WorldWideScience

Sample records for coated uranium-dioxide fuel

  1. Boron nitride coated uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, G [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, I; Tore, C; Tanker, E [Turkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-08-01

    Pure Urania and Urania-gadolinia (5 and 10%) fuels were produced by sol-gel technique. The sintered fuel pellets were then coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The analyses under scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a variety of BN structures, mainly platelike and rodlike structures were observed. Burnup calculations by using WIMSD4 showed that BN coated and gadolinia containing fuels have larger burnups than other fuels. The calculations were repeated at different pitch distances. The change of the radius of the fuel pellet or the moderator/fuel ratio showed that BN coated fuel gives the highest burnups at the present design values of a PWR. Key words: burnable absorber, boron nitride, gadolinia, CVT, nuclear fuel. (author). 32 refs, 14 figs.

  2. Boron nitride coated uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, G.; Uslu, I.; Tore, C.; Tanker, E.

    1997-01-01

    Pure Urania and Urania-gadolinia (5 and 10%) fuels were produced by sol-gel technique. The sintered fuel pellets were then coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The analyses under scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a variety of BN structures, mainly platelike and rodlike structures were observed. Burnup calculations by using WIMSD4 showed that BN coated and gadolinia containing fuels have larger burnups than other fuels. The calculations were repeated at different pitch distances. The change of the radius of the fuel pellet or the moderator/fuel ratio showed that BN coated fuel gives the highest burnups at the present design values of a PWR. Key words: burnable absorber, boron nitride, gadolinia, CVT, nuclear fuel. (author). 32 refs, 14 figs

  3. boron nitride coating of uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels by chemical precipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Tanker, E.; Guenduez, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this research pure urania and urania-gadolinia (5 and 10 %) fuels were coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron tricloride BCl 3 ) and ammonia (NH 3 ) at 600 C.Boron tricloride and ammonia are carried to tubular furnace using hydrogen as carrier gas. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The properties of the coated samples were observed using BET surface area analysis, infrared spectra (IR), X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) techniques

  4. Uranium dioxide Caramel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    The work performed in France on Caramel fuels for research reactors reflects the reality of a program based on non proliferation criteria, as they have already appeared several years ago. This work actually includes the following different aspects: identification of the non proliferation criterion defining this action; determination of the economical and technical goals to be reached; realization of research and development studies finalized in a full scale demonstration; transposition to an industrial and commercial level

  5. Process for preparing sintered uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is prepared for use as fuel in nuclear reactors by sintering it to the desired density at a temperature less than 1300 0 C in a chemically controlled gas atmosphere comprised of at least two gases which in equilibrium provide an oxygen partial pressure sufficient to maintain the uranium dioxide composition at an oxygen/uranium ratio of at least 2.005 at the sintering temperature. 7 Claims, No Drawings

  6. Uranium dioxide and beryllium oxide enhanced thermal conductivity nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antonio Santos; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2007-01-01

    The uranium dioxide is the most used substance as nuclear reactor fuel for presenting many advantages such as: high stability even when it is in contact with water in high temperatures, high fusion point, and high capacity to retain fission products. The conventional fuel is made with ceramic sintered pellets of uranium dioxide stacked inside fuel rods, and presents disadvantages because its low thermal conductivity causes large and dangerous temperature gradients. Besides, the thermal conductivity decreases further as the fuel burns, what limits a pellet operational lifetime. This research developed a new kind of fuel pellets fabricated with uranium dioxide kernels and beryllium oxide filling the empty spaces between them. This fuel has a great advantage because of its higher thermal conductivity in relation to the conventional fuel. Pellets of this kind were produced, and had their thermophysical properties measured by the flash laser method, to compare with the thermal conductivity of the conventional uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. (author) (author)

  7. Irradiation of TZM: Uranium dioxide fuel pin at 1700 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A fuel pin clad with TZM and containing solid pellets of uranium dioxide was fission heated in a static helium-cooled capsule at a maximum surface temperature of 1700 K for approximately 1000 hr and to a total burnup of 2.0 percent of the uranium-235. The results of the postirradiation examination indicated: (1) A transverse, intergranular failure of the fuel pin occurred when the fuel pin reached 2.0-percent burnup. This corresponds to 1330 kW-hr/cu cm, where the volume is the sum of the fuel, clad, and void volumes in the fuel region. (2) The maximum swelling of the fuel pin was less than 1.5 percent on the fuel-pin diameter. (3) There was no visible interaction between the TZM clad and the UO2. (4) Irradiation at 1700 K produced a course-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.02 centimeter and with some of the grains extending one-half of the thickness of the clad. (5) Below approximately 1500 K, the irradiation of the clad produced a moderately fine-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.004 centimeter.

  8. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  9. Micromechanical approach of behavior of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulacroix, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is the reference fuel for pressurized water nuclear reactors. Our study deals with understanding and modeling of mechanical behavior at the microstructure scale at low temperatures (brittle fracture) and high temperature (viscoplastic strain). We have first studied the geometrical properties of polycrystals at large and of UO 2 polycrystal more specifically. As of now, knowledge of this behavior in the brittle fracture range is limited. Consequently, we developed an experimental method which allows better understanding of brittle fracture phenomenon at grain scale. We show that fracture is fully intra-granular and {100} planes seem to be the most preferential cleavage planes. Experimental results are directly used to deduce constitutive equations of intra-granular brittle fracture at crystal scale. This behavior is then used in 3D polycrystal simulation of brittle fracture. The full field calculation gives access to the initiation of fracture and propagation of the crack through the grains. Finally, we developed a mechanical behavior model of UO 2 in the viscoplastic range. We first present constitutive equations at macroscopic scale which accounts for an ageing process caused by migration of defects towards dislocations. Secondly, we have developed a crystal plasticity model which was fitted to UO 2 . This model includes the rotation of the crystal lattice. We present examples of polycrystalline simulations. (author) [fr

  10. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  11. Method and device for the dry preparation of ceramic uranium dioxide nuclear fuel wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirk, H.; Roepenack, H.; Goeldner, U.

    1977-01-01

    Reprocessing of waste, resulting from the production of ceramic sintered bodies from uranium dioxide for use as nuclear fuel, in a dry process into very finely dispersed pure U 3 O 8 powder may be improved by applying vibrating screening during oxidation. An appropriate device is described. (UWI) [de

  12. Safety analysis report of uranium dioxide fuel laboratory, Nuclear Research Centre Inchas, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Azim, M.S.; Abdel-Halim, A.

    1987-07-01

    In the Nuclear Research Center Inchas a uranium dioxide fuel laboratory is planned and built by the AEA Cairo (Atomic Energy Authority). The layout of this fuel lab and the programmatical contents are subject to the bilaterial cooperation between Egypt and the Federal Republic of Germany. In this report the safety analysis as basic items for the approval procedure are started in detail. (orig.) [de

  13. Fracture toughness of WWER Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with various grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, R.; Novikov, V.; Mikheev, E.; Fedotov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with grain sizes 13, 26, and 33 μm for WWER were investigated in the present work in order to determine crack formation and the fracture toughness.The investigation of crack formation in uranium oxide fuel pellets of the WWER-types showed that Young’s modulus and the microhardness of polycrystalline samples increase with increasing grain size, while the fracture toughness decreases. Characteristically, radial Palmqvist cracks form on the surface of uranium dioxide pellets for loads up to 1 kg. Transgranular propagation of cracks over distances several-fold larger than the length of the imprint diagonal is observed in pellets with large grains and small intragrain pores. Intergranular propagation of cracks along grain boundaries with branching occurs in pellets with small grains and low pore concentration on the grain boundaries. Blunting on large pores and at breaks in direction does not permit the cracks to reach a significant length

  14. Minimization of the fission product waste by using thorium based fuel instead of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, A. Abdelghafar, E-mail: Agalahom@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    This research discusses the neutronic characteristics of VVER-1200 assembly fueled with five different fuel types based on thorium. These types of fuel based on mixing thorium as a fertile material with different fissile materials. The neutronic characteristics of these fuels are investigated by comparing their neutronic characteristics with the conventional uranium dioxide fuel using the MCNPX code. The objective of this study is to reduce the production of long-lived actinides, get rid of plutonium component and to improve the fuel cycle economy while maintaining acceptable values of the neutronic safety parameters such as moderator temperature coefficient, Doppler coefficient and effective delayed neutrons (β). The thorium based fuel has a more negative Doppler coefficient than uranium dioxide fuel. The moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) has been calculated for the different proposed fuels. Also, the fissile inventory ratio has been calculated at different burnup step. The use of Th-232 as a fertile material instead of U-238 in a nuclear fuel is the most promising fuel in VVER-1200 as it is the ideal solution to avoid the production of more plutonium components and long-lived minor actinides. The reactor grade plutonium accumulated in light water reactor with burnup can be recycled by mixing it with Th-232 to fuel the VVER-1200 assembly. The concentrations of Xe-135 and Sm-151 have been investigated, due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  15. Assessment of uranium dioxide fuel performance with the addition of beryllium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T., E-mail: romuniz@usp.br, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: danieldesouza@gmail.com, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco; Aguiar, Amanda A., E-mail: amanda.abati.aguiar@gmail.com [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 pointed the problem related to the hydrogen generation under accident scenarios due to the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys widely used as fuel rod cladding in water-cooled reactors. This problem promoted research programs aiming the development of accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which are fuels that under accident conditions could keep longer its integrity enabling the mitigation of the accident effects. In the framework of the ATF program, different materials have been studied to be applied as cladding to replace zirconium-based alloy; also efforts have been made to improve the uranium dioxide thermal conductivity doping the fuel pellet. This paper evaluates the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO) to the uranium dioxide in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellet. Investigations performed in this area considering the addition of 10% in volume of BeO, resulting in the UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel, have shown good results with the improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity and the consequent reduction of the fuel temperatures under irradiation. In this paper, two models obtained from open literature for the thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2}- BeO fuel were implemented in the FRAPCON 3.5 code and the results obtained using the modified code versions were compared. The simulations were carried out using a case available in the code documentation related to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod irradiated under steady state condition. The results show that the fuel centerline temperatures decrease with the addition of BeO, when compared to the conventional UO{sub 2} pellet, independent of the model applied. (author)

  16. A new mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model for a uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geun

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model (MEGA) for uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel was developed. It was based upon the diffusional release of fission gases from inside the grain to the grain boundary and the release of fission gases from the grain boundary to the external surface by the interconnection of the fission gas bubbles in the grain boundary. The capability of the MEGA model was validated by a comparison with the fission gas release data base and the sensitivity analyses of the parameters. It was found that the MEGA model correctly predicts the fission gas release in the broad range of fuel burnups up to 98 MWd/kgU. Especially, the enhancement of fission gas release in a high-burnup fuel, and the reduction of fission gas release at a high burnup by increasing the UO 2 grain size were found to be correctly predicted by the MEGA model without using any artificial factor. (author)

  17. Critical experiments simulating accidental water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Glushkov, L.S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper focuses on experimental analysis of nuclear criticality safety at accidental water immersion of fuel elements of the Russian TOPAZ-2 space nuclear power system reactor. The structure of water-moderated heterogeneous critical assemblies at the NARCISS facility is described in detail, including sizes, compositions, densities of materials of the main assembly components for various core configurations. Critical parameters of the assemblies measured for varying number of fuel elements, height of fuel material in fuel elements and their arrangement in the water moderator with a uniform or variable spacing are presented. It has been found from the experiments that at accidental water immersion of fuel elements involved, the minimum critical mass equal to approximately 20 kg of uranium dioxide is achieved at 31-37 fuel elements. The paper gives an example of a physical model of the water-moderated heterogeneous critical assembly with a detailed characterization of its main components that can be used for calculations using different neutronic codes, including Monte Carlo ones. (author)

  18. Assessment of current atomic scale modelling methods for the investigation of nuclear fuels under irradiation: Example of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.; Freyss, M.; Krack, M.; Devanathan, R.

    2015-01-01

    We focus here on the assessment of the description of interatomic interactions in uranium dioxide using, on the one hand, electronic structure methods, in particular in the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework, and on the other hand, empirical potential methods. These two types of methods are complementary, the former enabling results to be obtained from a minimal amount of input data and further insight into the electronic and magnetic properties to be achieved, while the latter are irreplaceable for studies where a large number of atoms need to be considered. We consider basic properties as well as specific ones, which are important for the description of nuclear fuel under irradiation. These are especially energies, which are the main data passed on to higher scale models. For this exercise, we limit ourselves to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) because of the extensive amount of studies available on this system. (authors)

  19. Improving the neutronic characteristics of a boiling water reactor by using uranium zirconium hydride fuel instead of uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, Ahmed Abdelghafar [Higher Technological Institute, Ramadan (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The present work discusses two different models of boiling water reactor (BWR) bundle to compare the neutronic characteristics of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH{sub 1.6}) fuel. Each bundle consists of four assemblies. The BWR assembly fueled with UO{sub 2} contains 8 × 8 fuel rods while that fueled with UZrH{sub 1.6} contains 9 × 9 fuel rods. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport code, based on the Mont Carlo method, is used to design three dimensional models for BWR fuel bundles at typical operating temperatures and pressure conditions. These models are used to determine the multiplication factor, pin-by-pin power distribution, axial power distribution, thermal neutron flux distribution, and axial thermal neutron flux. The moderator and coolant (water) are permitted to boil within the BWR core forming steam bubbles, so it is important to calculate the reactivity effect of voiding at different values. It is found that the hydride fuel bundle design can be simplified by eliminating water rods and replacing the control blade with control rods. UZrH{sub 1.6} fuel improves the performance of the BWR in different ways such as increasing the energy extracted per fuel assembly, reducing the uranium ore, and reducing the plutonium accumulated in the BWR through burnup.

  20. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  1. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  2. NARCISS critical stand experiments for studying the nuclear safety in accident water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Bubelev, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the Topaz-2 SNPS designed under scientific supervision of RRC KI in Russia, and of the NARCISS critical facility, is given. At the NARCISS critical facility, neutronic peculiarities and nuclear safety issues of the Topaz-2 system reactor were studied experimentally. This work is devoted to a detailed description of experiments on investigation of criticality safety in accident water immersion og highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements, performed at the NARCISS facility. The experiments were carried out at water-moderated critical assemblies with varying height, number, and spacing of fuel elements. The results obtained in the critical experiments, computational models of the investigated critical configurations, and comparison of the computational and experimental results are given [ru

  3. Fracture of Zircaloy cladding by interactions with uranium dioxide pellets in LWR fuel rods. Technical report 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.; Ranjan, G.V.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Power reactor fuel rod failures can be caused by uranium dioxide fuel pellet-Zircaloy cladding interactions. The report summarizes the current position attained in a detailed theoretical study of Zircaloy cladding fracture caused by the growth of stress corrosion cracks which form near fuel pellet cracks as a consequence of a power increase after a sufficiently high burn-up. It is shown that stress corrosion crack growth in irradiated Zircaloy must be able to proceed at very low stress intensifications if uniform friction effects are operative at the fuel-cladding interface, when the interfacial friction coefficient is less than unity, when a symmetric distribution of fuel cracks exists, and when symmetric interfacial slippage occurs (i.e., ''uniform'' conditions). Otherwise, the observed fuel rod failures must be due to departures from ''uniform'' conditions, and a very high interfacial friction coefficient and particularly fuel-cladding bonding, are means of providing sufficient stess intensification at a cladding crack tip to explain the occurrence of cladding fractures. The results of the investigation focus attention on the necessity for reliable experimental data on the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of irradiated Zircaloy, and for further investigations on the correlation between local fuel-cladding bonding and stress corrosion cracking

  4. Fracture toughness and fracture surface energy of sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, T.R.G.; Chandrasekharan, K.N.; Panakkal, J.P.; Ghosh, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the variation of fracture toughness Ksub(ic) and fracture surface energy γsub(s) in sintered uranium dioxide pellets in the density range 9.86 to 10.41 g cm -3 , using Vickers indentation technique. A minimum of four indentations were made on each pellet sample and the average crack length of each indentation and the hardness values were determined. The overall average crack-length datra and the data on volume fraction porosity in the pellets fitted a straight line, from which Ksub(ic) and γsub(s) were calculated. The fracture parameters of nonporous polycrystalline UO 2 , calculated from the experimental data, are presented in tabular form. (U.K.)

  5. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  6. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  7. Uranium dioxide. Sintering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Description of a sintering method and of the equipment devoted to uranium dioxide powder caracterization and comparison between different samples. Determination of the curve giving specific volume versus pressure and micrographic examination of a pellet at medium pressure [fr

  8. Comparison of uranium dissolution rates from spent fuel and uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, S.A.; Gray, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    Two similar sets of dissolution experiments, resulting from a statistical experimental design were performed in order to examine systematically the effects of temperature (25--75 degree C), dissolved oxygen (0.002-0.2 atm overpressure), pH (8--10) and carbonate concentrations (2--200 x 10 -4 molar) on aqueous dissolution of UO 2 and spent fuel. The average dissolution rate was 8.6 mg/m 2 ·day for UO 2 and 3.1 mg/m 2 ·day for spent fuel. This is considered to be an insignificant difference; thus, unirradiated UO 2 and irradiated spent fuel dissolved at about the same rate. Moreover, regression analyses indicated that the dissolution rates of UO 2 and spent fuel responded similarly to changes in pH, temperature, and carbonate concentration. However, the two materials responded very differently to dissolved oxygen concentration. Approximately half-order reaction rates with respect to oxygen concentration were found for UO 2 at all conditions tested. At room temperature, spent fuel dissolution (reaction) rates were nearly independent of oxygen concentration. At 75 degree C, reaction orders of 0.35 and 0.73 were observed for spent fuel, and there was some indication that the reaction order with respect to oxygen concentration might be dependent on pH and/or carbonate concentration as well as on temperature

  9. Atomic-scale effects of chromium-doping on defect behaviour in uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zhexi; Ngayam-Happy, Raoul; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The effects of doping conventional UO 2 fuel with chromium are studied through atomistic simulations using empirical force field methods. We first analyse the stable structures of unirradiated doped fuel by determining the preferred lattice configuration of chromium ions and oxygen vacancies within the matrix. In order to understand the physical effects of the dopants, we investigate the energy change upon inserting isolated defects and Frenkel pairs in the vicinity of chromium. The behaviour of point defects is then studied with collision cascade simulations and relaxation of doped simulation cells containing Frenkel pairs. The defective structures are analysed using an in-house tool named ASTRAM. Results indicate definite effects of chromium-doping on the ease with which defects are formed. Moreover, the extent of Cr effects on the residual damage following a displacement cascade is dependent on the dopant distribution and concentration in the fuel matrix.

  10. Atomic-scale effects of chromium-doping on defect behaviour in uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zhexi; Ngayam-Happy, Raoul, E-mail: raoul.ngayam-happy@psi.ch; Krack, Matthias; Pautz, Andreas

    2017-05-15

    The effects of doping conventional UO{sub 2} fuel with chromium are studied through atomistic simulations using empirical force field methods. We first analyse the stable structures of unirradiated doped fuel by determining the preferred lattice configuration of chromium ions and oxygen vacancies within the matrix. In order to understand the physical effects of the dopants, we investigate the energy change upon inserting isolated defects and Frenkel pairs in the vicinity of chromium. The behaviour of point defects is then studied with collision cascade simulations and relaxation of doped simulation cells containing Frenkel pairs. The defective structures are analysed using an in-house tool named ASTRAM. Results indicate definite effects of chromium-doping on the ease with which defects are formed. Moreover, the extent of Cr effects on the residual damage following a displacement cascade is dependent on the dopant distribution and concentration in the fuel matrix.

  11. Swelling of uranium dioxide and deformation behavior of the fuel element at high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontar, A.S.; Gutnik, V.S.; Nelidov, M.V.; Nikolaev, Yu.V.

    1993-01-01

    As post-reactor investigations showed, significant difference of swelling rates is connected with the fact that swelling of UO 2 with the equiaxial structure is mainly the result of fission gas bubbles accumulation along grain boundaries, and, in the case of the column structure, with formation of fine bubbles inside grains. The data given testify to usefulness of such investigations to predict TFE lifetime. As proven in this study one can see rates of radial deformation of fuel element cladding of a multi-cell TFE as a result of UO 2 swelling. They were calculated using the code SDS. Typical sizes were taken for calculation: cladding diameter--20 mm, cladding temperature at the central section of the fuel element--1,900 K, energy generation rate--145 W/cm 3 . These parameters provide output electric power of the TFE 600 W at the active zone length--400 mm

  12. Development of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide for increasing of thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2011-01-01

    The CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear presents a project named 'Beryllium Project' viewing to increasing the thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel pellets, increasing the lifetime of those pellets in the reactor, generating a greater economy. This increase of conductivity is obtained by means of Be O addition to the UO 2 fuel pellets, which is very used for the production of nuclear energy. The UO 2 pellets however present a thermal conductivity relatively low, generating a high temperature gradient between the center and his side surface. The addition of beryllium oxide, with higher thermal conductivity gives pellets which will present lower temperature gradient and, consequently, more durability and better utilization of energy potential of the pellet in the reactor. (author)

  13. Advances in simulating non-congruent phase transitions of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welland, M.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Lewis, B.J.

    2007-01-01

    A model is being developed to simulate UO 2 at very high temperatures incorporating the effects of non-congruent phase transitions. In particular, the melting transformation and the possible 'Λ-transition' is being investigated to help support the design and analysis of experimental work being conducted as part of nuclear safety research. This work includes the interpretation of the behaviour of operating CANDU fuel under upset conditions, where centerline melting may potentially occur (particularly if the fuel is oxidized). The model presented here numerically solves a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations as derived from fundamental principles. The results of the model present here compare well against laser flash experiments in recently published literature. (author)

  14. Increase of thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel pellets with beryllium oxide addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarano, D.M.; Mansur, F.A.; Santos, A.M.M. dos; Ferraz, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    The UO_2 fuel is one of the most used nuclear fuel in thermal reactors and has many advantages such as high melting point, chemical compatibility with cladding, etc. However, its thermal conductivity is relatively low, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel pellets due to a high radial temperature gradient during reactor operation. An alternative to avoid this problem is to increase the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellets, by adding beryllium oxide (BeO). Pellets of UO_2 and UO_2-BeO were obtained from a homogenized mixture of powders of UO_2 and BeO, containing 2% and 3% by weight of BeO and sintering at 1750 °C for 3 h under H_2 atmosphere after uniaxial pressing at 400 MPa. The pellet densities were obtained by xylol penetration-immersion method and the thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity were determined according to ASTM E-1461 at room temperature (25 deg C) and 100 deg C. The thermal diffusivity measurements were carried out employing the laser flash method. The thermal conductivity obtained at 25 deg C showed an increase with the addition of 2% and 3% of BeO corresponding to 19% and 28%, respectively. As for the measurements carried out at 100 deg C, there was an increase in the thermal conductivity for the same BeO contents of 20% and 31%. These values as a percentage of increased conductivity were obtained in relation to the UO_2 pellets. (author)

  15. Mass spectrometric determination of burnup of thorium-uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, L.W.; Knight, C.H.; Longhurst, T.H.; Cassidy, R.M

    1984-07-01

    The isotopes {sup 148}Nd and {sup 145+146}Nd were investigated for use as fission monitors. A two-column anion-exchange procedure was used to separate these and U and Th from the fuel matrix, and the purified fractions were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Relative standard deviations of Nd, U, and Th determinations by isotope dilution were {approx}0.7%. A computer-generated simulation of the irradiation was used to estimate the effective fission yields for {sup 148}Nd and {sup 145+146}Nd. Burnup results with {sup 145+146}Nd as the fission monitor showed excellent agreement with results obtained by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method that used {sup 139}La as the fission monitor; the average difference between the two methods was 0.02%. The {sup 148}Nd results were biased high by up to 4%; this was attributed to a {sup 147}Nd neutron capture effect. Results obtained with the initial heavy element content estimated from the weight and initial composition of the fuel, instead of from analyses for the actinides, showed excellent agreement (average difference = 0.2 %) with the conventional method. (author)

  16. Mass spectrometric determination of burnup of thorium-uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, L.W.; Knight, C.H.; Longhurst, T.H.; Cassidy, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopes 148 Nd and 145+146 Nd were investigated for use as fission monitors. A two-column anion-exchange procedure was used to separate these and U and Th from the fuel matrix, and the purified fractions were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Relative standard deviations of Nd, U, and Th determinations by isotope dilution were ∼0.7%. A computer-generated simulation of the irradiation was used to estimate the effective fission yields for 148 Nd and 145+146 Nd. Burnup results with 145+146 Nd as the fission monitor showed excellent agreement with results obtained by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method that used 139 La as the fission monitor; the average difference between the two methods was 0.02%. The 148 Nd results were biased high by up to 4%; this was attributed to a 147 Nd neutron capture effect. Results obtained with the initial heavy element content estimated from the weight and initial composition of the fuel, instead of from analyses for the actinides, showed excellent agreement (average difference = 0.2 %) with the conventional method. (author)

  17. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  18. Penetrate-leach dissolution of zirconium-clad uranium and uranium dioxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1975-01-01

    A new decladding-dissolution process was developed for zirconium-clad uranium metal and UO 2 fuels. The proposed penetrate-leach process consists of penetrating the zirconium cladding with Alniflex solution (2M HF--1M HNO 3 --1M Al(NO 3 ) 3 --0.1M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) and of leaching the exposed core with 10M HNO 3 . Undissolved cladding pieces are discarded as solid waste. Periodic HF and HNO 3 additions, efficient agitation, and in-line zirconium analyses are required for successful control of ZrF 4 and/or AlF 3 precipitation during the cladding-penetration step. Preliminary solvent extraction studies indicated complete recovery of uranium with 30 vol. percent tributyl phosphate (TBP) from both Alniflex solution and blended Alniflex-HNO 3 leach solutions. With 7.5 vol. percent TBP, high extractant/feed flow ratios and low scrub flows are required for satisfactory uranium recovery from Alniflex solution. Modified waste-handling procedures may be required for Alniflex waste, because it cannot be evaporated before neutralization and large quantities of solids are generated on neutralization. The effect of unstable UZr 3 (epsilon phase of uranium-zirconium system) on the safety of penetrate-leach dissolution was investigated

  19. Literature review of thermal and radiation performance parameters for high-temperature, uranium dioxide fueled cermet materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertling, C.; Hanrahan, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature fissile-fueled cermet literature was reviewed. Data are presented primarily for the W-UO 2 as this was the system most frequently studied; other reviewed systems include cermets with Mo, Re, or alloys as a matrix. Failure mechanisms for the cermets are typically degradation of mechanical integrity and loss of fuel. Mechanical failure can occur through stresses produced from dissimilar expansion coefficients, voids created from diffusion of dissimilar materials or formation of metal hydride and subsequent volume expansion. Fuel loss failure can occur by high temperature surface vaporization or by vaporization after loss of mechanical integrity. Techniques found to aid in retaining fuel include the use of coatings around UO 2 fuel particles, use of oxide stabilizers in the UO 2 , minimizing grain sizes in the metal matrix, minimizing impurities, controlling the cermet sintering atmosphere, and cladding around the cermet

  20. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  1. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  2. Physical and chemical analysis of interaction between oxide fuel and pyrocarbon coating of coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Kromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    In terms of the model proposed the equilibrium pressure of gases (CO, Kr, Xe) in pyrocarbon-coated uranium dioxide fuel particles has been calculated, as function of the initial composition of the fuel (O/U), the design features of the coated particles, the fuel temperature, and the burnup. The possibility of reducing gas pressure in the particles by alloying the kernels with uranium carbide, and increasing the kernel capacity for retention of solid fission products by alloying the uranium oxide with aluminum-silicates, has been investigated. (author)

  3. Establishment of THERPRO Database and Estimation of the Effect of Fuel Burn-up on the Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Seon

    2005-02-01

    Materials property data are an essential part of major disciplines in many engineering fields. To nuclear engineering, fundamental understanding of thermo-physical chemical mechanical properties of nuclear materials is very important. THERPRO data base that is re-designed and re-constructed through this study is a web-based on-line nuclear materials properties data base. For the future upgrade of the data base contemporary information technologies have been incorporated during the construction. Basically THERPRO data base has a hierarchical structure consisting of several levels: home page, element, compound, property, author, report, and bibliography level. All of data sets in each level are interconnected using network structure and thus every data can be easily retrieved including the bibliographical information by an appropriate query action. As a part of THERPRO DB utilization, the effect of fuel burn-up on the thermal conductivity of irradiated uranium dioxide is analyzed with the data contained in the data base as well as recent data published in the relevant journals. Their data are comparatively studied and the effect is estimated using FRAPCON-3 code with two in-pile data sets, BR-3 111i5 and Oconee rod 15309. The results show that the fuel center line temperature can differ 200 .deg. C∼400 .deg. C from thermal conductivity models depending on burn-up, which can significantly influence high burn-up fuel performance. In conclusion, it is demonstrated through this study that THERPRO data base can be a great utility for nuclear engineers and researchers, if appropriately utilized

  4. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, C.G.S.; George, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide of composition UO 2.015 was measured from 300 to 1400 K. The phonon component of the conductivity is found to be quantitatively accounted for by the theoretical expression of Slack derived by modifying the Leibfried-Schlomann equation. (orig.)

  5. performance calculations of gadolinium oxide and boron nitride coated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanker, E.; Uslu, I.; Disbudak, H.; Guenduez, G.

    1997-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on the behaviour of natural uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide mixture fuel and boron nitride coated low enriched fuel in a pressurized water reactor. A fuel element containing one burnable poison fuel pins was modeled with the computer code WIMS, and burn-up dependent critically, fissile isotope inventory and two dimensional power distribution were obtained. Calculations were performed for burnable poison fuels containing 5% and 10% gadolinium oxide and for those coated with 1μ,5μ and 10μ of boron nitride. Boron nitride coating was found superior to gadolinium oxide on account of its smoother criticality curve, lower power peaks and insignificant change in fissile isotope content

  6. Method for preparing a sinterable uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, T.A.; Holaday, V.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an improved method for preparing a sinterable uranium dioxide powder for the preparation of nuclear fuel, using microwave radiation in a microwave induction furnace. The starting compound may be uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, ammonium diuranate or ammonium uranyl carbonate. The starting compound is heated in a microwave induction furnace for a period of time sufficient for compound decomposition. The decomposed compound is heated in a microwave induction furnace in a reducing atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to reduce the decomposed compound to uranium dioxide powder

  7. In-pile and out-of-pile testing of a molybdenum-uranium dioxide cermet fueled themionic diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diianni, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of Mo-UO2 cermet fuel in a diode for thermionic reactor application was studied. The diode had a Mo-0.5 Ti emitter and niobium collector. Output power ranged from 1.4 to 2.8 W/cm squared at emitter and collector temperatures of 1500 deg and 540 C. Thermionic performance was stable within the limits of the instrumentation sensitivity. Through 1000 hours of in-pile operation the emitter was dimensionally stable. However, some fission gases (15 percent) leaked through an inner clad imperfection that occurred during fuel fabrication.

  8. Separation and mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of uranium and thorium from thorium-uranium dioxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, L.W.; Elliot, N.L.; Longhurst, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    A microchemical procedure was developed for the separation and isotopic analysis of U and Th from irradiated (Th,U)O 2 fuel. The separation procedure consisted of two stages; in the first a tributyl phosphate impregnated resin bead was equilibrated with the dissolved fuel in 0.08 M HF/6 M HNO 3 solution. The bead sorbed approximately 1.7 μg of U and 4.8μg of Th and provided good separation of these from the fission products. In the second stage, the U and Th were back-extracted into 0.025 M HF/8 M HNO 3 solution, which contained a small anion-exchange membrane disk. The disk adsorbed approximately 14 ng of U and 45 ng of Th, and subsequently was transferred to the ionizing filament of a thermal-ionization mass spectrometer and covered with a starch deposit. Sensitivities were sufficiently high for sequential analysis of these quantities of Th and U from a single disk. Isotopic data obtained for a combined U and Th standard showed excellent agreement with certified values: overall bias and precision were < 0.03% and 0.2% relative standard deviation, respectively, for both elements. The applicability of the procedure to uranium fuels was also demonstrated. 6 figures, 2 tables

  9. Separation and mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of uranium and thorium from thorium-uranium dioxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, L.W.; Elliot, N.L.; Longhurst, T.H

    1983-07-01

    A convenient and sensitive microchemical procedure was developed for the separation and isotopic analysis of U and Th from irradiated (Th,U)O{sub 2} fuel. The separation procedure consisted of two stages; in the first a tributyl phosphate impregnated resin bead was equilibrated with the dissolved fuel in 0.08 M HF/6 M HNO{sub 3} solution. The bead sorbed approximately 1.7 {mu}g of U and 4.8 {mu}g of Th and provided good separation of these from the fission products. In the second stage, the U and Th were back-extracted into 0.025 M HF/8 M HNO{sub 3} solution, which contained a small anion-exchange membrane disk. The disk adsorbed approximately 14 ng of U and 45 ng of Th, and subsequently was transferred to the ionizing filament of a thermal-ionization mass spectrometer and covered with a starch deposit. Sensitivities were sufficiently high for sequential analysis of these quantities of Th and U from a single disk. Isotopic data obtained for a combined U and Th standard showed excellent agreement with certified values: overall bias and precision were < -0.03% and 0.2% relative standard deviation, respectively, for both elements. The applicability of the procedure to uranium fuels was also demonstrated. (author)

  10. Study of the changes of uranium dioxide properties resulting from sintering; Izucavanje procesa sinterovanja urandioksida sa gledista promene karakteristicnih osobina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    Uranium dioxide powder used for studying the sintering process having grain size 63 {mu}. Sintering was performed in the temperature interval from 1000 - 1300 deg C in argon atmosphere. The O/U ratio of the used uranium dioxide was 2.07. Densities obtained by sintering under the mentioned conditions were not higher than 91% TG (theoretical density). This showed that the mentioned conditions were optimal, but the uranium dioxide obtained could be used for studying the radiation damage of fuel.

  11. Pyrolytic carbon coatings for nuclear fuels from commercial butane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, I.D.; Abdelhalim, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide and graphite semi-spherical particles (average diameter = 300 um) were coated with pyrolytic carbon at relatively low temperatures (800 to 1200 0 C). The spouting gas was a mixture of commercial butane and nitrogen. The hydrocarbon served as a source for carbon whereas nitrogenated as a diluent and a support for the bed. The total gas flow rate was 3.5 lit/min and the hydrocarbon content varied from 3 to 10%. Coating efficiencies ranging from 4 to 25 percent were obtained. The densities of the coatings varied from 1.25 g/cm 3 (which corresponds to coatings of laminar microstructures) and 1.82 g/cm 3 (which suggests the formation of isotropic coatings. Metallographic examination (using polarized light) of the pyrolytic carbon formed at the experimental conditions indicated the possibility of using the coatings for nuclear fuel applications

  12. Contribution to the study of mechanical properties of nuclear fuel: atomistic modelling of the deformation of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossati, P.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of nuclear fuel are a complex problem, involving many coupled mechanisms occurring at different length scales. We used Molecular Dynamics models to bring some light on some of these mechanisms at the atomic scale. We devised a procedure to calculate transition pathways between some UO 2 polymorphs, and then carried out dynamics simulations of these transitions. We confirmed the stability of the cotunnite structure at high pressure using various empirical potentials, the fluorite structure being the most stable at room pressure. Moreover, we showed a reconstructive phase transition between the fluorite and cotunnite structures. We also showed the importance of the major deformation axis on the kind of transition that occur under tensile conditions. Depending on the loading direction, a scrutinyite or rutile phase can appear. We then calculated the elastic behaviour of UO 2 using different potentials. The relative agreement between them was used to produce a set of parameters to be used as input in mesoscale models. We also simulated crack propagation in UO 2 single crystals. These simulations showed secondary phases nucleation at crack tips, and hinted at the importance thereof on crack propagation at higher length-scales. We then described some properties of edge dislocations in UO 2 . The core structures were compared for various glide planes. The critical resolved shear stress was calculated for temperatures up to 2000 K. These calculations showed a link between lattice disorder at the dislocations core and the dislocations mobility. (author)

  13. High Frequency Acoustic Microscopy for the Determination of Porosity and Young's Modulus in High Burnup Uranium Dioxide Nuclear Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mara; Laux, Didier; Cappia, Fabiola; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V. V.; Wiss, T.; Despaux, G.

    2016-06-01

    During irradiation UO2 nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of both porosity and elastic properties in high burnup UO2 pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. For this purpose ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A UO2 pellet with a burnup of 67 GWd/tU was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the JRC-ITU at a 90 MHz frequency, with methanol as coupling liquid. VR was measured at different radial positions. A good agreement was found, when comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using SEM image analysis, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition, Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile and to the hardness radial profile data obtained by Vickers micro-indentation.

  14. Manufacture of uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide powder is prepared by the AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) method. Supplementing the known process steps, the AUC, after separation from the mother liquor, is washed with an ammonium hydrogen carbonate or an NH 4 OH solution and is subsequently post-treated with a liquid which reduces the surface tension of the residual water in an AUC. Such a liquid is, for instance, alcohol

  15. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  16. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  17. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  18. Gas phase deposition of oxide and metal-oxide coatings on fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patokin, A.P.; Khrebtov, V.L.; Shirokov, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Production processes and properties of oxide (Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) and metal-oxide (Mo-Al 2 O 3 , Mo-ZrO 2 , W-Al 2 O 3 , W-ZrO 2 ) coatings on molybdenum substrates and uranium dioxide fuel particles were investigated. It is shown that the main factors that have an effect on the deposition rate, density, microstructure and other properties of coatings are the deposition temperature, the ratio of H 2 and CO 2 flow rates, the total reactor pressure and the ratio of partial pressures of corresponding metal chlorides during formation of metal-oxide coatings

  19. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  20. Study of non stoichiometric uranium dioxide samples (UO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Sergio C.; Lima, Nelson B. de; Bustillos, Jose O.V.

    1999-01-01

    The gravimetric and voltammetric methods for determination of non-stoichiometric O/U ratio in uranium dioxide used as nuclear fuel are discussed in this work. The oxidation of uranium oxide is very complex due to many phase changes. gravimetric and voltammetric methods do not detect phase changes. The results of this work shown that, to evaluate both methods is requiring to be done Rietveld methods by x-ray diffraction data to identify the uranium oxide phase changes. (author)

  1. Fuel particle coating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Wagner, P.; Wahman, L.A.; White, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies

  2. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.; Itzkovitch, I.J.

    1983-01-01

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO 2 are described

  3. Improved ionic model of liquid uranium dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryaznov, [No Value; Iosilevski, [No Value; Yakub, E; Fortov, [No Value; Hyland, GJ; Ronchi, C

    The paper presents a model for liquid uranium dioxide, obtained by improving a simplified ionic model, previously adopted to describe the equation of state of this substance [1]. A "chemical picture" is used for liquid UO2 of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric composition. Several ionic species

  4. Surface Characterization and Electrochemical Oxidation of Metal Doped Uranium Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Goo; Ha, Yeong-Keong; Kim, Jong-Yun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Trivalent element in UO{sub 2} matrix makes the oxygen vacancy from loss of oxygen for charge compensation. Tetravalent element alters lattice parameter of UO{sub 2} due to diameter difference between the tetravalent element and replaced U. These structural changes have significant effect on not only relevant fuel performance but also the kinetics of fuel oxidation. Park and Olander explained the stabilization of Ln (III)-doped UO{sub 2} against oxidation based on oxygen potential calculations. In this work, we have been investigated the effect of Gd{sup 3+} and Th{sup 4+} doping on the UO{sub 2} structure with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize the surface structure of nuclear fuel material. For Gd doped UO{sub 2}, its electrochemical oxidation behaviors are also investigated. The Gd and Th doped uranium dioxide solid solution pellets with various doping level were investigated by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, electrochemical experiments to investigate surface structure and electro chemical oxidation behaviors. The lattice parameter evaluated from XRD spectra indicated the formation of solid solutions. Raman spectra showed the existence of the oxygen vacancy. SEM images showed the grain structure on the surface of Gd doped uranium dioxide depending on doping level and oxygen-to-metal ratio.

  5. Determination of the stoichiometric ratio uranium dioxide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Sergio Carvalho

    1999-01-01

    The determination of the O/U stoichiometric ratio in uranium dioxide is an important parameter in order to qualify nuclear fuels. The excess oxygen in the crystallographic structure can cause changes in the physico-chemical properties of this compound such as variation of the thermal conductivity alterations, fuel plasticity and others, affecting the efficiency of this material when it is utilized as nuclear fuel in the reactor core. The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods for the determination of uranium oxide samples from two different production processes, using gravimetric, voltammetric and X-ray diffraction techniques. After the evaluation of these techniques, the main aspect of this work is to define a reliable methodology in order to characterize the behavior of uranium oxide. The methodology used in this work consisted of two different steps: utilization of gravimetric and volumetric methods in order to determine the ratio in uranium dioxide samples; utilization of X-ray diffraction technique in order to determine the lattice parameters using patterns and application of the Rietveld method during refining of the structural data. As a result of the experimental part of this work it was found that the X-ray diffraction analysis performs better and detects the presence of more phases than gravimetric and voltammetric techniques, not sensitive enough in this detection. (author)

  6. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  7. Uranium Dioxide Powder Flow ability Improvement Using Sol-Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanda, D.; Sambodo Daru, G.

    1998-01-01

    The improvement of flow ability characteristics of uranium dioxide powder has been done using sol-gel process. To anticipate a pellet mass production with uniform pellet dimension, the uranium dioxide powder must be have a spherical form. Uranium dioxide spherical powder has been diluted in acid transformed into sol colloidal solution. To obtain uranium dioxide spherical form, the uranium sol-colloidal solution has been dropped in a hot paraffin ( at the temperature of 90 0 C) to form gelatinous colloid and then dried at 800 0 C, and sintered at the temperature of 1700 0 C. The flow ability of spherical uranium dioxide powder has been examined by using Flowmeter Hall (ASTM. B. 213-46T). The measurement result reveals that the spherical uranium dioxide powder has a flow ability twice than that of unprocessed uranium dioxide powder

  8. Contribution to the study of uranium dioxide aqueous corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion of uranium dioxide by a synthetical ground water has been studied in order to understand the behaviour of nuclear fuels in the hypothesis of a direct storage. An original leaching unit has been carried out in order to control the parameters occurring in the oxidation-dissolution of the uranium dioxide and to condition the leachate (in particular the temperature and the partial pressure of the carbon dioxide). A ground water in equilibrium with the geological enveloping site has been reconstituted from data acquired on the site. The influence of two parameters has been followed: the carbon dioxide carbon pressure and the redox potential. Each experiment has been carried out at 96 C during one month and the time-history of the solutions and of the solids has been studied. In oxidizing conditions, the uranium concentration in solution has been controlled by an U(VI) complex (one oxide, one hydroxide or a carbonate). The possibility of a control by an U(IV) complex (as coffinite, uraninite or uraninite B) has been confirmed in the case of reducing leaching. An original interpretation of the Rutherford backscattering spectra has allowed to describe the decomposition of the samples in a succession of layers of different densities. A very good agreement between the analyses of the solids and those of the solutions has been obtained in the experiments occurring in reducing conditions. Complementary leaching involving solutions containing stable isotopes (deuterium, O 18 ) have revealed the formation of an hydrated layer and the contribution of grain boundaries to the corrosion phenomenon of uranium dioxide. The results of the current hydro-geochemistry study on the uranium Oklo deposit prove the realism of the experiments that have been carried out in the laboratory. (O.M.)

  9. Thermodynamic and transport properties of uranium dioxide and related phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The high melting point of uranium dioxide and its stability under irradiation have led to its use as a fuel in a variety of types of nuclear reactors. A wide range of chemical and physical studies has been stimulated by this circumstances and by the complex nature of the uranium dioxide phase itself. The boundaries of this phase widen as the temperature is increased; at 2000 deg. K a single, homogeneous phase exists from U 2.27 to a hypostoichiometric (UO 2-x ) composition, depending on the oxygen potential of the surroundings. Since there is often an incentive to operate a reactor at the maximum practicable heat rating and, therefore, maximum thermal gradient in the fuel, the determination of the physical properties of the UO 2-x phase becomes a matter of great technological importance. In addition a complex sequence of U-O phases may be formed during the preparation of powder feed material or during the sintering process; these affect the microstructure and properties of the final product and have also received much attention. 184 refs, 33 figs, 15 tabs

  10. Nuclear energy - Determination of chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the chlorine and fluorine concentrations in uranium dioxide and in sintered fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis of samples, followed either by liquid ion-exchange chromatography or by selective electrode measurement of chlorine and fluorine ions. Many ion-exchange chromatography systems and ion-selective electrode measurement systems are available

  11. Evaluation of uranium dioxide thermal conductivity using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woongkee; Kaviany, Massoud; Shim, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    It can be extended to larger space, time scale and even real reactor situation with fission product as multi-scale formalism. Uranium dioxide is a fluorite structure with Fm3m space group. Since it is insulator, dominant heat carrier is phonon, rather than electrons. So, using equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we present the appropriate calculation parameters in MD simulation by calculating thermal conductivity and application of it to the thermal conductivity of polycrystal. In this work, we investigate thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and optimize the parameters related to its process. In this process, called Green Kubo formula, there are two parameters i.e correlation length and sampling interval, which effect on ensemble integration in order to obtain thermal conductivity. Through several comparisons, long correlation length and short sampling interval give better results. Using this strategy, thermal conductivity of poly crystal is obtained and comparison with that of pure crystal is made. Thermal conductivity of poly crystal show lower value that that of pure crystal. In further study, we broaden the study to transport coefficient of radiation damaged structures using molecular dynamics. Although molecular dynamics is tools for treating microscopic scale, most macroscopic issues related to nuclear materials such as voids in fuel materials and weakened mechanical properties by radiation are based on microscopic basis. Thus, research on microscopic scale would be expanded in this field and many hidden mechanism in atomic scales will be revealed via both atomic scale simulations and experiments

  12. Thermal properties of nonstoichiometry uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazauri, R.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Tenishev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, was developed a method of oxidation pure uranium dioxide to a predetermined deviation from the stoichiometry. Oxidation was carried out using the thermogravimetric method on NETZSCH STA 409 CD with a solid electrolyte galvanic cell for controlling the oxygen potential of the environment. 4 samples uranium oxide were obtained with a different ratio of oxygen-to-metal: O / U = 2.002, O / U = 2.005, O / U = 2.015, O / U = 2.033. For the obtained samples were determined basic thermal characteristics of the heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity. The error of heat capacity determination is equal to 5%. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing deviation from stoichiometry. For the sample with O / M = 2.033, difference of both values with those of stoichiometric uranium dioxide is close to 50%.

  13. Irradiation effects and micro-structural changes in large grain uranium dioxide fuel investigated by micro-beam X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieszczynski, C. [NES and SYN, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kuri, G., E-mail: goutam.kuri@psi.ch [NES and SYN, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Degueldre, C.; Martin, M.; Bertsch, J.; Borca, C.N.; Grolimund, D. [NES and SYN, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Delafoy, Ch. [AREVA NP, 10 Rue Juliette Récamier, 69456 Lyon Cedex 06 (France); Simoni, E. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Université Paris-Sud, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2014-01-15

    Microstructural changes in a set of commercial grade UO{sub 2} fuel samples have been investigated using synchrotron based micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) techniques. The results are associated with conventional UO{sub 2} materials and relatively larger grain chromia-doped UO{sub 2} fuels, irradiated in a commercial light water reactor plant (average burn-up: 40 MW d kg{sup −1}). The lattice parameters of UO{sub 2} in fresh and irradiated specimens have been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. In the pristine state, the doped fuel has a somewhat smaller lattice parameter than the standard UO{sub 2} as a result of chromia doping. Increase in micro-strain and lattice parameter in irradiated materials is highlighted. All irradiated samples behave in a similar manner with UO{sub 2} lattice expansion occurring upon irradiation, where any Cr induced effect seems insignificant and accumulated lattice defects prevail. Elastic strain energy densities in the irradiated fuels are also evaluated based on the UO{sub 2} crystal lattice strain and non-uniform strain. The μ-XRD patterns further allow the evaluation of the crystalline domain size and sub-grain formation at different locations of the irradiated UO{sub 2} pellets.

  14. High frequency acoustic microscopy for the determination of porosity and Young's modulus in high burnup uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements P.O. Box 2340 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); University of Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); Laux, D. [University of Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); CNRS, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); Cappia, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements P.O. Box 2340 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Boltzmannstrasse 15, 85747 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements P.O. Box 2340 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Despaux, G. [University of Montpellier, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France); CNRS, IES, UMR 5214, F-34000, Montpellier (France)

    2015-07-01

    During irradiation UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of the porosity and of elastic properties in high burnup UO{sub 2} pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. Ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A 67 MWd/kgU UO{sub 2} pellet was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the Institute of Transuranium Elements: 90 MHz frequency was applied, methanol was used as coupling liquid and VR was measured at different radial positions. By comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using ceramographic image analysis a good agreement was found, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile. (authors)

  15. High frequency acoustic microscopy for the determination of porosity and Young's modulus in high burnup uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, M.; Laux, D.; Cappia, F.; Laurie, M.; Van Uffelen, P.; Rondinella, V.V.; Despaux, G.

    2015-01-01

    During irradiation UO 2 nuclear fuel experiences the development of a non-uniform distribution of porosity which contributes to establish varying mechanical properties along the radius of the pellet. Radial variations of the porosity and of elastic properties in high burnup UO 2 pellet can be investigated via high frequency acoustic microscopy. Ultrasound waves are generated by a piezoelectric transducer and focused on the sample, after having travelled through a coupling liquid. The elastic properties of the material are related to the velocity of the generated Rayleigh surface wave (VR). A 67 MWd/kgU UO 2 pellet was characterized using the acoustic microscope installed in the hot cells of the Institute of Transuranium Elements: 90 MHz frequency was applied, methanol was used as coupling liquid and VR was measured at different radial positions. By comparing the porosity values obtained via acoustic microscopy with those determined using ceramographic image analysis a good agreement was found, especially in the areas close to the centre. In addition Young's modulus was calculated and its radial profile was correlated to the corresponding burnup profile. (authors)

  16. Predictor of regulation of uranium dioxide powder pressing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Eduardo Souza; Araujo, Victor Hugo Leal de; Bernardelli, Sergio Henrique

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important steps of the uranium dioxide pellets fabrication used in the nuclear fuel elements is the green pellets pressing. The target density of the pellets after the sintering process determines the density of the green pellet. To meet the same sintered target density the green density may vary according to the powder characteristics. These variations implies in changing the regulation of the press for different powder's patches. The regulation done empirically imply in productivity loss and necessity of reprocessing the pellets pressed during the press regulation and also depends on the operator experience. At this work, was developed an artificial neural network feed forward back propagation to predict the press regulation, depending on the powder characteristics and the green pellet's target density. The results obtained at INB - Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S. A. during the fabrication of the fifth recharge of Angra II nuclear power plant are presented. (author)

  17. Polarographic determination of uranium dioxide stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguie, J.; Uny, G.

