WorldWideScience

Sample records for coastal soils developed

  1. Climate change and soil salinity: The case of coastal Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Susmita; Hossain, Md Moqbul; Huq, Mainul; Wheeler, David

    2015-12-01

    This paper estimates location-specific soil salinity in coastal Bangladesh for 2050. The analysis was conducted in two stages: First, changes in soil salinity for the period 2001-2009 were assessed using information recorded at 41 soil monitoring stations by the Soil Research Development Institute. Using these data, a spatial econometric model was estimated linking soil salinity with the salinity of nearby rivers, land elevation, temperature, and rainfall. Second, future soil salinity for 69 coastal sub-districts was projected from climate-induced changes in river salinity and projections of rainfall and temperature based on time trends for 20 Bangladesh Meteorological Department weather stations in the coastal region. The findings indicate that climate change poses a major soil salinization risk in coastal Bangladesh. Across 41 monitoring stations, the annual median projected change in soil salinity is 39 % by 2050. Above the median, 25 % of all stations have projected changes of 51 % or higher.

  2. Analysis and assessment on heavy metal sources in the coastal soils developed from alluvial deposits using multivariate statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinling; He, Ming; Han, Wei; Gu, Yifan

    2009-05-30

    An investigation on heavy metal sources, i.e., Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, Cr, and Cd in the coastal soils of Shanghai, China, was conducted using multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis, clustering analysis, and correlation analysis). All the results of the multivariate analysis showed that: (i) Cu, Ni, Pb, and Cd had anthropogenic sources (e.g., overuse of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, industrial and municipal discharges, animal wastes, sewage irrigation, etc.); (ii) Zn and Cr were associated with parent materials and therefore had natural sources (e.g., the weathering process of parent materials and subsequent pedo-genesis due to the alluvial deposits). The effect of heavy metals in the soils was greatly affected by soil formation, atmospheric deposition, and human activities. These findings provided essential information on the possible sources of heavy metals, which would contribute to the monitoring and assessment process of agricultural soils in worldwide regions.

  3. Biodiversity and ecology of soil fungi in a primary succession of a temperate coastal dune system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prenafeta Boldú, F.X.; Summerbell, R.C.; de Boer, W.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Gamsformerly, W.

    2014-01-01

    Soil fungal communities were studied in an actively developing coastal dune system at Goeree Island, the Netherlands. A shore to inland sampling transect was laid out, extending from coastal brackish marshes to recently formed foredunes to older dune pastures to adjacent woodlands. Soil samples from

  4. Soil thermal properties at Kalpakkam in coastal south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Anandakumar; R Venkatesan; Thara V Prabha

    2001-09-01

    Time series of soil surface and subsurface temperatures, soil heat ux, net radiation, air temperature and wind speed were measured at two locations in Kalpakkam, coastal southeast India. The data were analysed to estimate soil thermal di usivity, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and soil heat ux. This paper describes the results and discusses their implications.

  5. Soil microorganisms control plant ectoparasitic nematodes in natural coastal foredunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piśkiewicz, Anna M; Duyts, Henk; Berg, Matty P; Costa, Sofia R; van der Putten, Wim H

    2007-06-01

    Belowground herbivores can exert important controls on the composition of natural plant communities. Until now, relatively few studies have investigated which factors may control the abundance of belowground herbivores. In Dutch coastal foredunes, the root-feeding nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis is capable of reducing the performance of the dominant grass Ammophila arenaria (Marram grass). However, field surveys show that populations of this nematode usually are controlled to nondamaging densities, but the control mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we first established that T. ventralis populations are top-down controlled by soil biota. Then, selective removal of soil fauna suggested that soil microorganisms play an important role in controlling T. ventralis. This result was confirmed by an experiment where selective inoculation of microarthropods, nematodes and microbes together with T. ventralis into sterilized dune soil resulted in nematode control when microbes were present. Adding nematodes had some effect, whereas microarthropods did not have a significant effect on T. ventralis. Our results have important implications for the appreciation of herbivore controls in natural soils. Soil food web models assume that herbivorous nematodes are controlled by predaceous invertebrates, whereas many biological control studies focus on managing nematode abundance by soil microorganisms. We propose that soil microorganisms play a more important role than do carnivorous soil invertebrates in the top-down control of herbivorous ectoparasitic nematodes in natural ecosystems. This is opposite to many studies on factors controlling root-feeding insects, which are supposed to be controlled by carnivorous invertebrates, parasitoids, or entomopathogenic nematodes. Our conclusion is that the ectoparasitic nematode T. ventralis is potentially able to limit productivity of the dune grass A. arenaria but that soil organisms, mostly microorganisms, usually prevent the

  6. Coastal tourism, environment, and sustainable local development

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Noronha, L.; Lourenco, N.; Lobo-Ferreira, J.P.; Lieopart, A.; Feoli, E.; Sawkar, K.; Chachadi, A.

    and managing for coastal development within a sustainability framework, and (3) the need for coastal policy making to be more state holder-sensitive. This roadmap provides a synoptic account of the analysis, results and decision tools developed to measure...

  7. Do ENSO and Coastal Development Enhance Coastal Burial of Terrestrial Carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macreadie, Peter I.; Rolph, Timothy C.; Boyd, Ron; Schröder-Adams, Claudia J.; Skilbeck, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon cycling on the east coast of Australia has the potential to be strongly affected by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) intensification and coastal development (industrialization and urbanization). We performed paleoreconstructions of estuarine sediments from a seagrass-dominated estuary on the east coast of Australia (Tuggerah Lake, New South Wales) to test the hypothesis that millennial-scale ENSO intensification and European settlement in Australia have increased the transfer of organic carbon from land into coastal waters. Our data show that carbon accumulation rates within coastal sediments increased significantly during periods of maximum millennial-scale ENSO intensity (“super-ENSO”) and coastal development. We suggest that ENSO and coastal development destabilize and liberate terrestrial soil carbon, which, during rainfall events (e.g., La Niña), washes into estuaries and becomes trapped and buried by coastal vegetation (seagrass in this case). Indeed, periods of high carbon burial were generally characterized as having rapid sedimentation rates, higher content of fine-grained sediments, and increased content of wood and charcoal fragments. These results, though preliminary, suggest that coastal development and ENSO intensification—both of which are predicted to increase over the coming century—can enhance capture and burial of terrestrial carbon by coastal ecosystems. These findings have important relevance for current efforts to build an understanding of terrestrial-marine carbon connectivity into global carbon budgets. PMID:26691557

  8. Sustainability in coastal tourism development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Marie Visbech; Blichfeldt, Bodil Stilling; Liburd, Janne J.

    2017-01-01

    explicitly requested nominations for sustainable tourism projects. A comparison between academic sustainability discourse and the approved projects suggests that tourism actors do not address sustainable tourism development as a holistic concept. Long-term perspectives are largely absent, whereas economic...... benefits are emphasized. Key findings also indicate weak political leadership in the envisaged transfer towards sustainable tourism development.......Denmark’s coastlines have been protected from tourism development and construction for more than 80 years. In 2014, the Danish politicians opened up for softer regulation of the coastlines and invited proposals for tourism development projects within the hitherto protected coastal zone. The call...

  9. Coastal acid sulphate soils in Poland: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulisz Piotr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the state of knowledge on coastal acid sulphate soils in Poland. The properties of these soils are closely related to the influence of brackish water from the Baltic Sea, high accumulation of organic matter and human activity. The obtained results demonstrate that the sulphide accumulation in soils refers to a relatively small areas of the Polish coastal zone with the unique and very valuable habitats. They require an adequate regulation of the water relations to avoid the risk of strong soil acidification and environmental pollution by heavy metals. Currently, there are no relevant criteria for classification of acid sulphate soil materials in the Polish Soil Classification (2011. Therefore, based on the presented data, the authors proposed to identify these features at the lower classification level (for different soil types. The criteria for the Thionic and Sulfidic qualifiers used in the WRB classification (IUSS Working Group WRB 2015 could be accepted for this purpose.

  10. Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    KAUST Repository

    Prakash, P. Jish

    2016-09-26

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effects on the Red Sea, land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of windblown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used in climate

  11. Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Tao, Weichun; Yapici, Tahir; Warsama, Bashir; Engelbrecht, Johann P.

    2016-09-01

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Arabian Red Sea coastal plain, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effects on the Red Sea, land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of windblown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), ion chromatography (IC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser particle size analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used in climate

  12. Contrasting soils and landscapes of the Piedmont and Coastal Plain, eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Pavich, M.J.; Buell, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces comprise 80 percent of the Atlantic Coastal states from New Jersey to Georgia. The provinces are climatically similar. The soil moisture regime is udic. The soil temperature regime is typically thermic from Virginia through Georgia, although it is mesic at altitudes above 400 m in Georgia and above 320 m in Virginia. The soil temperature regime is mesic for the Piedmont and Coastal Plain from Maryland through New Jersey. The tightly folded, structurally complex crystalline rocks of the Piedmont and the gently dipping "layer-cake" clastic sedimentary rocks and sediments of the Coastal Plain respond differently to weathering, pedogenesis, and erosion. The different responses result in two physiographically contrasting terrains; each has distinctive near-surface hydrology, regolith, drainage morphology, and morphometry. The Piedmont is predominantly an erosional terrain. Interfluves are as narrow as 0.5 to 2 km, and are convex upward. Valleys are as narrow as 0.1 to 0.5 km and generally V-shaped in cross section. Alluvial terraces are rare and discontinuous. Soils in the Piedmont are typically less than 1 m thick, have less sand and more clay than Coastal Plain soils, and generally have not developed sandy epipedons. Infiltration rates for Piedmont soils are low at 6-15 cm/h. The soil/saprolite, soil/rock, and saprolite/rock boundaries are distinct (can be placed within 10 cm) and are characterized by ponding and/or lateral movement of water. Water movement through soil into saprolite, and from saprolite into rock, is along joints, foliation, bedding planes and faults. Soils and isotopic data indicate residence times consistent with a Pleistocene age for most Piedmont soils. The Coastal Plain is both an erosional and a constructional terrain. Interfluves commonly are broader than 2 km and are flat. Valleys are commonly as wide as 1 km to greater than 10 km, and contain numerous alluvial and estuarine terrace

  13. Survival and bioturbation effects of common marine macrofauna in coastal soils newly flooded with seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Quintana, Cintia Organo; Thorsen, Sandra Walløe

    Low-lying coastal soils are at risk of being permanently flooded due to global sea level rise, but how will these areas develop as habitat for marine species? We conducted an experiment to evaluate the habitat quality of flooded soils for common marine polychaetes (Marenzelleria viridis, Nereis...... that some species (M. viridis) show decreased bioirrigation activity and avoidance behavior when exposed to flooded soil, while others (N. diversicolor and S. armiger) showed high survival and unaffected bioirrigation activity. Overall it appears that flooded coastal soils can rapidly support diverse...... diversicolor and Scoloplos armiger). Soil cores were collected at Gyldensteen Beach (Northern Fyn, Denmark), where a 200 ha area is designated for flooding as part of a nature restoration project. Soils cores were experimentally flooded for 1 month before adding polychaetes. We measured the effect...

  14. Carbon sequestration potential of coastal wetland soils of Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Romero, Elisabeth; García-Calderón, Norma Eugenia; Ikkonen, Elena; García-Varela, Kl

    2014-05-01

    Tropical coastal wetlands, including rainforests and mangrove ecosystems play an increasingly important ecological and economic role in the tropical coastal area of the State of Veracruz /Mexico. However, soil processes in these environments, especially C-turnover rates are largely unknown until today. Therefore, we investigated CO2 and CH4 emissions together with gains and losses of organic C in the soils of two different coastal ecosystems in the "Natural Protected Area Cienaga del Fuerte (NPACF)" near Tecolutla, in the State of Veracruz. The research areas were an artificially introduced grassland (IG) and a wetland rainforest (WRF). The gas emissions from the soil surfaces were measured by a static chamber array, the soil organic C was analysed in soil profiles distributed in the two areas, humic substances were characterized and C budget was calculated. The soils in both areas acted as carbon sinks, but the soils of the WRF sequestered more C than those of the IG, which showed a higher gas emission rate and produced more dissolved organic carbon. The gas emission measurements during the dry and the rainy seasons allowed for estimating the possible influence of global warming on gas fluxes from the soils of the two different ecological systems, which show in the WRF a quite complex spatial emission pattern during the rainy season in contrast to a more continuous emission pattern in the IG plots

  15. Modeling daily soil salinity dynamics in response to agricultural and environmental changes in coastal Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payo, Andrés.; Lázár, Attila N.; Clarke, Derek; Nicholls, Robert J.; Bricheno, Lucy; Mashfiqus, Salehin; Haque, Anisul

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of salt movement in the soil is a prerequisite for devising appropriate management strategies for land productivity of coastal regions, especially low-lying delta regions, which support many millions of farmers around the world. At present, there are no numerical models able to resolve soil salinity at regional scale and at daily time steps. In this research, we develop a novel holistic approach to simulate soil salinization comprising an emulator-based soil salt and water balance calculated at daily time steps. The method is demonstrated for the agriculture areas of coastal Bangladesh (˜20,000 km2). This shows that we can reproduce the dynamics of soil salinity under multiple land uses, including rice crops, combined shrimp and rice farming, as well as non-rice crops. The model also reproduced well the observed spatial soil salinity for the year 2009. Using this approach, we have projected the soil salinity for three different climate ensembles, including relative sea-level rise for the year 2050. Projected soil salinity changes are significantly smaller than other reported projections. The results suggest that inter-season weather variability is a key driver of salinization of agriculture soils at coastal Bangladesh.

  16. Mapping spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field based on electromagnetic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Huang, Jingyi; Shi, Zhou; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, there is an urgent need to increase land area for agricultural production and urban development, where there is a rapid growing population. One solution is land reclamation from coastal tidelands, but soil salinization is problematic. As such, it is very important to characterize and map the within-field variability of soil salinity in space and time. Conventional methods are often time-consuming, expensive, labor-intensive, and unpractical. Fortunately, proximal sensing has become an important technology in characterizing within-field spatial variability. In this study, we employed the EM38 to study spatial variability of soil salinity in a coastal paddy field. Significant correlation relationship between ECa and EC1:5 (i.e. r >0.9) allowed us to use EM38 data to characterize the spatial variability of soil salinity. Geostatistical methods were used to determine the horizontal spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity over three consecutive years. The study found that the distribution of salinity was heterogeneous and the leaching of salts was more significant in the edges of the study field. By inverting the EM38 data using a Quasi-3D inversion algorithm, the vertical spatio-temporal variability of soil salinity was determined and the leaching of salts over time was easily identified. The methodology of this study can be used as guidance for researchers interested in understanding soil salinity development as well as land managers aiming for effective soil salinity monitoring and management practices. In order to better characterize the variations in soil salinity to a deeper soil profile, the deeper mode of EM38 (i.e., EM38v) as well as other EMI instruments (e.g. DUALEM-421) can be incorporated to conduct Quasi-3D inversions for deeper soil profiles.

  17. Development of a coastal drought index using salinity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul A.; Darby, Lisa S.

    2017-01-01

    A critical aspect of the uniqueness of coastal drought is the effects on the salinity dynamics of creeks, rivers, and estuaries. The location of the freshwater–saltwater interface along the coast is an important factor in the ecological and socioeconomic dynamics of coastal communities. Salinity is a critical response variable that integrates hydrologic and coastal dynamics including sea level, tides, winds, precipitation, streamflow, and tropical storms. The position of the interface determines the composition of freshwater and saltwater aquatic communities as well as the freshwater availability for water intakes. Many definitions of drought have been proposed, with most describing a decline in precipitation having negative impacts on the water supply. Indices have been developed incorporating data such as rainfall, streamflow, soil moisture, and groundwater levels. These water-availability drought indices were developed for upland areas and may not be ideal for characterizing coastal drought. The availability of real-time and historical salinity datasets provides an opportunity for the development of a salinity-based coastal drought index. An approach similar to the standardized precipitation index (SPI) was modified and applied to salinity data obtained from sites in South Carolina and Georgia. Using the SPI approach, the index becomes a coastal salinity index (CSI) that characterizes coastal salinity conditions with respect to drought periods of higher-saline conditions and wet periods of higher-freshwater conditions. Evaluation of the CSI indicates that it provides additional coastal response information as compared to the SPI and the Palmer hydrologic drought index, and the CSI can be used for different estuary types and for comparison of conditions along coastlines.

  18. Survival and bioturbation effects of common marine macrofauna in coastal soils newly flooded with seawater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun; Quintana, Cintia Organo; Thorsen, Sandra Walløe;

    of polychaetes on CO2 and nutrient fluxes for 4 weeks, and by the end quantified survival and bioirrigation activity. Results show that polychaetes stimulate benthic metabolism and nutrient release in flooded soil and therefore accelerate the transformation of soils into sediments. Furthermore it appears......Low-lying coastal soils are at risk of being permanently flooded due to global sea level rise, but how will these areas develop as habitat for marine species? We conducted an experiment to evaluate the habitat quality of flooded soils for common marine polychaetes (Marenzelleria viridis, Nereis...... diversicolor and Scoloplos armiger). Soil cores were collected at Gyldensteen Beach (Northern Fyn, Denmark), where a 200 ha area is designated for flooding as part of a nature restoration project. Soils cores were experimentally flooded for 1 month before adding polychaetes. We measured the effect...

  19. PEDOTRANSFER FUNCTIONS FOR WATER RETENTION IN THE MAIN SOILS FROM THE BRAZILIAN COASTAL PLAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiane da Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pedotransfer functions (PTFs are equations used to estimate soil characteristics difficult to determine from other easily obtained ones. Water retention in soil is used in several agronomic and environmental applications, but its direct determination is time consuming and onerous, therefore PTFs are alternatives to obtaining this information more quickly and economically. The aims of this study were to generate a database and develop PTFs for water retention at potentials of -33 kPa (field capacity and -1500 kPa (permanent wilting point for Yellow Argisol and Yellow Latosol from the Brazilian Coastal Plains region. The Coastal Plains soils are mostly developed from Barreiras formation (pre-weathered sediments and their main uses are sugarcane, livestock, forestry and fruticulture. The database to generate the PTFs was composed from the selection of information derived from scientific works and soil survey reports of the region. Specific PTFs were generated for each soil class, in their respective A and B horizons and for solum, through multiple regression by stepwise package of R language programming. Due to the small pedological variability (small number of soil classes containing great geographical expression and mineralogical uniformity, usually observed in this environment, non-stratification of soil classes to create general PTFs presented similar or superior results compared to equations for each soil class. The adjustment of data demonstrated that water retention values at -33 kPa and -1500 kPa potentials can be estimated with adequate accuracy for the main soils of the Brazilian Coastal Plains through PTFs mainly from particle size distribution and secondarily from organic matter data.

  20. Management Effects on Soil Respiration in North Carolina Coastal Plain Loblolly Pine Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, M.; McNulty, S.; Noormets, A.; Treasure, E.

    2012-12-01

    Loblolly pine is the most widely planted tree for plantation management in the southern US. In the southern coastal plain, where much of the original longleaf pine and bottomland hardwood forests have been converted to loblolly pine plantations, inland areas are commonly characterized by deep organic soils that can store up to 80 kg C m-2. Intensive management activities on these sites disturb the forest floor and soil and their impact on soil respiration rates and long term soil storage capabilities is unclear. We measured soil respiration rates in three loblolly pine plantations being managed with a combination of ditching, bedding, clearcutting, thinning and fertilization. Sites and management regimes represented a wide range of real world conditions found in managed southern US forestry plantations. Soil efflux rates along with soil temperature and moisture were measured throughout the year at four to six plots on each site and best fit relationships were developed. Annual soil respiration rates where modeled using 30-minute soil temperature and moisture measurements recorded at a centralized meteorological station on each site. Soil efflux rates were highly correlated with soil temperature and moisture, but interaction between the two effects was uncommon. Soil temperature was the primary driver of soil respiration rates, but rates were suppressed under high soil moisture content. Modeled annual soil efflux rates were higher the first two years following clearcut harvest and thinning operations, but lower two years following fertilization. Rates were lower in the gaps, where entire tree rows were removed, compared to thinned areas, especially on the unfertilized site. Results indicate that soil respiration rates can be strongly impacted by forest management practices; however, the period of increased soil CO2 efflux due to site disturbance may last only a few years.

  1. Enhanced growth of halophyte plants in biochar-amended coastal soil: roles of nutrient availability and rhizosphere microbial modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Wang, Xiao; Chen, Lei; Wang, Zhenyu; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Yipeng; Wang, Hefang; Luo, Xianxiang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-03-27

    Soil health is essential and irreplaceable for plant growth and global food production, which has been threatened by climate change and soil degradation. Degraded coastal soils are urgently required to reclaim using new sustainable technologies. Interest in applying biochar to improve soil health and promote crop yield has rapidly increased because of its multiple benefits. However, effects of biochar addition on the saline-sodic coastal soil health and halophyte growth were poorly understood. Response of two halophytes, Sesbania (Sesbania cannabina) and Seashore mallow (Kosteletzkya virginica), to the individual or co-application of biochar and inorganic fertilizer into a coastal soil was investigated using a 52-day pot experiment. The biochar alone or co-application stimulated the plant growth (germination, root development, biomass), primarily attributed to the enhanced nutrients availability from the biochar-improved soil health. Additionally, the promoted microbial activities and bacterial community shift towards the beneficial taxa (e.g., Pseudomonas and Bacillus) in the rhizosphere also contributed to the enhanced plant growth and biomass. Our findings showed the promising significance because biochar added at an optimal level (≤5%) could be a feasible option to reclaim the degraded coastal soil, enhance plant growth and production, and increase soil health and food security.

  2. Integrating Remote Sensing and Proximal Sensors for the Detection of Soil Moisture and Salinity Variability in Coastal Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yan; SHI Zhou; ZHOU Lian-qing; JIN Xi; TIAN Yan-feng; TENG Hong-fen

    2013-01-01

    Soil moisture and salinity are two crucial coastal saline soil variables, which influence the soil quality and agricultural productivity in the reclaimed coastal region. Accurately characterizing the spatial variability of these soil parameters is critical for the rational development and utilization of tideland resources. In the present study, the spatial variability of soil moisture and salinity in the reclaimed area of Hangzhou gulf, Shangyu City, Zhejiang Province, China, was detected using the data acquired from radar image and the proximal sensor EM38. Soil moisture closely correlates radar scattering coefficient, and a simplified inversion model was built based on a backscattering coefficient extracted from multi-polarization data of ALOS/PALSAR and in situ soil moisture measured by a time domain reflectometer to detect soil moisture variations. The result indicated a higher accuracy of soil moisture inversion by the HH polarization mode than those by the HV mode. Soil salinity is reflected by soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa). Further, ECa can be rapidly detected by EM38 equipment in situ linked with GPS for characterizing the spatial variability of soil salinity. Based on the strong spatial variability and interactions of soil moisture and salinity, a cokriging interpolation method with auxiliary variable of backscattering coefficient was adopted to map the spatial variability of ECa. When compared with a map of ECa interpolated by the ordinary kriging method, detail was revealed and the accuracy was increased by 15.3%. The results conclude that the integrating active remote sensing and proximal sensors EM38 are effective and acceptable approaches for rapidly and accurately detecting soil moisture and salinity variability in coastal areas, especially in the subtropical coastal zones of China with frequent heavy cloud cover.

  3. Web Application for Coastal Area Planning through Analysis of Landslide and Soil Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzoni, Giulio; Debiasi, Alberto; Eccher, Matteo; De Amicis, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Global warming and rapid climatic changes are producing dramatic effects on coastal area of Mediterranean countries. Italian coastal areas are one of the most urbanized zones of the south western Europe and the extensive use of soil is causing a consistent impact on the hydrogeological context. Moreover, soil consumption combined with extreme meteorological events, facilitates the occurrence of hazardous landslide events. Environmental policy makers and data managers in territorial planning need to face such emergency situation with appropriate tools. We present an application service with the aim of advising user through environmental analysis of Landslide and Soil Consumption impact. This service wants also to improve the sharing of environmental harmonized datasets/metadata across different organizations and the creation of a collaborative environment where the stakeholders and environmental experts can share their data and work cooperatively. We developed a set of processing services providing functionalities to assess impact of landslide on territory and impact of land take and soil sealing. Among others, the service is able to evaluate environmental impacts of landslide events on Cultural Heritage sites. We have also designed a 3D WebGL client customized to execute the processing services and visualize their outputs. It provides high usability in terms of navigation and data visualization. In this way the service provides not only a Spatial Data Infrastructure to access and visualize data but a complete Decision Support Systems for a more effective environmental planning of coastal area.

  4. Evaluation of amendments to decrease high strength in southeastern USA Coastal Plain soils using fuzzy multi-attributive comparison of alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Productivity of many southeastern USA Coastal Plain soils is reduced by cemented subsurface layers that restrict root growth. Though tillage is the usual way to reduce cementation, if soil amendments can develop aggregation, they offer a more permanent solution. To improve soil physical properties a...

  5. Causal mechanisms of soil organic matter decomposition: deconstructing salinity and flooding impacts in coastal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L; Schoolmaster, Donald R; Krauss, Ken W; Cormier, Nicole; Conner, William H

    2017-08-01

    Coastal wetlands significantly contribute to global carbon storage potential. Sea-level rise and other climate-change-induced disturbances threaten coastal wetland sustainability and carbon storage capacity. It is critical that we understand the mechanisms controlling wetland carbon loss so that we can predict and manage these resources in anticipation of climate change. However, our current understanding of the mechanisms that control soil organic matter decomposition, in particular the impacts of elevated salinity, are limited, and literature reports are contradictory. In an attempt to improve our understanding of these complex processes, we measured root and rhizome decomposition and developed a causal model to identify and quantify the mechanisms that influence soil organic matter decomposition in coastal wetlands that are impacted by sea-level rise. We identified three causal pathways: (1) a direct pathway representing the effects of flooding on soil moisture, (2) a direct pathway representing the effects of salinity on decomposer microbial communities and soil biogeochemistry, and (3) an indirect pathway representing the effects of salinity on litter quality through changes in plant community composition over time. We used this model to test the effects of alternate scenarios on the response of tidal freshwater forested wetlands and oligohaline marshes to short- and long-term climate-induced disturbances of flooding and salinity. In tidal freshwater forested wetlands, the model predicted less decomposition in response to drought, hurricane salinity pulsing, and long-term sea-level rise. In contrast, in the oligohaline marsh, the model predicted no change in response to drought and sea-level rise, and increased decomposition following a hurricane salinity pulse. Our results show that it is critical to consider the temporal scale of disturbance and the magnitude of exposure when assessing the effects of salinity intrusion on carbon mineralization in coastal

  6. Causal mechanisms of soil organic matter decomposition: Deconstructing salinity and flooding impacts in coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Schoolmaster, Donald; Krauss, Ken W.; Cormier, Nicole; Conner, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal wetlands significantly contribute to global carbon storage potential. Sea-level rise and other climate change-induced disturbances threaten coastal wetland sustainability and carbon storage capacity. It is critical that we understand the mechanisms controlling wetland carbon loss so that we can predict and manage these resources in anticipation of climate change. However, our current understanding of the mechanisms that control soil organic matter decomposition, in particular the impacts of elevated salinity, are limited, and literature reports are contradictory. In an attempt to improve our understanding of these complex processes, we measured root and rhizome decomposition and developed a causal model to identify and quantify the mechanisms that influence soil organic matter decomposition in coastal wetlands that are impacted by sea-level rise. We identified three causal pathways: 1) a direct pathway representing the effects of flooding on soil moisture, 2) a direct pathway representing the effects of salinity on decomposer microbial communities and soil biogeochemistry, and 3) an indirect pathway representing the effects of salinity on litter quality through changes in plant community composition over time. We used this model to test the effects of alternate scenarios on the response of tidal freshwater forested wetlands and oligohaline marshes to short- and long-term climate-induced disturbances of flooding and salinity. In tidal freshwater forested wetlands, the model predicted less decomposition in response to drought, hurricane salinity pulsing, and long-term sea-level rise. In contrast, in the oligohaline marsh, the model predicted no change in response to sea-level rise, and increased decomposition following a drought or a hurricane salinity pulse. Our results show that it is critical to consider the temporal scale of disturbance and the magnitude of exposure when assessing the effects of salinity intrusion on carbon mineralization in coastal

  7. Coastal vegetation invasion increases greenhouse gas emission from wetland soils but also increases soil carbon accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yaping [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, Fujian (China); Chen, Guangcheng [Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005, Fujian (China); Ye, Yong, E-mail: yeyong.xmu@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Coastal and Wetland Ecosystem, College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361102, Fujian (China)

    2015-09-01

    Soil properties and soil–atmosphere fluxes of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O from four coastal wetlands were studied throughout the year, namely, native Kandelia obovata mangrove forest vs. exotic Sonneratia apetala mangrove forest, and native Cyperus malaccensis salt marsh vs. exotic Spartina alterniflora salt marsh. Soils of the four wetlands were all net sources of greenhouse gases while Sonneratia forest contributed the most with a total soil–atmosphere CO{sub 2}-equivalent flux of 137.27 mg CO{sub 2} m{sup −2} h{sup −1}, which is 69.23%, 99.75% and 44.56% higher than that of Kandelia, Cyperus and Spartina, respectively. The high underground biomass and distinctive root structure of Sonneratia might be responsible for its high greenhouse gas emission from the soil. Soils in Spartina marsh emitted the second largest amount of total greenhouse gases but it ranked first in emitting trace greenhouse gases. Annual average CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O fluxes from Spartina soil were 13.77 and 1.14 μmol m{sup −2} h{sup −1}, respectively, which are 2.08 and 1.46 times that of Kandelia, 1.03 and 1.15 times of Sonneratia, and 1.74 and 1.02 times of Cyperus, respectively. Spartina has longer growing season and higher productivity than native marshes which might increase greenhouse gas emission in cold seasons. Exotic wetland soils had higher carbon stock as compared to their respective native counterparts but their carbon stocks were offset by a larger proportion because of their higher greenhouse gas emissions. Annual total soil–atmosphere fluxes of greenhouse gases reduced soil carbon burial benefits by 8.1%, 9.5%, 6.4% and 7.2% for Kandelia, Sonneratia, Cyperus and Spartina, respectively, which narrowed down the gaps in net soil carbon stock between native and exotic wetlands. The results indicated that the invasion of exotic wetland plants might convert local coastal soils into a considerable atmospheric source of greenhouse gases although they at the

  8. Prediction of cadmium enrichment in reclaimed coastal soils by classification and regression tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Feng; Yin, Aijing; Jin, Jiaxin; Zhang, Xiuying; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ming; Gao, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Reclamation of coastal land is one of the most common ways to obtain land resources in China. However, it has long been acknowledged that the artificial interference with coastal land has disadvantageous effects, such as heavy metal contamination. This study aimed to develop a prediction model for cadmium enrichment levels and assess the importance of affecting factors in typical reclaimed land in Eastern China (DFCL: Dafeng Coastal Land). Two hundred and twenty seven surficial soil/sediment samples were collected and analyzed to identify the enrichment levels of cadmium and the possible affecting factors in soils and sediments. The classification and regression tree (CART) model was applied in this study to predict cadmium enrichment levels. The prediction results showed that cadmium enrichment levels assessed by the CART model had an accuracy of 78.0%. The CART model could extract more information on factors affecting the environmental behavior of cadmium than correlation analysis. The integration of correlation analysis and the CART model showed that fertilizer application and organic carbon accumulation were the most important factors affecting soil/sediment cadmium enrichment levels, followed by particle size effects (Al2O3, TFe2O3 and SiO2), contents of Cl and S, surrounding construction areas and reclamation history.

  9. Mapping forest soil organic matter on New Jersey's coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian J. Clough; Edwin J. Green; Richard B. Lathrop

    2012-01-01

    Managing forest soil organic matter (SOM) stocks is a vital strategy for reducing the impact of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. However, the SOM pool is highly variable, and developing accurate estimates to guide management decisions has remained a difficult task. We present the results of a spatial model designed to map soil organic matter for all forested...

  10. Trends in Coastal Development and Land Cover Change: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa. Keywords: Land cover change, coastal management, coastal development, ... population growth, social and economic development and climate-induced factors. The results ... changing in response to human demands and needs ...

  11. Egyptian coastal regions development through economic diversity for its coastal cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek AbdeL-Latif

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the structure of the coastal cities industry, the main types, the impacts (economic, environmental, and social of coastal cities, and the local trends in development in the Egyptian coastal cities and its regions. It will also analyze coastal and marine tourism in several key regions identified because of the diversity of life they support, and the potential destruction they could face. This paper confirms that economic diversification in coastal cities is more effective than developments in only one economic sector, even if this sector is prominent and important.

  12. Development of a Coastal Inventory in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karditsa, Aikaterini; Poulos, Serafim; Velegrakis, Adonis; Ghionis, George; Petrakis, Stelios; Alexandrakis, George; Andreadis, Olympos; Monioudi, Isavella

    2015-04-01

    Greek coastline that accounts more than 16.000 km hosts hundreds of beaches, which constitute a great touristic destination. However, no gathered information exists relative to its qualitative and quantitative characteristics (e.g. physicogeographical characteristics, artificial structures, nearby land use). Therefore, the development of a coastal database that would successfully concentrate all relative data, in the form of a National Inventory, could be a valuable tool for the management and the sustainable use and exploitation of beaches and the coastal zone. This work presents an example of the development of a beach inventory in the case of the beach zones of Heraklion and Lassithi counties in the Island of Crete, which is one of the most touristic areas in Greece. Data were initially abstracted from satellite images and combined with in situ observations carried out along 98 beaches with shoreline length >100 m. The collected data included geomorphological, topographic and bathymetric mapping, sediment sampling from the subaerial and underwater part and recording of artificial structures. The initial mapping showed that beaches represent only the 18%, with 74% of the total coastline to be rocky while 8% of the coastline host some kind of artificial intervention. The combination of satellite and in situ mapping led to the development of a coastal geomorphological map. Beach widths were found to be limited with the majority of beaches (59%) to have maximum widths less than 25 m, 35% to range between 25 and 50m and about 6% with maximum widths >50m. Concerning beach length, the threshold of 1000 m is overcome only by the 46% of the beaches. Beaches with very smooth slopes (terms of sediment texture, 41% of the beaches were found to consist mostly of medium and coarse sands (gS and (g)S) and 31% of gravels with some sand presence ((s)G and sG). The exclusively sandy beaches correspond to the 11% when the exclusively gravelly beaches accounts for 16%. North sided

  13. Influence of microsprinkler irrigation amount on water, soil, and pH profiles in a coastal saline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Linlin; Kang, Yaohu; Wan, Shuqin

    2014-01-01

    Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China.

  14. Influence of Microsprinkler Irrigation Amount on Water, Soil, and pH Profiles in a Coastal Saline Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China.

