-Jian; Lou, Qing; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2017-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important product of oxidase-based enzymatic reactions, such as glucose/glucose oxidase (GOD) reaction. Therefore, the probing of generated H2O2 for achieving the detection of various carbohydrates and their oxidases is very significative. Herein, we report one kind of dual-emission carbon nanodots (CDs) that can serve as novel dual-mode nanosensors with both fluorometric and colorimetric output for the selective detection of H2O2. The dual-model nanosensors are established only by the undecorated dual-emission CDs, where significant fluorometric and colorimetric changes are observed with the addition of different concentrations of H2O2 in the CD solution, which benefit to the achievement of the naked-eye detection for H2O2. The mechanism of the nanosensors can be attributed to the fact that the external chemical stimuli like hydroxyl radicals from H2O2 bring about the change of surface properties and the aggregation of CDs, which dominate the emission and absorption of CDs. The constructed dual-mode nanosensors exhibit good biocompatibility and high selectivity toward H2O2 with a linear detection range spanning from 0.05 to 0.5 M and allow the detection of H2O2 as low as 14 mM.

  7. Performance of photocatalyst based carbon nanodots from waste frying oil in water purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aji, Mahardika Prasetya; Wiguna, Pradita Ajeng; Susanto,; Rosita, Nita; Suciningtyas, Siti Aisyah; Sulhadi

    2016-01-01

    Carbon Nanodots (C-Dots) from waste frying oil could be used as a photocatalyst in water purification with solar light irradiation. Performance of C-Dots as a photocatalyst was tested in the process of water purification with a given synthetic sewage methylene blue. The tested was also conducted by comparing the performance C-Dots made from frying oil, waste fryng oil as a photocatalyst and solution of methylene blue without photocatalyst C-Dots. Performance of C-Dots from waste frying oil were estimated by the results of absorbance spectrum. The results of measurement absorbance spectrum from the process of water purification with photocatalyst C-Dots showed that the highest intensity at a wavelength 664 nm of methylene blue decreased. The test results showed that the performance of photocatalyst C-Dots from waste frying oil was better in water purification. This estimated that number of particles C-dots is more in waste frying oil because have experieced repeated the heating process so that the higher particles concentration make the photocatalyst process more effective. The observation of the performance C-Dots from waste frying oil as a photocatalyst in the water purification processes become important invention for solving the problems of waste and water purification.

  8. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of ruthenium oxide nanodots on reduced graphene oxide sheets for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yao [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Xiong [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Dacheng [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma Yanwei, E-mail: ywma@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: > Graphite oxide instead of graphene as precursor has been used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites by a hydrothermal treatment. > Using NaOH solution to adjust pH of GO colloids leads to homogeneous ruthenium oxide deposited on reduced graphene oxide sheets. > A maximum capacitance of 471 F g{sup -1} is obtained at 0.5 A g{sup -1} for the composites when loading 40% of RuO{sub 2} and its life retention reaches 92% after 3000 cycles. - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide nanodots have been deposited on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets homogeneously by hydrothermal and annealing methods. Adding NaOH solution in GO colloids prevents the restack and agglomeration of GO sheets when mixed with ruthenium chloride solution. Local crystallization of RuO{sub 2} in the composites is revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The element mapping image demonstrates the uniform distribution of Ru on RGO sheets. Unlike the pure crystalline RuO{sub 2} exhibiting poor electrochemical performance, the composites present superior capacitive properties. The hydrothermal time is optimized and a maximum of 471 F g{sup -1} is measured in the composites at 0.5 A g{sup -1} when loaded with 45 wt% of RuO{sub 2}. After 3000 cycles, its specific capacitance remains 92% of the maximum capacitance. Our results suggest potential application of the reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites to supercapacitors.

  9. Fluorescence turn-on detection of target sequence DNA based on silicon nanodot-mediated quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Ning, Xinping; Mao, Guobin; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a new enzyme-free method for target sequence DNA detection based on the dynamic quenching of fluorescent silicon nanodots (SiNDs) toward Cy5-tagged DNA probe. Fascinatingly, the water-soluble SiNDs can quench the fluorescence of cyanine (Cy5) in Cy5-tagged DNA probe in homogeneous solution, and the fluorescence of Cy5-tagged DNA probe can be restored in the presence of target sequence DNA (the synthetic target miRNA-27a). Based on this phenomenon, a SiND-featured fluorescent sensor has been constructed for "turn-on" detection of the synthetic target miRNA-27a for the first time. This newly developed approach possesses the merits of low cost, simple design, and convenient operation since no enzymatic reaction, toxic reagents, or separation procedures are involved. The established method achieves a detection limit of 0.16 nM, and the relative standard deviation of this method is 9% (1 nM, n = 5). The linear range is 0.5-20 nM, and the recoveries in spiked human fluids are in the range of 90-122%. This protocol provides a new tactic in the development of the nonenzymic miRNA biosensors and opens a promising avenue for early diagnosis of miRNA-associated disease. Graphical abstract The SiND-based fluorescent sensor for detection of S-miR-27a.

  10. Size-controlled soft-template synthesis of carbon nanodots toward versatile photoactive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Woosung; Lee, Gyeongjin; Do, Sungan; Joo, Taiha; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2014-02-12

    Size-controlled soft-template synthesis of carbon nanodots (CNDs) as novel photoactive materials is reported. The size of the CNDs can be controlled by regulating the amount of an emulsifier. As the size increases, the CNDs exhibit blue-shifted photoluminescence (PL) or so-called an inverse PL shift. Using time-correlated single photon counting, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and low-temperature PL measurements, it is revealed that the CNDs are composed of sp² clusters with certain energy gaps and their oleylamine ligands act as auxochromes to reduce the energy gaps. This insight can provide a plausible explanation on the origin of the inverse PL shift which has been debatable over a past decade. To explore the potential of the CNDs as photoactive materials, several prototypes of CND-based optoelectronic devices, including multicolored light-emitting diodes and air-stable organic solar cells, are demonstrated. This study could shed light on future applications of the CNDs and further expedite the development of other related fields. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Uniform Si nano-dot fabrication using reconstructed structure of Si(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Masahiro; Uozumi, Yuki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Asaoka, Hidehito

    2018-06-01

    Si nano-dot (ND) formation on Si(110) is observed by means of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The initial Si-NDs are Si crystals that are continuous from the substrate and grow during the oxide layer desorption. The NDs fabricated on the flat surface of Si(110)-1 × 1 are surrounded by four types of facets with almost identical appearance probabilities. An increase in the size of the NDs increases the variety of its morphology. In contrast, most Si-NDs fabricated on straight-stepped surface of Si(110)-16 × 2 reconstructed structure are surrounded by only a single type of facet, namely the \\text{Si}(17,15,1)-2 × 1 plane. An appearance probability of the facet in which the base line is along the step of Si(110)-16 × 2 exceeds 75%. This finding provides a fabrication technique of uniformed structural Si-NDs by using the reconstructed structure of Si(110).

  12. One-pot hydrothermal synthesis of ruthenium oxide nanodots on reduced graphene oxide sheets for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yao; Zhang Xiong; Zhang Dacheng; Ma Yanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Graphite oxide instead of graphene as precursor has been used to synthesize reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites by a hydrothermal treatment. → Using NaOH solution to adjust pH of GO colloids leads to homogeneous ruthenium oxide deposited on reduced graphene oxide sheets. → A maximum capacitance of 471 F g -1 is obtained at 0.5 A g -1 for the composites when loading 40% of RuO 2 and its life retention reaches 92% after 3000 cycles. - Abstract: Ruthenium oxide nanodots have been deposited on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets homogeneously by hydrothermal and annealing methods. Adding NaOH solution in GO colloids prevents the restack and agglomeration of GO sheets when mixed with ruthenium chloride solution. Local crystallization of RuO 2 in the composites is revealed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The element mapping image demonstrates the uniform distribution of Ru on RGO sheets. Unlike the pure crystalline RuO 2 exhibiting poor electrochemical performance, the composites present superior capacitive properties. The hydrothermal time is optimized and a maximum of 471 F g -1 is measured in the composites at 0.5 A g -1 when loaded with 45 wt% of RuO 2 . After 3000 cycles, its specific capacitance remains 92% of the maximum capacitance. Our results suggest potential application of the reduced graphene oxide/ruthenium oxide composites to supercapacitors.

  13. One-step synthesis of multi-emission carbon nanodots for ratiometric temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vanthan; Yan, Lihe; Xu, Huanhuan; Yue, Mengmeng

    2018-01-01

    Measuring temperature with greater precision at localized small length scales or in a nonperturbative manner is a necessity in widespread applications, such as integrated photonic devices, micro/nano electronics, biology, and medical diagnostics. To this context, use of nanoscale fluorescent temperature probes is regarded as the most promising method for temperature sensing because they are noninvasive, accurate, and enable remote micro/nanoscale imaging. Here, we propose a novel ratiometric fluorescent sensor for nanothermometry using carbon nanodots (C-dots). The C-dots were synthesized by one-step method using femtosecond laser ablation and exhibit unique multi-emission property due to emissions from abundant functional groups on its surface. The as-prepared C-dots demonstrate excellent ratiometric temperature sensing under single wavelength excitation that achieves high temperature sensitivity with a 1.48% change per °C ratiometric response over wide-ranging temperature (5-85 °C) in aqueous buffer. The ratiometric sensor shows excellent reversibility and stability, holding great promise for the accurate measurement of temperature in many practical applications.

  14. Nanosecond pulsed laser induced self-organized nano-dots patterns on GaSb surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yutaka, E-mail: yyoshida@cris.hokudai.ac.jp [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N8, W13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan); Creative Research Institution Sousei, Hokkaido University, N21, W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo 001-0021, Hokkaido (Japan); Oosawa, Kazuya; Wajima, Jyunya; Watanabe, Seiichi [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N8, W13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan); Matsuo, Yasutaka [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0020, Hokkaido (Japan); Kato, Takahiko [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika, Hitachi-shi 319-1292, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N8, W13, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We report a technique for formation of two-dimensional (2D) nanodot (ND) patterns on gaillium antimoide (GaSb) using a nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation with 532 nm wavelength. The patterns have formed because of the interference and the self-organization under energy deposition of the laser irradiation, which induced the growth of NDs on the local area. The NDs are grown and shrunken in the pattern by energy depositions. In the laser irradiation with average laser energy density of 35 mJ cm⁻², large and small NDs are formed on GaSb surface. The large NDs have grown average diameter from 160 to 200 nm with increase of laser pulses, and the small NDs have shrunken average diameter from 75 to 30 nm. The critical dot size is required about 107 nm for growth of the NDs in the patterns. Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation can control the self-organized ND size on GaSb in air as a function of the laser pulses.

  15. Growth mechanism of InGaN nanodots on three-dimensional GaN structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghwy; Min, Daehong; Nam, Okhyun [Department of Nano-Optical Engineering, Convergence Center for Advanced Nano-Semiconductor (CANS), Korea Polytechnic University (KPU), Siheung-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we investigated the growth mechanism of indium gallium nitride (InGaN) nanodots (NDs) and an InGaN layer, which were simultaneously formed on a three-dimensional (3D) gallium nitride (GaN) structure, having (0001) polar, (11-22) semi-polar, and (11-20) nonpolar facets. We observed the difference in the morphological and compositional properties of the InGaN structures. From the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images, it can be seen that the InGaN NDs were formed only on the polar and nonpolar facets, whereas an InGaN layer was formed on the semi-polar facet. The indium composition variation in all the InGaN structures was observed using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The different growth mechanism can be explained by two reasons: (i) The difference in the diffusivities of indium and gallium adatoms at each facet of 3D GaN structure; and (ii) the difference in the kinetic Wulff plots of polar, semi-polar, and nonpolar GaN planes. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Non-lift-off block copolymer lithography of 25 nm magnetic nanodot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruth, A; Rodwogin, Marc D; Shankar, A; Erickson, M J; Hillmyer, Marc A; Leighton, C

    2011-09-01

    Although nanolithographic techniques based on self-assembled block copolymer templates offer tremendous potential for fabrication of large-area nanostructure arrays, significant difficulties arise with both the lift-off and etch processes typically used for pattern transfer. These become progressively more important in the limit of extreme feature sizes. The few techniques that have been developed to avoid these issues are quite complex. Here, we demonstrate successful execution of a nanolithographic process based on solvent annealed, cylinder-forming, easily degradable, polystyrene-b-polylactide block copolymer films that completely avoids lift-off in addition to the most challenging aspects of etching. We report a "Damascene-type" process that overfills the polystyrene template with magnetic metal, employs ion beam milling to planarize the metal surface down to the underlying polystyrene template, then exploits the large etch rate contrast between polystyrene and typical metals to generate pattern reversal of the original template into the magnetic metal. The process is demonstrated via formation of a large-area array of 25 nm diameter ferromagnetic Ni(80)Fe(20) nanodots with hexagonally close-packed order. Extensive microscopy, magnetometry, and electrical measurements provide detailed characterization of the pattern formation. We argue that the approach is generalizable to a wide variety of materials, is scalable to smaller feature sizes, and critically, minimizes etch damage, thus preserving the essential functionality of the patterned material.

  17. Performance of photocatalyst based carbon nanodots from waste frying oil in water purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, Mahardika Prasetya, E-mail: mahardika190@gmail.com; Wiguna, Pradita Ajeng; Susanto,; Rosita, Nita; Suciningtyas, Siti Aisyah; Sulhadi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science Universitas Negeri Semarang, Jalan Raya Sekaran Gunungpati 50229 Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Carbon Nanodots (C-Dots) from waste frying oil could be used as a photocatalyst in water purification with solar light irradiation. Performance of C-Dots as a photocatalyst was tested in the process of water purification with a given synthetic sewage methylene blue. The tested was also conducted by comparing the performance C-Dots made from frying oil, waste fryng oil as a photocatalyst and solution of methylene blue without photocatalyst C-Dots. Performance of C-Dots from waste frying oil were estimated by the results of absorbance spectrum. The results of measurement absorbance spectrum from the process of water purification with photocatalyst C-Dots showed that the highest intensity at a wavelength 664 nm of methylene blue decreased. The test results showed that the performance of photocatalyst C-Dots from waste frying oil was better in water purification. This estimated that number of particles C-dots is more in waste frying oil because have experieced repeated the heating process so that the higher particles concentration make the photocatalyst process more effective. The observation of the performance C-Dots from waste frying oil as a photocatalyst in the water purification processes become important invention for solving the problems of waste and water purification.

  18. Simulation of non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Tachi, K.; Takano, S.; Irisawa, J.

    2002-01-01

    A ferrite sharpener is a non-linear coaxial line using ferrite beads, which produces high-voltage, high-dV/dt pulses. We have been examining the characteristics of ferrite sharpeners experimentally, varying various parameters. Also we have made the simulation of the ferrite sharpener and compared the predictions with the experimental results in detail to analyze the characteristics of the sharpener. In this report, calculating the magnetization M of the ferrite bead, we divide the bead into n sections radially instead of adopting M at the average radius in the previous report. (author)

  19. Structural study of Mg doped cobalt ferrite thin films on ITO coated glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Mahesh; Bapna, Komal; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.

    2018-05-01

    We have synthesized thin films of Co1-xMgxFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) on transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by pulsed laser deposition method. The structural properties of the grown films were analyzed by the X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, which suggest the single phase growth of these films. Raman spectra revealed the incorporation of Mg ions into CoFe2O4 lattice and suggest that the Mg ions initially go both to the octahedral and tetrahedral sites upto a certain concentration. For higher concentration, Mg ions prefer to occupy the tetrahedral sites.

  20. Tuning of magnetic property by lattice strain in lead substituted cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajnish [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta, Patna 801103 (India); Singh, Rakesh Kr. [Aryabhatta Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Aryabhatta Knowledge University, Patna 800001 (India); Zope, Mukesh Kumar [Indira Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sheikhpura, Patna 800014 (India); Kar, Manoranjan, E-mail: mano@iitp.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta, Patna 801103 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Increase of lattice parameter due to Pb substitution in CFO. • Magnetism due to lattice strain in nonmagnetic (Pb) substituted CFO. • Saturation magnetization increases up to 2% Pb concentration. • Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant increases up to 2% Pb concentration. • Existence of non-collinear spin structure which can be explained by three sublattice model of Yafet and Kittel. - Abstract: Co{sub 1−x}Pb{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 00–0.15) have been synthesized using citric acid modified sol-gel method. Samples for x ≤ 0.02 have been ball milled to reduce the particle size. Hence, all the materials under the study are in almost equal crystallite size (∼15 nm). The phase purity and structural study have been carried out using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) technique. The Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns reveals the increasing lattice parameter with the lead (Pb) concentration. Detailed analysis of the Raman spectroscopy data supports the XRD pattern analysis results. Magnetic hysteresis loop measurements have been performed using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) at room temperature over field range of ±20 kOe. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant was calculated using Law of Approach (LA) to saturation, which shows increasing behavior till 2% Pb concentration. The large difference in experimental and theoretical saturation magnetic moment per formula unit shows existence of three sublattice model suggested by Yafet-Kittel.

  1. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with improved aqueous colloidal stability and electrophoretic mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munjal, Sandeep; Khare, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized CoFe 2 O 4 (CFO) nanoparticles of size ∼ 12.2 nm by hydrothermal synthesis method. To control the size of these CFO nanoparticles, oleic acid was used as a surfactant. The inverse spinel phase of the synthesized nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction method. As synthesized oleic acid coated CFO (OA@CFO) nanoparticles has very less electrophoretic mobility in the water and are not water dispersible. These OA@CFO nanoparticles were successfully turned into water soluble phase with a better colloidal aqueous stability, through a chemical treatment using citric acid. The modified citric acid coated CFO (CA@CFO) nanoparticles were dispersible in water and form a stable aqueous solution with high electrophoretic mobility.

  2. Synthesis and characterization cobalt ferrite and evaluation of performance in the transesterification methyl two lipid sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, R.B.L.; Costa, A.C.F.M.; Dantas, B.B.; Silva, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    The cottonseed and soybean oils are two lipid matrices that can be used to obtain biodiesel through the use of homogeneous catalysts, which increase operating costs. The use of heterogeneous catalysts can remedy this problem. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the use of heterogeneous catalyst CoFe 2 O 4 synthesized by combustion reaction in the transesterification of methyl cottonseed oil, soybean and their mixtures (1:1). The sample was characterized by XRD and textural analysis by nitrogen adsorption. The catalytic tests were conducted at 200 deg C, molar ratio of oil:ethanol 1:15, 2% of catalyst and 3 hours. The results show that the synthesis has been effective in obtaining the phase CoFe2O4 with surface area of 23.75 m 2 g -1 . Tests for transesterification of methyl cottonseed oil, soybean and their blends indicated that the material under study resulted conversions above 50%. The highest efficiency was obtained for the reaction using the mixture of oils. (author)

  3. Electrical Properties and Dipole Relaxation Behavior of Zinc-Substituted Cobalt Ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriya, Sweety; Kumar, Sunil; Kar, Manoranjan

    2017-12-01

    Co1- x Zn x Fe2O4 ceramics with x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20 were synthesized by a modified citric acid sol-gel method. The crystalline phase of the samples was characterized by the powder x-ray diffraction technique (XRD) and the Rietveld analysis of the XRD patterns. The morphology and particle size were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies were consistent with the XRD results. The impedance measurements were carried out from 100 Hz to 10 MHz at different temperatures from 40°C to 300°C. The frequency dispersion of dielectric was analyzed with a modified Debye equation. The activation energy derived from the dielectric constant and the impedance follows the Arrhenius law and are comparable with each other. The dielectric relaxation and impedance relaxation are correlated in terms of activation energy, show a good temperature stability of the dielectrics and are useful for their applications in microelectronic devices such as filters, capacitors, resonators, etc.