    1966-10-01

    The method described allows the determination of small deviations from stoichiometry for uranium dioxide. It was applied to the study of surface oxidation of bulk samples. The sample is dissolved in phosphoric acid under an argon atmosphere; U(VI) is determined by polarography in PO 4 H 3 4.5 N - H 2 SO 4 4 N. U(IV) is determined by potentiometry. The detection limit is UO 2,0002 . The accuracy for a single determination at the 95% confidence level is ±20 per cent for samples with composition included between UO 2,001 and UO 2,01 . (authors) [fr

  18. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrel, H.

    1991-12-01

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO 2+x ), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U 8 O 8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol -1 for UO 2.10 to 440 kJ.mol -1 for UO 2.25 . Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  19. Fluorination reaction uranium dioxide by fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Shinji; Homma, Shunji; Koga, Jiro; Matsumoto, Shiro; Sasahira, Akira; Kawamura, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Kinetics of the fluorination reaction of uranium dioxide is studied using un-reacted core model with shrinking particles. The model includes the film mass transfer of fluorine gas and its diffusion in the particle. The rate constants of the model are determined by fitting the experimental data for 370-450degC. The model successfully represents the fluorination in this temperature range. The rate control step is identified by examining the rate constants of the model for 300-1,800degC. For temperature range up to 900degC, the fluorination reaction is rate controlling. For over 900degC, both mechanisms of the mass transfer of fluorine and the fluorination reaction control the rate of the fluorination. With further increase of the temperature, however, the fluorination reaction becomes so fast that the mass transfer of fluorine eventually controls the rate of the fluorination. (author)

  20. Dissolution experiments of unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the dissolution rate of uranium from unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets in deionized water and natural groundwater. Moreover, the solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater was measured. Two different temperatures, 25 and 60 deg C were used. The low oxygen content of deep groundwater was simulated. The dissolution rate of uranium varied from 10 -7 to 10 -8 g cm -2 d -1 . The rate in reionized water was one order of magnitude lower than in groundwater. No great difference was observed between the natural groundwaters with different composition. Temperature seems to have effect on the dissolution rate. The solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater in reducing conditions, at 25 deg C, varied from 20 to 600 μg/l and in oxidizing conditions, at 60 deg C, from 4 to 17 mg/l

  1. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 0 C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving, cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means

  2. Behaviour of uranium dioxide in liquid nitrogen tetraoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Klavsut', G.N.; Dolgov, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Interaction kinetics of uranium dioxide with liquid nitrogen tetroxide at 25-150 deg C has been studied. It is shown that in the temperature range studied NO[UO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 ] is the final product of the reaction. With the increase of specific surface of uranium dioxide and with the temperature increase the degree of oxide transformation increases. Uranium dioxide-liquid N 2 O 4 interaction proceeds in the diffusion region. Seeming activation energies and rate constants of the mentioned processes are calculated. Effect of nitrogen trioxide additions on transformation kinetics is considered

  3. Nuclear energy - Uranium dioxide pellets - Determination of density and volume fraction of open and closed porosity. 2. ed. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the chlorine and fluorine concentrations in uranium dioxide and in sintered fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis of samples, followed either by liquid ion-exchange chromatography or by selective electrode measurement of chlorine and fluorine ions. Many ion-exchange chromatography systems and ion-selective electrode measurement systems are available

  4. Study of uranium dioxide pellets by micro-acoustic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, V.

    1999-01-01

    In order to reduce the volume of spent fuel to reprocess and to improve the productivity and the safety of the nuclear reactor, 'Electricite De France' aim to increase the average fuel discharge burn-up. To elaborate the safety reports, EDF develops codes to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the nuclear fuel element. These numeric simulations need to evaluate accurately and locally the evolution of the material and of its properties. One of the major concern today is the local characterisation of the intrinsic volume fraction porosity and the mechanical properties of the irradiated fuel. The fuel pellet fragmentation, the steep radial gradient in its physical properties evolution and the chemical evolution of the irradiated material make difficult nay the use of the conventional techniques. This leads EDF to pay interest for the use of two complementary techniques: micro-indentation on the one hand and acoustic methods on the other hand (acoustic microscopy and micro-echography), with an additional constrain to perform on active materials. The objective of this work has been to adapt the acoustic methods for an application on uranium dioxide pellets, used as nuclear fuel in Water Pressurised Reactor. Acquisitions protocols have been set to measure accurately the Rayleigh velocity and the longitudinal velocity of the UO 2 . Using these protocols, we have calibrated these acoustic methods by analysing non irradiated nuclear pellet which properties were well known. This process enable to quantify the effects of different physico-chemical parameters of the UO 2 on the ultrasonic velocities measured. Particularly, the large influence of the porosity has been demonstrated and empirical laws to express the evolution of the acoustic velocities as a function of the volume fraction porosity were established. Moreover, we have established a methodology to characterise the intrinsic elastic constants and the volume fraction porosity on irradiated UO 2 fuel pellets

  5. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  6. Effect of additives on enhanced sintering and grain growth in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.

    1992-06-01

    The use of sintering additives has been the most effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. We have established a same mechanism for additives which belongs to corundum structure: chromium, aluminium, vanadium and titanium sesquioxides. Study of thermodynamical stabilities of dopants has lead to define suitable sintering atmospheres in order to enhance grain growth. Low solubility limits have been defined at T=1700 deg C for four additives, from variations of final grain size versus initial dopant concentration Identification of second phase after cooling has been done from electronic diffraction patterns. It appears that these solubilities decrease sharply as positive deviation from stoichiometry of uranium dioxide increases. Dilatometric analysis of sintering of doped uranium dioxide has shown in certain cases some enhancement in densification rates, at the point of onset of abnormal grain growth, which is believed to be the source. Nevertheless, the following growth is accompanied with pores coalescence mechanisms and pores entrapment inside grains. Increased thermal stability, during standard annealing, is expected, limiting thereby redensification of nuclear fuel in reactors. Finally, from investigations of additives vaporizations, Al 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 , oxygen exchanges between additives and matrix are believed to occur, which should lead to enhance pore mobility. (Author)., refs., figs., tabs

  7. Improvement of cesium retention in uranium dioxide by additional phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamaury Dubois, S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the cesium retention in nuclear fuel. A bibliographic survey indicates that cesium is rapidly released from uranium dioxide in an accident condition. At temperatures higher than 1500 deg C or in oxidising conditions, our experiments show the difficulty of maintaining cesium inside simulated fuel. Two ternary systems are potentially interesting for the retention of cesium and to reduce the kinetics of release from the fuel: Cs 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 et Cs 2 O-ZrO 2 -SO 2 . The compounds CsAISi 2 O 6 and Cs 2 ZrSi 6 O 15 were studied from 1200 deg C to 2000 deg C by thermogravimetric analysis. The volumetric diffusion coefficients of cesium in these structures, in solid state as well as in liquid one, were measured. A fuel was sintered with (Al 2 O 3 + SiO 2 ) or (ZrO 2 + SiO 2 ) and the intergranular phase was characterized. In the presence of (Al 2 O 3 + SiO 2 ), the sintering is realized at 1610 deg C in H 2 . It is a liquid phase sintering. On the other end, with (ZrO 2 + SiO 2 ), the sintering is a low temperature one in oxidising atmosphere. Finally, cesium containing simulated fuels were produced with these additives. According to the effective diffusion coefficients that were measured, the additives improved the retention of cesium. We have predicted the improvement that could be hoped for in a nuclear reactor, depending on the dispersion of the intergranular additives, the temperature and the degree of oxidation of the UO 2+x . We wait for a factor of 2 for x=0 and more than 8 for x=0.05, up to 2000 deg C. (author). 148 refs., 122 figs., 34 tabs

  8. Green strength of zirconium sponge and uranium dioxide powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Murty, B. Narasimha; Sahoo, P.K.; Gopalakrishna, T.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium metal sponge is compacted into rectangular or cylindrical shapes using hydraulic presses. These shapes are stacked and electron beam welded to form a long electrode suitable for vacuum arc melting and casting into solid ingots. The compact electrodes should be sufficiently strong to prevent breakage in handling as well as during vacuum arc melting. Usually, the welds are strong and the electrode strength is limited by the green strength of the compacts, which constitute the electrode. Green strength is also required in uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder compacts, to withstand stresses during de-tensioning after compaction as well as during ejection from the die and for subsequent handling by man and machine. The strengths of zirconium sponge and UO 2 powder compacts have been determined by bending and crushing respectively, and Weibul moduli evaluated. The green density of coarse sponge compact was found to be larger than that from finer sponge. The green density of compacts from lightly attrited UO 2 powder was higher than that from unattrited category, accompanied by an improvement in UO 2 green crushing strength. The factors governing green strength have been examined in the light of published literature and experimental evidence. The methodology and results provide a basis for quality control in metal sponge and ceramic powder compaction in the manufacture of nuclear fuel

  9. On the nature of the phase transition in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofryk, K.; Mast, D.; Antonio, D.; Shrestha, K.; Andersson, D.; Stanek, C.; Jaime, M.

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is by far the most studied actinide material as it is a primary fuel used in light water nuclear reactors. Its thermal and magnetic properties remain, however, a puzzle resulting from strong couplings between magnetism and lattice vibrations. UO2 crystalizes in the face-centered-cubic fluorite structure and is a Mott-Hubbard insulator with well-localized uranium 5 f-electrons. In addition, below 30 K, a long range antiferromagnetic ordering of the electric-quadrupole of the uranium moments is observed, forming complex non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. This transition is accompanied by Jahn-Teller distortion of oxygen atoms. It is believed that the first order nature of the transition results from the competition between the exchange interaction and the Jahn-Teller distortion. Here we present results of our extensive thermodynamic investigations on well-characterized and oriented single crystals of UO2+x (x = 0, 0.033, 0.04, and 0.11). By focusing on the transition region under applied magnetic field we are able to study the interplay between different competing interactions (structural, magnetic, and electrical), its dynamics, and relationship to the oxygen content. We will discuss implications of these results. Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Engineering Division.

  10. Studies on the sintering behaviour of uranium dioxide powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.; Chowdhury, R.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets are normally made from their precursor ammonium diuranate, followed by calcination, subsequent reduction to sinterable grade powders and a post operation treatment of pressing and sintering. The low temperature calcined powders, usually exhibiting non-crystalline behaviour (under X-ray diffraction studies) progressively transforms into a crystalline variety on subsequent heat treatment at higher temperature. It is observed however that powders calcined between 800 to 900 0 C exhibit enhanced densification behaviour when sintered at higher temperatures. The isothermal shrinkage versus time plot of the sintered compacts are well described by a hyperbolic relationship which takes care of the observed shrinkage (λ) as caused due to a cumulative effect from the initial sintering of the powder compacts at zero time (α) and that caused due to the structural transformation from a non-crystalline modification with increased thermal treatment (β). The derived equation is a modification of the sintering mechanism of the viscous flow type proposed by Frenkel, involving sintering of an amorphous phase, the viscosity of the latter is presumed to increase with increasing thermal treatment to assume the final modified form as λ=t/(α+βt), where t = time, λ = shrinkage and α and β are the unknown parameters. (orig.)

  11. Process for the preparation of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.W.; Baugh, D.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An actinide dioxide, e.g., uranium dioxide, plutonium dioxide, neptunium dioxide, etc., is prepared by reacting the actinide nitrate hexahydrate with sodium dithionite as a first step; the reaction product from this first step is a novel composition of matter comprising the actinide sulfite tetrahydrate. The reaction product resulting from this first step is then converted to the actinide dioxide by heating it in the absence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., nitrogen) to a temperature of about 500 0 to about 950 0 C for about 15 to about 135 minutes. If the reaction product resulting from the first step is, prior to carrying out the second heating step, exposed to an oxygen-containing atmosphere such as air, the resultant product is a novel composition of matter comprising the actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate which can also be readily converted to the actinide dioxide by heating it in the absence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., nitrogen) at a temperature of about 400 0 to about 900 0 C for about 30 to about 150 minutes. Further, the actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate can be partially dehydrated at reduced pressures (and in the presence of a suitable dehydrating agent such as phosphorus pentoxide). The partially dehydrated product may be readily converted to the dioxide form by heating it in the absence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., nitrogen) at a temperature of about 500 0 to about 900 0 C for about 30 to about 150 minutes. 16 claims

  12. Sintered nuclear fuel and method of preparing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abate-Daga, G.; Amato, I.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a method of preparing a nuclear fuel containing a consumable nuclear poison uniformly distributed therein in the form of coated micro-spheres of between 10 and 2,000 microns diameter, consisting in preparing sintered micro-spheres of the consumable poison, covering those micro-spheres with a protective coating and incorporating the coated micro-spheres into uranium dioxide powder, followed by sintering

  13. Contribution to the study of second phases particles dispersion in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, V.

    1994-06-01

    To reduce fission gas release of irradiated polycrystalline uranium dioxide, the dispersion of intragranular nanometric particles of second phase necessary to pin gas bubbles may complete the advantage of a large-grained fuel microstructure. Moreover, intergranular glass films may improve high temperatures mechanical properties of UO 2 . In this study, mixtures of additives composed of ''corindon'' structure oxides that enhance the fuel grain growth and composed of different oxides with variable solid solubilities in the UO 2 matrix were achieved. Additives with a negligible solubility inhibit grain boundaries motion except those, such as silica, that involve a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. Rare earth oxides that form stable solid solutions with UO 2 cannot lead to precipitation, but have no effect on the fuel grain growth doped with ''corindon'' type oxides. A chromium oxide excess allows the creation of a fuel microstructure described by large grains and intragranular spherical Cr 2 O 3 inclusions observed by scanning electron microscopy. Values for the bulk lattice diffusion coefficient of Cr 3+ cations in UO 2 can be deduced from the experimental growth of those dispersed particles by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of small precipitated metal particles inside the uranium dioxide matrix induced by the internal reduction of a solid solution has not been performed. However, direct reduction of insoluble chromium oxide particles is easy and produces metallic intragranular precipitates. (author). 119 refs., 112 figs., 33 tabs., 5 annexes

  14. Investigation of the dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric media: a new approach aiming at understanding interface mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delwaulle, Celine

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis deals with the back-end cycle of the nuclear fuel by improving, modernizing and optimizing the processes used for all types of fuels which are to be re-processed. After a presentation of the industrial context and of the state of the art concerning dissolution kinetic data for uranium dioxide and mixed oxide, the author proposes a model which couples dissolution kinetics and hydrodynamics of a solid in presence of auto-catalytic species, in order to better understand phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid-gas interface. The next part reports dissolution experiments on a non-radioactive material (copper) and out of a nuclear environment. Then, the author identifies steps which are required to transpose this experiment within a nuclear environment. The first results obtained on uranium dioxide are discussed. Recommendations for further studies conclude the report

  15. Evaluation of Hydrothermally Synthesized Uranium Dioxide for Novel Semiconductor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy ...Senanayake, G. Waterhouse, A. Chan, T. Madey, D. Mullins and H. Idriss, "Probing Surface Oxidation of Reduced Uranium Dioxide Thin Film Using

  16. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, T.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de Grenoble, 38

    1996-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author)

  17. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle for use in establishing ''as low as practicable'' guides: fabrication of light-water reactor fuel from enriched uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechin, W.H.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Finney, B.C.; Lindauer, R.B.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1975-05-01

    A cost-benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model enriched-uranium, light-water reactor (LWR) fuel fabrication plant, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as practicable'' in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of current plant technology and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of LWR fuel. Additional radwaste treatment equipment is added to the base case plants in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Some of the technology used in the advanced cases is in an early stage of development and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costs and the radiological doses, detailed calculations, and tabulations are presented in Appendix A and ORNL-4992. (U.S.)

  18. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  19. The cohesive energy of uranium dioxide and thorium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, B.G.

    1958-08-01

    Theoretical values have been calculated of the heats of formation of uranium dioxide and thorium dioxide on the assumption that the atomic binding forces in these solids are predominantly ionic in character. The good agreement found between the theoretical and observed values shows that the ionic model may, with care, be used in calculating the energies of defects in the uranium and thorium dioxide crystal structures. (author)

  20. Determination of carbon chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijko, N.I.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of chlorine and fluorine determination and simultaneous determination of carbon and chlorine in electrolytic uranium dioxide are described. The method of chlorine and fluorine determination is based on their separation during oxide pyrohydrolysis with subsequent spectrophotometric analysis of condensate. Lower determination limits constitute 1 μg for chlorine, 0.5 μg for fluorine. Relative standard deviation when the content of impurities analyzed is 10 -3 % constitutes 0.05-0.07

  1. Coarsening-densification transition temperature in sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Narasimha Murty, B.; Chakraborthy, K.P.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Ganguly, C.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of coarsening-densification transition temperature (CDTT) has been proposed to explain the experimental observations of the study of sintering undoped uranium dioxide and niobia-doped uranium dioxide powder compacts in argon atmosphere in a laboratory tubular furnace. The general method for deducing CDTT for a given material under the prevailing conditions of sintering and the likely variables that influence the CDTT are described. Though the present work is specific in nature for uranium dioxide sintering in argon atmosphere, the concept of CDTT is fairly general and must be applicable to sintering of any material and has immense potential to offer advantages in designing and/or optimizing the profile of a sintering furnace, in the diagnosis of the fault in the process conditions of sintering, and so on. The problems of viewing the effect of heating rate only in terms of densification are brought out in the light of observing the undesirable phenomena of coring and bloating and causes were identified and remedial measures suggested

  2. Determination of gas residues in uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riella, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The measurement of low amounts of residual gases, excluding water, in ceramic grade uranium dioxide pellets, using high temperature vacuum extraction technique, is dealt with. The high temperature extraction gas analysis apparatus was designed and assembled for sequential analysis of up to eight uranium dioxide pellets by run. The system consists of three major units, namely outgassing unit, transfer unit and analytical unit. The whole system is evacuated to a final pressure of less then 10 -5 torr. A weighed pellet is transfered into the outgassing unit for subsequent dropping into a Platinum-Rhodium crucible which is heated inductively up to 1600 0 C during 30 minutes. The released gases are imediately transfered from the outgassing to analytical unit passing through a cold trap at -95 0 C to remove water vapor. The gases are transfered to previously calibrated volumetric bulb where the total pressure and temperature are determined. An estimate of the gas content in the pellets at STP condition is obtained from the measured volume, pressure and temperature of the gas mixture by applying ideal gases equation. Analysis to two lots (fourteen samples) of uranium dioxide pellets by the method described here indicated a mean gas content of 0,060cm 3 /g UO 2 . The lower limit of this technique is 0,03cm 3 /g UO 2 (STP). The time required for the analysis of eight pellets is about 9 hours [pt

  3. Fission products stability in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.; Gupta, F.; Pasturel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fission product stability in nuclear fuels is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, incorporation and solution energies of He, Kr, Xe, I, Te, Ru, Sr and Ce in pre-existing trap sites of UO 2 (vacancies, interstitials, U-O divacancy, and Schottky trio defects) are calculated using the projector-augmented-wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package. Correlation effects are taken into account within the DFT+U approach. The stability of many binary and ternary compounds in comparison to soluted atoms is also explored. Finally the involvement of FP in the formation of metallic and oxide precipitates in oxide fuels is discussed in the light of experimental results.

  4. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, isotopes such as 35 Cl present as impurities in the nuclear fuel are activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of nuclear fuel, the activation products such as 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute to the ''instant release fraction'' as they are likely to migrate in defects and grain boundaries. In order to differentiate diffusion mechanisms due to ''athermal'' processes during irradiation from thermally activated diffusion, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This work concerns the measurement of the thermal diffusion coefficient of chlorine in UO 2 . 37 Cl was implanted at a 10 13 at/cm 2 fluence in depleted UO 2 samples which were then annealed in the 900-1200 C temperature range and finally analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to obtain 37 Cl depth profiles. The migration process appears to be rather complex, involving mechanisms such as atomic, grain boundary, directed diffusion along preferential patterns as well as trapping into sinks before successive effusion. However, using a diffusion model based on general equation of transport, apparent diffusion coefficients could be calculated for 1000 and 1100 C and a mean activation energy of 4.3 eV is proposed. This value is one of the lowest values compared to those found in literature for other radionuclides pointing out a great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures. In order to unequivocally determine the diffusion behaviour of both implanted and pristine chlorine before and after thermal annealing, the structural environment of chlorine in UO 2 was examined using micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS). (orig.)

  5. The migration of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in irradiated uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.

    1977-05-01

    The mobility of intragranular fission gas bubbles in uranium dioxide irradiated at 1600-1800 0 C has been studied following isothermal annealing at temperatures below 1600 0 C. The intragranular fission gas bubbles, average diameter approximately 2nm, are virtually immobile at temperatures below 1500 0 C. The bubbles have clean surfaces with no solid fission product contamination and are faceted to the highest observed irradiation temperature of 1800 0 C. This bubble faceting is believed to be a major cause of bubble immobility. In fuel operating below 1500 0 C the predominant mechanism allowing the growth of intragranular bubbles and the subsequent gas release must be the diffusion of dissolved gas atoms rather than the movement of entire intragranular bubbles. (author)

  6. Study of process parameters for reducing ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in fluidized bed furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao Junior, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists of studying the process parameters of AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) to U O 2 (uranium dioxide) reduction, with good physical and chemical characteristics, in fluidized bed. Initially, it was performed U O 2 cold fluidization experiments with an acrylic column. Afterward, it was done AUC to U O 2 reduction experiments, in which the process parameters influence in the granulometry, specific surface area, porosity and fluoride amount on the U O 2 powder produced were studied. As a last step, it was done compacting and sintering tests of U O 2 pellets in order to appreciate the U O 2 powder performance, obtained by fluidized bed, in the fuel pellets fabrication. (author)

  7. Nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress iodine release thereby prevent stress corrosion cracks in fuel cans by dispersing ferrous oxide at the outer periphery of sintered uranium dioxide pellets filled and sealed within zirconium alloy fuel cans of fuel elements. Constitution: Sintered uranium dioxide pellets to be filled and sealed within a zirconium alloy fuel can are prepared either by mixing ferric oxide powder in uranium dioxide powder, sintering and then reducing at low temperature or by mixing iron powder in uranium dioxide powder, sintering and then oxidizing at low temperature. In this way, ferrous oxide is dispersed on the outer periphery of the sintered uranium dioxide pellets to convert corrosive fission products iodine into iron iodide, whereby the iodine release is suppressed and the stress corrosion cracks can be prevented in the fuel can. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Certification of a uranium dioxide reference material for chemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, Y.

    1984-01-01

    This report, issued by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM), describes the characterization of a uranium dioxide reference material with accurately determined uranium mass fraction for chemical analyses. The preparation, conditioning, homogeneity tests and the analyses performed on this material are described in Annex 1. The evaluation of the individual impurity results, total of impurities and uranium mass fraction are given in Annex 2. Information on a direct determination of uranium by titration is given in Annex 3. The uranium mass fraction (881.34+-0.13) g.kg -1 calculated in Annex 2 is given on the certificate

  9. Hot deformation of polycrystalline uranium dioxide: from microscopic mechanisms to macroscopic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dherbey, Francine

    2000-01-01

    The improvement of nuclear fuels performances in PWR requires in particular an enhancement of creep ability of uranium dioxide in order to minimise rupture risks of the cladding material during interactions between pellets and cladding. The aim of this study is to investigate the link between the ceramic macroscopic thermo-mechanical behaviour and the changes in the fuel microstructure during deformation. Stoichiometric UO 2 pellets with various grains sizes from 9 pm to 36 μm have been deformed by compression at intermediate temperatures, i.e. near T M /2, and quenched under stress. The damage is characterised by the presence of cavities at low stresses and cracks at high stresses, both along grain boundaries parallel to the compression axis. Inside grains, dislocations organise themselves into cellular substructures in which sub-boundaries are made of dislocation hexagonal networks. In these conditions, uranium dioxide deformation is described by grain boundary sliding, which is the main origin of material damage, partially accommodated by dislocational creep inside grains. A steady-state creep model is proposed on a physical basis. It accounts for the almost similar contributions of two mechanisms which are grain boundaries sliding and intragranular creep, and takes into account the grain boundary roughness. In contrast with phenomenological descriptions used up to now, this picture leads to a unique creep law on the whole range of stresses explored here, from 10 MPa to 80 MPa. The creep rate controlling mechanism seems to be the migration of sub-boundaries. The deformation at constant strain rate is controlled by the same mechanisms as creep. (author) [fr

  10. Design and fabrication of an advanced TRISO fuel with ZrC coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Ian E., E-mail: porteri@email.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Knight, Travis W., E-mail: knighttw@cec.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Dulude, Michael C., E-mail: dulude@email.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Roberts, Elwyn, E-mail: robertse@cec.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Hobbs, Jim, E-mail: JSHobbs@nuclearfuelservices.com [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., 1205 Banner Hill Road, Erwin, TN 37650 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Zirconium carbide was deposited on surrogate zirconia and UO{sub 2} kernels. • Deposition rates were found to be dependent on temperature and gas concentration. • Calcining and sintering parameters were optimized to reduce cracking in UO{sub 2} kernel production. -- Abstract: Very high temperature reactors (VHTRs) are expected to achieve coolant outlet temperatures up to 1000 °C, allowing for increased plant efficiency as well as the ability to use the process heat for hydrogen production and various uses in the process chemical industry. The feasibility of using VHTRs as part of the next generation of nuclear reactors greatly depends on the reliability of tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles to retain both gaseous and metallic fission products created in irradiated uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This work sought the deposition parameters necessary to produce an additional zirconium carbide (ZrC) layer used in advanced coated particle fuels. The additional ZrC layer will act as an oxygen getter to prevent typical TRISO failure mechanisms including over pressurization of the particle and kernel migration of the kernel within the particle, also known as the amoeba effect. In this study, ZrC coatings were applied to surrogate zirconia kernels as well as UO{sub 2} kernels using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized bed reactor, and the deposition characteristics were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The ZrC layer was confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The calcining and sintering of urania kernels for use in these coating experiments is also discussed.

  11. Design and fabrication of an advanced TRISO fuel with ZrC coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Ian E.; Knight, Travis W.; Dulude, Michael C.; Roberts, Elwyn; Hobbs, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Zirconium carbide was deposited on surrogate zirconia and UO 2 kernels. • Deposition rates were found to be dependent on temperature and gas concentration. • Calcining and sintering parameters were optimized to reduce cracking in UO 2 kernel production. -- Abstract: Very high temperature reactors (VHTRs) are expected to achieve coolant outlet temperatures up to 1000 °C, allowing for increased plant efficiency as well as the ability to use the process heat for hydrogen production and various uses in the process chemical industry. The feasibility of using VHTRs as part of the next generation of nuclear reactors greatly depends on the reliability of tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles to retain both gaseous and metallic fission products created in irradiated uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). This work sought the deposition parameters necessary to produce an additional zirconium carbide (ZrC) layer used in advanced coated particle fuels. The additional ZrC layer will act as an oxygen getter to prevent typical TRISO failure mechanisms including over pressurization of the particle and kernel migration of the kernel within the particle, also known as the amoeba effect. In this study, ZrC coatings were applied to surrogate zirconia kernels as well as UO 2 kernels using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized bed reactor, and the deposition characteristics were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The ZrC layer was confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The calcining and sintering of urania kernels for use in these coating experiments is also discussed

  12. Total surface area change of Uranium dioxide fuel in function of burn-up and its impact on fission gas release during neutron irradiation for small, intermediate and high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the early published papers it was observed that the fractional fission gas release from the specimen have a tendency to increase with the total surface area of the specimen - a fairy linear relationship was indicated. Moreover it was observed that the increase of total surface area during irradiation occurs in the result of connection the closed porosity with the open porosity what in turn causes the increase of fission gas release. These observations let us surmise that the process of knock-out release is the most significant process of fission gas release since its quantity is proportional to the total surface area. Review of the experiments related to the increase of total surface area in function of burn-up is presented in the paper. For very high burn-up the process of grain sub-division (polygonization) occurs under condition that the temperature of irradiated fuel lies below the temperature of grain re-crystallization. Simultaneously with the process of polygonization, the increase in local porosity and the decrease in local density in function of burn-up occurs, which leads to the increase of total surface area. It is suggested that the same processes take place in the transformed fuel as in the original fuel, with the difference that the total surface area is so big that the whole fuel can be treated as that affected by the knock-out process. This leads to explanation of the experimental data that for very high burn-up (>120 MWd/kgU) the concentration of xenon is constant. An explanation of the grain subdivision process in function of burn-up in the 'athermal' rim region in terms of total surface area, initial grain size and knock-out release is undertaken. Correlation of the threshold burn-up, the local fission gas concentration, local total surface area, initial and local grain size and burn-up in the rim region is expected. (author)

  13. Increase of thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel pellets with beryllium oxide addition; Condutividade termica de pastilhas de combustivel nuclear de UO{sub 2}-BeO nas temperaturas de 25 deg C e 100 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarano, D.M.; Mansur, F.A.; Santos, A.M.M. dos; Ferraz, W.B., E-mail: dmc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTM/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The UO{sub 2} fuel is one of the most used nuclear fuel in thermal reactors and has many advantages such as high melting point, chemical compatibility with cladding, etc. However, its thermal conductivity is relatively low, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel pellets due to a high radial temperature gradient during reactor operation. An alternative to avoid this problem is to increase the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellets, by adding beryllium oxide (BeO). Pellets of UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}-BeO were obtained from a homogenized mixture of powders of UO{sub 2} and BeO, containing 2% and 3% by weight of BeO and sintering at 1750 °C for 3 h under H{sub 2} atmosphere after uniaxial pressing at 400 MPa. The pellet densities were obtained by xylol penetration-immersion method and the thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity were determined according to ASTM E-1461 at room temperature (25 deg C) and 100 deg C. The thermal diffusivity measurements were carried out employing the laser flash method. The thermal conductivity obtained at 25 deg C showed an increase with the addition of 2% and 3% of BeO corresponding to 19% and 28%, respectively. As for the measurements carried out at 100 deg C, there was an increase in the thermal conductivity for the same BeO contents of 20% and 31%. These values as a percentage of increased conductivity were obtained in relation to the UO{sub 2} pellets. (author)

  14. Contribution to the study of the creep of uranium dioxide. Role of grain growth promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivant-Duguay, Christelle

    1998-01-01

    Improvement of nuclear fuel performances involves enhancing the plasticity of uranium dioxide UO 2 , in order to reduce the stress applied by the pellet to the cladding during a power ramp. The objective of this work is to identify and to formulate the effects produced by the nature and the concentration of additives of corundum structure, Cr 2 O 3 or Al 2 O 3 , which are grain growth promoters for UO 2 . The review of literature data establishes that oxygen content, grain size or porosity markedly affect the mechanical properties of uranium dioxide. On the other hand, there is relatively little reported work on the influence of doping. Prepared samples have been deformed by uniaxial compression. In the case of standard undoped UO 2 , two distinct preponderant creep mechanisms occur depending on stress level: a grain boundary diffusional creep, as per Coble, for stresses below the transition stress and a dislocation creep above. The doped materials have a large grained microstructure, which allows a dislocation creep only. In the range of temperature and stress investigated here, doping significantly improves the plasticity of standard UO 2 . This common effect of dopants is characterized by a decrease in the flow stress for tests with constant strain rate and by enhanced steady-state creep rates. Cr 2 O 3 doping is the more effective. The apparent benefit of doping results from the gain due to the increased grain size, but it is compensated by the strengthening effect of the additive. The creep law used to describe the behavior of standard UO 2 , has been modified to account for the influence of the dopant, by including either the concentration or the grain size. (author) [fr

  15. Strain fields and line energies of dislocations in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfitt, David C; Bishop, Clare L; Wenman, Mark R; Grimes, Robin W

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to investigate the stability of typical dislocations in uranium dioxide. We explain in detail the methods used to produce the dislocation configurations and calculate the line energy and Peierls barrier for pure edge and screw dislocations with the shortest Burgers vector 1/2 . The easiest slip system is found to be the {100}(110) system for stoichiometric UO 2 , in agreement with experimental observations. We also examine the different strain fields associated with these line defects and the close agreement between the strain field predicted by atomic scale models and the application of elastic theory. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the processes of slip that may occur for the three different edge dislocation geometries and nudged elastic band calculations are used to establish a value for the Peierls barrier, showing the possible utility of the method in investigating both thermodynamic average behaviour and dynamic processes such as creep and plastic deformation.

  16. XAS characterisation of xenon bubbles in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: martinp@drncad.cea.fr; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Valot, C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Nassif, V. [CEA Grenoble, DSM/DRFMC/SP2M/NRS, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proux, O. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, UMR CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier, 1381 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, 38400 Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France); Hazemann, J.-L. [Institut Neel, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-06-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were performed on a set of uranium dioxide samples implanted with 10{sup 17} xenon cm{sup -2} at 800 keV (8 at.% at 140 nm). EXAFS measurements performed at 12 K showed that during implantation the gas forms highly pressurised nanometre size inclusions. Bubble pressures were estimated at 2.8 {+-} 0.3 GPa at low temperature. Following the low energy xenon implantation, samples were annealed between 1073 and 1773 K for several hours. Stability of nanometre size highly pressurized xenon aggregates in UO{sub 2} is demonstrated up to 1073 K as for this temperature almost no modification of the xenon environment was observed. Above this temperature, bubbles will trap migrating vacancies and their inner pressure is seen to decrease substantially.

  17. Electronic structure calculations of atomic transport properties in uranium dioxide: influence of strong correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorado, B.

    2010-09-01

    Uranium dioxide UO 2 is the standard nuclear fuel used in pressurized water reactors. During in-reactor operation, the fission of uranium atoms yields a wide variety of fission products (FP) which create numerous point defects while slowing down in the material. Point defects and FP govern in turn the evolution of the fuel physical properties under irradiation. In this study, we use electronic structure calculations in order to better understand the fuel behavior under irradiation. In particular, we investigate point defect behavior, as well as the stability of three volatile FP: iodine, krypton and xenon. In order to take into account the strong correlations of uranium 5f electrons in UO 2 , we use the DFT+U approximation, based on the density functional theory. This approximation, however, creates numerous metastable states which trap the system and induce discrepancies in the results reported in the literature. To solve this issue and to ensure the ground state is systematically approached as much as possible, we use a method based on electronic occupancy control of the correlated orbitals. We show that the DFT+U approximation, when used with electronic occupancy control, can describe accurately point defect and fission product behavior in UO 2 and provide quantitative information regarding point defect transport properties in the oxide fuel. (author)

  18. Results of Uranium Dioxide-Tungsten Irradiation Test and Post-Test Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.; Debogdan, C. E.; Diianni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A uranium dioxide (UO2) fueled capsule was fabricated and irradiated in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility. The capsule consisted of two bulk UO2 specimens clad with chemically vapor deposited tungsten (CVD W) 0.762 and 0.1016 cm (0.030-and 0.040-in.) thick, respectively. The second specimen with 0.1016-cm (0.040-in.) thick cladding was irradiated at temperature for 2607 hours, corresponding to an average burnup of 1.516 x 10 to the 20th power fissions/cu cm. Postirradiation examination showed distortion in the bottom end cap, failure of the weld joint, and fracture of the central vent tube. Diametral growth was 1.3 percent. No evidence of gross interaction between CVD tungsten or arc-cast tungsten cladding and the UO2 fuel was observed. Some of the fission gases passed from the fuel cavity to the gas surrounding the fuel specimen via the vent tube and possibly the end-cap weld failure. Whether the UO2 loss rates through the vent tube were within acceptable limits could not be determined in view of the end-cap weld failure.

  19. The production of sinterable uranium dioxide from ammonium diuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fane, A.G.; Le Page, A.H.

    1975-02-01

    The development of a 0.13 m diameter pulsed fluidised bed reactor for the continuous production of sinterable uranium dioxide from ammonium diuranate is described. Calcination-reduction at 670 to 680 0 C produced powders with surface areas of 4 to 6 m 2 g -1 giving pellet densities in excess of 10.6 g cm -3 . Sinterability was relatively insensitive to changes in operating conditions, provided the availability of hydrogen was adequate, for gas flow rates in the range 0.95 to 1.4 l S -1 , pulse frequencies of 0.5 and 0.75 Hz and mean residence times of the solids from 0.6 to 1.4 hours. Sinterability was shown to be improved either by use of higher input concentrations, or by use of a secondary flow of hydrogen (about 5 per cent of input) fed into the powder collection system and flowing countercurrent to the UO 2 product. The maximum throughput of 17 kg UO 2 h -1 (0.6 hours mean residence time) required only 120 per cent of the stoichiometric requirement at an input concentration of 50 vol.per cent with secondary hydrogen flow. Results are given for studies of the kinetics of reduction of calcined ammonia diuranate in hydrogen and the residence time distribution of solids in a pulsed fluidised bed. Estimates based on these data suggested that the overall conversion of ammonium diuranate to uranium dioxide in the continuously operated pulsed fluidised bed reactor was in excess of 99 per cent. Continuous stabilisation of the UO 2 product was demonstrated at 12 kg h -1 or UO 2 , in a 0.15 m diameter glass stabiliser, using 10 vol.per cent air in nitrogen and a temperature of about 50 0 C. (author)

  20. Study of rare gases behavior in uranium dioxide: diffusion and bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.

    2011-01-01

    During in-reactor irradiation of the nuclear fuel, fission gases, mainly xenon and krypton, are generated that are subject to several phenomena: diffusion and precipitation. These phenomena can have adverse consequences on the fuel physical and chemical properties and its in-reactor behavior. The purpose of this work is to better understand the behavior of fission gases by identifying diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms. To do this, studies involving separate effects have been established coupling ion irradiations/implantations with fine characterizations on Large Scale Facilities. The influence of several parameters such as gas type, concentration and temperature has been identified separately. Interpretation of the Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) measurements has enabled us to determine xenon and krypton diffusion coefficients in uranium dioxide. A heterogeneous nucleation mechanism on defects was determined by means of experiments on the JANNuS platform in Orsay that consists of a coupling of an implantor, an accelerator and a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Finally, TEM and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy characterizations of implanted and annealed samples put in relieve a bubble growth mechanism by atoms and vacancies capture. (author) [fr

  1. Design of a uranium-dioxide powder spheroidization system by plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of a tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) ceramic-metallic (cermet) fuel for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion. For the purposes of fissile fuel retention, UO2 spheroids ranging in size from 50 - 100 micrometers (μm) in diameter will be encapsulated in a tungsten shell. The PSS produces spherical particles by melting angular stock particles in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet where they become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO 2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Stock and spheroidized powders were micrographed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and evaluated by statistical methods to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders showed a statistically significant improvement in spherocity, with greater that 60% of the examined particles having an irregularity parameter of equal to or lower than 1.2, compared to stock powder.

  2. Investigation of high burnup structures in uranium dioxide applying cellular automata: algorithms and codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Kostenko, B.F.; Ivanov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    A new method of research in spatial structures that result from uranium dioxide burning in nuclear reactors of modern atomic plants is suggested. The method is based on the presentation of images of the mentioned structures in the form of the working field of a cellular automaton (CA). First, it has allowed one to extract some important quantitative characteristics of the structures directly from the micrographs of the uranium fuel surface. Secondly, the CA has been found out to allow one to formulate easily the dynamics of the evolution of the studied structures in terms of such micrograph elements as spots, spots' boundaries, cracks, etc. Relation has been found between the dynamics and some exactly solvable models of the theory of cellular automata, in particular, the Ising model and the vote model. This investigation gives a detailed description of some CA algorithms which allow one to perform the fuel surface image processing and to model its evolution caused by burnup or chemical etching. (author)

  3. Long-term testing of HTR fuel elements in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1986-12-01

    The extensive results from irradiation experiments carried out on coated particles, on graphitic matrices of different composition and on integral fuel elements have shown that the spherical fuel elements with high-enriched uranium/thorium mixed-oxide particles and optimized graphitic matrix are available for use in the planned HTR facilities. A concentrated qualification programme is on the way in order to bring the fuel elements with particles from low-enriched uranium dioxide (LEU) and TRISO coating to a comparable level of experience and knowledge, i.e. to make them licensable for the planned HTR facilities. (orig.) [de

  4. Burnable absorber coated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubb, W.; Radford, K.C.; Parks, B.H.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear fuel body which is at least partially covered by a burnable neutron absorber layer is provided with a hydrophobic overcoat generally covering the burnable absorber layer and bonded directly to it. In a method for providing a UO 2 fuel pellet with a zirconium diboride burnable poison layer, the fuel body is provided with an intermediate niobium layer. (author)

  5. Development of Coated Particle Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, B. G.; Kim, Y. K.

    2009-04-01

    UO 2 kernel fabrication technology was developed at the lab sacle(20∼30g-UO 2 /batch). The GSP technique, modified method of sol-gel process, was used in the preparation of spherical ADU gel particle and these particles were converted to UO 3 and UO 2 phases in calcination furnace and sintering furnace respectively. Based on the process variables optimized using simulant kernels in 1-2 inch beds, SiC TRISO-coated particles were fabricated using UO 2 kernel. Power densities of TRISO coated particle fuels and gamma heat of the tubes are calculated as functions of vertical location of the fuel specimen in the irradiation holes by using core physics codes, MCNP and Helios. A finite model was developed for the calculations of temperatures and stresses of the specimen and the irradiation tubes. Dimensions of the test tubes are determined based on the temperatures and stresses as well as the gamma heat generated at the given condition. 9 modules of the COPA code (MECH, FAIL, TEMTR, TEMBL, TEMPEB, FPREL, MPRO, BURN, ABAQ), the MECH, FAIL, TEMTR, TEMBL, TEMPEB, and FPREL were developed. The COPA-FPREL was verified through IAEA CRP-6 accident benchmarking problems. KAERI participated in the round robin test of IAEA CRP-6 program to characterize the diameter, sphericity, coating thickness, density and anisotropy of coated particles provided by Korea, USA and South Africa. The inspection and test plan describing specifications and inspection method of coated particles was developed to confirm the quality standard of coated particles. The quality inspection instructions were developed for the inspection of coated particles by particle size analyzer, density inspection of coating layers by density gradient column, coating thickness inspection by X-ray, and inspection of optical anistropy factor of PyC layer. The quality control system for the TRISO-coated particle fuel was derived based on the status of quality control systems of other countries

  6. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G., E-mail: guillaume.martin@cea.fr [CEA – DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C. [CEA – DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Devynck, F.; Krack, M. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Maillard, S. [CEA – DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO{sub 2}. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO{sub 2}. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  7. Hardened over-coating fuel particle and manufacture of nuclear fuel using its fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimuda, Hideharu.

    1990-01-01

    Coated-fuel particles comprise a coating layer formed by coating ceramics such as silicon carbide or zirconium carbide and carbons, etc. to a fuel core made of nuclear fuel materials. The fuel core generally includes oxide particles such as uranium, thorium and plutonium, having 400 to 600 μm of average grain size. The average grain size of the coated-fuel particle is usually from 800 to 900 μm. The thickness of the coating layer is usually from 150 to 250 μm. Matrix material comprising a powdery graphite and a thermosetting resin such as phenol resin, etc. is overcoated to the surface of the coated-fuel particle and hardened under heating to form a hardened overcoating layer to the coated-fuel particle. If such coated-fuel particles are used, cracks, etc. are less caused to the coating layer of the coated-fuel particles upon production, thereby enabling to prevent the damages to the coating layer. (T.M.)

  8. Pyrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide by lithium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, T.; Kurata, M.; Inoue, T.; Sims, H.E.; Beetham, S.A.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The lithium reduction process has been developed to apply a pyrochemical recycle process for oxide fuels. This process uses lithium metal as a reductant to convert oxides of actinide elements to metal. Lithium oxide generated in the reduction would be dissolved in a molten lithium chloride bath to enhance reduction. In this work, the solubility of Li 2 O in LiCl was measured to be 8.8 wt% at 650 deg. C. Uranium dioxide was reduced by Li with no intermediate products and formed porous metal. Plutonium dioxide including 3% of americium dioxide was also reduced and formed molten metal. Reduction of PuO 2 to metal also occurred even when the concentration of lithium oxide was just under saturation. This result indicates that the reduction proceeds more easily than the prediction based on the Gibbs free energy of formation. Americium dioxide was also reduced at 1.8 wt% lithium oxide, but was hardly reduced at 8.8 wt%

  9. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Ogawa, Toru; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1981-09-01

    Loose coated fuel particles prepared in confirmity to a preliminary design for the multi-purpose VHTR in fiscal 1972 - 1974 were irradiated by 73F - 12A capsule in JMTR. Main purpose for this irradiation experiment was to examine irradiation stability of the candidate TRISO coated fuel particles for the VHTR. Also the coated particles possessing low-density kernel (90%TD), highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC and ZrC coating layer were loaded with the candidate particles in this capsule. The coated particles were irradiated up to 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 of fast neutron fluence (E > 0.18 MeV) and 3.2% FIMA of burnup. In the post irradiation examination it was observed that among three kinds of TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the normal operating condition of the VHTR ones possessing poor characteristics of the coating layers did not show a good stability. The particles irradiated under abnormally high temperature condition (> 1800 0 C) revealed 6.7% of max. EOL failure fraction (95% confidence limit). Most of these particles were failed by the ameoba effect. Furthermore, among four kinds of the TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the transient condition of the VHTR (--1500 0 C) the two showed a good stability, while the particles possessing highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC or poorly characteristic coating layers were not so good. (author)

  10. Development of Coated Particle Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, B. G.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    Uranium kernel fabrication technology using a wet chemical so-gel method, a key technology in the coated particle fuel area, is established up to the calcination step and the first sintering of UO2 kernel was attempted. Experiments on the parametric study of the coating process using the surrogate ZrO2 kernel give the optimum conditions for the PyC and SiC coating layer and ZrC coating conditions were obtained for the vaporization of the ZrCl4 precursor and coating condition from ZrC coating experiments using plate-type graphite substrate. In addition, by development of fuel performance analysis code a part of the code system is completed which enables the participation to the benchmark calculation and comparison in the IAEA collaborated research program. The technologies for irradiation and post irradiation examination, which are important in developing the HTGR fuel technology of its first kind in Korea was started to develop and, through a feasibility study and preliminary analysis, the technologies required to be developed are identified for further development as well as the QC-related basic technologies are reviewed, analyzed and identified for the own technology development. Development of kernel fabrication technology can be enhanced for the remaining sintering technology and completed based on the technologies developed in this phase. In the coating technology, the optimum conditions obtained using a surrogate ZrO2 kernel material can be applied for the uranium kernel coating process development. Also, after completion of the code development in the next phase, more extended participation to the international collaboration for benchmark calculation can be anticipated which will enable an improvement of the whole code system. Technology development started in this phase will be more extended and further focused on the detailed technology development to be required for the related technology establishment

  11. Uranium dioxide sintering Kinetics and mechanisms under controlled oxygen potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1980-06-01

    The initial, intermediate, and final sintering stages of uranium dioxide were investigated as a function of stoichiometry and temperature by following the kinetics of the sintering reaction. Stoichiometry was controlled by means of the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere, which was measured continuously by solid-state oxygen sensors. Included in the kinetic study were microspheres originated from UO 2 gels and UO 2 pellets produced by isostatic pressing ceramic grade powders. The microspheres sintering behavior was examined using hot-stage microscopy and a specially designed high-temperature, controlled atmosphere furnace. This same furnace was employed as part of an optical dilatometer, which was utilized in the UO 2 pellet sintering investigations. For controlling the deviations from stoichiometry during heat treatment, the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere was varied by passing the gas through a Cu-Ti-Cu oxygen trap. The trap temperature determined the oxygen partial pressure of the outflowing mixture. Dry hydrogen was also used in some of the UO sub(2+x) sintering experiments. The determination of diametrial shrinkages and sintering indices was made utilizing high-speed microcinematography and ultra-microbalance techniques. It was observed that the oxygen potential has a substantial influence on the kinetics of the three sintering stages. The control of the sintering atmosphere oxygen partial pressure led to very fast densification of UO sub(2+x). Values in the interval 95.0 to 99.5% of theoretical density were reached in less than one minute. Uranium volume diffusion is the dominant mechanism in the initial and intermediate sintering stages. For the final stage, uranium grain boundary diffusion was found to be the main sintering mechanism. (Author) [pt

  12. Development of coated particle fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moonsung; Kim, B. G.; Kim, D. J.