  15. Changes in soil organic carbon fractions after remediation of a coastal floodplain soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V N L; McNaughton, C; Pearson, A

    2016-03-01

    Coastal floodplain soils and wetland sediments can store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). These environments are also commonly underlain by sulfidic sediments which can oxidise to form coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS) and contain high concentrations of acidity and trace metals. CASS are found on every continent globally except Antarctica. When sulfidic sediments are oxidised, scalds can form, which are large bare patches without vegetation. However, SOC stocks and fractions have not been quantified in these coastal floodplain environments. We studied the changes in soil geochemistry and SOC stocks and fractions three years after remediation of a CASS scald. Remediation treatments included raising water levels, and addition of either lime (LO) or lime and mulch (LM) relative to a control (C) site. We found SOC concentrations in the remediated sites (LO and LM) were more than double than that found at site C, reflected in the higher SOC stocks to a depth of 1.6 m (426 Mg C/ha, 478 Mg C/ha and 473 Mg C/ha at sites C, LO and LM, respectively). The particulate organic C (POC) fraction was higher at sites LO and LM due to increased vegetation and biomass inputs, compared to site C. Reformation of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) occurred throughout the profile at site LM, whereas only limited AVS reformation occurred at sites LO and C. Higher AVS at site LM may be linked to the additional source of organic matter provided by the mulch. POC can also potentially contribute to decreasing acidity as a labile SOC source for Fe(3+) and SO4(2-) reduction. Therefore, coastal floodplains and wetlands are a large store of SOC and can potentially increase SOC following remediation due to i) reduced decomposition rates with higher water levels and waterlogging, and ii) high C inputs due to rapid revegetation of scalded areas and high rates of biomass production. These results highlight the importance of maintaining vegetation cover in coastal floodplains and wetlands for

  16. Isotopically exchangeable Al in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A.M. [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Fink, D. [Centre Européen de Recherche et d' Enseignement des Géosciences de l' Environnement, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix en Provence (France); Rose, J. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Waite, T. David [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [UNSW Water Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW Australia, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Periodic discharges of high concentrations of aluminium (Al) causing fish kills and other adverse effects occur worldwide in waterways affected by coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS). The exchangeability — a metal's ability to readily transfer between the soil solid- and solution-phases — of Al in these soils is therefore of particular importance as it has implications for metal transport, plant availability and toxicity to living organisms. In the present study, the concentrations of isotopically exchangeable Al (E values) were measured in 27 CLASS and compared with common salt extractions (i.e. KCl and CuCl{sub 2}) used to estimate exchangeable soil pools of Al. E values of Al were high in the soils, ranging from 357 to 3040 mg·kg{sup −1}. Exchangeable concentrations estimated using 1 M KCl were consistently lower than measured E values, although a reasonable correlation was obtained between the two values (E = 1.68 × Al{sub KCl}, r{sup 2} = 0.66, n = 25). The addition of a 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extraction step improved the 1:1 agreement between extractable and isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations, but lead to significant mobilisation of non-isotopically exchangeable Al in surficial ‘organic-rich’ CLASS having E values < 1000 mg·kg{sup −1}. It was concluded that currently used (i.e. 1 M KCl) methodology severely underestimates exchangeable Al and total actual acidity values in CLASS and should be corrected by a factor similar to the one determined here. - Highlights: • Isotopically exchangeable Al was compared to 1 M KCl or 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} extractable Al. • 1 M KCl always underestimated isotopically exchangeable Al concentrations. • 0.2 M CuCl{sub 2} mobilised non-isotopically exchangeable Al • 1 M KCl values require correction of ~ 1.7 to reflect exchangeable Al concentrations.

  17. Carbon degradation in agricultural soils flooded with seawater after managed coastal realignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Kamilla Schneekloth; Treusch, Alexander H.; Valdemarsen, Thomas Bruun

    2017-01-01

    Climate change induced sea level rise is expected to continue for centuries and cause permanent flooding of low lying coastal areas. Furthermore, intentional flooding of coastal areas through ‘managed coastal realignment’, may also become a common solution to protect coastal areas. So far...... Strand) that was planned to be flooded in a coastal realignment project. We found rapid carbon degradation almost immediately after flooding and microbial sulfate reduction rapidly established as the dominant mineralization pathway. Nevertheless, no free sulfide was observed as it precipitated as Fe...... degradation after 6 months. During the experiment only 6–7 % of the initial organic carbon pools were degraded. On this basis we suggest that flooding of coastal soils through sea level rise or managed coastal realignment, will cause significant C-preservation and create a negative feedback on atmospheric...

  18. Experimental determination of soil heat storage for the simulation of heat transport in a coastal wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Michael; Swain, Matthew; Lohmann, Melinda; Swain, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Two physical experiments were developed to better define the thermal interaction of wetland water and the underlying soil layer. This information is important to numerical models of flow and heat transport that have been developed to support biological studies in the South Florida coastal wetland areas. The experimental apparatus consists of two 1.32. m diameter by 0.99. m tall, trailer-mounted, well-insulated tanks filled with soil and water. A peat-sand-soil mixture was used to represent the wetland soil, and artificial plants were used as a surrogate for emergent wetland vegetation based on size and density observed in the field. The tanks are instrumented with thermocouples to measure vertical and horizontal temperature variations and were placed in an outdoor environment subject to solar radiation, wind, and other factors affecting the heat transfer. Instruments also measure solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed.Tests indicate that heat transfer through the sides and bottoms of the tanks is negligible, so the experiments represent vertical heat transfer effects only. The temperature fluctuations measured in the vertical profile through the soil and water are used to calibrate a one-dimensional heat-transport model. The model was used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the soil. Additionally, the model was used to calculate the total heat stored in the soil. This information was then used in a lumped parameter model to calculate an effective depth of soil which provides the appropriate heat storage to be combined with the heat storage in the water column. An effective depth, in the model, of 5.1. cm of wetland soil represents the heat storage needed to match the data taken in the tank containing 55.9. cm of peat/sand/soil mix. The artificial low-density laboratory sawgrass reduced the solar energy absorbed by the 35.6. cm of water and 55.9. cm of soil at midday by less than 5%. The maximum heat transfer into the underlying peat-sand-soil mix

  19. Urbanisation, coastal development and vulnerability, and catchments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntombela, Cebile

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of urban areas that form coastal cities, especially in the WIO, places an increasing demand on natural coastal extractive and non-extractive resources. The use and conversion of coastal land and catchments is considered a permanent effect...

  20. Agroforestry and its Application in Amelioration of Saline Soils in Eastern China Coastal Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jianfeng; Xing Shangjun; Li Jiyue; F.Makeschin; Song Yumin

    2004-01-01

    Some environmental problems, especially soil salinity hinder the regional sustainable development of eastern China coastal region. Salinity mainly comes from tide weave, seawater flooding and seawater intrusion. Over exploitation of groundwater, which is the result of unfitful land use systems, leads to seawater intrusion and salt concentration increase. Agroforestry systems can enrich soil fertility and prevent soil salinization, furthermore help maintain biodiversity and enhance productivity. For the intergrated multiple ecosystems the most critical issue is to select optimum tree species and rationally arrange these plants. The basics of this multiple ecosystem is that different plants will occupy variable ecological niches within an area, both in space and in soil depth. Shelterbelts and trees intercropping with agricultural crops are major types of the multiple ecosystem. Shelterbelts can reduce wind speed and consequently lessen evaporation and erosion of the soil, increase pasture growth by up to 60% on exposed sites, increase crop yields by up to 25%. Besides intercropping with jujube, other agroforestry multiple ecosystem such as forestry plus agriculture, forestry plus agriculture plus fishery, and forestry plus animal husbandry are the most appropriate ways to utilise land resource in this region.

  1. Physiological Responses of Kosteletzkya virginica to Coastal Wetland Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of salinity on growth and physiological indices of Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings were studied. Plant height, fresh weight (FW, dry weight (DW, and net photosynthetic rate (Pn increased at 100 mM NaCl and slightly declined at 200 mM, but higher salinity induced a significant reduction. Chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance (Gs, intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci, and transpiration rate (E were not affected under moderate salinities, while markedly decreased at severe salinities except for the increased Ci at 400 mM NaCl. Furthermore, no significant differences of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII were found at lower than 200 mM NaCl, whereas higher salinity caused the declines of Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, and qP similar to Pn, accompanied with higher NPQ. Besides, salt stress reduced the leaf RWC, but caused the accumulation of proline to alleviate osmotic pressure. The increased activities of antioxidant enzymes maintained the normal levels of MDA and relative membrane permeability. To sum up, Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings have good salt tolerance and this may be partly attributed to its osmotic regulation and antioxidant capacity which help to maintain water balance and normal ROS level to ensure the efficient photosynthesis. These results provided important implications for Kosteletzkya virginica acting as a promising multiuse species for reclaiming coastal soil.

  2. Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil Column Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulakhudin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil ColumnMethod (Sulakhudin, A Syukur, D Shiddieq and T Yuwono: In coastal sandy soil, mainly nitrogen losses due toleaching resulted to low fertilizer efficiency. Slow-release N fertilizers are proposed to minimize these losses, andhumic-calcium coated urea has been examined. A soil column method was used to compare the effects of coated ureawith humic-calcium on transformation and leaching loss of N in coastal sandy soil. The experiment aid to compare twokinds sources of humic substances (cow manure and peat which mixed with calcium as coated urea on transformation,vertical distribution and leaching N in coastal sandy soil. The concentration of humic-calcium coated urea i.e.1%, 5%and 10% based on their weight. The results showed that urea coated with humic-calcium from cow manure (UCHMand humic-calcium from peat (UCHP increased the N total and available N in the soil and decreased leaching loss ofN from the soil column. Compared to UCHP, UCHM in all concentration showed N-nitrate higher than N-ammonium onincubation length 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The N leached from a costal sandy soil with application coated urea with UCHMranged from 21.18% to 23.72% of the total N added as fertilizer, for coated urea with UCHP they ranged between21.44% and 23.25%, whereas for urea (control reached 29.48%. Leaching losses of mineral N were lower when ureacoated with UCHM compared to urea coated with UCHP or urea fertilizer. The study concluded that the UCHM isbetter than UCHP in decreasing N leached from coastal sandy soil

  3. Study of Arabian Red Sea coastal soils as potential mineral dust sources

    KAUST Repository

    Prakash, P. Jish

    2016-03-23

    Both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) satellite observations suggest that the narrow heterogeneous Red Sea coastal region is a frequent source of airborne dust that, because of its proximity, directly affects the Red Sea and coastal urban centers. The potential of soils to be suspended as airborne mineral dust depends largely on soil texture, moisture content, and particle size distributions. Airborne dust inevitably carries the mineralogical and chemical signature of a parent soil. The existing soil databases are too coarse to resolve the small but important coastal region. The purpose of this study is to better characterize the mineralogical, chemical and physical properties of soils from the Red Sea Arabian coastal plane, which in turn will help to improve assessment of dust effect on the Red Sea and land environmental systems and urban centers. Thirteen surface soils from the hot-spot areas of wind-blown mineral dust along the Red Sea coastal plain were sampled for analysis. Analytical methods included Optical Microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), Ion Chromatography (IC), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA). We found that the Red Sea coastal soils contain major components of quartz and feldspar, as well as lesser but variable amounts of amphibole, pyroxene, carbonate, clays, and micas, with traces of gypsum, halite, chlorite, epidote and oxides. The wide range of minerals in the soil samples was ascribed to the variety of igneous and metamorphic provenance rocks of the Arabian Shield forming the escarpment to the east of the Red Sea coastal plain. The analysis revealed that the samples contain compounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron that are essential nutrients to marine life. The analytical results from this study will provide a valuable input into dust emission models used

  4. Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at different scales in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhao, Gengxing; Gao, Mingxiu; Chang, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at macro, meso and micro scales in the Yellow River delta, China. Soil electrical conductivities (ECs) were measured at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths at 49 sampling sites during November 9 to 11, 2013. Soil salinity was converted from soil ECs based on laboratory analyses. Our results indicated that at the macro scale, soil salinity was high with strong variability in each soil layer, and the content increased and the variability weakened with increasing soil depth. From east to west in the region, the farther away from the sea, the lower the soil salinity was. The degrees of soil salinization in three deeper soil layers are 1.14, 1.24 and 1.40 times higher than that in the surface soil. At the meso scale, the sequence of soil salinity in different topographies, soil texture and vegetation decreased, respectively, as follows: depression >flatland >hillock >batture; sandy loam >light loam >medium loam >heavy loam >clay; bare land >suaeda salsa >reed >cogongrass >cotton >paddy >winter wheat. At the micro scale, soil salinity changed with elevation in natural micro-topography and with anthropogenic activities in cultivated land. As the study area narrowed down to different scales, the spatial variability of soil salinity weakened gradually in cultivated land and salt wasteland except the bare land.

  5. Biochar-induced negative carbon mineralization priming effects in a coastal wetland soil: Roles of soil aggregation and microbial modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Wang, Xiao; Luo, Xianxiang; Wang, Zhenyu; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-08-19

    Biochar can sequestrate carbon (C) in soils and affect native soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralization via priming effects. However, the roles of soil aggregation and microbial regulation in priming effects of biochars on SOC in coastal wetland soils are poorly understood. Thus, a coastal wetland soil (δ(13)C -22‰) was separated into macro-micro aggregates (53-2000μm, MA) and silt-clay fractions (priming effect using two (13)C enriched biochars produced from corn straw (δ(13)C -11.58‰) at 350 and 550°C. The two biochars induced negative priming effect on the native SOC mineralization in the both soil aggregate size fractions, attributed to the enhanced stability of the soil aggregates resulting from the intimate physico-chemical associations between the soil minerals and biochar particles. Additionally, biochar amendments increased soil microbial biomass C and resulted in a lower metabolic quotient, suggesting that microbes in biochar amended aggregates could likely incorporate biomass C rather than mineralize it. Moreover, the biochar amendments induced obvious shifts of the bacterial community towards low C turnover bacteria taxa (e.g., Actinobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria) and the bacteria taxa responsible for stabilizing soil aggregates (e.g., Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria), which also accounted for the negative priming effect. Overall, these results suggested that biochar had considerable merit for stabilizing SOC in the coastal soil and thus has potential to restore and/or enhance "blue C" sink in the degraded coastal wetland ecosystem. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Field application of PAM as an amendment in deep-tilled US southeastern Coastal Plain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) was added to sandy coastal plain soils to improve physical properties and yield. Soils were amended with 8 treatments of linear and cross-linked PAMs or controls. Treatments and controls included the following: 1. spraying a 600 mg/kg solution of linear PAM behind a subsoil shan...

  7. Nitrogen Mineralization of Broiler Litter Applied to Southeastern Coastal Plain Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (clayey, kaoliniti...

  8. MINERALIZATION OF NITROGEN FROM BROILER LITTER AS AFFECTED BY SOIL TEXTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted during 2004-2005 to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (...

  9. Effects of Tamarisk shrub on physicochemical properties of soil in coastal wetland of the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiuping; WANG Baodong; XIE Linping; XIN Ming; WANG Wei; WANG Zicheng; ZHANG Wenquan; WEI Qinsheng

    2016-01-01

    There are many different and even controversial results concerning the effects of Tamarisk on the physicochemical properties of soil. A year-round monitoring of soil salinity, pH and moisture is conducted beneath the Tamarisk shrub in a coastal wetland in the Bohai Sea in China, to ascertain the effects of Tamarisk on the physicochemical properties of soil in coastal wetland. Compared with the control area, the soil moisture content is lower around the area of the taproot when there is less precipitation in the growing season because of water consumption by Tamarisk shrub. However, the soil moisture content is higher around the taproot when there is more precipitation in the growing season or in the non-growing period because of water conservation by the rhizosphere. The absorption of salt by the Tamarisk shrub reduces the soil salinity temporarily, but eventually salt returns to the soil by the leaching of salt on leaves by rainfall or by fallen leaves. The annual average soil moisture content beneath the Tamarisk shrub is lower than the control area by only 6.4%, indicating that the Tamarisk shrub has little effect on drought or water conservation in soils in the temperate coastal wetland with moderate annual precipitation. The annual average salinity beneath the Tamarisk shrub is 18% greater than that of the control area, indicating that Tamarisk does have an effect of rising soil salinity around Tamarisk shrubs. The soil pH value is as low as 7.3 in summer and as high as 10.2 in winter. The pH of soil near the taproot of the Tamarisk shrubs is one pH unit lower than that in the control area during the growing season. The difference in pH is less different from the control area in the non-growing season, indicating that the Tamarisk shrub does have the effect of reducing the alkalinity of soil in coastal wetland.

  10. Effects of coastal afforestation on some soil properties in Lakshmipur coast of Bangladesh

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. M. Shaifullah; M. Mezbahuddin; M. Sujauddin; S. M. S. Haque

    2008-01-01

    Coastal zones comprising important intertidal tropical and subtropical ecosystems are characterized by high productivity, diversity and unique zonation of various plant and animal communities. The comparison of some selected physicochemical soil properties viz. Texture, particle density, moisture content, pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen between planted site (Telir char) and barren site (Boyar char) has been investigated at surface (0-10 cm) and subsurface (10-45 cm) soil across three different land strips viz. Inland, middle part and sea side in Lakshmipur coast of Bangladesh. Sand particles in the soil were lower in planted site than barren site. The reverse trend was found in case of both silt and clay percentage. Coastal afforestation had a significant effect on soil binding process since a common trend of increment in soil particle density was noticed. Maximum increment (20.43% to 23.30%) in soil moisture content was recorded in surface soil across the seaside while at subsurface soil both across the middle part (19.53% to 22.30%) and sea side (20.19% to 22.96%). Moreover, the highest reduction in soil pH was recorded at surface soil (7.27 to 6.60) across the sea side and subsurface soil (7.16 to 6.67) in inland due to the influence of coastal plantation. Across all the land strips and the soil depths studied, soil organic carbon was higher in planted site than in barren site with only exception at subsurface soil in the middle part (0.50% in both sites). Total soil nitrogen in the study area was increased at both depths due to forestation with the highest increment in the inland at both surface and subsurface soil.

  11. Sterol-inhibiting fungicide impacts on soil microbial ecology in Atlantic Coastal Plain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P. M.; Potter, T. L.; Strickland, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    Seventy-five percent of the peanuts (Arachus hypogaia) produced in the United States are grown in the Atlantic Coastal Plain region. Portions of this area, including Alabama and Georgia, exhibit a subtropical climate that promotes soil-borne plant fungal diseases. Most fields receive repeated fungicide applications during the growing season to suppress the disease causing organisms, such as Sclerotium rolfsii, Rhizoctonia solani, and Cylindrocladium parasiticum. Information regarding fungicide effects on the soil microbial community, with components principally responsible for transformation and fate of fungicides and other soil-applied pesticides, is limited. The objectives of the study were to assess soil microbial community response to (1) varying rates of the sterol-inhibiting fungicide tebuconazole (0, single application, season max, 2x season max), and (2) field rates of the sterol-inhibitors cyproconazole, prothioconazole, tebuconazole, and flutriafol, and thiol-competitor chlorothalonil. The sterol-inhibitors exhibited different half lives, as listed in the FOOTPRINT database, ranging from 1300 d. Chlorothalonil was chosen because it is the most frequently applied fungicide to peanut. Shifts in the fungi, gram positive and gram negative bacteria, were monitored during the experiments using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Ergosterol levels and pesticide decay rates were also monitored to evaluate the effectiveness of the fungicide and soil residence time, respectively. In the rate study, the highest rate of tebuconazole reduced the fungal biomarker 18:2ω6,9c to 2.6 nmol g-1 dry soil at 17 d, as compared to the control (4.1 nmol g-1 dry soil). However, levels of the fungal PLFA biomarker were similar regardless of rate at 0 and 32 d. The gram negative bacterial PLFA mole percent was greater at 17 d for the two highest rates of tebuconazole, but was similar at 0 and 32 d. Gram positive and fungal mole percents were not affected at any time point

  12. Spatial variability of heavy metals in the coastal soils under long-term reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Coles, Neil A.; Wu, Chunfa; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-12-01

    The coastal plain of Cixi City, China, has experienced over 1000 years of reclamation. With the rapid development of agriculture and industry after reclamation, successive inputs into agricultural soils have drastically modified the soil environment. To determine the spatial distribution of heavy metals and to evaluate the influence of anthropogenic activities, a total of 329 top soil samples were taken along a transect on the coastal plain. The samples collected across 11 sea dikes, were selected by a nested sampling methodology. Total Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations, as well as their diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) extractable (available) concentrations were determined. Results indicated that except for Zn concentrations, there was neither heavy metals pollution nor mineral deficiency in the soils. Heavy metals exhibited considerable spatial variability, obvious spatial dependence, and close relationships on the reclaimed land. For most metals, the reclamation history was the main influencing factor. Metals concentrations generally showed discontinuities around the position of sea dikes, and the longer reclamation histories tended to have higher metals concentrations than the recently reclaimed sectors. As for Cu and Zn total concentrations, stochastic factors, like industrial waste discharge, fertilization and pesticide application, probably led to the high nugget effect and altered this relationship. The 6th and 10th zones generally had the highest total metals concentrations, due to the concentration of household appliance manufacturers in these reclaimed areas. The first two zones were characterized by high available metals concentrations, probably due to the alternant flooding and emergence, low pH values and high organic matter contents in these paddy field soils. From the 3rd to 7th zones with the same land use history and soil type, metals concentrations, especially available concentrations, showed homogeneity. The nested sampling

  13. Intensified coastal development in beach-nourishment zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E.; Armstrong, S.; Limber, P. W.; Goldstein, E. B.; Ballinger, R.

    2016-12-01

    Population density, housing development, and property values in coastal counties along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts continue to rise despite increasing hazard from storm impacts. Beach nourishment, a method for mitigating coastal storm damage or chronic erosion by deliberately replacing sand on an eroded beach, has been the leading form of coastal protection in the U.S. since the 1970s. However, investment in hazard protection can have the unintended consequence of encouraging development in places especially vulnerable to damage. To quantitatively compare development in nourishing and non-nourishing zones, we examine the parcel-scale housing stock of all shorefront single-family homes in the state of Florida. We find that houses in nourishing zones are significantly larger and more numerous than in non-nourishing zones. Florida represents both an advanced case of coastal risk and an exemplar of ubiquitous, fundamental challenges in coastal management. The predominance of larger homes in nourishing zones indicates a positive feedback between nourishment and development that is compounding coastal risk in zones already characterized by high vulnerability. We offer that this phenomenon represents a variant of Jevons' paradox, a theoretical argument from environmental economics in which more efficient use of a resource spurs an increase in its consumption. Here, we suggest reductions in coastal risk through hazard protection are ultimately offset or reversed by increased coastal development.

  14. Sufficiency and Deficiency Indices of Soil Available Zinc for Rice in the Alluvial Soil of the Coastal Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To determine the sufficiency and deficiency indices of soil available Zn by the Agro Services International (ASI) method (ASI-Zn) for Zn fertilizer recommendation in rice production in the alluvial soil of the coastal Yellow Sea, the relationship between relative rice yield and soil available ASI-Zn concentration was analyzed from a ten-field experiment with various soil test classes ranging from low to high fertility in 2005 and 2006, and nine Zn fertilizer application rates (0, 7.5,15, 22.5, 30, 37.5, 45, 52.5 and 60 kg Zn/ha) arranged at random with three replications in each field. There was a significant quadratic relationship between soil available ASI-Zn and rice yield, and a significant linear relationship between soil available ASI-Zn concentration and Zn fertilization rate. For rice variety Wuyujing 3, soil available ASI-Zn was deficient when the value was at lower than 1 mg Zn/L, low at 1 to 2 mg Zn/L, sufficient at 1 to 2 mg Zn/L, excessive at higher than 7.5 mg Zn/L. Thus, Zn fertilizer recommendation could be done according to the sufficiency and deficiency indices of soil ASI-Zn. For most of alluvial soils of the coastal Yellow Sea in the study, the available ASI-Zn was lower than 1 mg Zn/L, and then the optimum application rate of Zn fertilizer was about 20 kg Zn/ha.

  15. Soil microorganisms control plant ectoparasitic nematodes in natural coastal foredunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskiewicz, A.M.; Duyts, H.; Berg, M.P.; Costa, S.R.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Belowground herbivores can exert important controls on the composition of natural plant communities. Until now, relatively few studies have investigated which factors may control the abundance of belowground herbivores. In Dutch coastal foredunes, the root-feeding nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis

  16. Soil microorganisms control plant ectoparasitic nematodes in natural coastal foredunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskiewicz, A.M.; Duyts, H.; Berg, M.P.; Costa, S.R.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Belowground herbivores can exert important controls on the composition of natural plant communities. Until now, relatively few studies have investigated which factors may control the abundance of belowground herbivores. In Dutch coastal foredunes, the root-feeding nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis

  17. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Bertness, Mark D; Bruno, John F; Li, Bo; Chen, Guoqian; Coverdale, Tyler C; Altieri, Andrew H; Bai, Junhong; Sun, Tao; Pennings, Steven C; Liu, Jianguo; Ehrlich, Paul R; Cui, Baoshan

    2014-08-08

    Despite their value, coastal ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic development is not well understood. We compiled a multifaceted dataset to quantify coastal trends and examine the role of economic growth in China's coastal degradation since the 1950s. Although China's coastal population growth did not change following the 1978 economic reforms, its coastal economy increased by orders of magnitude. All 15 coastal human impacts examined increased over time, especially after the reforms. Econometric analysis revealed positive relationships between most impacts and GDP across temporal and spatial scales, often lacking dropping thresholds. These relationships generally held when influences of population growth were addressed by analyzing per capita impacts, and when population density was included as explanatory variables. Historical trends in physical and biotic indicators showed that China's coastal ecosystems changed little or slowly between the 1950s and 1978, but have degraded at accelerated rates since 1978. Thus economic growth has been the cause of accelerating human damage to China's coastal ecosystems. China's GDP per capita remains very low. Without strict conservation efforts, continuing economic growth will further degrade China's coastal ecosystems.

  18. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Bertness, Mark D.; Bruno, John F.; Li, Bo; Chen, Guoqian; Coverdale, Tyler C.; Altieri, Andrew H.; Bai, Junhong; Sun, Tao; Pennings, Steven C.; Liu, Jianguo; Ehrlich, Paul R.; Cui, Baoshan

    2014-08-01

    Despite their value, coastal ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic development is not well understood. We compiled a multifaceted dataset to quantify coastal trends and examine the role of economic growth in China's coastal degradation since the 1950s. Although China's coastal population growth did not change following the 1978 economic reforms, its coastal economy increased by orders of magnitude. All 15 coastal human impacts examined increased over time, especially after the reforms. Econometric analysis revealed positive relationships between most impacts and GDP across temporal and spatial scales, often lacking dropping thresholds. These relationships generally held when influences of population growth were addressed by analyzing per capita impacts, and when population density was included as explanatory variables. Historical trends in physical and biotic indicators showed that China's coastal ecosystems changed little or slowly between the 1950s and 1978, but have degraded at accelerated rates since 1978. Thus economic growth has been the cause of accelerating human damage to China's coastal ecosystems. China's GDP per capita remains very low. Without strict conservation efforts, continuing economic growth will further degrade China's coastal ecosystems.

  19. Changes in soil organic carbon fractions following remediation of a degraded coastal floodplain wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa; McNaughton, Caitlyn; Pearson, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Coastal floodplain soils and wetland sediments can store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC). These environments are also commonly underlain by sulfidic sediments which can oxidise, largely due to drainage of floodplains to decrease water levels, to form coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS). Following oxidation, pH of both soil and water decrease, and acidity and mobilisation of trace metals increases to adversely affect vegetation and adjacent aquatic ecosystems. In extreme cases, vegetation death occurs resulting in the formation of scalds, which are large bare patches. Remediation of these degraded coastal soils generally involves neutralisation of acidity via application of lime and the re-introduction of anoxic conditions by raising water levels. Our understanding of the geochemical changes which occur as a result of remediation is relatively well established. However, SOC stocks and fractions have not been quantified in these coastal floodplain environments. We studied the changes in soil geochemistry and SOC stocks and fractions three years after remediation of a degraded and scalded coastal floodplain. Remediation treatments included raising water levels, and addition of either lime (LO) or lime and mulch (LM) relative to a control (C) site. We found SOC concentrations in the remediated sites (LO and LM) were more than double than that found at site C, reflected in the higher SOC stocks to a depth of 1.6 m. The particulate organic C fraction was higher at sites LO and LM due to increased vegetation and biomass inputs, compared to site C. Therefore, coastal floodplains and wetlands are a large store of SOC and can potentially increase SOC following remediation due to i) reduced decomposition rates with higher water levels and waterlogging, and ii) high C inputs due to rapid revegetation of scalded areas and high rates of biomass production.

  20. Can sustainable development save the rural coastal community?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer E., 1982-

    2011-01-01

    The research is presented as the final component of a Master’s Degree in Natural Resource Management with a specialty in Coastal and Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in conjunction with the University of the Westfjords. It serves to answer if the theories of sustainable development can be used to assess the degree of sustainable development taking place in a rural coastal community in a meaningful way. Through the development of a Sustainable Development Assessment Tool for R...

  1. Overview of investigations into mercury in ground water, soils, and septage, New Jersey coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, J.L.; Szabo, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, investigations by health departments of eight counties in southern New Jersey, by the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), and subsequently by the US Geological Survey (USGS), have shown that Hg concentrations in water tapped by about 600 domestic wells exceed the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 ??g/L. The wells are finished in the areally extensive unconfined Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system of New Jersey's Coastal Plain; background concentrations of Hg in water from this system are point sources of Hg, such as landfills or commercial and industrial hazardous-waste sites, is lacking. During 1996-2003, the USGS collected water samples from 203 domestic, irrigation, observation, and production wells using ultraclean techniques; septage, leach-field effluent, soils, and aquifer sediments also were sampled. Elevated concentrations of NH4, B, Cl, NO3, and Na and presence of surfactants in domestic-well water indicate that septic-system effluent can affect water quality in unsewered residential areas, but neither septage nor effluent appears to be a major Hg source. Detections of hydrogen sulfide in ground water at a residential area indicate localized reducing conditions; undetectable SO4 concentrations in water from other residential areas indicate that reducing conditions, which could be conducive to Hg methylation, may be common locally. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), mostly chlorinated solvents, also are found in ground water at the affected areas, but statistically significant associations between presence of Hg and VOCs were absent for most areas evaluated. Hg concentrations are lower in some filtered water samples than in paired unfiltered samples, likely indicating that some Hg is associated with particles or colloids. The source of colloids may be soils, which, when undisturbed, contain higher concentrations of Hg than do disturbed soils and aquifer sediments. Soil disturbance during residential development and

  2. THE INNOVATIVE POLICY OPTIONS FOR COASTAL FISHERIES ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: A CASE OF KWANDANG BAY COASTAL ECOSYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Taylor Moore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Socio-environmental problems, such as climate change, pollution and habitat destruction, present serious challenges for fisheries economic development. The integration of interventions or investments within a coastal marine ecosystem, a defined spatial area, is considered important in the economic development of local communities leading to the planned outcomes of livelihoods, food security and conservation The coastal marine ecosystem, is the provider of products and services to the local economy adjacent to the ecosystem where the benefit flows, within that area, are interconnected. The roles of science, technology and innovation (STI are an integral part of these multi-dimensional interventions. Hence the need for an integrated approach for these interventions by government and/or through donor funded projects to enhance economic development of coastal communities. The policy framework proposed is therefore an STI perspective of the links between these intervention and investment options, based on a ‘fisheries economic development Hub’ (Hub and discussed using the multi-level perspective (MLP. The policy innovation proposal suggests an implementation strategy of a pilot project and analyses the selection and implications of a potential Indonesian site for the application of the Hub. This paper aims to introduce the MLP into the framework of coastal community-based fisheries economic development.   Key words: policy innovation. coastal marine ecosystem, fisheries economic development Hub, value chains, multi-level perspective (MLP

  3. Narrowing the gap between theory and practice? Interactive knowledge development in a coastal defense project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijger, Chris; van Tatenhove, J.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Otter, Henriëtte; Javernick-Will, A.; Chinowsky, P.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal defence projects intend to develop solutions in a highly dynamic environment. The coastal zone is characterized by expanding cities, rising flood risks, economic activity, and a threatened natural environment. Developing relevant knowledge for solutions in coastal defence projects is

  4. Soil attributes under agroecosystems and forest vegetationin the coastal tablelands of Northestern Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    João Bosco Vasconcellos Gomes; Marcelo Ferreira Fernandes; Antonio Carlos Barreto; José Coelho de Araújo Filho; Nilton Curi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the changes occurred in a set of soil attributes, particularly those related to the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC), as a function of the replacement of native forest for agricultural ecosystems of regional importance in the coastal tablelands of Northeastern Brazil (orange, coconut, eucalyptus and sugarcane). Six commercial sites under these agroecosystems were compared to neighboring areas of native forest in five areas along this region (Coruripe, Umbaúba, Acajut...

  5. Biological Soil Crusts from Coastal Dunes at the Baltic Sea: Cyanobacterial and Algal Biodiversity and Related Soil Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Karoline; Mikhailyuk, Tatiana; Dreßler, Mirko; Leinweber, Peter; Karsten, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are known as "ecosystem-engineers" that have important, multifunctional ecological roles in primary production, in nutrient and hydrological cycles, and in stabilization of soils. These communities, however, are almost unstudied in coastal dunes of the temperate zone. Hence, for the first time, the biodiversity of cyanobacterial and algal dominated BSCs collected in five dunes from the southern Baltic Sea coast on the islands Rügen and Usedom (Germany) was investigated in connection with physicochemical soil parameters. The species composition of cyanobacteria and algae was identified with direct determination of crust subsamples, cultural methods, and diatom slides. To investigate the influence of soil properties on species composition, the texture, pH, electrical conductivity, carbonate content, total contents of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and the bioavailable phosphorus-fraction (PO4 (3-)) were analyzed in adjacent BSC-free surface soils at each study site. The data indicate that BSCs in coastal dunes of the southern Baltic Sea represent an ecologically important vegetation form with a surprisingly high site-specific diversity of 19 cyanobacteria, 51 non-diatom algae, and 55 diatoms. All dominant species of the genera Coleofasciculus, Lyngbya, Microcoleus, Nostoc, Hydrocoryne, Leptolyngbya, Klebsormidium, and Lobochlamys are typical aero-terrestrial cyanobacteria and algae, respectively. This first study of coastal sand dunes in the Baltic region provides compelling evidence that here the BSCs were dominated by cyanobacteria, algae, or a mixture of both. Among the physicochemical soil properties, the total phosphorus content of the BSC-free sand was the only factor that significantly influenced the cyanobacterial and algal community structure of BSCs in coastal dunes.

  6. Positive responses of coastal dune plants to soil conditioning by the invasive Lupinus nootkatensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslin, Hans Martin; Kollmann, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    Invasive nitrogen-fixing plants drive vegetation dynamics and may cause irreversible changes in nutrient-limited ecosystems through increased soil resources. We studied how soil conditioning by the invasive alien Lupinus nootkatensis affected the seedling growth of co-occurring native plant species in coastal dunes, and whether responses to lupin-conditioned soil could be explained by fertilisation effects interacting with specific ecological strategies of the native dune species. Seedling performance of dune species was compared in a greenhouse experiment using field-collected soil from within or outside coastal lupin stands. In associated experiments, we quantified the response to nutrient supply of each species and tested how addition of specific nutrients affected growth of the native grass Festuca arundinacea in control and lupin-conditioned soil. We found that lupin-conditioned soil increased seedling biomass in 30 out of 32 native species; the conditioned soil also had a positive effect on seedling biomass of the invasive lupin itself. Increased phosphorus mobilisation by lupins was the major factor driving these positive seedling responses, based both on growth responses to addition of specific elements and analyses of plant available soil nutrients. There were large differences in growth responses to lupin-conditioned soil among species, but they were unrelated to selected autecological indicators or plant strategies. We conclude that Lupinus nootkatensis removes the phosphorus limitation for growth of native plants in coastal dunes, and that it increases cycling of other nutrients, promoting the growth of its own seedlings and a wide range of dune species. Finally, our study indicates that there are no negative soil legacies that prevent re-establishment of native plant species after removal of lupins.

  7. Determining soil erosion from roads in coastal plain of Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFero Grace; W.J. Elliot

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports soil losses and observed sediment deposition for 16 randomly selected forest road sections in the National Forests of Alabama. Visible sediment deposition zones were tracked along the stormwater flow path to the most remote location as a means of quantifying soil loss from road sections. Volumes of sediment in deposition zones were determined by...