  4. Polytypic transformations during the thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, Thimmasandra Narayan

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature leads to the formation of Co 3 O 4 . The phase evolution during the decomposition process was monitored using powder X-ray diffraction. The transformation of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt oxide occurs via three phase mixture while cobalt hydroxynitrate to cobalt oxide occurs through a two phase mixture. The nature of the sample and its preparation method controls the decomposition mechanism. The comparison of topotactical relationship between the precursors to the decomposed product has been reported in relation to polytypism. - Graphical abstract: Isothermal thermal decomposition studies of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt hydroxynitrate at different intervals of temperature show the metastable phase formed prior to Co 3 O 4 phase.

  5. Recovery of Cobalt as Cobalt Oxalate from Cobalt Tailings Using Moderately Thermophilic Bioleaching Technology and Selective Sequential Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guobao Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt is a very important metal which is widely applied in various critical areas, however, it is difficult to recover cobalt from minerals since there is a lack of independent cobalt deposits in nature. This work is to provide a complete process to recover cobalt from cobalt tailings using the moderately thermophilic bioleaching technology and selective sequential extraction. It is found that 96.51% Co and 26.32% Cu were extracted after bioleaching for four days at 10% pulp density. The mean compositions of the leach solutions contain 0.98 g·L−1 of Co, 6.52 g·L−1 of Cu, and 24.57 g·L−1 of Fe (III. The copper ion was then recovered by a solvent extraction process and the ferric ions were selectively removed by applying a goethite deironization process. The technological conditions of the above purification procedures were deliberately discussed. Over 98.6% of copper and 99.9% of ferric ions were eliminated from the leaching liquor. Cobalt was finally produced as cobalt oxalate and its overall recovery during the whole process was greater than 95%. The present bioleaching process of cobalt is worth using for reference to deal with low-grade cobalt ores.

  6. Structural, Magnetic and Microwave Properties of Nanocrystalline Ni-Co-Gd Ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikzad, Alireza; Parvizi, Roghaieh; Rezaei, Ghasem; Vaseghi, Behrooz; Khordad, Reza

    2018-02-01

    A series of Co- and Gd-substituted NiFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles with the formula Ni1- x Co x Fe2- y Gd y O4 (where x = 0.0-1.0 and y = 0.0-0.1) have been successfully synthesized using a hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy results indicated that a highly crystallized spherical ferrite nanoparticle structure was obtained along with an increase in the lattice parameters. Compositional analysis of the prepared nanoferrite powders has been carried out using energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectra. The EDX analysis reveals the presence of Ni, Co, Gd and Fe elements in the specimens. Magnetization and the coercive field improved dramatically with an increase in the amount of cobalt and gadolinium added, attributed to the redistribution of cations in the spinel nanoferrite structure. Saturation magnetization and coercivity values up to 99 emu/g and 918 Oe, respectively, were measured using a vibration sample magnetometer at room temperature. Comparative microwave absorption experiments demonstrated that the reflection loss (RL) properties enhanced with increasing substitution of cations in the Ni-ferrite spinel structure for an absorber thickness of 1.8 mm. A maximum RL of - 26.7 dB was obtained for substituted Ni-Co-Gd nanoferrite with x = 1.0 and y = 0.1 at a frequency of 9.4 GHz with a bandwidth of 3.6 GHz (RL ≤ - 10 dB). Experimental results revealed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed great potential in microwave absorption applications.

  7. Derivative spectrophotometry of cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of derivative spectrophotometry is briefly described, and derivative absorption spectra are presented for samarium, cobalt, and commercial Sm-Co alloys. It is shown that the use of derivative spectrophotometry not only improves the accuracy and selectivity of element determinations but also simplifies the analysis of alloys. Results of a statistical evaluation of the metrological characteristics of the analytical procedure described here are presented. 8 references

  8. EFTF cobalt test assembly results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawlins, J.A.; Wootan, D.W.; Carter, L.L.; Brager, H.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A cobalt test assembly containing yttrium hydride pins for neutron moderation was irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility during Cycle 9A for 137.7 equivalent full power days at a power level fo 291 MW. The 36 test pins consisted of a batch of 32 pins containing cobalt metal to produce Co-60, and a set of 4 pins with europium oxide to produce Gd-153, a radioisotope used in detection of the bone disease Osteoporosis. Post-irradiation examination of the cobalt pins determined the Co-60 produced with an accuracy of about 5 %. The measured Co-60 spatially distributed concentrations were within 20 % of the calculated concentrations. The assembly average Co-60 measured activity was 4 % less than the calculated value. The europium oxide pins were gamma scanned for the europium isotopes Eu-152 and Eu-154 to an absolute accuracy of about 10 %. The measured europium radioisotpe anc Gd-153 concentrations were within 20 % of calculated values. In conclusion, the hydride assembly performed well and is an excellent vehicle for many Fast Flux Test Facility isotope production applications. The results also demonstrate that the calculational methods developed by the Westinghouse Hanford Company are very accurate. (author)

  9. Cobalt accumulation and circulation by blackgum trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    Blackgum (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.) trees accumulate far greater concentrations of cobalt in mature foliage than do other species on the same site (363 ppM in ash of blackgum, compared with about 3 ppM by mockernut hickory and about 1 ppM by red maple, tulip tree, and white oak). Cobalt concentrations in dormant woody tissues of blackgum also significantly exceed those in the other four species. Inoculation of six blackgums with 60 Co revealed that cobalt remains mobile in the trees for at least 3 years. Foliar concentrations of stable cobalt increase uniformly until senescence. In late August, foliage accounts for only 9 percent of total tree weight but 57 percent of total tree cobalt. Losses of cobalt from trees occur almost entirely by leaf abscission, and the loss rates of weight and cobalt from decomposing litter are similar. Retention of cobalt in the biologically active soil layers perpetuates zones of cobalt concentration created by this species in woodlands

  10. Magnetic properties of nanostructured spinel ferrites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exchange interaction strength because of an increase in the magnetic ion concentration in the A-site on milling, ... By using a copper wheel, rotating with the ... Zn ferrite with a small applied field of 4 mT for two different grain sizes. The Néel ... By varying the concentration of the oxidant (KNO3) or ferric ions, we could achieve.

  11. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    36, No. 5, October 2013, pp. 919–922. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Structural properties of Cd–Co ferrites. S P DALAWAIa,∗. , T J SHINDEb, A B GADKARIc and P N VASAMBEKARa. aDepartment of Electronics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416 004, India. bDepartment of Physics, KRP Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Islampur ...

  12. Neutron diffraction in a frustrated ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirebeau, I.; Iancu, G.; Gavoille, G.; Hubsch, J.

    1994-01-01

    The competition between a long range ordered ferrimagnetic lattice and small fluctuating clusters have been probed by neutron diffraction in a titanium magnesium frustrated ferrite. The description of the system is then compared to the predictions of several theoretical models for frustrated systems. 3 figs., 8 refs

  13. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    395–398. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation. MOHSEN KAZEMINEZHAD. ∗. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Avenue, Tehran, Iran. MS received 17 January 2011; revised 9 July 2011. Abstract. In this research, an algorithm ...

  14. Synthesis of lithium ferrites from polymetallic carboxylates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANIA STOLERIU

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium ferrite was prepared by the thermal decomposition of three polynuclear complex compounds containing as ligands the anions of malic, tartaric and gluconic acid: (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O53(OH4(H2O2]×4H2O (I, (NH46[Fe2.5Li0.5(C4H4O63(OH8]×2H2O (II and (NH42[Fe2.5Li0.5(C6H11O73(OH7] (III. The polynuclear complex precursors were characterized by chemical analysis, IR and UV–Vis spectra, magnetic measurements and thermal analysis. The obtained lithium ferrites were characterized by XRD, scanning electron microscopy, IR spectra and magnetic measurements. The single α-Li0.5Fe2.5O4 phase was obtained by thermal decomposition of the tartarate complex annealed at 700 °C for 1 h. The magnetization value ≈ 50 emu g-1 is lower than that obtained for the bulk lithium ferrite due to the nanostructural character of the ferrite. The particle size was smaller than 100 nm.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.S.; Yang, X.L.; Gao, L.

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powders with a partially inverted spinel structure were synthesized by high-energy ball milling in a closed container at ambient temperature from a mixture of alpha-Fe2O3 and ZnO crystalline powders in equimolar ratio. From low-temperature and in-field Mossbauer...

  16. Morphological evolution of InP nano-dots and surface modifications after keV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramanik, Dipak; Sahu, S N; Varma, Shikha

    2008-01-01

    Evolution and coarsening behaviour of self-assembled nano-dots fabricated on an InP surface by 3 keV Ar ion sputtering have been studied in conjunction with the structural modifications at the surface. The dots have been produced in off-normal geometry but in the absence of rotation. For small sputtering durations, the dots coarsen and agglomerate, up to a critical time t c , while the surface roughens and experiences a tensile stress. A relaxation in this stress is observed after the surface becomes amorphized at t c , beyond which an inverse coarsening, fragmentation of dots and a smoothened surface are observed

  17. Formation mechanisms of metallic Zn nanodots by using ZnO thin films deposited on n-Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuk, J. M.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y.; No, Y. S.; Kim, T. W.; Choi, W. K.

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results showed that metallic Zn nanodots (NDs) were fabricated through transformation of ZnO thin films by deposition of SiO x on ZnO/n-Si (100) heterostructures. The Zn NDs with various sizes and densities were formed due to the occurrence of the mass diffusion of atoms along the grain boundaries in the ZnO thin films. The fabrication mechanisms of metallic Zn NDs through transformation of ZnO thin films deposited on n-Si substrates are described on the basis of the experimental results.

  18. Study of structural phase transformation and hysteresis behavior of inverse-spinel α-ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagh, Shadab; Chaudhary, Kashif; Haider, Zuhaib; Ali, Jalil

    2018-03-01

    Substitution of cobalt (Co2+) ions in cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) with copper (Cu2+) and aluminum (Al3+) ions allows variations in their electric and magnetic properties which can be optimized for specific applications. In this article, synthesis of inverse-spinel Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) nanoparticles by substituting Cu2+ and Al3+ ions in CoFe2O4 via co-precipitation method is reported. By controlling copper and aluminum (Cu-Al) substituent ratio, the magnetic moment and coercivity of synthesized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles is optimized. The role of substituents on the structure, particle size, morphology, and magnetic properties of nano-crystalline ferrite is investigated. The Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x≤ 0.8) nanoparticles with crystallite size in the range of 23.1-26.5 nm are observed, 26.5 nm for x = 0.0-23.1 nm for x = 0.8. The inverse-spinel structure of synthesized Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) nano-particles is confirmed by characteristic vibrational bands at tetrahedral and octahedral sites using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A decreases in coercive field and magnetic moment is observed as Cu-Al contents are increased (x = 0.0-0.8). The positive anisotropy of synthesized particles Co1-xCuxFe2-xAlxO4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) is obtained in the range 1.96 × 105 J/m3 for x = 0.0 to 0.29 × 105 J/m3 for x = 0.8.

  19. The effect and fate of water-soluble carbon nanodots in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dou, Runzhi; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Chuanbin; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the toxicity of water-soluble carbon nanodots (C-dots) to maize (Zea mays L.) and their uptake and transport in plants were investigated. After exposed in sand matrix amended with 0-2000 mg/L C-dots for 4 weeks, we found that the phytotoxicity of C-dots was concentration-dependent. C-dots at 250 and 500 mg/L showed no toxicity to maize. However, 1000 and 2000 mg/L C-dots significantly reduced the fresh weight of root by 57% and 68%, and decreased the shoot fresh weight by 38% and 72%, respectively. Moreover, in maize roots, the exposure of C-dots at 2000 mg/L significantly increased the H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation (6.5 and 1.65 times higher, respectively), as well as, the antioxidant enzymes activities, up to 2, 1.5, 1.9 and 1.9 times higher for catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase, respectively. On the other hand, C-dots were observed in detached root-cap cells, cortex and vascular bundle of roots and mesophyll cells of leaves through fluorescence microscopy analysis, suggesting that C-dots were absorbed and translocated systemically in maize. Remarkably, a certain amount of C-dots were excreted out from leaf blade. To our knowledge, this is the first study combined phenotypic observation with physiologic responses and bioaccumulation and translocation analysis of C-dots to investigate their effect and fate in maize.

  20. Cell characteristics of FePt nano-dot memories with a high-k Al2O3 blocking oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gae Hun; Lee, Jung Min; Yang, Hyung Jun; Song, Yun Heub; Bea, Ji Cheol; Tanaka, Testsu

    2012-01-01

    The cell characteristics of an alloy FePt nano-dot (ND) charge trapping memory with a high-k dielectric as a blocking oxide was investigated. Adoption of a high-k Al 2 O 3 material as a blocking oxide for the metal nano-dot memory provided a superior scaling of the operation voltage compared to silicon oxide under a similar gate leakage level. For the 40-nm-thick high-k (Al 2 O 3 ) blocking oxide, we confirmed an operation voltage reduction of ∼7 V under the same memory window on for silicon dioxide. Also, this device showed a large memory window of 7.8 V and a low leakage current under 10 -10 A in an area of Φ 0.25 mm. From these results, the use of a dielectric (Al 2 O 3 ) as a blocking oxide for a metal nano-dot device is essential, and a metal nano-dot memory with a high-k dielectric will be one of the candidates for a high-density non-volatile memory device.

  1. Chip-based generation of carbon nanodots via electrochemical oxidation of screen printed carbon electrodes and the applications for efficient cell imaging and electrochemiluminescence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanhong; Liu, Jingquan; Zhang, Jizhen; Zong, Xidan; Jia, Xiaofang; Li, Dan; Wang, Erkang

    2015-06-07

    A portable lab-on-a-chip methodology to generate ionic liquid-functionalized carbon nanodots (CNDs) was developed via electrochemical oxidation of screen printed carbon electrodes. The CNDs can be successfully applied for efficient cell imaging and solid-state electrochemiluminescence sensor fabrication on the paper-based chips.

  2. Cobalt 60 availability for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, F.M.

    1986-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the steady and significant growth in the application of radiation processing to industrial sterilization has been seen. The principal application of this technology is the sterilization of disposable medical products, food irradiation, the irradiation of personal care goods and so on. At present, more than 70 million curies of cobalt-60 supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. have been used for gamma processing in these applications. This is estimated to be more than 80 % of the total cobalt-60 in service in the world. Commercial food irradiation has an exciting future, and as to the impact of food irradiation on the availability of cobalt-60 over the next ten years, two principal factors must be examined, namely, the anticipated demand for cobalt-60 in all radiation processing applications, and the supply of cobalt-60 to reliably meet the expected demand. As for the cobalt-60 in service today, 90 % is used for the sterilization of disposable medical products, 5 % for food irradiation, and 5 % for other application. The demand for up to 30 million curies of cobalt-60 is expected over the next 10 years. Today, it is estimated that over 150,000 tons of spices, fruit and fish are irradiated. The potential cobalt-60 production could exceed 110 million curies per year. Gamma processing application will demand nearly 50 million curies in 1990. (Kako, I.)

  3. Cobalt allergy in hard metal workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, T; Rystedt, I

    1983-03-01

    Hard metal contains about 10% cobalt. 853 hard metal workers were examined and patch tested with substances from their environment. Initial patch tests with 1% cobalt chloride showed 62 positive reactions. By means of secondary serial dilution tests, allergic reactions to cobalt were reproduced in 9 men and 30 women. Weak reactions could not normally be reproduced. A history of hand eczema was found in 36 of the 39 individuals with reproducible positive test reactions to cobalt, while 21 of 23 with a positive initial patch test but negative serial dilution test had never had any skin problems. Hand etching and hand grinding, mainly female activities and traumatic to the hands, were found to involve the greatest risk of cobalt sensitization. 24 individuals had an isolated cobalt allergy. They had probably been sensitized by hard metal work, while the individuals, all women, who had simultaneous nickel allergy had probably been sensitized to nickel before their employment and then became sensitized to cobalt by hard metal work. A traumatic occupation, which causes irritant contact dermatitis and/or a previous contact allergy or atopy is probably a prerequisite for the development of cobalt allergy.

  4. Effect of alloying element partitioning on ferrite hardening in a low alloy ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimian, A., E-mail: ebrahimiana@yahoo.com; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2016-11-20

    In this paper, the effect of carbon and other alloying elements partitioning on ferrite hardening behavior were studied in details using a low alloy AISI4340 ferrite-martensite dual phase (DP) steel. To do so, various re-austenitised samples at 860 °C for 60 min were isothermally heated at 650 °C from 3 to 60 min and then water–quenched to obtain the final ferrite-martensite DP microstructures containing different ferrite and martensite volume fractions. Light and electron microscopic observations were supplemented with electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and nanoindentation tests to explore the localized compositional and hardening variations within ferrite grains in DP samples. The experimental results showed that the ferrite hardness was varied with progress of austenite to ferrite phase transformation in DP samples. In the case of a particular ferrite grain in a particular DP sample, despite a homogeneous distribution of carbon concentration, the ferrite hardness was significantly increased by increasing distance from the central location toward the interfacial α/γ areas. Beside a considerable influence of martensitic phase transformation on adjacent ferrite hardness, these results were rationalized in part to the significant level of Cr and Mo pile-up at α/γ interfaces leading to higher solid solution hardening effect of these regions. The reduction of potential energy developed by attractive interaction between C-Cr and C-Mo couples toward the carbon enriched prior austenite areas were the dominating driving force for pile-up segregation.

  5. Azimuthal spin-wave excitations in magnetic nanodots over the soliton background: Vortex, Bloch, and Néel-like skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruczkiewicz, M.; Gruszecki, P.; Krawczyk, M.; Guslienko, K. Y.

    2018-02-01

    We study azimuthal spin-wave (SW) excitations in a circular ferromagnetic nanodot in different inhomogeneous, topologically nontrivial magnetization states, specifically, vortex, Bloch-type skyrmion, and Néel-type skyrmion states. A continuous transition between these states is realized by gradually changing the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange interaction (DMI), and the corresponding SW spectra are calculated for each state. We observe the lifting of degeneracy of SW mode frequencies and a change in the systematics of frequency levels. The latter effect is induced by the geometric Berry phase, which occurs in SWs localized at the edge of the dot in the vortex state, and vanishes in the skyrmion states. Furthermore, channeling of edge-localized azimuthal SWs and a related large frequency splitting are observed in the skyrmion states. This is attributed to DMI-induced nonreciprocity, while the coupling of the breathing and gyrotropic modes is related to the skyrmion motion. Finally, we demonstrate efficient coupling of the dynamic magnetization to a uniform magnetic field in nanodots of noncircular symmetry in the skyrmion states.