    2011-06-01

    Ammonia contacting method for prehardenning the surfaces of ADU liquid droplets and the ageing/washing/drying method and equipment for spherical dried-ADU particles were improved and tested with laboratory sacle. After the improvement of fabrication process, the sphericity of UO 2 kernel obtained to 1.1, and the sintered density and O/U ratio of final UO 2 kernel were above 10.60g/cm 3 . 2.01 respectively. Defects of SiC coating layer could be minimized by optimization of gas flow rate. The fracture strength of SiC layer increased from 450 MPa to 530 MPa by controlling the coating defects. An effort was made to develop the fundamental technology for the fuel element compact for use in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor(HTGR) through an establishment of fabrication process, required materials and process equipment as well as performing experiments to identify the basic process conditions and optimize them. Thermal load simulation and verification experiments were carried out for an assesment of the design feasibility of the irradiation rod. Out-of-pile testing of irradiation device such as measurement of pressure drop and vibration, endurance test was performed and the validity of its design was confirmed. A fuel performance analysis code, COPA has been developed to calculate the fuel temperature, the failure fractions of coated fuel particles, the release of fission products. The COPA code can be used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature reactor fuel under the reactor operation, irradiation, heating conditions. KAERI participated in the round robin test of IAEA CRP-6 program to characterize the diameter, sphericity, coating thickness, density and anisotropy of coated particles provided by Korea, USA and South Africa. QC technology was established for TRISO-coated fuel particle. A method for accurate measurement of the optical anisotropy factor for PyC layers of coated particles was developed. Technology and inspection procedures for density

  13. Dissolution testing of intermediary products in uranium dioxide production by the sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, F.; Landspersky, H.; Urbanek, V.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed of dissolving polyuranates and uranium dioxides in sulphuric acid and in carbonate solutions for testing intermediate products in the sol-gel process preparation of uranium dioxide. A detailed granulometric analysis of spherical particle dispersion was included as part of the tests. Two different production methods were used for the two types of studied materials. The test results show that the test method is suitable for determining temperature sensitivity of the materials to dissolution reaction. The geometrical distribution of impurities in the spherical particles can be determined from the dissolution kinetics. The method allows the determination of the effect of carbon from impurities on the process of uranium dioxide leaching and is thus applicable for testing materials prepared by the sol-gel method. (Z.M.)

  14. Study of Physical modifications induced by chromium doping of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraczkiewicz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Improvement of nuclear fuel performances requires reducing fission gas release. Doping uranium dioxide with chromium is the improvement axis considered in this work. Indeed, chromium fastens crystal growth in UO 2 , and thus enables a significant increase of the grain size. This work aims at the identification of defects produced by chromium addition in UO 2 , and their impact on properties of interest of the material. First, defects existing in doped fuel directly after sintering have been studied. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy allowed the identification of the environment of solubilised chromium in UO 2 . Chromium atoms are roughly substituting for uranium atoms, but generate a complete reorganisation of neighbouring oxygen atoms, and distortion of uranium sublattice. Characterisation of transport properties (electrical conductivity and oxygen self-diffusion) have shown that because of charge balance, chromium plays a leading role on such properties. A model of point defects in UO 2 has been proposed, showing how complex the involved phenomena are. Observations by Transmission Electron Microscopy of ion-irradiated thin foils have shown that chromium makes the coalescence of irradiation defects easier. This behaviour can be explained by a stabilisation of defect clusters due to precipitation of chromium. Finally, study of thermal diffusion of helium in doped UO 2 , performed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis, has confirmed this interaction between chromium atoms and irradiation defects. Indeed, μ-NRA measures have shown no fast gas diffusion close to grain boundaries, in contrast with standard UO 2 behaviour, which is associated with defects recovery in grain boundaries. (author) [fr

  15. Characterisation of electrodeposited polycrystalline uranium dioxide thin films on nickel foil for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamska, A.M.; Bright, E. Lawrence; Sutcliffe, J.; Liu, W.; Payton, O.D.; Picco, L.; Scott, T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Polycrystalline uranium dioxide thin films were grown on nickel substrates via aqueous electrodeposition of a precursor uranyl salt. The arising semiconducting uranium dioxide thin films exhibited a tower-like morphology, which may be suitable for future application in 3D solar cell applications. The thickness of the homogenous, tower-like films reached 350 nm. Longer deposition times led to the formation of thicker (up to 1.5 μm) and highly porous films. - Highlights: • Electrodeposition of polycrystalline UO_2 thin films • Tower-like morphology for 3D solar cell applications • Novel technique for separation of heavy elements from radioactive waste streams

  16. Silver release from coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.E.; Nabielek, H.

    1977-03-01

    The fission product Ag-110 m released from coated particles can be the dominant source of radioactivity from the core of a high temperature reactor in the early stages of the reactor life and possibly limits the accessability of primary circuit components. It can be shown that silver is retained in oxide fuel by a diffusion process (but not in carbide or carbon-diluted fuel) and that silver is released through all types of pyrocarbon layers. The retention in TRISO particles is variable and seems to be mainly connected with operating temperature and silicon carbide quality. (orig.) [de

  17. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ikawa, Katsuichi

    1980-07-01

    This report is concerning to the irradiation experiments of the coated fuel particles, which were performed by 72F-6A and 72F-7A capsules in JMTR. The coated particles referred to the preliminary design of VHTR were prepared for the experiments in 1972 and 1973. 72F-6A capsule was irradiated at G-10 hole of JMTR fuel zone for 2 reactor cycles, and 72F-7A capsule had been planned to be irradiated at the same irradiation hole before 72F-6A. However, due to slight leak of the gaseous fission products into the vacuum system controlling irradiation temperature, irradiation of 72F-7A capsule was ceased after 85 hrs since the beginning. In the post irradiation examination, inspection to surface appearance, ceramography, X-ray microradiography and acid leaching for the irradiated particle samples were made, and crushing strength of the two particle samples was measured. (author)

  18. Operating conditions of T.B.P. line uranium purification plant, for uranium dioxide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardich, R.N.; La Gamma, A.M.; Anasco, R.; Soler, S.M.G. de; Isnardi, E.; Gea, V.; Chiaraviglio, R.; Matyjasczyk, E.; Aramayo, R.

    1992-01-01

    In this contribution are presented the operative conditions and the results obtained step of the Uranium dioxide production plant of Argentina. The refining step involve the Uranium concentrate dissolution, the silica ageing, the filtration and liquid - liquid extraction with n-tributyl phosphate solution in kerosene. The established operative conditions allow to obtain Uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear purity in industrial scale. (author)

  19. Qualitative relations between the kinetics of sintering in hydrogen and the observed microstructures of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, B.; Delmas, R.; Caillat, F.; Lacombe, P.

    1975-01-01

    The microscopic study of uranium dioxide sintered in hydrogen, together with density measurements, shows on the one hand that the large scale appearance of pores trapped at the grain boundaries in the course of sintering has the effect of practically stopping densification, and on the other hand that this particular microstructure is stable over a wide range of time and temperature. (author)

  20. Characterization of transport properties in uranium dioxide: the case of the oxygen auto-diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraczkiewicz, M.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2008-01-01

    Point defects in uranium dioxide which control the transport phenomena are still badly known. The aim of this work is to show how in carrying out several experimental techniques, it is possible to demonstrate both the existence and to determine the nature (charge and localization) of predominant defects responsible of the transport phenomena in a fluorite-type structure oxide. The oxygen diffusion in the uranium dioxide illustrates this. In the first part of this work, the accent is put on the electric properties of uranium dioxide and more particularly on the variation laws of the electric conductivity in terms of temperature, of oxygen potential and of the impurities amounts present in the material. These evolutions are connected to point and charged complex defects models and the pertinence of these models is discussed. Besides, it is shown how the electric conductivity measurements can allow to define oxygen potential domains in which the concentrations in electronic carriers are controlled. This characterization being made, it is shown that the determination of the oxygen intrinsic diffusion coefficient and particularly its dependence to the oxygen potential and to the amount of impurity, allows to determine the main defect responsible to the atomic diffusion as well as its nature and its charge. In the second part, the experimental techniques to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficient are presented: there are the isotopic exchange technique for introducing the tracer in the material, and two techniques to characterize the diffusion profiles (SIMS and NRA). Examples of preliminary results are given for mono and polycrystalline samples. At last, from this methodology on uranium dioxide, studies considered to quantify the thermal and physicochemical effects are presented. Experiments considered with the aim to characterize the radiation diffusion in uranium dioxide are presented too. (O.M.)

  1. Method of manufacturing a graphite coated fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Koichi; Uchida, Shunsuke.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the close bondability and homogeneity of a graphite coating formed at the inner surface of a fuel can. Method: A coating containing graphite dispersed in a volatile organic solvent is used and a graphite coating is formed to the inner surface of a fuel can by way of a plunger method. After applying graphite coating, an inert gas is caused to flow at a certain flow rate to the inside of the fuel can horizontally rotaged so that gassification and evaporation of the volatile organic solvent contained in the graphite coating may be promoted. Since drying of the graphite coating coated to the inner surface of the fuel can thus be controlled, a graphite coating with satisfactory close bondability and homogeneity can be formed. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Fuel particle coating data. [Detailed information on coating runs at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Wagner, P.; Wahman, L.A.; White, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies.

  3. Automatic size analysis of coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallisch, K.; Koss, P.

    1977-01-01

    The determination of the diameter, coating thickness, and sphericity of coated fuel particles by conventional methods is very time consuming. Therefore, statistical data can only be obtained with limited accuracy. An alternative method is described that avoids these disadvantages by utilizing a fast optical data-collecting system of high accuracy. This system allows the determination of the diameter of particles in the range between 100 and 1500 μm, with an accuracy of better than +-2 μm and with a rate of 100 particles per second. The density and thickness of coating layers can be determined by comparing the data obtained before and after coating, taking into account the relative increase of weight. A special device allows the automatic determination of the sphericity of single particles as well as the distribution in a batch. This device measures 50 to 100 different diameters of each particle per second. An on-line computer stores the measured data and calculates all parameters required, e.g., number of particles measured, particle diameter, standard deviation, diameter limiting values, average particle volume, average particle surface area, and the distribution of sphericity in absolute and percent form

  4. Fluidization calculation on nuclear fuel kernel coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukarsono; Wardaya; Indra-Suryawan

    1996-01-01

    The fluidization of nuclear fuel kernel coating was calculated. The bottom of the reactor was in the from of cone on top of the cone there was a cylinder, the diameter of the cylinder for fluidization was 2 cm and at the upper part of the cylinder was 3 cm. Fluidization took place in the cone and the first cylinder. The maximum and the minimum velocity of the gas of varied kernel diameter, the porosity and bed height of varied stream gas velocity were calculated. The calculation was done by basic program

  5. Report on in-situ studies of flash sintering of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, Alicia Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Flash sintering is a novel type of field assisted sintering that uses an electric field and current to provide densification of materials on very short time scales. The potential for field assisted sintering techniques to be used in producing nuclear fuel is gaining recognition due to the potential economic benefits and improvements in material properties. The flash sintering behavior has so far been linked to applied and material parameters, but the underlying mechanisms active during flash sintering have yet to be identified. This report summarizes the efforts to investigate flash sintering of uranium dioxide using dilatometer studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory and two separate sets of in-situ studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s NSLS-II XPD-1 beamline. The purpose of the dilatometer studies was to understand individual parameter (applied and material) effects on the flash behavior and the purpose of the in-situ studies was to better understand the mechanisms active during flash sintering. As far as applied parameters, it was found that stoichiometry, or oxygen-to-metal ratio, has a significant effect on the flash behavior (time to flash and speed of flash). Composite systems were found to have degraded sintering behavior relative to pure UO2. The critical field studies are complete for UO2.00 and will be analyzed against an existing model for comparison. The in-situ studies showed that the strength of the field and current are directly related to the sample temperature, with temperature-driven phase changes occurring at high values. The existence of an ‘incubation time’ has been questioned, due to a continuous change in lattice parameter values from the moment that the field is applied. Some results from the in-situ experiments, which should provide evidence regarding ion migration, are still being analyzed. Some preliminary conclusions can be made from these results with regard to using field assisted sintering to

  6. Modeling of coated fuel particles irradiation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Tongxiang; Phelip, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report, PANAMA code was used to estimate the CP performance under normal and accident condition. Under the normal irradiation test (1000 degree C 625 efpd, 10% FIMA), for intact CP fuel, failure fraction is in the level of 10 -7 . As-fabricated SiC failed particles results in the through coatings failed particles much earlier than the intact particles does, OPyC layer does not fail immediately after irradiation starts. The significant failures start at beyond the burnup of about 7% FIMA. Under the accident condition, the calculated results showed that when the heating temperature is much higher than 1850 degree C, the failure fraction of coated particle can reach the level of 1 percent. The CP fuel fails significantly if it has a buffer layer thinner than 65 urn, SiC layer thinner than 30 μm. High burnup CP need to develop small size kernel, thick buffer layer and thick SiC layer. (authors)

  7. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the “true” chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  8. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Philippe; Magnaldo, Alastair; Godard, Jérémy; Schaer, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the "true" chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  9. Standard test methods for analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Section Carbon (Total) by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity Method C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion-Selective Electrode Method C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Gadolinia Content by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry C1456 Test Method for Determination of Uranium or Gadolinium, or Both, in Gadolinium Oxide-Uranium Oxide Pellets or by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hydrogen by Inert Gas Fusion C1457 Test Method for Determination of Total Hydrogen Content of Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets by Carrier Gas Extraction Isotopic Uranium Composition by Multiple-Filament Surface-Ioni...

  10. Coated powder for electrolyte matrix for carbonate fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacovangelo, C.D.; Browall, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    A plurality of electrolyte carbonate-coated ceramic particle which does not differ significantly in size from that of the ceramic particle and wherein no significant portion of the ceramic particle is exposed is fabricated into a porous tape comprised of said coated-ceramic particles bonded together by the coating for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell

  11. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porneuf, A.

    1960-05-01

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [fr

  12. Micromechanical simulation of Uranium dioxide polycrystalline aggregate behaviour under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacull, J.

    2011-02-01

    In pressurized water nuclear power reactor (PWR), the fuel rod is made of dioxide of uranium (UO 2 ) pellet stacked in a metallic cladding. A multi scale and multi-physic approaches are needed for the simulation of fuel behavior under irradiation. The main phenomena to take into account are thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod and chemical-physic behavior of the fission products. These last years one of the scientific issue to improve the simulation is to take into account the multi-physic coupling problem at the microscopic scale. The objective of this ph-D study is to contribute to this multi-scale approach. The present work concerns the micro-mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline aggregate of UO 2 . Mean field and full field approaches are considered. For the former and the later a self consistent homogenization technique and a periodic Finite Element model base on the 3D Voronoi pattern are respectively used. Fuel visco-plasticity is introduced in the model at the scale of a single grain by taking into account specific dislocation slip systems of UO 2 . A cohesive zone model has also been developed and implemented to simulate grain boundary sliding and intergranular crack opening. The effective homogenous behaviour of a Representative Volume Element (RVE) is fitted with experimental data coming from mechanical tests on a single pellet. Local behavior is also analyzed in order to evaluate the model capacity to assess micro-mechanical state. In particular, intra and inter granular stress gradient are discussed. A first validation of the local behavior assessment is proposed through the simulation of intergranular crack opening measured in a compressive creep test of a single fuel pellet. Concerning the impact of the microstructure on the fuel behavior under irradiation, a RVE simulation with a representative transient loading of a fuel rod during a power ramp test is achieved. The impact of local stress and strain heterogeneities on the multi

  13. Method to determine the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and the surface conductance at the cladding-core interface from internal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsykanov, V A; Samsonov, B F; Spiridonov, Yu G; Fomin, N A

    1975-01-01

    A method is given for determining the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and the contact conductance of the gas gap between the core and cladding of a fuel element. These quantities should be determined on various samples with different diameters. A method is described for determining the heat-production rate of a fuel element to within 1.5 to 2.5 percent. The method is based on using a calibrated electric heater and a sensor to measure the specific energy evolution from reactor gamma-radiation. The total errors in determining the thermal conductivity and the contact conductance do not exceed 4.5 and 8 percent, respectively.

  14. Current state of the Uranium dioxide sintering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.; Devyatko, Y.; Tenishev, A.; Khlunov, A.; Khomyakov, O.

    2011-01-01

    The basic approaches to the description of the ceramics sintering phenomenon are considered. It is established that diffusive sintering models incorrectly describe an intermediate stage of this process. The physical model of sintering, considering the substance plastic flow of pressing under the influence of internal stress forces and capillary forces, as the basic mechanism defining the shrinkage of sintering oxide nuclear fuel, is offered. (authors)

  15. Experimental studies of neutron irradiated uranium dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanke, R.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In case of an accident situation, in which the heat of the nuclear fuel can no longer be transferred to coolin water, the temperature of the nuclear fuel ay rise very strongly, so that radioactive fission products may be released, which can ultimately lead to the release of radioactive substances to the environment. In this respect it is important to know more about the release rate of the various fission products and their fuel samples, used in the investigation, were UO-2 spheres of approximately 1 mm. The chemical forms of the particles which are being released from the sphees during evaporation have been determined using a mass spectrometer. At the same time, the activity of the fission products has been measured using a gamma spectrometer. A gamma tomographer has been developed for determining the three-dimensional distribution of the concentration of radioactive fission products in the sphere. With this tomographer the change of this distribution as a function of temperature could be measured. For interpretation of the results two models have been developed: a model of the evaporation of the non-stoichiometric UO-2, and a model of the diffusion of fission products in UO-2. The first model was used to determine the stoichiometry of the sphere while the second has been used to determine the activation energy for the diffusion of the fission products. The main conclusion is that the microstructure of the nuclear fuel has a great effect on both the amount of free oxygen atoms, the release rate and the chemical form of fission products. This microstructure has not been investigated in greater detail so that all other conclusions are of qualitative nature. (author). 111 refs.; 114 figs.; 13 tabs

  16. Interation between a superheated uranium dioxide jet and cold concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.D.; Denham, M.K.; Turland, B.D.; Dop, L.M.G.; Humphreys, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    A scoping experiment has been carried out at the Winfrith Technology Centre using its Molten Fuel Test Facilities to examine the initial interaction between a fuel melt and concrete. A molten fuel simulant consisting of 81% UO 2 and 19% Mo with a large superheat (T≅3600 K) was poured onto a basaltic concrete target. Thermocouple data indicate that there was an initial high rate of ablation. The test demonstrated that in the case of such high superheats, a vigorous interaction between the jet and the target takes place, with much of the impinging material ejected within the first few seconds. There was a depression eroded into the target by the jet. The experiment has subsequently been modeled at Culham Laboratory using a version of the CORCON MCCI (molten core-concrete interaction) computer code. The calculations were able to produce a representation of this effect. The results of the experiment and the calculation have been compared with jetting correlations, and reasonable agreement has been found. We conclude by advising caution when applying the results of this isolated test to more prototypic interactions. (orig.)

  17. Study on principle and method of measuring system for external dimensions, geometric density and appearance quality of uranium dioxide pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Deng Hua; Wang Tao

    2010-01-01

    To adapt to the need of nuclear power development, and keep in step with the increasingly growing nuclear fuel element production, a special measuring system for integrated measuring, calculation, data processing method of External Dimensions, Tolerance of figure and place, Geometric Density and Appearance Quality of Uranium Dioxide Pellet is studied and discussed. This system is with important guiding significance for the improvement of technologic and frocking level.. The measuring system is primarily applied to sampling test during production and is the same with several types of products.The successful application of this measuring method ensures the accuracy and reliability of measured data, reduces the artificial error and makes the measuring be move convenient and fast, thus achieves high precision and high efficiency of measuring process. The measuring method is approach the advanced world level of measuring method at the same industry. So, based on the product inspection requirement, using special measuring instrument and computer data processing system is an important approach we use for nonce and future. (authors)

  18. The pressure bonding ability of uranium dioxide powders in relation to the evolution of their surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danroc, J.

    1982-09-01

    The long term storage of sinterable uranium dioxide powders generally improves their pressure bonding ability and the strength of the resulting green pellets. Evidence of the gradual evolution of the surface texture and composition of these powders during storage at room temperature and pressure has been provided by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric and microcalorimetric methods. These techniques demonstrated the existence of a thin adherent surface layer of UO 3 2H 2 0. Such a natural evolutionary process can be reproduced and substantially amplified by subjecting the powder to thermal treatments at temperatures up to 90 0 C in a moist air environment. It was shown that powder treated in this manner could be more readily compacted into strong green pellets than could raw material. The tensile strength, commonly regarded as a quality test for such pellets and measured by the brazilian method, was found to be at least twice that of normal pellets. The high density and geometric integrity of these sintered products ensures the extrapolation of these preparation techniques to the mass production of nuclear reactor fuel pellets [fr

  19. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  20. Coated fuel particles: requirements and status of fabrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huschka, H.; Vygen, P.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel cycle, design, and irradiation performance requirements impose restraints on the fabrication processes. Both kernel and coating fabrication processes are flexible enough to adapt to the needs of the various existing and proposed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Extensive experience has demonstrated that fuel kernels with excellent sphericity and uniformity can be produced by wet chemical processes. Similarly experience has shown that the various multilayer coatings can be produced to fully meet design and specification requirements. Quality reliability of coated fuel particles is ensured by quality control and quality assurance programs operated by an aduiting system that includes licensing officials and the customer

  1. The development of CVR coatings for PBR fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, R. E.; Vanier, P. E.; Dowell, M. B.; Lennartz, J. A.

    Particle bed reactors (PBR's) are being developed for both space power and propulsion applications. These reactors operate with exhaust gas temperatures of 2500 to 3000 K and fuel temperatures hundreds of degrees higher. One fuel design for these reactors consists of uranium carbide encapsulated in either carbon or graphite. This fuel kernel must be protected from the coolant gas, usually H2, both to prevent attack of the kernel and to limit fission product release. Refractory carbide coatings have been proposed for this purpose. The typical coating process used for this is a chemical vapor deposition. Testing of other components have indicated the superiority of refractory carbide coatings applied using a chemical vapor reaction (CVR) process, however technology to apply these coatings to large numbers of fuel particles with diameters on the order of 500 pm were not readily available. A process to deposit these CVR coatings on surrogate fuel consisting of graphite particles is described. Several types of coatings have been applied to the graphite substrate: NbC in various thicknesses and a bilayer coating consisting of NbC and TaC with a intermediate layer of pyrolytic graphite. These coated particles have been characterized prior to test; results are presented.

  2. A cluster dynamics study of fission gases in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek, Richard

    2013-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation of nuclear fuels a lot of rare gases are produced, mainly xenon and krypton. The behaviour of these highly insoluble fission gases may lead to an additional load of the cladding, which may have detrimental safety consequences. For these reasons, fission gas behaviour (diffusion and clustering) has been extensively studied for years.In this work, we present an application of Cluster Dynamics to address the behaviour of fission gases in UO_2 which simultaneously describes changes in rare gas atom and point defect concentrations in addition to the bubble size distribution. This technique, applied to Kr implanted and annealed samples, yields a precise interpretation of the release curves and helps justifying the estimation of the Kr diffusion coefficient, which is a data very difficult to obtain due to the insolubility of the gas. (author) [fr

  3. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 μg/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 μg. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 μg. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  4. Inert matrix fuel in dispersion type fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchenko, A.M. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: sav@bochvar.ru; Vatulin, A.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Morozov, A.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sirotin, V.L. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dobrikova, I.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulakov, G.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ershov, S.A. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kostomarov, V.P. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stelyuk, Y.I. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-30

    The advantages of using inert matrix fuel (IMF) as a dispersion fuel in an aluminium alloy matrix are considered, in particular, low temperatures in the fuel centre, achievable high burn-ups, serviceability in transients and an environmentally friendly process of fuel rod fabrication. Two main versions of IMF are under development at A.A. Bochvar Institute, i.e. heterogeneous or isolated distribution of plutonium. The out-of-pile results on IMF loaded with uranium dioxide as plutonium simulator are presented. Fuel elements with uranium dioxide composition fabricated at A.A. Bochvar Institute are currently under MIR tests (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad). The fuel elements reached a burn-up of 88 MW d kg{sup -1} (equivalent to the burn up of the standard uranium dioxide pelletized fuel) without loss of leak-tightness of the cladding. The feasibility of fabricating IMF of these particular types with plutonium dioxide is considered with a view to in-pile irradiation.

  5. Inert matrix fuel in dispersion type fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, A. M.; Vatulin, A. V.; Morozov, A. V.; Sirotin, V. L.; Dobrikova, I. V.; Kulakov, G. V.; Ershov, S. A.; Kostomarov, V. P.; Stelyuk, Y. I.

    2006-06-01

    The advantages of using inert matrix fuel (IMF) as a dispersion fuel in an aluminium alloy matrix are considered, in particular, low temperatures in the fuel centre, achievable high burn-ups, serviceability in transients and an environmentally friendly process of fuel rod fabrication. Two main versions of IMF are under development at A.A. Bochvar Institute, i.e. heterogeneous or isolated distribution of plutonium. The out-of-pile results on IMF loaded with uranium dioxide as plutonium simulator are presented. Fuel elements with uranium dioxide composition fabricated at A.A. Bochvar Institute are currently under MIR tests (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad). The fuel elements reached a burn-up of 88 MW d kg-1 (equivalent to the burn up of the standard uranium dioxide pelletized fuel) without loss of leak-tightness of the cladding. The feasibility of fabricating IMF of these particular types with plutonium dioxide is considered with a view to in-pile irradiation.

  6. Development of a reduction process of ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1990-07-01

    Laboratory development of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amount of fluoride (approx. 500μg/g) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentration is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical properties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  7. Determination of Oxygen - to - Uranium Ratio in Hyperstoichio - Metric Uranium Dioxide. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolk, A.; Lingerak, W.A.

    1970-09-01

    For the determination of the O/U ratio in hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide we prefer the following chemical procedure. The sample is dissolved in concentrated phosphoric acid without change in valence of the uranium. Then the amount of U (VI) present in the solution is titrated with a Fe (II) - standard solution in phosphoric acid. The titrimetric end-point is detected following the ''dead-stop-end-point'' procedure. When special precautions are made the O/U value can be determined with an accuracy and precision of + 0.0001 0/U units when 500 mg sample aliquots are used. (author)

  8. Surface characterization of uranium metal and uranium dioxide using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Trickle, I.R.; Tucker, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra of pure uranium metal and stoichiometric uranium dioxide have been obtained using an AEI ES300 spectrometer. Binding energy values for core and valence electrons have been determined using an internally calibrated energy scale and monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Satellite peaks observed accompanying certain principal core ionizations are discussed in relation to the mechanisms by which they arise. Confirmation is obtained that for stoichiometric UOsub(2.00) a single shake-up satellite is observed accompanying the U 4fsub(7/2,5/2) principal core lines, separated by 6.8 eV to higher binding energy. (author)

  9. Experience with a uranyl nitrate/uranium dioxide conversion pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcuri, L.; Pietrelli, L.

    1984-01-01

    A plant for the precipitation of sinterable nuclear grade UO 2 powders is described in this report. The plant has been designed, built and set up by SNIA TECHINT. ENEA has been involved in the job as nuclear consultant. Main process steps are: dissolution of UO 2 powder or sintered UO 2 pellets, adjustment of uranyl nitrate solutions, precipitation of uranium peroxide by means of hydrogen peroxide, centrifugation of the precipitate, drying, calcination and reduction to uranium dioxide. The report is divided in two main section: the process description and the ''hot test'' report. Some laboratory data on precipitation of ammonium diuranate by means of NH 4 OH, are also reported

  10. Influence of uranium dioxide nonstoichiometric oxygen on the work function of Mo(110) single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekmukhabetov, E.S.; Dzhajmurzin, A.A.; Imanbekov, Zh.Zh.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of the uranium dioxide nonstoichiometric oxygen on the work function of a Mo(110) single crystal has been studied. When the surface diffusion of oxygen on the tested surface takes place, the work function is shown to decrease and, subsequently, to increase until it becomes stable. The dependence of the work function on the temperature of the specimen in the range of 1600-1900 K with a minimum at 1730 K has been found. The minimum is attributed to the dipole layer formation

  11. Development of ammonium uranyl carbonate reduction to uranium dioxide using fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory development of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amounts of fluoride ( - 500μgF - /gTCAU) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentrations is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical proterties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  12. Irradiation Testing of TRISO-Coated Particle Fuel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bong Goo; Yeo, Sunghwan; Jeong, Kyung-Chai; Eom, Sung-Ho; Kim, Yeon-Ku; Kim, Woong Ki; Lee, Young Woo; Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Yong Wan

    2014-01-01

    In Korea, coated particle fuel is being developed to support development of a VHTR. At the end of March 2014, the first irradiation test in HANARO at KAERI to demonstrate and qualify TRISO-coated particle fuel for use in a VHTR was terminated. This experiment was conducted in an inert gas atmosphere without on-line temperature monitoring and control, or on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contained two test rods, one has nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact contains about 260 TRISO-coated particles. The duration of irradiation testing at HANARO was about 135 full power days from last August 2013. The maximum average power per particle was about 165 mW/particle. The calculated peak burnup of the TRISO-coated fuel was a little less than 4 atom percent. Post-irradiation examination is being carried out at KAERI’s Irradiated Material Examination Facility beginning in September of 2014. This paper describes characteristics of coated particle fuel, the design of the test rod and irradiation device for this coated particle fuel, and discusses the technical results of irradiation testing at HANARO. (author)

  13. Application of Coating Technology for Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To commercialize the ATF cladding concepts, various factors are considered, such as safety under normal and accident conditions, economy for the fuel cycle, and developing development challenges, and schedule. From the proposed concepts, it is known that the cladding coating, FeCrAl alloy, and Zr-Mo claddings are considered as a near/mid-term application, whereas the SiC material is considered as a long-term application. Among them, the benefit of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the fuel cycle economy regarding the manufacturing, neutron cross section, and high tritium permeation characteristics. However, the challenge of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the lower oxidation resistance and mechanical strength at high-temperature than other concepts. Another important point is the adhesion property between the Zr-based alloy and coating materials. As an improved coating technology compared to a previous study, a 3D laser coating technology supplied with Cr powders is considered to make a coated cladding because it is possible to make a coated layer on the tubular cladding surface by controlling the 3-diminational axis. We are systematically studying the laser beam power, inert gas flow, cooling of the cladding tube, and powder control as key points to develop 3D laser coating technology. After Cr-coating on the Zr-based cladding, ring compression and ring tensile tests were performed to evaluate the adhesion property between a coated layer and Zr-based alloy tube at room temperature (RT), and a high-temperature oxidation test was conducted to evaluate the oxidation behavior at 1200 .deg. C of the coated tube samples. A 3D laser coating method supplied with Cr powders was developed to decrease the high-temperature oxidation rate in a steam environment through a systematic study for various coating parameters, and a Cr-coated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube of 100 mm in length to the axial direction can be successfully manufactured.

  14. Impact on burnup performance of coated particle fuel design in pebble bed reactor with ROX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Hai Quan; Obara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The pebble bed reactor (PBR), a kind of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), is expected to be among the next generation of nuclear reactors as it has excellent passive safety features, as well as online refueling and high thermal efficiency. Rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel has been studied at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) as a new once-through type fuel concept. Rock-like oxide used as fuel in a PBR can be expected to achieve high burnup and improve chemical stabilities. In the once-through fuel concept, the main challenge is to achieve as high a burnup as possible without failure of the spent fuel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on burnup performance of different coated fuel particle (CFP) designs in a PBR with ROX fuel. In the study, the AGR-1 Coated Particle design and Deep-Burn Coated Particle design were used to make the burnup performance comparison. Criticality and core burnup calculations were performed by MCPBR code using the JENDL-4.0 library. Results at equilibrium showed that the two reactors utilizing AGR-1 Coated Particle and Deep-Burn Coated Particle designs could be critical with almost the same multiplication factor k eff . However, the power peaking factor and maximum power per fuel ball in the AGR-1 coated particle design was lower than that of Deep-Burn coated particle design. The AGR-1 design also showed an advantage in fissions per initial fissile atoms (FIFA); the AGR-1 coated particle design produced a higher FIFA than the Deep-Burn coated particle design. These results suggest that the difference in coated particle fuel design can have an effect on the burnup performance in ROX fuel. (author)

  15. Uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets - Determination of nitrogen content - Method using ammonia-sensing electrode. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for determining the nitrogen content in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. It is applicable to the determination of nitrogen, present as nitride, in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The concentration range within which the method can be used is between 9 μg and 600 μg of nitrogen per gram. Interference can occur from metals which form complex ammines, but these are not normally present in significant amounts

  16. Contribution to the study of sputtering and damage of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlutig, S.

    2001-03-01

    Swift heavy ion-solid interaction leads in volume to track creation and on the surface to the ejection of particles into the vacuum. To learn more about initial mechanisms of track formation, we are focused on the sputtering of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions. This present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power on the emission of neutral particles and especially on their angular distribution. These measurements are completed by those of the ions emitted from UO 2 targets bombarded with swift heavy ions. The whole experimental results give access to: i) the nature of the sputtered particles; ii) the charge state of the emitted particles; iii) the direction of ejection of the sputtered particles ; iv) the sputtering yields deduced from the angular distributions. These results are compared to the prediction of the sputtering models proposed in the literature and it seems that the supersonic gas flow model is well suited to describe our results. Finally, the sputtering yields are compared with a set of earlier experimental data on uranium dioxide damage obtained by T. Wiss and we observe that only a small fraction of UO 2 monolayers are sputtered. (author)

  17. Anomalous behaviour of thermophysical properties of stoichiometric uranium dioxide by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunev, A.V.; Tarasov, B.A.; Nazarov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a classical molecular dynamics simulation of uranium dioxide in the temperature range of 300-3000 K. Temperature dependences of thermal conductivity, heat capacity and ionic conductivity are investigated. Our study shows the rise of thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide at very high temperatures (above 2500 K), which is not predicted by the former anharmonic theories. Several pair potentials are used in the simulation, and they depict similar effects. Long range forces are accounted by Ewald sums. Static thermal properties are evaluated in NPT ensemble. It is shown that a high-temperature peak on heat capacity is present and is more legible in large systems. To ensure the best reliability, transport properties are evaluated using the theory of autocorrelation functions in NVE ensemble. In order to properly define thermal conductivity in ionic systems with charge fluxes, an expression which accounts the thermoelectric effect is derived from Onsager reciprocal relations. The rise on temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is accompanied by the peak on heat capacity and an anomalous rise of ionic conductivity. However, it is shown that there is no partial melting of the oxygen sublattice, which suggests that the system does not necessarily exhibit a superionic transition. Instead, kick-out diffusion in oxygen sublattice is proposed to be the origin of such anomalous behavior of thermophysical properties. (author)

  18. Cold spray copper coatings for used fuel containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keech, P. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada); Vo, P.; Poirier, D.; Legoux, J-G [National Research Council, Boucherville QC, (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Recently, the Nuclear Waste Management Organization has been developing copper coatings as a method of protecting steel used fuel containers (UFCs) from corrosion within a deep geological repository. The corrosion barrier design is based on the application of a copper coating bonded directly to the exterior surface of the UFC structural core. Copper coating technologies amendable to supply of pre-coated UFC vessel components and application to the weld zone following UFC closure within the radiological environment have been investigated. Copper cold spray has been assessed for both operations; this paper outlines the research and development to date of this technique. (author)

  19. Irradiation testing of coated particle fuel at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo Kim, Bong; Sung Cho, Moo; Kim, Yong Wan

    2014-01-01

    TRISO-coated particle fuel is developing to support development of VHTR in Korea. From August 2013, the first irradiation testing of coated particle fuel was begun to demonstrate and qualify TRISO fuel for use in VHTR in the HANARO at KAERI. This experiment is currently undergoing under the atmosphere of a mixed inert gas without on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contains two test rods, one contains nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact has 263 coated particles. After a peak burn-up of about 4 at% and a peak fast neutron fluence of about 1.7 x 10 21 n/cm 2 , PIE will be carried out at KAERI's Irradiated Material Examination Facility. This paper is described characteristics of coated particle fuel, the design of test rod and irradiation device for coated particle fuel, discusses the technical results for irradiation testing at HANARO. (authors)

  20. Fission product release from HTGR coated microparticles and fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.A.; Deryugin, A.I.; Lyutikov, R.A.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of fission products release from microparticles with UO 2 core and five-layer HII PyC- and SiC base protection layers of TRICO type as well as from spherical fuel elements based thereon. It is shown that relative release of short-lived xenon and crypton from microparticles does not exceed (2-3) 10 -7 . The release of gaseous fission products from fuel elements containing no damaged coated microparticles, is primarily determined by the contamination of matrix graphite with fuel. An analytical dependence is derived, the dependence described the relation between structural parameters of coated microparticles, irradiation conditions and fuel burnup at which depressurization of coated microparticles starts

  1. Process engineering of ceramic composite coatings for fuel cell systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G.; Kim, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Q.; Troczynski, T. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Researchers at UBCeram at the Department of Metals and Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia have developed a technology to chemically bond composite sol-gel (CB-CSG) coating onto metallic surfaces of complex or concave shapes. The process has been optimized for electrically resistive coatings and corrosion-resistant coatings. The CSG is sprayed onto metallic surfaces and is heat-treated at 300 degrees C to partially dehydrate the hydroxides. The CSG film is then chemically bonded through reaction of active alumina with metal phosphates, such as aluminium phosphate. A new chromate-free process is being developed to address the issue of coatings porosity. The electrodeposition technique involves polymer particles mixed with suspended fine alumina particles which are co-deposited by electrophoretic means or by electrocoagulation. The composite e-coatings have excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as a protective coating for various components of fuel cell systems. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  2. On the possibility of reprocessing of fuel elements of dispersion type with copper matrix by pyrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, B.D.; Ivanov, V.A.; Shchetinskij, A.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Savochkin, Yu.P.; Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.

    2005-01-01

    A consideration is given to pyrochemical processes suitable for separation of uranium dioxide from structural materials when reprocessing cermet type fuel elements. The estimation of the possibility to apply liquid antimony and bismuth, potassium and copper chlorides melts is made. The specimens compacted of copper and uranium dioxide powders in a stainless steel can are used as simulators of fuel element sections. It is concluded that the dissolution of structural materials in molten salts at the stage of uranium dioxide concentration is the process of choice for reprocessing of dispersion type fuel elements [ru

  3. Coated U(Mo) Fuel: As-Fabricated Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Ann Leenaers; Sven Van den Berghe; Tom Wiencek

    2014-04-01

    As part of the development of low-enriched uranium fuels, fuel plates have recently been tested in the BR-2 reactor as part of the SELENIUM experiment. These fuel plates contained fuel particles with either Si or ZrN thin film coating (up to 1 µm thickness) around the U-7Mo fuel particles. In order to best understand irradiation performance, it is important to determine the starting microstructure that can be observed in as-fabricated fuel plates. To this end, detailed microstructural characterization was performed on ZrN and Si-coated U-7Mo powder in samples taken from AA6061-clad fuel plates fabricated at 500°C. Of interest was the condition of the thin film coatings after fabrication at a relatively high temperature. Both scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed. The ZrN thin film coating was observed to consist of columns comprised of very fine ZrN grains. Relatively large amounts of porosity could be found in some areas of the thin film, along with an enrichment of oxygen around each of the the ZrN columns. In the case of the pure Si thin film coating sample, a (U,Mo,Al,Si) interaction layer was observed around the U-7Mo particles. Apparently, the Si reacted with the U-7Mo and Al matrix during fuel plate fabrication at 500°C to form this layer. The microstructure of the formed layer is very similar to those that form in U-7Mo versus Al-Si alloy diffusion couples annealed at higher temperatures and as-fabricated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al-Si alloy matrix fabricated at 500°C.

  4. Viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide at high temperature; Comportement viscoplastique du dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, F

    2001-02-01

    This work is a part of a project led by EDF the purpose of which is the development of more predictive models to describe the thermomechanical behavior of fuel assembly. First, we recall the baselines of the Power Water Reactors then we deal with the viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This knowledge enables an accurate description of the stress relaxation during Pellet Cladding Interactions. The pellets we have used in the last part are similar to the industrial ones. They exhibit a yield point during strain hardening tests and a sigma creep curve. In order to describe these characteristics, we have adapted different kind of approaches: thermodynamical - the Distribution of Non Linear Relaxations, approaches based on dislocation glide inspired by Alexander and Haasen and introduced in the Pilvin polycrystalline model. We recall the purpose of internal variables in the thermodynamics of system far from equilibrium then in case of a viscoplastic flow controlled by dislocation glide, we establish a link between densities of dislocations and internal variables in the D.N.L.R. approach. As vacancy diffusion in the grain boundary has a contribution to the viscoplastic strain, a similar is presented in appendix. These models are able to reproduce the behavior of UO{sub 2} pellets in strain hardening, stress relaxation and creep tests. Much possible progress has been revealed by the analysis of the tests. Further more, we propose a model for yield point and sigma creep curve. We also have extended these results to the behavior of irradiated pellets and stressed the influence of damage. (author)

  5. The 1/4 technical scale, continuous process of obtaining the ceramic uranium dioxide from ammonium polyuranates containing fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodarski, R.

    1977-01-01

    Based on the laboratory results, the 1/4 technical apparatus for the continuous reduction and defluorination of ammonium polyuranate containing fluoride was designed and constructed. The possibility of obtaining the ceramic uranium dioxide in a continuous process has been confirmed. The main part of the apparatus used in this process was the horizontal tubular oven with the extruder transporting material. (author)

  6. Dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate-hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, A.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Direct dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) has been attempted. The effects of TBP concentration and pressure on the extraction of uranium have been studied. Addition of hydrogen peroxide in the modifier enhances the dissolution/extraction of uranium. (author)

  7. Fission product released experiment of coated fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shijiang, Xu; Bing, Yang; Chunhe, Tang; Junguo, Zhu; Jintao, Huang; Binzhong, Zhang [Inst. of Nucl. Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Jinghan, Luo [Inst. of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    1992-01-15

    Four samples of coated fuel particles were irradiated in the Heavy-Water Research Reactor of the Institute of Atomic Energy. Each of them was divided into two groups and irradiated to the burn up of 0.394% fima and 0.788% fima in two static capsules, respectively. After irradiation and cooling, post irradiation annealing experiment was carried out, the release ratios of the fission product {sup 133}Xe and {sup 131}I were measured, they are in the order of 10{sup -6}{approx}10{sup -7}. The fission product release ratio of naked kernel was also measured under the same conditions as for the coated fuel particles, the ratio of the fission product release of the coated fuel particles and of the naked kernel was in the order of 10{sup -5}{approx}10{sup -4}.

  8. Nuclear fuel recycling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.R.; Koch, A.K.; Krawczyk, A.

    1981-01-01

    A process is provided for recycling sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets rejected during fuel manufacture and the swarf from pellet grinding. The scrap material is prepared mechanically by crushing and milling as a high solids content slurry, using scrap sintered UO 2 pellets as the grinding medium under an inert atmosophere

  9. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  10. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide; Etude de la structure electronique des actinides et de leurs dioxydes. Application aux defauts ponctuels et aux gaz de fission dans le dioxyde d`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique

    1996-09-28

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author). 256 refs.

  11. Coating applications for the molten carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigeaud, A.; Skok, A.J.; Patel, P.S.; Maru, H.C.

    1981-09-25

    The molten carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient low polluting fuel-to-electricity conversion device which is at present being developed for power plant and industrial use. Because the alkali carbonates at the operating temperature of 650/sup 0/C are corrosive and the methods employed for sealing the cell lead to certain electrochemical corrosion couples, different types of protective coatings are needed to minimize attack in a cost-effective manner. Besides protective purposes, other opportunities are also described where coating technology can be gainfully employed in this system.

  12. Mechanical Properties and Structures of Pyrolytic Carbon Coating Layer in HTR Coated Particle Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Woong Ki; Cho, Moon Sung

    2009-01-01

    The TRISO(tri-isotropic)-coated fuel particle for a HTR(High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor) has a diameter of about 1 mm, composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and four different outer coating layers, consisting of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, inner PyC layer, SiC layer, and outer PyC layer with different coating thicknesses following a specific fuel design. While the fuel kernel is a source for a heat generation by a nuclear fission of fissile uranium, each of the four coating layers acts as a different role in view of retaining the generated fission products and the other interactions during an in-reactor service. Among these coating layers, PyC properties are scarcely in agreement among various investigators and the dependency of their changes upon the deposition condition is comparatively large due to their additional anisotropic properties. Although a recent review work has contributed to an establishment of relationship between the material properties and QC measurements, the data on the mechanical properties and structural parameters of PyC coating layers remain still unclearly evaluated. A review work on dimensional changes of PyC by neutron irradiation was one of re-evaluative works recently attempted by the authors. In this work, an attempt was made to analyze and re-evaluate the existing data of the experimental results of the mechanical properties, i.e., Young's modulus and fracture stress, in relation with the coating conditions, density and the BAF (Bacon Anisotropy Factor), an important structural parameter, of PyC coating layers obtained from various experiments performed in the early periods of the HTR coated particle development

  13. Bonding xenon and krypton on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Ludwik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present density functional theory (DFT calculation results of krypton and xenon atoms interaction on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal. A pseudo-potential approach in the generalised gradient approximation (GGA was applied using the ABINIT program package. To compute the unit cell parameters, the 25 atom super-cell was chosen. It has been revealed that close to the surface of a potential well is formed for xenon and krypton atom due to its interaction with the atoms of oxygen and uranium. Depth and shape of the well is the subject of ab initio calculations in adiabatic approximation. The calculations were performed both for the case of oxygenic and metallic surfaces. It has been shown that the potential well for the oxygenic surface is deeper than for the metallic surface. The thermal stability of immobilising the atoms of krypton and xenon in the potential wells were evaluated. The results are shown in graphs.

  14. Plastic deformation of uranium dioxide: observation of the sub-structures of dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.; Lefebvre, J.M.; Soullard, J.

    1978-01-01

    Single crystals of uranium dioxide were deformed in compression at imposed strain rates in the temperature range of 700 0 C to 1400 0 C. The crystals were oriented to promote slip over one or two slip systems of the family [100] and also on the [110] system. Thin films of the deformed specimens were examined by transmission electron microscopy. When [100] single glide system operates, the dislocation substructure consist of numerous dipoles, their edge components lying along directions. For the [100] double glide system the grain boundaries and dislocation hexagonal network are observed, the complexity of which increases with the nominal strain. Dislocation arrangments consisting of extensive cellular networks of tangling dislocations and hexagonal netting were detected for [110] system. The auxillary role of [111] planes on the dislocation cross slip from [100] and [110] system was demonstrated. Weak beam images suggest that dissociation of dislocations can occur. (Auth.)

  15. The study of Ashby-type sintering diagrams for uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeoni, P.

    1980-01-01

    Computer modelling of binary and ternary Ashby-type sintering diagrams for stoechiometric and hyperstoechiometric uranium dioxide (in the range O/U = 2, 0-2, 10). Material data and mass transfer equations, selected from the literature, were used. Sintering isochronous curves were calculated and traced as well. Improvement of a modern dilatometric method by reading and processing experimental curves on a computer and by determining for them a criterion of proximity to the theoretical model equation. It was possible: to develop a reliable method of determination for the dominant mechanism, diffusion coefficient and real process activation energy; to draw up the real sintering diagram; to understand the quantitative and qualitative changes occuring during the actual sintering process of UO 2 , concerning massing and modification of pore shape; to recommend the technological parameters of the thermal regime concerning the elimination of lubricant and binder additives in order to obtain high quality sintered tablets. (author)

  16. Methods for oxygen/uranium ratio determination in substoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.G.; Godin, Yu.G.; S'edin, Yu.D.; Kosykh, V.G.; Nepryakhin, A.M.; Komarenko, F.F.; Kutyreva, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations are performed into a possibility to use the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, gas chromatography, hydration-dehydration, and e.m.f. of high-temperature solid-electrode galvanic cell for determining O-U atomic ratio in UO 2-x . It is shown that the investigated methods have an analysis error of ± 0.001 O/U units. However, the e.m.f. method, which feature a high accuracy near stoichiometry can be applied only within the limits of UO 2-x homogeneity. A possibility is shown to expend the area of e.m.f. method application during the analysis of substoichiometric uranium dioxide. 9 refs.; 1 tab

  17. Determination of trace metals in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, V.L.R.; Imakuma, K.

    1988-04-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of low concentrations of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the use of chemical treatment. The lower limits of detection range from 2 μg g -1 for nickel and manganese to 5 μg g -1 for copper. Samples are prepared in the form of double-layer pellets with boric acid as a binding agent. Standards are prepared in a U 3 O 8 matrix, which is more chemically stable than UO 2 and has similar matrix behaviour. The correlation coefficients for calibration curves are better than 0.999. Erros range from 2.4 % for chromium to 6.8 % for nickel. (author) [pt

  18. Determination of trace elements in ceramic uranium dioxide pellets powders CRMs by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Husheng; Li Jun

    1997-01-01

    The 237-quaternary ammonium extraction resin chromatography is used to the separation of 6 trace elements in ceramic uranium dioxide pellets powders, which are used as certified reference materials (CRMs). The sample is dissolved in 6.5 mol/L HNO 3 and uranium is separated by chromatographic column. the 6 trace elements Al, Ba, Co, Ta, Ti and V contained in the elutriant are determined by using ICP directly reading spectrometer. For a 300 mg sample, the lowest determinable concentration of impurities in ceramic UO 2 pellets powders CRMs is (0.016-0.250) x 10 -6 . The relative standard deviation is less than 7.5%. The proposed method provides excellent and accurate analytical data for the ceramic UO 2 pellets powders samples (CRMs)

  19. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerikar, Pankaj; Watanabe, Taku; Tulenko, James S.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    The stability range of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide is determined as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and non-stoichiometry. The computational approach integrates high accuracy ab initio electronic-structure calculations and thermodynamic analysis supported by experimental data. In particular, the density functional theory calculations are performed at the level of the spin polarized, generalized gradient approximation and includes the Hubbard U term; as a result they predict the correct anti-ferromagnetic insulating ground state of uranium oxide. The thermodynamic calculations enable the effects of system temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on defect formation energy to be determined. The predicted equilibrium properties and defect formation energies for neutral defect complexes match trends in the experimental literature quite well. In contrast, the predicted values for charged complexes are lower than the measured values. The calculations predict that the formation of oxygen interstitials becomes increasingly difficult as higher temperatures and reducing conditions are approached

  20. Error Analysis of Ceramographic Sample Preparation for Coating Thickness Measurement of Coated Fuel Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoxue; Li Ziqiang; Zhao Hongsheng; Zhang Kaihong; Tang Chunhe

    2014-01-01

    The thicknesses of four coatings of HTR coated fuel particle are very important parameters. It is indispensable to control the thickness of four coatings of coated fuel particles for the safety of HTR. A measurement method, ceramographic sample-microanalysis method, to analyze the thickness of coatings was developed. During the process of ceramographic sample-microanalysis, there are two main errors, including ceramographic sample preparation error and thickness measurement error. With the development of microscopic techniques, thickness measurement error can be easily controlled to meet the design requirements. While, due to the coated particles are spherical particles of different diameters ranged from 850 to 1000μm, the sample preparation process will introduce an error. And this error is different from one sample to another. It’s also different from one particle to another in the same sample. In this article, the error of the ceramographic sample preparation was calculated and analyzed. Results show that the error introduced by sample preparation is minor. The minor error of sample preparation guarantees the high accuracy of the mentioned method, which indicates this method is a proper method to measure the thickness of four coatings of coated particles. (author)

  1. Study and simulation of the behaviour under irradiation of helium in uranium dioxide; Etude et modelisation du comportement sous irradiation de l'helium dans le dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G

    2007-06-15

    Large quantities of helium are produced from {alpha}-decay of actinides in nuclear fuels during its in-pile operating and its storage. It is important to understand the behaviour of helium in these matrix in order to well simulate the evolution and the resistance of the fuel element. During this thesis, we have used nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) to follow the evolution of the helium implanted in polycrystalline and monocrystalline uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). An experimental rig was developed to follow the on-line helium release in UO{sub 2} and the evolution of {sup 3}He profiles as a function of annealing temperature. An automated procedure taking into account the evolution of the depth resolution was developed. Analyses performed with a nuclear microprobe allowed to characterise the spatial distribution of helium at the grain scale and to study the influence of the sample microstructure on the helium migration. This work put into evidence the particular role of grain boundaries and irradiation defects in the helium release process. The analyse of experimental results with a diffusion model corroborates these interpretations. It allowed to determine quantitatively physical properties that characterise the helium behaviour in uranium dioxide (diffusion coefficient, activation energy..). (author)

  2. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. SPOUTED BED DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR COATED NUCLEAR FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2017-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are fueled with tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated nuclear fuel particles embedded in a carbon-graphite fuel body. TRISO coatings consist of four layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide that are deposited on uranium ceramic fuel kernels (350µm – 500µm diameters) in a concatenated series of batch depositions. Each layer has dedicated functions such that the finished fuel particle has its own integral containment to minimize and control the release of fission products into the fuel body and reactor core. The TRISO coatings are the primary containment structure in the HTGR reactor and must have very high uniformity and integrity. To ensure high quality TRISO coatings, the four layers are deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using high purity precursors and are applied in a concatenated succession of batch operations before the finished product is unloaded from the coating furnace. These depositions take place at temperatures ranging from 1230°C to 1550°C and use three different gas compositions, while the fuel particle diameters double, their density drops from 11.1 g/cm3 to 3.0 g/cm3, and the bed volume increases more than 8-fold. All this is accomplished without the aid of sight ports or internal instrumentation that could cause chemical contamination within the layers or mechanical damage to thin layers in the early stages of each layer deposition. The converging section of the furnace retort was specifically designed to prevent bed stagnation that would lead to unacceptably high defect fractions and facilitate bed circulation to avoid large variability in coating layer dimensions and properties. The gas injection nozzle was designed to protect precursor gases from becoming overheated prior to injection, to induce bed spouting and preclude bed stagnation in the bottom of the retort. Furthermore, the retort and injection nozzle designs minimize buildup of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide on the

  4. TRISO coated fuel particles with enhanced SiC properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Tan, J.; Meadows, P.J.; Marsh, G.; Xiao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of TRISO coated fuel particles is normally produced at 1500-1650 deg. C via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of SiC coatings with uniform grain size throughout the coating thickness, as opposed to standard coatings which have larger grain sizes in the outer sections of the coating. Furthermore, the use of argon as the fluidizing gas and propylene as a carbon precursor, in addition to hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane, allowed the deposition of stoichiometric SiC coatings with refined microstructure at 1400 and 1300 deg. C. The deposition of SiC at lower deposition temperatures was also advantageous since the reduced heat treatment was not detrimental to the properties of the inner pyrolytic carbon which generally occurs when SiC is deposited at 1500 deg. C. The use of a chemical vapor deposition coater with four spouts allowed the deposition of uniform and spherical coatings.