  8. Landscape scale assessment of soil and water salinization processes in agricultural coastal area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elen Bless, Aplena; Follain, Stéphane; Coiln, François; Crabit, Armand

    2017-04-01

    Soil salinization is among main land degradation process around the globe. It reduces soil quality, disturbs soil function, and has harmful impacts on plant growth that would threaten agricultural sustainability, particularly in coastal areas where mostly susceptible on land degradation because of pressure from anthropogenic activities and at the same time need to preserve soil quality for supporting food production. In this presentation, we present a landscape scale analysis aiming to assess salinization process affecting wine production. This study was carried out at Serignan estuary delta in South of France (Languadoc Roussillon Region, 43˚ 28'N and 3˚ 31'E). It is a sedimentary basin near coastline of Mediterranean Sea. Field survey was design to characterize both space and time variability of soil and water salinity through water electrical conductivity (ECw) and soil 1/5 electrical conductivity (EC1/5). For water measurements, Orb River and groundwater salinity (piezometers) were determined and for soil 1737 samples were randomly collected from different soil depths (20, 50, 80, and 120 cm) between year 2012 and 2016 and measured. In order to connect with agricultural practices observations and interviews with farmers were conducted. We found that some areas combining specific criteria presents higher electrical conductivity: positions with lower elevation (a.s.l), Cambisols (Calcaric) / Fluvisols soil type (WRB) and dominated clay textures. These observations combined with geochemical determination and spatial analysis confirm our first hypothesis of sea salt intrusion as the main driven factor of soil salinity in this region. In this context, identification of salinization process, fine determination of pedological specificities and fine understanding of agricultural practices allowed us to proposed adaptation strategies to restore soil production function. Please fill in your abstract text. Key Words: Salinity, Coastal Agriculture, Landscape, Soil, Water

  9. Integrating Sustainable Tourism Development in Coastal and Marine Zone Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal Mohammed Marafa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La gestion des processus touristique dans des secteurs marins et côtiers est complexe. Les pratiques touristiques et récréatives s’accompagnent d’effets positifs et négatifs sur l'environnement. Le développement de tourisme peut s’épanouir sur des environnements faiblement modifiés mais il n’est pas sans conséquence sur la modification des environnements côtiers. Une gestion intégrée s’impose pour intégrer les pratiques touristiques dans un processus de développement côtier soutenable. Le but de cet article est de proposer un cadre et une orientation pour la gestion intégrée des secteurs côtiers. Des cadres pour le développement côtier soutenable de tourisme et la gestion côtière de zone (CZM sont suggérés en tenant compte de la nature diversifiée des environnements côtiers. Bien que Hong Kong constitue destination touristique réussie, le tourisme littoral, avec des approches alternatives, est aussi un aspect à promouvoir tant autour de la diversité des habitats et que des formes de vie qui rendent le littoral d’Hong Kong uniqueTourism in marine and coastal areas is a complex phenomenon. Tourism in coastal areas brings along both positive and negative effects on the environment as a result of activities exerted upon such areas by proponents and tourists. While tourism development results in the modification of coastal environments, it can also flourish where such environments are left unmodified as the pristine nature of the environments attract visitors. Alternatively, in order for marine and coastal tourism to develop and continue to attract tourists, there is the need for an integrated approach that can be translated into a sustainable coastal tourism development.  The aim of this paper therefore, is to postulate and develop a framework and guideline to be addressed by decision-makers for coastal areas. Frameworks for sustainable coastal tourism development and coastal zone management (CZM are

  10. Ecomarkets for conservation and sustainable development in the coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Rod; Lynham, John; Micheli, Fiorenza; Feinberg, Pasha G; Bourillón, Luis; Sáenz-Arroyo, Andrea; Markham, Alexander C

    2013-05-01

    Because conventional markets value only certain goods or services in the ocean (e.g. fish), other services provided by coastal and marine ecosystems that are not priced, paid for, or stewarded tend to become degraded. In fact, the very capacity of an ecosystem to produce a valued good or service is often reduced because conventional markets value only certain goods and services, rather than the productive capacity. Coastal socio-ecosystems are particularly susceptible to these market failures due to the lack of clear property rights, strong dependence on resource extraction, and other factors. Conservation strategies aimed at protecting unvalued coastal ecosystem services through regulation or spatial management (e.g. Marine Protected Areas) can be effective but often result in lost revenue and adverse social impacts, which, in turn, create conflict and opposition. Here, we describe 'ecomarkets' - markets and financial tools - that could, under the right conditions, generate value for broad portfolios of coastal ecosystem services while maintaining ecosystem structure and function by addressing the unique problems of the coastal zone, including the lack of clear management and exclusion rights. Just as coastal tenure and catch-share systems generate meaningful conservation and economic outcomes, it is possible to imagine other market mechanisms that do the same with respect to a variety of other coastal ecosystem goods and services. Rather than solely relying on extracting goods, these approaches could allow communities to diversify ecosystem uses and focus on long-term stewardship and conservation, while meeting development, food security, and human welfare goals. The creation of ecomarkets will be difficult in many cases, because rights and responsibilities must be devolved, new social contracts will be required, accountability systems must be created and enforced, and long-term patterns of behaviour must change. We argue that efforts to overcome these obstacles

  11. Evaluation of radon activity in soil gas at Curitiba - metropolitan area and coastal region of Parana, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Janine N.; Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Reque, Marilson; Schwarzbach, Vinicius; Schlottag, Thalyta C., E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: flavia_delclaro@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the results of Rn-222 and Rn-220 measurements in soil gas at the city of Curitiba, Metropolitan Area and Parana Coastal Region developed by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of Federal University of Technology, Parana (UTFPR). The survey was performed using the AlphaGUARD instant radon detector (SAPHYMO) associated with gas probe, filter vessels and air pump (AlphaPUMP) following the recommendation of User Manual for soil gas measurements and practice protocols developed by CDTN. Each test consisted of three main steps: background evaluation, total activity measurement of Rn-222 and Rn-220 isotopes in soil gas and static activity measurements (with disconnected AlphaPUMP) of soil gas accumulated within the cavity of AlphaGUARD ionization chamber. Specific activity levels of Rn-222 and Rn-220 were obtained by theoretical decay curves fitting to the set of experimental data using scientific graphing and data analysis software Origin 6.1. Obtained Rn-222 concentrations in soil gas varied from 26.0 ± 8.2 kBq/m³ to 38.7 ± 7.7 kBq/m³ and the average values of Rn-220 were found in a range of 18.8 ± 7.4 kBq/m³ and 142±67 kBq/m³. It has to be noted that found activity of Rn-222 isotope in soil gas of studied locations of Parana is below 50 kBq/m³, which is the maximum radon activity level established by some European countries for classification of high-risk soil. Despite the high levels of Rn-220 activity in soil gas, this does not represent the health risk for the population since the half-life of Rn-220 is short (54.5 seconds). (author)

  12. Developing a Global Soil Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Boer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From the 1960s onwards, the global community became more aware of the phenomena of air and water pollution. More recently, the issues of climate change, loss of biodiversity, desertification, drought, and land degradation have become more prominent. While biodiversity loss and climate change have garnered close attention, issues of land degradation and sustainability of soils has attracted less focus in international fora and by national governments. We argue here that soil, as a vital biological and cultural resource, demands attention on the same level as biological diversity and climate change, and that this should be reflected in both international law and in legislation at national level. This article explores the elements that could form the basis of a global instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of soil, and sets out the premise for the community of nations to support the negotiation and drafting of such an instrument. It does so in light of the recent discussion on the introduction of a provision in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals on the achievement of zero net land degradation, the revision of the World Soil Charter as well as the work of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. It also briefly explores other complementary mechanisms that can be used for promoting the sustainable use of soils.

  13. Developing a Global Soil Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Boer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From the 1960s onwards, the global community became more aware of the phenomena of air and water pollution. More recently, the issues of climate change, loss of biodiversity, desertification, drought, and land degradation have become more prominent. While biodiversity loss and climate change have garnered close attention, issues of land degradation and sustainability of soils has attracted less focus in international fora and by national governments. We argue here that soil, as a vital biological and cultural resource, demands attention on the same level as biological diversity and climate change, and that this should be reflected in both international law and in legislation at national level. This article explores the elements that could form the basis of a global instrument for the conservation and sustainable use of soil, and sets out the premise for the community of nations to support the negotiation and drafting of such an instrument. It does so in light of the recent discussion on the introduction of a provision in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals on the achievement of zero net land degradation, the revision of the World Soil Charter as well as the work of the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. It also briefly explores other complementary mechanisms that can be used for promoting the sustainable use of soils.

  14. The Center for Coastal Studies: Sustainable Development Education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollervides, F.; Farrell, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present The School for Field Studies-Center for Coastal Studies (SFS-CCS) as a success story in sustainable development education. This success is based on a unique academic model, which incorporates sustainable development opportunities and challenges faced by the local community into the program…

  15. Toxaphene residues from cotton fields in soils and in the coastal environment of Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F P; Montenegro-Guillén, S; Villeneuve, J P; Cattini, C; Tolosa, I; Bartocci, J; Lacayo-Romero, M; Cruz-Granja, A

    2003-11-01

    Toxaphene (camphechlor) was intensively used in the cotton growing fields of Nicaragua for decades with application rates as high as 31 kg ha(-1) in 1985. Although the use of this compound has recently been discontinued in the country, its intensive use in the past and its long persistence in soil allowed for the build up of large reservoirs of toxaphene in agriculture soils and a wide dispersal of residues in the environment. Measurements of toxaphene in coastal areas on the coast of the Pacific Ocean show that environmental concentrations are particularly high in the district of Chinandega, the traditional cotton growing region. Toxaphene residues measured in soils attained 44 microg g(-1) (dry weight) while concentrations in lagoon sediments attained 6.9 microg g(-1) (dry weight) near the mouth of the rivers flowing across the agricultural region. Measurements in aquatic biota showed concentrations as high as 1.6 microg g(-1) (dry weight) in the soft tissues of clams. The toxaphene reservoir in soils combined with the obvious persistence of this compound in soils and lagoon sediments allows predicting that toxaphene will remain in the coastal ecosystem at relatively high concentrations for many years. Toxic effects in lagoon fauna are likely to be observed especially in benthic species that may recycle this compound from sediments. Consumption of seafood, in particular of clams (Anadara spp.) from the more contaminated areas, may expose the population to unacceptably high intake of toxaphene, 30 microg d(-1) per person, with the diet.

  16. Research on Dynamic Parameters of Soil Site in the Tianjin Coastal Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Yanju; Lv Yuejun; Qian Haitao

    2011-01-01

    The Tianjin coastal area is a typical soft soil region, where the soil is a marine deposit of the late Quaternary. The soil dynamic parameters from seismic risk assessment reports are collected, and drilling of 15 holes was carried out to sample the soils and measure their dynamic characteristics. The data was divided into 7 types based on lithology, namely, muddy clay, muddy silty clay, silt, silty clay, clay, silty sand and fine sand. Statistics of the dynamic parameters of these soils are collected to obtain the mean values of dynamic shear modulus ratio and damping ratio at different depths. Then, two typical drill holes are selected to establish the soil dynamic models to investigate the seismic response in different cases. The dynamic seismic responses of soil are calculated using the statistical values of this paper, and the values of Code (1994) and those recommended by Yuan Xiaoming et al. (2000), respectively. The applicability and pertinence of the statistical value obtained in this paper are demonstrated by the response spectrum shape, peak ground acceleration and response spectral characteristics. The results can be taken as a reference of the soil dynamic value in this area and can be used in the seismic risk assessment of engineering projects.

  17. Effects of salinity on dynamics of soil carbon in degraded coastal wetlands: Implications on wetland restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingqing; Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhang, Guangliang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of salinity on dynamics of soil carbon contents and stocks, soil samples were collected at a depth of 30 cm at four sampling sites (Sites B, T, S and P) along a salinity gradient in a drained coastal wetland, the Yellow River Delta, China. The salinity of these four sites ranked in the order: B (8.68 ± 4.25 ms/cm) > T (5.89 ± 3.17 ms/cm) > S (3.19 ± 1.01 ms/cm) > P (2.26 ± 0.39 ms/cm). Soil total carbon (TC), soil organic carbon (SOC), and soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were measured. Based on these data, soil organic carbon density (SOCD) and soil microbial biomass carbon density (MBCD) were calculated at four sites. The results showed that the mean concentrations of TC and MBC showed a general deceasing tendency with increasing salinities in the top 30 cm of soils. The values of SOCD and MBCD exhibited similar tendency along the salinity gradient. As for profile distribution pattern, The C/N ratios ranged from 8.28 to 56.51. The microbial quotient values at four sampling sites were quite low, ranging from 0.06 to 0.19. Higher C/N ratios were found in samples with high salinity. Correlation analysis showed that the concentrations of TC and MBC at four sampling sites were significantly negatively correlated with salinity (P carbon accumulation and microbial activities.

  18. Comparing radiation dose rates in soils and riverine sediment to track the dispersion of radioactive contamination in Fukushima coastal rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Chartin, Caroline; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Bonté, Philippe; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident that occurred in March 2011 led to the formation of a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume on soils located up to 70 km to the northwest of the damaged site. Forests and paddy fields are the dominant land uses in this mountainous region drained to the Pacific Ocean by several rivers that flow across densely inhabited coastal plains. It is then crucial to track the dispersion of radioactive material conveyed by those rivers to estimate the continental supply of radionuclides to the Ocean and to assess redistribution of radioactive sediment in those catchments. Radiations emitted by this contaminated material may indeed lead to an external exposure threat for local populations. As river discharge and sediment concentration data were not available during the first two years that followed the accident, alternative methods had to be developed to track this dispersion. We therefore organized field campaigns every six months and conducted local ground dose rate measurements to estimate whether fresh sediment drape deposits were more or less contaminated compared to local soils. Overall, our results showed that, in those regions exposed to violent typhoons and spring snowmelt, transfers of sediment are massive and episodic, and that they followed a seasonal cycle in 2011-2012. Then, in May 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. This could have indicated a drying-up of the upstream sources of contamination. However, after the violent typhoons that occurred during summer in 2013, dose rates measured in fresh sediment deposits in November 2013 increased again systematically across the region. We thereby suggest that remobilization of contaminated sediment by typhoons and their storage in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the

  19. Effects of poly-γ-glutamic acid biopreparation (PGAB) on nitrogen conservation in the coastal saline soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; Xu, Xianghong; Zhang, Huan; Han, Rui; Cheng, Yao; Tan, Xueyi; Chen, Xuanyu

    2017-04-01

    Water leaching is the major method to decrease soil salinity of the coastal saline soil. Conservation of soil nutrition in the soil ameliorating process is helpful to maintain soil fertility and prevent environment pollution. In the experiment, glutamic acid and poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) producing bacteria were isolated for manufacturing the PGA biopreparation (PGAB), and the effect of PGAB on the soil nitrogen (N) conservation was assayed. The glutamic acid and PGA producing bacteria were identified as Brevibacterium flavum and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. After soil leached with water for 90 days, compared to control treatment, salt concentration of 0-30cm soil with PGAB treatment was lowered by 39.93%, however the total N loss was decreased by 65.37%. Compared to control, the microbial biomass N increased by 1.19 times at 0-30 cm soil with PGAB treatment. The populations of soil total bacteria, fungi, actinomyces, nitrogen fixing bacteria, ammonifying bacteria, nitrifying bacteria and denitrifying bacteria and biomass of soil algae were significantly increased in PGAB treatment, while anaerobic bacteria decreased (P 0.25 mm and 0.02 mm < diameter <0.25 mm were increased by 2.93 times and 26.79% respectively in PGAB treatment. The soil erosion-resistance coefficient of PGAB treatment increased by 50%. All these suggested that the PGAB conserved the soil nitrogen effectively in the process of soil water leaching and improved the coastal saline soil quality.

  20. An Integrated GIS/RS Approach for Soil Erosion Assessment and Modeling in Syrian Coastal Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    An integrated remote sensing (RS) and geographic information system (GIS) technique was employed to characterize the spatial distribution of the risk of soil erosion by water on Latakia district,Syria.The universal soil loss equation (USLE) was used to calculate the annual soil loss rates for Latakia soils.Mainly,remote sensing data,soil survey,land use inventory,elevation data and climatic atlases are used as resource data sets to generate USLE factor values.The results revealed that integration of GIS/RS with USLE was a practical and effective approach for monitoring soil erosion over large areas.

  1. Shoreline development and degradation of coastal fish reproduction habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Göran; Bergström, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    Coastal development has severely affected habitats and biodiversity during the last century, but quantitative estimates of the impacts are usually lacking. We utilize predictive habitat modeling and mapping of human pressures to estimate the cumulative long-term effects of coastal development in relation to fish habitats. Based on aerial photographs since the 1960s, shoreline development rates were estimated in the Stockholm archipelago in the Baltic Sea. By combining shoreline development rates with spatial predictions of fish reproduction habitats, we estimated annual habitat degradation rates for three of the most common coastal fish species, northern pike (Esox lucius), Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus). The results showed that shoreline constructions were concentrated to the reproduction habitats of these species. The estimated degradation rates, where a degraded habitat was defined as having ≥3 constructions per 100 m shoreline, were on average 0.5 % of available habitats per year and about 1 % in areas close to larger population centers. Approximately 40 % of available habitats were already degraded in 2005. These results provide an example of how many small construction projects over time may have a vast impact on coastal fish populations.

  2. Yantai Institute of Coastal Research for Sustainable Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Yantai Institute of Coastal Research for Sustainable Development is a research body specializing in the exploration of natural resources and the environment and related hi-tech inter-disciplines. It was a joint venture co-established by CAS, the provincial government of Shandong and municipal government of Yantai on the Shandong Peninsula.

  3. Report of International Coastal Atlas Network Workshop 6: Expanding Participation in Coastal Web Atlas Development and Use

    OpenAIRE

    Dwyer, Ned; Kopke, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    From June 16th to 17th, 2013, the International Coastal Atlas Network (ICAN) held a workshop on “Expanding Participation in Coastal Web Atlas Development and Use”, at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. The workshop (aka “ICAN 6”) engaged 29 participants from 9 countries, representing 22 organizations and multiple areas of scientific and technical expertise. This meeting was a follow-up to the successful 2011 workshop on “Coastal Atlases as Engines for Coastal & Marine Spati...

  4. China's coastal population and economic development: summary of the symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, R

    1992-01-01

    China's coastal areas have led the rest of China in economic development and low fertility rates; migration from inland areas and urbanization are well advanced. A symposium on China's coastal population and economic development was conducted in 1990 by the Population Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Liaoning Population Institute, and the Dalian Population Institute at the request of the China Population Institute. There were 50 people in attendance representing major research institutes and family planning associations and media organizations. 26 papers were submitted. The opening speaker addressed developing the economy as a positive cycle of population and development, and accelerating change. Discussion focused on the following topics: the relationship between fertility rate changes and coastal economic development, population mobility and migration to coast areas, population urbanization, and related problems. In the summation by Professor Tian Xueyuan, 7 trends were identified: continued coastal population growth, a two-directional change in natural population growth, an increase in the rate of coastal population migration, rapid urban population growth, productive age population growth and changes in the employment structure, improvements in economic and technological progess and quality of life, and rapid population aging. The symposium was considered particularly timely in highlighting the current problems and strengths, integrating theorists with field workers, and maintaining an open exchange of ideas and information. Problems were identified as regional open areas in Heihai in Guangxi, Heihe in Heilongjiang, and Dalian in Liaoning Province. Although the population is considered professionally better qualified than in other regions, there is still a lack of technicians and skilled workers and an excess of untrained workers. Development is being slowed and mismanaged due to deficiencies in the job allocation and personnel

  5. Soil and Solution Based Assessments of Weathering along a Hillslope Transect in Coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, K.; Sanderman, J.; Mudd, S. M.; Amundson, R.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the genesis of hillslope soils is challenging. They are the products of geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical processes that are interacting among themselves and are affected by the soils they shape. Our goal is to mechanically and quantitatively integrate the soil production and transport, chemical weathering of minerals, and solute fluxes with the observed topographic variation of soil elemental compositions. We studied a grass covered hillslope in coastal California where geomorphic processes of soil production and transport are well characterized. The parent material is clay-rich sandstone and bioturbation drives the slope- dependent soil transport. 10 sites were excavated to the depth of 10-20 cm beyond the soil-saprolite boundary, and soil and saprolite samples were collected for total chemical analyses of major elements. Soil solution was sampled throughout the year at multiple depths at 6 hillslope locations, along with outflow stream samples. We report that long term weathering rates, determined by the enrichment of weathering resistant element (Zr), are approximately proportional to soil production rates, whereas solute measurements indicate fastest chemical weathering rate near the toeslope where the soil production rate is lowest due to the thick soils. In saprolite, the Zr enrichment increased with increasing soil thickness, a trend consistent with the fact that soil production rate declines with soil thickness. If we assume mineral residence time in the saprolite increases with a decreasing conversion rate of saprolite to soil, the saprolite residence time may explain the greater degrees of saprolite chemical alteration in the depositional slope. Comparisons of elemental compositions of the soils and saprolite suggest that less than 10 % of the original saprolite mass has been lost via dissolution and leaching during the soil formation. Despite the mass losses of most elements, phosphorous and calcium appear to be selectively retained

  6. Exchangeable and secondary mineral reactive pools of aluminium in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvanes-Giuliani, Yliane A M; Waite, T David; Collins, Richard N

    2014-07-01

    The use of coastal floodplain sulfidic sediments for agricultural activities has resulted in the environmental degradation of many areas worldwide. The generation of acidity and transport of aluminium (Al) and other metals to adjacent aquatic systems are the main causes of adverse effects. Here, a five-step sequential extraction procedure (SEP) was applied to 30 coastal lowland acid sulfate soils (CLASS) from north-eastern New South Wales, Australia. This enabled quantification of the proportion of aluminium present in 'water-soluble', 'exchangeable', 'organically-complexed', 'reducible iron(III) (oxyhydr)oxide/hydroxysulfate-incorporated' and 'amorphous Al mineral' fractions. The first three extractions represented an average of 5% of 'aqua regia' extractable Al and their cumulative concentrations were extremely high, reaching up to 4000 mg·kg(-1). Comparison of Al concentrations in the final two extractions indicated that 'amorphous Al minerals' are quantitatively a much more important sink for the removal of aqueous Al derived from the acidic weathering of these soils than reducible Fe(III) minerals. Correlations were observed between soil pH, dissolved and total organic carbon (DOC and TOC) and Al concentrations in organic carbon-rich CLASS soil horizons. These results suggest that complexation of Al by dissolved organic matter significantly increases soluble Al concentrations at pH values >5.0. As such, present land management practices would benefit with redefinition of an 'optimal' soil from pH ≥5.5 to ~4.8 for the preservation of aquatic environments adjacent to organic-rich CLASS where Al is the sole or principle inorganic contaminant of concern. Furthermore, it was observed that currently-accepted standard procedures (i.e. 1 M KCl extraction) to measure exchangeable Al concentrations in these types of soils severely underestimate exchangeable Al and a more accurate representation may be obtained through the use of 0.2 M CuCl2. Copyright © 2014

  7. Economic valuation for sustainable development in the Swedish coastal zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderqvist, Tore; Eggert, Håkan; Olsson, Björn; Soutukorva, Asa

    2005-03-01

    The Swedish coastal zone is a scene of conflicting interests about various goods and services provided by nature. Open-access conditions and the public nature of many services increase the difficulty in resolving these conflicts. "Sustainability" is a vague but widely accepted guideline for finding reasonable trade-offs between different interests. The UN view of sustainable development suggests that coastal zone management should aim at a sustainable ecological, economic, and social-cultural development. Looking closer at economic sustainability, it is observed that economic analyses about whether changes in society imply a gain or a loss should take into account the economic value of the environment. Methods used for making such economic valuation in the context of the Swedish coastal zone are briefly reviewed. It is noted that the property rights context matters for the results of a valuation study. This general background is followed by a concise presentation of the design and results of four valuation studies on Swedish coastal zone issues. One study is on the economic value of an improved bathing water quality in the Stockholm archipelago. The other studies are a travel cost study about the economic value of improved recreational fisheries in the Stockholm archipelago, a replacement cost study on the value of restoring habitats for sea trout, and a choice experiment study on the economic value of improved water quality along the Swedish westcoast.

  8. Combined Resistivity and Shear Wave Velocity Soil-type Estimation Beneath a Coastal Protection Levee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Goff, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Unconsolidated Holocene deltaic sediments comprise levee foundation soils in New Orleans, USA. Whereas geotechnical tests at point locations are indispensable for evaluating soil stability, the highly variable sedimentary facies of the Mississippi delta create difficulties to predict soil conditions between test locations. Combined electrical resistivity and seismic shear wave studies, calibrated to geotechnical data, may provide an efficient methodology to predict soil types between geotechnical sites at shallow depths (0- 10 m). The London Avenue Canal levee flank of New Orleans, which failed in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, 2005, presents a suitable site in which to pioneer these geophysical relationships. Preliminary cross-plots show electrically resistive, high-shear-wave velocity areas interpreted as low-permeability, resistive silt. In brackish coastal environments, low-resistivity and low-shear-wave-velocity areas may indicate both saturated, unconsolidated sands and low-rigidity clays. Via a polynomial approximation, soil sub-types of sand, silt and clay can be estimated by a cross-plot of S-wave velocity and resistivity. We confirm that existent boring log data fit reasonably well with the polynomial approximation where 2/3 of soil samples fall within their respective bounds—this approach represents a new classification system that could be used for other mid-latitude, fine-grained deltas.

  9. Denitrification of soil nitrogen in coastal and inland salt marshes with different flooding frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Wang, Xin; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-02-01

    Denitrification is an important process for removing nitrogen in wetlands, and it is influenced by many environmental factors. However, little information is available on the relationship between hydrologic conditions and denitrification. In this study three typical sampling sites with different flooding frequencies, including short-term flooding wetlands (STFW), seasonal-flooding wetlands (SFW) and tidal flooding wetlands (TFW) were chosen as the study sites in the Yellow River Delta. In contrast, five typical sampling sites with different flooding frequencies, including 100-year floodplain (H), 10-year floodplain (T), 5-year floodplain (F), 1-year floodplain (O) and permanently flooded floodplain (B) were chosen as the study sites in Xianghai wetlands. This study reflected that the denitrification rates decreased with depth along soil profiles in both inland and coastal salt marsh soils. Flooding periods, soil depth and their interaction showed significant effects on the denitrification processes. Generally, higher flooding frequencies will cause higher denitrification rates in salt marshes. Moreover, the denitrification rates were significantly positively correlated with soil moisture content in both wetlands. Additionally, the denitrification rates were significantly positively correlated with organic matter and NO3-_N content while negatively correlated with soil pH and salinity in inland salt marshes. Therefore, the changes in soil properties (e.g. SOM, TN, pH and salinity) can become an important way to control NO3- levels in inland salt marshes.

  10. Microbial biomass and biological activity of soils and soil-like bodies in coastal oases of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, D. A.; Marfenina, O. E.; Kudinova, A. G.; Lysak, L. V.; Mergelov, N. S.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Lupachev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    The method of luminescent microscopy has been applied to study the structure of the microbial biomass of soils and soil-like bodies in East (the Thala Hills and Larsemann Hills oases) and West (Cape Burks, Hobbs coast) Antarctica. According to Soil Taxonomy, the studied soils mainly belong to the subgroups of Aquic Haploturbels, Typic Haploturbels, Typic Haplorthels, and Lithic Haplorthels. The major contribution to their microbial biomass belongs to fungi. The highest fungal biomass (up to 790 μg C/g soil) has been found in the soils with surface organic horizons in the form of thin moss/lichen litters, in which the development of fungal mycelium is most active. A larger part of fungal biomass (70-98%) is represented by spores. For the soils without vegetation cover, the accumulation of bacterial and fungal biomass takes place in the horizons under surface desert pavements. In the upper parts of the soils without vegetation cover and in the organic soil horizons, the major part (>60%) of fungal mycelium contains protective melanin pigments. Among bacteria, the high portion (up to 50%) of small filtering forms is observed. A considerable increase (up to 290.2 ± 27 μg C/g soil) in the fungal biomass owing to the development of yeasts has been shown for gley soils (gleyzems) developing from sapropel sediments under subaquatic conditions and for the algal-bacterial mat on the bottom of the lake (920.7 ± 46 μg C/g soil). The production of carbon dioxide by the soils varies from 0.47 to 2.34 μg C-CO2/(g day). The intensity of nitrogen fixation in the studied samples is generally low: from 0.08 to 55.85 ng C2H4/(g day). The intensity of denitrification varies from 0.09 to 19.28 μg N-N2O/(g day).

  11. Investigation into the Physico-Chemical Properties of Soils of Caspian Sea Coastal Area in Mangystau Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samal Syrlybekkyzy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the results of investigation into physico-chemical properties of coastal soils in the areas of oil fields. it has been established that the considered soils are characterized with low content of organics, alkaline reaction of soil solutions, high salinity and weak resistance against anthropogenic impacts. The obtained data can be applied for further studies and monitoring of environment in oil field areas.

  12. 肥料与石膏配施对滨海盐土玉米生长及养分吸收的影响%Effects of Fertilizer with Gypsum Application on Growing Development and Nutrient Uptake of Potting Corn in Coastal Saline Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李孝良; 徐克琴; 肖瑞; 李健姣; 陈效民; 王晓洋

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fertilizer with gypsum with the pot experiments in coastal saline soil application on growing development and nutrients uptake of corn were studied. The appropriate fertilizer varieties were discussed. The results were as follows: there were significant effects in fertilizer and gypsum application on corn growth in coastal saline soil. The dry matter accumulation and nutrient uptake in the treatment of gypsum with organic - in- organic fertilizer or bio - organic fertilizer and inorganic compound fertilizer were better. During corn growth periand among the tested fertilizer varieties, the order of the dry matter accumulation was organic - inorganic corn-pound fertilizers (F2 ), bio -organic fertilizer and inorganic compound fertilizer (F4 ) 〉 inorganic compound fertilizer ( F1 ) 〉 bio - organic fertilizer ( F3 ) 〉 the control. The application of gypsum with organic - inorganic compound fertilizer or bio - organic fertilizer and inorganic compound fertilizer could significant improve the growth of corn. But the application of gypsum with inorganic compound fertilizer could significantly decrease the dry matter accumulation of corn in coastal saline soil. There were significant effects of fertilizer with gypsum ap- plication on the nutrient uptake of corn in coastal saline soil. The N uptake in organic - inorganic compound fertilizers ( F2) was higher, and the K uptake in inorganic compound fertilizer ( F1 ) was higher in the nutrient up- take of corn in seeding stage. There was not significant effect of gypsum application on nutrient uptake of potting corn in coastal saline soil, but gypsum application could significantly decrease the P uptake. The appropriate fer- tilizer variety ic compound during corn cultivation was organic - inorganic fertilizer ( F2 ) or bio - organic fertilizer and inorgan- fertilizer (F4) with gypsum application in coastal saline soil.%通过盆栽试验,研究了肥料与石膏配合

  13. Effects of Fertilizer with Gypsum Application on Growing Development and Nutrient Uptake of Potting Rape in Coastal Saline Soil%肥料与石膏配施对滨海盐土油菜生长及养分吸收的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李孝良; 陈效民; 徐克琴; 肖瑞; 王晓洋

    2012-01-01

    通过盆栽试验,研究了肥料与石膏配合施用对滨海盐土油菜生长及养分吸收的影响,探讨了滨海盐土适宜的肥料品种。结果表明,肥料与石膏配合施用对滨海油菜生长有显著影响,在油菜干物质累积、油菜产量上均以有机无机复混肥、生物有机肥配合无机复混肥配施石膏效果最好。供试肥料品种间,油菜生长中后期在干物质累积、产量上均表现出有机无机复混肥(F2)、生物有机肥配合无机复混肥(F4)〉无机复混肥(F1)〉生物有机肥(F3)〉对照,各肥料较对照分别增产195.6%、190.9%、117.0%和53.4%。在有机无机复混肥、生物有机肥配合无机复混肥的基础上增加石膏的施用量可明显改善油菜生长状况和产量,但在无机复混肥基础上增加石膏施用量会导致油菜干物质累积和产量的明显降低。肥料与石膏配合施用影响油菜对N、P、K养分的吸收,在油菜苗期养分吸收上,N、K以无机复混肥(F1)较高,P以有机无机复混肥(F2)较高,施用石膏可促进油菜对N、K的吸收,但会显著降低对P的吸收量。滨海盐土地区油菜栽培以有机无机复混肥(F2)、生物有机肥配合无机复混肥(F4)配合石膏(B2)施用较为适宜。%The effects of fertilizer with gypsum application on growing development and nutrients uptake of rape with the pot experiments in coastal saline soil were studied. The appropriate fertilizer varieties were discussed. The results were as follows: there were significant effects in fertilizer and gypsum application on rape growth in coastal saline soil. The dry matter accumulation and rapeseed yield in treatments of organic-inorganic fertilizer or bio-organic fertilizer and inorganic compound fertilizer with gypsum were the best. During rapeseed growth period and among the tested fertilizer varieties, the order of the dry matter accumulation

  14. Soil remediation of degraded coastal saline wetlands by irrigation with paper mill effluent and plowing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Meng-jing; LIU Zhi-mei; LU Zhao-hua

    2012-01-01

    Combined with anti-waterlogging ditches,irrigation with treated paper mill effluent (TPME) and plowing were applied in this study to investigate the effects of remediation of degraded coastal saline-alkaline wetlands.Three treatments were employed,viz.,control (CK),irrigated with 10 cm depth of TPME (I),and plowing to 20 cm deep before irrigating 10 cm depth of TPME (IP).Results show that both I-treatment and IP-treatment could improve soil structure by decreasing bulk density by 5% and 8%.Irrigation with TPME containing low salinity stimulated salts leaching instead of accumulating.With anti-waterlogging ditches,salts were drained out of soil.Irrigation with 10 cm depth of TPME lowered total soluble salts in soil and sodium adsorption ration by 33% and 8%,respectively,but there was no significant difference compared with CK,indicating that this irrigation rate was not heavy enough to remarkably reduce soil salinity and sodicity.Thus,irrigation rate should be enhanced in order to reach better effects of desalinization and desodication.Irrigation with TPME significantly increased soil organic matter,alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available phosphorus due to the abundant organic matmr in TPME.Plowing increased soil air circulation,so as to enhance mineralization of organic matter and lead to the loss of organic matter; however,plowing significantly improved soil alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available phosphorus.Improvements of physicochemical properties in I-treatment and IP-treatment both boosted soil microbial population and activity.Microbial biomass carbon increased significantly by 327% (I-treatment) and 451% (IP-treatment),while soil respiration increased significantly by 316% (I-treatment) and 386% (IP-treatment).Urease and dehydrogenase activities in both I-treatment and IP-treatment were significantly higher than that in CK.Phosphatase in IP-treatment was significantly higher than that in CK.Compared to I-treatment,IP-treatment improved

  15. South Coastal Community Development: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imamudin Yuliadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reality show that Indonesia is one country that have longest beach in the world. This fact give implication that economic potential of people life at the beach is important factor to indoors economic growth for improving walfare and equity economic development both national and regional scope. Research method that applied is desriptive investigative for obtain the fact about the economic problem of people at the beach especially beach potential economy for improving people economic welfare. Analitical methode at this research is location quotion (LQ, shift-share, and typology klassen. The output of this research is making the planning model of promotion system and integrated investment to realize the equality of development economic at beach are in Yogyakarta.

  16. Bioremediation of soils contaminated by hydrocarbons at the coastal zone of “Punta Majagua”.

    OpenAIRE

    Jelvys Bermúdez Acosta; Roberto Núñez Moreira; Yoelvis Castro Hernández

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe and assess the main results in the process of bioremediation of 479 m3 of petroleum residuals spilled on the soil and restrained into four deposits of fuel on the coastal zone of “Punta Majagua”, Cienfuegos. The volume of hydrocarbons spilled and contained into the tanks was determined by means of their previous mixture with fertile ground in a ratio of 3/1. The hydrocarbons were disposed in a bioremediation area of 115 m X 75m built in situ. In tu...