  6. Cobalt sorption onto Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1985-06-01

    A laboratory study of cobalt-60 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that cobalt sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Over a pH range of 2 to 9, the distribution coefficient ranged from 2 to more than 10,000 mL/g. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence cobalt sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect on cobalt sorption. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the condition of water at the bottom of the waste trenches, accounts for part of the decrease in cobalt sorption observed with trench waters. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Michel; Lemire, Christian

    2002-01-01

    CANDU reactors can produce cobalt-60 very efficiently and with an interesting return on investment. This paper discusses what is needed to convert a CANDU reactor into a cobalt-60 producer: what are the different phases, the safety studies required, the physical modifications needed, and what is the minimum involvement of the utility owning the plant. The past ten years of experience of Hydro-Quebec as a cobalt-60 producer will be reviewed, including the management of the risk of both incident and electricity generation loss, and including the benefits for the utility and its personnel. Originally a simple metal used for centuries as a pigment, cobalt-59 today is transformed into cobalt-60, a radioactive element of unprecedented value. Well known in medicine for cancer treatment, cobalt-60 is also used to sterilize a wide range of disposable medical products used in hospitals and to sanitize pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. Cobalt-60 is proving to be a new and effective solution, in the food sector, for preserving harvests and controlling food-borne diseases, or to advantageously replace certain gases and chemical products which are suspected of being harmful or carcinogenic. There are also other applications, such as: hardening of some plastics, treatment of sewage sludge and elimination of harmful insect populations. With a half-life of 5,3 years, cobalt-60 is a metal not found in nature. It is a radioactive isotope produced by exposing stable nuclei of cobalt-59 to neutrons. One of the best places to find such an important neutron source is a nuclear reactor. High energy gamma rays are then emitted during the process of radioactive decay, where cobalt-60 seeks again its stable state

  8. High-Q perpendicular-biased ferrite-tuned cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlini, R.D.; Thiessen, H.A.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Modest power tests of a small (10-cm-dia) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by nickel-zinc ferrites and aluminum-doped garnets indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity at power levels from 2 to 200 watts

  9. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnjak, A.; Tusek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma spot wedding of ferritic stainless steels studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shieldings and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas , i. e. a 98% Ar/2% H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joint was compared to that of resistance sport welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a large weld sport diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same. (Author) 32 refs

  10. Microwave firing of MnZn-ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsakaloudi, V.; Papazoglou, E.; Zaspalis, V.T.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave firing is evaluated in comparison to conventional firing for MnZn-ferrites. For otherwise identical conditions, microwave firing results to higher densities and coarser microstructures. Initial magnetic permeability values (25 kHz, 25 deg. C, <0.1 mT) after conventional firing are approximately 5000, but the corresponding values after microwave firing are approximately 6000. Unlike the conventional firing process, the final density after microwave firing is increased by increasing the prefiring temperature. As appears from the results of this study, microwave firing could be in principle a promising MnZn-ferrite firing technology for materials to be used in high magnetic permeability applications. No advantages of microwave firing are evident for materials intended to be used in high field power applications

  11. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe 3 O 4 and SrFe 12 O 19 ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic

  12. Titanium oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrix, W.; Vandermeulen, W.

    1980-04-01

    The available data on the DT02 and DT3911 ferritic dispersion strengthened alloys, developed at SCK/CEN, Mol, Belgium, are presented. Both alloys consist of Fe - 13% Cr - 1.5% Mo to which 2% TiO 2 and about 3.5% Ti are added (wt.%). Their main use is for the fabrication of fast breeder reactor cladding tubes but their application as turbine blade material is also envisaged for cases where high damping is important. (auth.)

  13. Magnetocapacitance effects in MnZn ferrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The magnetocapacitance effects of MnZn ferrites with different initial permeabilities have been studied systematically. Both intrinsic effect associated with magnetoelectric coupling and extrinsic effect, which means the combined contribution of magnetoresistance and the Maxwell-Wagner effect, have been observed simultaneously. Analysis shows that the relationship between the origins of both is in competitive equilibrium. Either of both mechanisms plays a dominant role in magnetocapacitance effects under different conditions, respectively, such as permeability and frequency of applied signals.

  14. CHARACTERIZING AND MODELING FERRITE-CORE PROBES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D(c), and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  15. Ferritic stainless steels: corrosion resistance + economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remus, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels provide corrosion resistance at lower cost. They include Type 409, Type 439, 18SR, 20-Mo (1.6 Mo), 18-2 (2 Mo), 26-1S, E-Brite 26-1, 29 Cr-4 Mo, and 29 Cr-4 Mo-2 Ni. Their corrosion and mechanical properties are examined. Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking is an advantage compared to austenitic types

  16. Removal of radioactive materials from waste solutions via magnetic ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.E.; Kochen, R.L.; Price, M.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Ferrite waste treatment was found to be effective in removing actinides from simulated Rocky Flats process waste solutions. With a one-stage ferrite treatment, plutonium concentrations were consistently reduced from 10 -4 g/l to less than 10 -8 g/l, and americium concentrations were lowered from 10 -7 g/l to below 10 -10 g/l. In addition, siginficantly less solid was produced as compared with the flocculant precipitation technique now employed at Rocky Flats. Aging of ferrite solids and elevated beryllium and phosphate concentrations were identified as interferences in the ferrite treatment of process waste, but neither appeeared serious enough to prevent implementation in plant operations

  17. Low-Loss Ferrite Components for NASA Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ferrite based isolators and circulators have been successfully demonstrated at microwave, millimeter-wave and submillimeter-wave frequencies. These components are...

  18. Preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Jimin; Liu Zhimin; Wu Weize; Li Zhonghao; Han Buxing; Huang Ying

    2005-01-01

    This article, for the first time, reports the preparation of single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods and nanodisks. Using amorphous copper ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by reverse micelle as reaction precursor, single-crystal copper ferrite nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG), however, copper ferrite nanodisks were prepared through the same procedures except the surfactant PEG. The resulting nanomaterials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), selected electron area diffraction (SEAD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bulk composition of the samples was determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  19. Surface effects on the magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline nickel ferrites and nickel ferrite-polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathani, H.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2004-01-01

    The magnetization studies on nanocrystalline nickel ferrite as powder particles, and as diluted dispersion (10 wt.%) in polymer matrix (polymer nanocomposites) are presented. The two polymer-based nanocomposites were prepared via ball-milling and in situ polymerization, respectively. The magnetization measurements provide strong evidence of surface effects to magnetization, which explains the non-saturation of magnetization at high fields. The differences in the magnetization behavior of nickel ferrite as powder particles and in the ball-milled nanocomposite and the nanocomposite prepared via in situ polymerization are attributed to the different extent of interparticle interactions between the particles and the preparation route. The magnetization versus applied field behavior of the three ferrite systems show a similar jump in the initial part of the magnetization curve in all the cases which implies the existence of a core-shell like morphology of the particles over a large temperature range and its dominance over the interparticle interaction effects between the particles

  20. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We...... investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found...... that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses...

  1. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments. The major application is in the health care industry where irradiators are used to sterilize single use medical products. These irradiators are designed and built by MDS Nordion and are used by manufacturers of surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes and other medical products. The irradiator is a large shielded room with a storage pool for the cobalt-60 sources. The medical products are circulated through the shielded room and exposed to the cobalt-60 sources. This treatment sterilizes the medical products which can then be shipped to hospitals for immediate use. Other applications for this irradiation technology include sanitisation of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials and food irradiation. The cobalt-60 sources are manufactured by MDS Nordion in their Cobalt Operations Facility in Kanata. More than 75,000 cobalt-60 sources for use in irradiators have been manufactured by MDS Nordion. The cobalt-60 sources are double encapsulated in stainless steel capsules, seal welded and helium leak tested. Each source may contain up to 14,000 curies. These sources are shipped to over 170 industrial irradiators around the world. This paper will focus on the MDS Nordion proprietary technology used to produce the cobalt-60 isotope in CANDU reactors. Almost 55 years ago MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada developed the process for manufacturing cobalt-60 at the Chalk River Labs, in Ontario, Canada. A cobalt-59 target was introduced into a research reactor where the cobalt-59 atom absorbed one neutron to become cobalt-60. Once the cobalt-60 material was removed from the research reactor it was encapsulated in stainless steel and seal welded using a Tungsten Inert Gas weld. The first cobalt-60 sources manufactured using material from the Chalk River Labs were used in cancer

  2. Contribution to the structural study of austeno-ferritic steels. Morphological and analytical definition of the ferritic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathily, Alassane.

    1977-07-01

    Conditions of fast and selective austenite dissolution were defined by means of current-voltage curves using AISI 316-type materials (welding beads). The ferritic phase was isolated and identified with X-rays. The percentages of ferrite were compared gravimetrically with those obtained by traditional methods. The ferrite isolated was chemically analysed by atomic absorption, the only doubtful value being carbon. It is shown by this method that a morphological study of the solidification of the ferritic lattice is possible, even for percentages around 1% [fr

  3. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Norton, J.L.; Slack, J.

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments, but are primarily used to sterilize single-use medical products including; surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes, and cotton swabs. Other applications include sanitization of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials, and food irradiation. The technology for producing the cobalt-60 isotope was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) almost 55 years ago using research reactors at the AECL Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The first cobalt-60 source produced for medical applications was manufactured by MDS Nordion and used in cancer therapy. The benefits of cobalt-60 as applied to medical product manufacturing, were quickly realized and the demand for this radioisotope quickly grew. The same technology for producing cobalt-60 in research reactors was then designed and packaged such that it could be conveniently transferred to a utility/power reactor. In the early 1970's, in co-operation with Ontario Power Generation (formerly Ontario Hydro), bulk cobalt-60 production for industrial irradiation applications was initiated in the four Pickering A CANDU reactors. As the demand and acceptance of sterilization of medical products grew, MDS Nordion expanded its bulk supply by installing the proprietary Canadian technology for producing cobalt-60 in additional CANDU reactors. CANDU is unique among the power reactors of the world, being heavy water moderated and fuelled with natural uranium. They are also designed and supplied with stainless steel adjusters, the primary function of which is to shape the neutron flux to optimize reactor power and fuel bum-up, and to provide excess reactivity needed to overcome xenon-135 poisoning following a reduction of power. The reactor is designed to develop full power output with all of the adjuster

  4. Investigation of superparamagnetism in pure and chromium substituted cobalt nanoferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghasudha, M., E-mail: raghasudha_m@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007, Telangana (India); Ravinder, D. [Department of Physics, University College of Science, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007, Telangana (India); Veerasomaiah, P. [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500007, Telangana (India)

    2016-12-15

    Nanostructured magnetic materials with the chemical composition CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 1.1}O{sub 4} were synthesized through Citrate-gel chemical synthesis with a crystallite size of 6.5 nm and 10.7 nm respectively. Structural characterization of the samples was performed by X-ray diffraction analysis and magnetic properties were studied using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Magnetization measurements as a function of applied magnetic field ±10 T at various temperatures 5 K, 25 K, 310 K and 355 K were carried out. Field cooled (FC) and Zero field cooled (ZFC) magnetization measurements under a magnetic field of 100 Oe for temperature ranging from 5–400 K were studied. The blocking temperature (T{sub b}) for both the ferrites was observed to be around 355 K. Below blocking temperature they showed ferromagnetic behavior and above which they are superparamagnetic in nature that favors their application in the biomedical field. The substitution of paramagnetic Cr{sup 3+} ions for magnetic Fe{sup 3+} ion in cobalt ferrite has resulted in a decrease in magnetization and the coercivity of the samples. CoCr{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 1.1}O{sub 4} nanoferrites with observed low coercivity of 338 Oe make them desirable in high frequency transformers due to their very soft magnetic behavior. - Highlights: • Particle size of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 1.1}O{sub 4} is 6.5 nm and 10.7 nm respectively. • At 5 K and 25 K the materials were ferromagnetic in nature with high coercivity. • Materials show superparamagnetic behavior above room temperature. • Blocking temperature is at around 355 K where coercivity and remanence are zero. • Materials are suitable for hyperthermia cancer therapy.

  5. Nanoferrites of nickel doped with cobalt: Influence of Co{sup 2+} on the structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, A.P.G. [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Chemical Institute, Natal-RN 59078-970 (Brazil); Gomes, D.K.S., E-mail: dkarinne@yahoo.com.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Graduate Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Laboratory of Catalysis and Materials, Natal-RN 59078-970 (Brazil); Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel, CAPES/PNPD (Brazil); Araújo, J.H., E-mail: humberto@dfte.ufrn.br [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Department of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Laboratory of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, Natal-RN 59078-970 (Brazil); Melo, D.M.A., E-mail: daraujomelo@gmail.com [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Chemical Institute, Natal-RN 59078-970 (Brazil); Oliveira, N.A.S. [Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Chemical Institute, Natal-RN 59078-970 (Brazil); Braga, R.M., E-mail: renata@cear.ufpb.br [Federal University of Paraíba, DEER-CEAR, João Pessoa–PB 58051-970 (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Nanoferrites of nickel substituted with cobalt of composition Ni{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0≤x≤0.75), were synthesized by combustion reaction assisted in microwaves. The influence of the substitution of Ni{sup 2+} by Co{sup 2+} content and the concentration of Co{sup 2+} in the structural and magnetic properties was investigated. The powders were prepared by combustion according to the concept of chemical propellants and heated in a microwave oven with a power of 7000 kW. The synthesized powders were characterized by absorption spectroscopy in the infrared region (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) together with Rietveld refinement, surface area (BET) method, scanning electron microscopy (MEV) and magnetic measurements (MAV). The results indicated that it was possible to obtain nickel ferrite doped with cobalt in all compositions and that an increase of cobalt concentration caused an increase in particle size (9.78–21.63 nm), a reduction in surface area, and reduction in magnetic concentrations greater than 50%. - Highlights: • Nanoferrites Ni{sub 1–x}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(0≤x≤0.75) synthesized by combustion reaction assisted. • The structural and magnetic properties of substitution of Ni{sup 2+} by Co{sup 2+} were investigate. • Combustion reaction takes spinel phase with suitable magnetic properties. • The ferrites presented characteristics of soft and intermediate magnetic materials.

  6. Nickel and cobalt base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlle, P.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel base alloys have a good resistance to pitting, cavernous or cracks corrosion. Nevertheless, all the nickel base alloys are not equivalent. Some differences exit between all the families (Ni, Ni-Cu, Ni-Cr-Fe, Ni-Cr-Fe-Mo/W-Cu, Ni-Cr-Mo/W, Ni-Mo). Cobalt base alloys in corrosive conditions are generally used for its wear and cracks resistance, with a compromise to its localised corrosion resistance properties. The choice must be done from the perfect knowledge of the corrosive medium and of the alloys characteristics (chemical, metallurgical). A synthesis of the corrosion resistance in three medium (6% FeCl 3 , 4% NaCl + 1% HCl + 0.1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 , 11.5% H 2 SO 4 + 1.2% HCl + 1% Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 + 1% CuCl 2 ) is presented. (A.B.). 11 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs

  7. Preparation of high purity cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isshiki, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Igaki, K.

    1985-01-01

    A combination of anion exchange separation, electrolytic extraction, floating zone refining and dry hydrogen treatment was used to purify cobalt. The effectiveness of each purification process was confirmed by measurements of the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and activation analyses. Proton activation analysis revealed that all the main metallic impurities except iron were effectively removed by a combination of these processes. The effective removal of oxygen, nitrogen and carbon by dry hydrogen treatment was confirmed by activation analyses using 3 He ion beams, proton beams and γ rays. It was found that the rate-controlling step in the decarburization process was a surface reaction. The maximum RRR obtained for the purified specimen was 334, which is higher than previously reported values. (Auth.)

  8. Chlorine triggered de-alloying of AuAg@Carbon nanodots: Towards fabrication of a dual signalling assay combining the plasmonic property of bimetallic alloy nanoparticles and photoluminescence of carbon nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadpour, Zahra; Safavi, Afsaneh, E-mail: safavi@susc.ac.ir; Abdollahi, Seyyed Hossein

    2017-03-22

    Integration of Au-Ag alloy and fluorescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) into a single platform resulted in a new dual sensing assay for chlorine. Selective etching of Ag from AuAg@C-dots was transformed into: (i) colorimetric signal by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) tuning of the alloy and (ii) fluorimetric signal by perturbation of fluorescence energy transfer between C-dots and alloy nanoparticles. Fast oxidizing of silver atoms incorporated in the bimetallic structure induced by chlorine resulted in selective de-alloying of bimetallic hybrid nanoparticles and an intense visible change of the colloidal dispersion color. On the other hand, the systematic change in Au/Ag ratio strongly affected the emission intensity of C-dots in the hybrid structure leading to an enhancement in the fluorescence signal. Thus, the assay enables the detection of chlorine both under visible and UV lights with high sensitivity. The detection limit (DL) values were calculated as 6.2 × 10{sup −7} M and 5.1 × 10{sup −7} M through colorimetric and fluorimetric pathways, respectively. Most importantly, it was demonstrated to be selective over common cations, anions and some reactive oxygen species (ROS). This assay was successfully applied to the determination of chlorine concentration in bleach solution and tap water. It is robust and is suitable for cost effective chlorine measurement in environmental samples. - Highlights: • A new dual signalling assay for hypochlorite ion is introduced. • Bimetallic Au-Ag nanoparticles are hybridized with fluorescent carbon nanodots. • It shows amplified colorimetric response with respect to monometallic counterparts. • This sensor is multifunctional, robust, rapid and sensitive. • The practical applicability is investigated for environmental monitoring.

  9. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    microwave and satellite communication, bubble devices, audio-video, digital recording and as permanent magnets. (Viswanathan and Murthy 1990), ferrites have opened a new vista in the field of chemical physics of materials. Keeping in view these technological applications, ferrites have been regarded as an important ...

  10. on the magnetic properties of ultra-fine zinc ferrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anantharaman, M.R.; Jagatheesan, S.; Malini, K.A.; Sindhu, S.; Narayanasamy, A.; Chinnasamy, C.N.; Jacobs, J.P.; Reijne, S.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Smits, R.H.H.; Smits, R.H.H.; Brongersma, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    Zinc ferrite belongs to the class of normal spinels where it is assumed to have a cation distribution of Zn2+(Fe3+)2(O2−)4, and it is purported to be showing zero net magnetisation. However, there have been recent reports suggesting that zinc ferrite exhibits anomaly in its magnetisation. Zinc

  11. A seeded ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment of AMD ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A seeded ambient temperature ferrite process for treatment of AMD waters: magnetite formation in the presence and absence of calcium ions under steady state operation. ... promising for AMD treatment. Keywords: Ferrite process, Magnetite seed, Calcium interference, Acid mine drainage (WaterSA: 2003 29(2): 117-124) ...

  12. Performance Variation of Ferrite Magnet PMBLDC Motor with Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2015-01-01

    The price fluctuations of rare earth metals and the uncertainty in their availability has generated an increased interest in ferrite magnet machines. The influence of temperature on BH characteristics of the ferrite magnet differ considerably from that of the rare earth magnet and hence, requires...