  5. Scratch Behaviors of Cr-Coated Zr-Based Fuel Claddings for Accident-Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As the progression of Fukushima accident is worsened by the runaway reaction at a high temperature above 1200 .deg. C, it is essential to ensure the stabilities of coating layers on conventional Zr-based alloys during normal operations as well as severe accident conditions. This is because the failures of coating layer result in galvanic corrosion phenomenon by potential difference between coating layer and Zr alloy. Also, it is possible to damage the coating layer during handling and manufacturing process by contacting structural components of a fuel assembly. So, adhesion strength is one of the key factors determining the reliability of the coating layer on conventional Zr-based alloy. In this study, two kinds of Cr-coated Zr-based claddings were prepared using arc ion plating (AIP) and direct laser (DL) coating methods. The objective is to evaluate the scratch deformation behaviors of each coating layers on Zr alloys. Large area spallation below normal load of about 15 N appeared to be the predominant mode of failure in the AIP coating during scratch test. However, no tensile crack were found in entire stroke length. In DL coating, small plastic deformation and grooving behavior are more dominant scratching results. It was observed that the change of the slope of the COF curve did not coincide with the failure of coating layer.

  6. Xenon Defects in Uranium Dioxide From First Principles and Interatomic Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander

    In this thesis, we examine the defect energetics and migration energies of xenon atoms in uranium dioxide (UO2) from first principles and interatomic potentials. We also parameterize new, accurate interatomic potentials for xenon and uranium dioxide. To achieve accurate energetics and provide a foundation for subsequent calculations, we address difficulties in finding consistent energetics within Hubbard U corrected density functional theory (DFT+U). We propose a method of slowly ramping the U parameter in order to guide the calculation into low energy orbital occupations. We find that this method is successful for a variety of materials. We then examine the defect energetics of several noble gas atoms in UO2 for several different defect sites. We show that the energy to incorporate large noble gas atoms into interstitial sites is so large that it is energetically favorable for a Schottky defect cluster to be created to relieve the strain. We find that, thermodynamically, xenon will rarely ever be in the interstitial site of UO2. To study larger defects associated with the migration of xenon in UO 2, we turn to interatomic potentials. We benchmark several previously published potentials against DFT+U defect energetics and migration barriers. Using a combination of molecular dynamics and nudged elastic band calculations, we find a new, low energy migration pathway for xenon in UO2. We create a new potential for xenon that yields accurate defect energetics. We fit this new potential with a method we call Iterative Potential Refinement that parameterizes potentials to first principles data via a genetic algorithm. The potential finds accurate energetics for defects with relatively low amounts of strain (xenon in defect clusters). It is important to find accurate energetics for these sorts of low-strain defects because they essentially represent small xenon bubbles. Finally, we parameterize a new UO2 potential that simultaneously yields accurate vibrational properties

  7. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    , Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO 2 ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO 2 fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The nature of spent nuclear

  8. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    irradiation, Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO{sub 2} ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO{sub 2} and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO{sub 2} fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The

  9. Method of manufacturing sintered nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watarumi, Kazutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain composite pellets with an improved strength. Method: A core mainly composed of fuel materials is previously prepared, embedded into the central portion of a pellet, silted therearound with cladding material, and then pressmolded and sintered. For instance, a rugby-ball like core body with the maximum outer diameter of 6 mm and the height of 6 mm is made by compressive molding with uranium dioxide powder, then coating material comprising the same powder incorporated with 0.1 % by weight of SiC fibers is filled around the core body, which is molded into a composite pellet by means of pressing and then sintered at 1600 0 C, to obtain a sintered pellet of 93.5 % theoretical density. As the result of the compression test for the pellet, it showed a strength greater by 15 % than that of the similar mono-layer pellet. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Improved graphite matrix for coated-particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, D.H.; Davidson, K.V.

    1978-10-01

    An experimental process was developed to incorporate coated fuel particles in an extruded graphite matrix. This structure, containing 41 vol% particles, had a high matrix density, >1.6 g/cm 3 , and a matrix conductivity three to four times that of a pitch-injected fuel rod at 1775 K. Experiments were conducted to determine the uniformity of particle loadings in extrusions. Irradiation specimens were supplied for five tests in the High-Fluence Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  11. Surface coating Zr or Zr alloy nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaghy, R.E.; Sherman, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. (author)

  12. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Kuhn, E.; Ronesch, K.; Zoigner, A.

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-20, were distributed to 32 laboratories in January 1980 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 11 laboratories reported their results (ANNEX 1). 5 laboratories applied titration procedures, 4 of them applied methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure (1), 2 laboratories used controlled potential coulometry, 2 laboratories used precipitation procedures, 1 laboratory used fluorimetry and 1 laboratory used activation analysis. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 1.7% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -9.1% and +0.92% uranium, but 9 laboratories agree within +-1%U with the reference value. The mean bias of these 9 laboratories is equal to +0.04%U. The standard deviation of the biases of these 9 laboratories is equal to 0.36%.U

  13. Quantitative analysis of occluded gases in uranium dioxide pellets by the mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bustillos, J.O.W.; Rodrigues, C.; Iyer, S.S.

    1981-05-01

    A quantitative analysis of different components of occluded gases except water in uranium dioxide pellets is attempted here. A high temperature vacuum extration system is employed for the liberation and the determination of total volume of the occluded gases. A mass spectrometric technique is employed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these gases. The UO 2 pellets are placed in a graphite crucible and are subjected to varing temperatures (1000 0 C - 1700 0 C). The liberated gases are dehydrated and transferred to a measuring unit consisting essentially of a Toepler pump and a McLeod gauge. In this system the total volume of the gases liberated at N. T. P. is determined with a sensitivity of 0.002 cm 3 /g of UO 2 . An aliquot of the liberated gas is introduced into a quadrupole mass spectrometer (VGA-100 Varian Corp.) for the determination of the different components of the gas. On the basis of the analysis suggestions are made for the possible sources of these gas components. (Author) [pt

  14. Uranium dioxide thermal characterization by the flash laser method from 23 Celsius to 175 Celsius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeda, K.C.M.; Lameiras, F.S.; Carneiro, L.S.S.; Camarano, D.M.; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Flash Method has become one of the most common techniques for measuring thermal diffusivity and conductivity in solids and liquids. This method is recognized by INMETRO as standard to be used in Brazil for measuring thermophysical properties of materials, such as metals, carbon composites, ceramics, and also nuclear materials. This article describes the experimental bench of the LMPT-Laboratorio de Medicao de Propriedades Termofisicas de Combustiveis Nucleares e Materiais of the CDTN-Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, (LMPT), as well as the mathematical model developed based on this method. The obtained results for the thermal diffusivity and for the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (U0 2 ) pellets in the temperature range from 25 deg to 175 deg C, are discussed and compared with the literature data. The estimative of the input quantities uncertainty of the mathematical model was determined according to ISO - BIPM-Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and the Monte Carlo Method was used to estimate of the output quantities uncertainty (thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity). Additionally the results of the x-rays of these pellets are presented. (author)

  15. Properties of raw materials and intermediate products in the production of uranium dioxide sintered tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Vanecek, I.; Podest, M.

    1977-01-01

    The properties are described of ammonium polyuranate and of powder uranium dioxide. Ammonium polyuranate, an intermediate product, is prepared by filtering the precipitate from uranyl nitrate solution precipitation, this either by an ammonia aqueous solution from a uranyl nitrate aqueous solution or by direct U 6+ precipitation from a TBP kerosene solution by aqueous concentrated ammonia. With relation to further processing, the major properties of the intermediate product include grain size, shape and appearance of crystallites, structure and thermal decomposition. These properties affect the properties of UO 2 , the following intermediate product obtained by reduction of ammonium polyuranate. Powder UO 2 is the final intermediate product; high-compacted UO 2 pellets are manufactured from it by compacting and sintering. The final product properties are affected by the following parameters: specific surface, grain size and shape, U/O ratio and compactibility. The effect of and the techniques of determining these parameters are shown. The necessity is emphasised of studying the properties of powder ammonium polyuranate because changes in its production technology affect the properties of further products. (J.P.)

  16. The reaction of sintered aluminium products with uranium dioxide and monocarbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, T.; Knudsen, Per

    1965-01-01

    The compatibility of SAP 930 with uranium dioxide and uranium monocarbide was investigated in the temperature range 450–600° C. The results indicate that a severe reaction occurs between SAP 930 and UO2 within 8000 hours at 600° C, a slight reaction at 600° C for 1000 hours and after 11 900 hours...... at 525° C, and no reaction in 14 300 hours at 450° C. Of the three grades of UC tested (hot pressed, arc cast, cold pressed and sintered) the slightly substoichiometric, hot-pressed UC is judged to be least compatible with SAP 930, reaction occurring after 7300 hours at 450° C. No reaction was observed...... between SAP 930 and the other carbides at this temperature. All SAP−UC combinations are incompatible at 600° C for as little as 100 hours of heat treatment. Tests designed to study the effect of a diffusion barrier on the SAP−UC reaction have shown that anodized SAP 930 and the three uranium carbides...

  17. Measurement of uranium dioxide thermophysical properties by the laser flash method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Andrade, Roberto Marcio de

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ), including a reliable uncertainty assessment, are required by the nuclear reactor design. These important information are used by thermohydraulic codes to define operational aspects and to assure the safety, when analyzing various potential situations of accident. The laser flash method had become the most popular method to measure the thermophysical properties of materials. Despite its several advantages, some experimental obstacles have been found due to the difficulty to obtain experimentally the ideals initial and boundary conditions required by the original method. An experimental apparatus and a methodology for estimating uncertainties of thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat measurements based on the laser flash method are presented. A stochastic thermal diffusion modeling has been developed and validated by standard samples. Inverse heat conduction problems (IHCPs) solved by finite volumes technique were applied to the measurement process with real initial and boundary conditions, and Monte Carlo Method was used for propagating the uncertainties. The main sources of uncertainty were due to: pulse time, laser power, thermal exchanges, absorptivity, emissivity, sample thickness, specific mass and dynamic influence of temperature measurement system. As results, mean values and uncertainties of thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of UO 2 are presented. (author)

  18. Swelling and gas release of grain-boundary pores in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrire, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    The swelling and gas release of overpressured grain boundary pores is sintered unirradiated uranium dioxide were investigated under isothermal conditions. The pores became overpressured when the ambient pressure was reduced, and the excess pressure driving force caused growth and interconnection of the pores, leading to eventual gas release. Swelling was measured continuously by a linear variable differential transformer, and open and closed porosity fractions were determined after the tests by immersion density and quantitative microscopy measurements. The sinter porosity consisted of pores situated on grain faces, grain edges, and grain corners. Isolated pores maintained their equilibrium shape while growing, without any measurable change in dihedral angle. Interconnection occurred predominantly along grain edges, without any evidence of pore sharpening or crack propagation at low driving forces. Extensive open porosity occurred at a threshold density of about 85% TD. There was an almost linear dependence of the initial swelling rate on the driving force, with an activation energy of 200+- 8 kJ/mole, in good agreement with published values of the activation energy for grain boundary diffusion

  19. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Y., E-mail: sasajima@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Shirakata 162-4, Tokai 319-1106 (Japan); Osada, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Ishikawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen-cho 1-1, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R{sub a} was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS{sub e}, i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S{sub e}: electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R{sub a} and gS{sub e} follows the relation R{sub a}{sup 2}=aln(gS{sub e})+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms.

  20. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Y.; Osada, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R a was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS e , i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S e : electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R a and gS e follows the relation R a 2 =aln(gS e )+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms

  1. Laboratory sol-gel preparation of fine fraction of sintered uranium dioxide spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Tympl, M.

    1984-01-01

    The results are summed up of the laboratory investigation of preparing the fine fraction of sintered uranium dioxide particles from uranyl gel using the method of the mixed reactor and the method of the dual-liquid nozzle, processed by leaching, drying, calcination and sintering. None of the two methods provides monodispersion particles under the given conditions but better control of the throughflow of the liquid media may improve results. Leaching of the fine fraction is very quick and the leaching of most components takes no longer than 5 minutes. In view of the fact that leaching of all components does not proceed at the same rate it is recommended that leaching time be doubled, or that leaching take place in two stages. Azeotropic distillation with chlorinated hydrocarbons is a favourable procedure for obtaining quality material; it is, however, necessary to prevent dried particles from comino. into contact with the water phase condensing on the walls of the distillation vessel and running down onto the surface of the distilling mixture. Calcination at a temperature of 500 degC in a thin layer and sintering at temperatures between 1350 and 1550 degC at an adequate rate of inflow of gaseous media and adequate rate of outflow of reaction wastes results in the production of high quality material whose density exceeds 97 to 98% theoretical density. (author)

  2. Heat processing of gels into sintered uranium dioxide modelled by thermal analysis. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Urbanek, V.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoanalytical methods were used for investigating the processes of air drying and calcination of gels prepared by internal gelation of uranyl nitrate, urea and urotropine solutions at 90 degC. The gels were dried in air at room temperature, at 220 degC in a controlled atmosphere or by azeotropic distillation with CCl 4 . The course of thermal decomposition of the gel depends not only on the drying method used but also on the medium in which the drying process takes place. If the drying is carried out so as to produce a macroporous structure after the elimination of most of the water, ammonia and possibly other gelation by-products and non-reacted gelating agents, the resulting gels can be further processed by calcination, reduction and sintering, thus obtaining compact undamaged spheres of sintered uranium dioxide. Dilatometric analysis generated of uranium trioxide gels showed that the transformation of UO 3 to U 3 O 8 generated another intermediate thermal decomposition product showing a change in dimensions at temperatures of about 520 degC and a change in colour. This phenomenon is analogous to the decomposition of UO 3 prepared by thermal decomposition of α-UO 3 .2H 2 O involving a change in weight producing the UOsub(3-x) compound or a phase transformation with a change in colour; the structural conversion cannot be identified by X-ray structural analysis. (author)

  3. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Kuhn, E.; Zoigner, A.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-10, were distributed to 27 laboratories in February 1979 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 7 laboratories reported their results. 6 laboratories applied titration procedures, 4 of them applied methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure (1), and one laboratory used controlled potential coulometry. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 0.10% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -0.48% and +0.87% uranium, but 5 laboratories agree within +-0.25% U with the reference value. The biases of 5 laboratories are greater than expected from their random errors. The mean bias of the 7 laboratories is equal to +0.03% U. The standard deviation of the laboratory biases is equal to 0.43% U. (author)

  4. The influence of alkali metal impurities on the uranium dioxide hydrofluorination reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponelis, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect alkali metal impurities (sodium and potassium) in the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) feed material have on the conversion to uraniumtetrafluoride (UF 4 ) was examined. A direct correlation exists between impurity level and sintering with concomitant reduced conversion. The sintering mechanism is attributable to decreased specific surface area. The typical 'die-off' of reaction or conversion can be explained in terms of increased particle growth rather than an arbitray zero porosity function. Hydrofluorination temperatures varied from 250 to 650 degrees C using pellets varying in size from 0.42 mm to 10 mm. Scanning electron microscope photographs show clearly the particle or grain growth in the pellet as well as the increased size with impurity level. A new dimensionless constant, N KP , is defined to facilitate explanation of the reaction as a function of pellet radius. N KP is defined as the ratio of pellet diffusion resistance to particle diffusion resistance of the reacting HF gas. At high values of this number (N KP >40) the conversion is limited to the outer periphery of the pellet while at low values (N KP KP at higher reaction temperatures which means that the particle diffusion resistance increases with increasing impurity level and results in easier sintering of these materials. 53 refs., 206 figs., 94 tabs

  5. Monte Carlo criticality analysis of simple geometries containing tungsten-rhenium alloys engrained with uranium dioxide and uranium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jonathan A.; Charit, Indrajit

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The addition of rhenium to the tungsten matrix within W-UO 2 and W-UN CERMET materials can help reduce the risk of submersion criticality accidents while increasing the strength and ductility of tungsten based nuclear fuel elements. → The addition of rhenium up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UO 2 mixtures can increase the critical mass by 65 kg. → The addition of rhenium up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UN mixtures can increase the critical mass by 22 kg. → The addition of rhenium by up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UO 2 mixtures can reduce the change in reactivity change due to water submersion by $5.07. → The addition of rhenium by up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UN mixtures can reduce the change in reactivity due to water submersion by $3.24. - Abstract: The critical mass and dimensions of simple geometries containing highly enriched uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and uranium mononitride (UN) encapsulated in tungsten-rhenium alloys are determined using MCNP5 criticality calculations. Spheres as well as cylinders with length to radius ratios of 1.82 are computationally built to consist of 60 vol.% fuel and 40 vol.% metal matrix. Within the geometries, the uranium is enriched to 93 wt.% uranium-235 and the rhenium content within the metal alloy was modeled over the range of 0-30 at.%. The spheres containing UO 2 were determined to have a critical radius of 18.29-19.11 cm and a critical mass ranging from 366 kg to 424 kg. The cylinders containing UO 2 were found to have a critical radius ranging from 17.07 cm to 17.84 cm with a corresponding critical mass of 406-471 kg. Spheres engrained with UN were determined to have a critical radius ranging from 14.82 cm to 15.19 cm and a critical mass between 222 kg and 242 kg. Cylinders which were engrained with UN were determined to have a critical radius ranging from 13.81 cm to 14.15 cm and a corresponding critical mass of 245-267 kg. The critical

  6. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz [Research Center Julich (FZJ), Julich (Germany); Kendall, James M. [Global Virtual L1c, Prescott (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be{exclamation_point} It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10{sup -4} initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine

  7. Coated particle fuel for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, Karl; Nabielek, Heinz; Kendall, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Roy Huddle, having invented the coated particle in Harwell 1957, stated in the early 1970s that we know now everything about particles and coatings and should be going over to deal with other problems. This was on the occasion of the Dragon fuel performance information meeting London 1973: How wrong a genius be! It took until 1978 that really good particles were made in Germany, then during the Japanese HTTR production in the 1990s and finally the Chinese 2000-2001 campaign for HTR-10. Here, we present a review of history and present status. Today, good fuel is measured by different standards from the seventies: where 9 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was typical for early AVR carbide fuel and 3 x 10 -4 initial free heavy metal fraction was acceptable for oxide fuel in THTR, we insist on values more than an order of magnitude below this value today. Half a percent of particle failure at the end-of-irradiation, another ancient standard, is not even acceptable today, even for the most severe accidents. While legislation and licensing has not changed, one of the reasons we insist on these improvements is the preference for passive systems rather than active controls of earlier times. After renewed HTGR interest, we are reporting about the start of new or reactivated coated particle work in several parts of the world, considering the aspects of designs/traditional and new materials, manufacturing technologies/ quality control/ quality assurance, irradiation and accident performance, modeling and performance predictions, and fuel cycle aspects and spent fuel treatment. In very general terms, the coated particle should be strong, reliable, retentive, and affordable. These properties have to be quantified and will be eventually optimized for a specific application system. Results obtained so far indicate that the same particle can be used for steam cycle applications with 700-750 .deg. C helium coolant gas exit, for gas turbine applications at 850-900 .deg. C

  8. Aluminum hydroxide coating thickness measurements and brushing tests on K West Basin fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminum hydroxide coating thicknesses were measured on fuel elements stored in aluminum canisters in K West Basin using specially developed eddy current probes . The results were used to estimate coating inventories for MCO fuel,loading. Brushing tests successfully demonstrated the ability to remove the coating if deemed necessary prior to MCO loading

  9. WWER-1000 nuclear fuel manufacturing process at PJSC MSZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morylev, A.; Bagdatyeva, E.; Aksenov, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this report a brief description of WWER-1000 fuel manufacturing process steps at PJSC MSZ as: uranium dioxide powder fabrication; fuel pellet manufacture fuel rod manufacture working assembly and fuel assembly manufacture is given. The implemented innovations are also presented

  10. Application of Ceramic Bond Coating for Reusable Melting Crucible of Metallic Fuel Slugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Ko, Young-Mo; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ki-Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel slugs of the driver fuel assembly have been fabricated by injection casting of the fuel alloys under a vacuum state or an inert atmosphere. Traditionally, metal fuel such as a U-Zr alloy system for SFR has been melted in slurry-coated graphite crucibles and cast in slurry-coated quartz tube molds to prevent melt/material interactions. Reactive coatings and porous coatings can be a source of melt contaminations, and fuel losses, respectively. Ceramic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TaC coating materials showed no penetration in the protective layer after a melt dipping test. However, the ceramic coating materials showed separations in the coating interface between the substrate and coating layer, or between the coating layer and fuel melt after the dipping test. All plasma-spray coated methods maintained a sound coating state after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr melt. A single coating Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(150) layer and double coating layer of TaC(50)-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100), showed a sound state or little penetration in the protective layer after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE melt. Injection casting experiments of U-10wt.%Zr and U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been performed to investigate the feasibility of a reusable crucible of the metal fuel slugs. U–10wt.%Zr and U–10wt.%Zr–5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been soundly fabricated without significant interactions of the graphite crucibles. Thus, the ceramic plasma-spray coatings are thought to be promising candidate coating methods for a reusable graphite crucible to fabricate metal fuel slugs.

  11. A new characterization approach for studying relationships between microstructure and creep damage mechanisms of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iltis, X., E-mail: xaviere.iltis@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ben Saada, M. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire d' Etudes des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Mansour, H.; Gey, N.; Hazotte, A.; Maloufi, N. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France)

    2016-06-15

    Four batches of UO{sub 2} pellets were studied comparatively, before and after creep tests, to evaluate a characterization methodology aimed to determine the links between microstructure and damage mechanisms induced by compressive creep of uranium dioxide at 1500 °C. They were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with image analysis, to quantify their fabrication porosity and the occurrence of inter-granular cavities after creep, and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), especially to characterize sub-structures development associated with plastic deformation. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) was also applied to evidence dislocations, at an exploratory stage, on one of the deformed pellets. This approach helped to identify and quantify microstructural differences between batches. Their as-fabricated microstructures differed in terms of grain size and fabrication porosity distribution. The pellets which had the lowest strain rates were those with the largest number of intra-granular pores, regardless of their grain size. They also exhibited less numerous sub-boundaries within the grains. These first results clearly illustrate the benefit of systematic examinations of crept UO{sub 2} pellets at a mesoscopic scale, by SEM and EBSD, to study their deformation process. In addition, ECCI appears as a powerful tool to evidence local dislocations arrangements, in bulk samples. Even if the sampling was limited, the results of this study also tend to indicate that the intra-granular pores population, resulting from the manufacturing of the samples by powder metallurgy, could have a significant influence on the UO{sub 2} viscoplastic deformation mechanisms. - Highlights: • Four different UO{sub 2} pellets batches are microstructurally compared, before and after compression creep tests. • Development of sub-boundaries within the original grains, in crept samples, is quantified by EBSD. • Links are observed between the intra

  12. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic study of hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide was performed between 375 and 475 C under partial pressures of HF between 42 and 720 mbar. The reaction was followed by thermogravimetry in isothermal and isobaric conditions. The kinetic data obtained coupled with a characterization of the powder before, during and after reaction by SEM, EDS, BET and XRD showed that the powder grains of UO 2 are transformed according a model of instantaneous germination, anisotropic growth and internal development. The rate limiting step of the growth process is the diffusion of HF in the UF 4 layer. A mechanism of growth of the UF 4 layer has been proposed. In the temperature and pressure range studied, the reaction is of first order with respect to HF and follows an Arrhenius law. A rate equation was determined and used to perform kinetic simulations which have shown a very good correlation with experience. Coupling of this rate equation with heat and mass transport phenomena allowed to perform simulations at the scale of a powder's agglomerate. They have shown that some structures of agglomerates influence the rate of diffusion of the gases in the porous medium and thereby influence the reaction rate. Finally kinetic simulations on powder's beds and pellets were carried out and compared with experimental rates. The experimental and simulated kinetic curves have the same paces, but improvements in the simulations are needed to accurately predict rates: the coupling between the three scales (grain, agglomerate, oven) would be a good example. (author) [fr

  13. Creep of uranium dioxide: bending test and mechanical behaviour; Etude du fluage du dioxyde d'uranium: caracterisation par essais de flexion et modelisation mecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, Ch

    2003-09-01

    These PhD work in the frame of Pellet-Cladding Interactions studies, in the fuel assemblies of nuclear plants. Electricite de France (EDF) must well demonstrate and insure the integrity of the cladding. For that purpose, the viscoplastic behaviour of the nuclear fuel has to be known and, if possible, controlled. This PhD work aimed to characterize the creep of uranium dioxide, in conditions of transient power regime. First, a literature survey on mechanical behaviour of UO{sub 2} revealed that the ceramic was essentially studied with compressive tests, and that its creep behaviour is characterized by two domains, depending on the stress level. To estimate the loadings in a fuel pellet, EDF and CEA developed specific global codes. A simulation during a power ramp allowed the order of magnitude of the loadings in the pellet to be determined (temperature, thermal gradients, strains, strain rate...). The stress calculation using a finite element simulation requires the identification of behaviour laws, able to describe the behaviour under small strains, low strain rates, and under tensile stresses. Starting from this observation, three point bending method has been chosen to test the uranium dioxide. As, for representativeness reasons, testing specimens cut in actual fuel pads was required in our study; a ten millimeters span has been used. For this study, a specific three-point testing device has been developed, that can tests specimens up to 2 000 C in a controlled atmosphere (Ar + 5% H{sub 2}). A special care has been taken for the measurement of the deflexion of the sample, which is measured using a laser beam, that allow an accuracy of {+-}2{mu}m to be reached at high temperature. Specimens with 0,5 to 1 mm thickness have been tested using this jig. A Norton's law describe, with respective stress exponent and activation energy values of 1.73 and 540 kJ.mole-1, provided a good description of the stationary creep rate. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the fuel

  14. Production method of burnable poison incorporated fuel pellet by coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Naoyoshi.

    1993-01-01

    A cylindrical member is formed with an organic material which is melted, decomposed or evaporated by heating. Such organic materials include polyethylene and polyvinyl alcohol, for example. A predetermined amount of burnable poisons are homogeneously incorporated in the cylindrical member by a means, such as melting before fabricating it into a cylindrical shape. UO 2 fuel pellets are inserted to the cylindrical member and heated, to scatter only the organic materials, so that non-volatile burnable poisons are homogeneously left on the surface of the pellets. It is preferred that the cylindrical member having pellets inserted therein is inserted to a cladding tube and applied with a heat treatment. With such procedures, a UO 2 pellet is coated with burnable poisons by a convenient and compact device. In addition, grinding step after the coating is unnecessary. (I.N.)

  15. Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploger, Scott A., E-mail: scott.ploger@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Demkowicz, Paul A. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3855 (United States); Hunn, John D.; Kehn, Jay S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6093 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 × 10{sup 5} total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer–IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer–IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyC–SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyC–SiC debonds.

  16. Effect of chloride concentration on the solubility of amorphous uranium dioxide at 25deg C under reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, M.; Casas, I.; Pablo, J. de; Torrero, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of the solubility of a microcrystalline uranium dioxide on the chloride concentration has been studied at 25deg C under reducing conditions. The concentration of uranium in solution has been found to be some orders of magnitude lower than in perchlorate media. Possible changes of both the morphology and the composition of the solid phase have been investigated by means of Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and X-ray Powder Difraction (XPD). The formation of a secondary solid phase as a reason for the decrease of the solubility has been postulated. (orig.)

  17. Thermochemical equilibrium in a kernel of a UN TRISO coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Jo, C. K.; Lim, H. S.; Cho, M. S.; Lee, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    A coated fuel particle (CFP) with a uranium mononitride (UN) kernel has been recently considered as an advanced fuel option, such as in fully ceramic micro encapsulated (FCM) replacement fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). In FCM fuel, a large number of tri isotropic coated fuel particles (TRISOs) are embedded in a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix. Thermochemical equilibrium calculations can predict the chemical behaviors of a kernel in a TRISO of FCM fuel during irradiation. They give information on the kind and quantity of gases generated in a kernel during irradiation. This study treats the quantitative analysis of thermochemical equilibrium in a UN TRISO of FCM LWR fuel using HSC software

  18. Phenomena in thermal transport in fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernatynskiy, A.; Tulenko, J.S.; Phillpot, S.R.; El-Azab, A.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport in nuclear fuels is a key performance metric that affects not only the power output, but is also an important consideration in potential accident situations. While the fundamental theory of the thermal transport in crystalline solids was extensively developed in the 1950's and 1960's, the pertinent analytic approaches contained significant simplifications of the physical processes. While these approaches enabled estimates of the thermal conductivity in bulk materials with microstructure, they were not comprehensive enough to provide the detailed guidance needed for the in-pile fuel performance. Rather, this guidance has come from data painfully accumulated over 50 years of experiments on irradiated uranium dioxide, the most widely used nuclear fuel. At this point, a fundamental theoretical understanding of the interplay between the microstructure and thermal conductivity of irradiated uranium dioxide fuel is still lacking. In this chapter, recent advances are summarised in the modelling approaches for thermal transport of uranium dioxide fuel. Being computational in nature, these modelling approaches can, at least in principle, describe in detail virtually all mechanisms affecting thermal transport at the atomistic level, while permitting the coupling of the atomistic-level simulations to the mesoscale continuum theory and thus enable the capture of the impact of microstructural evolution in fuel on thermal transport. While the subject of current studies is uranium dioxide, potential applications of the methods described in this chapter extend to the thermal performance of other fuel forms. (authors)

  19. Coating Thickness Measurement of the Simulated TRISO-Coated Fuel Particles using an Image Plate and a High Resolution Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Yeon Ku; Jeong, Kyung Chai; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Bong Goo; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Young Min; Yeo, Sung Hwan; Cho, Moon Sung

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the thickness of the coating layers of 196 coated particles was measured using an Image Plate detector, high resolution scanner and digital image processing techniques. The experimental results are as follows. - An X-ray image was acquired for 196 simulated TRISO-coated fuel particles with ZrO 2 kernel using an Image Plate with high resolution in a reduced amount of time. - We could observe clear boundaries between coating layers for 196 particles. - The geometric distortion error was compensated for the calculation. - The coating thickness of the TRISO-coated fuel particles can be nondestructively measured using X-ray radiography and digital image processing technology. - We can increase the number of TRISO-coated particles to be inspected by increasing the number of Image Plate detectors. A TRISO-coated fuel particle for an HTGR (high temperature gas-cooled reactor) is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The coating layers consist of buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon), inner PyC (I-PyC), SiC, and outer PyC (O-PyC) layer. The coating thickness is measured to evaluate the soundness of the coating layers. X-ray radiography is one of the nondestructive alternatives for measuring the coating thickness without generating a radioactive waste. Several billion particles are subject to be loaded in a reactor. A lot of sample particles should be tested as much as possible. The acquired X-ray images for the measurement of coating thickness have included a small number of particles because of the restricted resolution and size of the X-ray detector. We tried to test many particles for an X-ray exposure to reduce the measurement time. In this experiment, an X-ray image was acquired for 196 simulated TRISO-coated fuel particles using an image plate and high resolution scanner with a pixel size of 25Χ25 μm 2 . The coating thickness for the particles could be measured on the image

  20. Radiation resistant polymers and coatings for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Mallika, C.; Lawrence, Falix

    2014-01-01

    Polymer based materials are extensively used in the nuclear industry for the reprocessing of spent fuels in highly radioactive and corrosive environment. Hence, these polymer materials are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation, resulting in the degradation in properties. Polymers containing aromatic molecules generally possess higher resistance to radiation degradation than the aliphatic polymers. For improving the radiation resistance of polymers various methods are reported in the literature. Among the aromatic polymers, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has the radiation tolerance up to 10 Mega Grey (MGy). To explore the possibility of enhancing the radiation resistance of PEEK, a study was initiated to develop PEEK - ceramic composites and evaluate the effect of radiation on the properties of the composites. PEEK and PEEK - alumina (micron size) composites were irradiated in a gamma chamber using 60 Co source and the degradation in mechanical, structural, electrical and thermal properties, gel fraction, coefficient of friction and morphology were investigated. The degradation in the mechanical properties owing to radiation could be reduced by adding alumina filler to PEEK. Nano alumina filler was observed to be more effective in suppressing the damage caused by radiation on the polymer, when compared to micron alumina filler. For the protection of aluminium components in the manipulators and the rotors and stators of the motors of the centrifugal extractors employed in the plant from the attack by nitric acid vapour, PEEK coating based on liquid dispersion was developed, which has resistance to radiation, chemicals and wear. The effect of radiation and chemical vapour on the properties of the PEEK coating was estimated. The performance of the coating in the plant was evaluated and the coating was found to give adequate protection to the motors of centrifugal extractors against corrosion. (author)

  1. Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

  2. The failure mechanisms of HTR coated particle fuel and computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; Liu Bing; Shao Youlin; Liang Tongxiang; Tang Chunhe

    2010-01-01

    The basic constituent unit of fuel element in HTR is ceramic coated particle fuel. And the performance of coated particle fuel determines the safety of HTR. In addition to the traditional detection of radiation experiments, establishing computer code is of great significance to the research. This paper mainly introduces the structure and the failure mechanism of TRISO-coated particle fuel, as well as a few basic assumptions,principles and characteristics of some existed main overseas codes. Meanwhile, this paper has proposed direction of future research by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of several computer codes. (authors)

  3. Protective Coatings for Wet Storage of Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; Souza, J.A. De; Ramanathan, L.V. [Materials science and Technology Center, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion protection of spent RR fuel for long term wet storage was considered important, primarily from the safety standpoint and the use of conversion coatings was proposed in 2008. This paper presents the results of: (a) on-going field tests in which un-coated and lanthanide-based conversion coated Al alloy coupons were exposed to the IEA-R1 reactor spent fuel basin for durations of up to a year; (b) preparation of cerium modified hydrotalcite coatings and cerium sealed boehmite coatings on AA 6061 alloy; (c) corrosion resistance of coated specimens in NaCl solutions. The field studies indicated that the oxidized and cerium dioxide coated coupons were the most corrosion resistant. The cerium modified hydrotalcite and cerium sealed boehmite coated specimens showed marked increase in pitting corrosion resistance. (author)

  4. Study on coating layer of ceramic materials for SFR fuel slugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jonghwan; Kim, Kihwan; Ko, Youngmo; Woo, Yoonmyung; Lee, Chanbock

    2013-01-01

    The plasma-sprayed coating can provide the crucible with a denser, more durable, coating layer, compared with the more friable coating layer formed by slurry-coating. Plasma-sprayed coatings are consolidated by mechanical interlocking of the molten particles impacting on the substrate and are dense by the heat applied by the plasma. The objective of this study is to develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with the U-Zr/U-TRU-Zr fuels. Reducing these interactions will result in a fuel loss reduction. According to coating and U-Zr interaction results preformed in previous experience, Y 2 O 3 , TiC, and TaC coating materials were selected as promising coating materials Various combinations of coating conditions such as; coating thickness, double multi-layer coating methods were investigated to find the bonding effect on the substrate in pursuit of more effective ways to withstand the thermal stresses. To develop a coating method and material for crucibles to prevent material interactions with U-TRU-Zr fuels, the refractory coating was performed using vacuum plasma-sprayed method onto niobium rod. The various combinations of coating conditions such as; coating thickness, double multi-layer coating methods were investigated to find the bonding effect to withstand the thermal stress. Most of coating method samples did not maintain integrity in the U-Zr-RE melt because of the cracks or the microcracks of the coating layer, presumably formed from the thermal expansion difference. Only the double-layer coated rod with TaC and Y 2 O 3 powders, which is, which consists of vacuum plasma-sprayed TaC bond coating with the coating thickness of 100μm onto niobium rod and vacuum plasma-sprayed Y 2 O 3 coating with the coating thickness of 100μm on the top of the bond coating layer, survived the 2 cycles dipping test of U-Zr-RE melt this is likely caused by good adhesion of the TaC coating onto the niobium rod and the chemical inertness

  5. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO 2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  6. Improvement of cesium retention in uranium dioxide by additional phases; Amelioration de la retention du cesium dans le dioxyde d`uranium au moyen de phases exogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamaury Dubois, S

    1995-09-19

    The objective of this study is to improve the cesium retention in nuclear fuel. A bibliographic survey indicates that cesium is rapidly released from uranium dioxide in an accident condition. At temperatures higher than 1500 deg C or in oxidising conditions, our experiments show the difficulty of maintaining cesium inside simulated fuel. Two ternary systems are potentially interesting for the retention of cesium and to reduce the kinetics of release from the fuel: Cs{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} et Cs{sub 2}O-ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 2}. The compounds CsAISi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}ZrSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} were studied from 1200 deg C to 2000 deg C by thermogravimetric analysis. The volumetric diffusion coefficients of cesium in these structures, in solid state as well as in liquid one, were measured. A fuel was sintered with (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + SiO{sub 2}) or (ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}) and the intergranular phase was characterized. In the presence of (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + SiO{sub 2}), the sintering is realized at 1610 deg C in H{sub 2}. It is a liquid phase sintering. On the other end, with (ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}), the sintering is a low temperature one in oxidising atmosphere. Finally, cesium containing simulated fuels were produced with these additives. According to the effective diffusion coefficients that were measured, the additives improved the retention of cesium. We have predicted the improvement that could be hoped for in a nuclear reactor, depending on the dispersion of the intergranular additives, the temperature and the degree of oxidation of the UO{sub 2+x}. We wait for a factor of 2 for x=0 and more than 8 for x=0.05, up to 2000 deg C. (author). 148 refs., 122 figs., 34 tabs.

  7. Mass-spectrometric determination in individual coated HTR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigl, A.

    1976-11-01

    A method is described which allows the simultaneous determination of fission and reaction gases in individual coated particles at temperatures up to 2000 0 C. The particles are heated under high-vacuum in a micro resistance-furnace up to the desired temperature. After preselected times the particles are crushed by action of a pneumatic cylinder. The gases liberated are fed into a quadrupoleanalyzer where they are analyzed in a dynamic mode. A peak selector allows the simultaneous measurement of up to four gases. The method is used routinely for the determination of fission gases (Kr and Xe) and of carbon monoxide which is formed as a reaction gas from oxide fuel. Precision and accuracy are in the order of a few percent. Detection limits for routine measurements are about 10 -7 cm 3 (STP) for KR and Xe and 2 x 10 -5 cm 3 (STP) for CO but can be lowered by special techniques. (author)

  8. Some calculations of the failure statistics of coated fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.G.; Hobbs, J.E.

    1977-03-01

    Statistical variations of coated fuel particle parameters were considered in stress model calculations and the resulting particle failure fraction versus burn-up evaluated. Variations in the following parameters were considered simultaneously: kernel diameter and porosity, thickness of the buffer, seal, silicon carbide and inner and outer pyrocarbon layers, which were all assumed to be normally distributed, and the silicon carbide fracture stress which was assumed to follow a Weibull distribution. Two methods, based respectively on random sampling and convolution of the variations were employed and applied to particles manufactured by Dragon Project and RFL Springfields. Convolution calculations proved the more satisfactory. In the present calculations variations in the silicon carbide fracture stress caused the greatest spread in burn-up for a given change in failure fraction; kernel porosity is the next most important parameter. (author)

  9. Roll-to-roll coated PBI membranes for high temperature PEM fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenberg, Thomas; Hjuler, Hans Aage; Terkelsen, Carina

    2012-01-01

    We employed roll-to-roll coating in the preparation of 40 μm thick poly[2,2′(m-phenylene)-5,5′bibenzimidazole] (PBI) films for fuel cells using both knife-coating (KC) and slot-die (SD) coating. The films were coated directly from a 9% (w/w) solution of PBI in dimethylacetamide onto a sacrificial...

  10. Nuclear fuel rod with burnable plate and pellet-clad interaction fix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel rod comprising a metallic tubular cladding containing nuclear fuel pellets, the pellets containing enriched uranium-235. The improvement described here comprises: ceramic wafers, each wafter comprising a sintered mixture of gadolinium oxide and uranium dioxide, the uranium oxide having no more uranium-235 than is present in natural uranium dioxide. Each of the wafers is axially disposed between a major portion of adjacent the nuclear fuel pellets, whereby the wafers freeze out volatile fission products produced by the nuclear fuel and prevent interaction of the fission products with the metallic tubing cladding

  11. Ceramic Materials Selection of Fuel Crucibles based on Plasma Spray Coating for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jonghwan; Kim, Hyungtae; Ko, Youngmo; Woo, Yoonmyung; Oh, Seokjin; Kim, Kihwan; Lee, Chanbock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The plasma-sprayed coating can provide the crucible with a denser, more friable coating layer, compared with the more friable coating layer formed by slurry-coating, which was used to prevent the interaction between melt and crucibles. Plasma-sprayed coatings are consolidated by mechanical interlocking of the molten particles impacting on the substrate and are dense by the heat applied by the plasma. The increased coating density is advantageous because it should not require frequent re coating and U-Zr melt penetration through the protective layer is more difficult in a dense coating than in a porous coating. In this study, we used Vacuum Plasma Spray method to investigate permanent coatings for re-usable crucibles for melting and casting of metallic fuel onto niobium substrates. Niobium was selected as a substrate because of its refractory nature and the coefficient of thermal expansion is similar to that of many of the candidate materials. After the HfC, ZrC, TiC, TaC, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 8% YSZ coatings were applied the resulting microstructure and chemical compositions was characterized to find the optimum process conditions for coating. Thermal plasma-sprayed coatings of refractory materials can be applied to develop a re-usable crucible coating for metallic fuel, such as the U-Zr alloy proposed for sodium cooled fast reactors.

  12. Investigating the structural changes of uranium dioxide dependent on additives, Phase I - Uranium-oxide system from structural-phase aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manojlovic, Lj.

    1962-12-01

    Having in mind the complex structure of the system uranium-oxygen, and that experimental studies of this system lead to controversial conclusions, an extensive review and analysis of the papers published on this subject were needed. This review wold be very useful for interpreting the expected structural changes of the uranium dioxide dependent on the additives

  13. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopic study of the adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, J.G.; Moers, H.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been investigated at 25 0 C. Clean surfaces were prepared in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopies (AES). Adsorption of I 2 was studied for exposures up to 100 langmuirs (1 langmuir = 10 -6 torr s) on uranium metal and to 75 langmuirs on uranium dioxide. Above about 2-langmuir I 2 exposure on uranium, spectroscopic evidence is obtained to indicate the beginning of UI 3 formation. Saturation coverage for I 2 adsorption on uranium dioxide occurs at approximately 10-15 langmuirs. Analysis of the XPS and AES results as well as studies of spectra as a function of temperature lead to the conclusions that a dissociative chemisorption/reaction process occurs on uranium metal while nondissociative adsorption occurs on uranium dioxide. Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extra-atomic relaxation processes. 42 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Method and device to produce pourable, directly pressable uranium dioxide powder. Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Herstellung von rieselfaehigem, direkt verpressbarem Urandioxid-Pulver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, P.; Isensee, H.J.; Vietzke, H.

    1978-08-17

    The uranium dioxide powder is produced from uranium peroxide which is obtained by continuous precipitation of uranyl nitrate solutions. By varying the precipitation conditions, one can exactly adjust the desired properties of the UO/sub 2/ powder, there is no 'post sintering'. The individual process steps are shown in detail.

  15. Uranium dispersion in the coating of weak-acid-resin-deprived HTGR fuel microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.W.; Beatty, R.L.; Tennery, V.J.; Lackey, W.J. Jr.

    1976-02-01

    The current reference HTGR recycle fuel particle is a UO 2 /UC 2 kernel with a Triso coating comprising a low-density pyrocarbon (PyC) buffer, a high-density PyC inner LTI coating, SiC, and a high-density PyC outer LTI. The kernel is fabricated from a weak-acid ion exchange resin (WAR). Microradiographic examination of coated WAR particles has demonstrated that considerable U can be transferred from the kernel to the buffer coating during fabrication. Investigation of causes of fuel dispersion has indicated several different factors that contribute to fuel redistribution if not properly controlled. The presence of a nonequilibrium UC/sub 1-x/O/sub x/ (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.3) phase had no significant effect on initiating fuel dispersion. Gross exposure of the completed fuel kernel to ambient atmosphere or to water vapor at room temperature produced very minimal levels of dispersion. Exposure of the fuel to perchloroethylene during buffer and inner LTI deposition produced massive redistribution. Fuel redistribution observed in Triso-coated particles results from permeation of the inner LTI by HCl during SiC deposition. As the decomposition of CH 3 Cl 3 Si is used to deposit SiC, chlorine is readily available during this process. The permeability of the inner LTI coating has a marked effect on the extent of this mode of fuel dispersion. LTI permeability was determined by chlorine leaching studies to be a strong function of density, coating gas dilution, and coating temperature but relatively unaffected by application of a seal coat, variations in coating thickness, and annealing at 1800 0 C. Mechanical attrition of the kernels during processing was identified as a potential source of U-bearing fines that may be incorporated into the coating in some circumstances

  16. Etching of uranium dioxide in nitrogen trifluoride RF plasma glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, John Mark

    1999-10-01

    A series of room temperature, low pressure (10.8 to 40 Pa), low power (25 to 210 W) RF plasma glow discharge experiments with UO2 were conducted to demonstrate that plasma treatment is a viable method for decontaminating UO2 from stainless steel substrates. Experiments were conducted using NF3 gas to decontaminate depleted uranium dioxide from stainless-steel substrates. Results demonstrated that UO2 can be completely removed from stainless-steel substrates after several minutes processing at under 200 W. At 180 W and 32.7 Pa gas pressure, over 99% of all UO2 in the samples was removed in just 17 minutes. The initial etch rate in the experiments ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 mum/min. Etching increased with the plasma absorbed power and feed gas pressure in the range of 10.8 to 40 Pa. A different pressure effect on UO2 etching was also noted below 50 W in which etching increased up to a maximum pressure, ˜23 Pa, then decreased with further increases in pressure. A computer simulation, CHEMKIN, was applied to predict the NF3 plasma species in the experiments. The code was validated first by comparing its predictions of the NF3 plasma species with mass spectroscopy etching experiments of silicon. The code predictions were within +/-5% of the measured species concentrations. The F atom radicals were identified as the primary etchant species, diffusing from the bulk plasma to the UO2 surface and reacting to form a volatile UF6, which desorbed into the gas phase to be pumped away. Ions created in the plasma were too low in concentration to have a major effect on etching, but can enhance the etch rate by removing non-volatile reaction products blocking the reaction of F with UO2. The composition of these non-volatile products were determined based on thermodynamic analysis and the electronic structure of uranium. Analysis identified possible non-volatile products as the uranium fluorides, UF2-5, and certain uranium oxyfluorides UO2F, UO2F2, UOF3, and UOF 4 which form over the

  17. Testing of reactor fuel materials using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.T.F.C.

    1978-01-01

    The tests presented here apply to: the quantitative determination of uranium in the core of fuel element plates by the detection of the number of neutrons produced in photo induced reactions in uranium; the determination of 235 U proportion in uranium dioxide samples, in the form of uranyl nitrate, by the technique of the detection of tracks produced by fission fragments and in pellet samples by passive gamma spectrometry and the checking of uranium homogenization distribution in fuel plates and uranium dioxide pellets. (Author) [pt

  18. Underwater Coatings Testing for INEEL Fuel Basin Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julia L. Tripp

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature

  19. Underwater Coatings Testing for INEEL Fuel Basin Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia L. Tripp

    2004-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included (1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; (2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; (3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and (4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55 F to 80 F dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature.