  17. Soil fluxes of methane, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide from aggrading forests in coastal Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Heather E.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil exchanges of greenhouse and other gases are poorly known for Pacific Northwest forests where gradients in nutrient availability and soil moisture may contribute to large variations in fluxes. Here we report fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and nitric oxide (NO) over multiple seasons from three naturally N-rich, aggrading forests of coastal Oregon, USA. Mean methane uptake rates (3.2 mg CH4 m−2 d−1) were high compared with forests globally, negatively related to water-filled pore space (WFPS), but unrelated to N availability or temperature. Emissions of NO (6.0 μg NO–N m−2 h−1) exceeded N2O (1.4 μg N2O–N m−2 h−1), except when WFPS surpassed 55%. Spatial variation in NO fluxes correlated positively with soil nitrate concentrations (which generally exceeded ammonium concentrations, indicating the overall high N status for the sites) and negatively with soil pH, and at one site increased with basal area of N2-fixing red alder. Combined NO and N2O emissions were greatest from the site with highest annual net N mineralization and lowest needle litterfall C/N. Our findings of high CH4 uptake and NO/N2O ratios generally >1 most likely reflect the high porosity of the andic soils underlying the widespread regenerating forests in this seasonally wet region.

  18. Potential methane production rates and its carbon isotopic composition from ornithogenic tundra soils in coastal Antarctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Tao; ZHU Renbin; BAI Bo; XU Hua

    2016-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is one of important greenhouse gases with chemical activity. The determination of isotopic compositions for CH4 emitted from the soils helps us to understand its production mechanisms. CH4 isotope measurements have been conducted for different types of global terrestrial ecosystems. However, no isotopic data of CH4 have been reported from Antarctic tundra soils. In this paper, ornithogenic soil profiles were collected from four penguin colonies, and potential CH4 production rates and its13C ratio (δ13C) were investigated based upon laboratory incubation experiments. The mean CH4 production rates are highly variable in these soil proifles, ranging from 0.7 to 20.3 μg CH4−C kg−1∙h−1. These ornithogenic soils had high potential production rates of CH4 under ambient air incubation or under N2 incubation, indicating the importance of potential CH4 emissions from penguin colonies. Most of the soil samples had higher δ13C-CH4 under N2 incubation (−39.28%~−43.53%) than under the ambient air incubation (−42.81%~−57.19%). Highly anaerobic conditions were conducive to the production of CH4 enriched in13C, and acetic acid reduction under N2 incubation might be a predominant source for soil CH4production. Overall theδ13C-CH4 showed a signiifcant negative correlation with CH4 production rates in ornithogenic tundra soils under N2 incubation (R2=0.41,p<0.01) or under the ambient air incubation (R2=0.50,p<0.01). Potential CH4 production from ornithogenic soils showed a signiifcant positive correlation with total phosphorus (TP) and NH4+−N contents, pH and soil moisture (Mc), but the δ13C-CH4 showed a signiifcant negative correlation with TP and NH4+−N contents, pH and Mc, indicating that the deposition amount of penguin guano increased potential CH4 production rates from tundra soils, but decreased the δ13C-CH4. The CH4 emissions from the ornithogenic soils affect carbon isotopic compositions of atmospheric CH4in coastal Antarctica.

  19. Developing Best Practices: System-wide Actions for Coastal Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-09

    10/9/2015 1 Developing Best Practices System-wide actions for coastal resilience US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Engineering...response phase • Act over longer periods • Provide some risk reduction to combined threats 10/9/2015 2 Best Practice Brainstorming Instructions 1...loss of view, etc. * Select a speaker to share ideas with the class. 4 Best Practices: Examples Mobile Bay, AL - Multiple lines of defense elevate

  20. Working with soils: soil science continuing professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, Jacqueline; Thompson, Dick

    2017-04-01

    The British Society of Soil Science launched the Working with Soils professional competency programme in 2011. This was in response to concerns from practitioners and professionals of a significant skills gap in various sectors that require soil science skills. The programme includes one and two day courses that cover the qualifications, knowledge and skills required of a professional scientist or engineer conducting a range of contract work. All courses qualify for continuing professional development points with various professional practice schemes. Three courses cover the foundations of soil science namely; describing a soil profile, soil classification and understanding soil variability in the field and landscape. Other tailored courses relate to specific skills required from consultants particularly in the planning process where land is assessed for agricultural quality (agricultural land classification). New courses this year include soil handling and restoration that provides practitioners with knowledge of the appropriate management of large volumes of soil that are disturbed during development projects. The courses have so far successfully trained over 100 delegates ranging from PhD students, environmental consultants and government policy advisors.

  1. Comparison of the quantitative determination of soil organic carbon in coastal wetlands containing reduced forms of Fe and S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Tassia R. G.; Artur, Adriana G.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Otero, Xosé L.; Ferreira, Tiago O.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of the Walkley-Black wet oxidation chemical method for soil organic carbon (SOC) determination in coastal wetland soils (mangroves, coastal lagoons, and hypersaline tidal flats) was evaluated in the state of Ceará along the semiarid coast of Brazil, assessing pyrite oxidation and its effects on soil C stock (SCS) quantification. SOC determined by the chemical oxidation method (CWB) was compared to that assessed by means of a standard elemental analyzer (CEA) for surficial samples (oxidation method, evaluating the effects of pyrite oxidation. Regardless of the method used, and consistent with site-specific physicochemical conditions, higher pyrite and SOC contents were recorded in the mangroves, whereas lower values were found in the other settings. CWB values were higher than CEA values. Significant differences in SCS calculations based on CWB and CEA were recorded for the coastal lagoons and hypersaline tidal flats. Nevertheless, the CWB and CEA values were strongly correlated, indicating that the wet oxidation chemical method can be used in such settings. In contrast, the absence of correlation for the mangroves provides evidence of the inadequacy of this method for these soils. Air drying and oxidation decrease the pyrite content, with larger effects rooted in oxidation. Thus, the wet oxidation chemical method is not recommended for mangrove soils, but seems appropriate for SOC/SCS quantification in hypersaline tidal flat and coastal lagoon soils characterized by lower pyrite contents.

  2. Optimal Groundwater Development in Coastal Aquifers Near Beihai, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Groundwater resources occur in a multi-aquifer system in the alluvial coastal plain near Beihai, China. The aquifers receive recharge from precipitation, canal and reservoir infiltration, and discharge through subterranean drainage into the sea and through artificial pumping. A quasithree-dimensional finite element model has been used to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of groundwater levels in the aquifers. Various input parameters were considered in the simulation model. A linear optimization model has been developed for groundwater development within the coastal aquifers. The objective function of the model is to maximize the total groundwater pumpage from the confined aquifer. The control of sea water intrusion is examined by the restriction of the water levels at points along the coast and of the pumping rates in coastal management cells. The response matrix used in the optimization model was generated from the simulation model by forecasting drawdown produced by pumping at a unit impulse discharge. Groundwater development can be primarily optimized by the alteration of the pumping rates of the existing wells.

  3. Narrowing the gap between theory and practice? Interactive knowledge development in a coastal defense project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijger, Chris; van Tatenhove, J.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Otter, Henriëtte; Javernick-Will, A.; Chinowsky, P.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal defence projects intend to develop solutions in a highly dynamic environment. The coastal zone is characterized by expanding cities, rising flood risks, economic activity, and a threatened natural environment. Developing relevant knowledge for solutions in coastal defence projects is therefo

  4. 15 CFR 930.153 - Coordination between States in developing coastal management policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Coordination between States in developing coastal management policies. Coastal States are encouraged to give... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coordination between States in developing coastal management policies. 930.153 Section 930.153 Commerce and Foreign Trade...

  5. Development of a coastal information system for the management of Jeddah coastal waters in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerle, R.; Al-Subhi, A.; Fernández Jaramillo, J.; Salama, A.; Bruss, G.; Zubier, K.; Runte, K.; Turki, A.; Hesse, K.; Jastania, H.; Ladwig, N.; Mudarris, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of the development and application of a web-based information system, Jeddah CIS, for assisting decision makers in the management of Jeddah coastal waters, in Saudi Arabia. The system will support coastal planning, management of navigation and tackle pollution due to accidents. The system was developed primarily to nowcast in quasi-real time and to deliver short-term forecasts of water levels, current velocities and waves with high spatial and temporal resolution for the area near Jeddah. Therefor it will hasten response when adverse weather conditions prevail. The Jeddah-CIS integrates sensors transmitting in real time, meteorological, oceanographic and water quality parameters and operational models for flow and waves. It also provides interactive tools using advanced visualization techniques to facilitate dissemination of information. The system relies on open source software and has been designed to facilitate the integration of additional components for enhanced information processing, data evaluation and generation of higher water level, current velocity and wave for the general public. Jeddah-CIS has been operational since 2013. Extensions of the system to speed operations and improving the accuracy of the predictions to the public are currently underway.

  6. Spatial variability of some soil properties varies in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) plantations of west coastal area of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Sanjib Kumar; Suresh, Kancherla; Narsimha Rao, Bezawada; Mathur, Ravi Kumar; Shukla, Arvind Kumar; Manorama, Kamireddy; Ramachandrudu, Kummari; Harinarayana, Parasa; Prakash, Chandra

    2016-06-01

    Mapping spatial variability of soil properties is the key to efficient soil resource management for sustainable crop yield. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the spatial variability of soil properties such as acidity (pH), salinity (electrical conductivity (EC)), organic carbon, available K, available P, exchangeable Ca2+, exchangeable Mg2+, available S and hot water soluble B in surface (0-20 cm) and subsurface (20-40 cm) soil layers of oil palm plantations in south Goa district of Goa located in west coastal area of India. A total of 128 soil samples were collected from 64 oil palm plantations of Goa located at an approximate interval of 1-2 km and analyzed. Soil was acidic to neutral in reaction. Other soil properties varied widely in both the soil layers. Correlations between soil pH and exchangeable Ca2+, between soil EC and available K, between available P and available S and between exchangeable Ca2+ and exchangeable Mg2+ in both the soil layers were found to be positive and significant (P < 0.01). Geostatistical analysis revealed a varied spatial distribution pattern for the measured soil properties. Best-fit models for measured soil properties were exponential, Gaussian, stable, K-Bessel and spherical with moderate to strong spatial dependency. The results revealed that site-specific fertilizer management options needed to be adopted in the oil palm plantations of the study area owing to variability in soil properties.

  7. Exploring the potential of near-surface geophysical methods to delineate a shallow hardpan in a southeastern U.S. sandy coastal plain soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hardpan, which is a dense soil layer near the ground surface, is an undesirable feature of many soils in the Southeast U.S., especially sandy Coastal Plain soils. Shallow hardpans restrict root growth and water penetration through the soil profile, in turn reducing the effective crop root zone and...

  8. Research Status and Development Trend of Coastal Wetland Ecological Restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-lei; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, with the influenced by both man-made and natural factors. coastal wetlands sharp decline in the area, lack of resources, biological diversity declined, and the ecosystem function damaged. Through on current issues such as pollution and destruction of coastal wetlands analysis of coastal wetlands in research conducted a review and prospect of ecological restoration. So the protection and restoration of coastal wetlands should be brook no delay. The article based on the current pollution and destruction of the coastal wetlands analyses, and reviewed the current effective measures to restore coastal wetlands mainly in china and abroad.

  9. Structural quality of polyacrylamide-treated cohesive soils in the coastal tablelands of Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Vandeval Maranhão de Melo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble polymers are characterized as effective flocculating agents due to their molecular features. Their application to soils with horizons with structural problems, e.g, a cohesive character, contributes to improvements in the physical quality and thus to the agricultural suitability of such soils. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural quality of soils with cohesive horizons of coastal tablelands in the State of Pernambuco treated with polyacrylamide (PAM as chemical soil conditioner. To this end, three horizons (one cohesive and two non-cohesive of a Yellow Argisol (Ultisol were evaluated and to compare cohesive horizons, the horizon of a Yellow Latosol (Oxisol was selected. The treatments consisted of aqueous PAM solutions (12.5; 50.0; 100.0 mg kg-1 and distilled water (control. The structural aspects of the horizons were evaluated by the stability (soil mass retained in five diameter classes, aggregate distribution per size class (mean weight diameter- MWD, geometric mean diameter - GMD and the magnitude of the changes introduced by PAM by measuring the sensitivity index (Si. Aqueous PAM solutions increased aggregate stability in the largest evaluated diameter class of the cohesive and non-cohesive horizons, resulting in higher MWD and GMD, with highest efficiency of the 100 mg kg-1 solution. The cohesive horizon Bt1 in the Ultisol was most sensitive to the action of PAM, where highest Si values were found, but the structural quality of the BA horizon of the Oxisol was better in terms of stability and aggregate size distribution.

  10. Soil microorganisms in coastal foredunes control the ectoparasitic root-feeding nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis by local interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piśkiewicz, A.M.; Duyts, H.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    1. In natural grassland ecosystems, root-feeding nematodes and insects are the dominant below-ground herbivores. In coastal foredunes, the ectoparasitic nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis would be a major root herbivore if not strongly controlled by soil microorganisms. Here, we examined if the

  11. Soil microorganisms in coastal foredunes control the ectoparasitic root-feeding nematode Tylenchorchynchus ventralis by local interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskiewicz, A.M.; Duyts, H.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2009-01-01

    1. In natural grassland ecosystems, root-feeding nematodes and insects are the dominant below-ground herbivores. In coastal foredunes, the ectoparasitic nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis would be a major root herbivore if not strongly controlled by soil microorganisms. Here, we examined if the

  12. Nutrient and salt relations of Pterocarpus officinalis L. in coastal wetlands of the Caribbean: assessment through leaf and soil analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernesto Medina; Elvira Cuevas; Ariel Lugo

    2007-01-01

    Pterocarpus officinalis L. is a dominant tree of freshwater coastal wetlands in the Caribbean and the Guiana regions. It is frequently associated with mangroves in areas with high rainfall and/or surface run-off. We hypothesized that P. officinalis is a freshwater swamp species that when occurring in association with mangroves occupies low-salinity soil microsites, or...

  13. Soil microorganisms in coastal foredunes control the ectoparasitic root-feeding nematode Tylenchorchynchus ventralis by local interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piskiewicz, A.M.; Duyts, H.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2009-01-01

    1. In natural grassland ecosystems, root-feeding nematodes and insects are the dominant below-ground herbivores. In coastal foredunes, the ectoparasitic nematode Tylenchorhynchus ventralis would be a major root herbivore if not strongly controlled by soil microorganisms. Here, we examined if the sup

  14. Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-04-01

    Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and early spring in 2013, a fifth campaign conducted in November 2013 showed that they started to increase again after the occurrence of violent typhoons. We show that this increase in dose rates was mostly due to remobilization of contaminated material that was temporarily stored in river channels or, more importantly, in dam reservoirs of the region during the typhoons. In addition, supply of particles from freshly eroded soils in autumn 2013 was the most important in areas where decontamination works are under progress. Our results underline the need to monitor the impact of decontamination works and dam releases in the region, as they may provide a continuous source of radioactive contamination to the coastal plains and the Pacific Ocean during the coming years.

  15. Enhanced decomposition offsets enhanced productivity and soil carbon accumulation in coastal wetlands responding to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, M.L.; Blum, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal wetlands are responsible for about half of all carbon burial in oceans, and their persistence as a valuable ecosystem depends largely on the ability to accumulate organic material at rates equivalent to relative sea level rise. Recent work suggests that elevated CO2 and temperature warming will increase organic matter productivity and the ability of marshes to survive sea level rise. However, we find that organic decomposition rates increase by about 12% per degree of warming. Our measured temperature sensitivity is similar to studies from terrestrial systems, twice as high as the response of salt marsh productivity to temperature warming, and roughly equivalent to the productivity response associated with elevated CO2 in C3 marsh plants. Therefore, enhanced CO2 and warmer temperatures may actually make marshes less resilient to sea level rise, and tend to promote a release of soil carbon. Simple projections indicate that elevated temperatures will increase rates of sea level rise more than any acceleration in organic matter accumulation, suggesting the possibility of a positive feedback between climate, sea level rise, and carbon emissions in coastal environments.

  16. Gaseous Nitrogen Losses from Coastal Acid Sulfate Soils:A Short-Term Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. C. T. MACDONALD; O. T. DENMEAD; I.WHITE; G. BYRANT

    2011-01-01

    NOx and N2O emissions from coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS) cultivated for sugarcane production were investigated on the coastal lowlands of northern New South Wales, Australia. Two series of short-term measurements were made using chambers and micrometeorological techniques. Series 1 occurred during the wet season, the water-filled pore space (WFPS) was between 60%-80% and the site flooded during the measurements. Measurements were made directly after the harvest of soybean crop, which fixed an estimated 100 kg N ha-1, and the emission amounted to 3.2 kg NOx-N ha-1 (12 d) and 1.8 kg N2O-N ha-1 (5 d). Series 2 was made towards the end of the dry season when the WFPS was less than 60%. In Series 2, after an application of 50 kg N ha-1, emissions were markedly less, amounting to 0.9 kg N ha-1 over 10 d. During both series when the soil was moist, emissions of NOx were larger than those of N2O. The emission of NOx appeared to be haphazard, with little time dependence, but there was a clear diurnal cycle for N2O, emphasising the need for continuous measurement procedures for both gases. Theseresults suggest that agricultural production on CASS could be important sources of greenhouse gases and nitrogen practices will need to be optimised to reduce the offsite effects of atmospheric warming, acidification or nitrification. Many questions still remain unanswered such as the emissions during the soybean bean filling stage and crop residue decomposition, the longer-term losses following the fertiliser application and emissions from CASS under different land uses.

  17. Spartina alterniflora invasion alters soil microbial community composition and microbial respiration following invasion chronosequence in a coastal wetland of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; Cheng, Xiaoli; An, Shuqing

    2016-05-01

    The role of exotic plants in regulating soil microbial community structure and activity following invasion chronosequence remains unclear. We investigated soil microbial community structure and microbial respiration following Spartina alterniflora invasion in a chronosequence of 6-, 10-, 17-, and 20-year-old by comparing with bare flat in a coastal wetland of China. S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased soil moisture and salinity, the concentrations of soil water-soluble organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon (MBC), the quantities of total and various types of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs), the fungal:bacterial PLFAs ratio and cumulative microbial respiration compared with bare flat. The highest MBC, gram-negative bacterial and saturated straight-chain PLFAs were found in 10-year-old S. alterniflora soil, while the greatest total PLFAs, bacterial and gram-positive bacterial PLFAs were found in 10- and 17-year-old S. alterniflora soils. The monounsaturated:branched PLFAs ratio declined, and cumulative microbial respiration on a per-unit-PLFAs increased following S. alterniflora invasion in the chronosequence. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion significantly increased the biomass of soil various microbial groups and microbial respiration compared to bare flat soil by increasing soil available substrate, and modifying soil physiochemical properties. Soil microbial community reached the most enriched condition in the 10-year-old S. alterniflora community.

  18. Incidence and distribution of heavy metals in soils of a Mediterranean coastal wetland (L'Albufera de Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, V.; Gimeno, E.; Fernandez-Despiau, E.; Pascual, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important issues in environmental conservation nowadays is the preservation of wetlands, mainly the coastal ones. This becomes more imperative in the Mediterranean. These particular ecosystems have suffered during the last decades an increasing human pressure. This has been reflected through the intensification of agriculture and construction of infrastructures in their surroundings or even draining part of them. As a result, the density of population and its residues affect them in a first place. This work has been developed in the Natural Park of La Albufera (Valencia, Spain), which includes a coastal lagoon, marshlands, dunes and pinewoods, surrounded by rice fields in its not urbanized part. In spite of this great ecological value, it suffers impacts derived from the high human and industrial occupation, and of the hydrological contributions from the connected irrigation systems. In addition, this park is one of the most important wetland in Europe, included in the RAMSAR agreement, being a key point for migratory birds and contains in its area one of the most important zones on rice production in Europe. In the park area, 28 sampling zones were selected to determine the degree of heavy metals incidence in soils. Total concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were evaluated. Their distribution in the surficial and sub-surficial horizons was determined together with their spatial distribution, and the possible sources of contamination. Zn, Cr and Cu show the highest concentrations in all land uses and zones. Cr is the metal that present maximum concentration in the studied area (254.93 ppm), being almost the only metal studied that exceeds the limits established by the Spanish an EU legislation. Co and Ni shows a tendency to accumulate below the 30 cm depth, the other metal studied continue with the cumulative trend in surface horizons. All the studied metals, except Co have highly significant correlations with the available phosphorous

  19. Detailed soil survey of an experimental watershed representative of the Brazilian Coastal Plains and its practical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walbert Júnior Reis dos Santos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a detailed soil survey of an experimental watershed with representative pedoclimatic characteristics of the Coastal Plains in Espírito Santo State and its practical applications. For the pedological survey, 35 observation sites and three soil profiles were sampled and described, which were morphologically characterized and subjected to physical (particle size and chemical analyses (routine and sulfuric acid digestion. The soil map was made using the geographic information system ArcGIS 9.3. This GIS software was also used to generate the digital elevation model (DEM for identifying the slope classes. SAGA software was used to calculate the topographic wetness index (WI which aided in a more accurate separation of Haplic Organosol from other soils. The predominant soil class in the watershed was the dystrophic/dystrocohesive Yellow Argisol (97%, containing morphological, chemical and physical characteristics representative of the most expressive Coastal Plains soils. Geoprocessing tools and techniques aided to make the watershed soil map.

  20. Fertilization Affects Biomass Production of Suaeda salsa and Soil Organic Carbon Pool in East Coastal Region of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-feng; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; LIU Guang-ming; YU Shi-peng

    2013-01-01

    Land use practice significantly affects soil properties. Soil is a major sink for atmospheric carbon, and soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered as an essential indicator of soil quality. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of N and P applied to Suaeda salsa on biomass production, SOC concentration, labile organic carbon (LOC) concentration, SOC pool and carbon management index (CMI) as well as the effect of the land use practice on soil quality of coastal tidal lands in east coastal region of China. The study provided relevant references for coastal exploitation, tidal land management and related study in other countries and regions. The field experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design, consisting of four N-fertilization rates (0 (N0), 60 (N1), 120 (N2) and 180 kg ha-1 (N3)), three P-fertilization rates (0 (P0), 70 (P1) and 105 kg ha-1 (P2)) and bare land without vegetation. N and P applied to S. salsa on coastal tidal lands significantly affected biomass production (above-ground biomass and roots), bulk density (ρb), available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool and CMI. Using statistical analysis, significantly interactions in N and P were observed for biomass production and the dominant factor for S. salsa production was N in continuous 2-yr experiments. There were no significant interactions between N and P for SOC concentration, LOC concentration and SOC pool. However, significant interaction was obtained for CMI at the 0-20 cm depth and N played a dominant role in the variation of CMI. There were significant improvements for soil measured attributes and parameters, which suggested that increasing the rates of N and P significantly decreasedρb at the 0-20 cm depth and increased available N and P, SOC, LOC, SOC pool as well as CMI at both the 0-20 and 20-40 cm depth, respectively. By correlation analysis, there were significantly positive correlations between biomass (above-ground biomass and roots) and SOC as well as LOC in

  1. Sustainable Coastal Destination Development: Fostering Green Practices of Restaurateurs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Derriks

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal tourism destinations are reinventing themselves, concentrating on product improvement and image enhancement. Reinventing sustainably is key and restaurants are an important factor. Research upon the processes of change in the industry seems to be fragmented and undefined in its conclusions. Knowledge is lacking on what specifically drives innovation in the hospitality industry. Since restaurants seem to be focusing more than ever on implementing green strategies, incorporating sustainability into restaurant practices is not an unexplored area. However, the how and why it is incorporated or not, can be different per restaurant. The objective of this study is to identify possibilities of change in restaurateur practices, which can lead to interventions that will foster sustainable destination development in Vrouwenpolder; a coastal destination within the Netherlands. For the identification of interventions that could advance the sustainability enacted in restaurateur practices, a qualitative research was conducted. Practices of restaurateurs in Vrouwenpolder are identified and compared to perceived-to-be ideal practices. Analysis of data collection draws on practice theory, and resulted into recommendations for advancing the sustainability enacted in restaurateur practices. It seems to be that primarily the meaning within a practice is decisive in whether sustainability is integrated or not.

  2. The Effects of Farmyard Manure and Mulch on Soil Physical Properties in a Reclaimed Coastal Tidal Flat Salt-Affected Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-bing; YANG Jing-song; YAO Rong-jiang; YU Shi-peng; LI Fu-rong; HOU Xiao-jing

    2014-01-01

    Careful soil management is important for the soil quality and productivity improvement of the reclaimed coastal tidal lfat saline land in northern Jiangsu Province, China. Farmyard manure (FYM) and mulch applications, which affect soil characteristics and plant signiifcantly, are regard as an effective pattern of saline land improvement. As a conventional management in the study region, FYM and mulch are used for the amendment of the new reclaimed tidal lfat regularly, but little is known about their effects on soil physical properties functioning. A study was conducted on a typical coastal tidal lfat saline land, which was reclaimed in 2005, to evaluate the effects of FYM, polyethylene iflm mulch (PM), straw mulch (SM), FYM combined with PM (FYM+PM), FYM combined with SM (FYM+SM), on soil hydraulic properties and soil mechanical impedance. CK represented conventional cultivation in study area without FYM and mulch application and served as a control. The experiment, laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications, was studied in Huanghaiyuan Farm, which specialized in the agricultural utilization for coastal tidal lfat. Result showed that capillary water holding capacity (CHC), saturated water content (SWC), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and bulk density (BD), cone index (CI) were affected signiifcantly by the FYM and mulch application, especially in the 0-10 cm soil layer. FYM and mulch management increased CHC, SWC and Ks over all soil depth in the order of FYM+SM>FYM+PM>FYM>SM>PM>CK. With the contrary sequence, BD and CI decreased signiifcantly;however, FYM and mulch application affected BD and CI only in the upper soil layers. CHC, SWC and Ks decreased signiifcantly with the increasing of soil depth, BD and CI, and a signiifcant liner equation was found between CHC, SWC, Ks and BD, CI. With the highest CHC (38.15%), SWC (39.55%), Ks (6.00 mm h-1) and the lowest BD (1.26 g cm-3) and CI (2.71 MPa), the combined management of FYM

  3. The socio-economic significance of the Turkish coastal environment for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleli, Tuncay

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution from the coastal resources in the coastal region to the national economy for sustainable development. There was no separate data base for the coastal zone so that the contribution from the coastal resources in the coastal region to the national economy was not evaluated. In estimating the significance of Turkish coastal cities, indirect methods and the geographical information system were used. In conclusion, it was found that 61.09% of the total national gross domestic product and 50.75% of the national agricultural, 90.98% of the national fisheries, 68.19% of the national tourism and 71.82% of the national industrial gross domestic product came from the coastal zone. It was determined that while coastal cities of Turkey had 28.23% of the national surface area, the coastal district had 12.96%; in other words, 21.5 million (28.04%) of the national population lived in 101.5 thousand km(2) (12.96%) of the national surface area. Approximately 44% of the national gross domestic product comes from the top ten coastal cities. According to the contribution ratio to the national economy of each coastal city, these low-lying coastal cities have about $16 billion risk value. An analysis showed that the coastal zone is very important for the national economy of Turkey and also the pressure on the coastal zone is very high. At a time of increasing pressures on coastal resources of Turkey, the decision-makers need the most up-to-date information on the full range of values these resources provide in order to make decisions that best reflect the public interest.

  4. Sr isotope characterization of atmospheric inputs to soils along a climate gradient of the Chilean Coastal Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeser, Ralf; Schuessler, Jan A.; Floor, Geerke H.; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2017-04-01

    The rate and degree of rock weathering controls the release, distribution, and cycling of mineral nutrients at the Earth's surface, being essential for developing and sustaining of ecosystems. Climate plays an important role as water flow and temperature determine both the biological community and activity, and also set the speed of weathering. Because of this double control by climate, the impact of biological activity on rock weathering and the feedbacks between the geosphere and the biosphere under different climatic conditions are not well understood. We explore the impact of biota on rock weathering in the four EarthShape primary study areas which are situated along the Chilean Coastal Range, featuring an outstanding vegetation gradient controlled by climate, ranging over 2000 km from hyper-arid, to temperate, to humid conditions. The study sites are within 80 km of the Pacific coast and are located in granitic lithology. Moreover, the sites were unglaciated during the last glacial maximum. However, as substrates get depleted in mineral nutrients, ecosystems are increasingly nourished by atmospheric inputs, sources, such as solutes contained in rain, dust, and volcanic ash. We aim to quantify the primary nutrient inputs to the ecosystem from these different potential sources. Radiogenic strontium (Sr) isotope ratios are a powerful tool to trace chemical weathering, soil formation, as well as cation provenance and mobility [1]. We determined 87Sr/86Sr ratios on bulk bedrock, saprolite, and soil and performed sequential extractions of the the easily bioavailable soil phases up to 2 m depth on two soil depth profiles in each of the four study sites. Our first results from the La Campana study site indicate that the radiogenic Sr isotope ratios of saprolite samples decrease from 0.70571 (n = 4) at the base of the profile to lower values of 0.70520 (n = 4) at the top of the immobile saprolite, indicating increasing biotite weathering. 87Sr/86Sr increases in the

  5. Spatial distribution and development of soils in tropical karst areas from the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Francisco; Palacio-Aponte, Gerardo; Quintana, Patricia; Zinck, Joseph Alfred

    2011-12-01

    Better understanding of soil formation requires knowing the spatial distribution of the soils that allows constructing models of soil sequences in multiple directions along various types of gradients. This approach was applied to comprehend the soil formation from the soil distribution in the tropical karst areas of the Peninsula of Yucatan, Mexico. For soil mapping, a two-step methodology was followed. First, a geomorphic analysis was performed; subsequently, 382 soil profiles were reclassified and integrated into a geopedologic map. Additional soil survey was carried out in areas where soil information was lacking (123 soil profiles). Satellite images were used to identify flooded areas. After conducting numerous field verifications and analyses, landforms and soils were combined to make a soilscape map. Based on field observations and the soilscape map, soil development was analyzed on soil sequences. Four geomorphic environments were identified, karstic plains and hills with Leptosols, Cambisols, Luvisols, and Vertisols; coastal plains with Arenosols, Regosols, Solonchacks, and Histosols; fluvio-paludal plains with Gleysols, Histosols, Leptosols and Solonchacks; and tectono-karstic plains and hills with Leptosols, Cambisols, Luvisols, and Vertisols. Relevant soil forming factors in the Peninsula of Yucatan include time of emersion of the limestone platforms, climate, rock type, and macro- and micro-relief. Other factors such as groundwater level, fractures, also have an influence on soil formation. Karst development can be considered as a complex soil and relief forming factor. Terra Rossa soils as Leptosols, Cambisols, Luvisols, Nitisols and Vertisols in the Peninsula of Yucatan may be polygenic. In some cases, the theory of residual origin fits better the data than the theory of allochthonous origin; in other cases, it is the other way around.

  6. Jerusalem artichoke decreased salt content and increased diversity of bacterial communities in the rhizosphere soil in the coastal saline zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Tianyun; Li, Niu; Cheng, Yongwen; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Zed, Rengel

    2017-04-01

    Soil salinity is one of the main environmental constraints that restrict plant growth and agricultural productivity; however, utilization of salt-affected land can bring substantial benefits. This study used an in-situ remediation method by planting Jerusalem artichoke in naturally occurring saline alkali soils with different salinity (high salinity (H, >4.0 g•salt kg-1 soil), moderate salinity (M, 2.0-4.0 g•salt kg-1 soil) and low salinity (L, 1.0-2.0 g•salt kg-1 soil) in the coastal saline zone in southeast China in comparison with the respective controls without Jerusalem artichoke planting (undisturbed soil). Soil pH and salinity increased sequentially from the rhizosphere to the bulk soil and the unplanted controls. The activity of neutral phosphatase and invertase decreased in the order L > M > H, whereas that of catalase was reverse. The minimum content of calcite, muscovite and quartz, and maximum content of chlorite and albite, were found in the control soils. Planting of Jerusalem artichoke enhanced bacterial microflora in saline alkali soil. Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla in all samples, accounting for more than 80% of the reads. The number of Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) in the rhizosphere soil was, respectively, 1.27, 1.02 and 1.25 times higher compared with the bulk soil, suggesting that Jerusalem artichoke played a significant role in increasing abundance and diversity of soil microbial populations. The study showed that Jerusalem artichoke could be used to improve saline alkali soil by enriching bacterial communities, enhancing the activity of phosphatase and invertase, and decreasing soil salinity.

  7. Impact of Addition of FGDB as a Soil Amendment on Physical and Chemical Properties of an Alkali Soil and Crop Yield of Maize in Northern China Coastal Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-L. Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of Flue gas desulfurization byproduct( FGDB as a soil amendment on growth and yield of maize (Zea mays and to determine the impact of FGDB additions on soil fertility characteristics in alkaline clayey soils, a 2-year field experiment was conducted in Huanghua, in Northern China Coastal Plain. The experiment included five treatments in which the soil was amended with FGDB at 15 cm depth at the rates of 0 t·hm−2, 4.50 t·hm−2, 9.00 t·hm−2, 13.5 t·hm−2, and 18.00 t·hm−2, respectively, before maize was planted. The values of soil pH, exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP, and bulk density (BD of the soil decreased; however, values of electrical conductivity (EC, water holding capacity (WHC, and plant nutrients increased with FGDB application in the soil. Crop plants grow more readily in FGDB amended soils because of improved soil properties. The best ameliorative effect was obtained at the rate of 13.5 t·hm−2. The germination percentage, plant height, and crop yield successively increased in both years. The results indicated FGDB was an effective soil amendment for improving the physicochemical properties and nutrient balance, and enhancing crop germination, growth, and yield, particularly when applied at a suitable application rate.

  8. Groundwater or floodwater? Assessing the pathways of metal exports from a coastal acid sulfate soil catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Isaac R; de Weys, Jason; Eyre, Bradley D

    2011-11-15

    Daily observations of dissolved aluminum, iron, and manganese in an estuary downstream of a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS) catchment provided insights into how floods and submarine groundwater discharge drive wetland metal exports. Extremely high Al, Fe, and Mn concentrations (up to 40, 374, and 8 mg L(-1), respectively) were found in shallow acidic groundwaters from the Tuckean Swamp, Australia. Significant correlations between radon (a natural groundwater tracer) and metals in surface waters revealed that metal loads were driven primarily by groundwater discharge. Dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al loads during a 16-day flood triggered by a 213 mm rain event were respectively 80, 35, and 14% of the total surface water exports during the four months of observations. Counter clockwise hysteresis was observed for Fe and Mn in surface waters during the flood due to delayed groundwater inputs. Groundwater-derived Fe fluxes into artificial drains were 1 order of magnitude higher than total surface water exports, which is consistent with the known accumulation of monosulfidic black ooze within the wetland drains. Upscaling the Tuckean catchment export estimates yielded dissolved Fe fluxes from global acid sulfate soil catchments on the same order of magnitude of global river inputs into estuaries.

  9. Adsorption behavior of Sudan I-IV on a coastal soil and their forecasted biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yong; Zhou, Qixing

    2017-04-01

    Sudan I-IV as synthetic azo dyes have been concerned worldwide and ever caused a panic on food safety because of illegal addition into foodstuffs. In the past decades, various methods are being developed to identify and determine Sudan dyes in foodstuffs. However, relevant studies about their biogeochemical behaviors and potential environmental effects are rarely reported, although it is of great importance and necessity accounting for their potential environmental contamination from various sources. In this work, the experimental studies on adsorption behavior of Sudan I-IV acting on soil (10, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mg/L) were carried out, and their transport in soil compartments and between soil-water, and air-soil interfaces were discussed. Results showed that the amount of Sudan I-IV adsorbed on soil increased accordingly with the increasing concentration of Sudan dyes in aqueous solution, and Sudan II and IV were more likely adsorbed on the tested soils than Sudan I and III based on their maximum adsorption amount. However, for Sudan I, III, and IV, in some high concentrations (under the treatment of 75 mg/L for Sudan III, 100 mg/L for Sudan I and IV), the adsorption was significantly increased, and then came back to the "normal" level (under the treatment of 100 mg/L for Sudan III). It is expected that relevant researches on their biogeochemical behaviors in soil compartments, and between soil-water and air-soil interfaces would be concerned and addressed.