  13. Cobalt-60 control in Ontario Hydro reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of specifying reduced Cobalt-59 in the primary heat transport circuit materials of construction on the radiation fields developed around the primary circuit. An eight-fold reduction in steam generator radiation fields due to Cobalt-60 has been observed for two identical sets of reactors, one with and one without Cobalt-59 control. The comparison is between eight reactors at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). Units 5 to 8 (PNGS-B) are identical to Units 1 to 4 (PNGS-A) except that PNGS-B has reduced impurity Cobalt-59 in the alloys of construction and a reduced use of stellite. The effects of chemistry control are also discussed

  14. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.; Joshi, Meenal M.; Tijare, Saumitra N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K.; Rayalu, Sadhana Suresh

    2012-01-01

    of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An elevator for cobalt-60 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zaimin; Liang Donghu

    1990-07-01

    The elevator used for cobalt-60 source is a key device in the irradiation industry. It plays an important role in the safety and control of irradiation operation as well as the utilization rate of radiation source. From 1983 to 1986, Beijing Institute of Nuclear Engineering undertook designing of various size irradiation projects for different uses. Since then a kind of cobalt-60 source elevator suited for the irradiator of wet-source-storage has been chosen. It is reliable in the operation and complete in the function. An automatic control circuit brings the systems of cobalt-60 source elevator into an interlock system which ensures the irradiation operation safety. Besides introducing the structural features and performance of this elevator, the conditions of safety interlocking in raising or lowering the cobalt-60 source is also discussed. The discussion is from the safety viewpoint of operating an irradiator and irradiation technology

  16. Two-stage preparation of magnetic sorbent based on exfoliated graphite with ferrite phases for sorption of oil and liquid hydrocarbons from the water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Julia A.; Ivanov, Andrei V.; Maksimova, Natalia V.; Pokholok, Konstantin V.; Vasiliev, Alexander V.; Malakho, Artem P.; Avdeev, Victor V.

    2018-05-01

    Due to the macropore structure and the hydrophobic properties, exfoliated graphite (EG) is considered as a perspective sorbent for oil and liquid hydrocarbons from the water surface. However, there is the problem of EG collection from the water surface. One of the solutions is the modification of EG by a magnetic compound and the collection of EG with sorbed oil using the magnetic field. In this work, the method of the two-stage preparation of exfoliated graphite with ferrite phases is proposed. This method includes the impregnation of expandable graphite in the mixed solution of iron (III) chloride and cobalt (II) or nickel (II) nitrate in the first stage and the thermal exfoliation of impregnated expandable graphite with the formation of exfoliated graphite containing cobalt and nickel ferrites in the second stage. Such two-stage method makes it possible to obtain the sorbent based on EG modified by ferrimagnetic phases with high sorption capacity toward oil (up to 45-51 g/g) and high saturation magnetization (up to 42 emu/g). On the other hand, this method allows to produce the magnetic sorbent in a short period of time (up to 10 s) during which the thermal exfoliation is carried out in the air atmosphere.

  17. Structural and optical properties of cobalt doped multiferroics BiFeO3 nanostructure thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasannakumara, R.; Naik, K. Gopalakrishna

    2018-05-01

    Bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) and Cobalt doped BiFeO3 (BiFe1-XCoXO3) nanostructure thin films were deposited on glass substrates by the sol-gel spin coating method. The X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) of the grown BiFeO3 and BiFe1-XCoXO3 nanostructure thin films showed distorted rhombohedral structure. The shifting of peaks to higher angles was observed in cobalt doped BiFeO3. The surface morphology of the BiFeO3 and BiFe1-XCoXO3 nanostructure thin films were studied using FESEM, an increase in grain size was observed as Co concentration increases. The thickness of the nanostructure thin films was examined using FESEM cross-section. The EDX studies confirmed the elemental composition of the grown BiFeO3 and BiFe1-XCoXO3 nanostructure thin films. The optical characterizations of the grown nanostructure thin films were carried out using FTIR, it confirms the existence of Fe-O and Bi-O bands and UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the increase in optical band gap of the BiFeO3 nanostructure thin films with Co doping by ploting Tauc plot.

  18. Dense arrays of cobalt nanorods as rare-earth free permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostopoulou, E; Grindi, B; Lacroix, L-M; Ott, F; Panagiotopoulos, I; Viau, G

    2016-02-21

    We demonstrate in this paper the feasibility to elaborate rare-earth free permanent magnets based on cobalt nanorods assemblies with energy product (BH)max exceeding 150 kJ m(-3). The cobalt rods were prepared by the polyol process and assembled from wet suspensions under a magnetic field. Magnetization loops of dense assemblies with remanence to a saturation of 0.99 and squareness of 0.96 were measured. The almost perfect M(H) loop squareness together with electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering demonstrate the excellent alignment of the rods within the assemblies. The magnetic volume fraction was carefully measured by coupling magnetic and thermogravimetric analysis and found in the range from 45 to 55%, depending on the rod diameter and the alignment procedure. This allowed a quantitative assessment of the (BH)max values. The highest (BH)max of 165 kJ m(-3) was obtained for a sample combining a high magnetic volume fraction and a very large M(H) loop squareness. This study shows that this bottom-up approach is very promising to get new hard magnetic materials that can compete in the permanent magnet panorama and fill the gap between the ferrites and the NdFeB magnets.

  19. Dependence of surface distribution of self-assembled InSb nanodots on surface morphology and spacer layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godbole, M., E-mail: mohit.godbole@nmmu.ac.za [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Olivier, E.J. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Coetsee, E.; Swart, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, PO Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Neethling, J.H.; Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Self-assembled InSb nanodots (NDs) were grown on a GaSb (1 0 0) substrate using metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The effects of etching depth of the substrate and thickness of the GaSb buffer layer on the density and size distribution of single and double layer dots were studied for detector applications. The etch depth of the substrate was varied up to 30 {mu}m. In this particular study, the dots were grown at 450 Degree-Sign C and the GaSb spacer thickness was varied between 50 nm and 200 nm. The optimum substrate etch depth was found to be 30 {mu}m while the best spacer thickness was found to be 200 nm.

  20. Dependence of surface distribution of self-assembled InSb nanodots on surface morphology and spacer layer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, M.; Olivier, E.J.; Coetsee, E.; Swart, H.C.; Neethling, J.H.; Botha, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembled InSb nanodots (NDs) were grown on a GaSb (1 0 0) substrate using metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The effects of etching depth of the substrate and thickness of the GaSb buffer layer on the density and size distribution of single and double layer dots were studied for detector applications. The etch depth of the substrate was varied up to 30 μm. In this particular study, the dots were grown at 450 °C and the GaSb spacer thickness was varied between 50 nm and 200 nm. The optimum substrate etch depth was found to be 30 μm while the best spacer thickness was found to be 200 nm.

  1. Evaluation of resistive switching properties of Si-rich oxide embedded with Ti nanodots by applying constant voltage and current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Akio; Kato, Yusuke; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Makihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2018-06-01

    We have studied the resistive switching behaviors of electron beam (EB) evaporated Si-rich oxide (SiO x ) sandwiched between Ni electrodes by applying a constant voltage and current. Additionally, the impact of Ti nanodots (NDs) embedded into SiO x on resistive switching behaviors was investigated because it is expected that NDs can trigger the formation of a conductive filament path in SiO x . The resistive switching behaviors of SiO x show that the response time during resistance switching was decreased by increasing the applied constant current or constant voltage. It was found that Ti-NDs in SiO x enhance the conductive filament path formation owing to electric field concentration by Ti-NDs.

  2. A self-ordered, body-centered tetragonal superlattice of SiGe nanodot growth by reduced pressure CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Zaumseil, Peter; Capellini, Giovanni; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Hesse, Anne; Albani, Marco; Bergamaschini, Roberto; Montalenti, Francesco; Schroeder, Thomas; Tillack, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    Self-ordered three-dimensional body-centered tetragonal (BCT) SiGe nanodot structures are fabricated by depositing SiGe/Si superlattice layer stacks using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. For high enough Ge content in the island (>30%) and deposition temperature of the Si spacer layers (T > 700 °C), we observe the formation of an ordered array with islands arranged in staggered position in adjacent layers. The in plane periodicity of the islands can be selected by a suitable choice of the annealing temperature before the Si spacer layer growth and of the SiGe dot volume, while only a weak influence of the Ge concentration is observed. Phase-field simulations are used to clarify the driving force determining the observed BCT ordering, shedding light on the competition between heteroepitaxial strain and surface-energy minimization in the presence of a non-negligible surface roughness.

  3. Atomic-layer deposited IrO2 nanodots for charge-trap flash-memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sangmoo; Cha, Young-Kwan; Seo, Bum-Seok; Park, Sangjin; Park, Ju-Hee; Shin, Sangmin; Seol, Kwang Soo; Park, Jong-Bong; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Youngsoo; Park, Yoondong; Yoo, In-Kyeong; Choi, Suk-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Charge-trap flash- (CTF) memory structures have been fabricated by employing IrO 2 nanodots (NDs) grown by atomic-layer deposition. A band of isolated IrO 2 NDs of about 3 nm lying almost parallel to Si/SiO 2 interface is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The memory device with IrO 2 NDs shows much larger capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis and memory window compared with the control sample without IrO 2 NDs. After annealing at 800 deg. C for 20 min, the ND device shows almost no change in the width of C-V hysteresis and the ND distribution. These results indicate that the IrO 2 NDs embedded in SiO 2 can be utilized as thermally stable, discrete charge traps, promising for metal oxide-ND-based CTF memory devices

  4. Transport properties of cobalt at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radharkishna, P.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1965-01-01

    Measurements are made of electrical resistivity, absolute thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline cobalt between 1.2 and 6 K; results are discussed on basis of inter-electronic scattering.......Measurements are made of electrical resistivity, absolute thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity of polycrystalline cobalt between 1.2 and 6 K; results are discussed on basis of inter-electronic scattering....

  5. Influence of cobalt doping on structural and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, U. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (China); Adeela, N., E-mail: adeela16@gmail.com [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab (Pakistan); Javed, K. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (China); Riaz, S. [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab (Pakistan); Ali, H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (China); Iqbal, M. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab (Pakistan); Han, X. F. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (China); Naseem, S., E-mail: shahzad-naseem@yahoo.com [Centre for Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab (Pakistan)

    2015-11-15

    Nanocrystalline cobalt-doped bismuth ferrites with general formula of BiFe{sub 1−δ}Co{sub δ}O{sub 3} (0 ≤ δ ≤ 0.1) have been synthesized using solution evaporation method. Structure and phase identification was performed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The results confirm the formation of rhombohedral-distorted Perovskite structure with R3c symmetry. A decrease in lattice parameters and an increase in X-ray density have been observed with increasing cobalt concentration in BiFeO{sub 3}. Particle size determined by transmission electron microscope was in good agreement with XRD, i.e., 39 nm. Room-temperature coercivity and saturation magnetization of nanoparticles were increased up to 7.5 % of cobalt doping. Low-temperature magnetic measurements of selected sample showed increasing behavior in saturation magnetization, coercivity, effective magnetic moments, and anisotropy constant. An increase in coercivity with decrease in temperature followed theoretical model of Kneller’s law, while modified Bloch’s model was employed for saturation magnetization in temperature range of 5–300 K.Graphical Abstract.

  6. Recent advances in processing and applications of microwave ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Vincent G.; Geiler, Anton; Chen Yajie; Yoon, Soack Dae; Wu Mingzhong; Yang, Aria; Chen Zhaohui; He Peng; Parimi, Patanjali V.; Zuo Xu; Patton, Carl E.; Abe, Manasori; Acher, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Next generation magnetic microwave devices will be planar, smaller, weigh less, and perform well beyond the present state-of-the-art. For this to become a reality advances in ferrite materials must first be realized. These advances include self-bias magnetization, tunability of the magnetic anisotropy, low microwave loss, and volumetric and weight reduction. To achieve these goals one must turn to novel materials processing methods. Here, we review recent advances in the processing of microwave ferrites. Attention is paid to the processing of ferrite films by pulsed laser deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, spin spray ferrite plating, screen printing, and compaction of quasi-single crystals. Conventional and novel applications of ferrite materials, including microwave non-reciprocal passive devices, microwave signal processing, negative index metamaterial-based electronics, and electromagnetic interference suppression are discussed.

  7. Characterization of ion-irradiation-induced nanodot structures on InP surfaces by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnaser, Hubert; Radny, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Surfaces of InP were bombarded by 1.9 keV Ar(+) ions under normal incidence. The total accumulated ion fluence the samples were exposed to was varied from 1 × 10(17) cm(-2) to 3 × 10(18)cm(-2) and ion flux densities f of (0.4-2) × 10(14) cm(-2) s(-1) were used. Nanodot structures were found to evolve on the surface from these ion irradiations, their dimensions however, depend on the specific bombardment conditions. The resulting surface morphology was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). As a function of ion fluence, the mean radius, height, and spacing of the dots can be fitted by power-law dependences. In order to determine possible local compositional changes in these nanostructures induced by ion impact, selected samples were prepared for atom probe tomography (APT). The results indicate that by APT the composition of individual InP nanodots evolving under ion bombardment could be examined with atomic spatial resolution. At the InP surface, the values of the In/P concentration ratio are distinctly higher over a distance of ~1 nm and amount to 1.3-1.8. However, several aspects critical for the analyses were identified: (i) because of the small dimensions of these nanostructures a successful tip preparation proved very challenging. (ii) The elemental compositions obtained from APT were found to be influenced pronouncedly by the laser pulse energy; typically, low energies result in the correct stoichiometry whereas high ones lead to an inhomogeneous evaporation from the tips and deviations from the nominal composition. (iii) Depending again on the laser energy, a prolific emission of Pn cluster ions was observed, with n ≤ 11. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The effect of cooling rate and austenite grain size on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmailian, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of different austenite grain size and different cooling rates on the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature and different ferrite morphologies in one Nb-microalloyed high strength low alloy steel has been investigated. Three different austenite grain sizes were selected and cooled at two different cooling rates for obtaining austenite to ferrite transformation temperature. Moreover, samples with specific austenite grain size have been quenched, partially, for investigation on the microstructural evolution. In order to assess the influence of austenite grain size on the ferrite transformation temperature, a temperature differences method is established and found to be a good way for detection of austenite to ferrite, pearlite and sometimes other ferrite morphologies transformation temperatures. The results obtained in this way show that increasing of austenite grain size and cooling rate has a significant influence on decreasing of the ferrite transformation temperature. Micrographs of different ferrite morphologies show that at high temperatures, where diffusion rates are higher, grain boundary ferrite nucleates. As the temperature is lowered and the driving force for ferrite formation increases, intragranular sites inside the austenite grains become operative as nucleation sites and suppress the grain boundary ferrite growth. The results indicate that increasing the austenite grain size increases the rate and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite in two different cooling rates. Moreover, by increasing of cooling rate, the austenite to ferrite transformation temperature decreases and volume fraction of intragranular ferrite increases.

  9. COBALT COMPOUNDS AS ANTIDOTES FOR HYDROCYANIC ACID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EVANS, C L

    1964-12-01

    The antidotal potency of a cobalt salt (acetate), of dicobalt edetate, of hydroxocobalamin and of cobinamide against hydrocyanic acid was examined mainly on mice and rabbits. All the compounds were active antidotes for up to twice the LD50; under some conditions for larger doses. The most successful was cobalt acetate for rabbits (5xLD50), which was effective at a molar cyanide/cobalt (CN/Co) ratio of 5, but had as a side-effect intense purgation. Hydroxocobalamin was irregular in action, but on the whole was most effective for mice (4.5xLD50 at a molar ratio of 1), and had no apparent side effects. Dicobalt edetate, at molar ratios of up to 2, was more effective for rabbits (3xLD50) than for mice (2xLD50), but had fewer side effects than cobalt acetate. The effect of thiosulphate was to augment the efficacy of dicobalt edetate and, in mice, that of hydroxocobalamin; but, apparently, in rabbits, to reduce that of hydroxocobalamin. Cobinamide, at a molar ratio of 1, was slightly more effective than hydroxocobalamin on rabbits and also less irregular in its action. Cobalt acetate by mouth was effective against orally administered hydrocyanic acid. The oxygen uptake of the body, reduced by cyanide, is rapidly reinstated when one of the cobalt antidotes has been successfully administered.

  10. Magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline nickel ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathani, H.; Gubbala, S.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2005-01-01

    In the previous papers [R.D.K. Misra, A. Kale, R.S. Srivatsava, O. Senkov, Mater. Sci. Technol. 19 (2003) 826; R.D.K. Misra, A. Kale, B. Hooi, J.Th. DeHosson, Mater. Sci. Technol. 19 (2003) 1617; A. Kale, S. Gubbala, R.D.K. Misra, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 277 (2004) 350; S. Gubbala, H. Nathani, K. Koizol, R.D.K. Misra, Phys. B 348 (2004) 317; R.D.K. Misra, S. Gubbala, A. Kale, W.F. Egelhoff, Mater. Sci. Eng. B. 111 (2004) 164], we reported the synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic behavior of nanocrystalline ferrites of inverse and mixed spinel structure made by reverse micelle technique that enabled a narrow particle size distribution to be obtained. In the present paper, the reverse micelle approach has been extended to synthesize nanocrystalline ferrites with varying surface roughness of 8-18 A (the surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy) and the magnetic behavior studied by SQUID magnetometer. Two different kinds of measurement were performed: (a) zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) magnetization versus temperature measurements and (b) magnetization as a function of applied field. The analysis of magnetic measurement suggests significant influence of surface roughness of particles on the magnetic behavior. While the superparamagnetic behavior is retained by the nanocrystalline ferrites of different surface roughness at 300 K, the hysteresis loop at 2 K becomes non-squared and the coercivity increases with increase in surface roughness. This behavior is discussed in terms of broken bonds and degree of surface spin disorder

  11. Preferential spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Brajesh, E-mail: bpandey@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science, Symbiosis Institute of Technology, SIU, Lavale, Pune 411112 (India); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Litterst, F.J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Institut für Physik der Kondensierten Materie,Technische Universität Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Baggio-Saitovitch, E.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Zinc ferrite nanoparticles powder with average size of 10.0±0.5 nm was synthesized by the citrate precursor route. We studied the structural and magnetic properties using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the synthesized zinc ferrite possesses good spinel structure. Both Mössbauer and magnetization data indicate superparamagnetic ferrimagnetic particles at room temperature. The magnetic behavior is determined by a considerable degree of cation inversion with Fe{sup III} in tetrahedral A-sites. Mössbauer spectroscopy at low temperature and in high applied magnetic field reveals that A-site spins are aligned antiparallel to the applied field with some possible angular scatter whereas practically all octahedral B-site spins are canted contrasting some earlier reported partial B-site spin canting in nanosize zinc ferrite. Deviations from the antiferromagnetic arrangement of B-site spins are supposed to be caused by magnetic frustration effects. - Highlights: • Spinel structure ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the uniform size range of 10.0±0.5 nm have been synthesized using the citrate precursor route. • Canting of the spins of A- and B-sublattice sites has been studied by low temperature and high magnetic field Mössbauer spectroscopy. • A-site spins are aligned antiparallel to the applied field with only small angular scatter. • B-site spins are strongly canted in contrast to earlier quoted only partial canting. • B site spin structure deviates significantly from a collinear antiferromagnetic arrangement.

  12. Dopant driven tunability of dielectric relaxation in MxCo(1-x)Fe2O4 (M: Zn2+, Mn2+, Ni2+) nano-ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datt, Gopal; Abhyankar, A. C.