  20. Nuclear energy - Uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets - Determination of oxygen/uranium atomic ratio by the amperometric method. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for the determination of the oxygen/uranium atomic ratio in uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets. The method is applicable to reactor grade samples of hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The presence of reducing agents or residual organic additives invalidates the procedure. The test sample is dissolved in orthophosphoric acid, which does not oxidize the uranium(IV) from UO 2 molecules. Thus, the uranium(VI) that is present in the dissolved solution is from UO 3 and/or U 3 O 8 molecules only, and is proportional to the excess oxygen in these molecules. The uranium(VI) content of the solution is determined by titration with a previously standardized solution of ammonium iron(II) sulfate hexahydrate in orthophosphoric acid. The end-point of the titration is determined amperometrically using a pair of polarized platinum electrodes. The oxygen/uranium ratio is calculated from the uranium(VI) content. A portion, weighing about 1 g, of the test sample is dissolved in orthophosphoric acid. The dissolution is performed in an atmosphere of nitrogen or carbon dioxide when sintered material is being analysed. When highly sintered material is being analysed, the dissolution is performed at a higher temperature in purified phosphoric acid from which the water has been partly removed. The cooled solution is titrated with an orthophosphoric acid solution of ammonium iron(II) sulfate, which has previously been standardized against potassium dichromate. The end-point of the titration is detected by the sudden increase of current between a pair of polarized platinum electrodes on the addition of an excess of ammonium iron(II) sulfate solution. The paper provides information about scope, principle, reactions, reagents, apparatus, preparation of test sample, procedure (uranium dioxide powder, sintered pellets of uranium dioxide, highly sintered pellets of uranium dioxide and determination

  1. Compositional changes at the interface between thorium-doped uranium dioxide and zirconium due to high-temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young-Sang; Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Kim, Jong-Yun

    2018-06-01

    Compositional changes at the interface between thorium-doped uranium dioxide (U0.97Th0.03O2) and Zr before and after annealing at 1700 °C for 18 h were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, the U0.97Th0.03O2 pellet consisted of hyperstoichiometric UO2+x with UO2 and ThO2, and the Zr sample contained Zr with ZrO2. After annealing, the former contained stoichiometric UO2 with ThO2 and the latter consisted of ZrO2 along with ZrO2·2H2O.

  2. French experience in the field of internal dosimetry assessment at a nuclear workplace. Methods and results on industrial uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Rannou, A.; Pihet, P.; Dewez, P.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of the new ICRP recommendations and the diversity of industrial exposure materials make it necessary to modify our approach of assessing internal dosimetry. This paper describes a methodology developed to asses different parameters such as activity concentration and particle size distribution at the workplace; physico-chemical characteristics of industrial dust handled; and in vitro and in vivo solubility in order to determine the absorption rate blood. The determination of such specific parameters will lead to dose calculation in terms of committed effective Dose Per Unit of Intake (DPUI). Results obtained for an industrial uranium dioxide, UO 2 , at a French nuclear facility are presented. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Pressure analysis in the fabrication process of TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Shao Youlin; Liu Bing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The pressure signals during the real TRISO UO2-coated fuel particle fabrication process. ► A new relationship about the pressure drop change and the coated fuel particles properties. ► The proposed relationship is validated by experimental results during successive coating. ► A convenient method for monitoring the fluidized state during coating process. - Abstract: The pressure signals in the coating furnace are obtained experimentally from the TRISO UO 2 -coated fuel particle fabrication process. The pressure signals during the coating process are analyzed and a simplified relationship about the pressure drop change due to the coated layer is proposed based on the spouted bed hydrodynamics. The change of pressure drop is found to be consistent with the change of the combination factor about particle density, bed density, particle diameter and static bed height, during the successive coating process of the buffer PyC, IPyC, SiC and OPyC layer. The newly proposed relationship is validated by the experimental values. Based on this relationship, a convenient method is proposed for real-time monitoring the fluidized state of the particles in a high-temperature coating process in the spouted bed. It can be found that the pressure signals analysis is an effective method to monitor the fluidized state on-line in the coating process at high temperature up to 1600 °C.

  4. The chemical stability of TRISO-coated HTGR fuel. Pt. 1. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, P.; Cordfunke, E.H.P.; Konings, R.J.M.

    1994-12-01

    The US fuel seemed to be more difficult to produce than the German fuel. Also the chemical stability of this fuel must be investigated. The conditions are more severe in the US concept than in the German concept. Oxidation of the graphite seems to be no problem, according to US HTGR concept. A ZrC coating seems to have a number of advantages with regard to the SiC coating: (1) Better retention, (2) no reaction with Pd, (3) no thermal dissociation. Only the oxidation resistance is worse than SiC. Also the maximum stress must be determined that the ZrC coating can have. (orig./HP)

  5. SP-100 coated-particle fuel development. Phase I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This document is the final report of Phase I of the SP-100 Coated-Particle Fuel Development Program conducted by GA Technologies Inc. for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AT03-82SF11690. The general objective of the study conducted between September and December 1982 was to evaluate coated-particle type fuel as an alternate or backup fuel to the UO 2 tile-and-fin arrangement currently incorporated into the reference design of the SP-100 reactor core. This report presents and discusses the following topics in the order listed: the need for an alternative fuel for the SP-100 nuclear reactor; an abbreviated description of the reference and coated-particle fuel module concepts; the bases and results of the study and analysis leading to the preliminary design of a coated particle suitable for the SP-100 space power reactor; incorporation of the fuel particles into compacts and heat-pipe-cooled modules; initial efforts and plans to fabricate coated-particle fuel and fuel compacts; the design and performance of the proposed alternative core relative that of the reference fuel; and a summary of critical issues and conclusions consistent with the level of effort and duration of the study

  6. Design and development on automated control system of coated fuel particle fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Malin; Shao Youlin; Liu Bing

    2013-01-01

    With the development trend of the large-scale production of the HTR coated fuel particles, the original manual control system can not meet the requirement and the automation control system of coated fuel particle fabrication in modern industrial grade is needed to develop. The comprehensive analysis aiming at successive 4-layer coating process of TRISO type coated fuel particles was carried out. It was found that the coating process could be divided into five subsystems and nine operating states. The establishment of DCS-type (distributed control system) of automation control system was proposed. According to the rigorous requirements of preparation process for coated particles, the design considerations of DCS were proposed, including the principle of coordinated control, safety and reliability, integration specification, practical and easy to use, and open and easy to update. A complete set of automation control system for coated fuel particle preparation process was manufactured based on fulfilling the requirements of these principles in manufacture practice. The automated control system was put into operation in the production of irradiated samples for HTRPM demonstration project. The experimental results prove that the system can achieve better control of coated fuel particle preparation process and meet the requirements of factory-scale production. (authors)

  7. Stress Calculation of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using a Poisson's Ratio in Creep Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon-Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Kim, W. K.

    2007-01-01

    KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) project since 2004, has been developing a performance analysis code for the TRISO coated particle fuel named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). COPA predicts temperatures, stresses, a fission gas release and failure probabilities of a coated particle fuel in normal operating conditions. KAERI, on the other hand, is developing an ABAQUS based finite element(FE) model to cover the non-linear behaviors of a coated particle fuel such as cracking or debonding of the TRISO coating layers. Using the ABAQUS based FE model, verification calculations were carried out for the IAEA CRP-6 benchmark problems involving creep, swelling, and pressure. However, in this model the Poisson's ratio for elastic solution was used for creep strain calculation. In this study, an improvement is made for the ABAQUS based finite element model by using the Poisson's ratio in creep condition for the calculation of the creep strain rate. As a direct input of the coefficient in a creep condition is impossible, a user subroutine for the ABAQUS solution is prepared in FORTRAN for use in the calculations of the creep strain of the coating layers in the radial and hoop directions of the spherical fuel. This paper shows the calculation results of a TRISO coated particle fuel subject to an irradiation condition assumed as in the Miller's publication in comparison with the results obtained from the old FE model used in the CRP-6 benchmark calculations

  8. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chong Tak; Lee, Chan Bock; Fielding, R.S.; Kennedy, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 °C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y 2 O 3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 °C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y 2 O 3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y 2 O 3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y 2 O 3 coating

  9. Microbial penetration and utilization of organic aircraft fuel-tank coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, M G; Reynolds, R J; Hedrick, H G

    1967-11-01

    Microorganisms have been found as contaminants in various types of aircraft fuel tanks. Their presence introduces problems in the operation of the aircraft, including destruction of components such as the organic coatings used as protective linings in the fuel tanks. Microbial penetration and utilization of the currently used organic coatings, EC 776, DV 1180, PR 1560, and DeSoto 1080, were determined by changes in electrical resistances of the coatings; mycelial weight changes; growth counts of the bacteria; and manometric determinations on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GD-FW B-25) and Cladosporium resinae (QMC-7998). The results indicate EC 776 and DV 1180 to be less resistant to microbial degradation than the other coatings. Organic coatings, serving as a source of nutrition, would be conducive to population buildups in aircraft fuel tanks.

  10. Carbon nanotube-coated macroporous sponge for microbial fuel cell electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Ye, Meng; Hu, Liangbing; Liu, Nian; McDonough, James R.; Chen, Wei; Alshareef, Husam N.; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The materials that are used to make electrodes and their internal structures significantly affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. In this study, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge composite prepared by coating a sponge with CNTs

  11. Production of nuclear ceramic fuel for nuclear power plants at 'Ulba metallurgical plant' OSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadeev, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the flow-sheet of production of uranium dioxide powders and nuclear ceramic fuel pellets of them existing at the facility. 'UMP' OSC applies ADU extraction process of UO2 powders production. An indisputable success of the process is the possibility of use of the wide range of raw materials. Uranium hexafluoride, uranium oxides, uranium metal, uranium tetrafluoride, uranyl salts, uranium ore concentrates, all possible types of uranium-containing materials the processing of which by routine methods is difficult (ashes, scraps, etc.) are used as the raw materials. In addition, a reprocessed nuclear fuel can be used for fuel production. The quality of uranium dioxide powder produced does not depend on the type of uranium raw material used. High selectivity of extraction refining makes possible to obtain material with rather low impurities content that meets practically all specifications for uranium dioxide known to us. Ceramic and process features of uranium dioxide powders, namely, specific surface, bulk density, grain size and sinterability make possible to produce nuclear ceramic fuel with specified features. Quality of uranium dioxide powders produced by 'UMP' OSC was highly rated by General Electric company that is one of the leading companies from fuel manufactures in the USA market . It has certified 'UMP' OSC as its supplier. Currently, our company makes great efforts on establishing production of uranium dioxide powders with natural isotopes content for production of fuel for CANDU reactors. Trial lots of such powders are under tests at some companies manufacturing fuel for this type reactors in Canada, USA and Corea

  12. Study on coated layer material performance of coated particle fuel FBR (2). High temperature property and capability of coating to thick layer of TiN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, Masayuki; Mizuno, Tomoyasu

    2002-08-01

    'Helium Gas Cooled Coated Particle Fuel FBR' is one of attractive core concepts in the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle System in Japan, and the design study is presently proceeded. As one of key technologies of this concept, the coated layer material is important, and ceramics is considered to be a candidate material because of the superior refractory. Based on existing knowledge, TiN is regarded to be a possible candidate material, to which some property tests and evaluations have been conducted. In this study, preliminary tests about the high temperature property and the capability of thick layer coating of TiN have been conducted. Results of these tests come to the following conclusions. Heating tests of two kinds of TiN layer specimens coated by PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) and CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) were conducted. As a result, as for CVD coating specimens, remarkable charge was not observed on the layer up to 2,000degC, therefore we concluded that the layer by CVD had applicability up to high temperature of actual operation level. On the other hand, as for PVD coating specimens, an unstable behavior that the layer changed to a mesh like texture was observed on a 2,000degC heated specimen, therefore the applied PVD method is not considered to be promising as the coating technique. The surface conditions of some parts inside CVD device were investigated in order to evaluate possibility of TiN thick coating (∼100 μm). As a result, around 500 μm of TiN coating layer was observed on the condition of multilayer. Therefore, we conclude that CVD has capability of coating up to thick layer in actual coated particle fuel fabrication. (author)

  13. Improvements in or relating to refractory oxide protective coatings for fuel can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, J.A.; Bennett, M.J.; Linacre, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    An improved coating for Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor austenitic stainless steel fuel cans is described which, tests have shown, inhibits the deposition of carbon on the cans in carbon-containing ionising radiation environments. The coating comprises a refractory oxide which has been prepared by a vapour phase condensation method, in combination with a noble metal. (U.K.)

  14. 1976 scientific progress report. [Fuel and coating materials for HTGR]; Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisberict 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, H.

    1976-07-01

    Activities at the Institute for Reactor Materials in the production and properties of high temperature gas cooled reactor fuel and coating materials are summarized. Major emphasis was placed on investigations of pyrocarbon, BISO and TRISO coatings, uranium and thorium oxides and carbides, and graphite and matrix materials. A list of publications is included. (HDR)

  15. Factors affecting defective fraction of biso-coated HTGR fuel particles during in-block carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, A.J.; Johnson, D.R.; Bayne, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of Biso-coated thoria fuel particles during the in-block processing step of HTGR fuel element refabrication was evaluated. The effect of various process variables (heating rate, particle crushing strength, horizontal and/or vertical position in the fuel element blocks, and fuel hole permeability) on pitch coke yield, defective fraction of fuel particles, matrix structure, and matrix porosity was evaluated. Of the variables tested, only heating rate had a significant effect on pitch coke yield while both heating rate and particle crushing strength had a significant effect on defective fraction of fuel particles

  16. Estimation of irradiation-induced material damage measure of FCM fuel in LWR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Chungchan; Park, Sang-Yoon; Cho, Jin-Young; Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Won Jae

    2014-01-01

    An irradiation-induced material damage measure on tri-isotropic (TRISO) multi-coating layers of fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel to replace conventional uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel for existing light water reactors (LWRs) has been estimated using a displacement per atom (DPA) cross section for a FCM fuel performance analysis. The DPA cross sections in 47 and 190 energy groups for both silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite are generated based on the molecular dynamics simulation by SRIM/TRIM. For the selected FCM fuel assembly design with FeCrAl cladding, a core depletion analysis was carried out using the DeCART2D/MASTER code system with the prepared DPA cross sections to evaluate the irradiation effect in the Korean OPR-1000. The DPA of the SiC and IPyC coating layers is estimated by comparing the discharge burnup obtained from the MASTER calculation with the burnup-dependent DPA for each coating layer calculated using DeCART2D. The results show that low uranium loading and hardened neutron spectrum compared to that of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) result in high discharge burnup and high fast neutron fluence. In conclusion, it can be seen that the irradiation-induced material damage measure is noticeably increased under LWR operating conditions compared to HTGRs. (author)

  17. Design and operation of equipment used to develop remote coating capability for HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchomel, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Preston, M.K.; Heck, J.L.; Bolfing, B.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1978-12-01

    Refabrication of HTGR fuels is a manufacturing process that consists of preparation of fuel kernels, application of multiple layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, preparation of fuel rods, and assembly of fuel rods into fuel elements. All the equipment for refabrication of 233 U-containing fuel must be designed for completely remote operation and maintenance in hot-cell facilities. Equipment to remotely coated HTGR fuel particles has been designed and operated. Although not all of the equipment development needed for a fully remote coating system has been completed, significant progress has been made. The most important component of the coating furnace is the gas distributor, which must be simple, reliable, and easily maintainable. Techniques for loading and unloading the coater and handling microspheres have been developed. An engineering-scale system, currently in operation, is being used to verify the workability of these concepts. Coating crucible handling components are used to remove the crucible from the furnace, remove coated particles, and exchange the crucible, if necessary. After the batch of particles has been unloaded, it is transferred, weighed, and sampled. The components used in these processes have been tested to ensure that no particle breakage or holdup occurs. Tests of the particle handling system have been very encouraging because no major problems have been encountered. Instrumentation that controls the equipment performed very smoothly and reliably and can be operated remotely

  18. Optimization and Characterization of High Velocity Oxy-fuel Sprayed Coatings: Techniques, Materials, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work High Velocity Oxy-fuel (HVOF thermal spray techniques, spraying process optimization, and characterization of coatings are reviewed. Different variants of the technology are described and the main differences in spray conditions in terms of particle kinetics and thermal energy are rationalized. Methods and tools for controlling the spray process are presented as well as their use in optimizing the coating process. It will be shown how the differences from the starting powder to the final coating formation affect the coating microstructure and performance. Typical properties of HVOF sprayed coatings and coating performance is described. Also development of testing methods used for the evaluation of coating properties and current status of standardization is presented. Short discussion of typical applications is done.

  19. Key differences in the fabrication of US and German TRISO-coated particle fuel, and their implications on fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Buongiorno, J.; Maki, J.T.; Miller, G.K.; Hobbins, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the irradiation performance of TRISO-coated gas reactor particle fuel in Germany has been superior to that in the US. German fuel generally displayed in-pile gas release values that were three orders of magnitude lower than US fuel. Thus, we have critically examined the TRISO-coated fuel fabrication processes in the US and German and the associated irradiation database with a goal of understanding why the German fuel behaves acceptably, why the US fuel has not faired as well, and what process/production parameters impart the reliable performance to this fuel form. The postirradiation examination results are also reviewed to identify failure mechanisms that may be the cause of the poorer US irradiation performance. This comparison will help determine the roles that particle fuel process/product attributes and irradiation conditions (burnup, fast neutron fluence, temperature, degree of acceleration, power per particle) have on the behavior of the fuel during irradiation and provide a more quantitative linkage between acceptable processing parameters, as-fabricated fuel properties and subsequent in-reactor performance. (author)

  20. Fabrication of uranium dioxide of different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate; Dobijanje urandioksida razlicitih granulacija iz uranilnitrata preko amonijumdiuranata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojnovic, J; Stamenkovic, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za termotehniku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Uranium dioxide is most frequently produced by reduction of higher oxides (UO{sub 3}, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) or reduction of uranium salts (uranium diuranate, uranium peroxide, uranyl oxalate). Reduction is most frequently done in hydrogen or carbon monoxide atmosphere under temperatures from 500 - 1700 deg C. One of the most frequently methods for producing uranium oxide is certainly reduction of ammonia diuranate by hydrogen (ADU method). Properties of uranium dioxide obtained by ADU method depend on properties of the initial substance. Investigations shown in this report are concerned with determining the properties of UO{sub 2} powders for determining the connection between their properties and conditions of fabrication and reduction of ADU and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}.

  1. Micro-radiography for the characterization of coated fuel microspheres for CHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharan, K.N.; Kumar, Arun; Kamath, H.S.

    2011-01-01

    India is pursuing the design of a Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR), which is basically a technology demonstrator for high temperature process heat applications such as Hydrogen production or secondary hydrocarbons as a substitute for primary fossil fuel. The probable option of the fuel for CHTR being 233 UO 2 and ThO 2 based TRISO coated microspheres in the form of fuel compacts, fabrication of coated fuel and its characterization and Quality Control (QC) is one of the key areas where research and development work is being carried out. As part of the development of QC techniques, an attempt has been made in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre to develop X-ray micro-radiography for the evaluation of coated fuel microspheres. One of the important characteristic to be measured during the quality control of the TRISO coated fuel particles for CHTR is the thickness measurement of the various coating layers. The nondestructive testing method employed for this purpose shall distinguish the layers clearly and shall be amenable for automation as the sample size involved is large. Use of X-rays as a probing tool was explored for the characterization of the fuel microspheres and the thickness measurement of Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating. The difference in the low energy X-ray transmission through carbon coating and through SiC coating has been utilized to get a good image contrast in the radiograph. It was possible to measure the SiC coating thickness employing digital image analysis of the micro-radiographs. This technique detects the size, shape and integrity of the microspheres in addition to the measurement of coating thickness. The technique involves taking contact X-ray radiograph of the microspheres on high resolution X-ray films using a fine focus X-ray source. The processed X-ray film is then magnified using a profile projector and the digitized image is used for quantitative measurement of the fuel kernel and the coating thickness. The development of micro

  2. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples...

  3. Performance limits of coated particle fuel. Part I. The significance of empirical performance diagrams and mathematical models in fuel development and power reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, L. W.; Hick, H.

    1973-06-15

    This report introduces a general survey of our present knowledge and understanding of coated particle fuel performance. It defines first the reference power reactor conditions and the reference coated particle design on which the survey is centred. It describes then the typical strategy which has been followed in coated particle fuel development by the Dragon Project R & D Branch. Finally it shows the priorities which have governed the time scale and scope of fuel development and of the present review.

  4. Effect of cracks in coating on gas release from a fuel microparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, A.G.; Gudkov, A.N.; Tselishchev, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of cracks in protective coating on gas release from a fuel microparticle is investigated in a general form. A fuel microparticle comprizing a kern, a buffer layer and an external protective coating is considered. The pressure of radioactive inert gases in the microparticle buffer layer is evaluated within the 1000-1800 K temperature range on the base of diffusion-defect-trap transport theory. It is shown that the process of radionuclide adsorption interaction with the coating material leads to a more abrupt than by exponent, weakening of mass transfer coefficient. In this case for long-living isotopes the effect of adsorption processes manifests weaker than for short-living ones. Mass transfer coefficient for the crack system depends sufficiently on the total pressure of gas mixture under the coating while for a single cracks such dependence is not observed. A conclusion is drawn that the obtained ratios can be applied for evaluating the character of fuel microparticle protective coating destruction (single non-intersecting cracks or a crack system) using the data on various nuclide release. These ratios can be also applied for the choice of the coating thichness under which gaseous fission product release from the fuel microparticle in case of its protective coating failure does not exceed the acceptable limits

  5. A study on coated particle fuel properties and performances and phase-I data base establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Hyo Cheol; Im, Byeong Ju; Yun, Sang Pil; Son, Seung Beom; Lee, Gyeong Hui; Jang, Jeong Nam

    2006-03-01

    For the successful development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor acquisition and generation of the high temperature properties of reactor materials, especially temperature and burn-up dependent properties of coated particle fuel and fuel element, are crucially essential. Recently national project for HTGR for hydrogen production has been kicked off. However, we have had little experience on this new challenges. Therefore, it became necessary to build up the materials properties and fuel performance data base. In this study, a primitive properties and performance DB for coated particle fuel was developed. This database report consists two sections: materials properties and fuel performance. The materials properties has three parts: kernel materials, carbide coating materials, and fuel elements and graphite matrix. UO 2 and UCO belong to kernel materials while PyC, SiC, and ZrC comprises the coating materials section. Thermal, mechanical and physical properties of these materials were collected, reviewed, and summarized. Additionally, the property change induced by manufacture process and irradiation were collected and summarized. Performance data were also collected, reviewed, and analyzed based on the key phenomena and failure mechanism. All of these data will be accessible in the on-line system. These results will be directly used for HTGR fuel design and fabrication and preliminary fuel performance analysis under irradiation

  6. Lanthanide based conversion coatings for long term wet storage of aluminium-clad spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; De Souza, J.A.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    Spent fuels from research reactors are stored in basins with water of less than desirable quality at many facilities around the world and instances of cladding failure caused by pitting corrosion have been reported. Conversion coatings have been used in many industries to protect different metals, including aluminium alloys. This paper presents the results of an ongoing investigation in which the corrosion resistance of lanthanide (cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium) based conversion coated RR fuel cladding alloys has been studied. Electrochemical tests in the laboratory revealed higher corrosion resistance of CeO 2 , La 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 coated AA 1100 and AA 6061 alloys in NaCl solutions. Uncoated and CeO 2 coated coupons of these alloys exposed for 50 days to the spent fuel basin of the IEA-R1 research reactor in IPEN, Brazil, revealed marked reductions in the extent of pitting corrosion. (author)

  7. Preliminary study of mechanical behavior for Cr coated Zr-4 Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Kim, Hak-Sung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo-Chan; Yang, Yong-Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    To decrease the oxidation rate of Zr-based alloy components, many concepts of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) such as Mo-Zr cladding, SiC/SiCf cladding and iron-based alloy cladding are under development. One of the promised concept is the coated cladding which can remarkably increase the corrosion and wear resistance. Recently, KAERI is developing the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding as accident tolerance cladding. To coat the Cr powder on the Zircaloy, 3D laser coating technology has been employed because it is possible to make a coated layer on the tubular cladding surface by controlling the 3-diminational axis. Therefore, for this work, the mechanical integrity of Cr coated Zircaloy should be evaluated to predict the safety of fuel cladding during the operating or accident of nuclear reactor. In this work, the mechanical behavior of the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding has been studied by using finite element analysis (FEA). The ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding was simulated to evaluate the validity of mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr, which were referred from the literatures and experimental reports. In this work, the mechanical behavior of the Cr coated Zircaloy cladding has been studied by using finite element analysis (FEA). The ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding was simulated to evaluate the validity of mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr. The pellet-clad mechanical interaction (PCMI) properties of Cr coated Zr-4 cladding were investigated by thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) simulation. The mechanical properties of Zr-4 and Cr was validated by simulation of ring compression test (RCT) of fuel cladding.

  8. Development of advanced fabrication technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel. Reduction of coating failure fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Tobita, Tsutomu; Yoshimuta, Sigeharu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Tomimoto, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Oda, Takafumi

    1998-11-01

    The advanced fabrication technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel has been developed to reduce the coating failure fraction of the fuel particles, which leads to an improvement of the reactor safety. The present report reviews the results of the relevant work. The mechanisms of the coating failure of the fuel particles during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the coating failure fraction of the fuel. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the fuel was improved outstandingly. (author)

  9. Extraction of Uranium Using Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Dioxide for Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayo Sawada; Daisuke Hirabayashi; Youichi Enokida [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    For the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a new method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. Uranium extraction from broken pieces, whose average grain size was 5 mm, of uranium dioxide pellet with nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was demonstrated in the present study. (authors)

  10. TRISO-coated spent fuel processing using a Grind-Leach head-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Barry B.; Del Cul, Guillermo D.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Collins, Emory D.

    2005-01-01

    Processing of TRISO-coated HTGR fuels with the grind-leach process requires that the fuel be finely pulverized for efficient and effective acid dissolution of the fuel components. Mechanical size reduction of the fuel is being investigated with jet mill technology as the final milling step. Laboratory experiments were performed with surrogates of crushed fuel compacts that indicate that milling to very small particle sizes is feasible. The size distribution of the milled product is sensitive to the solids feed rate, and the distribution may be bimodal which could support an effective solid-solid separation. (author)

  11. An improved model of fission gas atom transport in irradiated uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    The hitherto standard approach to predicting fission gas release has been a pure diffusion gas atom transport model based upon Fick's law. An additional mechanism has subsequently been identified from experimental data at high burnup and has been summarised in an empirical model that is considered to embody a so-called fuel matrix 'saturation' phenomenon whereby the fuel matrix has become saturated with fission gas so that the continued addition of extra fission gas atoms results in their expulsion from the fuel matrix into the fuel rod plenum. The present paper proposes a different approach by constructing an enhanced fission gas transport law consisting of two components: 1) Fick's law and 2) a so-called drift term. The new transport law can be shown to be effectively identical in its predictions to the 'saturation' approach and is more readily physically justifiable. The method introduces a generalisation of the standard diffusion equation which is dubbed the Drift Diffusion Equation. According to the magnitude of a dimensionless Péclet number, P, the new equation can vary from pure diffusion to pure drift, which latter represents a collective motion of the fission gas atoms through the fuel matrix at a translational velocity. Comparison is made between the saturation and enhanced transport approaches. Because of its dependence on P, the Drift Diffusion Equation is shown to be more effective at managing the transition from one type of limiting transport phenomenon to the other. Thus it can adapt appropriately according to the reactor operation.

  12. Comparative evaluation of coating techniques for the corrosion protection of disposal container for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Kim, Sung Soo; Park, Chong Mook; Choi, Jong Won

    2005-02-01

    To propose a suitable coating technique to prevent corrosion on metal or metal alloys of a waste container to be used for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel, several methods related to spray coating and vapor deposition techniques have been comparatively evaluated, based on some major factors recommended. From these comparative results, it can be suggested that the best coating methods among the existing techniques in Korea would be HVOF and low pressure plasma spray. Even though the surface of the container coated by these methods would be coated, pores could be remained in the coated film. And therefore post-treatment methods for eliminating the pores have been briefly introduced to keep the life time of the container. The other techniques, the cold spray and hollow cathode discharge, may become excellent coating methods in the future if they are extensively researched to apply for coating on the container. An optimal process among the recommended methods should be selected by considering the state of container, such as an empty or a loaded container, and also related coating materials. For the support to this, the characteristics of the coating materials and the coated films and the durability of this film under a repository condition should be analyzed in detail

  13. Study of the behaviour of cesium fission product in uranium dioxide by the ab initio method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Florence

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of the behaviour of fission products in the nuclear fuel is very important for safety considerations and for understanding the evolution of the fuel properties under irradiation. In this work, we focussed mainly on the behaviour of caesium in UO 2 through ab initio studies of its solubility at point defects in the matrix, its diffusion and its contribution to the formation of solid phases in the fuel. The role of electronic correlation effects of the f electrons of uranium on these properties and on the description of the defect free crystal, is assessed. The formation energies of the main point defects are calculated and their concentration as a function of fuel stoichiometry and temperature is estimated. The migration barriers and migration paths for the self-diffusion of oxygen and uranium vacancies and oxygen interstitials in UO 2 are discussed. The solubility of Cs is found to be very low in UO 2 in agreement with experimental findings. The most favourable trapping sites are determined as a function of oxygen concentration in the fuel. Our results show that in the hyper-stoichiometric regime, the diffusion of Cs from its most favourable trapping site is limited by the uranium vacancy diffusion mechanism. We also considered the formation of the main solid phases of caesium resulting from its oxidation (Cs 2 O, Cs 2 O 2 , CsO 2 ) and from its interaction with the fuel (Cs 2 UO 4 ), with molybdenum (Cs 2 MoO 4 ) and with the zirconium of the clad (Cs 2 ZrO 3 ), since the formation of such phases, their solubility and their interdependence will affect the release of caesium. (author)

  14. Research on in-pile release of fission products from coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, K.; Iwamoto, K.

    1985-01-01

    Coated particle fuels fabricated in accordance with VHTR (Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor) fuel design have been irradiated by both capsules and an in-pile gas loop (OGL-1), and data on the fission products release under irradiation were obtained for loose coated particles, fuel compacts and fuel rods in the temperature range between 800 deg. C and 1600 deg. C. For the fission gases, temperature- and time dependences of the fractional release(R/B) were measured. Relation between release and failure fraction of the coated particles was elucidated on the VHTR reference fuels. Also measured was tritium concentration in the helium coolant of OGL-1. In-pile release behavior of the metallic fission products was studied by measuring the activities of the fission products adsorbed in the graphite sleeves of the OGL-1 fuel rods and the graphite fuel container of the sweep gas capsules in the PIE. Investigation on palladium interaction with SiC coating layer was included. (author)

  15. Plasmachemical synthesis and evaluation of the thermal conductivity of metal-oxide compounds "Molybdenum-uranium dioxide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Alexandra A.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Mendoza, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The article represents possibility to apply oxidative and reducing plasma for plasma-chemical synthesis of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» from water-salt mixtures «molybdic acid‒uranyl nitrate» and «molybdic acid‒ uranyl acetate». The composition of water-salt mixture was calculated and the conditions ensuring plasma-chemical synthesis of «Mo‒UO2» compounds were determined. Calculations were carried out at atmospheric pressure over a wide range of temperatures (300-4000 K), with the use of various plasma coolants (air, hydrogen). The heat conductivity coefficients of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» consisting of continuous component (molybdenum matrix) are calculated. Inclusions from ceramics in the form of uranium dioxide were ordered in the matrix. Particular attention is paid to methods for calculating the coefficients of thermal conductivity of these compounds with the use of different models. Calculated results were compared with the experimental data.

  16. Following the electroreduction of uranium dioxide to uranium in LiCl–KCl eutectic in situ using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Jervis, R.; Bharath, V.J. [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Atwood, R.C.; Reinhard, C.; Connor, L.D. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Simons, S.J.R.; Inman, D.; Brett, D.J.L. [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Shearing, P.R., E-mail: p.shearing@ucl.ac.uk [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the electroreduction of UO{sub 2} to U in LiCl/KCL eutectic molten salt. • Combined electrochemical measurement and in situ XRD is utilised. • The electroreduction appears to occur in a single, 4-electron-step, process. • No intermediate compounds were observed. - Abstract: The electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide to metallic uranium has been investigated in lithium chloride–potassium chloride eutectic molten salt. Laboratory based electrochemical studies have been coupled with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, for the first time, to deduce the reduction pathway. No intermediate phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction before, during or after electroreduction to form α-uranium. This suggests that the electrochemical reduction occurs via a single, 4-electron-step, process. The rate of formation of α-uranium is seen to decrease during electrolysis and could be a result of a build-up of oxygen anions in the molten salt. Slow transport of O{sup 2−} ions away from the UO{sub 2} working electrode could impede the electrochemical reduction.

  17. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially with high accuracy. Due to its ability to spatially characterize chemistry in non-conducting materials, such as oxides, provides the opportunity to characterize stoichiometry, which strongly is tied to material performance. However, accuracy has been correlated with instrument run parameters. A systematic study of the effect of laser energy, temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of a model oxide, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). Modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect its evaporation behavior as laser energy. It was discovered that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO 2 . Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser assisted field evaporation and high laser energy produces thermal effects in the evaporation behavior. Laser energy had the greatest impact on evaporation and the optimal instrument condition for UO 2 was determined to be 50K, 10 pJ laser energy, 0.3% detection rate, and a 100 kHz repetition rate. These conditions provide the best combination of mass resolution, accurate stoichiometry, and evaporation behavior.

  18. Matpro--version 10: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reymann, G.A.

    1978-02-01

    The materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO--Version 10) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures

  19. MATPRO-Version 11: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Reymann, G.A.

    1979-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO-Version 11) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures

  20. MATPRO-Version 11: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Reymann, G.A. (comps.)

    1979-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO-Version 11) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures.

  1. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  2. Results of fuel elements fabrication on the basis of increased concentration dioxide fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.B.; Afanasiev, V.L.; Enin, A.A.; Suprun, V.B.

    1996-01-01

    According to the Russian Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, that were constructed under the Russian projects, at the Novosibirsk Chemical Concentrates Plant the pilot series of different configuration (WR-M2, MR, IRT-4M) fuel elements, based on increased concentration uranium dioxide fuel, have been fabricated for reactor tests. Comprehensive fabricated fuel elements quality estimation has been carried out. (author)

  3. Analysis of irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Sato, Sadao; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Kashimura, Satoru.

    1991-07-01

    Irradiation-induced stresses in coating layers of coated fuel particles were analyzed by the MICROS-2 code for the fuels of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) under its operating conditions. The analyses were made on the standard core fuel (A-type) and the test fuels comprising the advanced SiC-coated particle fuel (B-1 type) and the ZrC-coated particle fuel (B-2 type). For the B-1 type fuel, the stresses were relieved due to the thicker buffer and SiC layers than for the A type fuel. The slightly decreased thickness of the fourth layer for the B-1 type than for the A type fuel had no significant effect on the stresses. As for the B-2 type fuel, almost the same results as for the B-1 type were obtained under an assumption that the ZrC layer as well as the SiC layer undergoes negligible dimension change within the analysis conditions. The obtained results indicated that the B-1 and B-2 type fuels are better than the A type fuel in terms of integrity against the irradiation-induced stresses. Finally, research subjects for development of the analysis code on the fuel behavior are discussed. (author)

  4. Modeling the UO2 ex-AUC pellet process and predicting the fuel rod temperature distribution under steady-state operating condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nguyen Trong; Thuan, Le Ba; Thanh, Tran Chi; Nhuan, Hoang; Khoai, Do Van; Tung, Nguyen Van; Lee, Jin-Young; Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-06-01

    Modeling uranium dioxide pellet process from ammonium uranyl carbonate - derived uranium dioxide powder (UO2 ex-AUC powder) and predicting fuel rod temperature distribution were reported in the paper. Response surface methodology (RSM) and FRAPCON-4.0 code were used to model the process and to predict the fuel rod temperature under steady-state operating condition. Fuel rod design of AP-1000 designed by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in these the pellet fabrication parameters are from the study, were input data for the code. The predictive data were suggested the relationship between the fabrication parameters of UO2 pellets and their temperature image in nuclear reactor.

  5. A Comprehensive Pitting Study of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Inconel 625 Coating by Using Electrochemical Testing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, Akbar; Khan, Sajid Ullah

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, Inconel 625 was coated on a mild steel substrate using a high velocity oxygen fuel coating process. The pitting propensity of the coating was tested by using open circuit potential versus time, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation, and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The pitting propensity of the coating was compared with bulk Inconel 625 alloy. The results confirmed that there were regions of different electrochemical activities on the coating which have caused pitting corrosion.

  6. Effect of coating density on oxidation resistance and Cr vaporization from solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Belma; Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Wiik, Kjell; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2017-06-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel oxides are promising materials for protective coatings for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. To achieve high density such coatings are often sintered in a two-step procedure, involving heat treatment first in reducing and then in oxidizing atmospheres. Sintering the coating inside the SOFC stack during heating would reduce production costs, but may result in a lower coating density. The importance of coating density is here assessed by characterization of the oxidation kinetics and Cr evaporation of Crofer 22 APU with MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 spinel coatings of different density. The coating density is shown to have minor influence on the long-term oxidation behavior in air at 800 °C, evaluated over 5000 h. Sintering the spinel coating in air at 900 °C, equivalent to an in-situ heat treatment, leads to an 88% reduction of the Cr evaporation rate of Crofer 22 APU in air-3% H2O at 800 °C. The air sintered spinel coating is initially highly porous, however, densifies with time in interaction with the alloy. A two-step reduction and re-oxidation heat treatment results in a denser coating, which reduces Cr evaporation by 97%.

  7. Automatic X-ray inspection for escaped coated particles in spherical fuel elements of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Min; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Hongsheng; Li, Ziqiang; Liu, Bing; Li, Xingdong; Meng, Fanyong

    2014-01-01

    As a core unit of HTGRs (high-temperature gas-cooled reactors), the quality of spherical fuel elements is directly related to the safety and reliability of HTGRs. In line with the design and performance requirements of the spherical fuel elements, no coated fuel particles are permitted to enter the fuel-free zone of a spherical fuel element. For fast and accurate detection of escaped coated fuel particles, X-ray DR (digital radiography) imaging with a step-by-step circular scanning trajectory was adopted for Chinese 10 MW HTGRs. The scanning parameters dominating the volume of the blind zones were optimized to ensure the missing detection of the escaped coated fuel particles is as low as possible. We proposed a dynamic calibration method for tracking the projection of the fuel-free zone accurately, instead of using a fuel-free zone mask of fixed size and position. After the projection data in the fuel-free zone were extracted, image and graphic processing methods were combined for automatic recognition of escaped coated fuel particles, and some practical inspection results were presented. - Highlights: • An X-ray DR imaging system for quality inspection of spherical fuel elements was introduced. • A method for optimizing the blind-zone-related scanning parameter was proposed. • A dynamic calibration method for tracking the fuel-free zone accurately was proposed. • Some inspection results of the disqualified spherical fuel elements with escaped coated fuel particles were presented

  8. Radiation enhanced thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide; Diffusion thermique et sous irradiation du chlore dans le dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipon, Yves [Ecole doctorale de physique et d' astrophysique, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, Lyon (France)

    2006-12-15

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of {sup 36}Cl in uranium dioxide. It is a contribution to PRECCI programme (research programme on the long-term behaviour of the spent nuclear fuel). {sup 36}Cl is a long lived volatile activation product (T = 300 000 years) able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction in geological disposal conditions. We simulated the presence of {sup 36}Cl by implanting a quantity of {sup 37}Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO{sub 2}. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 deg. C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 deg. C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D{sub 1000} {sub deg.} {sub C} around 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and deduced an activation energy of 4.3 eV. This value is one of lowest compared to that of volatile fission products such as iodine or the xenon. These parameters reflect the very mobile behaviour of chlorine; - the irradiation effects induced by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with {sup 127}I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We showed that the implanted chlorine diffusion in the temperature range 30 - 250 deg. C is not purely athermal. In these conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub 250} {sub deg.} {sub C} for the implanted chlorine is around 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and the activation energy is calculated to be 0.1 eV. Moreover, at 250 deg. C, we observed an important transport of the pristine chlorine from the bulk towards the surface. This chlorine comes from a zone where the defects are mainly produced by the nuclear energy loss process at the end of iodine range. We showed the importance of the

  9. A review of the oxidation of uranium dioxide at temperatures below 400oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, R.J.; Taylor, P.

    1997-01-01

    A critical review of the extensive literature on the air oxidation Of U0 2 at temperatures below 400 o C is presented. The key parameters that affect the rate Of U0 2 oxidation are examined systematically, and their importance to the reaction rate is evaluated. The formation of U 30 7/U 4 0 9 on unirradiated U0 2 powders follows the discrete-layer mechanism and displays diffusion-controlled kinetics. In contrast, U 3 0 8 formation on unirradiated U0 2 displays sigmoidal 'nucleation-and-growth' kinetics. Low-temperature oxidation of used fuel tends to proceed by rapid grain-boundary oxidation followed by simultaneous intragranular oxidation throughout the sample. The activation energy for the formation Of U 3 0 7 /U 4 0 9 is 96 kJ mol -1 for U0 2 powders, 99 kJ mol -1 for sintered pellets and 106 kJ mol -1 for used fuel. The activation energy for the formation Of U 3 0 8 is temperature dependent. The best estimate of the activation energy below ∼325 o C is 154 kJ mol -1 , but all the kinetic data incorporate substantial approximations so that further study is required to properly predict the behaviour of used fuel under low-temperature ( o C) dry-air storage conditions, based on high-temperature (200 to 350 o C) laboratory data. (author). 204 refs., 5 tabs., 4 figs

  10. Analysis of UO2 fuel structure for low and high burn-up and its impact on fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.; El-Koliel, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    During irradiation, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel undergo important restructuring mainly represented by densification and swelling, void migration, equiaxed grain growth, grain subdivision, and the formation of columnar grains. The purpose of this study is to obtain a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon of equiaxed grain growth in UO 2 ceramic material. The change of the grain size in high-density uranium dioxide as a function of temperature, initial grain size, time, and burnup is calculated. Algorithm of fission gas release from UO 2 fuel during high temperature irradiation at high burnup taking into account grain growth effect is presented. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data. (author)

  11. Thermal performance of annular-coated and sphere-pac LWR fuel rod designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Hsieh, K.A.; Barner, J.O.; Freshley, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    Two FCI-resistant UO 2 fuel rod designs are being compared to a reference design in irradiation tests in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) as part of the DOE-sponsored Fuel Performance Improvement Program (FPIP). The primary fuel design (annular-coated-pressurized) incorporates annular pellets, a graphite coating on the inner surface of the Zircaloy cladding, and pressurized helium fill gas. Also being investigated is an 87% smear density sphere-pac design with pressurized helium fill gas. The solid pellet (reference) and annular-coated designs described had helium fill gas at approx. 100 kPa and the sphere-pac rods were pressurized at approx. 455 kPa

  12. Study of automatic boat loading unit and horizontal sintering process of uranium dioxide pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhongjing; Chen Yu; Yao Dengfeng; Wang Youliang; Shu Binhua; Wu Genjiu

    2014-01-01

    Sintering process is a key process for the manufacture of nuclear fuel UO_2 pellet. In our factory, the continuous high temperature sintering furnace is used for sintering process. During the sintering of green pellets, the furnace, the boat and the accumulation way can influence the quality of the final product. In this text, on the basis of early process research, The automatic loading boat Unit and horizontal sintering process is studied successively. The results show that the physical and chemical properties of the products manufactured by automatic loading boat unit and horizontal sintering process can meet the technique requirements completely, and this system is reliable and continuous. (authors)

  13. Foreign programs for the storage of spent nuclear power plant fuels, high-level waste canisters and transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The various national programs for developing and applying technology for the interim storage of spent fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and TRU wastes are summarized. Primary emphasis of the report is on dry storage techniques for uranium dioxide fuels, but data are also provided concerning pool storage

  14. Development of Cr cold spray–coated fuel cladding with enhanced accident tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ševeček

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Accident-tolerant fuels (ATFs are currently of high interest to researchers in the nuclear industry and in governmental and international organizations. One widely studied accident-tolerant fuel concept is multilayer cladding (also known as coated cladding. This concept is based on a traditional Zr-based alloy (Zircaloy-4, M5, E110, ZIRLO etc. serving as a substrate. Different protective materials are applied to the substrate surface by various techniques, thus enhancing the accident tolerance of the fuel. This study focuses on the results of testing of Zircaloy-4 coated with pure chromium metal using the cold spray (CS technique. In comparison with other deposition methods, e.g., Physical vapor deposition (PVD, laser coating, or Chemical vapor deposition techniques (CVD, the CS technique is more cost efficient due to lower energy consumption and high deposition rates, making it more suitable for industry-scale production. The Cr-coated samples were tested at different conditions (500°C steam, 1200°C steam, and Pressurized water reactor (PWR pressurization test and were precharacterized and postcharacterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, or nanoindentation; results are discussed. Results of the steady-state fuel performance simulations using the Bison code predicted the concept's feasibility. It is concluded that CS Cr coating has high potential benefits but requires further optimization and out-of-pile and in-pile testing. Keywords: Accident-Tolerant Fuel, Chromium, Cladding, Coating, Cold Spray, Nuclear Fuel

  15. A study on properties-performances of coated particle fuel and on-line DB establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Hyo Cheol; Jang, Jeong Nam; Kwon, Seok Hwan

    2007-03-01

    Recently national project for HTGR for hydrogen production has been kicked off. However, For the successful development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor high temperature and burn-up dependent properties of the reactor materials are essentially and crucially required. Therefore, it was proposed to build up the materials properties and fuel performance data base. In this study, a phase - 1 properties and performance DB for coated particle fuel was developed. This database report consists two sections: materials properties and fuel performance. The materials properties has three parts: kernel materials, carbide coating materials, and fuel elements and graphite matrix. UO2 and UCO belong to kernel materials while PyC, SiC, and ZrC comprises the coating materials section. Thermal, mechanical and physical properties data of these materials were collected, reviewed, and summarized. Additionally, the property change induced by manufacture process and irradiation were reviewed. Fuel performance data were also collected, reviewed, and analyzed based on the key phenomena and failure mechanism, These performance data are divided into two: normal and accident. All of these data will be accessible in the pc based stand-alone system. These results will be directly used for HTGR fuel design and fabrication and preliminary fuel performance analysis under irradiation

  16. Quality control of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Mitsunobu

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of the coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors is characterized by the fact that the size of the target product to be controlled is very small, and the quantity is very large. Accordingly, the sampling plan and the method of evaluating the population through satisfically treating the measured data of the samples are the important subjects to see and evaluate the quality of a batch or a lot. This paper shows the fabrication process and the quality control procedure for the coated fuel particles. The development work of a HTGR was started by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in 1969, and as for the production technology for coated fuel particles, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. has continued the development work. The pilot plan with the capacity of about 40 kg/year was established in 1972. The fuel product fabricated in this plant was put to the irradiation experiment and out-of-pile evaluation test. In 1983, the production capacity was expanded to 200 kg/year, and the fuel compacts for the VHTRC in JAERI were produced for two years. The basic fuel design, the fabrication process, the quality control, the process control and the quality assurance are reported. For the commercial product, the studies from the viewpoint of production and quality control costs are required. (Kako, I.)

  17. Chlorine Diffusion in Uranium Dioxide: Thermal Effects versus Radiation Enhanced Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Yves; Moncoffre, Nathalie; Bererd, Nicolas; Jaffrezic, Henri; Toulhoat, Nelly; Barthe, Marie France; Desgardin, Pierre; Raimbault, Louis; Scheidegger, Andre M.; Carlot, Gaelle

    2007-01-01

    Chlorine is present as an impurity in the UO 2 nuclear fuel. 35 Cl is activated into 36 Cl by thermal neutron capture. In case of interim storage or deep geological disposal of the spent fuel, this isotope is known to be able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction because of its mobile behavior and its long half life (around 300000 years). It is therefore important to understand its migration behavior within the fuel rod. During reactor operation, chlorine diffusion can be due to thermally activated processes or can be favoured by irradiation defects induced by fission fragments or alpha decay. In order to decouple both phenomena, we performed two distinct experiments to study the effects of thermal annealing on the behaviour of chlorine on one hand and the effects of the irradiation with fission products on the other hand. During in reactor processes, part of the 36 Cl may be displaced from its original position, due to recoil or to collisions with fission products. In order to study the behavior of the displaced chlorine, 37 Cl has been implanted into sintered depleted UO 2 pellets (mean grain size around 18 μm). The spatial distribution of the implanted and pristine chlorine has been analyzed by SIMS before and after treatment. Thermal annealing of 37 Cl implanted UO 2 pellets (implantation fluence of 10 13 ions.cm -2 ) show that it is mobile from temperatures as low as 1273 K (E a =4.3 eV). The irradiation with fission products (Iodine, E=63.5 MeV) performed at 300 and 510 K, shows that the diffusion of chlorine is enhanced and that a thermally activated contribution is preserved (E a =0.1 eV). The diffusion coefficients measured at 1473 K and under fission product irradiation at 510 K are similar (D = 3.10 -14 cm 2 .s -1 ). Considering in first approximation that the diffusion length L can be expressed as a function of the diffusion coefficient D and time t by : L=(Dt)1/2, the diffusion distance after 3 years is L=17 μm. It results that

  18. Microstructure Characterization of WCCo-Mo Based Coatings Produced Using High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Islak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been carried out in order to investigate the microstructural properties of WCCo-Mo composite coatings deposited onto a SAE 4140 steel substrate by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF thermal spray. For this purpose, the Mo quantity added to the WCCo was changed as 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt. % percents. The coatings are compared in terms of their phase composition, microstructure and hardness. Phase compound and microstructure of coating layers were examined using X-ray diffractometer (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. XRD results showed that WCCo-Mo composite coatings were mainly composed of WC, W2C, Co3W3C, Mo2C, MoO2, Mo and Co phases. The average hardness of the coatings increased with increasing Mo content.