  10. The Coastal Regions of Europe: Economic Development at the Turn of the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makhnovsky D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the current condition and spatial dynamics of the key socioeconomic processes in the coastal zone of the European subcontinent at the turn of the 20th century. Europe is a region where the “coastal component” of socioeconomic development plays a major role and is therefore one of the most interesting objects for research in this field. Russian geographical proximity to the European countries, a significant number of shared problems, and a considerable potential for cooperation in solving them and developing the world ocean’s resources create grounds for an integrated study of European coastal regions. The author analyses Russian findings in the field of the socioeconomic development of coastal regions. The differences in the natural and socioeconomic conditions and resources along a significant portion of the European coastline necessitate the zoning of subcontinent’s coastal territories and contiguous water areas. The findings of EU maritime research constitute the economic and statisti cal basis of the study, whose author, relying on necessary calculations, proposes a new concept of coastal regions.The study identifies significant differences in the nature and trends in the development of European coastal regions in the first decade of the 21st century. Thus, Russian coastal regions show the most dynamic development rate. In general, coastal regions are not superior to inland European regions in terms of major development rates.

  11. Scour around coastal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Whiteouse, J. S.; Tørum, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the European Union Marine Science and Technology (EU MAST) III project "Scour Around Coastal Structures" (SCARCOST). The summary is presented under three headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Flow and scour processes with the subheadings: flow and scour processes...... pressures and effective stresses around a bottom seated cylinder; non-linear soil modelling with respect to wave-induced pore pressures and gradients; wave-induced pressures on the bottom for non-linear coastal waves, including also wave kinematics; development of a numerical model (linear soil modelling...

  12. On the relative roles of hydrology, salinity, temperature, and root productivity in controlling soil respiration from coastal swamps (freshwater)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Ken W.; Whitbeck, Julie L.; Howard, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Soil CO2 emissions can dominate gaseous carbon losses from forested wetlands (swamps), especially those positioned in coastal environments. Understanding the varied roles of hydroperiod, salinity, temperature, and root productivity on soil respiration is important in discerning how carbon balances may shift as freshwater swamps retreat inland with sea-level rise and salinity incursion, and convert to mixed communities with marsh plants. Methods We exposed soil mesocosms to combinations of permanent flooding, tide, and salinity, and tracked soil respiration over 2 1/2 growing seasons. We also related these measurements to rates from field sites along the lower Savannah River, Georgia, USA. Soil temperature and root productivity were assessed simultaneously for both experiments. Results Soil respiration from mesocosms (22.7-1678.2 mg CO2 m-2 h-1) differed significantly among treatments during four of the seven sampling intervals, where permanently flooded treatments contributed to low rates of soil respiration and tidally flooded treatments sometimes contributed to higher rates. Permanent flooding reduced the overall capacity for soil respiration as soils warmed. Salinity did reduce soil respiration at times in tidal treatments, indicating that salinity may affect the amount of CO2 respired with tide more strongly than under permanent flooding. However, soil respiration related greatest to root biomass (mesocosm) and standing root length (field); any stress reducing root productivity (incl. salinity and permanent flooding) therefore reduces soil respiration. Conclusions Overall, we hypothesized a stronger, direct role for salinity on soil respiration, and found that salinity effects were being masked by varied capacities for increases in respiration with soil warming as dictated by hydrology, and the indirect influence that salinity can have on plant productivity.

  13. Streptomyces development in colonies and soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manteca, Angel; Sanchez, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Streptomyces development was analyzed under conditions resembling those in soil. The mycelial growth rate was much lower than that in standard laboratory cultures, and the life span of the previously named first compartmentalized mycelium was remarkably increased.......Streptomyces development was analyzed under conditions resembling those in soil. The mycelial growth rate was much lower than that in standard laboratory cultures, and the life span of the previously named first compartmentalized mycelium was remarkably increased....

  14. Areas of research and manpower development for coastal zone management

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan

    stream_size 6 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Trg_Course_Coastal_Zone_Mgmt_1993_74.pdf.txt stream_source_info Trg_Course_Coastal_Zone_Mgmt_1993_74.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  15. Process-based modeling of coastal dune development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.C.; Roelvink, D.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Vries, S.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the aeolian transport model DUNE (Sauermann et al., 2001, Kroy et al., 2002) that describes important features and dynamics of typical desert dunes, is extended such that it can be applied in sandy coastal areas. Initial tests explore the limitations of the model in coastal areas afte

  16. Study on Cultural Technologies and Salt-resistance of Nitraria sibirica in Coastal Areas with Serious Salt-affected Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJianfeng; XINGShangjun; SUNQixiang; XIJinbiao; SONGYumin

    2004-01-01

    In this research, five Nitraria sibirica provenances such as Dayilu were selected to do experiment of salt-resistance, combining fixed plots test with typical plot investigation, measuring survival rate and growth as main indicators. The experiments of main cultural technology were done on Nitraria sibirica in 4 types of site preparation, 3 types of planting, 3 designs for planting density. The Nitraria sibirica experiments for the effects of curbing salt and improving soil were done by testing soil nutrients, salt content, soil physical properties as focal points in typical site of 3-4 years woods. The experiment results showed that the Nitraria sibirica could survive well with soil salt content of 0.6%, and that survival rate declined distinctively as soil salt content exceeded 0.8%. However, high soil salt content did not influence growth in the year of planting. There were obvious differences in salt-tolerance among Nitraria sibirica provenances; Dayilu was the best on salt-tolerance, the other 4 provenances had no differences, and obviously inferior to Dayilu. The different types of site preparation clearly influenced planting survival rate, conserving rate and growth. The method of two-ploughing-two-harrowing was the best among all 4 types of site preparation. Seed forestation was largely limited, bared-rooted seedling forestation may be popularised when soil salt content was less than 1% and soil moisture content was better in spring. Forestation with container seedling was suited to coastal saline soil in rainy season. The optimum planting density of Nitraria sibirica was 2 505/ha in the Yellow River Delta area in view of coverage rate, yield of fruits and cost of planting. Generally speaking,Nitraria sibirica could effectively refrain soil from accumulation of salt in the surface soil, decrease salt content and increase soil nutrient, and heighten soil capillary pore rate.

  17. Modeling Storm Water Runoff and Soil Interflow in a Managed Forest, Upper Coastal Plain of the Southeast US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.J. Callahan; J.D. Cook; Mark D. Coleman; Devendra M. Amatya; Carl C. Trettin

    2004-01-01

    The Forest Service-Savannah River is conducting a hectare-scale monitoring and modeling study on forest productivity in a Short Rotation Woody Crop plantation at the Savannah River Site, which is on Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Detailed surveys, i.e., topography, soils, vegetation, and dainage network, of small (2-5 ha) plots have been completed in a 2 square...

  18. Development of an inverse method for coastal risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Idier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent flooding events, like Katrina (USA, 2005 or Xynthia (France, 2010, illustrate the complexity of coastal systems and the limits of traditional flood risk analysis. Among other questions, these events raised issues such as: "how to choose flooding scenarios for risk management purposes?", "how to make a society more aware and prepared for such events?" and "which level of risk is acceptable to a population?". The present paper aims at developing an inverse approach that could seek to address these three issues. The main idea of the proposed method is the inversion of the usual risk assessment steps: starting from the maximum acceptable hazard level (defined by stakeholders as the one leading to the maximum tolerable consequences to finally obtain the return period of this threshold. Such an "inverse" approach would allow for the identification of all the offshore forcing conditions (and their occurrence probability inducing a threat for critical assets of the territory, such information being of great importance for coastal risk management. This paper presents the first stage in developing such a procedure. It focuses on estimation (through inversion of the flooding model of the offshore conditions leading to the acceptable hazard level, estimation of the return period of the associated combinations, and thus of the maximum acceptable hazard level. A first application for a simplified case study (based on real data, located on the French Mediterranean coast, is presented, assuming a maximum acceptable hazard level. Even if only one part of the full inverse method has been developed, we demonstrate how the inverse method can be useful in (1 estimating the probability of exceeding the maximum inundation height for identified critical assets, (2 providing critical offshore conditions for flooding in early warning systems, and (3 raising awareness of stakeholders and eventually enhance preparedness for future flooding events by allowing them to

  19. Donnan membrane speciation of Al, Fe, trace metals and REEs in coastal lowland acid sulfate soil-impacted drainage waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adele M; Xue, Youjia; Kinsela, Andrew S; Wilcken, Klaus M; Collins, Richard N

    2016-03-15

    Donnan dialysis has been applied to forty filtered drainage waters collected from five coastal lowland acid sulfate soil (CLASS) catchments across north-eastern NSW, Australia. Despite having average pH values70%) as negatively-charged complexes. In contrast, the speciation of the divalent trace metals Co, Mn, Ni and Zn was dominated by positively-charged complexes and was strongly correlated with the alkaline earth metals Ca and Mg. Thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dominated Fe(III) speciation in agreement with that obtained by Donnan dialysis. In the case of Fe(II), however, the free cation was predicted to dominate under thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst our results indicated that Fe(II) was mainly present as neutral or negatively-charged complexes (most likely with sulfate). For all other divalent metals thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations agreed well with the Donnan dialysis results. The proportion of Al and REEs predicted to be negatively-charged was also grossly underestimated, relative to the experimental results, highlighting possible inaccuracies in the stability constants developed for these trivalent Me(SO4)2(-) and/or Me-NOM complexes and difficulties in modeling complex environmental samples. These results will help improve metal mobility and toxicity models developed for CLASS-affected environments, and also demonstrate that Australian CLASS environments can discharge REEs at concentrations an order of magnitude greater than previously reported.

  20. Mid term monitoring of heavy metals content in soils of Mediterranean coastal wetlands. La Albufera de Valencia Natural Park, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Andreu, Vicente; Gimeno-García, Eugenia

    2014-05-01

    Coastal wetlands, in general, and Mediterranean ones, in particular, suffer from differente anthropogenic pressures that may affect their intrinsic environmental and ecological functions. Most, if not all, Mediterranean wetlands are not natural spaces were preservation of habitat and wildlife is the only management policy achieved, bur rather their terriroty is a combination of land units with different activities and influences, such as farming, environmental protection and connectivities with urban and industrial areas. Therefore, the need of periodical monitoring is required whenever pressures and environmental health of wetlands is assessed, particularly of those processes that affect the interconnection of environmental compartiments involving water, soils and biota. In agro-ecological protected wetlands soils play and important role because they are potential sources of pollutants due to farming practices. In this case, presence of heavy metals in soils is and indicator of both environmental health and anthtopogenic direct (farming activities) and indirect (neighbour urban areas) pressures. In this work a mid term (17 year) monitoring of seven heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) in soils of coastal Mediterranean wetlands (La Albufera Natural Park, Spain) are analyzed. Two monitoring campaings were achieved in 1991 and 2008. In both cases the same 20 points were visited which were distributed in the natural park according two four different sectors of potential anthropogenic pressure and land use. At each point two soil samples were collected at differente depths (0 to 20 cm and 20 to 40 cm). The selected metals were analyzed to determine its total and extractable fractions by treatment with EDTA. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, using graphite furnace when necessary, was used for the determination of metals. In general, there is a reduction of metal contents in the study area in both dates. The trend of metals according to average concentration (mg

  1. Agronomic performance of green cane fertilized with ammonium sulfate in a coastal tableland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Pessim Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The recent approach of eliminating the usage of fire for sugarcane harvesting resulted in managing the crop on a trashblanketed soil, to which a proper recommendation of N fertilization is lacking, a problem that remains in the coastal tablelands of the Espírito Santo State, Brazil. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of increasing N rates on stalk and sugar yields and the N use efficiency by the crop. The experimental area planted with sugarcane, at the first ratoon, is located in Linhares, Espírito Santo State. The treatments consisted of N rates varying from 80 to 160 kg N∙ha−1 as ammonium sulphate, and a control without N, in a completely randomized blocks experimental design. Stalk yield increased with the N rate, and fitting the results to a quadratic function suggests no response to fertilizer rates above 130 kg N∙ha−1. The highest margin of agricultural contribution was obtained at the rate of 100 kg N∙ha−1. The N use efficiency decreased from almost 49 to 38%, when the N rate increased from 100 to 160 kg N∙ha−1. There was no effect of increasing N rates on the sugar concentration, although the sugar yield response was positive and strongly influenced by the stalk production. Results showed the importance of reassessing the adequate N rate for maximizing yield in green cane production systems.

  2. Bioperspective of actinomycetes isolates from coastal soils: A new source of antimicrobial producers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattanaporn Srivibool

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Forty five soil samples were collected from four coastal islands on the east coast of Thailand: Chang, Hwai, Lao-yanai in Trat Province and Pai Islands in Chonburi Province. On 3 isolating media, Actinomycetes Isolation Agar, Starch Casein Agar and Glucose Asparagine Agar, 495 isolates of actinomycetes were found. Preliminary test to search for antimicrobial activity was done with Bacillus subtilis TISTR 008, Staphylococcus aureus TISTR 885, Staphylococus aureus TISTR 517 (ATCC 25923, Micrococcus luteus TISTR 884 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa TISTR 781 and Escherichia coli TISTR 887 (ATCC 25922. Fifty-eight actinomycetes were found to be antimicrobial-producing strains. From the morphological determination, cell wall diaminopimelic acid and sugars in whole-cell hydrolysate studies, among the 58 strains, Streptomyces sp. and Actinomadura sp. were the predominant genera. The other antibiotic active strains were Micromonospora sp., Microbispora sp., Nocardia sp., Pseudonocardia sp., Saccharomonospora sp., Streptoalloteichus sp. and Streptoverticillium sp. Most of them could inhibit gram-positive bacteria, especially M. luteus TISTR 884, and 8 strains (4 strains of Actinomadura, 2 strains of Micromonospora, 1 strain of Microbispora, and 1 strain of Streptomyces could inhibit both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Bioremediation of soils contaminated by hydrocarbons at the coastal zone of “Punta Majagua”.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelvys Bermúdez Acosta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to describe and assess the main results in the process of bioremediation of 479 m3 of petroleum residuals spilled on the soil and restrained into four deposits of fuel on the coastal zone of “Punta Majagua”, Cienfuegos. The volume of hydrocarbons spilled and contained into the tanks was determined by means of their previous mixture with fertile ground in a ratio of 3/1. The hydrocarbons were disposed in a bioremediation area of 115 m X 75m built in situ. In turn 54, 5 m3 of BIOIL - FC were applied, which were fermented in an industrial bioreactor of 12000 L. An initial sampling was carried out registering values of total hydrocarbons (HTP higher than 41880 mg/kg, with high concentrations of Saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, resins, asphaltens (SARA. Three subsequent samples were taken with a sampling interval of 0, 45, 90 and 120 days of the application. An average concentration of 1884.57 mg/kg of total hydrocarbons was obtained at 120 days with an average removal rate of 94.8%, moreover values of 94.6%, 90.78%, 86.99% y 79.9% of SARA were respectively reported.

  4. Effects of biochar blends on microbial community composition in two coastal plain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The amendment of soil with biochar has been demonstrated to have an effect not only on the soil physicochemical properties, but also on soil microbial community composition and activity. Previous reports have demonstrated significant impacts on soil microbial community structure....

  5. Reflections on transdisciplinarity, integrated coastal development, and governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the conceptual and methodological challenges that are increasingly apparent with regard to the dominant strategy that responds to degradation of the world's coasts: integrated coastal zone management (ICZM)

  6. Reflections on transdisciplinarity, integrated coastal development, and governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the conceptual and methodological challenges that are increasingly apparent with regard to the dominant strategy that responds to degradation of the world's coasts: integrated coastal zone management (ICZM)

  7. Temporal development of coastal ecosystems in the Baltic Sea over the past two decades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Jens; Tomczak, Maciej; Ojaveer, Henn;

    2015-01-01

    Coastal areas are among the most biologically productive aquatic systems worldwide, but face strong and variable anthropogenic pressures. Few studies have, however, addressed the temporal development of coastal ecosystems in an integrated context. This study represents an assessment of the develo...

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from penguin guanos and ornithogenic soils in coastal Antarctica: Effects of freezing-thawing cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renbin; Liu, Yashu; Ma, Erdeng; Sun, Jianjun; Xu, Hua; Sun, Liguang

    In coastal Antarctica, freezing and thawing influence many physical, chemical and biological processes for ice-free tundra ecosystems, including the production of greenhouse gases (GHGs). In this study, penguin guanos and ornithogenic soil cores were collected from four penguin colonies and one seal colony in coastal Antarctica, and experimentally subjected to three freezing-thawing cycles (FTCs) under ambient air and under N 2. We investigated the effects of FTCs on the emissions of three GHGs including nitrous oxide (N 2O), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4). The GHG emission rates were extremely low in frozen penguin guanos or ornithogenic soils. However, there was a fast increase in the emission rates of three GHGs following thawing. During FTCs, cumulative N 2O emissions from ornithogenic soils were greatly higher than those from penguin guanos under ambient air or under N 2. The highest N 2O cumulative emission of 138.24 μg N 2O-N kg -1 was observed from seal colony soils. Cumulative CO 2 and CH 4 emissions from penguin guanos were one to three orders of magnitude higher than those from ornithogenic soils. The highest cumulative CO 2 (433.0 mgCO 2-C kg -1) and CH 4 (2.9 mgCH 4-C kg -1) emissions occurred in emperor penguin guanos. Penguin guano was a stronger emitter for CH 4 and CO 2 while ornithogenic soil was a stronger emitter for N 2O during FTCs. CO 2 and CH 4 fluxes had a correlation with total organic carbon (TOC) and soil/guano moisture (M c) in penguin guanos and ornithogenic soils. The specific CO 2-C production rate (CO 2-C/TOC) indicated that the bioavailability of TOC was markedly larger in penguin guanos than in ornithogenic soils during FTCs. This study showed that FTC-released organic C and N from sea animal excreta may play a significant role in FTC-related GHG emissions, which may account for a large proportion of annual fluxes from tundra ecosystems in coastal Antarctica.

  9. Coastal Aquaculture Development in Bangladesh: Unsustainable and Sustainable Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, A. Kalam; Jensen, Kathe R.; Lin, C. Kwei

    2009-10-01

    Coastal aquaculture in Bangladesh consists mainly of two shrimp species ( Penaeus monodon and Macrobrachium rosenbergii). Currently, there are about 16,237 marine shrimp ( P. monodon) farms covering 148,093 ha and 36,109 fresh water shrimp ( M. rosenbergii) farms covering 17,638 ha coastal area. More than 0.7 million people are employed in the farmed shrimp sector and in 2005-2006 the export value of shrimp was 403.5 million USD. Thus, coastal aquaculture contributes significantly to rural employment and economy but this is overshadowed by negative social and ecological impacts. This article reviews the key issues, constraints and opportunities of sustainable shrimp farming. In addition we present the results of two case studies from southwestern coastal areas where shrimp farming originated and central coastal areas where shrimp farming, especially M. rosenbergii, began in recent years. Lessons learned from the review and case studies are considered in the context of recommendations to encompass a socially equitable and ecologically sound coastal aquaculture.

  10. Physico-Chemical Properties and Laboratory Hyperspectral Reflectance of Coastal Saline Soil in Shangyu City of Zhejiang Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI ZHOU; HUANG MINGXIANG; LI YAN

    2003-01-01

    45 and 50 composite soil samples were collected, respectively, from two agricultural fields, that wereenclosed and reclaimed fron coastal tidal-flat areas in 1996 and 1984 respectively, in Shangyu of ZhejiangProvince, China, to investigate the physico-chemical properties and the hyperspectral characteristics of thesaline soils and to make an assessment on their relationships. The reflectance spectra of saline soils weremeasured using a spectroradiometer in laboratory. The mean spectral curves of the saline soils from thetwo sites different in reclamation year showed that the saline soil taken from the recently reclaimed landwith higher salinity demonstrated a lower reflectance intensity in the spectral region from about 550 nm to2300 nm. In addition, nine absorption bands, i.e., 488 nm, 530 nm, 670 nm, 880 nm, 940 nm, 1400 nm,1 900 nm, 2 200 nm and 2 300 nm, were chosen as the spectral bands to investigate the relationships betweensoil physico-chemical properties by means of Pearson correlation analysis. Finally, the first two principalcomponents were calculated from nine absorption bands and used to discriminate the saline soil samplestaken from two sampled fields. The results indicate that it is feasible to detect physico-chemical propertiesof saline soils from fields reclaimed for varying time periods on the basis of the hyperspectral data.

  11. Characterization of labile organic carbon in coastal wetland soils of the Mississippi River deltaic plain: relationships to carbon functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodla, Syam K; Wang, Jim J; Delaune, Ronald D

    2012-10-01

    Adequate characterization of labile organic carbon (LOC) is essential to the understanding of C cycling in soil. There has been very little evaluation about the nature of LOC characterizations in coastal wetlands, where soils are constantly influenced by different redox fluctuations and salt water intrusions. In this study, we characterized and compared LOC fractions in coastal wetland soils of the Mississippi River deltaic plain using four different methods including 1) aerobically mineralizable C (AMC), 2) cold water extractable C (CWEC), 3) hot water extractable C (HWEC), and 4) salt extractable C (SEC), as well as acid hydrolysable C (AHC) which includes both labile and slowly degradable organic C. Molecular organic C functional groups of these wetland soils were characterized by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The LOC and AHC increased with soil organic C (SOC) regardless of wetland soil type. The LOC estimates by four different methods were positively and significantly linearly related to each other (R(2)=0.62-0.84) and with AHC (R(2)=0.47-0.71). The various LOC fractions accounted for ≤4.3% of SOC whereas AHC fraction represented 16-49% of SOC. AMC was influenced positively by O/N-alkyl and carboxyl C but negatively by alkyl C, whereas CWEC and SEC fractions were influenced only positively by carboxyl C but negatively by alkyl C in SOC. On the other hand, HWEC fraction was found to be only influenced positively by carbonyl C, and AHC positively by O/N-alkyl and alkyl C but negatively by aromatic C groups in SOC. Overall these relations suggested different contributions of various molecular organic C moieties to LOC in these wetlands from those often found for upland soils. The presence of more than 50% non-acid hydrolysable C suggested the dominance of relatively stable SOC pool that would be sequestered in these Mississippi River deltaic plain coastal wetland soils. The results have important implications to the understanding of the

  12. Soil change and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) seedling growth following site preparation tillage in the Upper Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad M. Lincoln; Rodney E. Will; Lawrence A. Morris; Emily A. Carter; Daniel Markewtiz; John R. Britt; Ben Cazell; Vic Ford

    2007-01-01

    To determine the relationship between changes in soil physical properties due to tillage and growth of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings, we measured soil moisture and penetration resistance for a range of tillage treatments on two Upper Coastal Plain sites in Georgia and correlated these measurements to the growth of individual seedlings. The...

  13. Factors and Processes of Coastal Zone Development in Nigeria: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Mmom

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the years the issue of coastal zone development has been of great concern especially in the face of global climate change. This has been motivated by the polluted state of the coastal zones which have given rise to high mortality of aquatic animals, Contaminations of human lathered, impairment of human health, Loss of biodiversity in breeding grounds, Vegetation destruction and other ecological hazards, Loss of portable and industrial water resources, Reduction in fishing activities, Poverty, rural underdevelopment and bitterness within the coastal communities. The coastal zone, which is land-sea interface is one of the most complex areas of management being the home to an increasing number of activities, rights and interests, its unplanned and uncontrolled development has the real potential to damage the social, economic and environmental interests of the residents within this area, each state and territory and each region or unit of local government. The paper identified three factors and processes that needs to be considered in the development of coastal zones. The findings of this review explains that in Nigeria, no policy is in place with relation to coastal zone development and management as a sector rather coastal zone issues are imbedded in the national policy on environment arising from this, there are no specific outline on the development of the coastal zone, the policy does not specify issues and concepts that houses the coastal zone, it does not capture the need for protecting the lives of the inhabitants of the coastal communities noting the nature of the terrain, it also does not take into cognizance the problems associated with the area and it is wide open without any particular organization saddled with the responsibility of coastal zone development. It also identified that due to the limitations in the policy of Nigeria on environment which did not capture specific items that relates to coastal zone development as well as

  14. Application of organic amendments to a coastal saline soil in north China: effects on soil physical and chemical properties and tree growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Wang

    Full Text Available The ability of the following four organic amendments to ameliorate saline soil in coastal northern China was investigated from April 2010 to October 2012 in a field experiment: green waste compost (GWC, sedge peat (SP, furfural residue (FR, and a mixture of GWC, SP and FR (1∶1∶1 by volume (GSF. Compared to a non-amended control (CK, the amendments, which were applied at 4.5 kg organic matter m(-3, dramatically promoted plant growth; improved soil structure; increased the cation exchange capacity (CEC, organic carbon, and available nutrients; and reduced the salt content, electrical conductivity (EC, and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP. At the end of the experiment in soil amended with GSF, bulk density, EC, and ESP had decreased by 11, 87, and 71%, respectively, and total porosity and organic carbon had increased by 25 and 96% respectively, relative to the CK. The GSF treatment resulted in a significantly lower Na(++K(+ content than the other treatments. CEC and the contents of available N, P, and K were significantly higher in the GSF-treated soil than in the CK and were the highest in all treatments. The FR treatment resulted in the lowest pH value and Ca(2+ concentration, which decreased by 8% and 39%, respectively, relative to the CK. Overall, the results indicate that a combination of green waste compost, sedge peat and furfural residue (GSF treatment has substantial potential for ameliorating saline soils in the coastal areas of northern China, and it works better than each amendment alone. Utilization of GWC and FR can be an alternative organic amendment to substitute the nonrenewable SP in saline soil amelioration.

  15. Distribution of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in coastal wetland soil related land use in the Modern Yellow River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junbao; Zhan, Chao; Li, Yunzhao; Zhou, Di; Fu, Yuqin; Chu, Xiaojing; Xing, Qinghui; Han, Guangxuan; Wang, Guangmei; Guan, Bo; Wang, Qing

    2016-11-01

    The delivery and distribution of nutrients in coastal wetland ecosystems is much related to the land use. The spatial variations of TOC, TN, NH4+-N, NO3--N and TP and associated soil salinity with depth in 9 kinds land uses in coastal zone of the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD) was evaluated based on monitoring data in field from 2009 to 2015. The results showed that the average contents of soil TOC, TN, NO3--N, NH4+-N and TP were 4.21 ± 2.40 g kg-1, 375.91 ± 213.44, 5.36 ± 9.59 and 7.20 ± 5.58 and 591.27 ± 91.16 mg kg-1, respectively. The high N and C contents were found in cropland in southern part and low values in natural wetland, while TP was relatively stable both in profiles and in different land uses. The land use, land formation age and salinity were important factors influencing distributions of TOC and N. Higher contents of TOC and N were observed in older formation age lands in whole study region, while the opposite regulation were found in new-born natural wetland, indicating that the anthropogenic activities could greatly alter the original distribution regulations of nutrients in coastal natural wetlands by changing the regional land use.

  16. Sustainable Eco Coastal Development Through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanissazly, Arsi; Mursito Ardy, Yong; Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Besides technical problems the company’s operational constraints that may effect high deficiency for the company is the company - community conflicts. Company - community conflict can also arise depends on the geographic conditions and characteristics of the community itself. Some studies has show that coastal community have higher level of social risk when compared to non-coastal community. Also, the coastal community ussually only rely on what sea provides as their main livelihood. Because of the level of education still contemtible the community couldn’t optimized the potential of their own area. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) har emerged as an important approach for addressing the social and environmental impact of company activities. Through CSR program, PT Pertamina EP Asset 3 Tambun Field (PEP) try to form value integration by utilizing resources from the community and the company by making sustainable eco - coastal living in Desa Tambaksari, Karawang, one of PEP working area. Using sustainable livelihood approach begin with compiling data by doing social mapping PEP has initiate the area to becoming Fish Processing Industry Centre. By implementing PDCA in every steps of the program, PEP has multiplied some other programs such as Organic Fish Feed Processing, Seaweed Farming and Waste Bank for Green Coastal Village. These program is PEP’s effort to create a sustainability environment by enhancing the community’s potentials as well as resolving social problems around Tambaksari. The most important result besides getting our license to operate from the community, is the community itself can grow into an eco coastal sustainable system.

  17. Dynamics of bacterial populations during bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil bioaugmented with coastal microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nidaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Sorkhoh, Naser; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Radwan, Samir

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a bench-scale attempt to bioremediate Kuwaiti, oily water and soil samples through bioaugmentation with coastal microbial mats rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacterioflora. Seawater and desert soil samples were artificially polluted with 1% weathered oil, and bioaugmented with microbial mat suspensions. Oil removal and microbial community dynamics were monitored. In batch cultures, oil removal was more effective in soil than in seawater. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria associated with mat samples colonized soil more readily than seawater. The predominant oil degrading bacterium in seawater batches was the autochthonous seawater species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. The main oil degraders in the inoculated soil samples, on the other hand, were a mixture of the autochthonous mat and desert soil bacteria; Xanthobacter tagetidis, Pseudomonas geniculata, Olivibacter ginsengisoli and others. More bacterial diversity prevailed in seawater during continuous than batch bioremediation. Out of seven hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species isolated from those cultures, only one, Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum, was of mat origin. This result too confirms that most of the autochthonous mat bacteria failed to colonize seawater. Also culture-independent analysis of seawater from continuous cultures revealed high-bacterial diversity. Many of the bacteria belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and were hydrocarbonoclastic. Optimal biostimulation practices for continuous culture bioremediation of seawater via mat bioaugmentation were adding the highest possible oil concentration as one lot in the beginning of bioremediation, addition of vitamins, and slowing down the seawater flow rate.

  18. Variability of soil-water quality due to Tsunami-2004 in the coastal belt of Nagapattinam district, Tamilnadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, H; Sarangi, A; Nagarajan, M; Singh, V P; Rao, D U M; Stalin, P; Natarajan, K; Chandrasekaran, B; Anbazhagan, S

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the Tsunami-caused deterioration of soil and groundwater quality in the agricultural fields of coastal Nagapattinam district of Tamilnadu state in India is presented by analyzing their salinity and sodicity parameters. To accomplish this, three sets of soil samples up to a depth of 30 cm from the land surface were collected for the first six months of the year 2005 from 28 locations and the ground water samples were monitored from seven existing dug wells and hand pumps covering the study region at intervals of 3 months. The EC and pH values of both the soil and ground water samples were estimated and the spatial and temporal variability mappings of these parameters were performed using the geostatistical analysis module of ArcGIS((R)). It was observed that the spherical semivariogram fitted well with the data set of both EC and pH and the generated kriged maps explained the spatial and temporal variability under different ranges of EC and pH values. Further, the recorded EC and pH data of soil and ground water during pre-Tsunami periods were compared with the collected data and generated variability soil maps of EC and pH of the post-Tsunami period. It was revealed from this analysis that the soil quality six months after the Tsunami was nearing the pre-Tsunami scenario (ECcauses for such changes and the remedial measures for taking up regular agricultural practices are also discussed.

  19. Measuring and modeling coastal dune development in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    De Groot, A.V.; S de Vries; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Q. Ye; Poortinga, A.; Arens, S.M.; Bochev-Van der Burgh, L.M.; K. M. Wijnberg; Schretlen, J.L.; Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the past couple of years, new coastal-dune research has sprung up in the Netherlands. In this paper, we give an overview of ongoing projects at Wageningen UR, Deltares, TU Delft and UTwente: how these are connected and what type of questions are addressed. There is an increasing demand for the understanding and prediction of coastal dune dynamics, both on the short (year) and long (100 years) term. We approach this from a variety of angles: scientific and applied, short-term and long-term,...

  20. Modeling Storm Water Runoff and Soil Interflow in a Managed Forest, Upper Coastal Plain of the Southeast US.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, T.J.; Cook, J.D.; Coleman, Mark D.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Trettin, Carl C.

    2004-08-01

    The Forest Service-Savannah River is conducting a hectare-scale monitoring and modeling study on forest productivity in a Short Rotation Woody Crop plantation at the Savannah River Site, which is on Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Detailed surveys, i.e., topography, soils, vegetation, and dainage network, of small (2-5 ha) plots have been completed in a 2 square-km watershed draining to Fourmile Creek, a tributary of the Savannah River. We wish to experimentally determine the relative importance of interflow on water yield and water quality at this site. Interflow (shallow subsurface lateral flow) can short-circuit rainfall infiltration, preventing deep seepage and resulting in water and chemical residence times in the watershed much shorter than that if deep seepage were the sole component of infiltration. The soil series at the site (Wagram, Dothan, Fuquay, Ogeechee, and Vaucluse) each have a clay-rich B horizon of decimeter-scale thickness at depths of 1-2 m below surface. As interflow is affected by rainfall intensity and duration and soil properties such as porosity, permeability, and antecedent soil moisture, our calculations made using the Green and Ampt equation show that the intensity and duration of a storm event must be greater than about 3 cm per hour and 2 hours, respectively, in order to initiate interflow for the least permeable soils series (Vaucluse). Tabulated values of soil properties were used in these preliminary calculations. Simulations of the largest rainfall events from 1972-2002 data using the Green and Ampt equation provide an interflow: rainfall ratio of 0 for the permeable Wagram soil series (no interflow) compared to 0.46 for the less permeable Vaucluse soil series. These initial predictions will be compared to storm water hydrographs of interflow collected at the outflow point of each plot and refined using more detailed soil property measurements.

  1. Low atmospheric nitrogen loads lead to grass encroachment in coastal dunes, but only on acid soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remke, E.; Brouwer, E.; Kooijman, A.; Blindow, I.; Roelofs, J.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric N-deposition on succession from open sand to dry, lichen-rich, short grassland, and tall grass vegetation dominated by Carex arenaria was surveyed in 19 coastal dune sites along the Baltic Sea. Coastal dunes with acid or slightly calcareous sand reacted differently to atmos

  2. Carbon Sequestration in Wetland Soils of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal wetlands play an important but complex role in the global carbon cycle, contributing to the ecosystem service of greenhouse gas regulation through carbon sequestration. Although coastal wetlands occupy a small percent of the total US land area, their potential for carbon...

  3. Biomass development of soil bioengineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Emilio; von der Thannen, Magdalena; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2017-04-01

    Soil bioengineering is a traditional construction technique focusing on living plants as construction material. Therefore, the development of plants, used in soil bioengineering constructions, plays a key role in their ecological and technical performance. Diverse constructions with the purpose of river bank stabilization have been studied in order to find out the long term vegetation development and suitability. The documented and analysed biomass records collected in the field are directly connected to the different parameters and site factors such as altitude, orientation, construction type, surrounding vegetation and distance to river bank. Consequently, the influence of the different parameters on biomass development can be presented. The study addresses the biomass calculation along with the suitability understanding of the most relevant plant species integrated in soil bioengineering constructions as well as the dominating vegetation at the end of the succession. Soil bioengineering constructions are believed to be more eco-efficient than conventional constructions. Thereby, the study provides worthwhile information demonstrating the ecological viability of these measures and their positive mitigation effects on carbon neutral construction style.

  4. Recent developments in remote sensing for coastal and marine applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lück-Vogel, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available such as wind, river discharge, waves, salt spray and ocean currents. Coastal processes take place at a wide range of spatial and temporal scale. Algal blooms, harmful or not, can extend from several hundreds of metres up to several hundreds of kilometres across...