    2017-07-01

    Nano-ferrites with tunable dielectric and magnetic properties are highly desirable in modern electronics industries. This work reports the effect of ferromagnetic (Ni), anti-ferromagnetic (Mn), and non-magnetic (Zn) substitution on cobalt-ferrites' dielectric and magnetic properties. The Rietveld analysis of XRD data and the Raman spectroscopic study reveals that all the samples are crystallized in the Fd-3m space group. The T2g Raman mode was observed to split into branches, which is due to the presence of different cations (with different vibrational frequencies) at crystallographic A and B-sites. The magnetization study shows that the MnCoFe2O4 sample has the highest saturation magnetization of 87 emu/g, which is attributed to the presence of Mn2+ cations at the B-site with a magnetic moment of 5 μB. The dielectric permittivity of these nanoparticles (NPs) obeys the modified Debye model, which is further supported by Cole-Cole plots. The dielectric constant of MnCoFe2O4 ferrite is found to be one order higher than that of the other two ferrites. The increased bond length of the Mn2+-O2- bond along with the enhanced d-d electron transition between Mn 2 +/Co 2 +⇋Fe 3 + cations at the B-site are found to be the main contributing factors for the enhanced dielectric constant of MnCoFe2O4 ferrite. We find evidence of variable-range hopping of localized polarons in these ferrite NPs. The activation energy, hopping range, and density of states N (" separators="|EF ), of these polarons were calculated using Motts' 1/4th law. The estimated activation energies of these polarons at 300 K were found to be 288 meV, 426 meV, and 410 meV, respectively, for the MnCoFe2O4, NiCoFe2O4, and ZnCoFe2O4 ferrite NPs, while the hopping range of these polarons were found to be 27.14 Å, 11.66 Å, and 8.17 Å, respectively. Observation of a low dielectric loss of ˜0.04, in the frequency range of 0.1-1 MHz, in these NPs makes them potential candidates for energy harvesting devices in

  13. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  14. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar; Schaltz, Erik; Ahn, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending...

  15. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruud, Clayton O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Ryan M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, Aaron A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Michael T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  16. Advances in ferrite microwave materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloemann, Ernst

    2000-01-01

    The application of ferrites in non-reciprocal components is discussed, with the emphasis on broadband isolators and circulators. The performance of such devices may be characterized by the ratio f max /f min of the frequencies that define the edges of the frequency band, within which satisfactory performance has been achieved. For the best currently available devices this ratio is approx. 3 : 1, but larger values appear feasible according to a detailed analysis of the 'low-field, low-frequency loss' that limits the performance

  17. Plasticity of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakine, C.; Prioul, C.; Alamo, A.; Francois, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two 13%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloys, DT and DY, exhibiting different oxide particle size distribution and a χ phase precipitation were studied. Their tensile properties have been tested from 20 to 700 C. Experimental observations during room temperature tensile tests performed in a scanning electronic microscope have shown that the main damage mechanism consists in microcracking of the χ phase precipitates on grain boundaries. These alloys are high tensile and creep resistant between 500 and 700 C. Their strongly stress-sensitive creep behaviour can be described by usual creep laws and incorporating a threshold stress below which the creep rate is negligible. (orig.)

  18. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery: has the use of cobalt replaced nickel following regulatory intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten S; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure.......Before the introduction of the EU Nickel Directive, concern was raised that manufacturers of jewellery might turn from the use of nickel to cobalt following the regulatory intervention on nickel exposure....

  19. Synthesis of new cobalt aluminophosphate framework by opening a cobalt methylphosphonate layered material

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zaarour, M.; Pérez, O.; Boullay, P.; Martens, J.; Mihailova, B.; Karaghiosoff, K.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 5100-5105 ISSN 1466-8033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : cobalt aluminophosphate * cobalt methylphosphonate * layered materials * crystallic structure * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.474, year: 2016

  20. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...

  1. Control of carbon nanotube growth using cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Yoon; Green, Malcolm L.H.; Kim, Young Heon; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2005-01-01

    We have controllably grown carbon nanotubes using uniformly distributed cobalt nanoparticles as catalyst. Cobalt nanoparticles with a uniform size were synthesized by chemical reaction and colloidal solutions including the cobalt nanoparticles were prepared. The cobalt nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on silicon substrates by a spin-coating method. Carbon nanotubes with a uniform diameter were synthesized on the cobalt nanoparticles by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene gas. The density and vertical alignment of carbon nanotubes could be controlled by adjusting the density of cobalt (Co) nanoparticles

  2. Cellulose-precursor synthesis of nanocrystalline Co0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 spinel ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ounnunkad, Kontad; Phanichphant, Sukon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of spinel copper cobalt nanoferrite particles from a cellulose precursor for the first time. Control of nanosize and properties of nanoferrites can take place by varying the calcining temperature. The simple, low cost, easy cellulose process is a choice of nanoparticle processing technology. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline Cu 0.5 Co 0.5 Fe 2 O 4 powders were prepared via a metal-cellulose precursor synthetic route. Cellulose was used as a fuel and a dispersing agent. The resulting precursors were calcined in the temperature range of 450–600 °C. The phase development of the samples was determined by using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The field-dependent magnetizations of the nanopowders were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). All XRD patterns are of a spinel ferrite with cubic symmetry. Microstructure of the ferrites showed irregular shapes and uniform particles with agglomeration. From XRD data, the crystallite sizes are in range of 16–42 nm. Saturation magnetization and coercivity increased with increasing calcining temperature due to enhancement of crystallinity and reduction of oxygen vacancies.

  3. A tunable ratiometric pH sensor based on carbon nanodots for the quantitative measurement of the intracellular pH of whole cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen; Li, Xiaohua; Ma, Huimin

    2012-06-25

    The whole picture: Carbon nanodots labeled with two fluorescent dyes have been developed as a tunable ratiometric pH sensor to measure intracellular pH. The nanosensor shows good biocompatibility and cellular dispersibility. Quantitative determinations on intact HeLa cells and pH fluctuations associated with oxidative stress were performed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Electronic Transport Mechanism for Schottky Diodes Formed by Au/HVPE a-Plane GaN Templates Grown via In Situ GaN Nanodot Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonsang Lee

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electrical characteristics of Schottky contacts for an Au/hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE a-plane GaN template grown via in situ GaN nanodot formation. Although the Schottky diodes present excellent rectifying characteristics, their Schottky barrier height and ideality factor are highly dependent upon temperature variation. The relationship between the barrier height, ideality factor, and conventional Richardson plot reveals that the Schottky diodes exhibit an inhomogeneous barrier height, attributed to the interface states between the metal and a-plane GaN film and to point defects within the a-plane GaN layers grown via in situ nanodot formation. Also, we confirm that the current transport mechanism of HVPE a-plane GaN Schottky diodes grown via in situ nanodot formation prefers a thermionic field emission model rather than a thermionic emission (TE one, implying that Poole–Frenkel emission dominates the conduction mechanism over the entire range of measured temperatures. The deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS results prove the presence of noninteracting point-defect-assisted tunneling, which plays an important role in the transport mechanism. These electrical characteristics indicate that this method possesses a great throughput advantage for various applications, compared with Schottky contact to a-plane GaN grown using other methods. We expect that HVPE a-plane GaN Schottky diodes supported by in situ nanodot formation will open further opportunities for the development of nonpolar GaN-based high-performance devices.

  5. Beam impedance of ferrite kicker magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelker, F.; Lambertson, G.

    1989-03-01

    We have measured the longitudinal beam impedance of a typical pulsed magnet that will be used in the Advanced Light Source. The magnets are of a ferrite window-frame design with a single plate conductor on each side. Two separate power supplies are used to drive current in opposite directions in the two conductors. The continuity of the ferrite yoke is interrupted by two copper plates 1 mm thick in the center of the top and bottom of the window frame. This increases the reluctance of the magnetic path, and thus decreases the flux which couples the beam. The measurements were made by exciting a 1/8'' rod along the beam path through the magnet. This makes a 185 ohm transmission line, and it was terminated in a resistive divider at the exit end. A 3 GHz network analyzer was used to measure S 21 through the magnet, and longitudinal beam impedance was calculated from this data. The impedance is dominated by two low frequency resonances in the magnet winding and drive current. 8 figs

  6. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots for ratiometric pH sensing by femtosecond laser ablation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Huanhuan; Yan, Lihe; Nguyen, Vanthan; Yu, Yang; Xu, Yanmin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-containing carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesize using pulsed laser ablation in liquid. • The CDs show a strong fluorescence consisting of a dual-band luminescence peak. • The as prepared CDs can offer a ratiometric sensing platform for the detection the pH values. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesized by one-step femtosecond laser ablation of graphite powder in aminotoluene at room temperature. The as-prepared CDs have the average diameter of 2.87 nm and possess an excitation-independent emission covering nearly the whole visible light region at a single excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicate that there are a huge number of multiple oxygen groups and amine groups on the surface of the CDs. As their different fluorescence peaks originated from different emission surface groups on the nanodots show different pH dependence, these CDs can be used for ratiometric pH sensing.

  7. Ultrasmall Tin Nanodots Embedded in Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: Metal-Organic-Framework Derivation and Electrochemical Application as Highly Stable Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Ruoling; Sun, Weiwei; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sn-based metal-organic-framework (MOF) is prepared. • Ultrasmall tin nanodots (2–3 nm) are embedded in nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. • The Sn/C composite anode shows high capacity and ultralong cycle life. - Abstract: This work reports a facile metal-organic-framework based approach to synthesize Sn/C composite, in which ultrasmall Sn nanodots with typical size of 2–3 nm are uniformly embedded in the nitrogen-doped porous carbon matrix (denoted as Sn@NPC). The effect of thermal treatment and nitrogen doping are also explored. Owing to the delicate size control and confined volume change within carbon matrix, the Sn@NPC composite can exhibit reversible capacities of 575 mAh g −1 (Sn contribution: 1091 mAh g −1 ) after 500 cycles at 0.2 A g −1 and 507 mAh g −1 (Sn contribution: 1077 mAh g −1 ) after 1500 cycles at 1 A g −1 . The excellent long-life electrochemical stability of the Sn@NPC anode has been mainly attributed to the uniform distribution of ultrasmall Sn nanodots and the highly-conductive and flexible N-doped carbon matrix, which can effectively facilitate lithium ion/electron diffusion, buffer the large volume change and improve the structure stability of the electrode during repetitive cycling with lithium ions.

  8. One-step synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots for ratiometric pH sensing by femtosecond laser ablation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huanhuan [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yan, Lihe, E-mail: liheyan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Nguyen, Vanthan [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Le Quy Don Technical University, Hanoi 122314 (Viet Nam); Yu, Yang; Xu, Yanmin [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Key Lab. of Information Photonic Technique, School of Electronics and Information Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Nitrogen-containing carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesize using pulsed laser ablation in liquid. • The CDs show a strong fluorescence consisting of a dual-band luminescence peak. • The as prepared CDs can offer a ratiometric sensing platform for the detection the pH values. - Abstract: Nitrogen-doped carbon nanodots (CDs) are synthesized by one-step femtosecond laser ablation of graphite powder in aminotoluene at room temperature. The as-prepared CDs have the average diameter of 2.87 nm and possess an excitation-independent emission covering nearly the whole visible light region at a single excitation wavelength. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicate that there are a huge number of multiple oxygen groups and amine groups on the surface of the CDs. As their different fluorescence peaks originated from different emission surface groups on the nanodots show different pH dependence, these CDs can be used for ratiometric pH sensing.

  9. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  10. Dissolution studies on Nickel ferrite in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Srinivasan, M.P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Laboratory; Raghavan, P.S. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India); Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India); Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India). Department of Chemistry

    2004-09-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important corrosion products in the pipeline surfaces of water-cooled nuclear reactors. The dissolution of the nickel ferrite by chelating agents is very sensitive to the nature of the chelant, the nature of the reductant used in the formulation and the temperature at which the dissolution studies are performed. The dissolution is mainly controlled by the reductive dissolution of the ferrite particles, but complexing agents also play a significant role in the dissolution process. This study deals with the leaching of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite prepared by the solid-state method. The dissolution studies are performed in pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) formulations containing organic reductants like ascorbic acid and low oxidation state transition metal ion reductants like Fe(II)-L (where L = PDCA, NTA, EDTA) at 85 C. The dissolution of nickel ferrite in PDCA, NTA and EDTA formulations is influenced by the presence of reductants in the formulations. The addition of Fe(II)-L in the formulation greatly enhances the dissolution of nickel ferrite. The preferential leaching of nickel over iron during the dissolution of nickel ferrite was observed in all the formulations. (orig.)

  11. Dissolution studies on Nickel ferrite in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Gopalan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important corrosion products in the pipeline surfaces of water-cooled nuclear reactors. The dissolution of the nickel ferrite by chelating agents is very sensitive to the nature of the chelant, the nature of the reductant used in the formulation and the temperature at which the dissolution studies are performed. The dissolution is mainly controlled by the reductive dissolution of the ferrite particles, but complexing agents also play a significant role in the dissolution process. This study deals with the leaching of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite prepared by the solid-state method. The dissolution studies are performed in pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) formulations containing organic reductants like ascorbic acid and low oxidation state transition metal ion reductants like Fe(II)-L (where L = PDCA, NTA, EDTA) at 85 C. The dissolution of nickel ferrite in PDCA, NTA and EDTA formulations is influenced by the presence of reductants in the formulations. The addition of Fe(II)-L in the formulation greatly enhances the dissolution of nickel ferrite. The preferential leaching of nickel over iron during the dissolution of nickel ferrite was observed in all the formulations. (orig.)

  12. Manufacturing of Mn-Zn ferrite transformer cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waqas, H.; Qureshi, A.H.; Hussain, N.; Ahmed, N.

    2012-01-01

    The present work is related to the development of soft ferrite transformer cores, which are extensively used in electronic devices such as switch mode power supplies, electromagnetic devices, computers, amplifiers etc. Mn-Zn Ferrite (soft ferrite) powders were prepared by conventional mixed oxide and auto combustion routes. These powders were calcined and then pressed in toroid shapes. Sintering was done at different temperatures to develop desired magnetic phase. Impedance resistance of sintered toroid cores was measured at different frequencies. Results revealed that Mn-Zn Ferrite cores synthesized by auto combustion route worked more efficiently in a high frequency range i.e. > 2MHz than the cores developed by conventional mixed oxide method. It was noticed that compact size, light weight and high impedance resistance are the prime advantages of auto combustion process which supported the performance of core in MHz frequency range. Furthermore, these compact size cores were successfully tested in linear pulse amplifier circuit of Pakistan Atomic Research Reactor-I. The fabrication of soft ferrite (Mn-Zn Ferrite) cores by different processing routes is an encouraging step towards indigenization of ferrite technology. (Orig./A.B.)

  13. Ferrite Nanoparticles, Films, Single Crystals, and Metamaterials: High Frequency Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, V.

    2006-01-01

    Ferrite materials have long played an important role in power conditioning, conversion, and generation across a wide spectrum of frequencies (up to ten decades). They remain the preferred magnetic materials, having suitably low losses, for most applications above 1 MHz, and are the only viable materials for nonreciprocal magnetic microwave and millimeter-wave devices (including tunable filters, isolators, phase shifters, and circulators). Recently, novel processing techniques have led to a resurgence of research interest in the design and processing of ferrite materials as nanoparticles, films, single crystals, and metamaterials. These latest developments have set the stage for their use in emerging technologies that include cancer remediation therapies such as magnetohyperthermia, magnetic targeted drug delivery, and magneto-rheological fluids, as well as enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. With reduced dimensionality of nanoparticles and films, and the inherent nonequilibrium nature of many processing schemes, changes in local chemistry and structure have profound effects on the functional properties and performance of ferrites. In this lecture, we will explore these effects upon the fundamental magnetic and electronic properties of ferrites. Density functional theory will be applied to predict the properties of these ferrites, with synchrotron radiation techniques used to elucidate the chemical and structural short-range order. This approach will be extended to study the atomic design of ferrites by alternating target laser-ablation deposition. Recently, this approach has been shown to produce ferrites that offer attractive properties not found in conventionally grown ferrites. We will explore the latest research developments involving ferrites as related to microwave and millimeter-wave applications and the attempt to integrate these materials with semiconductor materials platforms

  14. RF electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ferrite polymer composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosoudil, Rastislav; Usakova, Marianna; Franek, Jaroslav; Slama, Jozef; Olah, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The frequency dispersion of complex initial (relative) permeability (μ * =μ ' -jμ ' ') and the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of composite materials based on NiZn sintered ferrite and a polyvinylchloride (PVC) polymer matrix have been studied in frequency range from 1MHz to 1GHz. The complex permeability of the composites was found to increase as the ferrite content increased, and was characterized by frequency dispersion localized above 50MHz. The variation of return loss (RL) of single-layer RF absorbers using the prepared composite materials has been investigated as a function of frequency, ferrite content and the thickness of the absorbers

  15. Fast ferrite tuner for the BNL synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivit, E.; Hanna, S.M.; Keane, J.

    1991-01-01

    A new type of ferrite tuner has been tested at the BNL. The ferrite tuner uses garnet slabs partially filling a stripline. One of the important features of the tuner is that the ferrite is perpendicularly biased for operation above FMR, thus reducing the magnetic losses. A unique design was adopted to achieve the efficient cooling. The principle of operation of the tuner as well as our preliminary results on tuning a 52 MHz cavity are reported. Optimized conditions under which we demonstrated linear tunability of 80 KHz are described. The tuner's losses and its effect on higher-order modes in the cavity are discussed. 2 refs., 8 figs

  16. The mechanism of nickel ferrite formation by glow discharge effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, L. A.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of various factors on the formation of nickel ferrite by the glow discharge effect has been studied. The ferritization process in the system FeSO4-NiSO4-NaOH-H2O has been studied by the methods of potentiometric titration, measurement of electrical conductivity, residual concentrations and apparent sediment volume. It has been established that the process proceeds in a multistage fashion at pH 11-12 with the formation of polyhydroxo complexes, an intermediate compound and the ferrite formation by its oxidation with active radicals.

  17. Cobalt: A vital element in the aircraft engine industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Recent trends in the United States consumption of cobalt indicate that superalloys for aircraft engine manufacture require increasing amounts of this strategic element. Superalloys consume a lion's share of total U.S. cobalt usage which was about 16 million pounds in 1980. In excess of 90 percent of the cobalt used in this country was imported, principally from the African countries of Zaire and Zambia. Early studies on the roles of cobalt as an alloying element in high temperature alloys concentrated on the simple Ni-Cr and Nimonic alloy series. The role of cobalt in current complex nickel base superalloys is not well defined and indeed, the need for the high concentration of cobalt in widely used nickel base superalloys is not firmly established. The current cobalt situation is reviewed as it applies to superalloys and the opportunities for research to reduce the consumption of cobalt in the aircraft engine industry are described.

  18. Assessment of cobalt levels in wastewater, soil and vegetable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Key words: Cobalt level, Kubanni River, soil, vegetable, wastewater. INTRODUCTION. Cobalt is ... metals released into the environment from a variety of anthropogenic activities ..... Heavy Metal Stress in Plants, 2nd Edition,. Springer,. United.

  19. Synthesis and phosphatase activity of a Cobalt(II) phenanthroline ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAMONI GARAI

    2017-09-19

    Sep 19, 2017 ... Synthesis and phosphatase activity of a Cobalt(II) phenanthroline complex. MAMONI GARAIa ... tion, cobalt complexes have gained importance because of their application as ... 2.3 Physical measurements. Infrared spectrum ...

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopic characterization of ferrite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.