  19. Development of a CVD silica coating for UK advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, M.J.; Houlton, M.R.; Moore, D.A.; Foster, A.I.; Swidzinski, M.A.M.

    1983-04-01

    Vapour deposited silica coatings could extend the life of the 20% Cr/25% Ni niobium stabilised (20/25/Nb) stainless steel fuel cladding of the UK advanced gas cooled reactors. A CVD coating process developed originally to be undertaken at atmospheric pressure has now been adapted for operation at reduced pressure. Trials on the LP CVD process have been pursued to the production scale using commercial equipment. The effectiveness of the LP CVD silica coatings in providing protection to 20/25/Nb steel surfaces against oxidation and carbonaceous deposition has been evaluated. (author)

  20. Operation Procedure of Inspection Equipment for TRISO-coated Fuel Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Cho, M. S.; Kim, Y. M.; Park, J. Y.; Kim, W. J.; Jeong, K. C.; Oh, S. C.; Lee, Y. W.

    2007-03-01

    TRISO-coated fuel particle for HTGR(high temperature gas cooled reactor) is composed of fuel kernel and coating layers. The kernel and coated particle are characterized by inspection processes for inspection items such as diameter of kernel, thickness, density and an-isotropy of coating layer. The coating thickness can be nondestructively measured by X-ray inspection equipment. The coating thickness as well as the sphericity can be also measured by optical inspection system as a ceramography method. The an-isotropy can be characterized by photometer. The density of coating layer can be measured by density column. The size and sphericity of particles can be measured by PSA(particle size analyzer). The thermo-chemical characteristics of kernel can be analyzed by TG/DTA(Thermogravimetric/Differential Thermal Analyzer). The inspection objective, equipment composition, operation principle, operation manual for each equipment was described in this operation procedure, which will be used for the characterization of inspection items described above

  1. Calculating failure probabilities for TRISO-coated fuel particles using an integral formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Maki, John T.; Knudson, Darrell L.; Petti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on the safe behavior of the coated particle fuel. The coating layers surrounding the fuel kernels in these spherical particles, termed the TRISO coating, act as a pressure vessel that retains fission products. The quality of the fuel is reflected in the number of particle failures that occur during reactor operation, where failed particles become a source for fission products that can then diffuse through the fuel element. The failure probability for any batch of particles, which has traditionally been calculated using the Monte Carlo method, depends on statistical variations in design parameters and on variations in the strengths of coating layers among particles in the batch. An alternative approach to calculating failure probabilities is developed herein that uses direct numerical integration of a failure probability integral. Because this is a multiple integral where the statistically varying parameters become integration variables, a fast numerical integration approach is also developed. In sample cases analyzed involving multiple failure mechanisms, results from the integration methods agree closely with Monte Carlo results. Additionally, the fast integration approach, particularly, is shown to significantly improve efficiency of failure probability calculations. These integration methods have been implemented in the PARFUME fuel performance code along with the Monte Carlo method, where each serves to verify accuracy of the others.

  2. TRISO-Coated Fuel Durability Under Extreme Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The PIs propose to examine TRISO-coated particles (SiC and ZrC coatings) in an integrated two-part study. In the first part, experiments will be performed to assess the reaction kinetics of the carbides under CO-CO2 environments at temperatures up to 1800 degree C. Kinetic model will be applied to describe the degradation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy will be employed to establish the chemical and microstructure evolution under the imposed environmental conditions. The second part of the proposed work focuses on establishing the role of the high temperature, environmental exposure described above on the mechanical behavior of TRISO-coated particles. Electron microscopy and other advanced techniques will be subsequently performed to evaluate failure mechanisms. The work is expected to reveal relationships between corrosion reactions, starting material characteristics (polytype of SiC, impurity concentration, flaw distribution), flaw healing behavior, and crack growth.

  3. Fuel efficiency and fouling control coatings in maritime transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholdt, Asger

    . As a result, it was determined that other methods must be explored in order to accurately measure the long-term drag performance of FCCs in conditions that mimic those encountered by ships’ hulls during actual voyages. In an experimental study, five commercial FCC systems were applied to smooth disks......, compared to the two SPC coatings. Furthermore, the drag performances of two different FCC systems with varying substrate roughness values (i.e., the roughness below the coating system) were measured in the newly applied condition.An increase in the substrate roughness led to increased drag for both FCC......’s hull, and a second, laboratory part measured the torque (drag) of coated cylinders in a rotary setup. Four commercial FCCs were exposed for 53 weeks in Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, i.e., in relatively cold seawater (salinity of 1.2 wt%), from the spring of 2013 to the autumn of 2014. The in situ immersion...

  4. Formalization of the kinetics for autocatalytic dissolutions. Focus on the dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, F.; Canion, D.; Gravinese, A.; Magnaldo, A.; Lalleman, S.; Borda, G.; Schaer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid is a complex reaction. On the one hand, the dissolution produces nitrous oxides (NOX), which makes it a triphasic reaction. On the other hand, one of the products accelerates the kinetic rate; the reaction is hence called autocatalytic.The kinetics for these kinds of reactions need to be formalized in order to optimize and design innovative dissolution reactors. In this work, the kinetics rates have been measured by optical microscopy using a single particle approach. The advantages of this analytical technique are an easier management of species transport in solution and a precise following of the dissolution rate. The global rate is well described by a mechanism considering two steps: a non-catalyzed reaction, where the catalyst concentration has no influence on the dissolution rate, and a catalyzed reaction. The mass transfer rate of the catalyst was quantified in order to discriminate when the reaction was influenced by catalyst accumulated in the boundary layer or uncatalyzed. This first approximation described well the sigmoid dissolution curve profile. Moreover, experiments showed that solutions filled with catalyst proved to lose reactivity over time. Results pointed out that the higher the liquid-gas exchanges, the faster the kinetic rate decreases with time. Thus, it was demonstrated, for the first time, that there is a link between catalyst and nitrous oxides. The outcome of this study leads to new ways for improving the design of dissolvers. Gas-liquid exchanges are indeed a lever to impact dissolution rates. Temperature and catalyst concentration can be optimized to reduce residence times in dissolvers. (authors)

  5. Polarographic determination of uranium dioxide stoichiometry; La determination polarographique de la stoechiometrie du dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viguie, J.; Uny, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1966-10-01

    The method described allows the determination of small deviations from stoichiometry for uranium dioxide. It was applied to the study of surface oxidation of bulk samples. The sample is dissolved in phosphoric acid under an argon atmosphere; U(VI) is determined by polarography in PO{sub 4}H{sub 3} 4.5 N - H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 4 N. U(IV) is determined by potentiometry. The detection limit is UO{sub 2,0002}. The accuracy for a single determination at the 95% confidence level is {+-}20 per cent for samples with composition included between UO{sub 2,001} and UO{sub 2,01}. (authors) [French] La methode decrite permet de determiner les faibles ecarts a la stoechiometrie du dioxyde d'uranium. Elle a ete appliquee a l'etude de l'oxydation superficielle des echantillons. La mise en solution s'effectue dans l'acide phosphorique concentre sous atmosphere d'argon; U(VI) est dose par polarographie dans le milieu PO{sub 4}H{sub 3} 4,5 N et H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 4 N; U(IV) est dose par potentiometrie. La limite de detection est UO{sub 2,0002}. La precision obtenue pour une determination au taux de certitude 0,95 est de l'ordre de 20 pour cent pour des echantillons dont la teneur est comprise entre UO{sub 2,001} et UO{sub 2,01}. (auteurs)

  6. Review of experimental studies of zirconium carbide coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of zirconium carbide(ZrC) coated fuel particles were reviewed from the viewpoints of fuel particle designs, fabrication, characterization, fuel performance, and fission product retentiveness. ZrC is known as a refractory and chemically stable compound, so ZrC is a candidate to replace the silicon carbide(SiC) coating layer of the Triso-coated fuel particles. The irradiation experiments, the postirradiation heating tests, and the out-of-reactor experiments showed that the ZrC layer was less susceptible than the SiC layer to chemical attack by fission products and fuel kernels, and that the ZrC-coated fuel particles performed better than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles at high temperatures, especially above 1600degC. The ZrC-coated fuel particles demonstrated better cesium retention than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles though the ZrC layer showed a less effective barrier to ruthenium than the SiC layer. (author) 51 refs

  7. Cask size and weight reduction through the use of depleted uranium dioxide-concrete material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobach, S.Yu.; Haire, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Newly developed depleted uranium (DU) composite materials enable fabrication of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transport and storage casks that are smaller and lighter in weight than casks made with conventional materials. One such material is DU dioxide (DUO2)-concrete, so-called DUCRETE TM . This paper examines the radiation shielding efficiency of DUCRETE as compared with that of a conventional concrete cask that holds 32 pressurized-water-reactor SNF assemblies. In this analysis, conventional concrete shielding material is replaced with DUCRETE. The thickness of the DUCRETE shielding is adjusted to give the same radiation surface dose, 200 mrem/h (2 mSv/hr), as the conventional concrete cask. It was found that the concrete shielding thickness decreased from 71 to 20 cm and that the cask radial cross-section shielding area was reduced approx 50 %. The weight was reduced approx 21 %, from 154 to approx 127 tons. Should one choose to add an extra outer ring of SNF assemblies, the number of such assemblies would increase from 32 to 52. In this case, the outside cask diameter would still decrease, from 169 to 137 cm. However, the weight would increase somewhat from 156 to 177 tons. Neutron cask surface dose is only approx 10 % of the gamma dose. These reduced sizes and weights will significantly influence the design of next-generation SNF casks

  8. Coatings for Fuel Cell Propulsion Compressor Bearings, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fuel cell air handling systems require clean and contaminant-free inlet air, which dictates that oil-free, motorized, compressor/expander systems should be used....

  9. Examination of the surface coatings removed from K-East Basin fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; Jenson, E.D.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides the results of studies conducted on coatings discovered on the surfaces of some N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) elements stored at the Hanford K-East Basin. These elements had been removed from the canisters and visually examined in-basin during FY 1996 as part of a series of characterization tests. The characterization tests are being performed to support the Integrated Process Strategy developed to package, dry, transport, and store the SNF in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site. Samples of coating materials were removed from K-East canister elements 2350E and 2540E, which had been sent, along with nine other elements, to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building) for further characterization following the in-basin examinations. These coating samples were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using various analytical methods. This report is part of the overall studies to determine the drying behavior of corrosion products associated with the K-Basin fuel elements. Altogether, five samples of coating materials were analyzed. These analyses suggest that hydration of the coating materials could be an additional source of moisture in the Multi-Canister Overpacks being used to contain the fuel for storage

  10. Examination of the surface coating removed from K-East Basin fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; Jenson, E.D.

    1998-05-01

    This report provides the results of studies conducted on coatings discovered on the surfaces of some N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) elements stored at the Hanford K-East Basin. These elements had been removed from the canisters and visually examined in-basin during FY 1996 as part of a series of characterization tests. The characterization tests are being performed to support the Integrated Process Strategy developed to package, dry, transport, and store the SNF in an interim storage facility on the Hanford site. Samples of coating materials were removed from K-East canister elements 2350E and 2540E, which had been sent, along with nine other elements, to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building) for further characterization following the in-basin examinations. These coating samples were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using various analytical methods. This report is part of the overall studies to determine the drying behavior of corrosion products associated with the K-Basin fuel elements. Altogether, five samples of coating materials were analyzed. These analyses suggest that hydration of the coating materials could be an additional source of moisture in the Multi-Canister Overpacks being used to contain the fuel for storage.

  11. International R and D project on development of coated particle fuel for innovative reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents an outline for an international collaborative project of coated particle fuel development for innovative reactors. Specific issues include identification of R and D needs and the Member State facilities for meeting the needs followed by development and demonstration of technology. (author)

  12. Interaction between UO2 kernel and pyrocarbon coating in irradiated and unirradiated HTR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drago, A.; Klersy, R.; Simoni, O.; Schrader, K.H.

    1975-08-01

    Experimental observations on unidirectional UO 2 kernel migration in TRISO type coated particle fuels are reported. An analysis of the experimental results on the basis of data and models from the literature is reported. The stoichiometric composition of the kernel is considered the main parameter that, associated with a temperature gradient, controls the unidirectional kernel migration

  13. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  14. In situ ceramic layer growth on coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, K. A.; Silva, C. M.; Kiggans, J. O.; Cai, Z.; Shin, D.; Snead, L. L.

    2013-06-01

    The extent and nature of the chemical interaction between the outermost coating layer of coated fuel particles embedded in zirconium metal during fabrication of metal matrix microencapsulated fuels were examined. Various particles with outermost coating layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, and ZrC have been investigated in this study. ZrC-Zr interaction was the least substantial, while the PyC-Zr reaction can be exploited to produce a ZrC layer at the interface in an in situ manner. The thickness of the ZrC layer in the latter case can be controlled by adjusting the time and temperature during processing. The kinetics of ZrC layer growth is significantly faster from what is predicted using literature carbon diffusivity data in ZrC. SiC-Zr interaction is more complex and results in formation of various chemical phases in a layered aggregate morphology at the interface.

  15. Development of a FE Model for the Stress Analysis of HTGR TRISO-coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Finite element modelling of the stresses in TRISO-coated fuel particle under normal operating conditions was carried out with use of the structural analysis computer code ABAQUS. The FE model took into account the irradiation induced swelling and the creep of the PyC layers, the internal fission gas pressure that builds up during irradiation and the constant external ambient pressure. All of the inputs such as particle dimensions, swelling rates and creep rates of PyC layers and other mechanical properties used in these calculations were adopted from Miller's publication published in 1993. The FE model was verified against Miller's solution. Results of this model were found to be in good agreement with Miller's results. With use of the FE model, the static behavior of the TRISO-coated fuel particle, such as load shares, stress contours, stress variations as a function of fluence and shape changes of the TRISO -coated layers were investigated

  16. Uranium dioxide in Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids with DMSO: Dissolution, separation, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Aining; Chu, Taiwei, E-mail: twchu@pku.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    UO{sub 2} can be successfully dissolved in imidazolium-based Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids (ILs) with the help of DMSO. Spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction show that UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2−} is the principal product. The dissolved uranyl species can be easily separated from the ILs via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction. Moreover, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd, compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. The solvents of acetone and acetonitrile could be used to separate the rare-earth elements from uranium in the IL with the help of imidazolium chloride. Considering the complete process from the dissolution of UO{sub 2} and some rare-earth oxides to the separation of uranium and rare-earth elements in the IL, the facile approach is promising for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. - Graphical abstract: UO{sub 2} can be successfully dissolved in Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO to form UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The rare earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd can be separated from uranium in the IL, and meanwhile, the recovery of dissolved uranyl species and Fe-containing IL can also be achieved. - Highlights: • Dissolution of UO{sub 2} can be successfully achieved in imidazolium-based Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO without additional oxidants. • Compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. • The separation of the rare-earth elements from uranium has also been achieved via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction.

  17. Uranium dioxide in Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids with DMSO: Dissolution, separation, and structural characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Aining; Chu, Taiwei

    2016-01-01

    UO_2 can be successfully dissolved in imidazolium-based Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids (ILs) with the help of DMSO. Spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction show that UO_2Cl_4"2"− is the principal product. The dissolved uranyl species can be easily separated from the ILs via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction. Moreover, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd, compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. The solvents of acetone and acetonitrile could be used to separate the rare-earth elements from uranium in the IL with the help of imidazolium chloride. Considering the complete process from the dissolution of UO_2 and some rare-earth oxides to the separation of uranium and rare-earth elements in the IL, the facile approach is promising for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. - Graphical abstract: UO_2 can be successfully dissolved in Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO to form UO_2Cl_4"2"−. The rare earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd can be separated from uranium in the IL, and meanwhile, the recovery of dissolved uranyl species and Fe-containing IL can also be achieved. - Highlights: • Dissolution of UO_2 can be successfully achieved in imidazolium-based Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO without additional oxidants. • Compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. • The separation of the rare-earth elements from uranium has also been achieved via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction.

  18. Phosphonitrilic Fluoroelastomer Coated Fabrics for Collapsible Fuel Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    Coated F,,brics .*.... *• .. ...... ..... •---*..,- *... 97 36. Stabilizer Masterbatch Formulations R21960 and -601. 58 37- Banbury "BR" Mixes of P®FO...minutes total mix time. The mix is then dumped. Curing agent is then added to the masterbatch banded on a mill. Ambient temperature mills were generally...maximum flow. 0 minutes-load polymer. speed: slow (77 rpm) 2 minutes-add fillers 7 minutes-add stabilizer masterbatch 15 minutevk-dunip mix To obtain as

  19. Improved gas distributor for coating HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackey, W.J.; Stinton, D.P.; Sease, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    The important criteria to be considered in design of the gas distributor are: (1) The distributor should ideally spread or disperse the gas over the full area of the coating chamber to maximize the particle gas contact area and thereby increase both particle circulation and the percentage of the input gas that ends up as coating. (2) The gas should not heat up during its passage through the distributor. Otherwise the gas would partially decompose prematurely, causing excessive coating deposition within or on the distributor. (3) The distributor should be designed to minimize accidental drainage of particles from the furnace and blowover of particles into the effluent system. (4) The distributor should be capable of depositing both carbon and SiC coatings of high quality as regards to density, preferred orientation, permeability, defective fraction, and other product attributes. (5) The distributor should be amenable to use with large particle charges and short turnaround times and be simple, inexpensive, and reliable. We have devised a simple distributor that incorporates the five criteria listed above. The new design is termed a blind-hole frit. All the gas passes through the thinned blind-hole regions, and thus the gas velocity is considerably higher than for a flat frit of uniform thickness. Because of its high velocity, the gas does not have time to reach a high enough temperature to cause deposition within the frit. Also most of the resistance to gas flow is provided by the porous distributor and not by the particle bed; therefore, localized variations of the quantity of particles above any particular gas inlet do not significantly alter the flow rate through that inlet

  20. Study on the development of coating technology for UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel pellet and the microstructural observation of the coated layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong; Song, Moon Sup; Cho, In Sik; Kim Yu Sin; Lim Young Kyun [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    In order to enhance inherent safety of UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel pellet and develop future nuclear fuel technology, a coating method for the preparation multi-layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide on the fuel was developed. Inner pyrolytic carbon layer and outer silicon layer were prepared by thermal decomposition of propane in a fluidized bed type CVD unit and silane in ECR PECVD, respectively. Combustion reaction between two layers resulted in forming silicon carbide layer. The morphology depended on the initial carbon shape. Phase identification and microstructural analysis of the combustion product with XRD, AES, SEM and TEM showed that final products of inner layer and outer layer were pyrolytic carbon with isotropic structure and fine crystalline {beta}-SiC, respectively. This coating process is very useful for the fabrication of coated UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel pellet an future nuclear fuel fabrication technology. (author). 45 refs., 47 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Design Optimization of Liquid Fueled High Velocity Oxy- Fuel Thermal Spraying Technique for Durable Coating for Fossil Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Love, Norman [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2016-11-04

    High-velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was developed in 1930 and has been commercially available for twenty-five years. HVOF thermal spraying has several benefits over the more conventional plasma spray technique including a faster deposition rate which leads to quicker turn-around, with more durable coatings and higher bond strength, hardness and wear resistance due to a homogeneous distribution of the sprayed particles. HVOF thermal spraying is frequently used in engineering to deposit cermets, metallic alloys, composites and polymers, to enhance product life and performance. HVOF thermal spraying system is a highly promising technique for applying durable coatings on structural materials for corrosive and high temperature environments in advanced ultra-supercritical coal- fired (AUSC) boilers, steam turbines and gas turbines. HVOF thermal spraying is the preferred method for producing coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. HVOF thermal spray process has been shown to be one of the most efficient techniques to deposit high performance coatings at moderate cost. Variables affecting the deposit formation and coating properties include hardware characteristics such as nozzle geometry and spraying distance and process parameters such as equivalence ratio, gas flow density, and powder feedstock. In the spray process, the powder particles experience very high speeds combined with fast heating to the powder material melting point or above. This high temperature causes evaporation of the powder, dissolution, and phase transformations. Due to the complex nature of the HVOF technique, the control and optimization of the process is difficult. In general, good coating quality with suitable properties and required performance for specific applications is the goal in producing thermal spray coatings. In order to reach this goal, a deeper understanding of the spray process as a whole is needed. Although many researchers studied commercial HVOF thermal spray

  2. Compatibility studies on Mo-coating systems for nuclear fuel cladding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Huan Chin; Hosemann, Peter; Glaeser, Andreas M.; Cionea, Cristian

    2017-12-01

    To improve the safety factor of nuclear power plants in accident scenarios, molybdenum (Mo), with its high-temperature strength, is proposed as a potential fuel-cladding candidate. However, Mo undergoes rapid oxidation and sublimation at elevated temperatures in oxygen-rich environments. Thus, it is necessary to coat Mo with a protective layer. The diffusional interactions in two systems, namely, Zircaloy-2 (Zr2) on a Mo tube, and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) on a Mo rod, were studied by aging coated Mo substrates in high vacuum at temperatures ranging from 650 °C to 1000° for 1000 h. The specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and nanoindentation. In both systems, pores in the coating increased in size and number with increasing temperature over time, and cracks were also observed; intermetallic phases formed between the Mo and its coatings.

  3. Evaluation of steam corrosion and water quenching behavior of zirconium-silicide coated LWR fuel claddings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Hwasung; Lockhart, Cody; Mariani, Robert; Xu, Peng; Corradini, Michael; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    This study investigates steam corrosion of bulk ZrSi2, pure Si, and zirconium-silicide coatings as well as water quenching behavior of ZrSi2 coatings to evaluate its feasibility as a potential accident-tolerant fuel cladding coating material in light water nuclear reactor. The ZrSi2 coating and Zr2Si-ZrSi2 coating were deposited on Zircaloy-4 flats, SiC flats, and cylindrical Zircaloy-4 rodlets using magnetron sputter deposition. Bulk ZrSi2 and pure Si samples showed weight loss after the corrosion test in pure steam at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 72 h. Silicon depletion on the ZrSi2 surface during the steam test was related to the surface recession observed in the silicon samples. ZrSi2 coating (∼3.9 μm) pre-oxidized in 700 °C air prevented substrate oxidation but thin porous ZrO2 formed on the coating. The only condition which achieved complete silicon immobilization in the oxide scale in aqueous environments was the formation of ZrSiO4 via ZrSi2 coating oxidation in 1400 °C air. In addition, ZrSi2 coatings were beneficial in enhancing quenching heat transfer - the minimum film boiling temperature increased by 6-8% in the three different environmental conditions tested. During repeated thermal cycles (water quenching from 700 °C to 85 °C for 20 s) performed as a part of quench tests, no spallation and cracking was observed and the coating prevented oxidation of the underlying Zircaloy-4 substrate.

  4. A Study on Silicide Coatings as Diffusion barrier for U-7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Ju Jin; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Chong Tak [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gamma phase U-Mo alloys are regarded as one of the promising candidates for advanced research reactor fuel when it comes to the irradiation performance. However, it has been reported that interaction layer formation between the UMo alloys and Al matrix degrades the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel. The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at 900 .deg. C for 1hr. U-Mo alloy powder was mixed with MoSi{sub 2}, Si and ZrSi{sub 2} powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. Silicide coated U-Mo powders and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The ZrSi{sub 2} coating layers has a thickness of about 1∼ 2μm. The surface of a silicide coated particle was very rough and silicide powder attached to the surface of the coating layer. 3. The XRD analysis of the coating layers showed that, they consisted of compounds such as U3Si{sub 2}, USi{sub 2}.

  5. Influence of process variables on permeability and anisotropy of Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Thiele, B.A.

    1977-11-01

    The effect of several important process variables on the fraction of defective particles and anisotropy of the low-temperature isotropic (LTI) coating layer was determined for Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Process variables considered are deposition temperature, hydrocarbon type, diluent type, and percent diluent. The effect of several other variables such as coating rate and density that depend on the process variables were also considered in this analysis. The fraction of defective particles was controlled by the dependent variables coating rate and LTI density. Coating rate was also the variable controlling the anisotropy of the LTI layer. Diluent type and diluent concentration had only a small influence on the deposition rate of the LTI layer. High-quality particles in terms of anisotropy and permeability can be produced by use of a porous plate gas distributor if the coating rate is between 3 and 5 μm/min and the coating density is between about 1.75 and 1.95 g/cm 3

  6. Fuel performance, design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.N.; Tripathi, Rahul Mani; Soni, Rakesh; Ravi, M.; Vijay Kumar, S.; Dwivedi, K.P.; Pandarinathan, P.R.; Neema, L.K.

    2006-01-01

    The normal fuel configurations for operating 220 MWe and 540 MWe PHWRs are natural uranium dioxide 19-element and 37- element fuel bundle types respectively. The fuel configuration for BWRs is 6 x 6 fuel. So far, about 330 thousand PHWR fuel bundles and 3500 number of BWR bundles have been irradiated in the 14 PHWRs and 2 BWRs. Improvements in fuel design, fabrication, quality control and operating practices are continuously carried out towards improving fuel utilization as well as reducing fuel failure rate. Efforts have been put to improve the fuel bundle utilization by increasing the fuel discharge burnup of the natural uranium bundles The overall fuel failure rate currently is less than 0.1 % . Presently the core discharge burnups in different reactors are around 7500 MWD/TeU. The paper gives the fuel performance experience over the years in the different power reactors and actions taken to improve fuel performance over the years. (author)

  7. Self reliance in equipment building for PHWR fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastry, V.S.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Keeping in tune with the policy of self-reliance and indigenisation adopted from the very inception of nuclear power programme in India during the mid 1960, Nuclear Fuel Complex, established in the year 1971, developed its own processes, equipment and technologies based on both in-house experience and the expertise available in the indigenous industry. Starting from the basic raw materials, Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) manufactures and supplies finished fuel assemblies, apart from zircaloy core components, to all the nuclear power stations in India. Out of several products manufactured by NFC, 19 and 37 element fuel bundles for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) is vital for operation of several PHWRs being operated by Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL). Starting from the manufacturing of half-charge for RAPS-1, more than 3.8 lakh fuel bundles were made till now. Several process improvements were taken up over the years for improving the quality of the fuel. PHWR fuel bundles manufactured by NFC has adopted an unique feature of joining appendages on zirconium alloy tubes by resistance welding before loading natural uranium dioxide pellets. Graphite coating on the inner surface of the zirconium alloy tube and vacuum baking, use of profiled end caps, use of bio-degradable cleaning agents are some of the processes adopted in the manufacturing of PHWR fuel bundles. With the recent opening up of international nuclear trade for India and the enhanced growth of nuclear power, exciting opportunities and challenges confront NFC. This paper presents salient features of some important special purpose equipment developed in-house at NFC for production of PHWR fuel bundles. It looks ahead to develop many more such special purpose equipment towards meeting the diverse demands now showing up to meet the indigenous as well as international requirements

  8. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ORGANOMETALLIC COATING APLICATED IN FUEL TANKS USING ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN BIOFUEL – PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Adriane Luciano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the industry has opted for more sustainable production processes, and the planet has also opted for new energy sources. From this perspective, automotive tanks with organometallic coatings as well as a partial substitution of fossil fuels by biofuels have been developed. These organometallic coated tanks have a zinc layer, deposited by a galvanizing process, formed between the steel and the organometallic coating. This work aims to characterize the organometallic coating used in metal automotive tanks and evaluate their corrosion resistance in contact with hydrated ethyl alcohol fuel (AEHC. For this purpose, the resistance of all layers formed between Zinc and EEP steel and also the tin coated steel, which has been used for over thirty years, were evaluated. The technique chosen was the Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. The results indicated an increase on the corrosion resistance when organometallic coatings are used in AEHC medium. In addition to that, these coatings allow an estimated 25% reduction in tanks production costs.

  9. Construction of a sputtering reactor for the coating and processing of monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In the presented thesis sputter deposition was used for the first time to coat monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel foils with diffusion inhibitive materials. The intention of these coatings is to prevent the formation of an interdiffusion layer between U-Mo and Al cladding during the use of the fuel. A small sputtering reactor was built, in which the method was tested and processing parameters were investigated. In parallel a larger sputtering reactor was constructed, that allows to coat full size monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel foils and was used to test an industrial application of the technique. As a result a method based on sputter deposition and erosion can be presented, that allows to clean as well as to coat the surface of monolithic U-Mo nuclear fuel foils in excellent quality. It can be included at any time into the manufacturing chain for U-Mo fuel elements, which is currently being developed.

  10. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  11. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V{sub 2}C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V{sub 2}C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  12. Performance of Nb protective diffusion coating on U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Sohn, Dong-Seong [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghwan; Nam, Ji Min; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To achieve this aim, it is necessary to increase the volume fraction of fuel particles inside the meat. However, the technical limit is reached at approximately 55 vol.% of fuel particles in the aluminum matrix. As a solution, an uranium compound with an higher uranium density than existing U3Si2 fuel has to be selected. Also alloying the uranium must stabilize γ-phase of uranium at room temperature because adequate properties of the γ -phase of uranium showed a good irradiation behavior in the past. Hence, U-Mo alloys were selected as the best candidates. The formation of interaction phase is a critical problem to apply U-Mo alloys to the high performance research reactor. Different means have been proposed to reduce the interaction between U-Mo fuel and Al matrix. There are three means. : 1. Addition of a diffusion limiting element to the matrix 2. Insertion of a diffusion barrier at the interface between the U-Mo and the Al 3. Alloying of the U-Mo with a third element Here we present the effect of Nb coating as diffusion barrier on formation of interaction layers between UMo powders and Al matrix. We present the effect of Nb coating on formation of interaction layers between U-Mo powders and Al matrix. Centrifugally atomized U-7 wt.% Mo powders were used, and Nb was coated on the surface of U-7 wt.% Mo by sputtering. Subsequently, the Nb-coated U-7 wt.% Mo powders were mixed with pure Al powders, and were made into compacts. The compacts were annealed at 550 .deg. C for 1, 3, 5 hours, respectively, and the result showed that the Nb coating on U-7 wt.% Mo effectively suppressed the growth of interaction layers between U-7 wt.% Mo and Al matrix.

  13. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  14. Fractional release of short-lived noble gases and iodine from HTGR fuel compact containing a fraction of coated fuel particles with through-coating defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kosaku; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Kikuchi, Teruo; Tobita, Tsutomu; Kashimura, Satoru; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Katsumune.

    1986-10-01

    Fractional release (R/B) data of short-lived noble gases and iodine from sweep-gas irradiated HTGR fuel compacts were analyzed. Empirical formulas to predict R/B of 88 Kr as a function of temperature and fraction through-coating defects, and to calculate ratios of R/B's of other shortlived gases to that of 88 Kr were proposed. A method to predict R/B of iodine was also proposed. As for 131 I, a fission product of major safety concern, (R/B) I 131 ≅ (R/B) Xe 133 was predicted. Applying those methods, R/B from OGL-1 fuel element (5th and 6th) was predicted to show a good agreement with observation. (author)

  15. In-pile test results of U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-7Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Park, J. M.; Lee, K. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Ryu, H. J.; Ye, B.

    2014-11-01

    U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al (U-Mo/Al) was in-pile tested to examine the effectiveness of the coating as a diffusion barrier between the U-7Mo fuel kernels and Al matrix. This paper reports the PIE data and analyses focusing on the effectiveness of the coating in terms of interaction layer (IL) growth and general fuel performance. The U-silicide coating showed considerable success, but it also provided evidence for additional improvement for coating process. The U-nitride coated specimen showed largely inefficient results in reducing IL growth. From the test, important observations were also made that can be utilized to improve U-Mo/Al fuel performance. The heating process for coating turned out to be beneficial to suppress fuel swelling. The use of larger fuel particles confirmed favorable effects on fuel performance.

  16. In-pile test results of U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-7Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo, E-mail: yskim@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Park, J.M.; Lee, K.H.; Yoo, B.O. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, H.J. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, B. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al (U-Mo/Al) was in-pile tested to examine the effectiveness of the coating as a diffusion barrier between the U-7Mo fuel kernels and Al matrix. This paper reports the PIE data and analyses focusing on the effectiveness of the coating in terms of interaction layer (IL) growth and general fuel performance. The U-silicide coating showed considerable success, but it also provided evidence for additional improvement for coating process. The U-nitride coated specimen showed largely inefficient results in reducing IL growth. From the test, important observations were also made that can be utilized to improve U-Mo/Al fuel performance. The heating process for coating turned out to be beneficial to suppress fuel swelling. The use of larger fuel particles confirmed favorable effects on fuel performance.

  17. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings

  18. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings.

  19. Does the conductivity of interconnect coatings matter for solid oxide fuel cell applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Claudia; Fefekos, Alexander G.; Svensson, Jan-Erik; Froitzheim, Jan

    2018-04-01

    The present work aims to quantify the influence of typical interconnect coatings used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) on area specific resistance (ASR). To quantify the effect of the coating, the dependency of coating thickness on the ASR is examined on Crofer 22 APU at 600 °C. Three different Co coating thicknesses are investigated, 600 nm, 1500 nm, and 3000 nm. Except for the reference samples, the material is pre-oxidized prior to coating to mitigate the outward diffusion of iron and consequent formation of poorly conducting (Co,Fe)3O4 spinel. Exposures are carried out at 600 °C in stagnant laboratory air for 500 h and subsequent ASR measurements are performed. Additionally the microstructure is investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On all pre-oxidized samples, a homogenous dense Co3O4 top layer is observed beneath which a thin layer of Cr2O3 is present. As the ASR values range between 7 and 12 mΩcm2 for all pre-oxidized samples, even though different Co3O4 thicknesses are observed, the results strongly suggest that for most applicable cases the impact of the coating on ASR is negligible and the main contributor is Cr2O3.

  20. Development method for measuring thickness of nuclei and coating of fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges Junior, Reinaldo

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important components of a nuclear reactor is the Nuclear Fuel. Currently, the most advanced commercial fuel, whose applicability in Brazilian reactors has been developed by IPEN since 1985, is the silicide U 3 Si 2 . This is formed by fuel plates with nuclei dispersion (where the fissile material (U 3 Si 2 ) is homogeneously dispersed in a matrix of aluminum) coated aluminum. This fuel is produced in Brazil with developed technology, the result of the efforts made by the group of manufacturing nuclear fuel (CCN - Center of Nuclear Fuel) of IPEN. Considering the necessity of increasing the power of the IEA- R1 and Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor Building (RMB), for the production of radioisotopes - mainly for the area of medicine - there will be significant increase in the production of nuclear fuel at IPEN. Given this situation, if necessary, make the development of more modern and automated classification techniques. Aiming at this goal, this work developed a new computational method for measuring thickness of core and cladding of fuel plates, which are able to perform such measurements in less time and with more meaningful statistical data when compared with the current method of measurement. (author)

  1. Determination of uranium in coated fuel particle compact by potassium fluoride fusion-gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Mitsuo; Iso, Shuichi; Hoshino, Akira; Suzuki, Shuichi.

    1992-03-01

    Potassium fluoride-gravimetric method has been developed for the determination of uranium in TRISO type-coated fuel particle compact. Graphite matrix in the fuel compact is burned off by heating it in a platinum crucible at 850degC. The coated fuel particles thus obtained are decomposed by fusion with potassium fluoride at 900degC. The melt was dissolved with sulfuric acid. Uranium is precipitated as ammonium diuranate, by passing ammonia gas through the solution. The resulting precipitate is heated in a muffle furnace at 850degC, to convert uranium into triuranium octoxide. Uranium in the triuranium octoxide was determined gravimetrically. Ten grams of caoted fuel particles were completely decomposed by fusion with 50 g of potassium fluoride at 900degC for 3 hrs. Analytical result for uranium in the fuel compact by the proposed method was 21.04 ± 0.05 g (n = 3), and was in good agreement with that obtained by non-destructive γ-ray measurement method : 21.01 ± 0.07 g (n = 3). (author)

  2. Physicochemical analysis of interaction of oxide fuel with pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Khromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium pressure of (CO+Kr,Xe) gases inside fuel particle with oxide kern depending on design features of fuel particle, on temperature. on (O/U) initial composition and fuel burnup is calculated using the suggested model. Analysis of possibility for gas pressure reduction by means of uranium carbide alloying of kern and degree increase of solid fission product retention (Cs for example) during alumosilicate alloying of uranium oxide is conducted

  3. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  4. Anisotropy variation of crystallographic orientation in pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles by annealing and neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizlik, K.

    1973-04-15

    This document is a translation of those parts of the German report Jul-868-RW concerned with changes in anisotropy as determined using an optical technique on pyrocarbon coatings on fuel particles resulting from annealing and neutron irradiations. Two lists of contents are included, one is for the present document and the other is the full contents of the original report and is included for the generl interest of users.

  5. A highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Mohamed R; Hafez, Inas H; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-11-23

    Driven by the demand for the commercialization of fuel cell (FC) technology, we describe the design and fabrication of a highly durable FC electrocatalyst based on double-polymer-coated carbon nanotubes for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The fabricated electrocatalyst is composed of Pt-deposited polybenzimidazole-coated carbon nanotubes, which are further coated with Nafion. By using this electrocatalyst, a high FC performance with a power density of 375 mW/cm(2) (at 70 ˚C, 50% relative humidity using air (cathode)/H2(anode)) was obtained, and a remarkable durability of 500,000 accelerated potential cycles was recorded with only a 5% loss of the initial FC potential and 20% loss of the maximum power density, which were far superior properties compared to those of the membrane electrode assembly prepared using carbon black in place of the carbon nanotubes. The present study indicates that the prepared highly durable fuel cell electrocatalyst is a promising material for the next generation of PEMFCs.

  6. Test plan for techniques to measure and remove coatings from K West Basin fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, A.E.; Pitner, A.L.; Makenas, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    Several types of coatings have previously been visually identified on the surface of 105-K East and 105-K West Basins fuel elements. One type of coating (found only in K West Basin) in particular was found to be a thick translucent material that was often seen to be dislodged from the elements as flakes when the elements were handled during visual examinations (Pitner 1997). Subsequently it was determined (for one element only in a hot cell) that this material, in the dry condition, could easily be removed from the element using a scraping tool. The coating was identified as Al(OH) 3 through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses and to be approximately 60 microm thick via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, brushing under water in the basin using numerous mechanical strokes failed to satisfactorily remove these coatings in their thickest form as judged by appearance. Such brushing was done with only one type of metal brush, a brush design previously found satisfactory for removing UO 4 .xH 2 O coatings from the elements

  7. Results of experimental investigations for substantiation of WWER cermet fuel pin performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.V.; Karpin, A.D.; Isupov, I.A.; Rumyantsev, V.N.; Troyanov, V.M.; Subonyaev, V.N.; Melnichenko, N.A.

    1997-01-01

    The out-of-pile experiment results on interaction of the cladding and matrix materials and uranium dioxide at cermet fuel temperature for normal operating conditions of the WWER-440 reactor are analyzed. Cermet fuel element behaviour under the maximum designed damage of the WWER-440 reactor is considered. In the AM reactor loop a fission product output from the unsealed cermet fuel elements have been studied. (author). 6 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Multilayer (TiN, TiAlN) ceramic coatings for nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alat, Ece, E-mail: exa179@psu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Motta, Arthur T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Comstock, Robert J.; Partezana, Jonna M. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Beulah Rd, Pittsburgh, PA 1332 (United States); Wolfe, Douglas E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Applied Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, 119 Materials Research Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    In an attempt to develop an accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) that can delay the deleterious consequences of loss-of-coolant-accidents (LOCA), multilayer coatings were deposited onto ZIRLO{sup ®} coupon substrates by cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CA-PVD). Coatings were composed of alternating TiN (top) and Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N (2-layer, 4-layer, 8-layer and 16-layer) layers. The minimum TiN top coating thickness and coating architecture were optimized for good corrosion and oxidation resistance. Corrosion tests were performed in static pure water at 360 °C and 18.7 MPa for up to 90 days. The optimized coatings showed no spallation/delamination and had a maximum of 6 mg/dm{sup 2} weight gain, which is 6 times smaller than that of a control sample of uncoated ZIRLO{sup ®} which showed a weight gain of 40.2 mg/dm{sup 2}. The optimized architecture features a ∼1 μm TiN top layer to prevent boehmite phase formation during corrosion and a TiN/TiAlN 8-layer architecture which provides the best corrosion performance. - Highlights: • The first study on multilayer TiAlN and TiN ceramic coatings on ZIRLO{sup ®} coupons. • Corrosion tests were performed at 360°C and 18.7 MPa for up to 90 days. • Coatings adhered well to the substrate, and showed no spallation/delamination. • Weight gains were six times lower than those of uncoated ZIRLO{sup ®} samples. • Longer and higher temperature corrosion tests will be discussed in a further paper.

  9. The significance of strength of silicon carbide for the mechanical integrity of coated fuel particles for HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.; Scheer, A.; Schuster, H.; Taeuber, K.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and pyrocarbon are used as coating material for the HTR fuel particles. The PyC shell having a certain strength acts as a pressure vessel for the fission gases whereas the SiC shell has to retain the solid fission products in the fuel kernel. For measuring the strength of coating material the so-called Brittle Ring Test was developed. Strength and Young's modulus can be measured simultaneously with this method on SiC or PyC rings prepared out of the coating material of real fuel particles. The strength measured on the ring under a certain stress distribution which is characteristic for this method is transformed with the aid of the Weibull formalism for brittle fracture into the equivalent strength of the spherical coating shell on the fuel particle under uniform stress caused by the fission gas pressure. The values measured for the strength of the SiC were high (400-700MN/m 2 ), it could therefore be assumed that a SiC layer might contribute significantly also to the mechanical strength of the fuel coating. This assumption was confirmed by an irradiation test on coated particles with PyC-SiC-PyC coatings. There were several particles with all PyC layers broken during the irradiation, whereas the SiC layers remained intact having to withstand the fission gas pressure alone. This fact can only be explained assuming that the strength of the SiC is within the range of the values measured with the brittle ring test. The result indicates that, in optimising the coating of a fuel particle, the PyC layers of a multilayer coating should be considered alone as prospective layers for the SiC. The SiC shell, besides acting as a fission product barrier, is then also responsible for the mechanical integrity of the particle

  10. Performance comparison of plane and cylindrical forms of sintered uranium dioxide for use in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, J.E.R. da.

    1989-01-01

    A study on the UO sub(2) performance and utilization in PWR's as plate and rod type fuel element is made. A comparative evaluation covering aspects of neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, thermal-mechanics and fuel performance is presented. The results to the plate type fuel, when comparing to the rod type fuel, show the following characteristics: larger reactivities and power densities; smaller quantities of fuel material are needed; pressure drop along the fuel channels are lower; fuel densification, swelling and fission gas release are minimized as a result of lower fuel temperatures. The results obtained for both fuels confirm the potential good performance of UO sub(2) in PWR's. Burnups up to 30.000 MWD/tonU can be achieved. (author)

  11. Performance limits of coated particle fuel. Part III. Fission product migration in HTR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabielek, H.; Hick, H.; Wagner-Loffler, M.; Voice, E. H.

    1974-06-15

    A general introduction and literature survey to the physics and mathematics of fission product migration in HTR fuel is given as well as a review of available experimental results and their evaluation in terms of models and materials data.

  12. Exact Solution of Fractional Diffusion Model with Source Term used in Study of Concentration of Fission Product in Uranium Dioxide Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chao; Cao Jianzhu; Sun Lifeng

    2011-01-01

    The exact solution of fractional diffusion model with a location-independent source term used in the study of the concentration of fission product in spherical uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) particle is built. The adsorption effect of the fission product on the surface of the UO 2 particle and the delayed decay effect are also considered. The solution is given in terms of Mittag-Leffler function with finite Hankel integral transformation and Laplace transformation. At last, the reduced forms of the solution under some special physical conditions, which is used in nuclear engineering, are obtained and corresponding remarks are given to provide significant exact results to the concentration analysis of nuclear fission products in nuclear reactor. (nuclear physics)

  13. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO/sub 2//Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented.

  14. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO 2 /Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented

  15. Standard test method for the determination of uranium by ignition and the oxygen to uranium (O/U) atomic ratio of nuclear grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.2 This test method does not include provisions for preventing criticality accidents or requirements for health and safety. Observance of this test method does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all international, national, or federal, state and local regulations pertaining to possessing, shipping, processing, or using source or special nuclear material. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 This test method also is applicable to UO3 and U3O8 powder.

  16. Nitride Coating Effect on Oxidation Behavior of Centrifugally Atomized U-Mo Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Jin; Cho, Woo Hyoung; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Yoon Sang; Yang, Jae Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Uranium metal and uranium compounds are being used as nuclear fuel materials and generally known as pyrophoric materials. Nowadays the importance of nuclear fuel about safety is being emphasized due to the vigorous exchanges and co-operations among the international community. According to the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program, the international research reactor community has decided to use low-enriched uranium instead of high-enriched uranium. As a part of the RERTR program, KAERI has developed centrifugally atomized U-Mo alloys as a promising candidate of research reactor fuel. Kang et al. studied the oxidation behavior of centrifugally atomized U-10wt% Mo alloy and it showed better oxidation resistance than uranium. In this study, the oxidation behavior of nitride coated U-7wt% Mo alloy is investigated to enhance the safety against pyrophoricity

  17. Fission product monitoring of TRISO coated fuel for the advanced gas reactor-1 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scates, Dawn M.; Hartwell, John K.; Walter, John B.; Drigert, Mark W.; Harp, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burnup of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B's) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  18. Cold spray deposition of Ti{sub 2}AlC coatings for improved nuclear fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Benjamin R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Hauch, Benjamin [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Olson, Luke C.; Sindelar, Robert L. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Sridharan, Kumar, E-mail: kumar@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Coatings of Ti{sub 2}AlC MAX phase compound have been successfully deposited on Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) test flats, with the goal of enhancing the accident tolerance of LWR fuel cladding. Low temperature powder spray process, also known as cold spray, has been used to deposit coatings ∼90 μm in thickness using powder particles of <20 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the phase-content of the deposited coatings to be identical to the powders indicating that no phase transformation or oxidation had occurred during the coating deposition process. The coating exhibited a high hardness of about 800 H{sub K} and pin-on-disk wear tests using abrasive ruby ball counter-surface showed the wear resistance of the coating to be significantly superior to the Zry-4 substrate. Scratch tests revealed the coatings to be well-adhered to the Zry-4 substrate. Such mechanical integrity is required for claddings from the standpoint of fretting wear resistance and resisting wear handling and insertion. Air oxidation tests at 700 °C and simulated LOCA tests at 1005 °C in steam environment showed the coatings to be significantly more oxidation resistant compared to Zry-4 suggesting that such coatings can potentially provide accident tolerance to nuclear fuel cladding. - Highlights: • Deposited Ti{sub 2}AlC coatings on Zircaloy-4 substrates with a low pressure powder spray process, also known as cold spray. • Coatings have high hardness and wear resistance for both damage resistance during rod insertion and fretting wear resistance. • The oxidation resistance of Ti{sub 2}AlC coated Zircaloy-4 at 700 °C and 1005 °C was significantly superior to uncoated Zircaloy. • Cold spray of Ti{sub 2}AlC demonstrates considerable promise as a near-term solution for accident tolerant Zr-alloy fuel claddings.