  5. Recent coastal dune development: Effects of sand nourishments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.A.J.; Heteren, S. van; Vonhgen, L.M.; Spek, A.J.F. van der; Valk, B. van der

    2012-01-01

    Much of the Dutch coast has been subject to structural erosion. From 1990 onward, sand nourishments have been used under a government policy of dynamic preservation. Annual monitoring and field inspections show that the structural erosion has decreased or even turned into coastal progradation after

  6. Measuring and modeling coastal dune development in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de A.V.; Vries, de S.; Keijsers, J.G.S.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Ye, Q.; Poortinga, A.; Arens, S.M.; Bochev-Van der Burgh, L.M; Wijnberg, K.M.; Schretlen, J.L.M.; Thiel de Vries, van J.S.M.; Kranenburg, W.M.; Horstman, E.M.; Wijnberg, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the past couple of years, new coastal-dune research has sprung up in the Netherlands. In this paper, we give an overview of ongoing projects at Wageningen UR, Deltares, TU Delft and UTwente: how these are connected and what type of questions are addressed. There is an increasing demand for the un

  7. Coastal geosystems of Azov-Black sea coast of Krasnodar region: vulnerability sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    VOLKOVA TATIANA ALEKSANDROVNA; FILOBOK ANATOLY ANATOLYEVICH; BELIKOV MIKHAIL YURYEVICH; MINENKOVA VERA VLADIMIROVNA

    2016-01-01

    Development of coastal geosystems is one of the leading and promising directions of the activity of the regional economy; hence, it is required to plan the development taking into account the existing system of population settlement, transformation of functional structure of towns and ecological safety. The increase of anthropogenic load on the ecosystems of the Black and Azov seas related to the enhancement of recreational activity in coastal districts has negative effect on the condition of...

  8. Moessbauer studies of one representative hydromorphic soil of the coastal area of the Rio de La Plata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichon, B. A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Instituto de Geomorfologia y Suelos (Argentina); Desimoni, J.; Mercader, R. C., E-mail: mercader@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Departamento de Fisica, IFLP-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas (Argentina); Imbellone, P. A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Instituto de Geomorfologia y Suelos (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    In the present work, we have applied Moessbauer spectroscopy as well as the traditional chemical analyses to assess the contents of different states of Fe in oxides and hydroxides in an Entisol soil from the Argentine coastal plain of the Rio de La Plata. Tentative assignments for the different Fe ion sites are proposed. Our findings show that the isomer shift and quadrupole splitting are sensitive to the changes detected in the Fe{sup 2+} contents of the soluble phase while others remain constant within the experimental uncertainties.

  9. Numerical Analysis of the Soil Deformation Caused by Tunneling under Vehicle Loads in the Coastal Reclamation Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoping Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of tunneling induced soil deformation is an important issue in the design of tunnels constructed in the densely populated urban areas. In this paper, commercial FEM software 3D ABAQUS is adopted to simulate the behavior of soil caused by tunneling under vehicle loads in the coastal reclamation area. A field case study was also carried out to verify the accuracy of the proposed model. A good agreement was achieved. It is also found from the studies that the areas affected by soil deformation can be classified into four zones: the key disturbed zone, the secondary disturbed zone, the general disturbed zone, and minor-disturbed zone. The maximum soil deformation occurs on side of the longitudinal medial axis of the tunnel. The shape of the settlement curve is almost the same as that of the normal distribution curve. The soil deformation in the action zone of vehicle load is greater than that of the nonaction zone of vehicle load.

  10. Donnan membrane speciation of Al, Fe, trace metals and REEs in coastal lowland acid sulfate soil-impacted drainage waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Adele M.; Xue, Youjia [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Kinsela, Andrew S. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Wilcken, Klaus M. [Institute for Environmental Research (IER), Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Collins, Richard N., E-mail: richard.collins@unsw.edu.au [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-03-15

    Donnan dialysis has been applied to forty filtered drainage waters collected from five coastal lowland acid sulfate soil (CLASS) catchments across north-eastern NSW, Australia. Despite having average pH values < 3.9, 78 and 58% of Al and total Fe, respectively, were present as neutral or negatively-charged species. Complementary isotope dilution experiments with {sup 55}Fe and {sup 26}Al demonstrated that only soluble (i.e. no colloidal) species were present. Trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) were also mainly present (> 70%) as negatively-charged complexes. In contrast, the speciation of the divalent trace metals Co, Mn, Ni and Zn was dominated by positively-charged complexes and was strongly correlated with the alkaline earth metals Ca and Mg. Thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations indicated that natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dominated Fe(III) speciation in agreement with that obtained by Donnan dialysis. In the case of Fe(II), however, the free cation was predicted to dominate under thermodynamic equilibrium, whilst our results indicated that Fe(II) was mainly present as neutral or negatively-charged complexes (most likely with sulfate). For all other divalent metals thermodynamic equilibrium speciation calculations agreed well with the Donnan dialysis results. The proportion of Al and REEs predicted to be negatively-charged was also grossly underestimated, relative to the experimental results, highlighting possible inaccuracies in the stability constants developed for these trivalent Me(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup −} and/or Me–NOM complexes and difficulties in modeling complex environmental samples. These results will help improve metal mobility and toxicity models developed for CLASS-affected environments, and also demonstrate that Australian CLASS environments can discharge REEs at concentrations an order of magnitude greater than previously reported. - Highlights: • CLASS discharge large amounts of metals and their speciation is poorly

  11. Developments in large-scale coastal flood hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vousdoukas, Michalis I.; Voukouvalas, Evangelos; Mentaschi, Lorenzo; Dottori, Francesco; Giardino, Alessio; Bouziotas, Dimitrios; Bianchi, Alessandra; Salamon, Peter; Feyen, Luc

    2016-08-01

    Coastal flooding related to marine extreme events has severe socioeconomic impacts, and even though the latter are projected to increase under the changing climate, there is a clear deficit of information and predictive capacity related to coastal flood mapping. The present contribution reports on efforts towards a new methodology for mapping coastal flood hazard at European scale, combining (i) the contribution of waves to the total water level; (ii) improved inundation modeling; and (iii) an open, physics-based framework which can be constantly upgraded, whenever new and more accurate data become available. Four inundation approaches of gradually increasing complexity and computational costs were evaluated in terms of their applicability to large-scale coastal flooding mapping: static inundation (SM); a semi-dynamic method, considering the water volume discharge over the dykes (VD); the flood intensity index approach (Iw); and the model LISFLOOD-FP (LFP). A validation test performed against observed flood extents during the Xynthia storm event showed that SM and VD can lead to an overestimation of flood extents by 232 and 209 %, while Iw and LFP showed satisfactory predictive skill. Application at pan-European scale for the present-day 100-year event confirmed that static approaches can overestimate flood extents by 56 % compared to LFP; however, Iw can deliver results of reasonable accuracy in cases when reduced computational costs are a priority. Moreover, omitting the wave contribution in the extreme total water level (TWL) can result in a ˜ 60 % underestimation of the flooded area. The present findings have implications for impact assessment studies, since combination of the estimated inundation maps with population exposure maps revealed differences in the estimated number of people affected within the 20-70 % range.

  12. Characterization of labile organic carbon in coastal wetland soils of the Mississippi River deltaic plain: Relationships to carbon functionalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodla, Syam K. [School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Sciences, Louisiana State Univ. Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Wang, Jim J., E-mail: jjwang@agcenter.lsu.edu [School of Plant, Environmental and Soil Sciences, Louisiana State Univ. Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); DeLaune, Ronald D. [Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, School of the Coast and Environment, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Adequate characterization of labile organic carbon (LOC) is essential to the understanding of C cycling in soil. There has been very little evaluation about the nature of LOC characterizations in coastal wetlands, where soils are constantly influenced by different redox fluctuations and salt water intrusions. In this study, we characterized and compared LOC fractions in coastal wetland soils of the Mississippi River deltaic plain using four different methods including 1) aerobically mineralizable C (AMC), 2) cold water extractable C (CWEC), 3) hot water extractable C (HWEC), and 4) salt extractable C (SEC), as well as acid hydrolysable C (AHC) which includes both labile and slowly degradable organic C. Molecular organic C functional groups of these wetland soils were characterized by {sup 13}C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The LOC and AHC increased with soil organic C (SOC) regardless of wetland soil type. The LOC estimates by four different methods were positively and significantly linearly related to each other (R{sup 2} = 0.62-0.84) and with AHC (R{sup 2} = 0.47-0.71). The various LOC fractions accounted for {<=} 4.3% of SOC whereas AHC fraction represented 16-49% of SOC. AMC was influenced positively by O/N-alkyl and carboxyl C but negatively by alkyl C, whereas CWEC and SEC fractions were influenced only positively by carboxyl C but negatively by alkyl C in SOC. On the other hand, HWEC fraction was found to be only influenced positively by carbonyl C, and AHC positively by O/N-alkyl and alkyl C but negatively by aromatic C groups in SOC. Overall these relations suggested different contributions of various molecular organic C moieties to LOC in these wetlands from those often found for upland soils. The presence of more than 50% non-acid hydrolysable C suggested the dominance of relatively stable SOC pool that would be sequestered in these Mississippi River deltaic plain coastal wetland soils. The results have important implications to the

  13. Variability of soil organic carbon reservation capability between coastal salt marsh and riverside freshwater wetland in Chongming Dongtan and its microbial mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hu; Yanli Li; Lei Wang; Yushu Tang; Jinhai Chen; Xiaohua Fu; Yiquan Le; Jihua Wu

    2012-01-01

    Two representative zones in Chongming Dongtan which faced the Yangtze River and East China Sea respectively were selected to study the variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) reservation capability between coastal wetland and riverside wetland in the Chongming Dongtan wetland as well as its mechanism by analyzing soil characteristics and plant biomass.The results showed the SOC content of riverside wetland was only 48.61% (P =0.000 < 0.05) that of coastal wetland.As the organic matter inputs from plant litter of the coastal wetland and riverside wetland were approximately the same,the higher soil microbial respiration (SMR) of riverside wetland led to its lower SOC reservation capability.In the riverside wetland,the high soil microbial biomass,higher proportion of β-Proteobacteria,which have strong carbon metabolism activity and the existence of some specific aerobic heterotrophic bacteria such as Bacilli and uncultured Lactococcus,were the important reasons for the higher SMR compared to the coastal wetland.There were additional differences in soil physical and chemical characteristics between the coastal wetland and riverside wetlands.Path analysis of predominant bacteria and microbial biomass showed that soil salinity influenced β-Proteobacteria and microbial biomass most negatively among these physical and chemical factors.Therefore the low salinity of the riverside area was suitable for the growth of microorganisms,especially β-Proteobacteria and some specific bacteria,which led to the high SMR and low SOC reservation capability when compared to the coastal area.

  14. Monitoring The Land Accretion Development at Coastal Area of Blanakan, Subang Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi; Meriana, Ginna; Somantri, Lili

    2016-11-01

    A land accretion is formed by deposition in estuaries. Recently, a land development in Subang coastal area has raised an increase. Beside its potential, coastal areas are also threatened with damage including abrasion, accretion, loss of mangrove forests, and sea water intrusion. One of the coastal areas that have been arising in very extensive land is Blanakan coastal in Subang Regency. This study aims to monitor the development of a land accretion that have been arise during the period of 1990 to 2015 and also to examine the use of a land accretion and analyze the impact of a land accretion to the social and economic conditions in the Blanakan Coastal Areas. The method used in this research was descriptive quantitative method. In this research, The Landsat imageries were overlaid came from 1990, 2000, 2010, and 2015 to determine the development of a land accretion. Based on the results of Landsat imagery overlaid over the period 1990-2015. Overall, during the period 1990-2015, accreted land formed was an area of 782.9 hectares and abrasion area of 73.3 hectares with changes in the most far reaching 1580.3 m. The use of land accretion in the Blanakan Coastal mostly used for a fishpond with a key commodity is Milkfish and Bago shrimps. The impact of land accretion to the social and economic conditions was reflected through the five indicators such as livelihoods, income, education, health, and ownership of assets.

  15. Effects of water application intensity of microsprinkler irrigation on water and salt environment and crop growth in coastal saline soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Lin-lin; KANG Yao-hu; WAN Shu-qin

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and ifeld experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of water application intensity (WAI) on soil salinity management and the growth ofFestuca arundinacea (festuca) under three stages of water and salt management strategies using microsprinkler irrigation in Hebei Province, North China. The soil water content (è) and salinity of homogeneous coastal saline soils were evaluated under different water application intensities in the laboratory experiment. The results indicated that the WAI of microsprinkler irrigation inlfuenced theè, electrical conductivity (ECe) and pH of saline soils. As the WAI increased, the average values ofè and ECe in the 0–40 cm proifle also increased, while their average values in the 40–60 cm proifle decreased. The pH value also slightly decreased as depth increased, but no signiifcant differences were observed between the different treatments. The time periods of the water redistribution treatments had no obvious effects. Based on the results forè, ECe and pH, a smaler WAI was more desirable. The ifeld experiment was conducted after being considered the results of the technical parameter experiment and evaporation, wind and leaching duration. The ifeld experiment included three stages of water and salt regulation, based on three soil matric potentials (SMP), in which the SMP at a 20-cm depth below the surface was used to trigger irrigation. The results showed that the microsprinkler irrigation created an appropriate environment for festuca growth through the three stages of water and salt regulation. The low-salinity conditions that occurred at 0–10 cm depth during the ifrst stage (−5 kPa) continued to expand through the next two stages. The average pH value was less than 8.5. The tiler number of festuca increased as SMP decreased from the ifrst stage to the third stage. After the three stages of water and salt regulation, the highly saline soil gradualy changed to a low-saline soil. Overal, based on the

  16. Dynamic dune management, integrating objectives of nature development and coastal safety: Examples from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Sebastiaan M.; Mulder, Jan P. M.; Slings, Quirinus L.; Geelen, Luc H. W. T.; Damsma, Petra

    2013-10-01

    This paper discusses and compares results of management interventions to remobilise dunes and obtain more autonomous changes in foredunes resulting from a change in coastal defence policy. In recent decades, nature conservation managers tried to restore aeolian dynamics and dune mobility landward of foredunes to maintain threatened, rare pioneer species. Results indicate that destabilisation activities yielded an important increase of blowing sand and its effects on ecology but with a limited effect on the desired integral remobilization of dunes. Roots remaining in the sand after removal of vegetation and soil is one of the main problems. Follow up removal of roots for 3 to 5 years seems to be essential, but it is not clear whether the dunes will remain mobile in the long term. In 1990 the Dutch government decided to maintain the position of the coastline by artificial sand nourishment. An intensive management of the foredunes was no longer required. Consequently, natural processes in the foredunes revived, and the sediment budget of the beach-dune system changed. Two main types of responses are visible. In some areas, increased input of sand resulted in the development of embryonic dunes seaward of the former foredunes, leading to increased stabilisation of the former foredunes. In other areas, development of embryonic dunes was insignificant despite the increased sand input, but wind erosion features developed in the foredunes, and the environment was more dynamic. The reasons for the differences are not clear, and the interaction between shoreface, beach and dunes is still poorly understood. Until now, attempts to mobilise the inner dunes were independent of changes made to the foredunes. We argue that an integrated, dynamic approach to coastal management, taking account of all relevant functions (including safety and natural values) and the dune-beach system as a whole, may provide new and durable solutions. An integrated approach would ideally provide fresh

  17. The Coastal Area Development Using GIS (Review of GIS Application Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastowo Sutanto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available GIS, Geographical Information System, is a means that an be used to plan and to develop the coastal area because in carrying out the analysis this system combines the space data and their  attributes. The activities done among others the prototype development of algae cultivation and tourism ativities, the development of fish pond location, the reclamation of the Jakarta Bay, and the concept of development the floating “Keramba” for pearl oysters and white sea fish similar to sole. GIS analysis with heaviness and overlay mapping yields the appropriate map to plan and to develop the coastal area. The result of GIS analysis can be used to plan and to develop the coastal area.

  18. Development of a Cost-Effective Airborne Remote Sensing System for Coastal Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duk-jin Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Coastal lands and nearshore marine areas are productive and rapidly changing places. However, these areas face many environmental challenges related to climate change and human-induced impacts. Space-borne remote sensing systems may be restricted in monitoring these areas because of their spatial and temporal resolutions. In situ measurements are also constrained from accessing the area and obtaining wide-coverage data. In these respects, airborne remote sensing sensors could be the most appropriate tools for monitoring these coastal areas. In this study, a cost-effective airborne remote sensing system with synthetic aperture radar and thermal infrared sensors was implemented to survey coastal areas. Calibration techniques and geophysical model algorithms were developed for the airborne system to observe the topography of intertidal flats, coastal sea surface current, sea surface temperature, and submarine groundwater discharge.

  19. Combined influence of sedimentation and vegetation on the soil carbon stocks of a coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Chen, Huaipu; Cao, Haobing; Ge, Zhenming; Zhang, Liquan

    2016-08-01

    Coastal wetlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Large quantities of sediment deposited in the Changjiang (Yangtze) estuary by the Changjiang River promote the propagation of coastal wetlands, the expansion of saltmarsh vegetation, and carbon sequestration. In this study, using the Chongming Dongtan Wetland in the Changjiang estuary as the study area, the spatial and temporal distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the influences of sedimentation and vegetation on the SOC stocks of the coastal wetland were examined in 2013. There was sediment accretion in the northern and middle areas of the wetland and in the Phragmites australis marsh in the southern area, and sediment erosion in the Scirpus mariqueter marsh and the bare mudflat in the southern area. More SOC accumulated in sediments of the vegetated marsh than in the bare mudflat. The total organic carbon (TOC) stocks increased in the above-ground biomass from spring to autumn and decreased in winter; in the below-ground biomass, they gradually increased from spring to winter. The TOC stocks were higher in the below-ground biomass than in the above-ground biomass in the P. australis and Spartina alterniflora marshes, but were lower in the below-ground biomass in S. mariqueter marsh. Stocks of SOC showed temporal variation and increased gradually in all transects from spring to winter. The SOC stocks tended to decrease from the high marsh down to the bare mudflat along the three transects in the order: P. australis marsh > S. alterniflora marsh > S. mariqueter marsh > bare mudflat. The SOC stocks of the same vegetation type were higher in the northern and middle transects than in the southern transect. These results suggest that interactions between sedimentation and vegetation regulate the SOC stocks in the coastal wetland in the Changjiang estuary.

  20. The development of a vulnerabilities indicator library for coastal flood risk management at a European scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Damon; Viavattene, Christophe; Priest, Sally; Micou, Paula; Parker, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Recent and historic low-frequency, high-impact events (Xynthia, Ligurian Flash Floods, the 1953 North Sea storm surge etc) have demonstrated the flood risks faced by exposed coastal areas in Europe. The hazard probability is likely to increase due to a changing climate with more frequent and violent instances of surge-driven floods, wind damage, erosion, overtopping and rain-driven flash flooding. The number and value of receptors in the coastal area also increases due to continued economic development and population growth. As part of the FP7 EU RISCKIT (Resilience-Increasing Strategies for Coasts toolkit) project, a coastal vulnerability indicator library has been produced incorporating ecosystems, built environment, human population, critical infrastructure and the overall characteristics of the coastal system. The library will include data at European, national and local levels and will be gathered, in large part, through a multitude of interviews with various members of the coastal community at 11 case study sites across Europe. The presentation will give a brief outline of the challenges in developing vulnerability indicators - particularly for countries where specific data is limited or lacking - and how the library will be organised to facilitate the use of the data. Finally, the presentation will describe how the vulnerability library will feed into a Coastal Risk Assessment Framework (CRAF). The CRAF will evaluate coastal risk at regional scale and identify "hot spots" to assist coastal practitioners to choose the best prevention, mitigation and preparedness measures for their coast. The work described in this abstract was supported by the European Community's 7th Framework Programme through the grant to the budget of RISC-KIT, contract no. 603458, and by contributions by the partner institutes.

  1. [Assessment of ecological environment effects of coastal development in Hebei Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li-Tuo; Li, Zhi-Wei

    2014-07-01

    Through the analysis of the development activities and the ecological environment in coastal of Hebei Province, China, an index system for evaluating the ecological environment effect, composed of 28 indices, was set up by the pressure, state and response subsystems. Using the comprehensive index evaluation method, the integrated effects of ecological environment index (EI) was calculated and its grading criterion was founded. The results showed that the ecological environment effect of Hebei Province coastal development varied from being relatively small, normal and then relatively large from 1984 to 2010, and its acceptance degree evolved from being acceptable to being unacceptable. Because the resource and environment pressures caused by coastal development were serious and a delay existed in the state relative to the response, the improvement of various measures in the response subsystem did not show a positive effect on the state, and the environmental quality of ocean showed a degrading trend. Due to the differences in coastal development pattern and strength, the ecological environment effect of development activities showed some spatial differences. The ecological environment effect of Qinhuangdao coastal development was the minimum, followed by Cangzhou and Tangshan. Cangzhou and Tangshan had reached unacceptable levels and needed to further strengthen the restoration and protection of ecological environment.

  2. Effects of dispersant used for oil spill remediation on nitrogen cycling in Louisiana coastal salt marsh soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroski, Jason P; White, John R; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2015-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon (DWH) offshore oil platform experienced an explosion which triggered the largest marine oil spill in US history. Approximately 7.9 million liters of dispersant, Corexit EC9500A, was used during the spill between May 15th and July 12th. Marsh soil samples were collected from an unimpacted marsh site proximal to coastal areas that suffered light to heavy oiling for a laboratory evaluation to determine the effect of Corexit on the wetland soil microbial biomass as well as N-mineralization and denitrification rates. Microbial biomass nitrogen (N) values were below detection for the 1:10, 1:100 and 1:1000 Corexit:wet soil treatments. The potentially mineralizable N (PMN) rate correlated with microbial biomass with significantly lower rates for the 1:10 and 1:100 Corexit:wet soil additions. Potential denitrification rates for Corexit:wet soil ratios after immediate dispersant exposure were below detection for the 1:10 treatment, while the 1:100 was 7.6±2.7% of the control and the 1:1000 was 33±4.3% of the control. The 1:10000 treatment was not significantly different from the control. Denitrification rates measured after 2 weeks exposure to the surfactant found the 1:10 treatment still below detection limit and the 1:100 ratio was 12±2.6% of the control. Results from this lab study suggest that chemical dispersants have the potential to negatively affect the wetland soil microbial biomass and resultant microbial activity. Consequences of exposure led to reductions in several important microbial-regulated ecosystem services including water quality improvement (denitrification) and ecosystem primary productivity (N-mineralization). Future studies should investigate the longer-term impacts of dispersant exposure on the microbial consortia to determine if microbial activity recovers over time.

  3. The role of atmospheric boundary layer-surface interactions on the development of coastal fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Malda

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Frictional convergence and thermal difference between land and sea surface are the two surface conditions that govern the intensity and evolution of a coastal front. By means of the mesoscale model MM5, we investigate the influence of these two processes on wind patterns, temperature and precipitation amounts, associated with a coastal front, observed on the west coast of The Netherlands in the night between 12 and 13 August 2004. The mesoscale model MM5 is further compared with available observations and the results of two operational models (ECMWF and HIRLAM. HIRLAM is not capable to reproduce the coastal front, whereas ECMWF and MM5 both calculate precipitation for the coastal region. The precipitation pattern, calculated by MM5, agrees satisfactorily with the accumulated radar image. The failure of HIRLAM is mainly due to a different stream pattern at the surface and consequently, a different behaviour of the frictional convergence at the coastline.

    The sensitivity analysis of frictional convergence is carried out with the MM5 model, by varying land surface roughness length (z0. For the sensitivity analysis of thermal difference between sea and land surface, we changed the sea surface temperature (SST. Increasing surface roughness implies stronger convergence near the surface and consequently stronger upward motions and intensification of the development of the coastal front. Setting land surface roughness equal to the sea surface roughness means an elimination of frictional convergence and results in a diminishing coastal front structure of the precipitation pattern. The simulation with a high SST produces much precipitation above the sea, but less precipitation in the coastal area above land. A small increment of the SST results in larger precipitation amounts above the sea; above land increments are calculated for areas near the coast. A decrease of the SST shifts the precipitation maxima inland, although the

  4. Inland and coastal flooding: developments in prediction and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J C R

    2005-06-15

    We review the scientific and engineering understanding of various types of inland and coastal flooding by considering the different causes and dynamic processes involved, especially in extreme events. Clear progress has been made in the accuracy of numerical modelling of meteorological causes of floods, hydraulics of flood water movement and coastal wind-wave-surge. Probabilistic estimates from ensemble predictions and the simultaneous use of several models are recent techniques in meteorological prediction that could be considered for hydraulic and oceanographic modelling. The contribution of remotely sensed data from aircraft and satellites is also considered. The need to compare and combine statistical and computational modelling methodologies for long range forecasts and extreme events is emphasized, because this has become possible with the aid of kilometre scale computations and network grid facilities to simulate and analyse time-series and extreme events. It is noted that despite the adverse effects of climatic trends on flooding, appropriate planning of rapidly growing urban areas could mitigate some of the worst effects. However, resources for flood prevention, including research, have to be considered in relation to those for other natural disasters. Policies have to be relevant to the differing geology, meteorology and cultures of the countries affected.

  5. Biochar applied with appropriate rates can reduce N leaching, keep N retention and not increase NH3 volatilization in a coastal saline soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haijun; Lu, Haiying; Chu, Lei; Shao, Hongbo; Shi, Weiming

    2017-01-01

    The impacts of biochar addition on nitrogen (N) leaching, (ammonia) NH3 volatilization from coastal saline soils are not well understood. In this soil column study, the effects of wheat straw biochar application at rates of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 4% by weight to a coastal saline soil on N leaching, NH3 volatilization, soil pH and N retention were investigated. Results showed that 0.5% and 1% biochar amendments reduce the NH4(+)-N, NO3(-)-N and total N concentrations of leachate and thereby significantly decrease their cumulative lost loads by 11.6-24.0%, 13.2-29.7%, and 14.6-26.0%, respectively, in compared with the control. The biochar-induced soil N leaching mitigation efficiency was weakened when the biochar application rates increased to 2% and 4%. However, the impact of biochar addition on cumulative NH3 volatilizations were negative and significantly 25.6-53.6% higher NH3 volatilizations in soils with 2% and 4% biochar amended than control were detected, which was mainly attributed to the averaged 0.53-0.88units higher soil pH as results of biochar addition. On average, the total N concentrations of soil were kept same with 1.01-1.06gkg(-1) under control and biochar treatments. Therefore, biochar application to the coastal saline soils with appropriate rates (i.e., 0.5% and 1% in current study) can reduce N leaching, keep soil N retention, and not increase NH3 volatilization, which was beneficial for sustainable use of saline soils.

  6. Development of soil quality metrics using mycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baar, J.

    2010-07-01

    Based on the Treaty on Biological Diversity of Rio de Janeiro in 1992 for maintaining and increasing biodiversity, several countries have started programmes monitoring soil quality and the above- and below ground biodiversity. Within the European Union, policy makers are working on legislation for soil protection and management. Therefore, indicators are needed to monitor the status of the soils and these indicators reflecting the soil quality, can be integrated in working standards or soil quality metrics. Soil micro-organisms, particularly arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), are indicative of soil changes. These soil fungi live in symbiosis with the great majority of plants and are sensitive to changes in the physico-chemical conditions of the soil. The aim of this study was to investigate whether AMF are reliable and sensitive indicators for disturbances in the soils and can be used for the development of soil quality metrics. Also, it was studied whether soil quality metrics based on AMF meet requirements to applicability by users and policy makers. Ecological criterions were set for the development of soil quality metrics for different soils. Multiple root samples containing AMF from various locations in The Netherlands were analyzed. The results of the analyses were related to the defined criterions. This resulted in two soil quality metrics, one for sandy soils and a second one for clay soils, with six different categories ranging from very bad to very good. These soil quality metrics meet the majority of requirements for applicability and are potentially useful for the development of legislations for the protection of soil quality. (Author) 23 refs.

  7. Determining the spatial variability of wetland soil bulk density, organic matter, and the conversion factor between organic matter and organic carbon across coastal Louisiana, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Piazza, Sarai C.; Sharp, Leigh A.; Stagg, Camille L.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Steyer, Gregory D.; McGinnis, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Soil bulk density (BD), soil organic matter (SOM) content, and a conversion factor between SOM and soil organic carbon (SOC) are often used in estimating SOC sequestration and storage. Spatial variability in BD, SOM, and the SOM–SOC conversion factor affects the ability to accurately estimate SOC sequestration, storage, and the benefits (e.g., land building area and vertical accretion) associated with wetland restoration efforts, such as marsh creation and sediment diversions. There are, however, only a few studies that have examined large-scale spatial variability in BD, SOM, and SOM–SOC conversion factors in coastal wetlands. In this study, soil cores, distributed across the entire coastal Louisiana (approximately 14,667 km2) were used to examine the regional-scale spatial variability in BD, SOM, and the SOM–SOC conversion factor. Soil cores for BD and SOM analyses were collected during 2006–09 from 331 spatially well-distributed sites in the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System network. Soil cores for the SOM–SOC conversion factor analysis were collected from 15 sites across coastal Louisiana during 2006–07. Results of a split-plot analysis of variance with incomplete block design indicated that BD and SOM varied significantly at a landscape level, defined by both hydrologic basins and vegetation types. Vertically, BD and SOM varied significantly among different vegetation types. The SOM–SOC conversion factor also varied significantly at the landscape level. This study provides critical information for the assessment of the role of coastal wetlands in large regional carbon budgets and the estimation of carbon credits from coastal restoration.

  8. 杭州湾南岸滨海平原土地利用变化对土壤发生层次质量演化的影响%The impact of land use change on quality evolution of soil genetic layers on the coastal plain of south Hangzhou Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李加林; 李伟方; 杨晓平; 张殿发; 童亿勤

    2008-01-01

    Land use change plays an important part in the studies of global environmental change and regional sustainable development. The change of soil quality can particularly reflect the impacts of human socio-economic activities on environment. Taking the coastal plain of south Hangzhou Bay as a study case, we analyzed the effects of land use changes on organic matter (OM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), available phosphorus (AP),available potassium (AK), total salinity (TS), pH value in soil genetic layers, and assessed soil quality change related to different land use types from 1982 to 2003. The results show that: (1)The general change tendency of soil quality in the coastal plain of south Hangzhou Bay declined obviously in A layer and slightly rise in B (or P) layer and C (or W) layer. The contents of TP decreased generally in all soil genetic layers, but the variety difference of other soil quality indices was relatively great. (2) The change of soil quality in the areas where land use changed is far more remarkable than that with land use unchanged. The value of quality variety is A layer B (or P) layer C (or W) layer. (3) The changes of soil tillage, cultivation, fertilization, irrigation and drainage activities related to land use may make some soil-forming processes disappeared and bring in other new processes which will affect the soil quality and soil genetic layers directly.

  9. Development of a surface scanning soil analysis instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahat, S; Köble, T; Schumann, O; Waring, C; Watt, G

    2012-07-01

    ANSTO is developing a nuclear field instrument for measurement of soil composition; particularly carbon. The instrument utilises the neutron activation approach with clear advantages over existing soil sampling and laboratory analysis. A field portable compact pulsed neutron generator and γ-ray detector are used for PGNAA and INS techniques simultaneously. Many elements can be quantified from a homogenised soil volume equivalent to the top soil layers. Results from first test experiments and current developments are reported.

  10. Soil salinity and sodicity in a shrimp farming coastal area of the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tho, Nguyen; Vromant, N.; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Hens, L.

    2008-06-01

    Soil salinity and sodicity are environmental problems in the shrimp farming areas of the Cai Nuoc district, Ca Mau province, Vietnam. In 2000, farmers in the district switched en masse from rice cropping to shrimp culture. Due to recent failure in shrimp farming, many farmers wish to revert to a rotational system with rice in the wet season and shrimps in the dry season. So far, all their attempts to grow rice have failed. To assess soil salinity and sodicity, 25 boreholes in shrimp ponds were analysed in four consecutive seasons from 2002 to 2004. The results showed that soil salinity was quite serious (mean ECe 29.25 dS m-1), particularly in the dry season (mean ECe 33.44 dS m-1). In the wet season, significant amounts of salts still remained in the soil (mean ECe 24.65 dS m-1) and the highest soil salinity levels were found near the sea. Soil sodicity is also a problem in the district (exchangeable sodium percentage range 9.63-72.07%). Sodicity is mainly a phenomenon of topsoils and of soils near the sea. Both soil salinity and sodicity are regulated by seasonal rainfall patterns. They could together result in disastrous soil degradation in the Cai Nuoc district.

  11. Effect of conservation practices on soil carbon and nitrogen accretion and crop yield in a corn production system in the southeastern coastal plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We implemented conservation farming practices (winter cover cropping plus strip tillage) for a non-irrigated corn production system in the southern coastal plain of Georgia, USA that had been previously been managed under a plow and harrow tillage regime. Total soil carbon and nitrogen were measure...

  12. Observed impacts of duration and seasonality of atmospheric-river landfalls on soil moisture and runoff in coastal northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, F.M.; Coleman, T.; Neiman, P.J.; Zamora, R.J.; Dettinger, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This study is motivated by diverse needs for better forecasts of extreme precipitation and floods. It is enabled by unique hourly observations collected over six years near California’s Russian River and by recent advances in the science of atmospheric rivers (ARs). This study fills key gaps limiting the prediction of ARs and, especially, their impacts by quantifying the duration of AR conditions and the role of duration in modulating hydrometeorological impacts. Precursor soil moisture conditions and their relationship to streamflow are also shown. On the basis of 91 well-observed events during 2004-10, the study shows that the passage of ARs over a coastal site lasted 20 h on average and that 12% of the AR events exceeded 30 h. Differences in storm-total water vapor transport directed up the mountain slope contribute 74% of the variance in storm-total rainfall across the events and 61% of the variance in storm-total runoff volume. ARs with double the composite mean duration produced nearly 6 times greater peak streamflow and more than 7 times the storm-total runoff volume. When precursor soil moisture was less than 20%, even heavy rainfall did not lead to significant streamflow. Predicting which AR events are likely to produce extreme impacts on precipitation and runoff requires accurate prediction of AR duration at landfall and observations of precursor soil moisture conditions.

  13. Development and prototype application of an oil spill risk analysis in a coastal zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsimopoulou, V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the development of a methodology for performance of oil spill risk analysis in coastal zones through a prototype application. The main objective of the research effort is to develop the basis for a tool that can assess risks due to the occurrence of an oil spill event aiming at

  14. Development and prototype application of an oil spill risk analysis in a coastal zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsimopoulou, V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the development of a methodology for performance of oil spill risk analysis in coastal zones through a prototype application. The main objective of the research effort is to develop the basis for a tool that can assess risks due to the occurrence of an oil spill event aiming at

  15. Assessing the Sustainable Development of Coastal Reclamation: A Case of Makassar Using GIS Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurnita, A.; Trisutomo, S.; Ali, M.

    2017-07-01

    Reclamation has been made in many areas in Indonesia including Makassar, as a response to the present needs of land as the impact of human activity in urban area. This research aims to assess the sustainable development of coastal reclamation and focus on environmental dimension of sustainable urban development. Assessment will be done by reclamation sustainability index (RSI) and analysis by GIS as the tools. RSI was built from previous research that has simplified from many researches and analysis by Structure of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and expert choice. RSI uses 9 indices from three indicators of environment factor which are coastal resources, building and infrastructure.

  16. Mercury in waters, soils, and sediments of the New Jersey Coastal Plain: A comparison of regional distribution and mobility with the mercury contamination at the William J. Hughes Technical Center, Atlantic County, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Julia L.; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Pamela A.