    1999-01-01

    The principle of Moessbauer effect and the nature of hyperfine interactions were presented. The discovery of the Moessbauer effect was the basis of a new spectroscopic technique, called Moessbauer spectroscopy, which has already made important contribution to research in physics, chemistry, metallurgy, mineralogy and biochemistry. In the present work the selected ferrites such as spinel ferrite, NiFe 2 O 4 , and some rare earth orthoferrites and garnets were investigated using Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used as complementary techniques. The formation of NiFe 2 O 4 was monitored during the thermal decomposition of mixed salt (Ni(NO 3 ) 2 +2Fe(NO 3 ) 3 )nH 2 O. The ferritization of Ni 2+ ions was observed at 500 deg. C and after heating at 1300 deg. C the stoichiometric NiFe 2 O 4 was produced. The Moessbauer parameters obtained for NiFe 2 O 4 , d Fe = 0.36 mm s -1 and HMF = 528 kOe, can be ascribed to Fe 3+ ions in the octahedral sublattice, while parameters d Fe = 0.28 mm s -1 and HMF = 494 kOe can be ascribed to Fe 3+ ions in the tetrahedral lattice. The effect of ball-milling of NiFe 2 O 4 was monitored. The formation of oxide phases and their properties in the systems Nd 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Sm 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 , Eu 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 and Er 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 were also investigated. Quantitative distributions of oxide phases, a-Fe 2 O 3 , R 2 O 3 , R 3 Fe 5 O 12 and RFeO 3 , R = Gd or Eu, were determined for the systems xGd 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 and xEu 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 . The samples, prepared by chemical coprecipitation in the system xEu 2 O 3 +(1-x)Fe 2 O 3 , 0≤x≤1, were completely amorphous as observed by XRD, even at the relatively high temperature of the sample preparation (600 deg. C). Similar behavior was observed during the formation of Er 3 Fe 5 O 12 . Moessbauer spectroscopy indicated that this 'amorphous' phase is actually composed of very small and/or poor

  1. The physiological effect of cobalt on watermelon cultivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Naihua; Jin Yafang; Sun Yaochen; Huang Yiming

    1993-01-01

    Cobalt has essential physiological action on both animals and plants. For the latter it can raise plant's nitrogen-fixing ability and saccharine content. Spray of cobalt mixed with other nutritive elements can improve the germinatit of seeds and the yield of fruit. For specifying the nutritive function of cobalt upon watermelon, isotope 60 Co was mixed into a complex leaf nutritive aqua and the regularity of transferring and absorbing cobalt in the watermelon's body was investigated

  2. Relaxation resistance of heat resisting alloys with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzdyka, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Relaxation resistance of refractory nickel-chromium alloys containing 5 to 14 % cobalt is under study. The tests involve the use of circular samples at 800 deg to 850 deg C. It is shown that an alloy containing 14% cobalt possesses the best relaxation resistance exceeding that of nickel-chromium alloys without any cobalt by a factor of 1.5 to 2. The relaxation resistance of an alloy with 5% cobalt can be increased by hardening at repeated loading

  3. Manipulating radicals: Using cobalt to steer radical reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chirilă, A.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes research aimed at understanding and exploiting metallo-radical reactivity and explores reactions mediated by square planar, low-spin cobalt(II) complexes. A primary goal was to uncover novel reactivity of discrete cobalt(III)-bound carbene radicals generated upon reaction of the cobalt(II) catalysts with carbene precursors. Another important goal was to replace cobalt(II)-porphyrin catalysts with cheaper and easier to prepare metallo-radical analogues. Therefore the cata...

  4. Perfluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine effectively catalyzes water electrooxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Morlanes, Natalia Sanchez

    2014-12-08

    Efficient electrocatalysis of water oxidation under mild conditions at neutral pH was achieved by a fluorinated cobalt phthalocyanine immobilized on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) surfaces with an onset potential at 1.7 V vs. RHE. Spectroscopic, electrochemical, and inhibition studies indicate that phthalocyanine molecular species are the operational active sites. Neither free cobalt ions nor heterogeneous cobalt oxide particles or films were observed. During long-term controlled-potential electrolysis at 2 V vs. RHE (phosphate buffer, pH 7), electrocatalytic water oxidation was sustained for at least 8 h (TON ≈ 1.0 × 105), producing about 4 μmol O2 h-1 cm-2 with a turnover frequency (TOF) of about 3.6 s-1 and no measurable catalyst degradation.

  5. Total quality management of cobalt-60 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    Total Quality Management of Cobalt-60 sources by a supplier requires a life cycle approach to source management. This covers various aspects, including design, manufacturing, installation, field inspection, source surveillance and return of cobalt-60 sources at the end of their useful life. The Total Quality Management approach demonstrates a strong industry commitment to the beneficial use of gamma technology for industrial irradiation applications in both developed nations and in those nations who are developing their infrastructure and techniques for the beneficial use of this technology. MDS Nordion continues to demonstrate its support and commitment to the industry by developing and implementing state-of-the-art standards for the safe use of cobalt-60 sources

  6. Preliminary studies of cobalt complexation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, P.; Shaw, P.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A relatively non-invasive method has been used to separate complexed from free cobalt-60 in groundwater, using the weak cationic adsorption properties of Sephadex gels, and a mobile phase of natural groundwater. Results show the kinetics of Co complex formation in groundwater to be slow, and that the equilibrium position is affected by temperature, cobalt concentration and the ionic/organic strength of the groundwater. The addition of DAEA cellulose to the groundwater to remove humic material, also removed the majority of organic species which absorb UV at 254 nm, but 45% of the original total organic carbon remained, and the amount of complexed cobalt left in solution was only reduced to 76% of its former concentration. This suggests that the completed Co species separated by the method described in this paper are a mixture of inorganic and organic compounds, and studies are therefore continuing to establish their exact nature. (author)

  7. Preliminary studies of cobalt complexation in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, P.; Shaw, P.; Williams, G.M.; Hooker, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A relatively non-invasive method has been used to separate complexed from free cobalt-60 in groundwater, using the weak cationic adsorption properties of Sephadex gels, and a mobile phase of natural groundwater. Results show the kinetics of Co complex formation in groundwater to be slow, and that the equilibrium position is affected by temperature, cobalt concentration and the ionic/organic strength of the groundwater. The addition of DEAE cellulose to the groundwater to remove humic material, also removed the majority of organic species with absorb UV at 254 nm, but 45% of the original total organic carbon remained, and the amount of complexed cobalt left in solution was only reduced to 76% of its former concentration. This suggests that the complexed Co species separated by the method described in this paper are a mixture of inorganic and organic compounds, and studies are therefore continuing to establish their exact nature. (orig.)

  8. Palladium-cobalt particles as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzic, Radoslav [East Setauket, NY; Huang, Tao [Manorville, NY

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates to palladium-cobalt particles useful as oxygen-reducing electrocatalysts. The invention also relates to oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells containing these palladium-cobalt particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for the production of electrical energy by using the palladium-cobalt particles of the invention.

  9. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin

    2016-01-01

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future

  10. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future.

  11. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  12. Creep lifetime assessements of ferritic pipeline welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, R.A.; Goodall, I.W.; Miller, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The low alloy ferritic steam pipework in Advanced Gas Cooled reactor (AGR) power stations operates at temperatures in the creep range. An inspection strategy for continued operation of the pipework has been developed based on estimation of the creep rupture life of pipework weldments and fracture mechanics for demonstrating acceptance of defects. This strategy is described in outline. The estimation of creep rupture life is described in more detail. Validation for the approach is illustrated by comparison with pressure vessel tests and with metallographic examination of components removed from service. The fracture mechanics methods are also described. It is shown that the amount of creep crack growth is dependent on the life fraction at which the assessment is made; crack growth being rapid as the creep rupture life is approached. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K.H; Koenig, H. [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  14. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K H; Koenig, H [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  15. Positron annihilation characterization of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinger, M.J.; Glade, S.C.; Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) were produced by mechanically alloying Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti and 0.25Y 2 O 3 (wt%) powders followed by hot isostatic pressing consolidation at 850, 1000 and 1150 deg. C. Positron annihilation lifetime and orbital momentum spectroscopy measurements are in qualitative agreement with small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography observations, indicating that up to 50% of the annihilations occur at high densities of Y-Ti-O enriched nm-scale features (NFs). Some annihilations may also occur in small cavities. In Y-free control alloys, that do not contain NFs, positrons primarily annihilate in the Fe-Cr matrix and at features such as dislocations, while a small fraction annihilate in large cavities or Ar bubbles.

  16. Cobalt-free nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Michio; Harada, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Cobalt-free nickel-base cast superalloys have been developed. Cobalt is considered to be a beneficial element to strengthen the alloys but should be eliminated in alloys to be used for direct cycle helium turbine driven by helium gas from HTGR (high temp. gas reactor). The elimination of cobalt is required to avoid the formation of radioactive 60 Co from the debris or scales of the alloys. Cobalt-free alloys are also desirable from another viewpoint, i.e. recently the shortage of the element has become a serious problem in industry. Cobalt-free Mar-M200 type alloys modified by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2 wt% B and 1 - 1.5 wt% Hf were found to have a creep rupture strength superior or comparable to that of the original Mar-M200 alloy bearing cobalt. The ductility in tensile test at 800 0 C, as cast or after prolonged heating at 900 0 C (the tensile test was done without removing the surface layer affected by the heating), was also improved by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf. The morphology of grain boundaries became intricated by the additions of 0.15 - 0.2% B and 1 - 1.5% Hf, to such a degree that one can hardly distinguish grain boundaries by microscopes. The change in the grain boundary morphology was considered, as suggested previously by one of the authors (M.Y.), to be the reason for the improvements in the creep rupture strength and tensile ductility. (author)

  17. Radiation induced ligand loss from cobalt complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funston, A. M.; McFadyen, W.D.; Tregloan, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Due to the rapid nature of ligand dissociation from cobalt(II) complexes the study of the rate of ligand dissociation necessitates the use of a technique such as pulse radiolysis. This allows the rapid reduction of the corresponding cobalt(III) complex by a reducing radical, such as the aquated electron, to form the cobalt(II) complex. However, to date, no systematic study of either the mechanism of reduction or the influence of the electronic structure on the rate of ligand dissociation has been carried out. In order to understand these processes more fully the mechanism of reduction of a range of related cobalt(III) complexes by the aquated electron and the subsequent rate of ligand dissociation from the resulting cobalt(II) complexes is being investigated. It has been found that a number of processes are observed following the initial rapid reaction of the cobalt(III) complex with the aquated electron. Ultimately ligand loss is observed. Depending upon the complex, the initial processes observed may include the formation of coordinated radicals and electron transfer within the complex. For complexes containing aromatic ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine the formation of a coordinated radical is observed as the initial reduction step. The kinetics of ligand dissociation of these complexes has been determined. The loss of monodentate ligands is fast and has been indistinguishable from the reduction processes when aromatic ligands are also present in the complex. However, for diamine chelates and diimine chelates spectra of the transient species can be resolved

  18. Tuning the magnetism of ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viñas, S. Liébana [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Vigo 36310 (Spain); Simeonidis, K. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Li, Z.-A.; Ma, Z. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Myrovali, E.; Makridis, A.; Sakellari, D. [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Angelakeris, M., E-mail: agelaker@auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Wiedwald, U.; Spasova, M. [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany); Farle, M., E-mail: michael.farle@uni-due.de [Faculty of Physics and CENIDE, University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg 47048 (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    The importance of magnetic interactions within an individual nanoparticle or between adjacent ones is crucial not only for the macroscopic collective magnetic behavior but for the AC magnetic heating efficiency as well. On this concept, single-(MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} where M=Fe, Co, Mn) and core–shell ferrite nanoparticles consisting of a magnetically softer (MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) or magnetically harder (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) core and a magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) shell with an overall size in the 10 nm range were synthesized and studied for their magnetic particle hyperthermia efficiency. Magnetic measurements indicate that the coating of the hard magnetic phase (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} provides a significant enhancement of hysteresis losses over the corresponding single-phase counterpart response, and thus results in a multiplication of the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency opening a novel pathway for high-performance, magnetic hyperthermia agents. At the same time, the existence of a biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} outer shell, toxicologically renders these systems similar to iron-oxide ones with significantly milder side-effects. - Highlights: • Magnetic hyperthermia is studied for 10 nm single and core/shell ferrite nanoparticles. • Maximum heating rate is observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • The increase is attributed to the interaction of phases with different anisotropy. • The presence of biocompatible Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} shell potentially minimizes toxic side-effects.

  19. Behavior of ferritic steels irradiated by fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erler, Jean; Maillard, Arlette; Brun, Gilbert; Lehmann, Jeanne; Dupouy, J.-M.

    1979-01-01

    Ferritic steels were irradiated in Rapsodie and Phenix at varying doses. The swelling and irradiation creep characteristics are reported below as are the mechanical characteristics of these materials [fr

  20. The behaviour of ferritic steels under fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erler, J.; Maillard, A.; Brun, G.; Lehmann, J.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1979-07-01

    Ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie and Phenix to doses up to 150 dpa F. The swelling and irradiation creep characteristics and the mechanical properties of these materials are reported. (author)

  1. Antiresonance in (Ni,Zn) ferrite-carbon nanofibres nanocomposites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernandez-Garcia, L.; Suarez, M.; Menéndez, J.L.; Pecharromán, C.; Torrecillas, R.; Peretyagin, P.Y.; Petzelt, Jan; Savinov, Maxim; Frait, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 5 (2015), 055003 ISSN 2053-1591 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ceramic composites * ferromagnetic resonance * ferrite devices Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.968, year: 2015

  2. Initial Ferritic Wall Mode studies on HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Navratil, G. A.

    2013-10-01

    Low-activation ferritic steels are leading material candidates for use in next-generation fusion development experiments such as a prospective US component test facility and DEMO. Understanding the interaction of plasmas with a ferromagnetic wall will provide crucial physics for these experiments. Although the ferritic wall mode (FWM) was seen in a linear machine, the FWM was not observed in JFT-2M, probably due to eddy current stabilization. Using its high-resolution magnetic diagnostics and positionable walls, HBT-EP has begun exploring the dynamics and stability of plasma interacting with high-permeability ferritic materials tiled to reduce eddy currents. We summarize a simple model for plasma-wall interaction in the presence of ferromagnetic material, describe the design of a recently-installed set of ferritic shell segments, and report initial results. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  3. Ferrite bead effect on Class-D amplifier audio quality

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad , Kevin El; Mrad , Roberto; Morel , Florent; Pillonnet , Gael; Vollaire , Christian; Nagari , Angelo

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper studies the effect of ferrite beads on the audio quality of Class-D audio amplifiers. This latter is a switch-ing circuit which creates high frequency harmonics. Generally, a filter is used at the amplifier output for the sake of electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC). So often, in integrated solutions, this filter contains ferrite beads which are magnetic components and present nonlinear behavior. Time domain measurements and their equivalence in frequency do...

  4. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi F. A.; Kurniawan T.; Salwani M. S.; Bin Y. S.; Harun W. S. W.

    2016-01-01

    The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on...

  5. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  6. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  7. EXAFS Determination of the Structure of Cobalt in Carbon-Supported Cobalt and Cobalt-Molybdenum Sulfide Hydrodesulfurization Catalysts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Bouwens, S.M.A.M.; Veen, J.A.R. van; Beer, V.H.J. de; Prins, R.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the cobalt present in carbon-supported Co and Co-Mo sulfide catalysts was studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Co K-edge and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thiophene hydrodesulfurization activities were used to measure the catalytic properties of

  8. Intragranular ferrite morphologies in medium carbon vanadium-microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadel A.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine TTT diagram of medium carbon V-N micro-alloyed steel with emphasis on the development of intragranular ferrite morphologies. The isothermal treatment was carried out at 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600°C. These treatments were interrupted at different times in order to analyze the evolution of the microstructure. Metallographic evaluation was done using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results show that at high temperatures (≥ 500°C polygonal intragranulary nucleated ferrite idiomorphs, combined with grain boundary ferrite and pearlite were produced and followed by an incomplete transformation phenomenon. At intermediate temperatures (450, 500°C an interloced acicular ferrite (AF microstructure is produced, and at low temperatures (400, 350°C the sheave of parallel acicular ferrite plates, similar to bainitic sheaves but intragranularly nucleated were observed. In addition to sheaf type acicular ferrite, the grain boundary nucleated bainitic sheaves are observed. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI174004

  9. Structural investigation of chemically synthesized ferrite magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanga, E.; Sangaa, D.; Hirazawa, H.; Tsogbadrakh, N.; Jargalan, N.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2018-05-01

    In recent times, interest in ferrite magnetic nanomaterials has considerably grown, mainly due to their highly promising medical and biological applications. Spinel ferrite powder samples, with high heat generation abilities in AC magnetic fields, were studied for their application to the hyperthermia treatment of cancer tumors. These properties of ferrites strongly depend on their chemical composition, ion distribution between crystallographic positions, magnetic structure and method of preparation. In this study, crystal and magnetic structures of several magnetic spinels were investigated by neutron diffraction. The explanation of the mechanism triggering the heat generation ability in the magnetic materials, and the electronic and magnetic states of ferrite-spinel type structures, were theoretically defined by a first-principles method. Ferrites with the composition of CuxMg1-xFe2O4 have been investigated as a heat generating magnetic nanomaterial. Atomic fraction of copper in ferrite was varied between 0 and 100% (that is, x between 0 and 1.0 with 0.2 steps), with the copper dope limit corresponding to appear a tetragonal phase.

  10. Specific heat of nano-ferrites modified composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntenita Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific heat of nano-ferrites modified composites was studied using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC method in the temperature range of 30 to 150°C. Initially, nano-ferrites were introduced in epoxy systems in order to improve the electromagnetic properties of formed materials. Together with the changes in electromagnetic properties some modifications occur regarding thermal and mechanical properties. The materials were formed by placing 5g or 10g of ferrite into 250g polymer matrix leading to a very low weight ratio of modifying agent. At so low ratios the effect of ferrite presence should be insignificant according to mixing rule. Anyway there is possible to appear some chelation reaction with effects on thermal properties of materials. Three types of epoxy resins had been used as matrix and barium ferrite and strontium ferrite as modifying agents. The thermal analysis was developed on two heatingcooling cycles and the specific heat was evaluated for each segment of the cycle analysis.

  11. Passivation and corrosion behaviours of cobalt and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Babic, R.

    2007-01-01

    Passivation and corrosion behaviour of the cobalt and cobalt-base alloy Co30Cr6Mo was studied in a simulated physiological solution containing chloride and bicarbonate ions and with pH of 6.8. The oxido-reduction processes included solid state transformations occurring at the cobalt/electrolyte interface are interpreted using theories of surface electrochemistry. The dissolution of cobalt is significantly suppressed by alloying it with chromium and molybdenum, since the alloy exhibited 'chromium like' passivity. The structural and protective properties of passive oxide films formed spontaneously at the open circuit potential or during the anodic polarization were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the wide frequency range

  12. Cytotoxicity of ferrite particles by MTT and agar diffusion methods for hyperthermic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se-Ho [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Mahn [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, In-Bo [Department of Electronic Physics, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yong-Keun [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of) and Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: leeyk@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2005-05-15

    We investigated the cytotoxicity of the prepared various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Ba-, Sr-, Co-, Co/Ni-ferrites) using MTT assay as well as agar diffusion method. Their cytotoxicity was compared with that of alginate-encapsulated ferrites. In the MTT assay, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and SrFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} ferrite showed the highest cell viability of 90%. Alginate-encapsulated Ba-ferrite was ranked mildly cytotoxic, whereas their ferrite particles were ranked cytotoxic.