  19. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Satoshi; Kawada, Toshiyuki; Matsuzaki, Masayoshi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a fuel element for reducing the mechanical interactions between a fuel-cladding tube and the fuel element and for alleviating the limits of the operating conditions of a reactor. Constitution: A fuel element having mainly uranium dioxide consists of a cylindrical outer pellet and cylindrical inner pellet inserted into the outer pellet. The outer pellet contains two or more additives selected from aluminium oxide, beryllium oxide, magnesium oxide, silicon oxide, sodium oxide, phosphorus oxide, calcium oxide and iron oxide, and the inner pellet contains nuclear fuel substance solely or one additive selected from calcium oxide, silicon oxide, aluminium oxide, magnesium oxide, zirconium oxide and iron oxide. The outer pellet of the fuel thus constituted is reduced in mechanical strength and also in the mechanical interactions with the cladding tube, and the plastic fluidity of the entire pellet is prevented by the inner pellet increased in the mechanical strength. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis of the PWR Spent Fuel with a Pt Coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyoung Mun; Lee, Hyung Kwon; Son, Young Zoon; Chun, Yong Bum

    2012-01-01

    The PWR spent fuel sample should be coated with conducting material in order to provide a path for electrons and to prevent charging. Generally, the ZAF method has been used for quantitative electron probe microanalysis of conducting samples. However, the coated samples are not applicable for the ZAF method. Probe current, primary electron energy and x-ray produced by the primary beam are attenuated within the coating films. The electron and X-ray depth distributions for a quantitative electron probe micro analysis were simulated by the CASINO Monte Carlo program [2] to evaluate the x-ray attenuation within the Pt coating films. The target samples are the PWR spent fuels with 50 GWd/tU of burnup , 6 years of cooling time and a Pt coating film (3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 nm thickness)

  1. Monte Carlo Simulation of Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis of the PWR Spent Fuel with a Pt Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Mun; Lee, Hyung Kwon; Son, Young Zoon; Chun, Yong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The PWR spent fuel sample should be coated with conducting material in order to provide a path for electrons and to prevent charging. Generally, the ZAF method has been used for quantitative electron probe microanalysis of conducting samples. However, the coated samples are not applicable for the ZAF method. Probe current, primary electron energy and x-ray produced by the primary beam are attenuated within the coating films. The electron and X-ray depth distributions for a quantitative electron probe micro analysis were simulated by the CASINO Monte Carlo program [2] to evaluate the x-ray attenuation within the Pt coating films. The target samples are the PWR spent fuels with 50 GWd/tU of burnup , 6 years of cooling time and a Pt coating film (3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 nm thickness)

  2. Calculations of IAEA-CRP-6 Benchmark Case 1 through 7 for a TRISO-Coated Fuel Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Lee, Y. W.; Chang, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    IAEA-CRP-6 is a coordinated research program of IAEA on Advances in HTGR fuel technology. The CRP examines aspects of HTGR fuel technology, ranging from design and fabrication to characterization, irradiation testing, performance modeling, as well as licensing and quality control issues. The benchmark section of the program treats simple analytical cases, pyrocarbon layer behavior, single TRISO-coated fuel particle behavior, and benchmark calculations of some irradiation experiments performed and planned. There are totally seventeen benchmark cases in the program. Member countries are participating in the benchmark calculations of the CRP with their own developed fuel performance analysis computer codes. Korea is also taking part in the benchmark calculations using a fuel performance analysis code, COPA (COated PArticle), which is being developed in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. The study shows the calculational results of IAEACRP- 6 benchmark cases 1 through 7 which describe the structural behaviors for a single fuel particle

  3. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) with Silicon-Carbide-Matrix Coated-Particle Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C. W.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2012-01-01

    The FHR is a new reactor concept that uses coated-particle fuel and a low-pressure liquid-salt coolant. Its neutronics are similar to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The power density is 5 to 10 times higher because of the superior cooling properties of liquids versus gases. The leading candidate coolant salt is a mixture of 7 LiF and BeF 2 (FLiBe) possessing a boiling point above 1300 C and the figure of merit ρC p (volumetric heat capacity) for the salt slightly superior to water. Studies are underway to define a near-term base-line concept while understanding longer-term options. Near-term options use graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel where the graphite is both a structural component and the primary neutron moderator. It is the same basic fuel used in HTGRs. The fuel can take several geometric forms with a pebble bed being the leading contender. Recent work on silicon-carbide-matrix (SiCm) coated-particle fuel may create a second longer-term fuel option. SiCm coated-particle fuels are currently being investigated for use in light-water reactors. The replacement of the graphite matrix with a SiCm creates a new family of fuels. The first motivation behind the effort is to take advantage of the superior radiation resistance of SiC compared to graphite in order to provide a stable matrix for hosting coated fuel particles. The second motivation is a much more rugged fuel under accident, repository, and other conditions.

  4. In vitro performance of ceramic coatings obtained by high velocity oxy-fuel spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, H; Garcia-Giralt, N; Fernández, J; Díez-Pérez, A; Guilemany, J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings obtained by plasma-spraying have been used for many years to improve biological performance of bone implants, but several studies have drawn attention to the problems arising from high temperatures and the lack of mechanical properties. In this study, plasma-spraying is substituted by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray, with lower temperatures reached, and TiO2 is added in low amounts to hydroxyapatite in order to improve the mechanical properties. Four conditions have been tested to evaluate which are those with better biological properties. Viability and proliferation tests, as well as differentiation assays and morphology observation, are performed with human osteoblast cultures onto the studied coatings. The hydroxyapatite-TiO2 coatings maintain good cell viability and proliferation, especially the cases with higher amorphous phase amount and specific surface, and promote excellent differentiation, with a higher ALP amount for these cases than for polystyrene controls. Observation by SEM corroborates this excellent behaviour. In conclusion, these coatings are a good alternative to those used industrially, and an interesting issue would be improving biological behaviour of the worst cases, which in turn show the better mechanical properties.

  5. Wire rod coating process of gas diffusion layers fabrication for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, A.M.; Sadananda, S.; Parker, D.; Munukutla, L. [Electronic Systems Department, Arizona State University, 7001 E Williams Field Road, Mesa, AZ 85212 (United States); Wertz, J. [Hollingsworth and Vose Co., A.K. Nicholson Research Lab, 219 Townsend Road West Groton, MA 01472 (United States); Thommes, M. [Quantachrome Instruments, 1900 Corporate Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Gas diffusion layers (GDLs) were fabricated using non-woven carbon paper as a macro-porous layer substrate developed by Hollingsworth and Vose Company. A commercially viable coating process was developed using wire rod for coating micro-porous layer by a single pass. The thickness as well as carbon loading in the micro-porous layer was controlled by selecting appropriate wire thickness of the wire rod. Slurry compositions with solid loading as high as 10 wt.% using nano-chain and nano-fiber type carbons were developed using dispersion agents to provide cohesive and homogenous micro-porous layer without any mud-cracking. The surface morphology, wetting characteristics and pore size distribution of the wire rod coated GDLs were examined using FESEM, Goniometer and Hg porosimetry, respectively. The GDLs were evaluated in single cell PEMFC under various operating conditions (temperature and RH) using hydrogen and air as reactants. It was observed that the wire rod coated micro-porous layer with 10 wt.% nano-fibrous carbon based GDLs showed the highest fuel cell performance at 85 C using H{sub 2} and air at 50% RH, compared to all other compositions. (author)

  6. Behavior of an improved Zr fuel cladding with oxidation resistant coating under loss-of-coolant accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Jun, E-mail: pdj@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Hyun Gil; Jung, Yang Il; Park, Jung Hwan; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2016-12-15

    This study investigates protective coatings for improving the high temperature oxidation resistance of Zr fuel claddings for light water nuclear reactors. FeCrAl alloy and Cr layers were deposited onto Zr plates and tubes using cold spraying. For the FeCrAl/Zr system, a Mo layer was introduced between the FeCrAl coating and the Zr matrix to prevent inter-diffusion at high temperatures. Both the FeCrAl and Cr coatings improved the oxidation resistance compared to that of the uncoated Zr alloy when exposed to a steam environment at 1200 °C. The ballooning behavior and mechanical properties of the coated cladding samples were studied under simulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The coated samples showed higher burst temperatures, lower circumferential strain, and smaller rupture openings compared to the uncoated Zr. Although 4-point bend tests of the coated samples showed a small increase in the maximum load, ring compression tests of a sectioned sample showed increased ductility. - Highlights: • Cr and FeCrAl were coated onto Zr fuel cladding for light water nuclear reactors. • Mo layer between FeCrAl and Zr prevented inter-diffusion at high temperatures. • Coated claddings were tested under loss-of-cooling accident conditions. • Coating improved high-temperature oxidation resistance and mechanical properties.

  7. Ag-polytetrafluoroethylene composite coating on stainless steel as bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yu. [Laboratory of Fuel Cells, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hou, Ming; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian [Laboratory of Fuel Cells, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Xu, Hongfeng; Hou, Zhongjun; Ming, Pingwen [Sunrise Power Co., Ltd., Dalian 116025 (China)

    2008-08-01

    Forming a coating on metals by surface treatment is a good way to get high performance bipolar plate of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). In our research, Ag-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) composite film was electrodeposited with silver-gilt solution of nicotinic acid by a bi-pulse electroplating power supply on 316 L stainless steel bipolar plate of PEMFC. Surface topography, contact angle, interfacial conductivity and corrosion resistance of the bipolar plate samples were investigated. Results showed that the defects on the Ag-PTFE composite coating are greatly reduced compared with those on the pure Ag coating fabricated under the same condition; and the contact angle of the Ag-PTFE composite coating with water is 114 , which is much bigger than that of the pure Ag coating (73 ). In addition, the interfacial contact resistance of the composite coating stays as low as the pure Ag coating; and the bipolar plate sample with composite coating shows a close corrosion resistance to the pure Ag coating sample in potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests. Coated 316 L stainless steel plate with Ag-PTFE composite coating exhibits well hydrophobic characteristic, less defects, high interfacial conductivity and good corrosion resistance, which shows a great potential of the application in PEMFC. (author)

  8. Uranium loss from BISO-coated weak-acid-resin HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, R.L.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1977-02-01

    Recycle fuel for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contains a weak-acid-resin (WAR) kernel, which consists of a mixture of UC 2 , UO 2 , and free carbon. At 1900 0 C, BISO-coated WAR UC 2 or UC 2 -UO 2 kernels lose a significant portion of their uranium in several hundred hours. The UC 2 decomposes and uranium diffuses through the pyrolytic coating. The rate of escape of the uranium is dependent on the temperature and the surface area of the UC 2 , but not on a temperature gradient. The apparent activation energy for uranium loss, ΔH, is approximately 90 kcal/mole. Calculations indicate that uranium loss from the kernel would be insignificant under conditions to be expected in an HTGR

  9. Optimization of spin-coated electrodes for electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, Shayenne Diniz da; Monteiro, Natalia Kondo; Tabuti, Francisco; Fonseca, Fabio Coral; Florio, Daniel Zanetti de

    2017-01-01

    Electrodes for electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC’s) were fabricated by spin coating. Strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode and nickel yttria-stabilized zirconia cermet anodes were synthesized and processed for enhanced deposition conditions. The influence of electrode microstructural parameters was investigated by a systematic experimental procedure aiming at optimized electrochemical performance of single cells. Polarization curves showed a strong dependence on both electrode thickness and sintering temperature. By a systematic control of such parameters, the performance of single cells was significantly enhanced due to decreasing of polarization resistance from 26 Ω cm² to 0.6 Ω cm² at 800°C. The results showed that spin-coated electrodes can be optimized for fast and cost effective fabrication of SOFCs. (author)

  10. Optimization of spin-coated electrodes for electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobrega, Shayenne Diniz da; Monteiro, Natalia Kondo; Tabuti, Francisco; Fonseca, Fabio Coral, E-mail: shaynnedn@hotmail.com, E-mail: nataliakm@usp.br, E-mail: fntabuti@ipen.br, E-mail: fabiocf@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Florio, Daniel Zanetti de, E-mail: daniel.florio@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Electrodes for electrolyte-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC’s) were fabricated by spin coating. Strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode and nickel yttria-stabilized zirconia cermet anodes were synthesized and processed for enhanced deposition conditions. The influence of electrode microstructural parameters was investigated by a systematic experimental procedure aiming at optimized electrochemical performance of single cells. Polarization curves showed a strong dependence on both electrode thickness and sintering temperature. By a systematic control of such parameters, the performance of single cells was significantly enhanced due to decreasing of polarization resistance from 26 Ω cm² to 0.6 Ω cm² at 800°C. The results showed that spin-coated electrodes can be optimized for fast and cost effective fabrication of SOFCs. (author)

  11. Fission product Pd-SiC interaction in irradiated coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs, T.N.

    1980-04-01

    Silicon carbide is the main barrier to fission product release from coated particle fuels. Consequently, degradation of the SiC must be minimized. Electron microprobe analysis has identified that palladium causes corrosion of the SiC in irradiated coated particles. Further ceramographic and electron microprobe examinations on irradiated particles with kernels ranging in composition from UO 2 to UC 2 , including PuO/sub 2 -x/ and mixed (Th, Pu) oxides, and in enrichment from 0.7 to 93.0% 235 U revealed that temperature is the major factor affecting the penetration rate of SiC by Pd. The effects of kernel composition, Pd concentration, other fission products, and SiC properties are secondary

  12. Behaviour of HTGR coated fuel particles at high-temperature tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Lyutikov, R.A.; Kurbakov, S.D.; Repnikov, V.M.; Khromonozhkin, V.V.; Soloviyov, G.I.

    1990-01-01

    At the temperature range 1200-2600 deg. C prereactor tests of TRISO fuel particles on the base of UO 2 , UC x O y and UO 2 +2Al 2 O 3 . SiO 2 kernels, and also fuel particle models with ZrC kernels were performed. Isothermal annealings carried out at temperatures of 1400-2600 deg. C, thermogradient ones at 1200-2200 deg. C (Δ T = 200-1200 deg. C/cm). It is shown that at heating to 2200 deg. C integrity of fuel particles is limited by different thermal expansion of PyC and SiC coatings, and also by thermal dissociation of SiC. At higher temperatures the failure is caused by development of high pressures within weakened fuel particles. It is found that uranium migration from alloyed fuel (UC x O y , UO 2 +2Al 2 O 3 .SiO 2 ) in the process of annealing is higher than that from UO 2 . (author)

  13. Irradiation performance of coated fuel particles with fission product retaining kernel additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerthmann, R.

    1979-10-01

    The four irradiation experiments FRJ2-P17, FRJ2-P18, FRJ2-P19, and FRJ2-P20 for testing the efficiency of fission product-retaining kernel additives in coated fuel particles are described. The evaluation of the obtained experimental data led to the following results: - zirconia and alumina kernel additives are not suitable for an effective fission product retention in oxide fuel kernels, - alumina-silica kernel additives reduce the in-pile release of Sr 90 and Ba 140 from BISO-coated particles at temperatures of about 1200 0 C by two orders of magnitude, and the Cs release from kernels by one order of magnitude, - effective transport coefficients including all parameters which contribute to kernel release are given for (Th,U)O 2 mixed oxide kernels and low enriched UO 2 kernels containing 5 wt.% alumina-silica additives: 10g sub(K)/cm 2 s -1 = - 36 028/T + 6,261 (Sr 90), 10g Dsub(K)/cm 2 c -2 = - 29 646/T + 5,826 (Cs 134/137), alumina-silica kernel additives are ineffective for retaining Ag 110 m in coated particles. However, also an intact SiC-interlayer was found not to be effective at temperatures above 1200 0 C, - the penetration of the buffer layer by fission product containing eutectic additive melt during irradiation can be avoided by using additives which consist of alumina and mullite without an excess of silica, - annealing of LASER-failed irradiated particles and the irradiation test FRJ12-P20 indicate that the efficiency of alumina-silica kernel additives is not altered if the coating becomes defect. (orig.) [de

  14. Yttria coating on quartz mould inner surface for fabrication of metal fuel slug using injection casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod, A.V.; Hemanth Kumar, S.; Manivannan, A.; Muralidaran, P.; Anthonysamy, S.; Sudha, R.

    2016-01-01

    Quartz moulds are used for casting metal alloy of U-Zr slugs by injection casting process. Ceramic (Y_2O_3) coating on inner surface of the quartz mould is provided to avoid silica contamination in the fuel slugs during casting. Experiments were carried out to standardise the coating process and optimising various parameters such as particle size of Y_2O_3, choice of suitable binder, method for application of coating, drying and sintering at high temperature to ensure uniformity and strength of coating. Required Coating thickness of ∼40 μm was achieved on a quartz mould of inner diameter of 4.98±0.01mm. Experimental procedure for coating on inner surface of the quartz tubes using yttrium oxide is described in this work. (author)

  15. Density determination of sintered ceramic nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Medek, J.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility was tested of using solids for pycnometric determination of the density of uranium dioxide-based sintered ceramic fuel materials manufactured by the sol-gel method in the shape of spherical particles of 0.7 to 1.0 mm in size and of particles smaller than 200 μm. For fine particles, this is the only usable method of determining their density which is a very important parameter of the fine fraction when it is employed for the manufacture of fuel elements by vibration compacting. The method consists in compacting a mixture of pycnometric material and dispersed particles of uranium dioxide, determining the size and weight of the compact, and in calculating the density of the material measured from the weight of the oxide sample in the mixture. (author)

  16. A study on the basic CVD process technology for TRISO coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, D. J.; Cheon, J. H.; Keum, I. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2006-03-01

    Hydrogen energy has many advantages and is suitable as alternative energy of fossil fuel. The study of nuclear hydrogen production has performed at present. For nuclear hydrogen production, it is needed the study of VHTR(Very High Temperature Reactor) and TRISO(TRI-iSOtropic) coated fuel. TRISO coated fuel particle deposited by FBCVD(Fludized Bed CVD) method is composed of three isotropic layers: Inner Pyrolytic Carbon (IPyC), Silicon Carbide (SiC), Outer Pyrolytic Carbon (OPyC) layers. Silicon carbide was chemically vapor deposed on graphite substrate using methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 ) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere. The effect of deposition temperature and input gas ratios ( α=Q H2 /Q MTS =P H2 /P MTS ) was investigated in order to find out characteristics of silicon carbide layer. From results of those, SiC-TRISO coating deposition was conducted and achieved. Zirconium carbide layer as an advanced material of silicon carbide layer has studied. In order to find out basic properties and characteristics, studies have conducted using various methods. Zirconium carbide is chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl 4 ) and using methan(CH 4 ) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere. Many experiments were conducted on graphite substrate about many deposition conditions such as ZrCl 4 heating temperatures and variables of H2 and CH 4 flow rate. but carbon graphite was deposited. For deposition of zirconium carbide, several different methods were approached. so zirconium carbide deposed on ZrO 2 substrate. In this experiments. source subliming type and equipment are no problems. But deposition of zirconium carbide will be continuously studied on graphite substrate approaching views of experimental way and equipment structure

  17. Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, M.J.; Valentine, K.H.

    1980-02-01

    The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as 137 Cs/ 95 Zr and 144 Ce/ 95 Zr for metallic fission product retention and 134 Cs/ 137 Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup

  18. Castor oil polyurethane as a coating option for spent nuclear fuel disposal containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortley, A.; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T. [Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Castor oil polyurethane (COPU) coatings are being proposed as an additional barrier in the design of the copper containers to store spent nuclear fuel in Canada. The present work investigates the variation in the physicomechanical properties of two COPUs, based on an aliphatic and aromatic diisocyanate, as a function of ionizing radiation dose and dose rate. The changes in physicomechanical properties have shown that radiation, regardless of dose rate and isocyanate structure, increases the values of the modulus and the ultimate tensile strength when compared with those of the unirradiated samples, with aromatic based polyurethanes being more susceptible to variation than aliphatic based ones. (author)

  19. Brittle-fracture statistics for the determination of the strength of fuel particle coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.; Schuster, H.

    1976-04-01

    Two influences on characteristic strength values of brittle materials were investigated: the specimen number which is limited in the laboratory by practical reasons, and the procedure for fitting the Weibull formalism to experimental results. The study was performed with respect to the evaluation of the strength of coatings of HTR-fuel particles. Strength values following Weibull statistics were produced artificially to simulate experimental results. The applicability of four different methods was studied to get best fits of the Weibull parameters to these values. The relation of the scatter of strength values and Weibull parameter to the specimen number is determined. (orig./GSCH) [de

  20. Castor oil polyurethane as a coating option for spent nuclear fuel disposal containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortley, A.; Bonin, H.W.; Bui, V.T.

    2009-01-01

    Castor oil polyurethane (COPU) coatings are being proposed as an additional barrier in the design of the copper containers to store spent nuclear fuel in Canada. The present work investigates the variation in the physicomechanical properties of two COPUs, based on an aliphatic and aromatic diisocyanate, as a function of ionizing radiation dose and dose rate. The changes in physicomechanical properties have shown that radiation, regardless of dose rate and isocyanate structure, increases the values of the modulus and the ultimate tensile strength when compared with those of the unirradiated samples, with aromatic based polyurethanes being more susceptible to variation than aliphatic based ones. (author)

  1. Development of coating technology for nuclear fuel by self-propagating high temperature synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.; Kim, Bong G.; Lee, Y. W.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the preparation of silicon carbide and graphite layers on a nuclear fuel from silane and propane gases by a conventional chemical vapor deposition and combustion synthesis technologies. The direct reaction between silicon and pyrolytic carbon in a high temperature releases sufficient amount of energy to make a synthesis self-sustaining under the preheating of about 1200 deg C. During this high temperature process, lamellar structure with isotropic carbon synthesis. A full characterization of phase composition and final morphology of the coated layers by X-ray diffraction, SEM and AES is presented. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs

  2. Comparison of stochastic models in Monte Carlo simulation of coated particle fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Nam Zin Cho

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest worldwide in very high temperature gas cooled reactors as candidates for next generation reactor systems. For design and analysis of such reactors with double heterogeneity introduced by the coated particle fuels that are randomly distributed in graphite pebbles, stochastic transport models are becoming essential. Several models were reported in the literature, such as coarse lattice models, fine lattice stochastic (FLS) models, random sequential addition (RSA) models, metropolis models. The principles and performance of these stochastic models are described and compared in this paper. Compared with the usual fixed lattice methods, sub-FLS modeling allows more realistic stochastic distribution of fuel particles and thus results in more accurate criticality calculation. Compared with the basic RSA method, sub-FLS modeling requires simpler and more efficient overlapping checking procedure. (authors)

  3. Metrological evaluation of characterization methods applied to nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeda, Kelly Cristina Martins; Lameiras, Fernando Soares; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Migliorini, Fabricio Lima; Carneiro, Luciana Capanema Silva; Silva, Egonn Hendrigo Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    In manufacturing the nuclear fuel, characterizations are performed in order to assure the minimization of harmful effects. The uranium dioxide is the most used substance as nuclear reactor fuel because of many advantages, such as: high stability even when it is in contact with water at high temperatures, high fusion point, and high capacity to retain fission products. Several methods are used for characterization of nuclear fuels, such as thermogravimetric analysis for the ratio O / U, penetration-immersion method, helium pycnometer and mercury porosimetry for the density and porosity, BET method for the specific surface, chemical analyses for relevant impurities, and the laser flash method for thermophysical properties. Specific tools are needed to control the diameter and the sphericity of the microspheres and the properties of the coating layers (thickness, density, and degree of anisotropy). Other methods can also give information, such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, microanalysis, and mass spectroscopy of secondary ions for chemical analysis. The accuracy of measurement and level of uncertainty of the resulting data are important. This work describes a general metrological characterization of some techniques applied to the characterization of nuclear fuel. Sources of measurement uncertainty were analyzed. The purpose is to summarize selected properties of UO 2 that have been studied by CDTN in a program of fuel development for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The selected properties are crucial for thermalhydraulic codes to study basic design accidents. The thermal characterization (thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity) and the penetration immersion method (density and open porosity) of UO 2 samples were focused. The thermal characterization of UO 2 samples was determined by the laser flash method between room temperature and 448 K. The adaptive Monte Carlo Method was used to obtain the endpoints of the

  4. Near-frictionless carbon coatings for spark-ignited direct-injected fuel systems. Final report, January 2002.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershberger, J.; Ozturk, O.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes an investigation by the Tribology Section of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) into the use of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coatings for spark-ignited, direct-injected (SIDI) engine fuel systems. Direct injection is being pursued in order to improve fuel efficiency and enhance control over, and flexibility of, spark-ignited engines. SIDI technology is being investigated by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) as one route towards meeting both efficiency goals and more stringent emissions standards. Friction and wear of fuel injector and pump parts were identified as issues impeding adoption of SIDI by the OTT workshop on ''Research Needs Related to CIDI and SIDI Fuel Systems'' and the resulting report, Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Argonne's NFC coatings consistently reduced friction and wear in existing and reformulated gasolines. (2) Compared to three commercial DLC coatings, NFC provided the best friction reduction and protection from wear in gasoline and alternative fuels. (3) NFC was successfully deposited on production fuel injectors. (4) Customized wear tests were performed to simulate the operating environment of fuel injectors. (5) Industry standard lubricity test results were consistent with customized wear tests in showing the friction and wear reduction of NFC and the lubricity of fuels. (6) Failure of NFC coatings by tensile crack opening or spallation did not occur, and issues with adhesion to steel substrates were eliminated. (7) This work addressed several of the current research needs of the OAAT SIDI program, as defined by the OTT report Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines

  5. For the criticality of water reflected homogeneous arrays and heterogeneous reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Hj; Rabitsch, H; Schuerrer, F [Technische Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik und Reaktorphysik

    1980-01-01

    The smallest critical masses for fuel elements of research reactors having a medium and high enrichment are calculated. The results fit close on the known critical masses of power reactors with low enrichment. The comparison of the critical masses of reactor fuel elements and homogenized uranium dioxide water systems yields the influence of the homogeneity and of the cladding on the criticality. A coefficient for heterogeneity is suggested which takes into consideration these influences.

  6. Behaviour of contact layer material between cermet fuel element core and can

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, S.S.; Permyakov, L.N.; Simakov, G.A.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    The structural state of the contact layer between the shell of the Zr1Nb alloy and cermet fuel element core containing up to 70% of uranium dioxides is experimental studied. The silumin alloy was used as contact material. The results of studies on interaction zones, formed on the Zr1Nb - silumin boundary after fuel elements manufacture and also under temperature conditions, modeling the maximum design and hypothetical accidents accompanied by the contact material melting, are presented [ru

  7. New developments in image-based characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jeffery R.; Aykac, Deniz; Hunn, John D.; Kercher, Andrew K.; Morris, Robert N.

    2006-02-01

    We describe in this paper new developments in the characterization of coated particle nuclear fuel using optical microscopy and digital imaging. As in our previous work, we acquire optical imagery of the fuel pellets in two distinct manners that we refer to as shadow imaging and cross-sectional imaging. In shadow imaging, particles are collected in a single layer on an optically transparent dish and imaged using collimated back-lighting to measure outer surface characteristics only. In cross-sectional imaging, particles are mounted in acrylic epoxy and polished to near-center to reveal the inner coating layers for measurement. For shadow imaging, we describe a curvaturebased metric that is computed from the particle boundary points in the FFT domain using a low-frequency parametric representation. We also describe how missing boundary points are approximated using band-limited interpolation so that the FFT can be applied. For cross-section imaging, we describe a new Bayesian-motivated segmentation scheme as well as a new technique to correct layer measurements for the fact that we cannot observe the true mid-plane of the approximately spherical particles.

  8. Quantitative chemical method for the determination of the disordered carbon component in pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfrum, E.A.; Nickel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The chemical behavior of the surface of pyrocarbon (PyC) coatings of nuclear fuel particles was investigated in aqueous suspension by reaction with oxygen at room temperature. The concentration of the disordered material component, which has a large internal surface, can be identified by means of a pH change. Using this fact, a chemical method was developed that can be used for the quantitative determination of the concentration of this carbon component in the PyC coating

  9. Smart coating process of proton-exchange membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leu, Hoang-Jyh; Chiu, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Using oxygen plasma and smart coating technique for membrane modification. ► Oxygen plasma treatment can increase the reaction area of the membrane. ► AFM, SEM, FT-IR, XPS, EIS spectra can prove the surface treatment process. ► Nafion membrane modification can reduce Rct and enhance current density. - Abstract: The interfaces of electrolyte|catalyst|electrode play an important role in the performance of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Increasing the interface effective area and lowering the charge transfer resistance of the interface are significant issues to promote the cell performance. In this study, oxygen plasma treatment was used to increase the surface roughness of Nafion®117 membrane, and then a smart coating process was applied to fabricate the initial Pt/C catalyst layer, which served to reduce the charge transfer resistance of the interface. The morphology and surface characteristics of membranes have been qualified by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results show that the plasma treatments and smart coating processes were effective in reducing the interface charge transfer resistance. At optimal condition, the interface charge transfer resistance was 0.45 Ω/cm 2 which was 1–2 order less than the untreated ones

  10. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenaers, A., E-mail: aleenaer@sckcen.be [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V. [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Detavernier, C. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK• CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% {sup 235}U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL–matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium–Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)–matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  11. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  12. Model-Based Control of a Continuous Coating Line for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Electrode Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Devaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most expensive component of a fuel cell is the membrane electrode assembly (MEA, which consists of an ionomer membrane coated with catalyst material. Best-performing MEAs are currently fabricated by depositing and drying liquid catalyst ink on the membrane; however, this process is limited to individual preparation by hand due to the membrane’s rapid water absorption that leads to shape deformation and coating defects. A continuous coating line can reduce the cost and time needed to fabricate the MEA, incentivizing the commercialization and widespread adoption of fuel cells. A pilot-scale membrane coating line was designed for such a task and is described in this paper. Accurate process control is necessary to prevent manufacturing defects from occurring in the coating line. A linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG controller was developed based on a physics-based model of the coating process to optimally control the temperature and humidity of the drying zones. The process controller was implemented in the pilot-scale coating line proving effective in preventing defects.

  13. Electroplating of Ni-Mo Coating on Stainless Steel for Application in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rashtchi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steel bipolar plates are preferred choice for use in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs. However, regarding the working temperature of 80 °C and corrosive and acidic environment of PEMFC, it is necessary to apply conductive protective coatings resistant to corrosion on metallic bipolar plate surfaces to enhance its chemical stability and performance. In the present study, by applying Ni-Mo and Ni-Mo-P alloy coatings via electroplating technique, corrosion resistance was improved, oxid layers formation on substrates which led to increased electrical conductivity of the surface was reduced and consequently bipolar plates fuction was enhanced. Evaluation tests included microstructural and phase characterizations for evaluating coating components; cyclic voltammetry test for electrochemical behavior investigations; wettability test for measuring hydrophobicity characterizations of the coatings surfaces; interfacial contact resistance measurements of the coatings for evaluating the composition of applied coatings; and polarization tests of fuel cells for evaluating bipolar plates function in working conditions. Finally, the results showed that the above-mentioned coatings considerably decreased the corrosion and electrical resistance of the stainless steel.

  14. Application of TiC reinforced Fe-based coatings by means of High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Liao, X.; Sommer, J.

    2017-03-01

    In the field of hydraulic applications, different development trends can cause problems for coatings currently used as wear and corrosion protection for piston rods. Aqueous hydraulic fluids and rising raw material prices necessitate the search for alternatives to conventional coatings like galvanic hard chrome or High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC/Co coatings. In a previous study, Fe/TiC coatings sprayed by a HVOF-process, were identified to be promising coating systems for wear and corrosion protection in hydraulic systems. In this feasibility study, the novel High Velocity Air Fuel (HVAF)-process, a modification of the HVOF-process, is investigated using the same feedstock material, which means the powder is not optimized for the HVAF-process. The asserted benefits of the HVAF-process are higher particle velocities and lower process temperatures, which can result in a lower porosity and oxidation of the coating. Further benefits of the HVAF process are claimed to be lower process costs and higher deposition rates. In this study, the focus is set on to the applicability of Fe/TiC coatings by HVAF in general. The Fe/TiC HVAF coating could be produced, successfully. The HVAF- and HVOF-coatings, produced with the same powder, were investigated using micro-hardness, porosity, wear and corrosion tests. A similar wear coefficient and micro-hardness for both processes could be achieved. Furthermore the propane/hydrogen proportion of the HVAF process and its influence on the coating thickness and the porosity was investigated.

  15. Surface characteristic of chemically converted graphene coated low carbon steel by electro spray coating method for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell bipolar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun

    2013-05-01

    Graphene was coated on low carbon steel (SS400) by electro spray coating method to improve its properties of corrosion resistance and contact resistance. Exfoliated graphite was made of the graphite by chemical treatment (Chemically Converted Graphene, CCG). CCG is distributed using dispersing agent, and low carbon steel was coated with diffuse graphene solution by electro spray coating method. The structure of the CCG was analyzed using XRD and the coating layer of surface was analyzed using SEM. Analysis showed that multi-layered graphite structure was destroyed and it was transformed in to fine layers graphene structure. And the result of SEM analysis on the surface and the cross section, graphene layer was uniformly formed with 3-5 microm thickness on the surface of substrate. Corrosion resistance test was applied in the corrosive solution which is similar to the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack inside. And interfacial contact resistance (ICR) test was measured to simulate the internal operating conditions of PEMFC stack. As a result of measuring corrosion resistance and contact resistance, it could be confirmed that low carbon steel coated with CCG was revealed to be more effective in terms of its applicability as PEMFC bipolar plate.

  16. Experimental study and model development for 'uranium dioxide-epoxy resin' heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chairat, Aziza

    2015-01-01

    In order to characterize nuclear fuels, samples are currently embedded in an epoxy polymer resin. In storage conditions, the presence of organic products in contact with highly radioactive material generates gas due to a radiolysis phenomenon. Samples management imposes the definition of a fuel and resin separation process. This work aims at developing a tool for the optimal design and control of a suitable heat treatment process. This development is based on experiments and on the modeling of the resin pyrolysis reactions coupled to mass, heat and momentum transfers. One of the difficulties of the study lies to the needed process control on various scales: i) on a global scale to represent the treatment conditions and ii) on a local scale to represent the conditions close to fuel material. This study uses a combined modeling - simulation approach with experiments carried out with the help of a thermo-balance for kinetic data acquisition, on the one hand and in an experimental oven, on the other hand. The process will be performed in two stages, resin pyrolysis and residue (Char) oxidation. Nuclear fuel can be oxidized during both stages. Indeed, the pyrolysis degrades the resin and generated pyrolysis gases, which produce an oxidizing atmosphere. Oxidation of pyrolysis residue can modify the structure of spent fuel and liberate fission gases. The resin pyrolysis produced non-condensable gases, steam, tar and char. The final hydrogen content in the char has to be as low as possible and close to zero to be sure that the radiolysis phenomenon will never occur during of nuclear fuel storage. The process development has been carried out in stages. The first step is to investigate the overall kinetics of epoxy degradation and the determination of the generated gas kinetics. The influence of the presence of nuclear fuel is investigated with epoxy-UO 2 mixture. The results showed no significant effect of the nuclear fuel presence. The second part is the coupling of

  17. Uranium dioxide-sodium interactions. Development of a theoretical model. Fitting of this model to the experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrmalenios, Panayotis

    1973-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the issue of safety of fast neutron reactors, and more particularly is a contribution of the study of mechanisms of interaction between molten fuel and sodium. It aims at developing tools of prediction of consequences of three main types of accidents: local fusion of a fuel rod and contact of the fuel with the surrounding sodium, failure of an assembly due to the fusion of several rods and fuel-coolant interaction within the assembly, and fuel-coolant interaction at the level of the reactor core. The author first proposes a bibliographical analysis of experimental and theoretical studies related to this issue of interaction between a hot body and a cold liquid, and of its consequences. Then, he introduces a mathematical model and its resolution method, and reports the use of the associated code (Corfou) for the interpretation of experimental results: expulsion of cold sodium column by expansion of an overheated sodium mass, fusion of a rod by Joule effect, interaction between UO_2 molten by high frequency with liquid sodium. Finally, the author discusses a comparison between the Corfou code and other models which are being currently developed [fr

  18. Direct reduction of uranium dioxide and few other metal oxides to corresponding metals by high temperature molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Molten salt based electro-reduction processes, capable of directly converting solid metal oxides to metals with minimum intermediate steps, are being studied worldwide. Production of metals apart, the process assumes importance in nuclear technology in the context of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent oxide fuels, for it serves as an intermediate step to convert spent oxide fuel to a metal alloy, which in turn can be processed by molten salt electro-refining method to gain the actinides present in it. In the context of future metal fuel fast reactor programme, the electrochemical process was studied for conversion of solid UO_2 to U metal in LiCl-1wt.% Li_2O melt at 650 °C with platinum anode at the Metal Processing Studies Section, PMPD, IGCAR. A brief overview of the work is presented in the paper

  19. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights May 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for April 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/125, was distributed to program participants on May 10, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

  20. Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights June 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Bell, Gary L.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2011-01-01

    During FY 2011 the CP and DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for May 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/126, was distributed to program participants on June 9, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Behavior, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

  1. Combined effects of thermal barrier coating and blending with diesel fuel on usability of vegetable oils in diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of using pure vegetable oils in a thermally insulated diesel engine has been experimentally investigated. Initially, the standard diesel fuel was tested in the engine, as base experiment for comparison. Then the engine was thermally insulated by coating some parts of it, such as piston, exhaust and intake valves surfaces with zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ). The main purpose of engine coating was to reduce heat rejection from the walls of combustion chamber and to increase thermal efficiency and thus to increase performance of the engine that using vegetable oil blends. Another aim of the study was to improve the usability of pure vegetable oils in diesel engines without performing any fuel treatments such as pyrolysis, emulsification and transesterification. Pure inedible cottonseed oil and sunflower oil were blended with diesel fuel. Blends and diesel fuel were then tested in the coated diesel engine. Experimental results proved that the main purpose of this study was achieved as the engine performance parameters such as power and torque were increased with simultaneous decrease in fuel consumption (bsfc). Furthermore, exhaust emission parameters such as CO, HC, and Smoke opacity were decreased. Also, sunflower oil blends presented better performance and emission parameters than cottonseed oil blends. -- Highlights: ► Usability of two different vegetable oils in a coated diesel engine was experimentally investigated. ► A diesel engine was coated with ZrO 2 layer to make the combustion chamber insulated. ► Test results showed significant improvements in performance parameters. ► While only minor reductions were observed in emissions with coated engine operation

  2. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962); Contribution a l'etude de la microstructure du dioxyde d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porneuf, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-05-15

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [French] La microstructure de frittes d'oxyde d'uranium est etudiee en fonction de divers parametres, en particulier de la temperature et de l'atmosphere de frittage, par examen de la surface externe des frittes, puis de leur microstructure interne (fractographie, ceramographie). Differentes techniques de preparation des surfaces (polissage mecanique ou electrolytique) et de revelation de la structure (attaque chimique ou anodique, bombardement ionique, oxydation preferentielle) ont ete experimentees et comparees. Des figures comparables a celles revelees dans les metaux et liees probablement a des interactions entre dislocations et lacunes ont ete observees. (auteur)

  3. Standard specification for blended uranium oxides with 235U content of less than 5 % for direct hydrogen reduction to nuclear grade uranium dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

  4. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962); Contribution a l'etude de la microstructure du dioxyde d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porneuf, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-05-15

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [French] La microstructure de frittes d'oxyde d'uranium est etudiee en fonction de divers parametres, en particulier de la temperature et de l'atmosphere de frittage, par examen de la surface externe des frittes, puis de leur microstructure interne (fractographie, ceramographie). Differentes techniques de preparation des surfaces (polissage mecanique ou electrolytique) et de revelation de la structure (attaque chimique ou anodique, bombardement ionique, oxydation preferentielle) ont ete experimentees et comparees. Des figures comparables a celles revelees dans les metaux et liees probablement a des interactions entre dislocations et lacunes ont ete observees. (auteur)

  5. Analysis on Propagation Characteristics and Experimental Verification of A1 Circumferential Waves in Nuclear Fuel Rods Coated with Oxide Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Young Sang; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Cheong, Yong Moo; Ih, Jeong Guon

    1999-01-01

    The resonance scattering of acoustic waves from the cylindrical shells of nuclear fuel rods coated with oxide layers has been theoretically modeled and numerically analyzed for the propagation characteristics of the circumferential waves. The normal mode solutions of the scattering pressure of the coated shells have been obtained. The pure resonance components have been isolated using the newly proposed inherent background coefficients. The propagation characteristics of resonant circumferential waves for the shells coated with oxide layers are affected by the presence and the thickness of an oxide layer. The characteristics have been experimentally confirmed through the method of isolation and identification of resonances. The change of the phase velocity of the A 1 circumferential wave mode for the coated shell is negligible at the specified partial waves in spite of the presence of the oxide layer and the increase in coating thickness. Utilizing the invariability characteristics of the phase velocity of the A 1 mode, the oxide layer thickness of the coated shells can be estimated. A new nondestructive technique for the relative measurement of the coating thickness of coated shells has been proposed

  6. Deposition of Cr, Nb, V, and Ti coatings on UO2-25w/oPuO2 fuel pellets by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibby, R.L.; McClanahan, E.D.

    1976-01-01

    A sputtering deposition process was developed for application of metallic coatings on either the ends or circumferences of LMFBR mixed-oxide fuel pellets. Coatings of Cr, Nb, V and Ti were applied to over 860 pellets. Ceramography, emission spectrography, and spark source spectroscopy were used to characterize the coatings. Coating thicknesses were controlled to within +-0.0005 cm (0.0002 inch) for a coating thickness of 0.00127 cm (0.0005 inch) on the circumference and 0.00254 cm (0.001 inch) on the ends of pellets. Chemical impurities in the coatings were generally less than 0.5 wt percent. The coatings were adherent in all cases, although some interfacial separations were noted with Ti coatings. The results indicated that further optimization of coatings' parameters would result in improvement of the coatings

  7. Performance limits of coated particle fuel. Part II. Mechanical failure of coated particles due to internal gas pressure and kernel swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hick, H.; Nabielek, H.; Harrison, T. A.

    1973-10-15

    This report presents a summary of experimental results and their theoretical explanation with regard to the "Pressure Failure" of coated particle fuel. While the experimental results refer mainly to the Dragon Reference Particle as proposed for typical Low Enriched Homogeneous Prismatic Steam Cycle HTR Power Reactors, the theoretical understanding of the phenomena and the mathematical models for their description are not limited to a specific design line.

  8. Degradation of graphene coated copper in simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y. J.; Anisur, M. R.; Qiu, W.; He, J. J.; Al-Saadi, S.; Singh Raman, R. K.

    2017-09-01

    Metallic materials are most suitable for bipolar plates of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) because they possess the required mechanical strength, durability, gas impermeability, acceptable cost and are suitable for mass production. However, metallic bipolar plates are prone to corrosion or they can passivate under PEMFC environment and interrupt the fuel cell operation. Therefore, it is highly attractive to develop corrosion resistance coating that is also highly conductive. Graphene fits these criteria. Graphene coating is developed on copper by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with an aim to improving corrosion resistance of copper under PEMFC condition. The Raman Spectroscopy shows the graphene coating to be multilayered. The electrochemical degradation of graphene coated copper is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. After exposure to the electrolyte for up to 720 h, the charge transfer resistance (Rt) of the graphene coated copper is ∼3 times greater than that of the bare copper, indicating graphene coatings could improve the corrosion resistance of copper bipolar plates.

  9. Mass spectrometric determination of gases in individual coated HTR fuel particles. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strigl, A.; Bildstein, H.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described which allows the simultaneous determination of fission and reaction gases in individual coated particles at temperatures up to 2 000 0 C. The particles are heated under high-vacuum in a micro resistance-furnace up to the desired temperature. After preselected times the particles are crushed by action of a pneumatic cylinder. The gases liberated are fed into a quadrupole analyzer where they are analyzed in a dynamic mode. A peak selector allows the simultaneous measurement of up to four gases. The method is used routinely for the determination of fission gases (Kr and Xe) and of carbon monoxide which is formed as a reaction gas from oxide fuel. Precision and accuracy are in the order of a few percent. Detection limits for routine measurements are about 10 -7 cm 3 (STP) for Kr and Xe and 2x10 -5 cm 3 (STP) for CO but can be lowered by special techniques. (Auth.)

  10. Fugitive binder for nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallivan, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    A compound consisting of ammonium cations and carbonate, bicarbonate, or carbamate anions, or a mixture of such compounds, is useful as a binder for uranium dioxide fuel pellets for which it is desired to maintain a certain degree of porosity, uniformity of pore size, a lack of interconnections between the pores, and the shape or configuration of the base material particles in the final article after sintering. Upon heating, these binders decompose into gases and leave substantially no impurities. A process for sintering green nuclear fuel pellets using these binders is provided. (LL)

  11. Plan of development of ZrC-TRISO coated fuel particle and construction of ZrC coater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueta, Shohei; Ino, Hiroichi; Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Tobita, Tsutomu [Nuclear Engineering Company, Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takahashi, Masashi [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    In order to use coated fuel particle under higher temperature condition, more refractory coating material, which is more refractory than conventional silicon carbide (SiC), should be applied. Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is considered to be one of the promising materials, which is proposed as candidate for VHTR fuel material in GENERATION-IV, because of its intactness under high temperature of around 2000degC and its higher stability against kernel migration (amoeba effect) and fission product corrosion under normal operating condition. In order to develop ZrC coated particle for commercial use, research and development items were extracted based on review of the previous works. Research and development plan was determined. Based on the plan, a new ZrC coater of 100g batch size, which applies bromine process, was constructed. This report describes the review of precious works, extracted research and develop items and plan, and specifications of the ZrC coater. (author)

  12. Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels (I-NERI Annual Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Languille, Alain; Martin, Philippe; Ballinger, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this INERI project is to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated particle fuels and to develop improved coated-particle fuel designs that can be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in fast gas-cooled reactors. Thermomechanical, thermophysical, and physiochemical material properties data were compiled by both the US and the French and preliminary assessments conducted. Comparison between U.S. and European data revealed many similarities and a few important differences. In all cases, the data needed for accurate fuel performance modeling of coated particle fuel at high burnup were lacking. The development of the INEEL fuel performance model, PARFUME, continued from earlier efforts. The statistical model being used to simulate the detailed finite element calculations is being upgraded and improved to allow for changes in fuel design attributes (e.g. thickness of layers, dimensions of kernel) as well as changes in important material properties to increase the flexibility of the code. In addition, modeling of other potentially important failure modes such as debonding and asphericity was started. A paper on the status of the model was presented at the HTR-2002 meeting in Petten, Netherlands in April 2002, and a paper on the statistical method was submitted to the Journal of Nuclear Material in September 2002. Benchmarking of the model against Japanese and an older DRAGON irradiation are planned. Preliminary calculations of the stresses in a coated particle have been calculated by the CEA using the ATLAS finite element model. This model and the material properties and constitutive relationships will be incorporated into a more general software platform termed Pleiades. Pleiades will be able to analyze different fuel forms at different scales (from particle to fuel body) and also handle the statistical variability in coated particle fuel. Diffusion couple experiments to study Ag and Pd transport through SiC were

  13. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  14. Method for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lloyd J.; Willey, Melvin G.; Tiegs, Sue M.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in "hot cells" designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel material, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  15. Carbon nanotube-coated macroporous sponge for microbial fuel cell electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing

    2012-01-01

    The materials that are used to make electrodes and their internal structures significantly affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. In this study, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge composite prepared by coating a sponge with CNTs. Compared to the CNT-coated textile electrodes evaluated in prior studies, CNT-sponge electrodes had lower internal resistance, greater stability, more tunable and uniform macroporous structure (pores up to 1 mm in diameter), and improved mechanical properties. The CNT-sponge composite also provided a three-dimensional scaffold that was favorable for microbial colonization and catalytic decoration. Using a batch-fed H-shaped MFC outfitted with CNT-sponge electrodes, an areal power density of 1.24 W m -2 was achieved when treating domestic wastewater. The maximum volumetric power density of a continuously fed plate-shaped MFC was 182 W m -3. To our knowledge, these are the highest values obtained to date for MFCs fed domestic wastewater: 2.5 times the previously reported maximum areal power density and 12 times the previously reported maximum volumetric power density. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  16. Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels -- Final Report under the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Martin, Philippe [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Phelip, Mayeul [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ballinger, Ronald [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this INERI project was to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated-particle fuels and to explore improved coated-particle fuel designs that could be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in gas-cooled fast reactors. Project participants included the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), Centre Étude Atomique (CEA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To accomplish the project objectives, work was organized into five tasks.

  17. Environmental degradation of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings for fuel-flexible gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Prabhakar

    The development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been undoubtedly the most critical advancement in materials technology for modern gas turbine engines. TBCs are widely used in gas turbine engines for both power-generation and propulsion applications. Metallic oxidation-resistant coatings (ORCs) are also widely employed as a stand-alone protective coating or bond coat for TBCs in many high-temperature applications. Among the widely studied durability issues in these high-temperature protective coatings, one critical challenge that received greater attention in recent years is their resistance to high-temperature degradation due to corrosive deposits arising from fuel impurities and CMAS (calcium-magnesium-alumino-silicate) sand deposits from air ingestion. The presence of vanadium, sulfur, phosphorus, sodium and calcium impurities in alternative fuels warrants a clear understanding of high-temperature materials degradation for the development of fuel-flexible gas turbine engines. Degradation due to CMAS is a critical problem for gas turbine components operating in a dust-laden environment. In this study, high-temperature degradation due to aggressive deposits such as V2O5, P2O 5, Na2SO4, NaVO3, CaSO4 and a laboratory-synthesized CMAS sand for free-standing air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the topcoat of the TBC system, and APS CoNiCrAlY, the bond coat of the TBC system or a stand-alone ORC, is examined. Phase transformations and microstructural development were examined by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. This study demonstrated that the V2O5 melt degrades the APS YSZ through the formation of ZrV2O7 and YVO 4 at temperatures below 747°C and above 747°C, respectively. Formation of YVO4 leads to the depletion of the Y2O 3 stabilizer and the deleterious transformation of the YSZ to the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. The investigation on the YSZ degradation by Na 2SO4 and a Na2SO4 + V2

  18. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Silicon Carbide and Pyrocarbon Coatings on Fuel Particles for High Temperature Reactors (HTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, V.; Charollais, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA, BP 1, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Dugne, O. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SCGS BP 17171 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Garcia, C. [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR CNRS 5801, 3 allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France); Perez, M. [CEA Grenoble DRT/DTH/LTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cea and AREVA NP have engaged an extensive research and development program on HTR (high temperature reactor) fuel. The improving of safety of (very) high temperature reactors (V/HTR) is based on the quality of the fuel particles. This requires a good knowledge of the properties of the four-layers TRISO particles designed to retain the uranium and fission products during irradiation or accident conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize exhaustively the structure and the thermomechanical properties of each unirradiated layer (silicon carbide and pyrocarbon coatings) by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), selected area electronic diffraction (SEAD), thermo reflectance microscopy and nano-indentation. The long term objective of this study is to define pertinent parameters for fuel performance codes used to better understand the thermomechanical behaviour of the coated particles. (authors)

  19. The nuclear fuel cycle: (2) fuel element manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, J.

    1976-01-01

    Large-scale production of nuclear fuel in the United Kingdom is carried out at Springfields Works of British Nuclear Fuels Ltd., a company formed from the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority in 1971. The paper describes in some detail the Springfields Works processes for the conversion of uranium ore concentrate to uranium tetrafluoride, then conversion of the tetrafluoride to either uranium metal for cladding in Magnox to form fuel for the British Mk I gas-cooled reactors, or to uranium hexafluoride for enrichment of the fissile 235 U isotope content at the Capenhurst Works of BNFL. Details are given of the reconversion at Springfields Works of this enriched uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide, which is pelleted and then clad in either stainless steel or zircaloy containers to form the fuel assemblies for the British Mk II AGR or advanced gas-cooled reactors or for the water reactor fuels. (author)

  20. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO2. For this purpose, sintered UO2 pellets were implanted with 37Cl at an ion fluence of 1013 cm-2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475 K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275 K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3 eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO2 at relatively low temperatures, the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing, the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I, the comparison between an U2O2Cl5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U2O2Cl5 to the pristine chlorine.