    2012-01-01

    Mercury in soils, surface water, and groundwater at the William J. Hughes Technical Center , Atlantic County, New Jersey, has been found at levels that exceed established background concentrations in Coastal Plain waters, and, in some cases, New Jersey State standards for mercury in various media. As of 2012, it is not known whether this mercury is part of regional mercury contamination or whether it is related to former military activities. Regionally, groundwater supplying about 700 domestic wells in the New Jersey Coastal Plain is contaminated with mercury that appears to be derived from anthropogenic inputs, such as agricultural pesticide use and atmospheric deposition. High levels of mercury occasionally are found in Coastal Plain soils, but disturbance during residential development on former agricultural land is thought to have mobilized any mercury applied during farming, a hypothesis borne out by experiments leaching mercury from soils. In the unsewered residential areas with mercury-contaminated groundwater, septic-system effluent is believed to create reducing conditions in which mercury sorbed to subsoils is mobilized to groundwater. In comparing the levels of mercury found in soils, sediments, streamwater, and groundwater at the William J. Hughes Technical Center site with those found regionally, mercury concentrations in groundwater in the region are, in some cases, substantially higher than those found in groundwater at the William J. Hughes Technical Center site. Nevertheless, concentrations of mercury in streamwater at the site are, in some instances, higher than most found regionally. The mercury contents in soils and sediment at the William J. Hughes Technical Center site are substantially higher than those found to date (2012) in the region, indicating that a source other than regional sources may be present at the site.

  17. Circulation constrains the evolution of larval development modes and life histories in the coastal ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, James M; Byers, James E; Pappalardo, Paula; Wares, John P; Marshall, Dustin

    2014-04-01

    The evolutionary pressures that drive long larval planktonic durations in some coastal marine organisms, while allowing direct development in others, have been vigorously debated. We introduce into the argument the asymmetric dispersal of larvae by coastal currents and find that the strength of the currents helps determine which dispersal strategies are evolutionarily stable. In a spatially and temporally uniform coastal ocean of finite extent, direct development is always evolutionarily stable. For passively drifting larvae, long planktonic durations are stable when the ratio of mean to fluctuating currents is small and the rate at which larvae increase in size in the plankton is greater than the mortality rate (both in units of per time). However, larval behavior that reduces downstream larval dispersal for a given time in plankton will be selected for, consistent with widespread observations of behaviors that reduce dispersal of marine larvae. Larvae with long planktonic durations are shown to be favored not for the additional dispersal they allow, but for the additional fecundity that larval feeding in the plankton enables. We analyzed the spatial distribution of larval life histories in a large database of coastal marine benthic invertebrates and documented a link between ocean circulation and the frequency of planktotrophy in the coastal ocean. The spatial variation in the frequency of species with planktotrophic larvae is largely consistent with our theory; increases in mean currents lead to a decrease in the fraction of species with planktotrophic larvae over a broad range of temperatures.

  18. The Earthworm Eisenia fetida Can Help Desalinate a Coastal Saline Soil in Tianjin, North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Suyan; Sun, Xiangyang; Zhang, Yang; Gong, Xiaoqiang; Fu, Ying; Jia, Liming

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory microcosm experiment was conducted to determine whether the earthworm Eisenia fetida could survive in a saline soil from a field site in North China, and an experiment using response surface methodology was conducted at that field site to quantify the effects of E. fetida and green waste compost (GWC) on the salt content of the soil. The microcosm results showed that E. fetida survived in GWC-amended saline soil and increased the contents of humic acid, available N, and available P in the GWC-amended soil. The data from the field experiment were described by the following second-order model: [Formula in text], where y is the decrease in soil salinity (g of salt per kg of dry soil) relative to the untreated control, x1 is the number of E. fetida added per m2, and x2 is the quantity of GWC added in kg per m2. The model predicted that the total salt content of the saline soil would decrease by > 2 g kg(-1) (p<0.05) when 29-90 individuals m-2 of E. fetida and 6.1-15.0 kg m(-2) of GWC were applied. We conclude that the use of E. fetida for soil desalination is promising and warrants additional investigation.

  19. The Earthworm Eisenia fetida Can Help Desalinate a Coastal Saline Soil in Tianjin, North China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available A laboratory microcosm experiment was conducted to determine whether the earthworm Eisenia fetida could survive in a saline soil from a field site in North China, and an experiment using response surface methodology was conducted at that field site to quantify the effects of E. fetida and green waste compost (GWC on the salt content of the soil. The microcosm results showed that E. fetida survived in GWC-amended saline soil and increased the contents of humic acid, available N, and available P in the GWC-amended soil. The data from the field experiment were described by the following second-order model: [Formula in text], where y is the decrease in soil salinity (g of salt per kg of dry soil relative to the untreated control, x1 is the number of E. fetida added per m2, and x2 is the quantity of GWC added in kg per m2. The model predicted that the total salt content of the saline soil would decrease by > 2 g kg(-1 (p<0.05 when 29-90 individuals m-2 of E. fetida and 6.1-15.0 kg m(-2 of GWC were applied. We conclude that the use of E. fetida for soil desalination is promising and warrants additional investigation.

  20. Soil nitrogen dynamics and leaching under conservation tillage in the Atlantic Coastal Plain, Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation tillage (CsT) involves management that reduces soil erosion by maintaining crop residue cover on farm fields. Typically, both infiltration and soil organic matter increase over time with CsT practices. We compared the impact of a commonly used CsT practice, strip tillage (ST), to conven...

  1. Indications of a positive feedback between coastal development and beach nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott; Lazarus, Eli; Limber, Patrick W.; Goldstein, Evan; Thorpe, Curtis; Ballinger, Rhoda

    2016-01-01

    Beach nourishment, a method for mitigating coastal storm damage or chronic erosion by deliberately replacing sand on an eroded beach, has been the leading form of coastal protection in the U.S. for four decades. However, investment in hazard protection can have the unintended consequence of encouraging development in places especially vulnerable to damage. In a comprehensive, parcel-scale analysis of all shorefront single-family homes in the state of Florida, we find that houses in nourishing zones are significantly larger and more numerous than in non-nourishing zones. The predominance of larger homes in nourishing zones suggests a positive feedback between nourishment and development that is compounding coastal risk in zones already characterized by high vulnerability.

  2. Strategic opportunities for economic development of the Baltic Sea coastal zones and sea industrial and port complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogoberidze George

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the principal dimensions in attraction of the world economy structures is coastal territories as spaces where marine potential of a state is most pronounced. In this respect, it is vital to set the priorities of development of coastal zones taking into account the changes in the strategic situation in order to maintain the components of marine potential of the Russian Federation at the level of its national interests. The article aims to develop an indicator system of assessment of coastal zone potential, and sea industrial and port facilities in order to identify the characteristic and strategic capacities of the economic development of these territories in the complex approach. The research methodology is based on the assessment of marine potential of coastal territories as an indicator of the efficacy of its marine economic complex development with using the indicator methods as a multi-factor and multi-level spatial system. The proposed system is applied to a complex analysis of coastal territories of the Russian Baltic, the estimation of a socio-economic factor of coastal zone marine potential, as well as recommendations for long-term planning of the economic development of Russia’s coastal zones of the Baltic Sea and the organization of marine activities. This methodology can help to identify a role of coastal territories in the economy and reflect perspectives and directions of strategic development of coastal zones, and sea industrial and port facilities of the Russian Federation.

  3. Natural and human-induced hypoxia and consequences for coastal areas: synthesis and future development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia has become a world-wide phenomenon in the global coastal ocean and causes a deterioration of the structure and function of ecosystems. Based on the collective contributions of members of SCOR Working Group #128, the present study provides an overview of the major aspects of coastal hypoxia in different biogeochemical provinces, including estuaries, coastal waters, upwelling areas, fjords and semi-enclosed basins, with various external forcings, ecosystem responses, feedbacks and potential impact on the sustainability of the fishery and economics. The obvious external forcings include freshwater runoff and other factors contributing to stratification, organic matter and nutrient loadings, as well as exchange between coastal and open ocean water masses. Their different interactions set up mechanisms that drive the system towards hypoxia. Coastal systems also vary in their relative susceptibility to hypoxia depending on their physical and geographic settings. It is understood that coastal hypoxia has a profound impact on the sustainability of ecosystems, which can be seen, for example, by the change in the food-web structure and system function; other influences include compression and loss of habitat, as well as changes in organism life cycles and reproduction. In most cases, the ecosystem responds to the low dissolved oxygen in non-linear ways with pronounced feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth System, including those that affect human society. Our knowledge and previous experiences illustrate that there is a need to develop new observational tools and models to support integrated research of biogeochemical dynamics and ecosystem behavior that will improve confidence in remediation management strategies for coastal hypoxia.

  4. Natural and human-induced hypoxia and consequences for coastal areas: synthesis and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Gilbert, D.; Gooday, A. J.; Levin, L.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Middelburg, J. J.; Scranton, M.; Ekau, W.; Peña, A.; Dewitte, B.; Oguz, T.; Monteiro, P. M. S.; Urban, E.; Rabalais, N. N.; Ittekkot, V.; Kemp, W. M.; Ulloa, O.; Elmgren, R.; Escobar-Briones, E.; van der Plas, A. K.

    2010-05-01

    Hypoxia has become a world-wide phenomenon in the global coastal ocean and causes a deterioration of the structure and function of ecosystems. Based on the collective contributions of members of SCOR Working Group #128, the present study provides an overview of the major aspects of coastal hypoxia in different biogeochemical provinces, including estuaries, coastal waters, upwelling areas, fjords and semi-enclosed basins, with various external forcings, ecosystem responses, feedbacks and potential impact on the sustainability of the fishery and economics. The obvious external forcings include freshwater runoff and other factors contributing to stratification, organic matter and nutrient loadings, as well as exchange between coastal and open ocean water masses. Their different interactions set up mechanisms that drive the system towards hypoxia. Coastal systems also vary in their relative susceptibility to hypoxia depending on their physical and geographic settings. It is understood that coastal hypoxia has a profound impact on the sustainability of ecosystems, which can be seen, for example, by the change in the food-web structure and system function; other influences include compression and loss of habitat, as well as changes in organism life cycles and reproduction. In most cases, the ecosystem responds to the low dissolved oxygen in non-linear ways with pronounced feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth System, including those that affect human society. Our knowledge and previous experiences illustrate that there is a need to develop new observational tools and models to support integrated research of biogeochemical dynamics and ecosystem behavior that will improve confidence in remediation management strategies for coastal hypoxia.

  5. Enhanced decomposition offsets enhanced productivity and soil carbon accumulation in coastal wetlands responding to climate change (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, M. L.; Blum, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    Where coastal wetlands are sediment deficient, ecosystem persistence depends on the balance between organic matter production and decay. Recent work in tidal wetlands suggests that elevated CO2 and temperature warming will increase plant growth, organic matter accumulation, and the ability of marshes to survive sea level rise. However, we find that decomposition rates also increase by about 12% per degree C of warming. Our measured temperature response is greater than most terrestrial studies, twice as high as the response of salt marsh productivity to temperature warming, and roughly equivalent to the productivity response associated with elevated CO2 in C3 marsh plants. Therefore, our results suggest that enhanced CO2 and warmer temperatures will actually make marshes less resilient to sea level rise, and tend to promote a release of soil carbon. Elevated temperatures tend to increase rates of sea level rise more than any acceleration in organic matter accumulation, suggesting the possibility of a positive feedback between climate, sea level rise, and carbon emissions in coastal environments.

  6. Rapid soil development after windthrow disturbance in pristine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.T. Bormann; H. Spaltenstein; M.H. McClellan; F.C. Ugolini; K. Cromack; S.M. Nay

    1995-01-01

    1. We examined how rapidly soils can change during secondary succession by observing soil development on 350-year chronosequences in three pristine forest ecosystems in south-east Alaska. 2. Soil surfaces, created by different windthrow events of known or estimated age, were examined within each of three forest stands (0.5-2.0 ha plots; i.e. a within-stand...

  7. Soil Retaining Structures: Development of models for structural analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the development of models for the structural analysis of soil retaining structures. The soil retaining structures being looked at are; block revetments, flexible retaining walls and bored tunnels in soft soil. Within this context typical structural behavior of these struc

  8. IGBP-DIS soil data set for pedotransfer function development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tempel, P.; Batjes, N.H.; Engelen, van V.W.P.

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the Global Soil Data Task (GSDT) of the Data and Information System of the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP-DIS), ISRIC prepared a uniform soil data set for the development of pedotransfer functions. The necessary chemical and physical soil data have been derived

  9. Characterizing Coastal Ecosystem Service Trade-offs with Future Urban Development in a Tropical City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Daniel R; Friess, Daniel A

    2017-08-23

    With rapid urbanization in the coastal zone and increasing habitat losses, it is imperative to understand how urban development affects coastal biodiversity and ecosystem service provision. Furthermore, it is important to understand how habitat fragments can best be incorporated into broader land use planning and coastal management, in order to maximize the environmental benefits they provide. In this study, we characterized the trade-offs between (a) urban development and individual mangrove environmental indicators (habitat quality and ecosystem services), and (b) between different environmental indicators in the tropical nation of Singapore. A range of biological, biophysical, and cultural indicators, including carbon, charcoal production, support for offshore fisheries, recreation, and habitat quality for a threatened species were quantified using field-based, remote sensing, and expert survey methods. The shape of the trade-off Pareto frontiers was analyzed to assess the sensitivity of environmental indicators for development. When traded off individually with urban development, four out of five environmental indicators were insensitive to development, meaning that relatively minor degradation of the indicator occurred while development was below a certain threshold, although indicator loss accelerated once this threshold was reached. Most of the pairwise relationships between the five environmental indicators were synergistic; only carbon storage and charcoal production, and charcoal production and recreational accessibility showed trade-offs. Trade-off analysis and land use optimization using Pareto frontiers could be a useful decision-support tool for understanding how changes in land use and coastal management will impact the ability of ecosystems to provide environmental benefits.

  10. Developing technology of remediation of oil-contaminated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Shevchyk, Lesya; Romaniuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Abstract ? The results of developing technologies for cleaning of soils from oil pollution on the example of Boryslav are shown. The prospects of tree species for the remediation of oil-contaminated soils are studied. The best results of cleaning oil contaminated soils with the application of Hippophae rhamnoides L. plants were obtained. It is a promising measure for restoring the oil-contaminated soils, attractive both from environmental and economical point of view.

  11. Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons

    OpenAIRE

    Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and earl...

  12. Phytoextraction and phytostabilisation of metal-contaminated soil in temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathiamma, P. K.; Li, L. Y.

    2009-04-01

    This research addressed the phytoremediation of roadside soils subjected to multi-component metal solutions. A typical right of way for roads in Canada is around 30 m, and at least 33% of that land in the right of way is unpaved and can support animal life. Thus, land associated with 12,000 km of roads in the province of British Columbia and millions of kilometres around the world represent a substantial quantity of wildlife habitat where metal contamination needs to be remediated. Phytostabilisation, requires least maintenance among different phytoremediation techniques, and it could be a feasible and practical method of remediating in roadside soils along highways and for improving highway runoff drainage. The suitability of five plant species was studied for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation in a region with temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada. Pot experiments were conducted using Lolium perenne L (perennial rye grass), Festuca rubra L (creeping red fescue), Helianthus annuus L (sunflower), Poa pratensis L (Kentucky bluegrass) and Brassica napus L (rape) in soils treated with three different metal (Cu, Pb, Mn and Zn) concentrations. The bio-metric characters of plants in soils with multiple-metal contaminations, their metal accumulation characteristics, translocation properties and metal removal were assessed at different stages of plant growth, 90 and 120 DAS (days after sowing). Lolium was found to be suitable for the phytostabilisation of Cu and Pb, Festuca for Mn and Poa for Zn. Metal removal was higher at 120 than at 90 days after sowing, and metals concentrated more in the underground tissues with less translocation to the above-ground parts. Bioconcentration factors indicate that Festuca had the highest accumulation for Cu, Helianthus for Pb and Zn and Poa for Mn.

  13. Development of MODIS data-based algorithm for retrieving sea surface temperature in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Deng, Zhiqiang

    2017-06-01

    A new algorithm was developed for retrieving sea surface temperature (SST) in coastal waters using satellite remote sensing data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua platform. The new SST algorithm was trained using the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method and tested using 8 years of remote sensing data from MODIS Aqua sensor and in situ sensing data from the US coastal waters in Louisiana, Texas, Florida, California, and New Jersey. The ANN algorithm could be utilized to map SST in both deep offshore and particularly shallow nearshore waters at the high spatial resolution of 1 km, greatly expanding the coverage of remote sensing-based SST data from offshore waters to nearshore waters. Applications of the ANN algorithm require only the remotely sensed reflectance values from the two MODIS Aqua thermal bands 31 and 32 as input data. Application results indicated that the ANN algorithm was able to explaining 82-90% variations in observed SST in US coastal waters. While the algorithm is generally applicable to the retrieval of SST, it works best for nearshore waters where important coastal resources are located and existing algorithms are either not applicable or do not work well, making the new ANN-based SST algorithm unique and particularly useful to coastal resource management.

  14. Integrating ecosystem services and climate change responses in coastal wetlands development plans for Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarwar, M.H.; Hein, L.G.; Rip, F.I.; Dearing, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the integration of ecosystem services and climate change adaptation in development plans for coastal wetlands in Bangladesh. A new response framework for adaptation is proposed, based on an empirical analysis and consultations with stakeholders, using a modified version of the

  15. Solar pond-based rural development programme for selected coastal regions - A concept

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopinathan, C.K.

    is expected to aid speedy development of selected coastal areas. The programme involves design and construction of a solar pond in which brine in the lower layer is heated to 85 degrees C by solar radiation and is used as the heat source for a closed cycle...

  16. Macrofouling community development at tropical coastal environment (New Mangalore Port, West Coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkat, K.; Anil, A.C.; Wagh, A.B.

    to evaluate the influence of environment on the development of macrofouling community at a locality which is not directly influenced by river run-off, a coastal station at New Mangalore Port (West coast of India) was monitored. Panels of admeasuring 10 x 15...

  17. Integrating ecosystem services and climate change responses in coastal wetlands development plans for Bangladesh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarwar, M.H.; Hein, L.G.; Rip, F.I.; Dearing, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the integration of ecosystem services and climate change adaptation in development plans for coastal wetlands in Bangladesh. A new response framework for adaptation is proposed, based on an empirical analysis and consultations with stakeholders, using a modified version of the DP

  18. Study on the construction of Guangdong coastal zone sustainable development decision support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yong-zhu; Zhang, Mei-ying; Xia, Bin; Zhang, Zheng-dong

    2008-10-01

    Coastal zones in Guangdong province are increasingly facing an ecological, economic and social pressure due to the increasing economic utilization and human activities in these regions worldwide, which is threatening the sustainable development of human being. How to take effective measurements and adopt integrated management to ensure sustainable development in these areas is ever becoming a focus that attracts close attentions to the governmental and academic sectors recently. It is important to resolve the problem to establish an advanced decision support system for the coastal zone sustainable development to help scientific decision-making and carry out integrated coastal zone management. This paper mainly introduces the general framework of Guangdong coastal zone sustainable development decision support system (GDCZSDDSS), including its requirements, general objectives, function and structure, and key technologies etc. After expounding the basic concept and requirements of GDCZSDDSS, the paper discusses generally the three-tier architecture and six kinds of functional modules, and lays a particular emphasis on the crucial role of such key technologies as GIS, RS and GPS (3S), spatial metadata and data warehouse etc., and discusses the methods of the GCZSDDSS integration, which aims at offering a whole solution for realization of the GCZSDDSS ultimately.

  19. Rise and Fall of Recent Chinese Coastal Resort Development:Case of Beihai Silver Beach, Guangxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; BAO Jigang

    2012-01-01

    Based upon a case study of Silver Beach coastal resort of Beihai,Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region,this article examines the rise and fall of Chinese coastal tourist resort development since the 1980s.It explores the causes for and responses to the decline of Chinese coastal resorts.The data were collected through in-depth interviews with twelve local key information providers,and secondary information sources such as government archives,survey reports,and resort plans.It was found that the rise and fall of Chinese coastal resorts in the last three decades is closely linked to the transitional reform from a central planned economy to a market economy.Three stages of coastal tourism development were identified in a sequence of rapid growth,decline and redevelopment.It was government financial funds and high local government involvement that promoted the rapid expansion of coastal resorts during the 1980s.However,coastal resort decline occurred when transitional reform was intensified and deflationary policy executed after 1992.Institutional failure is found to be the main reason of Chinese coastal resorts decline since the mid-1990s.The government-dominated pattern could not be sustained and should be restructured in forthcoming coastal tourism development in China.Revival strategies should emphasize enhancing market-oriented reform in the declining resorts on both supply and demand sides.

  20. Coastal soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy%反射光谱估算滨海土壤黏粒含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦彩霞; 郑光辉; 赏刚; 孙东敏

    2016-01-01

    Clay content is an important soil property that affects the structure, nutrient supply and other characteristics of soils. Variations in clay content can indicate the degree of soil development or soil age. In traditional chemical analyses of soil properties, the extractant interacts in the solution and at the solution-particle interface, thus altering the equilibrium between the soil solid and solution phases. Soil reflectance spectroscopy has been developed as an effective alternative method of measuring soil properties primarily because it requires minimal sample preparation and it is fast, cost-effective, non-destructive and non-hazardous to the soil. In recent decades, research on the use of reflectance spectroscopy in soil science has achieved rapid advances. Reflectance spectroscopy can be successfully applied to estimate the soil clay content. However, the mechanisms of soil clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy are not very clear. The goals of this study were to identify the bands within the range of 360-2490 nm that can be used to estimate the clay content and explore the mechanisms of the clay content estimation using reflectance spectroscopy. A total of 150 coastal soil samples were collected. The soil reflectance spectra were measured in a dark room using a FieldSpec 3 portable spectrometer. Raw spectral data were pre-processed by smoothing (R) and then by first derivative (FD), continuum removal (CR) or reciprocal transformation (DS). Calibration (75 soil samples) and validation datasets (75 soil samples) were obtained from 1,000 random selections of the data. Stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were performed to estimate the soil clay content and to further identify the bands useful for modeling this parameter. The results indicated that the SMLR analysis of CR and R spectra and the PLSR analysis of R and FD spectra were characterized by good calibration and validation accuracies

  1. The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS): Developing A Coastal Observation System To Enable Both Science Based Decision Making And Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, E.; John, O.

    2005-05-01

    The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS) is a consortium that extends from Northern Baja CA in Mexico to Morro Bay at the southern edge of central California, and aims to streamline, coordinate, and further develop individual institutional efforts by creating an integrated, multidisciplinary coastal observatory in the Bight of Southern California for the benefit of society. By leveraging existing infrastructure, partnerships, and private, local, state, and federal resources, SCCOOS is developing a fully operational coastal observation system to address issues related to coastal water quality, marine life resources, and coastal hazards for end user communities spanning local, state, and federal interests. However, to establish a sensible observational approach to address these societal drivers, sound scientific approaches are required in both the system design and the transformation of data to useful products. Since IOOS and coastal components of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) are not mutually exclusive within this framework, the SCCOOS consortium of observatory implementers have created an organizational structure that encourages dovetailing of OOI into the routine observations provided by the operational components of a regional IOOS. To begin the development, SCCOOS has grant funding from the California Coastal Conservancy as part of a $21M, statewide initiative to establish a Coastal Ocean Currents Monitoring Program, and funding from NOAA's Coastal Observing Technology System (COTS). In addition, SCCOOS is leveraging IT development that has been supported by the NSF Information Technology Research program Real-time observatories, Applications,and Data Manageemnt Network (ROADNET), and anticipates using developments which will result from the NSF Laboratory for Ocean Observatory Knowledge Integration Grid (LOOKING) program. The observational components now funded at SCCOOS include surface current mapping by HF radar; high

  2. Inconsistencies in coastal dune genesis and development in the western Mediterranean Cabopino Dune system, southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado-Pintado, Emilia; Malvárez, Gonzalo; Jackson, Derek; Navas, Fatima

    2016-04-01

    It is generally agreed that a falling sea level regime is required in the long term to establish dunes as distinctive landform features along a coast. Sedimentary (supply) bodies from fluvial, glacial sources or marine platform processes also need to be in place. In most Atlantic-facing coastal dune systems the current morpho-sedimentary structures are usually associated with the period between 18K BP and present when both glacial and riverine sediments emplaced sediments within the active zone of present sea level to help form beaches and dunes. Mediterranean coastal dunes fronted by steep continental shelves, such as in the western Mediterranean coast of southern Spain are, however, not associated with glacial deposits and thus are only present in association with river mouths and/or coastal lagoons. Their development is attributed to very recent sediment supply, which, combined with other forcing factors such as wind and waves, several orders of magnitude below those of north Atlantic systems, explains their limited extent. Some coastal dune fields however, do not seem to respond to this general pattern because of their scale and, more importantly, their origin linked possibly to marine platform processes rather than riverine or lagoonal development. Here, we examine the Cabopino dune system in southern Spain offering a conceptual model of their genesis and development as an "Atlantic" dune system within a Mediterranean setting. This is demonstrated by their scale (the largest in the Spanish Mediterranean) and their morphodynamic link to nearshore and platform processes in the last 18,000 years.

  3. Natural and human-induced hypoxia and consequences for coastal areas: synthesis and future development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia has become a world-wide phenomenon in the global coastal ocean and causes deterioration of structure and function of ecosystems. Based on the collective contributions of members of SCOR Working Group #128, the present study provides an overview of the major aspects of coastal hypoxia in different biogeochemical provinces, including estuaries, upwelling areas, fjords and semi-enclosed basins, with various external forcings, ecosystem responses, feedbacks and potential impact on the sustainability of the fishery and economics. The obvious external forcings include fresh water runoff and other factors contributing to stratification, organic matter and nutrient loadings, as well as exchange between coastal and open ocean water masses; their different interactions set up mechanisms that drive the system towards hypoxia. However, whether the coastal environment becomes hypoxic or not, under the combination of external forcings, depends also on the nature of the ecosystem, e.g. physical and geographic settings. It is understood that coastal hypoxia has a profound impact on the sustainability of ecosystems, which can be seen, for example, by the change in the food-web structure and system function; other influences can be compression and loss of habitat, as well as change in life cycle and reproduction. In most cases, the ecosystem responds to the low dissolved oxygen in a non-linear way and has pronounced feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth System, hence affecting human society. Our knowledge and previous experiences illustrate that there is a need to develop new observational tools and models to support integrated research of biogeochemical dynamics and ecosystem behaviour that will improve confidence in remediation management strategies for coastal hypoxia.

  4. Strong linkage between plant and soil fungal communities along a successional coastal dune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Bolduc, Alice; Laliberté, Etienne; Boudreau, Stéphane; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Complex interactions between plants and soil microorganisms drive key ecosystem and community properties such as productivity and diversity. In nutrient-poor systems such as sand dunes, plant traits and fungal symbioses related to nutrient acquisition can strongly influence vegetation dynamics. We investigated plant and fungal communities in a relic foredune plain located on an archipelago in Québec, Canada. We detected distinct communities across the edaphic and successional gradient. Our results showed a clear increase in plant species richness, as well as in the diversity of nutrient-acquisition strategies. We also found a strong correlation between aboveground vegetation and soil fungal communities, and both responded similarly to soil physicochemical properties. Soil pH influenced the composition of plant and fungal communities, and could act as an important environmental filter along this relic foredune plain. The increasing functional diversity in plant nutrient-acquisition strategies across the gradient might favor resource partitioning and facilitation among co-occurring plant species. The coordinated changes in soil microbial and plant communities highlight the importance of aboveground-belowground linkages and positive biotic interactions during ecological succession in nutrient-poor environments.

  5. An integrated geotechnical-geophysical investigation of soft clay at a coastal site in the Mekong Delta for oil and gas infrastructure development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giao, P.H. [Asian Inst. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand). School of Engineering; Dung, N.T. [Dong A Univ., Sahagu (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Geotechnical Engineering; Long, P.V. [Vina Mekong Engineering J.S. Co., Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2008-11-15

    In southern Vietnam, an increasing number of energy facilities are being constructed on soft clays of the very low-level Mekong River Delta. Prior to any energy infrastructure development in coastal areas, it is necessary to conduct adequate site investigations of the soft clay since a poor site investigation could result in damage to newly constructed facilities. To date, deficiencies in site investigations in southern Vietnam have been due to a rapid development of energy facilities resulting in limited soil investigation and soil improvement. Deficiencies in site investigations can also be attributed to outdated laboratory and in situ geotechnical testing capability and a lack of conformance with the geotechnical standards and engineering practice codes. This paper reviewed and analyzed geotechnical data at a typical coastal site at Ca Mau in the Mekong River Delta and demonstrated the application of a near-surface geophysical technique known as electric imaging (EI) for mapping the soft clay deposit at the site. An integrated geotechnical-geophysical study was conducted on the soft clay deposit at the Ca Mau site in order to characterize the subsoil profile and soil parameters that can be used in the design of energy facilities. 1 fig.

  6. Management of the coastal biophysical environment in tropical Queensland under conditions of heavy developmental pressure: the case of tourist resorts and acid sulphate soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Erfurt-Haupt

    2008-09-01

    While the remarkable surface features of the tropical coastal environment such as the surf beaches, the unique dune lakes, and the coastal vegetation, as well as the prolific wildlife, are used as selling points for new settlement and above all tourism, little is known or apparently of major concern with respect to the long term environmental impact of coastal development. While the crowding effect of large numbers of visitors and their impact on the natural environment - through significant degradation, site hardening or lack of proper on-site management – has been identified as a particular problem in certain areas, there is little knowledge of impacts on the underlying coastal geomorphology. In particular, developmental choices are often made in ignorance of, or disregard of, the widespread existence of tropical acid sulfate soils in that coastal environment. Reactive soils such as these can, and do, greatly affect the biophysical outcomes of a development if they are exposed. This paper documents such impacts in the form of a case study of the acid sulfate soil problem in relation to the development of tourist resorts, and suggests that part of the solution is for the State Government to insist on enforceable standards relating to their development for tourism in the coastal zone. These would reduce the use by many resort owners of fancy golf course developments as an environmental cover up to make it look as if they put a lot of effort into protecting the environment ….

  7. Simulated storm surge effects on freshwater coastal wetland soil porewater salinity and extractable ammonium levels: Implications for marsh recovery after storm surge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, M.; White, J. R.; Putnam-Duhon, L. A.

    2016-11-01

    Coastal wetland systems experience both short-term changes in salinity, such as those caused by wind-driven tides and storm surge, and long-term shifts caused by sea level rise. Salinity increases associated with storm surge are known to have significant effects on soil porewater chemistry, but there is little research on the effect of flooding length on salt penetration depth into coastal marsh soils. A simulated storm surge was imposed on intact soil columns collected from a non-vegetated mudflat and a vegetated marsh site in the Wax Lake Delta, LA. Triplicate intact cores were continuously exposed to a 35 salinity water column (practical salinity scale) for 1, 2, and 4 weeks and destructively sampled in order to measure porewater salinity and extractable NH4sbnd N at two cm depth intervals. Salinity was significantly higher in the top 8 cm for both the marsh and mudflat cores after one week of flooding. After four weeks of flooding, salinity was significantly higher in marsh and mudflat cores compared to the control (no salinity) cores throughout the profile for both sites. Extractable ammonium levels increased significantly in the marsh cores throughout the experiment, but there was only a marginally (p coastal marsh soil in just one week. This vertical intrusion of salt can potentially negatively impact macrophytes and associated microbial communities for significantly longer term post-storm surge.

  8. Succession of Denitrifying Community Composition in Coastal Wetland Soils Along a Salinity Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PIAO Zhe; ZHANG Wen-Wen; MA Shuai; LI Yu-Min; YIN Shi-Xue

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the effect of salinity on denitrification communities,soils along a salinity gradient (ranging from 7.32 to 1.70 mS cm-1) in a wetland along the Yellow Sea coastline in Jiangsu Province,China,were studied using both culture-dependent and -independent methods.Culture efforts yielded 82 isolates in total,81.7% of which were close relatives of Bacillus sp.based on partial sequences of their 16S rRNA genes.Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis based on 16S rRNA sequences suggested possible existence of bacterial community succession along the salinity gradient.Clone library analysis based on nosZ gene sequences (coding nitrous oxide reductase) showed that operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with α-proteobacteria dominated in all three soils,whereas those associated with β-and γ-subdivisions showed a clear succession.In the high salinity soil,only the OTUs associated with α-subdivision were found.In the medium salinity soil,small proportions ofβ- (6.5%) and γ-associated (19.6%) OTUs were found.In the low salinity soil,the proportions were further increased to 33% and 25% for β- and γ-Proteobacteria,respectively.Statistic analysis using Unifrac P test showed that nosZ-communities in different saline soils were significantly different from each other.It could be concluded that α-subdivision of nosZ-community tended to be sustained in high salinity environments whereas β- and γ-subdivisions,especially the former,tended to be sustained in low salinity environments.Salinity was the key determinant of nosZ-community composition in the environment.

  9. Development of Generic Tools for Coastal Early Warning and Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogaard Tom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent and historic high-impact events demonstrated coastal risk (Xynthia, Europe, 2010; Katrina, USA, 2005. This is only to get worse, because risk is increasing due to increase in both hazard intensity, frequency and increase in consequences (increased coastal development. Adaptation requires a re-evaluation of coastal disaster risk reduction (DRR strategies and a new mix of prevention, mitigation (e.g. limiting construction in flood-prone areas and preparedness (e.g. Early warning systems, EWS measures. Within the EU funded project RISC-KIT the focus is on preparedness measures and its aim is to demonstrate robustness and applicability of coastal EWS (Early Warning Systems and DSS (Decision Support Systems. Delft-FEWS, a generic tool for Early Warning Systems has been extended, to be applied at sites all across Europe. The challenges for developing a modern EWS are found in the integration of large data sets, specialised modules to process the data, and open interfaces to allow easy integration of existing modelling capacities. In response to these challenges, Delft-FEWS provides a state of the art EWS framework, which is highly customizable to the specific requirements of an individual organisation. For ten case study sites on all EU regional seas a EWS has been developed, to provide real-time (short-term forecasts and early warnings. The EWS component is a 2D model framework of hydro-meteo and morphological models which computes hazard intensities. The total expected impact of a hazard can be obtained by using a Bayesian network DSS. This DSS, which is incorporated in the Delft-FEWS platform is a tool that links coastal multi-hazards to their socioeconomic and environmental consequences. An important innovation of the EWS/DSS lies in its application in dual mode: as a forecast and warning system and as a consistent ex-ante planning tool to evaluate the long-term vulnerability due to multiple (low-frequency coastal hazards, under various

  10. Developing New Coastal Forest Restoration Products Based on Landsat, ASTER, and MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Graham, William; Smoot, James

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses an ongoing effort to develop new geospatial information products for aiding coastal forest restoration and conservation efforts in coastal Louisiana and Mississippi. This project employs Landsat, Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data in conjunction with airborne elevation data to compute coastal forest cover type maps and change detection products. Improved forest mapping products are needed to aid coastal forest restoration and management efforts of State and Federal agencies in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) region. In particular, such products may aid coastal forest land acquisition and conservation easement procurements. This region's forests are often disturbed and subjected to multiple biotic and abiotic threats, including subsidence, salt water intrusion, hurricanes, sea-level rise, insect-induced defoliation and mortality, altered hydrology, wildfire, and conversion to non-forest land use. In some cases, such forest disturbance has led to forest loss or loss of regeneration capacity. In response, a case study was conducted to assess and demonstrate the potential of satellite remote sensing products for improving forest type maps and for assessing forest change over the last 25 years. Change detection products are needed for assessing risks for specific priority coastal forest types, such as live oak and baldcypress-dominated forest. Preliminary results indicate Landsat time series data are capable of generating the needed forest type and change detection products. Useful classifications were obtained using 2 strategies: 1) general forest classification based on use of 3 seasons of Landsat data from the same year; and 2) classification of specific forest types of concern using a single date of Landsat data in which a given targeted type is spectrally distinct compared to adjacent forested cover. When available, ASTER data was

  11. A systems approach framework for the transition to sustainable development: Potential value based on coastal experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Tom S.; Bailly, Denis; Elmgren, Ragnar

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the value of the Systems Approach Framework (SAF) as a tool for the transition to sustainable development in coastal zone systems, based on 18 study sites in Europe, where the SAF was developed and tested. The knowledge gained from these experiments concerns the practical......-dependent and system-independent problems, and the inclusion of non-market evaluations. It also develops a real partnership among research, management, and stakeholders to establish a quantitative basis for collaborative decision making. Furthermore, the article argues that the transition to sustainable development...... for coastal systems requires consideration of the scale interdependency from individual to global and recognition of the probable global reorganizational emergence of scale-free networks that could cooperate to maximize the integrated sustainability among them...