  13. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author).

  14. Cobalt reduction of NSSS valve hardfacings for ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Hak; Lee, Sang Sub

    1994-07-01

    This report informs NSSS designer that replacement of materials is one of the major means of ALARA implementation, and describes that NSSS valves with high-cobalt hardfacing are significant contributors to post-shutdown radiation fields caused by activation of cobalt-59 to cobalt-60. Generic procedures for implementing cobalt reduction programs for valves are presented. Discussions are presented of the general and specific design requirements for valve hardfacing in nuclear service. The nuclear safety issues involved with changing valve hardfacing materials are discussed. The common methods used to deposit hardfacing materials are described together with an explanation of the wear measurements. Wear resistance, corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, and mechanical properties of candidate hardfacing alloys are given. World-wide nuclear utility experience with cobalt-free hardfacing alloys is described. The use of low-cobalt or cobalt-free alloys in other nuclear plant components is described. 17 figs., 38 tabs., 18 refs. (Author)

  15. Analytical modeling of demagnetizing effect in magnetoelectric ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayers taking into account a mechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyau, V.; Aubert, A.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the demagnetizing effect in ferrite/PZT/ferrite magnetoelectric (ME) trilayer composites consisting of commercial PZT discs bonded by epoxy layers to Ni-Co-Zn ferrite discs made by a reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. ME voltage coefficients (transversal mode) were measured on ferrite/PZT/ferrite trilayer ME samples with different thicknesses or phase volume ratio in order to highlight the influence of the magnetic field penetration governed by these geometrical parameters. Experimental ME coefficients and voltages were compared to analytical calculations using a quasi-static model. Theoretical demagnetizing factors of two magnetic discs that interact together in parallel magnetic structures were derived from an analytical calculation based on a superposition method. These factors were introduced in ME voltage calculations which take account of the demagnetizing effect. To fit the experimental results, a mechanical coupling factor was also introduced in the theoretical formula. This reflects the differential strain that exists in the ferrite and PZT layers due to shear effects near the edge of the ME samples and within the bonding epoxy layers. From this study, an optimization in magnitude of the ME voltage is obtained. Lastly, an analytical calculation of demagnetizing effect was conducted for layered ME composites containing higher numbers of alternated layers (n ≥ 5). The advantage of such a structure is then discussed.

  16. Water splitting: Taking cobalt in isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiqin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The sustainable production of hydrogen is key to the delivery of clean energy in a hydrogen economy; however, lower-cost alternatives to platinum electrocatalysts are needed. Now, isolated, earth-abundant cobalt atoms dispersed over nitrogen-doped graphene are shown to efficiently electrolyse water to generate hydrogen.

  17. Nano cobalt oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-07-01

    Nano structured metal oxides including TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 have been synthesized and evaluated for their photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The photocatalytic activity of nano cobalt oxide was then compared with two other nano structured metal oxides namely TiO 2 and Fe 3O 4. The synthesized nano cobalt oxide was characterized thoroughly with respect to EDX and TEM. The yield of hydrogen was observed to be 900, 2000 and 8275 mmol h -1 g -1 of photocatalyst for TiO 2, Co 3O 4 and Fe 3O 4 respectively under visible light. It was observed that the hydrogen yield in case of nano cobalt oxide was more than twice to that of TiO 2 and the hydrogen yield of nano Fe 3O 4 was nearly four times as compared to nano Co 3O 4. The influence of various operating parameters in hydrogen generation by nano cobalt oxide was then studied in detail. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sputtering on cobalt with noble gas ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.

    1983-01-01

    Single crystals of cobalt have been bombarded with 80 keV Ar + ions and with 80 keV and 200 keV Xe + ions in the [0001] direction of the hcp phase and the [111] direction of the fcc phase. The sputtering yield has been measured as function of target temperature (20 0 C-500 0 C), showing a reduction in sputtering yield for 80 keV Ar + ions and 200 keV Xe + ions, when the crystal structure changes from hcp to fcc. In contrast to this, bombardment with 80 keV Xe + ions results in an increase in sputtering yield as the phase transition is passed. Sputtering yields for [111] nickel are in agreement with the sputtering yields for fcc cobalt indicating normal behaviour of the fcc cobalt phase. The higher sputtering yield of [0001] cobalt for certain combinations of ion mass and energy may then be ascribed to disorder induced partly by martensitic phase transformation, partly by radiation damage. (orig.)

  19. Amplified spontaneous emission from ZnO in n-ZnO/ZnO nanodots-SiO(2) composite/p-AlGaN heterojunction light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ying Tsang; Wu, Mong Kai; Li, Wei Chih; Kuan, Hon; Yang, Jer Ren; Shiojiri, Makoto; Chen, Miin Jang

    2009-04-22

    This study demonstrates amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of the ultraviolet (UV) electroluminescence (EL) from ZnO at lambda~380 nm in the n-ZnO/ZnO nanodots-SiO(2) composite/p- Al(0.12)Ga(0.88)N heterojunction light-emitting diode. A SiO(2) layer embedded with ZnO nanodots was prepared on the p-type Al(0.12)Ga(0.88)N using spin-on coating of SiO(2) nanoparticles followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO. An n-type Al-doped ZnO layer was deposited upon the ZnO nanodots-SiO(2) composite layer also by the ALD technique. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) reveals that the ZnO nanodots embedded in the SiO(2) matrix have diameters of 3-8 nm and the wurtzite crystal structure, which allows the transport of carriers through the thick ZnO nanodots-SiO(2) composite layer. The high quality of the n-ZnO layer was manifested by the well crystallized lattice image in the HRTEM picture and the low-threshold optically pumped stimulated emission. The low refractive index of the ZnO nanodots-SiO(2) composite layer results in the increase in the light extraction efficiency from n-ZnO and the internal optical feedback of UV EL into n-ZnO layer. Consequently, significant enhancement of the UV EL intensity and super-linear increase in the EL intensity, as well as the spectral narrowing, with injection current were observed owing to ASE in the n-ZnO layer.

  20. Label-free silicon nanodots featured ratiometric fluorescent aptasensor for lysosomal imaging and pH measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Guo, Shan; Cheng, Shibo; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2017-08-15

    The homeostasis of lysosomal pH is crucial in cell physiology. Developing small fluorescent nanosensors for lysosome imaging and ratiometric measurement of pH is highly demanded yet challenging. Herein, a pH-sensitive fluorescein tagged aptamer AS1411 has been utilized to covalently modify the label-free fluorescent silicon nanodots via a crosslinker for construction of a ratiometric pH biosensor. The established aptasensor exhibits the advantages of ultrasmall size, hypotoxicity, excellent pH reversibility and good photostability, which favors its application in an intracellular environment. Using human breast MCF-7 cancer cells and MCF-10A normal cells as the model, this aptasensor shows cell specificity for cancer cells and displays a wide pH response range of 4.5-8.0 in living cells. The results demonstrate that the pH of MCF-7 cells is 5.1, which is the expected value for acidic organelles. Lysosome imaging and accurate measurement of pH in MCF-7 cells have been successfully conducted based on this nanosensor via fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Red Phosphorus Nanodots on Reduced Graphene Oxide as a Flexible and Ultra-Fast Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yihang; Zhang, Anyi; Shen, Chenfei; Liu, Qingzhou; Cao, Xuan; Ma, Yuqiang; Chen, Liang; Lau, Christian; Chen, Tian-Chi; Wei, Fei; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-06-27

    Sodium-ion batteries offer an attractive option for potential low cost and large scale energy storage due to the earth abundance of sodium. Red phosphorus is considered as a high capacity anode for sodium-ion batteries with a theoretical capacity of 2596 mAh/g. However, similar to silicon in lithium-ion batteries, several limitations, such as large volume expansion upon sodiation/desodiation and low electronic conductance, have severely limited the performance of red phosphorus anodes. In order to address the above challenges, we have developed a method to deposit red phosphorus nanodots densely and uniformly onto reduced graphene oxide sheets (P@RGO) to minimize the sodium ion diffusion length and the sodiation/desodiation stresses, and the RGO network also serves as electron pathway and creates free space to accommodate the volume variation of phosphorus particles. The resulted P@RGO flexible anode achieved 1165.4, 510.6, and 135.3 mAh/g specific charge capacity at 159.4, 31878.9, and 47818.3 mA/g charge/discharge current density in rate capability test, and a 914 mAh/g capacity after 300 deep cycles in cycling stability test at 1593.9 mA/g current density, which marks a significant performance improvement for red phosphorus anodes for sodium-ion chemistry and flexible power sources for wearable electronics.

  2. Controllable synthesis of green and blue fluorescent carbon nanodots for pH and Cu(2+) sensing in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lihong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Bo; Wen, Xiangping; Zhang, Guomei; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin

    2016-03-15

    We report a controllable strategy for fabrication of green and blue fluorescent carbon nanodots (CDs), and demonstrate their applications for pH and Cu(2+) sensing in living cells. Green and blue fluorescent CDs have been synthesized by hydrothermal method and pyrolysis of leeks, respectively, providing an easy way for the production of CDs without the request of tedious synthetic methodology or the use of toxic/expensive solvents and starting materials. Green fluorescent CDs (G-CDs) exhibit high tolerance to pH values and external cations. Blue fluorescent CDs (B-CDs) can be applied to pH and Cu(2+) sensing. The linear range of Cu(2+) detection is 0.01-10.00 μM and the detection limit is 0.05 μM. For pH detection, there is a good linearity in the pH range of 3.5-10.0. The linear and rapid response of B-CDs to Cu(2+) and pH is valuable for Cu(2+) and pH sensing in living cells. Confocal fluorescent imaging of human cervical carcinoma cells indicates that B-CDs could visualize Cu(2+) and pH fluctuations in living cells with negligible autofluorescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešnjak, A.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma spot welding of ferritic stainless steels is studied. The study was focused on welding parameters, plasma and shielding gases and the optimum welding equipment. Plasma-spot welded overlap joints on a 0.8 mm thick ferritic stainless steel sheet were subjected to a visual examination and mechanical testing in terms of tension-shear strength. Several macro specimens were prepared. Plasma spot welding is suitable to use the same gas as shielding gas and as plasma gas, i.e., a 98 % Ar/2 % H 2 gas mixture. Tension-shear strength of plasma-spot welded joints was compared to that of resistance-spot welded joints. It was found that the resistance welded joints withstand a somewhat stronger load than the plasma welded joints due to a larger weld spot diameter of the former. Strength of both types of welded joints is approximately the same.

    El artículo describe el proceso de soldeo de aceros inoxidables ferríticos por puntos con plasma. La investigación se centró en el establecimiento de los parámetros óptimos de la soldadura, la definición del gas de plasma y de protección más adecuado, así como del equipo óptimo para la realización de la soldadura. Las uniones de láminas de aceros inoxidables ferríticos de 0,8 mm de espesor, soldadas a solape por puntos con plasma, se inspeccionaron visualmente y se ensayaron mecánicamente mediante el ensayo de cizalladura por tracción. Se realizaron macro pulidos. Los resultados de la investigación demostraron que la solución más adecuada para el soldeo por puntos con plasma es elegir el mismo gas de plasma que de protección. Es decir, una mezcla de 98 % de argón y 2 % de hidrógeno. La resistencia a la cizalladura por tracción de las uniones soldadas por puntos con plasma fue comparada con la resistencia de las uniones soldadas por resistencia por puntos. Se llegó a la conclusión de que las uniones soldadas por resistencia soportan una carga algo mayor que la uniones

  4. Water corrosion resistance of ODS ferritic-martensitic steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasuji

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels have superior radiation resistance; it is possible to achieve a service temperature of up to around 973 K because of their superior creep strength. These advantages of ODS steels facilities their application to long-life cladding tubes in advanced fast reactor fuel elements. In addition to neutron radiation resistance, sufficient general corrosion resistance to maintain the strength of the cladding, and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance for spent-fuel-pool cooling systems and high-temperature oxidation for the fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) of ODS ferritic steel are required. Although the addition of Cr to ODS is effective in preventing water corrosion and high-temperature oxidation, an excessively high amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the formation of a Cr-rich α' precipitate. The Cr content in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite, the ODS steels developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), is controlled. In a previous paper, it has been demonstrated that the resistances of 9Cr- and 12Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature oxidation are superior to those of conventional 12Cr ferritic steel. However, the water corrosion data of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels are very limited. In this study, a water corrosion test was conducted on ODS steels in consideration of the spent-fuel-pool cooling condition, and the results were compared with those of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  5. Comparative dose evaluations between XVI and OBI cone beam CT systems using Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, Tawfik; Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James; Yu Yan; Xiao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of energy (kVp) and filters (no filter, half Bowtie, and full Bowtie) on the dose response curves of the Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot optical stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in CBCT dose fields. To measure surface and internal doses received during x-ray volume imager (XVI) (Version R4.5) and on board imager (OBI) (Version 1.5) CBCT imaging protocols using these two types of dosimeters. Methods: Gafchromic XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLD dose response curves were generated at different kV imaging settings used by XVI (software version R4.5) and OBI (software version 1.5) CBCT systems. The settings for the XVI system were: 100 kVp/F0 (no filter), 120 kVp/F0, and 120 kVp/F1 (Bowtie filter), and for the OBI system were: 100 kVp/full fan, 125 kVp/full fan, and 125 kVp/half fan. XRQA2 film was calibrated in air to air kerma levels between 0 and 11 cGy and scanned using reflection scanning mode with the Epson Expression 10000 XL flat-bed document scanner. NanoDot OSLDs were calibrated on phantom to surface dose levels between 0 and 14 cGy and read using the inLight TM MicroStar reader. Both dosimeters were used to measure in field surface and internal doses in a male Alderson Rando Phantom. Results: Dose response curves of XRQA2 film and nanoDot OSLDs at different XVI and OBI CBCT settings were reported. For XVI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in head region during fast head and neck scan and 4.99 cGy in the chest region during symmetry scan. On the other hand, the internal dose ranged between 0.02 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 3.17 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. The average (internal and external) dose ranged between 0.05 cGy in the head region during fast head and neck scan and 2.41 cGy in the chest region during chest M20 scan. For OBI system, the surface dose ranged between 0.19 cGy in head region during head scan and 4.55 cGy in the pelvis region during spot

  6. Enhanced saturation magnetization of Fe3Si nanodot-embedded Fe80Si17Nb3 flexible film for efficient wireless power transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, Yi-Hao; Yan, Zih-Yu; Fu, Ping-Hao

    2013-01-01

    An efficient magnetically coupled resonance response is performed using an iron silicide-based nanostructured magnetoelectric material with high saturation magnetization for the wireless charging of battery-powered consumer electronics. With 500 °C annealing, the self-assembled Fe 3 Si nanodots buried in the Fe 80 Si 17 Nb 3 host matrix with (220) lattice spacing of 1.99 Å corresponding to a volume density of 8.96 × 10 16 cm 3 , can be obtained and a maximum saturation magnetization of 244 emu g −1 achieved. The return loss of the antenna will be tuned to match the designed frequency with greater attenuated intensity (−0.39 dB) and a relatively narrow bandwidth (6 kHz) when the Fe 3 Si nanodot-embedded Fe 80 Si 17 Nb 3 sample is placed in a WiTricity system. An efficient wireless power transfer can be created and improved from 47.5% to 97.3%. The associated coil and loop antenna resonators are significantly readjusted to match the power transfer by putting this nanostructured magnetoelectric material in a WiTricity system. - Highlights: • The saturation magnetization is effective enhancement in the presence of Fe 3 Si nanodot buried in the Fe 80 Si 17 Nb 3 . • A saturation magnetization of 244 emu g −1 is proposed for high-efficiency wireless power transfer. • The return loss of the antenna will be tuned to match the designed frequency. • Such a wireless power transfer can be enhanced efficiency up to 97.3%

  7. Theory and design of a half-mode SIW Ferrite LTCC phase shifter

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.; Shamim, Atif

    2015-01-01

    A half mode SIW based Ferrite LTCC phase shifter is presented in this work. A theoretical model to predict the phase shift in the partially magnetized state has been derived. Contrary to the bulky external magnets employed by conventional ferrite

  8. Bismuth ferrite as low-loss switchable material for plasmonic waveguide modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose new designs of plasmonic modulators, which can beused for dynamic signal switching in photonic integrated circuits. We studyperformance of a plasmonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as atunable material. The bismuth ferrite core is sandwiched between metalplates (metal...

  9. Effect of Ferrite Morphology on Sensitization of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hun; Lee, Jun Ho; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The sensitization behaviors of L-grade SSs having predominant austenitic structure with small amount of ferrite have not been well understood. In this regard, the effect of ferrite morphology on sensitization was investigated in this study. The sensitization behaviors of three heats of 316L and 316LN SSs were investigated, Stringer type of ferrite (316L - heat A and B) showed the early sensitization by chromium depletion at ferrite. austenite interface. And, later sensitization is due to GB sensitization. On the other hand, blocky type of ferrite (316L - heat C) showed lower DOS and higher resistance to GB sensitization. It could be due to sufficient supply of chromium from relatively large ferrite phase. As a consequence, the sensitization of 316L SSs could be affected by their ferrite morphology rather than ferrite content. The sensitized region was distinguishable from results of DL-EPR tests. It can be used as an effective method for evaluation of type of sensitization.

  10. A biosensor system using nickel ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Prachi, E-mail: prachi.singh@st.niituniversity.in; Rathore, Deepshikha, E-mail: deep.nano@gmail.com [NIIT University, Neemrana, NH-8, Alwar, Rajasthan, India, 301705 (India)

    2016-05-06

    NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and the structural characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction technique, where single cubic phase formation of nanoparticles was confirmed. The average particle size of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was found to be 4.9 nm. Nanoscale magnetic materials are an important source of labels for biosensing due to their strong magnetic properties which are not found in biological systems. This property of the material was exploited and the fabrication of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle based biosensor was done in the form of a capacitor system, with NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} as the dielectric material. The biosensor system was tested towards different biological materials with the help of electrochemical workstation and the same was analysed through Cole-Cole plot of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The performance of the sensor was determined based on its sensitivity, response time and recovery time.