  1. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35 Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO 2 . For this purpose, sintered UO 2 pellets were implanted with 37 Cl at an ion fluence of 10 13 cm -2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: (1) the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures; (2) the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing; (3) the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I; (4) the comparison between an U 2 O 2 Cl 5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U 2 O 2 Cl 5 to the pristine chlorine

  2. Release of fission products during and after oxidation of trace-irradiated uranium dioxide at 300-900 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, P; Bannister, G H [Central Electricity Generating Board, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (United Kingdom)

    1985-07-01

    Should defected UO{sub 2} fuel pins come into contact with air then oxidation of the fuel may occur, the rate and consequences of which are dependent upon temperature and oxygen partial pressure. At CEGB-BNL an experimental programme is underway investigating the kinetics, and extent, of release of fission products during and after oxidation of trace-irradiated UO{sub 2} to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and reduction of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to UO{sub 2}. This paper presents preliminary results and analysis of experiments performed at 300-900 deg. C. Dense sintered UO{sub 2} has been oxidised at 300-500 deg. C using a thermo balance with simultaneous counting of released {sup 85}Kr. The kinetics of the {sup 85}Kr release are shown to correlate with the kinetics of oxidation, and the extent of release has been determined as 3-8% of that in the UO{sub 2} converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The release of {sup 106}Ru and {sup 137}Cs during this oxidation has been estimated by {gamma}-counting of the fuel sample, before and after oxidation, and of glassware in the vicinity of the sample. This indicates slight release of ruthenium and caesium. Greater fission product release is caused by oxidation at higher temperatures or by heating of the oxidation product. U{sub 3}O{sub 8} produced at 400 deg. C has been heated at 800 and 900 deg. C in air for 20 hours. This results in near total release of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 106}Ru, but still only slight release of {sup 137}Cs. The kinetics of the {sup 85}Kr release have been analysed and found to follow the Booth diffusion equation at 900 deg. C, but not at 800 deg. C. The fuel burn-up level may also have an effect. Some results of fission product release during reduction of the oxidation product U{sub 3}O{sub 8} are presented, and the influence of chemical effects upon the release of individual fission products is discussed. The future programme is outlined. (author)

  3. Stress Analysis of a TRISO Coated Particle Fuel by Using ABAQUS Finite Element Visco-Elastoplastic Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on an understanding of the behavior of a coated particle fuel. KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) Project since 2004, is developing a fuel performance analysis code for a VHTR named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). A validation of COPA was attempted by comparing its benchmark results with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the ABAQUS code calculations for the IAEA-CRP-6 TRISO coated particle benchmark problems involving a creep, swelling, and pressure. However, the ABAQUS finite element model used for the above-mentioned analysis did not consider the material nonlinearity of the SiC coating layer that showed stress levels higher than the assumed yield point of the material. In this study, a consideration of the material nonlinearity is included in the ABAQUS model to obtain the visco-elastoplastic solutions and the results are compared with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the previous ABAQUS model

  4. First-principles study on oxidation effects in uranium oxides and high-pressure high-temperature behavior of point defects in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua Y.; Song, Hong X.; Jin, K.; Xiang, S. K.; Wu, Q.

    2011-11-01

    Formation Gibbs free energy of point defects and oxygen clusters in uranium dioxide at high-pressure high-temperature conditions are calculated from first principles, using the LSDA+U approach for the electronic structure and the Debye model for the lattice vibrations. The phonon contribution on Frenkel pairs is found to be notable, whereas it is negligible for the Schottky defect. Hydrostatic compression changes the formation energies drastically, making defect concentrations depend more sensitively on pressure. Calculations show that, if no oxygen clusters are considered, uranium vacancy becomes predominant in overstoichiometric UO2 with the aid of the contribution from lattice vibrations, while compression favors oxygen defects and suppresses uranium vacancy greatly. At ambient pressure, however, the experimental observation of predominant oxygen defects in this regime can be reproduced only in a form of cuboctahedral clusters, underlining the importance of defect clustering in UO2+x. Making use of the point defect model, an equation of state for nonstoichiometric oxides is established, which is then applied to describe the shock Hugoniot of UO2+x. Furthermore, the oxidization and compression behavior of uranium monoxide, triuranium octoxide, uranium trioxide, and a series of defective UO2 at 0 K are investigated. The evolution of mechanical properties and electronic structures with an increase of the oxidation degree are analyzed, revealing the transition of the ground state of uranium oxides from metallic to Mott insulator and then to charge-transfer insulator due to the interplay of strongly correlated effects of 5f orbitals and the shift of electrons from uranium to oxygen atoms.

  5. Reduction of harmful emissions from a diesel engine fueled by kapok methyl ester using combined coating and SNCR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedharaj, S.; Vallinayagam, R.; Yang, W.M.; Saravanan, C.G.; Chou, S.K.; Chua, K.J.E.; Lee, P.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal barrier coating was accomplished by coating the engine components with PSZ. • Under-utilized kapok oil biodiesel was used as renewable fuel in a coated engine. • The BTE of the engine was improved by 9% with reduced BSFC. • CO, HC and smoke were reduced by 40%, 35.3% and 21.4%, respectively. • After implementing SCR assembly, the NO X emission was decreased by 13.4%. - Abstract: This research work has been formulated to reduce the stinging effect of NO X emission on atmospheric environment from a coated diesel engine fueled by biodiesel. As such, in the current study, we attempted to harness the renewable source of energy from in-edible kapok oil, which is normally under-utilized despite being a viable feedstock for biodiesel synthesis. Notably, steam treatment process followed by crushing of the kapok seeds in a mechanical expeller was done to extract large quantities of kapok oil for the application of diesel engine, which is quite distinct of a method adopted herein. The conventional trans-esterification process was availed to synthesize KME (kapok methyl ester) and the physical and thermal properties of it were estimated by ASTM standard methods. Subsequently, two blends of KME with diesel such as B25 (KME – 25% and diesel – 75%) and B50 (KME – 50% and diesel – 50%) were prepared and tested in a single cylinder diesel engine with thermal barrier coating. To help realize the coating process, PSZ (partially stabilized zirconia), a pertinent coating material in respect of its poor thermal conductivity and better durability, has been chosen as the coating material to be applied on engine components by plasma spray coating technique. As an outcome of the coating study, B50 was found to show improved BTE (brake thermal efficiency) than that in an uncoated engine, with notable decrease in major emissions such as HC (hydrocarbon), CO (carbon monoxide) and smoke. However, due to reduction in heat losses and increase in in

  6. Comparison of iron and copper doped manganese cobalt spinel oxides as protective coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Belma; Molin, Sebastian; Wiik, Kjell; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2017-12-01

    MnCo2O4, MnCo1.7Cu0.3O4 and MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 are investigated as coatings for corrosion protection of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. Electrophoretic deposition is used to deposit the coatings on Crofer 22 APU alloy. All three coating materials reduce the parabolic oxidation rate in air at 900 °C and 800 °C. At 700 °C there is no significant difference in oxidation rate between coated samples and uncoated pre-oxidized Crofer 22 APU. The cross-scale area specific resistance (ASR) is measured in air at 800 °C using La0.85Sr0.1Mn1.1O3 (LSM) contact plates to simulate the interaction with the cathode in a SOFC stack. All coated samples have three times lower ASR than uncoated Crofer 22 APU after 4370 h aging. The ASR increase with time is lowest with the MnCo2O4 coating, followed by the MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 and MnCo1.7Cu0.3O4 coatings. LSM plates contacted to uncoated Crofer 22 APU contain significant amounts of Cr after aging, while all three coatings effectively prevent Cr diffusion into the LSM. A complex Cr-rich reaction layer develops at the coating-alloy interface during oxidation. Cu and Fe doping reduce the extent of this reaction layer at 900 °C, while at 800 °C the effect of doping is insignificant.

  7. Effect of coating density on oxidation resistance and Cr vaporization from solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talic, Belma; Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Venkatachalam, Vinothini

    2017-01-01

    •Protective action of dense and porous spinel coatings on Crofer 22 APU was compared. •Reduction and re-oxidation produces denser coatings than heat treating in air only. •Coating density has minor influence on oxidation resistance at 800 °C in air. •Dense coating resulted in three times lower Cr...... evaporation rate than porous coating....

  8. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA, similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident management, an accident tolerant fuel (ATF design may extend coping and recovery time for operators to restore emergency power, and cooling, and achieve safe shutdown. An ATF is required to possess high resistance to steam oxidation to reduce hydrogen generation and sufficient mechanical strength to maintain fuel rod integrity and core coolability. The initiative undertaken by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing an ATF cladding with capability to maintain its integrity in 1,200–1,500°C steam for at least 24 hours. This ATF cladding utilizes thin-walled Mo-alloys coated with oxidation-resistant surface layers. The basic design consists of a thin-walled Mo alloy structural tube with a metallurgically bonded, oxidation-resistant outer layer. Two options are being investigated: a commercially available iron, chromium, and aluminum alloy with excellent high temperature oxidation resistance, and a Zr alloy with demonstrated corrosion resistance. As these composite claddings will incorporate either no Zr, or thin Zr outer layers, hydrogen generation under severe LOCA conditions will be greatly reduced. Key technical challenges and uncertainties specific to Mo alloy fuel cladding include: economic core design, industrial scale fabricability, radiation embrittlement, and corrosion and oxidation resistance during normal operation, transients, and severe accidents. Progress in each aspect has been made and key results are

  9. Comparison of iron and copper doped manganese cobalt spinel oxides as protective coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talic, Belma; Molin, Sebastian; Wiik, Kjell

    2017-01-01

    MnCo2O4, MnCo1.7Cu0.3O4 and MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 are investigated as coatings for corrosion protection of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell stacks. Electrophoretic deposition is used to deposit the coatings on Crofer 22 APU alloy. All three coating materials reduce the parabolic oxidation...... rate in air at 900 °C and 800 °C. At 700 °C there is no significant difference in oxidation rate between coated samples and uncoated pre-oxidized Crofer 22 APU. The cross-scale area specific resistance (ASR) is measured in air at 800 °C using La0.85Sr0.1Mn1.1O3 (LSM) contact plates to simulate...... contain significant amounts of Cr after aging, while all three coatings effectively prevent Cr diffusion into the LSM. A complex Cr-rich reaction layer develops at the coating-alloy interface during oxidation. Cu and Fe doping reduce the extent of this reaction layer at 900 °C, while at 800 °C the effect...

  10. Effect of burn-up on the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide up to 100.000 MWd t-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, C.; Sheindlin, M.; Staicu, D.; Kinoshita, M.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity and specific heat of reactor-irradiated UO 2 fuel have been measured. Starting from end-of-life conditions at various burn-ups, measurements under thermal annealing cycles were performed in order to investigate the recovery of the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. The separate effects of soluble fission products, of fission gas frozen in dynamical solution and of radiation damage were determined. In this context, particular emphasis was given to the behaviour of samples displaying the high burn-up rim structure. Recovery stages could be thoroughly investigated in samples that were irradiated at low burn-ups and/or at high irradiation temperatures. Other samples, in particular those exhibiting the characteristic rim structure, disintegrated at temperatures slightly higher than the irradiation temperature. Finally, from a database of several thousand measurements, an accurate formula for the in-pile thermal conductivity of UO 2 up to 100 GWd t -1 was developed, taking into account all the relevant effects and structural changes induced by reactor burn-up

  11. Characterization of microstructure and surface properties of hybrid coatings of WC-CoCr prepared by laser heat treatment and high velocity oxygen fuel spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shihong; Cho, Tong-Yul; Yoon, Jae-Hong; Fang, Wei; Song, Ki-O; Li Mingxi; Joo, Yun-Kon; Lee, Chan Gyu

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure and microhardness of high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings were comparatively studied both before and after laser heat treatment of the coatings. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness testing were applied to investigate the microstructure, phase composition, porosity and microhardness. The results indicate that WC is still present, and W 2 C has appeared, while neither cobalt nor σ-CrCo is detectable. Co 4 W 2 C has appeared in the high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed coating after laser heat treatment as compared to the coating before laser treatment. The relative content of the W 2 C has not increased with laser treatment, but the laser treatment has essentially eliminated the porosity almost entirely, providing a more homogeneous and densified microstructure. The laser heat treatment has effected the formation of a denser compact coating on the substrate. After laser heat treatment, the thickness of the coating has decreased from 300 μm to 225 μm. This corresponds to an average porosity in the high velocity oxygen fuel-sprayed coating that is approximately five times greater than that in the subsequently laser heat-treated coating. The laser treatment has also resulted in an increased hardness of the coating near the surface, where the average value increased from Hv 0.2 = 1262.4 in the coating before laser heat treatment to Hv 0.2 = 1818.7 after laser heat treatment

  12. Nuclear fuel, with emphasis on its utilization in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazaneh, R.; Roshanzamir, M.

    1997-01-01

    Production processes of nuclear fuel on one hand and using nuclear fuels in reactors, particularly PWR Type reactors on the other hand is investigated. The first chapter reviews the relationship between fuel and reactors; The principals of reactor physics in relation with fuel are described shortly. The second chapter reviews uranium exploration and extraction as well as production of uranium concentrate and uranium dioxides. The third chapter is specified to the different procedures of uranium enrichment. In the fourth chapter, processing of uranium dioxide powder and fuel pellet is described. In the fifth chapter fabrication of fuel rod and fuel assemblies is explained thoroughly. The sixth chapter devoted to the different phenomena which occur ed in fuel structure and can during operational time of reactor; damage to fuel rods and developing theoretical models to describe these phenomena and analysis of fuel structure. The seventh chapter discusses how fuel rods are to be experimented during fabrication, operation and development of technology. The eighth chapter explains different fuels such as uranium compounds and mixed oxide fuel of uranium Gadolinium and uranium plutonium and the process of fabrication of zircaloy. In the tenth chapter, fuel reprocessing is investigated and the difficulties of developing this technology is referred

  13. High-performance Fuel Cell with Stretched Catalyst-Coated Membrane: One-step Formation of Cracked Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Sungjun; Hwang, Wonchan; Jang, Segeun; Shin, Sungsoo; Lee, Gunhee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-05-23

    We have achieved performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) though crack generation on its electrodes. It is the first attempt to enhance the performance of PEMFC by using cracks which are generally considered as defects. The pre-defined, cracked electrode was generated by stretching a catalyst-coated Nafion membrane. With the strain-stress property of the membrane that is unique in the aspect of plastic deformation, membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) was successfully incorporated into the fuel cell. Cracked electrodes with the variation of strain were investigated and electrochemically evaluated. Remarkably, mechanical stretching of catalyst-coated Nafion membrane led to a decrease in membrane resistance and an improvement in mass transport, which resulted in enhanced device performance.

  14. High-temperature deformation and processing maps of Zr-4 metal matrix with dispersed coated surrogate nuclear fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Liu, Huiqun; Zhang, Ruiqian; Li, Gang; Yi, Danqing; Lin, Gaoyong; Guo, Zhen; Liu, Shaoqiang

    2018-06-01

    High-temperature compression deformation of a Zr-4 metal matrix with dispersed coated surrogate nuclear fuel particles was investigated at 750 °C-950 °C with a strain rate of 0.01-1.0 s-1 and height reduction of 20%. Scanning electron microscopy was utilized to investigate the influence of the deformation conditions on the microstructure of the composite and damage to the coated surrogate fuel particles. The results indicated that the flow stress of the composite increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. The true stress-strain curves showed obvious serrated oscillation characteristics. There were stable deformation ranges at the initial deformation stage with low true strain at strain rate 0.01 s-1 for all measured temperatures. Additionally, the coating on the surface of the surrogate nuclear fuel particles was damaged when the Zr-4 matrix was deformed at conditions of high strain rate and low temperature. The deformation stability was obtained from the processing maps and microstructural characterization. The high-temperature deformation activation energy was 354.22, 407.68, and 433.81 kJ/mol at true strains of 0.02, 0.08, and 0.15, respectively. The optimum deformation parameters for the composite were 900-950 °C and 0.01 s-1. These results are expected to provide guidance for subsequent determination of possible hot working processes for this composite.

  15. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Morphology and Cavitation Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. L.; Sucharski, G. B.; Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2018-02-01

    The cavitation wear process is one of the major wear mechanisms in turbines and rotors of hydroelectric power plants in Brazil. An effective way to increase the cavitation resistance is the use of coatings, applied by thermal spraying. The high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF) is one of the most used thermal spraying processes, and it is widely adopted for applying coatings for protection against wear and in maintenance components. A FeCrMnSiB experimental alloy was deposited onto SAE 1020 substrate by HVOF process, in order to evaluate the influence of the powder particle size range on the morphology and cavitation resistance of the coatings. The morphology of the coatings showed an increase in oxide content with powder size reduction. The increase in the powder particle size reduced the wettability of the particles, observed by the increase in the quantity of non-melted particles. Higher particle size distribution led to an increase in erosion rate, due to higher presence of non-melted particles in the coatings and consequently reduction of splats adhesion. The cavitation damage was perceived mainly by the mechanism of lamellae detachment; however, part of the damage was also absorbed by strain hardening due to the γ-ɛ martensitic transformation.

  16. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Morphology and Cavitation Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. L.; Sucharski, G. B.; Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2018-04-01

    The cavitation wear process is one of the major wear mechanisms in turbines and rotors of hydroelectric power plants in Brazil. An effective way to increase the cavitation resistance is the use of coatings, applied by thermal spraying. The high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF) is one of the most used thermal spraying processes, and it is widely adopted for applying coatings for protection against wear and in maintenance components. A FeCrMnSiB experimental alloy was deposited onto SAE 1020 substrate by HVOF process, in order to evaluate the influence of the powder particle size range on the morphology and cavitation resistance of the coatings. The morphology of the coatings showed an increase in oxide content with powder size reduction. The increase in the powder particle size reduced the wettability of the particles, observed by the increase in the quantity of non-melted particles. Higher particle size distribution led to an increase in erosion rate, due to higher presence of non-melted particles in the coatings and consequently reduction of splats adhesion. The cavitation damage was perceived mainly by the mechanism of lamellae detachment; however, part of the damage was also absorbed by strain hardening due to the γ- ɛ martensitic transformation.

  17. Nuclear fuel supply view in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirimello, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    The Argentine Atomic Energy Commission promoted and participated in a unique achievement in the R and D system in Argentina: the integration of science technology and production based on a central core of knowledge for the control and management of the nuclear fuel cycle technology. CONUAR SA, as a fuel manufacturer, FAE SA, the manufacturer of Zircaloy tubes, CNEA and now DIOXITEC SA producer of Uranium Dioxide, have been supply, in the last ten years, the amount of products required for about 1300 Tn of equivalent U content in fuels. The most promising changes for the fuel cycle economy is the Slight Enriched Uranium project which begun in Atucha I reactor. In 1997 seventy five fuel assemblies, equivalent to 900 Candu fuel bundles, will complete its irradiation. (author)

  18. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  19. Effect of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic silicon carbide coatings for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-10-01

    Silicon carbide coatings on HTGR microsphere fuel act as the barrier to contain metallic fission products. Silicon carbide coatings were applied by the decomposition of CH 3 SiCl 3 in a 13-cm-diam (5-in.) fluidized-bed coating furnace. The effects of temperature, CH 3 SiCl 3 supply rate and the H 2 :CH 3 SiCl 3 ratio on coating properties were studied. Deposition temperature was found to control coating density, whole particle crushing strength, coating efficiency, and microstructure. Coating density and microstructure were also partially determined by the H 2 :CH 3 SiCl 3 ratio. From this work, it appears that the rate at which high quality SiC can be deposited can be increased from 0.2 to 0.5 μm/min

  20. Mikrostruktur dan Karakterisasi Sifat Mekanik Lapisan Cr3C2-NiAl-Al2O3 Hasil Deposisi Dengan Menggunakan High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating processing of industrial component with thermal spray coatings have been applied in many industrial fields. Ceramic matrix composite coating which consists of Cr3C2-Al2O3-NiAl had been carried out to obtain layers of material that has superior mechanical properties to enhance component performance. Deposition of CMC with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF thermal spray coating has been employed. This study aims to determine the effect of powder particle size on the microstructure, surface roughness and hardness of the layer, by varying the NiAl powder particle size. Test results show NiAl powder particle size has an influence on the mechanical properties of CMC coating. Hardness of coating increases and surface roughness values of coating decrease with smaller NiAl particle size.  

  1. High temperature compression tests performed on doped fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duguay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, CEA Grenoble (France); Fantozzi, G. [INSA Lyon - GEMPPM, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-12-31

    The use of additives of corundum structure M{sub 2}O{sub 3} (M=Cr, Al) is an effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO{sub 2} doped with these oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO{sub 2} with a standard microstructure. Such doped fuels are expected to exhibit enhanced plasticity. Their use would therefore reduce the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and thus improve the performances of the nuclear fuel. (orig.) 5 refs.

  2. High temperature compression tests performed on doped fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguay, C.; Mocellin, A.; Dehaudt, P.; Fantozzi, G.

    1997-01-01

    The use of additives of corundum structure M 2 O 3 (M=Cr, Al) is an effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. The high-temperature compressive deformation of large-grained UO 2 doped with these oxides has been investigated and compared with that of pure UO 2 with a standard microstructure. Such doped fuels are expected to exhibit enhanced plasticity. Their use would therefore reduce the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and thus improve the performances of the nuclear fuel. (orig.)

  3. Method of production of granulates of ceramic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    To obtain a classified granulate of ceramic nuclear fuels with narrow grain size spectrum, the nuclear fuel powder is made into a slurry in a non-aqueous solvent with a water content as low as possible (e.g. chlorated hydrocarbon), a binder added to it, and spray-dried. The dry granulate desired is already obtained by this working stage. Polybutyl methacrylate in dibutylphthalate is proposed as binder. An example in which uranium dioxide powder is slurried in trichloro-ethylene is described in detail. (UWI/LH) [de

  4. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  5. Role of Oxides and Porosity on High-Temperature Oxidation of Liquid-Fueled HVOF Thermal-Sprayed Ni50Cr Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K. T.; Hussain, T.

    2017-02-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high-temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid-fueled high velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using oxygen content analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Short-term air oxidation tests (4 h) of freestanding coatings (without boiler steel substrate) in a thermogravimetric analyzer at 700 °C were performed to obtain the kinetics of oxidation of the as-sprayed coating. Long-term air oxidation tests (100 h) of the coated substrates were performed at same temperature to obtain the oxidation products for further characterization in detail using SEM/EDX and XRD. In all samples, oxides of various morphologies developed on top of the Ni50Cr coatings. Cr2O3 was the main oxidation product on the surface of all three coatings. The coating with medium porosity and medium oxygen content has the best high-temperature oxidation performance in this study.

  6. Development of an environmentally friendly protective coating for the depleted uranium-0.75 wt% titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeper, Donald F.; Chidambaram, Devicharan; Clayton, Clive R.; Halada, Gary P.; Derek Demaree, J.

    2006-01-01

    Molybdenum oxide-based conversion coatings have been formed on the surface of the depleted uranium-0.75 wt% titanium alloy using either concentrated nitric acid or fluorides for surface activation prior to coating formation. The acid-activated surface forms a coating that offers corrosion protection after a period of aging, when uranium species have migrated to the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the protective coating is primarily a polymolybdate bound to a uranyl ion. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) on the acid-activated coatings also shows uranium dioxide migrating to the surface. The fluoride-activated surface does not form a protective coating and there are no uranium species on the surface as indicated by XPS. The coating on the fluoride-activated samples has been found to contain a mixture of molybdenum oxides of which the main component is molybdenum trioxide and a minor component of an Mo(V) oxide

  7. Electrochemical Behavior and Hydrophobic Properties of CrN and CrNiN Coatings in Simulated Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Jie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The CrN and CrNiN coatings were prepared on the surface of 304 stainless steel by closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering.X ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the structure and morphology of the coatings.The electrochemical corrosion properties under the simulated proton exchange membrane fuel cell(PEMFC environment, interfacial contact resistance and hydrophobic properties of the two kinds of different coatings were investigated by electrochemical methods,contact resistance test and hydrophobic test,respectively.The results indicate that CrN coating mainly consists of CrN and Cr2N phase,CrN and Cr2N phases in the CrNiN coating are less compared to CrN film, and Ni exist as element in CrNiN coating; dynamic polarization tests show the coating is of better corrosion resistance,whereas the corrosion resistance of CrNiN coating is worse than that of CrN coating,constant potential polarization test shows the corrosion current density of CrN and CrNiN coatings are equivalent; CrN and CrNiN coatings significantly reduce the interfacial contact resistance of the 304 stainless steel,among which CrN coating has the smallest contact resistance; and CrNiN coating which has better hydrophobicity than that of CrN coating is more beneficial for the water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cell.

  8. Detailed Reaction Kinetics for CFD Modeling of Nuclear Fuel Pellet Coating for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, Francine

    2008-01-01

    The research project was related to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and was in direct alignment with advancing knowledge in the area of Nuclear Fuel Development related to the use of TRISO fuels for high-temperature reactors. The importance of properly coating nuclear fuel pellets received a renewed interest for the safe production of nuclear power to help meet the energy requirements of the United States. High-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors use fuel in the form of coated uranium particles, and it is the coating process that was of importance to this project. The coating process requires four coating layers to retain radioactive fission products from escaping into the environment. The first layer consists of porous carbon and serves as a buffer layer to attenuate the fission and accommodate the fuel kernel swelling. The second (inner) layer is of pyrocarbon and provides protection from fission products and supports the third layer, which is silicon carbide. The final (outer) layer is also pyrocarbon and provides a bonding surface and protective barrier for the entire pellet. The coating procedures for the silicon carbide and the outer pyrocarbon layers require knowledge of the detailed kinetics of the reaction processes in the gas phase and at the surfaces where the particles interact with the reactor walls. The intent of this project was to acquire detailed information on the reaction kinetics for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon and silicon carbine on uranium fuel pellets, including the location of transition state structures, evaluation of the associated activation energies, and the use of these activation energies in the prediction of reaction rate constants. After the detailed reaction kinetics were determined, the reactions were implemented and tested in a computational fluid dynamics model, MFIX. The intention was to find a reduced mechanism set to reduce the computational time for a simulation, while still providing accurate results

  9. Fabrication and testing of the sintered ceramic UO2 fuel - I - III, Part III - testing of sintered uranium dioxide properties dependent on the fabrication procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.; Ristic, M.M.

    1961-12-01

    The objective of this task was testing the influence of some parameters on the properties of sintered UO 2 . The influence of parameters tested were as follows: adhesives; pressure in the pressing procedure; temperature of sintering of the UO 2 powder. Other parameters were chosen according to the theoretical study. Sintering was done in argon atmosphere. Characterization of the UO 2 powder was performed meaning determining the needed chemical, physical and physico-chemical properties. Some new methods were developed within this task: SET method for measuring the specific surfaces, DTA, TGA, high-temperature torsion

  10. Irradiation test HT-31: high-temperature irradiation behavior of LASL-made extruded fuel rods and LASL-made coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.; Reiswig, R.D.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1977-04-01

    Three LASL-made extruded graphite and coated particle fuel rods have been irradiated in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Fluence Isotope Reactor test HT-31. Test conditions were about 9 x 10 21 nvt(E > .18 MeV) at 1250 0 C. The graphite matrix showed little or no effect of the irradiation. LASL-made ZrC containing coated particles with ZrC coats and ZrC-doped pyrolytic carbon coats showed no observable effects of the irradiation

  11. Thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on thermodynamic and transport properties of solid and liquid UO 2 have been reviewed and analyzed to obtain consistent equations for the thermophysical properties. Thermodynamic properties that have been assessed include enthalpy, heat capacity, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion, density, surface tension and vapor pressure. Transport properties that have been assessed are thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, viscosity, emissivity and optical constants. The assessments include a review of the experiments and data, review of previous recommendations, analysis of data to obtain new recommendations, determination of uncertainties in the recommended values, and comparisons of new recommendations with data and previous recommendations

  12. Mixed U/Pu oxide fuel fabrication facility co-processed feed, pelletized fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Two conceptual MOX fuel fabrication facilities are discussed in this study. The first facility in the main body of the report is for the fabrication of LWR uranium dioxide - plutonium dioxide (MOX) fuel using co-processed feed. The second facility in the addendum is for the fabrication of co-processed MOX fuel spiked with 60 Co. Both facilities produce pellet fuel. The spiked facility uses the same basic fabrication process as the conventional MOX plant but the fuel feed incorporates a high energy gamma emitter as a safeguard measure against diversion; additional shielding is added to protect personnel from radiation exposure, all operations are automated and remote, and normal maintenance is performed remotely. The report describes the fuel fabrication process and plant layout including scrap and waste processing; and maintenance, ventilation and safety measures

  13. Technical specifications and performance of CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejnoha, R.

    1997-01-01

    The relations between Technical Specifications and fuel performance are discussed in terms of design limits and margins. The excellent performance record of CANDU reactor fuel demonstrates that the fuel design defined in the Technical Specifications (and with it other components of the procurement cycle, such as fuel manufacturing), satisfy the requirements. New requirements, changing conditions of fuel application and accumulating experience make periodic updates of the Technical Specifications necessary. Under the CANDU Owners Group (COG) Working Party 9, a Work Package has been conducted to support the review of the Specifications and the documentation of the rationales for their requirements. So far, the review has been completed for 4 Specifications: 1 for Zircaloy tubing, and 3 for uranium dioxide powder. It is planned to complete the review of all 11 currently used specifications by 1999. The paper summarizes the results achieved to mid 1997. (author)

  14. Manufacturing technology and process for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    Following recent advanced technologies, processes and requests of the design changes of BWR fuel, Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd. (NFI) has upgraded the manufacturing technology and honed its own skills to complete its brand-new automated facility in Tokai in the latter half of 1980's. The plant uses various forms of automation throughout the manufacturing process: the acceptance of uranium dioxide powder, pelletizing, fuel rod assembling, fuel bundle assembling and shipment. All processes are well computerized and linked together to establish the integrated control system with three levels of Production and Quality Control, Process Control and Process Automation. This multi-level system plays an important role in the quality assurance system which generates the highest quality of fuels and other benefits. (author)

  15. Application of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF Spraying to the Fabrication of Yb-Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Bakan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available From the literature, it is known that due to their glass formation tendency, it is not possible to deposit fully-crystalline silicate coatings when the conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS process is employed. In APS, rapid quenching of the sprayed material on the substrate facilitates the amorphous deposit formation, which shrinks when exposed to heat and forms pores and/or cracks. This paper explores the feasibility of using a high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF process for the cost-effective fabrication of dense, stoichiometric, and crystalline Yb2Si2O7 environmental barrier coatings. We report our findings on the HVOF process optimization and its resultant influence on the microstructure development and crystallinity of the Yb2Si2O7 coatings. The results reveal that partially crystalline, dense, and vertical crack-free EBCs can be produced by the HVOF technique. However, the furnace thermal cycling results revealed that the bonding of the Yb2Si2O7 layer to the Silicon bond coat needs to be improved.

  16. Development and characterization of monolithic fuel miniplate alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, coated in zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Geraldo Correa

    2014-01-01

    The autocthonal production of nuclear fuel in Brazil for test and research reactors is restricted to MTR (Material Test Reactor) fuel type dispersion plate, using U3Si2 alloy, coated and dispersed in aluminum, developed by IPEN-SP for use in IEA-R1 reactor. Moreover, the UO 2 fuel rod type for power reactors is manufactured by Rezende (RJ) with a German technology by INB under license. Currently, Brazil is performing two programs of developing reactors. Currently, Brazil is developing two reactors. One of them is the development, by CNEN, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), for testing, research and radioisotope production. The other one is the development a power reactor for naval propulsion, conducted by the Brazilian Navy. This dissertation presents the development and characterization of monolithic fuel miniplate alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, coated in zircaloy (ZRY), on a laboratory scale. Due to its innovative features and properties, this fuel can be used as fuel in both test reactors, research and producing radioisotopes for power reactors as small and medium sizes. Thus, this high potential fuel can be used in domestic reactors currently under development. The development of monolithic fuel plate type is made using the technique called 'picture-frame' where a sandwich composed of a monolith alloy U-2.5Zr- 7.5Nb coupled to a frame and coated sheets of Zry is obtained. The alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb was obtained by melting in an induction furnace and then was cast into rectangular ingots of graphite, thus achieving an ingot with approximate dimensions of 170 x 50 x 60 mm. The obtained ingot was hot rolled at 850 ºC, with a 50 % reduction in thickness, in order to refine the raw structure of fusion. Samples cut from the alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, with dimensions 20 x 20 x 6 mm were placed in frames and plates Zry and joined by TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) under an atmosphere of argon, obtaining a set of 10 mm thick, 45 mm wide and 100 mm long. The sandwiches were hot rolled to

  17. The current state of development works for manufacturing and methods of controlling the nuclear fuel for NPPs of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeychuk, N.P.; Levenets, V.V.; Krasnorutsky, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results of NSC KIPT researches on manufacturing the fuel microspheres and pellets based on uranium dioxide. The data on fuel characteristics for different manufacturing stages are given. The problems of improving the fuel quality with changing the structure characteristics of pellets are considered. Demonstrated is the hardware for pellet controlling and presented are the new ways for developing the methods of controlling the nuclear fuel: X-ray fluorescent analysis; complex of nuclear-physical methods on the base of accelerators; laser-excitation energy-mass-spectrometer. (author)

  18. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  19. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen Zhongwei

    2010-01-01

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO 2 )-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO 2 -coated SWNT (SnO 2 -SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO 2 -SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO 2 -SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO 2 -SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO 2 loading of Pt/SnO 2 -SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  20. LaCrO3 composite coatings for AISI 444 stainless steel solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Acchar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Doped lanthanum chromite-based ceramics are the most widely used interconnector material in solid fuel cells (SOFC since they exhibit significant electrical and thermal conductivity, substantial corrosion resistance and adequate mechanical strength at ambient and high temperatures. The disadvantage of this material is its high cost and poor ductility. The aim of this study is to determine the mechanical and oxidation behavior of a stainless steel (AISI 444 with a LaCrO3 deposition on its surface obtained through spray pyrolisis. Coated and pure AISI 444 materials were characterized by mechanical properties, oxidation behavior, X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy. Results indicated that the coated material displays better oxidation behavior in comparison to pure stainless steel, but no improvement in mechanical strength. Both materials indicate that deformation behavior depends on testing temperatures.

  1. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen, Zhongwei

    2010-04-23

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO(2))-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO(2)-coated SWNT (SnO(2)-SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO(2)-SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO(2) loading of Pt/SnO(2)-SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  2. Investigating the structural changes of uranium dioxide dependent on additives, Phase I - Uranium-oxide system from structural-phase aspect; Ispitivanje strukturnih promena kod urandioksida u zavisnosti od aditiva, I faza - Sistem Uran-kiseonik sa strukturno-faznog aspekta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manojlovic, Lj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    Having in mind the complex structure of the system uranium-oxygen, and that experimental studies of this system lead to controversial conclusions, an extensive review and analysis of the papers published on this subject were needed. This review wold be very useful for interpreting the expected structural changes of the uranium dioxide dependent on the additives.

  3. Advances in microreaction technology for portable fuel cell applications: Wall coating of thin catalytic films in microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo Bersano, Jaime Cristian

    This research has focused on the need to coat microreactor systems composed of channels in the micron size range of 100 to 1000 mum. The experimental procedures and learning are outlined in terms of slurry and surface preparation requirements which are detailed in the experimental section. This system is motivated and applied to micro methanol steam reformers. Thus, a detailed discussion on the driving motivation is given in the introduction. The low temperatures required for steam-reforming of methanol ˜ 493°K (220°C) make it possible to utilize the reformate as a feed to the fuel cell anode. The group of catalysts that shows the highest activity for methanol steam reforming (SR) at low temperature has composition of CuO/ZnO/Al 2O3, which is also the catalyst used for methanol synthesis. Steam reforming of methanol is a highly endothermic process. Conventional reactor configurations, such as a packed bed reactor, operate in a heat transfer limited mode for this reaction. Using catalyst in packed bed form for portable devices is also not convenient due to high pressure drop and possible channeling of gases in addition to poor heat transfer. A wall-coated catalyst represents a superior geometry since it provides lower pressure drop and ease of manufacturing. Due to their small size, microreactors are especially suited for endothermic reactions whose reactivity depends on the rate of heat input. A brief review on microreaction technology is given with a comprehensive survey for catalyst integration into microreactors for catalytic heterogeneous gas phase reactions. The strength of this research is the model that was developed to coat the interior of micron sized capillaries with coats of CuO/ZnO/Al2O 3 slurries as thick as 25 mum in the dry state. The details of the model are given in terms Taylor's theory and Rayleigh's theory. A model is presented that can predict the coat thickness based on experimental conditions The model combines Taylor's experimental work

  4. Analysis of the U.K. measurements of temperature effects in tubular loose coated particle fuels in HECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, A J

    1972-06-15

    A series of measurements of reaction rates and reactivity changes with temperature were made in teh central region of HECTOR, using loose coated particle fuel provided by the Dragon project under the collaborative agrement between the Project and the UKAEA. A DP report giving the results of these experiments was issued in 1970 and an interim statement given at the 10th DCPM. Since that time, analysis of the reactivity changes with temperature in uranium fuelled cores has indicated significant discrepancies, which were not apparent from the earlier analysis of reaction rate measurements. This report documents the current analysis.

  5. Manufacturing and testing of fuel cans with barrier coating for LWR type reactors in USA and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Papers on manufacturing methods for fuel cans of zircalloy with barrier coating of zirconium prepared by pressing an internal tube into external one as well as by pressing of two-layer tubes with further rolling are reviewed. Heat treatment based on creation of the assigned gradient of temperature over tube wall cross section in order to change the structure of a thin layer of the outside surfce when conserving the initial structure of the rest cross section is developed to increase corrosion resistance. Eddy current and ultrasound methods for control of quality and thickness of the barrier layer of zirconium are used

  6. Sensitivity study for accident tolerant fuels: Property comparisons and behavior simulations in a simplified PWR to enable ATF development and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Kristina Yancey, E-mail: kristina.yancey@gmail.com; Sudderth, Laura; Brito, Ryan A.; Evans, Jordan A.; Hart, Clifford S.; Hu, Anbang; Jati, Andi; Stern, Karyn; McDeavitt, Sean M., E-mail: mcdeavitt@tamu.edu

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • This study compared four accident tolerant fuels against uranium dioxide. • Material property correlations were developed to evaluate fuel performance. • The fuels’ neutronic and thermal hydraulic behaviors were studied in the AP1000. • No fuel type performed better in all areas, but each has strengths and weaknesses. • More research is needed to build a complete model of the fuel performances. - Abstract: Since the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant, there has been increased interest in developing fuels to better withstand accidents for current light water reactors. Four accident tolerant fuel candidates are uranium oxide with beryllium oxide additives, uranium oxide with silicon carbide matrix additives, uranium nitride, and uranium nitride with uranium silicide composite. The first two candidates represent near-term high performance uranium oxide with high thermal conductivity and neutron transparency, and the second two represent mid-term high-density fuels with highly beneficial thermal properties. This study seeks to understand the benefits and drawbacks of each option in place of uranium dioxide. To assess the material properties for each of the fuel types, an extensive literature review was performed for material property data. Correlations were then made to evaluate the properties during reactor operation. Neutronics and thermal hydraulics studies were also completed to determine the impact of the use of each candidate in an AP1000 reactor. In most cases, the candidate fuels performed more desirably than uranium dioxide, but no fuel type performed better in all aspects. Much more research needs to be performed to build a complete model of the fuel performances, primarily experimental data for uranium silicide. Each of the fuels studied has its own benefits and drawbacks, and the comparisons discussed in this report can be used to aid in determining the most appropriate fuel depending on the desired specifications.

  7. Nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Toyoji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To remove failures caused from combination of fuel-cladding interactions, hydrogen absorptions, stress corrosions or the likes by setting the quantity ratio of uranium or uranium and plutonium relative to oxygen to a specific range in fuel pellets and forming a specific size of a through hole at the center of the pellets. Constitution: In a fuel rods of a structure wherein fuel pellets prepared by compacting and sintering uranium dioxide, or oxide mixture consisting of oxides of plutonium and uranium are sealed with a zirconium metal can, the ratio of uranium or uranium and plutonium to oxygen is specified as 1 : 2.01 - 1 : 2.05 in the can and a passing hole of a size in the range of 15 - 30% of the outer diameter of the fuel pellet is formed at the center of the pellet. This increases the oxygen partial pressure in the fuel rod, oxidizes and forms a protection layer on the inner surface of the can to control the hydrogen absorption and stress corrosion. Locallized stress due to fuel cladding interaction (PCMI) can also be moderated. (Horiuchi, T.)

  8. Spinel-based coatings for metal supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Elena; Neagu, Dragos; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Metal supports and metal supported half cells developed at DTU are used for the study of a solution infiltration approach to form protective coatings on porous metal scaffolds. The metal particles in the anode layer, and sometimes even in the support may undergo oxidation in realistic operating...... conditions leading to severe cell degradation. Here, a controlled oxidation of the porous metal substrate and infiltration of Mn and/or Ce nitrate solutions are applied for in situ formation of protective coatings. Our approach consists of scavenging the FeCr oxides formed during the controlled oxidation...... into a continuous and well adhered coating. The effectiveness of coatings is the result of composition and structure, but also of the microstructure and surface characteristics of the metal scaffolds....

  9. Quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhalim, A.S.; Elsayed, A.A.; Shaaban, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    The department of metallurgy, NRC Inchass is embarking on a programme of on a laboratory scale, fuel pins containing uranium dioxide pellets are going to be produced. The department is making use of the expertise and equipment at present available and is going to utilize the new fuel pin fabrication unit which would be shortly in operation. The fabrication and testing of uranium dioxide pellets then gradually adapt them and develop, a national know how in this field. This would also involve building up of indigenous experience through proper training of qualified personnel. That are applied to ensure quality of U o 2 pellets, the techniques implemented, the equipment used and the specifications of the equipment presently available. The following parameters are subject to quality control tests: density. O/U ration, hydrogen content, microstructure, each property will be discussed, measurements related to U o 2 powders, including flow ability, bulk density, O/U ratio, bet surface area and water content will be critically discussed. Relevant tests to ensure Q C of pellets are reviewed. These include surface integrity, density, dimensions, microstructure.4 fig., 1 tab

  10. Fatty acid methyl esters, carbon nanotubes and carbon nanowalls coatings such as lubricity improvers of low sulfur diesel fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cursaru, Diana Luciana; Tanasescu, Constantin [Petroleum-Gas Univ. of Ploiesti (Romania); Vizireanu, Sorin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (Romania)

    2013-06-01

    In this study the lubricity of diesel fuel was restored by different methods, firstly by classic addition of fatty acid methyl esters or by dispersing carbon nanotubes into diesel fuels and secondly, by protecting the metallic surfaces which are in the direct contact to the low sulfur diesel fuel, by application of solid carbon nanowalls coatings synthesized by radiofrequency plasma beam deposition. The fatty acid methyl esters were prepared by transesterification of the sun flower oil in the presence of methanol. The carbon nanotubes were synthesized by CO disproportionation method and were characterized by RAMAN spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The CNWs layers, before the friction tests, were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, while the wear on the steel balls was investigated by optical microscopy of the HRRT apparatus and the wear track on the steel disk was investigated by SEM, AFM and profilometry. The lubricity was measured using the High Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) method. It has been found that CNWs layers exhibit a lubricating potential for the rubbed surfaces in the presence of low sulfur diesel fuels. Tribological analyses of various carbon materials revealed that the friction coefficient of carbon nanowalls is close to the values obtained for graphite. (orig.)

  11. Fission product retention in TRISO coated UO2 particle fuels subjected to HTR simulated core heating tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.A.; Kania, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the examination and analysis of 25,730 individual microspheres from spherical fuel elements HFR-K3/1 and HFR-K3/3 are reported. The parent spheres were irradiated in excess of end-of-life exposure and subsequently subjected to simulated core heating tests in a special high-temperature furnace at Forschungszentrum, Juelich, GmbH (KFA). Following the heating tests, the spheres were electrolytically deconsolidated to obtain unbounded fuel particles for Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) analysis. For sphere HFR-K3/1, which was heated for 500 h at 1600 deg. C, only four particles were identified as having released fission products. The remaining particles from the sphere showed no statistical evidence of fission product release. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination showed that three of the defect particles had large sections of the TRISO coating missing, while the fourth appeared normal. For sphere HFR-K3/3, which was heated for 100 h at 1800 deg. C, the IMGA data revealed that fission product release (cesium) from individual particles was significant and that there was large particle-to-particle variation in retention capabilities. Individual particle release (cesium) averaged ten times the KFA-measured integral spherical fuel element release value. In addition, the bimodal distribution of the individual particle data indicated that two distinct modes of failure at fuel temperatures of 1800 deg. C and above may exist. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs, 4 tabs

  12. Fission product retention in TRISCO coated UO2 particle fuels subjected to HTR simulated core heating tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, C.A.; Kania, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    Results of the examination and analysis of 25,730 individual microspheres from spherical fuel elements HFR-K3/1 and HFR-K3/3 are reported. The parent spheres were irradiated in excess of end-of-life exposure and subsequently subjected to simulated core heating tests in a special high-temperature furnace at Forschungszentrum, Juelich, GmbH (KFA). Following the heating tests, the spheres were electrolytically deconsolidated to obtain unbonded fuel particles for Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) analysis. For sphere HFR-K3/1, which was heated for 500 h at 1600 degree C, only four particles were identified as having released fission products. The remaining particles from the sphere showed no statistical evidence of fission product release. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination showed that three of the defect particles had large sections of the TRISO coating missing, while the fourth appeared normal. For sphere HFR-K3/3, which was heated for 100 h at 1800 degree C, the IMGA data revealed that fission product release (cesium) from individual particles was significant and that there was large particle-to-particle variation in retention capabilities. Individual particle release (cesium) averaged ten times the KFA-measured integral spherical fuel element release value. In addition, the bimodal distribution of the individual particle data indicated that two distinct modes of failure at fuel temperatures of 1800 degree C and above may exist. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Corrosion behavior of Fe-Si metallic coatings added with NiCrAlY in an environment of fuel oil ashes at 700 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Porcayo-Calderon, J.; Romero-Castanon, T. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Procesos Termicos., Av. Reforma 113, C.P. 62490 Col. Palmira. Temixco. Morelos (Mexico); Dominguez-Patino, G.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G. [U.A.E.M. Centro de Investigaciones en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas., Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62210, Col. Chamilpa. Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curves and immersion tests for 300 h at 700 C in a furnace have been used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of Fe-Si metallic coatings added with up to 50 wt.% of NiCrAIY. The corrosive environment was fuel oil ashes from a steam generator. The composition of fuel oil ashes includes high content of vanadium, sodium and sulfur. The results obtained show that only the addition of 20 wt.% NiCrAlY to the Fe-Si coating improves its corrosion resistance. The behavior of all tested coatings is explained by the results obtained from the analysis of every coating using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Improvement of Silicide Coating Method as Diffusion Barrier for U-Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Park, Jong Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Ti, or Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-Mo-Ti alloy powders were coated with silicide layers. The coating process was improved when compared to the previous coating in terms of the ball milling and heat treatment conditions. Subsequently, silicide coated U-Mo-Ti powders and pure aluminum powders were mixed and made into a compact for the annealing test. The compacts were annealed at 550 .deg. C for 2hr, and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). 1. Uniform, homogeneous, thickness controllable silicide layers were successfully coated on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti powders. 2. U{sub 3}Si, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} silicide layers formed on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti powders, and were identified by XRD and EDS analyses.

  15. Ni-based amorphous alloy-coating for bipolar plate of PEM fuel cell by electrochemical plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, S; Kim, S C; Inoue, A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates were produced by electro-plating on the Cu base plates with a flow field. The power generation tests of a single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates were conducted at 353 K. It was found that the single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed excellent I-V performance as well as that with the carbon graphite bipolar plates. It was also found that the single cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed better I-V performance than that with the Ni-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates. Furthermore, the long-time operation test was conducted for 440 h with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates at the constant current density of 200 mA·cm −2 . As a result, it was found that the cell voltage gradually decreased at the beginning of the measurement before 300 h and then the voltage was kept constant after 300 h.

  16. Nanosized TiN-SBR hybrid coating of stainless steel as bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Masanobu; Myung, Seung-Taek; Asaishi, Ryo; Sun, Yang-Kook; Yashiro, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    In attempt to improve interfacial electrical conductivity of stainless steel for bipolar plates of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, TiN nanoparticles were electrophoretically deposited on the surface of stainless steel with elastic styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) particles. From transmission electron microscopic observation, it was found that the TiN nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm) surrounded the spherical SBR particles (ca. 300-600 nm), forming agglomerates. They were well adhered on the surface of the type 310S stainless steel. With help of elasticity of SBR, the agglomerates were well fitted into the interfacial gap between gas diffusion layer (GDL) and stainless steel bipolar plate, and the interfacial contact resistance (ICR), simultaneously, was successfully reduced. A single cell using the TiN nanoparticles-coated bipolar plates, consequently, showed comparable cell performance with the graphite employing cell at a current density of 0.5 A cm -2 (12.5 A). Inexpensive TiN nanoparticle-coated type 310S stainless steel bipolar plates would become a possible alternate for the expensive graphite bipolar plates as use in fuel cell applications

  17. Failure analysis of thermally cycled columnar thermal barrier coatings produced by high-velocity-air fuel and axial-suspension-plasma spraying: A design perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ganvir, A.; Vaidhyanathan, V.; Markocsan, N.; Gupta, M.; Pala, Zdeněk; Lukáč, František

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2018), s. 3161-3172 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings * Axial Suspension Plasma spraying * Thermal Cyclic Fatigue * High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884217325403

  18. Air plasma spray processing and electrochemical characterization of Cu-SDC coatings for use in solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)