  11. Magnetostatic excitations in thin ferrite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zil'berman, P.E.; Lugovskoi, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss the influence of the exchange interaction and dissipative processes in thin ferrite films on the eigenfrequency spectrum of magnetostatic standing waves and on the dispersion relation and attenuation of magnetostatic traveling waves. For the first time they obtain explicitly the dispersion relation for magnetostatic waves (MSWs) in a tangential saturating magnetic field H 0 to second order (inclusive) in the exchange interaction parameter λ. The authors obtain computer solutions for this equation in the complex frequency (ω) plane (for standing waves) or wave-number (q) plane (for traveling waves). The authors show that the dispersion relation constructed from the standing-wave spectrum is different from that of the traveling waves if λ≠0, even if dissipation is neglected. The traveling waves have auxiliary branches of the dispersion relation with weak damping near the spin-wave-resonance (SWR) frequencies. Dissipation has only a relatively weak effect on the frequency spectrum of the standing waves, shifting it upward. For the traveling waves, however, dissipation leads to qualitative changes in the structure of the dispersion relation, giving rise to new branches, forbidden bands, reentrant and anomalous-dispersion regions

  12. Neutron depolarization in compressed ferrite powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekveldt, M.Th.; Kraan, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    The polarization change of a polarized neutron beam after transmission through a partly magnetized ferromagnetic material can be described by a (3x3) depolarization matrix. This matrix can be expressed in terms of domain quantities such as the reduced mean magnetization M, the mean domain size delta and the mean square direction cosinus γsub(y) of the inner magnetization within the domain, and can be used for measuring magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials. In the underlying depolarization theory it is assumed that no correlations exist between the direction of the spontaneous magnetization Bs in neighbouring domains, and between the direction of Bs and the individual domain sizes. In order to extend the measuring method for ferromagnetic materials, measurements have been made with different compressed ferrite powders assuming that the mean domain size is equal to the mean particle size. The neutron depolarization matrix is measured as a function of an alternative external magnetic field and interpreted in terms of m, γsub(y), and delta. The possibilities and limitations of the measuring method are discussed

  13. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung fibroblast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Leah J.; Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Kandpal, Sanjeev Kumar; Mason, Michael D. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Zheng, Tongzhang [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT (United States); Wise, John Pierce, E-mail: John.Wise@usm.maine.edu [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Maine Center for Environmental Toxicology and Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04101-9300 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cobalt exposure is increasing as cobalt demand rises worldwide due to its use in enhancing rechargeable battery efficiency, super-alloys, and magnetic products. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in human lung cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble cobalt was more cytotoxic than particulate cobalt while particulate and soluble cobalt induced similar levels of genotoxicity. However, soluble cobalt induced cell cycle arrest indicated by the lack of metaphases at much lower intracellular cobalt concentrations compared to cobalt oxide. Accordingly, we investigated the role of particle internalization in cobalt oxide-induced toxicity and found that particle-cell contact was necessary to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity after cobalt exposure. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung fibroblasts, and solubility plays a key role in cobalt-induced lung toxicity. - Highlights: • Particulate and soluble cobalt are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung cells. • Soluble cobalt induces more cytotoxicity compared to particulate cobalt. • Soluble and particulate cobalt induce similar levels of genotoxicity. • Particle-cell contact is required for particulate cobalt-induced toxicity.

  14. Microwave left-handed composite material made of slim ferrite rods and metallic wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Xu; Yang, Bai; Li-Jie, Qiao; Hong-Jie, Zhao; Ji, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental study of the microwave properties of a composite material consisting of ferrite and copper wires. It finds that the slim ferrite rods can modify the magnetic field distribution through their anisotropy, so that the ferrite's negative influence on the copper wires' plasma will be reduced. Left-handed properties are observed even in the specimen with close stuck ferrite rods and copper wires. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Plasma discharge in ferritic first wall vacuum vessel of the Hitachi Tokamak HT-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Mitsushi; Nakayama, Takeshi; Asano, Katsuhiko; Otsuka, Michio

    1997-01-01

    A tokamak discharge with ferritic material first wall was tried successfully. The Hitachi Tokamak HT-2 had a stainless steel SUS304 vacuum vessel and modified to have a ferritic plate first wall for experiments to investigate the possibility of ferritic material usage in magnetic fusion devices. The achieved vacuum pressure and times used for discharge cleaning was roughly identical with the stainless steel first wall or the original HT-2. We concluded that ferritic material vacuum vessel is possible for tokamaks. (author)

  16. Heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheremnykh, V.G.; Derevyankin, E.V.; Sakulin, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The heating temperature effect on ferritic grain size of two steels 13Kh1M1FA and 25Kh1M1FA is evaluated. It is shown that exposure time increase at heating temperatures below 1000 deg C up to 10h changes but slightly the size of the Cr-Mo-V ferritic grain of rotor steel cooled with 25 deg C/h rate. Heating up to 1000 deg C and above leads to substantial ferritic grain growth. The kinetics of ferritic grain growth is determined by the behaviour of phases controlling the austenitic grain growth, such as carbonitrides VCsub(0.14)Nsub(0.78) in 13Kh1M1FA steel and VCsub(0.18)Nsub(0.72) in 25Kh1M1FA steel. Reduction of carbon and alloying elements content in steel composition observed at the liquation over rotor length leads to a certain decrease of ferritic grain resistance to super heating

  17. Magnesium ferrite nanoparticles: a rapid gas sensor for alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Rhushikesh; Rao, Pratibha; Bhagwat, Sunita

    2017-02-01

    Highly porous spinel MgFe2O4 nanoparticles with a high specific surface area have been successfully synthesized by a sintering free auto-combustion technique and characterized for their structural and surface morphological properties using XRD, BET, TEM and SEM techniques. Their sensing properties to alcohol vapors viz. ethanol and methanol were investigated. The site occupation of metal ions was investigated by VSM. The as-synthesized sample shows the formation of sponge-like porous material which is necessary for gas adsorption. The gas sensing characteristics were obtained by measuring the gas response as a function of operating temperature, concentration of the gas, and the response-recovery time. The response of magnesium ferrite to ethanol and methanol vapors was compared and it was revealed that magnesium ferrite is more sensitive and selective to ethanol vapor. The sensor operates at a substantially low vapor concentration of about 1 ppm of alcohol vapors, exhibits fantastic response reproducibility, long term reliability and a very fast response and recovery property. Thus the present study explored the possibility of making rapidly responding alcohol vapor sensor based on magnesium ferrite. The sensing mechanism has been discussed in co-relation with magnetic and morphological properties. The role of occupancy of Mg2+ ions in magnesium ferrite on its gas sensing properties has also been studied and is found to influence the response of magnesium ferrite ethanol sensor.

  18. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T; Asta, Mark D; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  19. Synthesis and controllable oxidation of monodisperse cobalt-doped wüstite nanoparticles and their core-shell stability and exchange-bias stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2015-09-14

    Cobalt-doped wüstite (CWT), Co0.33Fe0.67O, nanoparticles were prepared via the thermal decomposition of CoFe2-oleate complexes in organic solvents. A controllable oxidation process was then performed to obtain Co0.33Fe0.67O/CoFe2O4 core-shell structures with different core-to-shell volume ratios and exchange bias properties. The oxidized core-shell samples with a ∼4 nm CoFe2O4 shell showed good resistance to oxygen transmission. Thus, it is inferred that the cobalt ferrite shell provides a better oxidation barrier performance than magnetite in the un-doped case. The hysteresis loops of the oxidized 19 nm samples exhibited a high exchange bias field (H(E)), an enhanced coercivity field (H(C)), and a pronounced vertical shift, thus indicating the presence of a strong exchange bias coupling effect. More importantly, the onset temperature of H(E) was found to be higher than 200 K, which suggests that cobalt doping increases the Néel temperature (T(N)) of the CWT core. In general, the results show that the homogeneous dispersion of Co in iron precursors improves the stability of the final CWT nanoparticles. Moreover, the CoFe2O4 shells formed following oxidation increase the oxidation resistance of the CWT cores and enhance their anisotropy energy.

  20. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld... Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the...

  1. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [[NRC-2012-0231] Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld... draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1279, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in...

  2. Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts: influence of cobalt dispersion and titanium oxides promotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azib, H

    1996-04-10

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of Sol-Gel preparation parameters which occur in silica supported cobalt catalysts synthesis. These catalysts are particularly used for the waxes production in natural gas processing. The solids have been characterized by several techniques: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), programmed temperature reduction (TPR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), Magnetism, thermodesorption of H{sub 2} (TPD). The results indicate that the control of the cobalt dispersion and oxide phases nature is possible by modifying Sol-Gel parameters. The catalytic tests in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were conducted on a pilot unit under pressure (20 atm) and suggested that turnover rates were independent of Co crystallite size, Co phases in the solids (Co deg., cobalt silicate) and titanium oxide promotion. On the other methane, the C{sub 3}{sup +} hydrocarbon selectivity is increased with increasing crystallite size. Inversely, the methane production is favoured by very small crystallites, cobalt silicate increase and titanium addition. However, the latter, used as a cobalt promoter, has a benefic effect on the active phase stability during the synthesis. (author). 149 refs., 102 figs., 71 tabs.

  3. Electrocatalytic performance evaluation of cobalt hydroxide and cobalt oxide thin films for oxygen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, P. T.; Lokhande, A. C.; Pawar, B. S.; Gang, M. G.; Jo, Eunjin; Go, Changsik; Suryawanshi, M. P.; Pawar, S. M.; Kim, Jin Hyeok

    2018-01-01

    The development of an inexpensive, stable, and highly active electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for the practical application of water splitting. Herein, we have synthesized an electrodeposited cobalt hydroxide on nickel foam and subsequently annealed in an air atmosphere at 400 °C for 2 h. In-depth characterization of all the films using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron emission spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) techniques, which reveals major changes for their structural, morphological, compositional and electrochemical properties, respectively. The cobalt hydroxide nanosheet film shows high catalytic activity with 290 mV overpotential at 10 mA cm-2 and 91 mV dec-1 Tafel slope and robust stability (24 h) for OER in 1 M KOH electrolyte compared to cobalt oxide (340 mV). The better OER activity of cobalt hydroxide in comparison to cobalt oxide originated from high active sites, enhanced surface, and charge transport capability.

  4. Effects of In{sub 3+} substitution on structural properties, cation distribution and Mössbauer spectra of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ravi, E-mail: ranade65@gmail.com [Centre for Material Science and Engineering, National Institute of Technology Hamirpur (H.P.)-177005 (India); Pandit, Rabia; Sharma, K. K.; Kaur, Pawanpreet [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Hamirpur (H.P.)-177005 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The use of non-destructive, high resolution technique namely Mössbauer spectroscopy is discussed in detail for the investigation of structural and magnetic properties of Fe based indium substituted cobalt ferrites. The polycrystalline samples of CoFe{sub 2−x}In{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.2, 0.6) were prepared by double sintering solid state reaction method. To ensure a single phase formation of the as prepared samples the X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the powdered samples was Rietveld refined using Fd3m space group. An excellent agreement is obtained between the integrated intensity ratios of 57 Fe spectra at A- and B-sites and those calculated on the basis of cation distribution the cation distribution obtained data analysis. The results of Mössbauer spectra and cation distribution are also correlated well with magnetization versus applied field (M-H) study.

  5. AC and DC electrical conductivity, dielectric and magnetic properties of Co{sub 0.65}Zn{sub 0.35}Fe{sub 2-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.1 and 0.2) ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, A.K.; Saha, S. [Vidyasagar University, Department of Physics and Techno Physics, Midnapore, West Bengal (India); Nath, T.K. [Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Department of Physics, Kharagpur, West Bengal (India)

    2017-11-15

    Cobalt-Zinc ferrites are an important material for designing multiferroic composite. The Mo (4d-transition metal) doped Cobalt-Zinc ferrites are synthesized using ceramic (solid-state reaction) method. Investigation of detailed ac and dc electrical conductivity, dielectric and magnetic properties of Co{sub 0.65}Zn{sub 0.35}Fe{sub 2-x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.1 and 0.2) spinel ferrites have been reported here. The recorded XRD pattern confirms the formation of inverse spinel structure of the material. The dielectric dispersion has been studied in detail and the existence of non-Debye type relaxation behavior has been confirmed. The dielectric tangent loss is found to be very small at high frequency. The ac conductivity follows the correlated barrier hopping like model. Also the conduction process can be best explained on the basis of Verwey-de Boer mechanism. Magnetic phase transition of the material is estimated from magnetization vs. temperature plots. (orig.)

  6. A computer controlled tele-cobalt unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brace, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    A computer controlled cobalt treatment unit was commissioned for treating patients in January 1980. Initially the controlling computer was a minicomputer, but now the control of the therapy unit is by a microcomputer. The treatment files, which specify the movement and configurations necessary to deliver the prescribed dose, are produced on the minicomputer and then transferred to the microcomputer using minitape cartridges. The actual treatment unit is based on a standard cobalt unit with a few additional features e.g. the drive motors can be controlled either by the computer or manually. Since the treatment unit is used for both manual and automatic treatments, the operational procedure under computer control is made to closely follow the manual procedure for a single field treatment. The necessary safety features which protect against human, hardware and software errors as well as the advantages and disadvantages of computer controlled radiotherapy are discussed

  7. Creep-fatigue of low cobalt superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    Testing for the low cycle fatigue and creep fatigue resistance of superalloys containing reduced amounts of cobalt is described. The test matrix employed involves a single high temperature appropriate for each alloy. A single total strain range, again appropriate to each alloy, is used in conducting strain controlled, low cycle, creep fatigue tests. The total strain range is based upon the level of straining that results in about 10,000 cycles to failure in a high frequency (0.5 Hz) continuous strain-cycling fatigue test. No creep is expected to occur in such a test. To bracket the influence of creep on the cyclic strain resistance, strain hold time tests with ore minute hold periods are introduced. One test per composition is conducted with the hold period in tension only, one in compression only, and one in both tension and compression. The test temperatures, alloys, and their cobalt compositions that are under study are given.

  8. Process for obtaining cobalt and lanthanum nickelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapcov, V.; Samusi, N.; Gulea, A.; Horosun, I.; Stasiuc, V.; Petrenco, P.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to the process for obtaining polycrystalline ceramics of cobalt and lanthanum nickelate with the perovskite structure from coordinative hetero metallic compounds. The obtained products can be utilized in the industry in the capacity of catalysts. Summary of the invention consists in obtaining polycrystalline ceramics LaCoO 3 and LaNiO 3 with the perovskite structure by pyrolysis of the parent compounds, namely, the coordinative hetero metallic compounds of the lanthanum cobalt or lanthanum nickel. The pyrolysis of the parent compound runs during one hour at 800 C. The technical result of the invention consists in lowering the temperature of the parent compound pyrolysis containing the precise ratio of metals necessary for ceramics obtaining

  9. Cobalt oxides from crystal chemistry to physics

    CERN Document Server

    Raveau, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Unparalleled in the breadth and depth of its coverage of all important aspects, this book systematically treats the electronic and magnetic properties of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric cobaltites in both ordered and disordered phases. Authored by a pioneer and a rising star in the field, the monograph summarizes, organizes and streamlines the otherwise difficult-to-obtain information on this topic. An introductory chapter sets forth the crystal chemistry of cobalt oxides to lay the groundwork for an understanding of the complex phenomena observed in this materials class. Special emphasis is placed on a comprehensive discussion of cobaltite physical properties in different structural families. Providing a thorough introduction to cobalt oxides from a chemical and physical viewpoint as a basis for understanding their intricacies, this is a must-have for both experienced researchers as well as entrants to the field.

  10. Radiation induced phosphorus segregation in austenitic and ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation induced surface segregation (RIS) of phosphorus in stainless steel attained a maximum at a dose of 0.8 dpa then decreased continually with dose. This decrease in the surface segregation of phosphorus at high dose levels has been attributed to removal of the phosphorus layer by ion sputtering. Phosphorus is not replenished since essentially all of the phosphorus within the irradiation zone has been segregated to the surface. Sputter removal can explain the previously reported absence of phosphorus segregation in ferritic alloys irradiated at high dosessup(1,2) (>1 dpa) since irradiation of ferritic alloys to low doses has shown measurable RIS. This sputtering phenomenon places an inherent limitation to the heavy ion irradiation technique for the study of surface segregation of impurity elements. The magnitude of the segregation in ferritics is still much less than in stainless steel which can be related to the low damage accumulation in these alloys. (orig.)

  11. Tube manufacturing and characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Shigeharu; Mizuta, Shunji; Yoshitake, Tunemitsu; Okuda, Takanari; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hagi, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Toshimi

    2000-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have an advantage in radiation resistance and superior creep rupture strength at elevated temperature due to finely distributed Y 2 O 3 particles in the ferritic matrix. Using a basic composition of low activation ferritic steel (Fe-12Cr-2W-0.05C), cladding tube manufacturing by means of pilger mill rolling and subsequent recrystallization heat-treatment was conducted while varying titanium and yttria contents. The recrystallization heat-treatment, to soften the tubes hardened due to cold-rolling and to subsequently improve the degraded mechanical properties, was demonstrated to be effective in the course of tube manufacturing. For a titanium content of 0.3 wt% and yttria of 0.25 wt%, improvement of the creep rupture strength can be attained for the manufactured cladding tubes. The ductility is also adequately maintained

  12. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  13. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-20

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  14. Impedimetric detection of alcohol vapours using nanostructured zinc ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Saraswathi, Ramiah

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study on the sensing characteristics of nanostructured zinc ferrite to three primary alcohols viz. methanol, ethanol and propanol has been carried out. The zinc ferrite has been prepared by a combustion method and characterized by XRD, FTIR, AFM and SEM. Impedance studies in the alcohol concentration range varying from 100 to 1000 ppm show definite variations in response to both the nature of the alcohol and its concentration. The nanostructured zinc ferrite shows the highest sensor response to methanol and least to propanol. Equivalent circuit modelling and calibration have been made for all the three alcohol sensors. The material shows a better selectivity to the alcohols compared to formaldehyde, ammonia and acetone vapours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multifunctional metal ferrite nanoparticles for MR imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Hrushikesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a very powerful non-invasive tool for in vivo imaging and clinical diagnosis. With rapid advancement in nanoscience and nanotechnology, there is rapid growth in nanoparticles-based contrast agents. Progress in synthetic protocols enable synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles which facilitated efforts toward the development of multimodal contrast agents. In this review, recent developments in metal ferrite-based MR contrast agents have been described. Specifically, effect of size, shape, composition, assembly and surface modification of metal ferrite nanoparticles on their T 2 contrast have been discussed. The review further outlines the effect of leaching on MRI contrast and other various factors which affect the multimodal ability of the (T 1 –T 2 and T 2 -thermal activation) metal ferrite nanoparticles.

  16. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  17. Tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carriers for chemical looping combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Fan, Yueying

    2017-10-25

    The disclosure provides a tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carrier for the chemical looping combustion of carbonaceous fuels. The tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carrier comprises Cu.sub.xFe.sub.yMn.sub.zO.sub.4-.delta., where Cu.sub.xFe.sub.yMn.sub.zO.sub.4-.delta. is a chemical composition. Generally, 0.5.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2.0, 0.2.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.2.5, and 0.2.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.2.5, and in some embodiments, 0.8.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.2, y.ltoreq.1.2, and z.gtoreq.0.8. The tri-metallic ferrite oxygen carrier may be used in various applications for the combustion of carbonaceous fuels, including as an oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion.

  18. Photoionization of cobalt impuritiesin zinc oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivanov, V.; Godlewski, M.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 9 (2015), s. 1988-1992 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP108/12/1941 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : absorption band * cobalt * photoionization * electron spin resonance * pulsed mode * ZnO Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  19. Speciation studies of cobalt in sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Sudersanan, M.; Iyer, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Recent results on the speciation of cobalt in simulated and actual sea water is reported using ion exchangers. The influence of magnesium ions in affecting the composition of ion exchangers and subsequent interpretation of the results is discussed. The results indicated that Co +2 may predominate in both the simulated and actual sea water and the presence of other constituents in sea water does not affect the nature of complex species present. (author). 2 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Literature study on the physiology of cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzberger, A.

    1986-12-01

    This literature study analyses the metabolism of cobalt in the human body, focussing on its resorption and the influence of various parameters like its chemical form, antagonisms, etc. on the level of resorption rate. The value currently recommended by ICRP for resorption rates (f 1 factor) of 0,3 or 0,05 for man is examined for its confirmation or non-confirmation in literature. (orig./MG) [de