  12. Application of risk perception and communication strategies to manage disease outbreaks of coastal shrimp farming in developing countires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan

    2008-01-01

    Coastal shrimp aquaculture is one of the major economic activities of the people of developing countries especially in Southeast Asia and Latin America. Risk and uncertainty are very common issues in coastal shrimp industry like in any other business. Various types of risks are associated in shri...

  13. Compacting coastal plain soils changes midrotation loblolly pine allometry by reducing root biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim H. Ludovici

    2008-01-01

    Factorial combinations of soil compaction and organic matter removal were replicated at the Long Term Site Productivity study in the Croatan National Forest, near New Bern, North Carolina, USA. Ten years after planting, 18 preselected loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees were destructively harvested to quantify treatment effects on total above- and...

  14. Harmful soil organisms in coastal foredunes involved in degeneration of Ammophila arenaria and Calammophila baltica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, W.H.; Troelstra, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of harmful soil organisms in the root zone of Ammophila arenaria (marram grass) was examined by biotesting. For this investigation three locations along the sandy shoreline of The Netherlands were chosen: Voorne, Texel, and Schouwen. At all three locations harmful organisms were detecte

  15. [Soil organic carbon content and its distribution pattern in Hangzhou Bay coastal wetlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xue-xin; Yang, Wen-ying; Wu, Ming; Jiang, Ke-yi

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the soil organic carbon (SOC) content and its distribution pattern in the natural intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands of Hangzhou Bay were studied, aimed to explore the effects of vegetation succession, exotic species invasion, and reclamation on the SOC in costal wetlands of the Bay. In intertidal zones, the surface SOC content ranged from 4.41 to 8.58 g x kg(-1), with an average of 6.45 g x kg(-1), and differed significantly under different vegetations, with a tendency of under Phragmites australis (8.56 +/- 0.04 g x kg(-1)) > Spartina alterniflora (7.31 +/- 0.08 g x kg(-1)) > Scirpus mariqueter (5.48 +/- 0.29 g x kg(-1)) > mudflats (4.47 +/- 0.09 g x kg(-1)); in reclaimed wetlands, the surface SOC content was 7.46 +/- 0.25 g x kg(-1) in the 1960s, 1.96 +/- 0.46 g x kg(-1) in the 1980s, and 5.12 +/- 0.16 g x kg(-1) in 2003, showing a trend of increased after an initial decrease with increasing reclamation year. The SOC in the profiles all showed a decreasing trend from the surface to the bottom. The SOC in intertidal zones and reclaimed wetlands was significantly negatively correlated with soil pH, and positively correlated with soil total nitrogen (TN), suggesting a large reserve of organic nitrogen in TN. The correlation between SOC and soil C/N ratio was not obvious in intertidal zones, but significantly positive in reclaimed wetlands, indicating that reclamation affected soil C/N ratio to a certain extent. This study showed that in the intertidal zones, soil carbon sequestration capacity increased gradually with plant community succession. However, the invasion of exotic species Spartina alternflora might decrease the capacity of carbon sequestration in intertidal zones. It was also found that the changes of soil moisture content, particle composition, vegetation coverage, and reclamation history were the main factors affecting the SOC distribution in reclaimed wetlands.

  16. Soil Carbon Inputs and Ecosystem Respiration: a Field Priming Experiment in Arctic Coastal Tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, L. S.; Zhu, B.; Bimueller, C.; Curtis, J. B.; Chafe, O.; Bill, M.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Torn, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    In Arctic ecosystems, climate change is expected to influence soil carbon stocks through changes in both plant carbon inputs and organic matter decomposition. This study addresses the potential for a priming effect, an interaction between these changes in which root-derived carbon inputs alter SOM decomposition rates via microbial biomass increases, co-metabolism of substrates, induced nitrogen limitation, or other possible mechanisms. The priming effect has been observed in numerous laboratory and greenhouse experiments, and is increasingly included in ecosystem models. Few studies, however, have evaluated the priming effect with in situ field manipulations. In a two-year field experiment in Barrow, Alaska, we tested for a priming effect under natural environmental variability. In September 2014 and August 2015, we added 6.1g of 13C-labeled glucose to 25cm diameter mesocosms, 15cm below the soil surface in the mineral soil layer. Over the following month, we quantified effects on the rate and temperature sensitivity of native (non-glucose) ecosystem respiration and GPP. Following the 2014 treatment, soil samples were collected at 1 and 3 weeks for microbial biomass carbon and 13C/12C analysis, and ion exchange membranes were buried for one week to assess nitrate and ammonium availability. In contrast with many laboratory incubation studies using soils from a broad range of ecosystems, we observed no significant priming effect. In spite of a clear signal of 13C-glucose decomposition in respired CO2 and microbial biomass, we detected no treatment effect on background ecosystem respiration or total microbial biomass carbon. Our findings suggest that glucose taken up by microbes was not used for production of additional SOM-decomposing enzymes, possibly due to stoichiometric limitations on enzyme production. To best inform models representing complex and dynamic ecosystems, this study calls for further research relating theory, laboratory findings, and field

  17. Development And Climate Change In Egypt: Focus On Coastal Resources

    OpenAIRE

    M. El Raey; Hagenstad, M.; Smith, J.; Agrawala, S.; M. van Aalst; Conway, D.; Moehner, A.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the integrated case study for Egypt carried out under an OECD project on Development and Climate Change. The report is structured around a three-tiered framework. First, recent climate trends and climate change scenarios for Egypt are assessed and key sectoral impacts are identified and ranked along multiple indicators to establish priorities for adaptation. Second, donor portfolios are analyzed to examine the proportion of development assistance activities af...

  18. Participatory Metalegal and Legal Processes for the Coastal Development Plan of Bolinao, Pangasinan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenceslao Asido Jr.

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Coastal Development Plan that was passed into law as the Municipal Fisheries Ordinance of Bolinao, Pangasinan, is a concrete example of community participation in policy development. Among the effective metalegal strategies used during the evolution of the plan into an ordinance were the lobbies staged by the federation of people’s organizations (KAISAKA, the Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council (MFARMC, and the Municipal Mayor. The capacity of various sectors to participate actively in the passage of the plan was enhanced through legal consultations and training provided by the Marine Fisheries Resources Management Project, in partnership with Tanggol Kalikasan, the legal arm of Haribon Foundation. The experience underscores the need for development projects to include the metalegal training of community constituents as a requisite for the latter to actively participate in the formulation of policies and laws for coastal resources management.

  19. A Collaborative Geospatial Shoreline Inventory Tool to Guide Coastal Development and Habitat Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Gies

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We are developing a geospatial inventory tool that will guide habitat conservation, restoration and coastal development and benefit several stakeholders who seek mitigation and adaptation strategies to shoreline changes resulting from erosion and sea level rise. The ESRI Geoportal Server, which is a type of web portal used to find and access geospatial information in a central repository, is customized by adding a Geoinventory tool capability that allows any shoreline related data to be searched, displayed and analyzed on a map viewer. Users will be able to select sections of the shoreline and generate statistical reports in the map viewer to allow for comparisons. The tool will also facilitate map-based discussion forums and creation of user groups to encourage citizen participation in decisions regarding shoreline stabilization and restoration, thereby promoting sustainable coastal development.

  20. COASTALT Project's contribution to the development and dissemination of coastal altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, P.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite altimeters have been monitoring the global ocean for 20 years, with an excellent degree of accuracy; but in the coastal strip data are normally flagged as bad because of a number of technical problems, and therefore rejected. However this situation is rapidly changing: prompted by the tantalizing prospect of recovering 20 years of data over the coastal ocean, and encouraged by the improved suitability for coastal applications of new and future altimeters (like those on Cryosat-2, AltiKa and Sentinel-3), a lively community of researchers in coastal altimetry has coalesced in the last few years, and is developing techniques to recover useful measurements of sea level and significant wave height in the coastal strip, as well as implementing and promoting new applications. The major space agencies are strongly supporting R&D in this new field with initiatives like ESA's COASTALT (for Envisat) and CNES' PISTACH (for Jason-2). The coastal altimetry community holds regular workshops (see http://www.coastalt.eu/community) where the science and techniques of coastal altimetry are reviewed and various applications are showcased and discussed. The present contribution revisits briefly the many recent technical improvements that are contributing to the steady progress of this new field and in particular focuses on the results of the COASTALT project, which has recently concluded. COASTALT has been an excellent incubator of ideas and new techniques for the improvement of coastal altimetry: first of all it has contributed to establish user requirements for this new field, and it has defined detailed product specifications for the new coastal altimetry products and produced the relevant documentation. At the same time COASTALT has tackled the two main areas of improvement for coastal altimetry. These are: 1) retracking, i.e. fitting a waveform model to the waveforms to obtain an estimate of the geophysical parameters: and 2) designing and validating improved coastal

  1. Development and application of fuzzy indicator for assessment of soil water flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite abundant rainfall, southeastern sandy Coastal Plains of the USA can be droughty because of low water holding capacity soils. A Sentek frequency domain reflectometry sensor was used to measure volumetric soil water content at 30-minute time steps and 10-centimeter depth intervals to 1 meter. ...

  2. The role of bigleaf maple in soil chemistry and nutrient dynamics in coastal temperate forests

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Tanya D.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum Pursh) in a forest dominated by Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziessi (Mirb.) Franco] and western hemlock [Tsuga heterophylla (RAF.) Sarg.] was studied in a paired-plot design through an examination of the annual contribution of bigleaf maple litterfall to nutrient flux, its rate of decay, and its properties within the forest floor and mineral soil. Compared to conifer plots, bigleaf maple plots had litterfall significantly higher in all elements...

  3. Modelling the impacts of coastal hazards on land-use development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, J.; Vafeidis, A. T.

    2009-04-01

    Approximately 10% of the world's population live in close proximity to the coast and are potentially susceptible to tropical or extra-tropical storm-surge events. These events will be exacerbated by projected sea-level rise (SLR) in the 21st century. Accelerated SLR is one of the more certain impacts of global warming and can have major effects on humans and ecosystems. Of particular vulnerability are densely populated coastal urban centres containing globally important commercial resources, with assets in the billions USD. Moreover, the rates of growth of coastal populations, which are reported to be growing faster than the global means, are leading to increased human exposure to coastal hazards. Consequently, potential impacts of coastal hazards can be significant in the future and will depend on various factors but actual impacts can be considerably reduced by appropriate human decisions on coastal land-use management. At the regional scale, it is therefore necessary to identify which coastal areas are vulnerable to these events and explore potential long-term responses reflected in land usage. Land-use change modelling is a technique which has been extensively used in recent years for studying the processes and mechanisms that govern the evolution of land use and which can potentially provide valuable information related to the future coastal development of regions that are vulnerable to physical forcings. Although studies have utilized land-use classification maps to determine the impact of sea-level rise, few use land-use projections to make these assessments, and none have considered adaptive behaviour of coastal dwellers exposed to hazards. In this study a land-use change model, which is based on artificial neural networks (ANN), was employed for predicting coastal urban and agricultural development. The model uses as inputs a series of spatial layers, which include information on population distribution, transportation networks, existing urban centres, and

  4. Soil moisture control over autumn season methane flux, Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Sturtevant

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of annual budgets of methane (CH4 efflux in arctic regions are severely constrained by the paucity of non-summer measurements. Moreover, the incomplete understanding of the ecosystem-level sensitivity of CH4 emissions to changes in tundra moisture makes prediction of future CH4 release from the Arctic extremely difficult. This study addresses some of these research gaps by presenting an analysis of eddy covariance and chamber measurements of CH4 efflux and supporting environmental variables during the autumn season and associated beginning of soil freeze-up at our large-scale water manipulation site near Barrow, Alaska (the Biocomplexity Experiment. We found that the autumn season CH4 emission is significant (accounting for 21–25% of the average growing season emission, and that this emission is mostly controlled by the fraction of inundated landscape, atmospheric turbulence, and the decline in unfrozen water during the period of soil freezing. Drainage decreased autumn CH4 emission by a factor of 2.4 compared to our flooded treatment. Flooding slowed the soil freezing process which has implications for extending elevated CH4 emissions longer into the winter season.

  5. [Content of natural uranium in the lichens and distribution of forms in the soil at the coastal area of Lakes Itkul and Sinara of Chelyabinsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyudina, A L; Deryagin, V V; Levina, S G

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of natural uranium in soils superaquatic and transeluvial positions of the coastal landscape of lakes Itkul and Sinara, and liches on this site.The necessity of analysis of the content item in accordance with its form of occurrence in the natural environment. The peculiarities of the migration, accumulation and distribution of uranium in soils of the mountain areas of the watersheds of lakes Itkul and Sinara are found. Identified of specificity species lichens on the content of uranium in the substrate.

  6. Visually assessing the level of development and soil surface stability of cyanobacterially dominated biological soil crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, J.; Phillips, S.L.; Witwicki, D.L.; Miller, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an integral part of dryland ecosystems and often included in long-term ecological monitoring programs. Estimating moss and lichen cover is fairly easy and non-destructive, but documenting cyanobacterial level of development (LOD) is more difficult. It requires sample collection for laboratory analysis, which causes soil surface disturbance. Assessing soil surface stability also requires surface disturbance. Here we present a visual technique to assess cyanobacterial LOD and soil surface stability. We define six development levels of cyanobacterially dominated soils based on soil surface darkness. We sampled chlorophyll a concentrations (the most common way of assessing cyanobacterial biomass), exopolysaccharide concentrations, and soil surface aggregate stability from representative areas of each LOD class. We found that, in the laboratory and field, LOD classes were effective at predicting chlorophyll a soil concentrations (R2=68-81%), exopolysaccharide concentrations (R2=71%), and soil aggregate stability (R2=77%). We took representative photos of these classes to construct a field guide. We then tested the ability of field crews to distinguish these classes and found this technique was highly repeatable among observers. We also discuss how to adjust this index for the different types of BSCs found in various dryland regions.

  7. Coupled Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Sound in Coastal Ocean for Renewable Ocean Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Wen; Jung, Ki Won; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea; Deng, Z. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An underwater sound model was developed to simulate sound propagation from marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) devices or offshore wind (OSW) energy platforms. Finite difference methods were developed to solve the 3D Helmholtz equation for sound propagation in the coastal environment. A 3D sparse matrix solver with complex coefficients was formed for solving the resulting acoustic pressure field. The Complex Shifted Laplacian Preconditioner (CSLP) method was applied to solve the matrix system iteratively with MPI parallelization using a high performance cluster. The sound model was then coupled with the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for simulating sound propagation generated by human activities, such as construction of OSW turbines or tidal stream turbine operations, in a range-dependent setting. As a proof of concept, initial validation of the solver is presented for two coastal wedge problems. This sound model can be useful for evaluating impacts on marine mammals due to deployment of MHK devices and OSW energy platforms.

  8. Developing an effective adaptive monitoring network to support integrated coastal management in a multiuser nature reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim Vugteveen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We elaborate the necessary conceptual and strategic elements for developing an effective adaptive monitoring network to support Integrated Coastal Management (ICM in a multiuser nature reserve in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region. We discuss quality criteria and enabling actions essential to accomplish and sustain monitoring excellence to support ICM. The Wadden Sea Long-Term Ecosystem Research project (WaLTER was initiated to develop an adaptive monitoring network and online data portal to better understand and support ICM in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region. Our comprehensive approach integrates ecological and socioeconomic data and links research-driven and policy-driven monitoring for system analysis using indicators of pressures, state, benefits, and responses. The approach and concepts we elaborated are transferable to other coastal regions to accomplish ICM in complex social-ecological systems in which scientists, multisectoral stakeholders, resource managers, and governmental representatives seek to balance long-term ecological, economic, and social objectives within natural limits.

  9. Soil degradation: a global problem endangering sustainable development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Soil degradation, defined as lowering and losing of soil functions, is becoming more and more serious worldwide in recent decades, and poses a threat to agricultural production and terrestrial ecosystem. It is estimated that nearly 2 billion ha of soil resources in the world have been degraded,namely approximately 22% of the total cropland, pasture, forest, and woodland. Globally, soil erosion,chemical deterioration and physical degradation are the important parts amongst various types of soil degradation. As a natural process, soil degradation can be enhanced or dampened by a variety of human activities such as inappropriate agricultural management, overgrazing, deforestation, etc.Degraded soil means less food. As a result of soil degradation, it is estimated that about 11.9-13.4% of the global agricultural supply has been lost in the past five decades. Besides, soil degradation is also associated with off-site problems of sedimentation, climate change, watershed functions, and changes in natural habitats leading to loss of genetic stock and biodiversity. Therefore, it is essential to combat soil degradation at different levels and scales worldwide, not only for food security and ecological health, but also for the guarantee of global sustainable development.

  10. The Coastal Area Development Using GIS (Review of GIS Application Models)

    OpenAIRE

    Prastowo Sutanto

    2004-01-01

    GIS, Geographical Information System, is a means that an be used to plan and to develop the coastal area because in carrying out the analysis this system combines the space data and their  attributes. The activities done among others the prototype development of algae cultivation and tourism ativities, the development of fish pond location, the reclamation of the Jakarta Bay, and the concept of development the floating “Keramba” for pearl oysters and white sea fish similar to sole. GIS analys...

  11. Relationship of Forest Vegetation to Soils on Geological Formations of the Oklahoma Gulf Coastal Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond John Taylor

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Portions of this paper were recently presented at the Cross Timbers Symposium at the Botany 2005 Symposium in Austin, Texas. I have come to realize the importance of this data as a baseline for the composition of forests in the Gulf Coastal Plain. Since the data were collected about 40 years ago, many changes have occurred including our expanding population, increase in rural housing, construction of pipelines, and clearing for pasture and cultivation. Many of the sites studied have been modified or completely disappeared. Another important change is the tremendous expansion of Juniperus virginiana (red cedar due to absence of fire. In the sampling of these 13 forests 40 years ago, this species was found in only one stand, and as a sapling. Other invasive plants include Ligustrum sinense (privet, an evergreen shrub that can expand into clones by underground roots, and the invasive vine Lonicera sempervirens (Japanese honeysuckle which is controlled in many areas by cattle grazing. Both of these species will continue to expand and affect our native flora.

  12. Strategy of Developing Tomini Bay for Economic Growth of Coastal Community in Central Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzakir Muzakir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to analyze the potential and the strategy of developing Tomini Bay to improve the economic growth of the coastal community in Central Sulawesi. The research is located in four regencies in Central Sulawesi. The method uses the descriptive analysis using SWOT analysis. The research result shows that the potential of fisheries resources in Poso Regency, Parigi Moutong Regency, Tojo Una-Una Regency, and Banggai Regency can support the development of Tomini Bay region based on fisheries in order to accelerate the economic growth of coastal communities in Central Sulawesi. The potential fishery resources that can support the development of Tomini Bay area are the potential of fisheries, marine and coastal infrastructure, social economy and geographic conditions in four regencies. The strategies are building the marketing network for fishery products both the catching and cultivation, improving the fishery human resouce capacity, controlling the fishery product quality, and increasing the social awareness to maintain the ecosystem sustainability. To optimize the utilization of Tomini Bay, it is suggested to improve the involvement of the regional government, the central government, and also the private sector and the whole community.

  13. Developing an integration tool for soil contamination assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Romero, Maria; Zingg, Felix; Pérez-Álvarez, José Miguel; Madejón, Paula; Kotb Abd-Elmabod, Sameh

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades, huge soil areas have been negatively influenced or altered in multiples forms. Soils and, consequently, underground water, have been contaminated by accumulation of contaminants from agricultural activities (fertilizers and pesticides) industrial activities (harmful material dumping, sludge, flying ashes) and urban activities (hydrocarbon, metals from vehicle traffic, urban waste dumping). In the framework of the RECARE project, local partners across Europe are focusing on a wide range of soil threats, as soil contamination, and aiming to develop effective prevention, remediation and restoration measures by designing and applying targeted land management strategies (van Lynden et al., 2013). In this context, the Guadiamar Green Corridor (Southern Spain) was used as a case study, aiming to obtain soil data and new information in order to assess soil contamination. The main threat in the Guadiamar valley is soil contamination after a mine spill occurred on April 1998. About four hm3 of acid waters and two hm3 of mud, rich in heavy metals, were released into the Agrio and Guadiamar rivers affecting more than 4,600 ha of agricultural and pasture land. Main trace elements contaminating soil and water were As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Tl and Zn. The objective of the present research is to develop informatics tools that integrate soil database, models and interactive platforms for soil contamination assessment. Preliminary results were obtained related to the compilation of harmonized databases including geographical, hydro-meteorological, soil and socio-economic variables based on spatial analysis and stakeholder's consultation. Further research will be modellization and upscaling at the European level, in order to obtain a scientifically-technical predictive tool for the assessment of soil contamination.

  14. Integrating Climate Science, Ecosystem Modeling, and Resource Management to Develop a Coastal Master Plan for Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, D.; Sharon, C.; Knopman, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority of Louisiana (CPRA) asked the RAND Corporation to develop a new Planning Tool to support Louisiana's 2012 Coastal Master Plan. The Planning Tool integrates climate science, ecosystem modeling, and resource management planning to comparing different risk reduction and coastal restoration projects and for developing groups of projects, or alternatives, for consideration for the Master Plan. The Planning Tool presents its results in an interactive visualization environment to support deliberation by CPRA decisionmakers and stakeholders. The Planning Tool uses new standardized estimates of project costs, planning and construction duration, and other project attributes along with science-based model estimates of project effects on risk reduction, land building, and ecosystem services. The Planning Tool considers how outcomes would differ under different future scenarios reflecting climate change, demographics, and other uncertainties. The Planning Tool uses a constrained optimization algorithm to develop a range of alternatives that meet CPRA's desired outcomes with respect to future flood risk reduction, coast-wide land area, and other decision criteria. Beginning in 2011, CPRA used the Planning Tool to compare hundreds of possible hurricane flood risk reduction and coastal restoration projects under several scenarios of long-term future conditions. CPRA next used the Planning Tool to develop and analyze hundreds of different alternatives that together would best meet Louisiana's goals of reducing hurricane flood risk and achieving a sustainable landscape. The Planning Tool then enabled CPRA to specify planning parameters such as total available funding, funding splits between risk reduction and restoration projects, and minimum levels of projected achievement of goals for ecosystem service and risk reduction decision criteria. Using this information, the Planning Tool then identified how those alternatives could be

  15. Development of an in-situ soil structure characterization methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debos, Endre; Kriston, Sandor

    2015-04-01

    The agricultural cultivation has several direct and indirect effects on the soil properties, among which the soil structure degradation is the best known and most detectable one. Soil structure degradation leads to several water and nutrient management problems, which reduce the efficiency of agricultural production. There are several innovative technological approaches aiming to reduce these negative impacts on the soil structure. The tests, validation and optimization of these methods require an adequate technology to measure the impacts on the complex soil system. This study aims to develop an in-situ soil structure and root development testing methodology, which can be used in field experiments and which allows one to follow the real time changes in the soil structure - evolution / degradation and its quantitative characterization. The method is adapted from remote sensing image processing technology. A specifically transformed A/4 size scanner is placed into the soil into a safe depth that cannot be reached by the agrotechnical treatments. Only the scanner USB cable comes to the surface to allow the image acquisition without any soil disturbance. Several images from the same place can be taken throughout the vegetation season to follow the soil consolidation and structure development after the last tillage treatment for the seedbed preparation. The scanned image of the soil profile is classified using supervised image classification, namely the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. The resulting image has two principal classes, soil matrix and pore space and other complementary classes to cover the occurring thematic classes, like roots, stones. The calculated data is calibrated with filed sampled porosity data. As the scanner is buried under the soil with no changes in light conditions, the image processing can be automated for better temporal comparison. Besides the total porosity each pore size fractions and their distributions can be calculated for

  16. Mapping and conservation importance rating of the South African coastal vegetation as an aid to development planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raal, PA

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available , more meaningful spatial scale, for example bio-geographical regions, was rarely established. Based on the needs and the recognised problems, the CSIR developed a protocol for coastal vegetation mapping which included the following: (1) Simplification...

  17. The significance of soils and soil science towards realization of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia D.; Bouma, Johan; Wallinga, Jakob; Tittonell, Pablo; Smith, Pete; Cerdà, Artemi; Montanarella, Luca; Quinton, John N.; Pachepsky, Yakov; van der Putten, Wim H.; Bardgett, Richard D.; Moolenaar, Simon; Mol, Gerben; Jansen, Boris; Fresco, Louise O.

    2016-04-01

    In this forum paper we discuss how soil scientists can help to reach the recently adopted UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the most effective manner. Soil science, as a land-related discipline, has important links to several of the SDGs, which are demonstrated through the functions of soils and the ecosystem services that are linked to those functions (see graphical abstract in the Supplement). We explore and discuss how soil scientists can rise to the challenge both internally, in terms of our procedures and practices, and externally, in terms of our relations with colleague scientists in other disciplines, diverse groups of stakeholders and the policy arena. To meet these goals we recommend the following steps to be taken by the soil science community as a whole: (i) embrace the UN SDGs, as they provide a platform that allows soil science to demonstrate its relevance for realizing a sustainable society by 2030; (ii) show the specific value of soil science: research should explicitly show how using modern soil information can improve the results of inter- and transdisciplinary studies on SDGs related to food security, water scarcity, climate change, biodiversity loss and health threats; (iii) take leadership in overarching system analysis of ecosystems, as soils and soil scientists have an integrated nature and this places soil scientists in a unique position; (iii) raise awareness of soil organic matter as a key attribute of soils to illustrate its importance for soil functions and ecosystem services; (iv) improve the transfer of knowledge through knowledge brokers with a soil background; (v) start at the basis: educational programmes are needed at all levels, starting in primary schools, and emphasizing practical, down-to-earth examples; (vi) facilitate communication with the policy arena by framing research in terms that resonate with politicians in terms of the policy cycle or by considering drivers, pressures and responses affecting impacts of land

  18. The significance of soils and soil science towards realization of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Bouma, Johan; Wallinga, Jakob; Tittonell, Pablo; SMith, Pete; Cerda, Artermi; Montanarella, Luca; Quinton, John; Pachepsky, Yakov; van der Putten, Wim; BArdgett, Richard; Moolenaar, Simon; Mol, Gerben; Janssen, Boris; Fresco, Louise

    2017-04-01

    In this research we discuss how soil scientists can help to reach the recently adopted UN Sustainable Development Goals in the most effective manner. Soil science, as a land-related discipline has important links to several of the SDGs which are demonstrated through the functions of soils and the ecosystem services that are linked to those functions. We explore and discuss how soil scientists can rise to the challenge both internally, in terms of our procedures and practices, and externally in terms of our relations with colleague scientists in other disciplines, diverse groups of stakeholders and the policy arena. To meet these goals we recommend the following steps to be taken by the soil science community as a whole: (i) Embrace the UN Sustainable Development Goals, as they provide a platform that allows soil science to demonstrate its relevance for realizing a sustainable society by 2030; (ii) Show the specific value of soil science: Research should explicitly show how using modern soil information can improve the results of inter- and trans-disciplinary studies on SDGs related to food security, water scarcity, climate change, biodiversity loss and health threats; (iii) Given the integrative nature of soils, soil scientists are in a unique position to take leadership in overarching systems-analyses of ecosystems; (iii) Raise awareness of soil organic matter as a key attribute of soils to illustrate its importance for soil functions and ecosystem services; (iv) Improve the transfer of knowledge through knowledge brokers with a soil background; (v) Start at the basis: educational programs are needed at all levels, starting in primary schools, and emphasizing practical, down-to-earth examples; (vi) Facilitate communication with the policy arena by framing research in terms that resonate with politicians in terms of the policy cycle or by considering drivers, pressures and responses affecting impacts of land use change; and finally (vii) All this is only possible

  19. Hydrologic index development and application to selected Coastwide Reference Monitoring System sites and Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, Gregg A.; Swenson, Erick M.

    2012-01-01

    Hourly time-series salinity and water-level data are collected at all stations within the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) network across coastal Louisiana. These data, in addition to vegetation and soils data collected as part of CRMS, are used to develop a suite of metrics and indices to assess wetland condition in coastal Louisiana. This document addresses the primary objectives of the CRMS hydrologic analytical team, which were to (1) adopt standard time-series analytical techniques that could effectively assess spatial and temporal variability in hydrologic characteristics across the Louisiana coastal zone on site, project, basin, and coastwide scales and (2) develop and apply an index based on wetland hydrology that can describe the suitability of local hydrology in the context of maximizing the productivity of wetland plant communities. Approaches to quantifying tidal variability (least squares harmonic analysis) and partitioning variability of time-series data to various time scales (spectral analysis) are presented. The relation between marsh elevation and the tidal frame of a given hydrograph is described. A hydrologic index that integrates water-level and salinity data, which are collected hourly, with vegetation data that are collected annually is developed. To demonstrate its utility, the hydrologic index is applied to 173 CRMS sites across the coast, and variability in index scores across marsh vegetation types (fresh, intermediate, brackish, and saline) is assessed. The index is also applied to 11 sites located in three Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act projects, and the ability of the index to convey temporal hydrologic variability in response to climatic stressors and restoration measures, as well as the effect that this community may have on wetland plant productivity, is illustrated.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF SOIL EROSION INDEX MODEL IN TAIWAN WATERSHEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Chin CHEN; Seasir CHIEN; Cheng-Daw HSIEH

    2001-01-01

    With steep terrain and excessive rainfall, Taiwan is affected by severe soil erosion caused by summer typhoons and storms that bring intensive rainfall and rapid fl . However, the actual erosion is much less than the value predicted by the USLE because the soil erosion types in Taiwan are different from those in America which has mild slope and dry weather. Developing a soil erosion index model applicable to Taiwan is the important goal of this research. Five factors, namely, soil texture, rainfall type,slope steepness, ground cover and land use, are included in this model. Soil index factor is measured by Km from the USLE model, and other index factors are calculated from local field data. The soil erosion index model (SEIM) is as follows:SE = 6 × 10-7 AI for AI≤ 50 SE = 0.233AI1.8 for AI > 50 where Al is the total index value, and SE is the soil erosion quantity (ton/ha/yr). After being properly calibrated and verified, SEIM proves to be useful in planning soil and water conservation, and assessing soil erosion impacts in Taiwan.

  1. Landscape development in the context of soil distribution in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Processes of landscape change can be assessed by studying the distribution of soil types and their connection to climate, the geology, and land use. In this context, even in areas where no virgin soils are available, paleosols pre-dating the introduction of agriculture can be utilized for estimating potential soil development without human impact. Soil distribution in Jordan follows closely the climate and topography: specific soil orders can be found within the dry and hot subtropical, subhumid-semiarid, semiarid-arid, and arid regions. The pattern of soil and paleosol distribution in Jordan points to an important role of the geology (bedrock and relief), and of climate in their formation, both locally such as in the vicinity of the ancient site of Abila, and regionally in the whole country. In contrast, the impact of land use appears relatively limited: overall erosion has been estimated not to exceed the expected geological rate, and Jordan is considered to be in the stable state of completed geologic erosion. This is further supported by strongly varying soil properties and archaeological material on agricultural fields, which suggests that overall erosion processes during historical periods were limited. The presence of a quite uniform 4 m thick loess cover around the site of Umm el-Jimal in north-east Jordan suggests that aeolian deposits are probably the by far dominating parent material of current soils in northern Jordan. In this context, an apparent division of some soil profiles into subsoil and topsoil could correspond to dominant in-situ soil formation out of bedrock weathering at the bottom, while the upper part of the profiles could correspond to aeolian dust as main parent material. A stone line or lithological discontinuity separating these two parts of the profile might refer to a major erosion event. If true, this could indicate that current soils in Jordan might represent a mixture of at least two phases of soil development with probably

  2. An experimental approach for archeological soil micromorphology: building a model for site taphonomy in coastal shell middens of the Beagle Channel (Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Andrea; Suarez Villagran, Ximena; Madella, Marco; Vila, Asumpcio; Estevez, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    There are still many archaeological contexts where soil micromorphology has been little applied. Examples of such are anthropic shell deposits, common in coastal settings worldwide. These archaeological sites have complex stratigraphies composed mainly of shell from diverse species of local mollusks and gastropods. They have the peculiarity of being highly porous sediments with a coarse fraction that is dominated by gravel-sized bioclastic remains (shell, fish bones) and a fine fraction composed of organic material (charcoal, organic matter). The use of soil micromorphology in shell deposits was started by the Spanish-Argentinean research team working in Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) since 1986. This project focused on excavation of hunter-gatherer sites from the contact period. One of the main objectives was to develop a detailed excavation method for shell middens that maximized the amount of recorded data during archaeological excavation. In this perspective, microstratigraphy was conceived as a fundamental complement for the study of site formation processes, as it would provide with high definition data for identification of shell accumulation episodes, trampling on site, abandonment periods, taphonomic alterations etc. A reference collection of known environmental and anthropic control features, such as hearths, trampling areas, wood ashes from local species, among others, was built to help in the microscopic characterization of archaeological samples. In this work, we analyze this experimental collection and compare it with samples from the Tunel VII archaeological site, located in the northern coast of the Beagle Channel and dated from the 18th-19th centuries. The set of modern samples included: trampling area from an animal pathway; beach deposit; forest litter; soil under the forest; hearths lit in diverse contexts (on the prairie, the beach and from the archaeologist camp site); and experimental burnt valves of Mytilus edulis, the main malacological

  3. Development and application of a soil organic matter-based soil quality index in mineralized terrane of the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. W. Blecker; L. L. Stillings; M. C. Amacher; J. A. Ippolito; N. M. DeCrappeo

    2012-01-01

    Soil quality indices provide a means of distilling large amounts of data into a single metric that evaluates the soil's ability to carry out key ecosystem functions. Primarily developed in agroecosytems, then forested ecosystems, an index using the relation between soil organic matter and other key soil properties in more semi-arid systems of the Western US...

  4. Development of a High-Resolution Coastal Circulation Model for the Ocean Observatory in Lunenburg Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; SHENG Jinyu

    2005-01-01

    An advanced ocean observatory has been established in Lunenburg Bay of Nova Scotia, Canada as part of an interdisciplinary research project of marine environmental prediction. The development of a high-resolution coastal circulation model is one of important components of the observatory. The model horizontal resolution is 60 m and the vertical resolution is about 1 m. The coastal circulation model is used to simulate the semi-diurnal tidal circulation and associated nonlinear dynamics with the M2 forcing specified at the model open boundaries. The model is also used to simulate the storm-induced circulation in the bay during Hurricane Juan in September 2003, with the model forcing to be the combination of tides and remotely generated waves specified at the model open boundaries and wind stress applied at the sea surface. The model results demonstrate strong interactions between the local wind stress, tidal forcing, and remotely generated waves during this period. Comparison of model results with the surface elevation and current observations demonstrates that the coastal circulation model has reasonable skills in simulating the tidal and storm-induced circulation in the bay.

  5. The Soil Spectroscopy Group and the development of a global soil spectral library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossel, R. Viscarra Rossel; Soil Spectroscopy Group

    2009-04-01

    This collaboration aims to develop a global soil spectral library and to establish a community of practice for soil spectroscopy. This will help progress soil spectroscopy from an almost purely research tool to a more widely adopted and useful technique for soil analysis, proximal soil sensing, soil monitoring and digital soil mapping. The initiative started in April 2008 with a proposal for the project to be conducted in a number of stages to investigate the following topics: Global soil diversity and variation can be characterised using diffuse reflectance spectra. Soil spectral calibrations can be used to predict soil properties globally. Soil spectroscopy can be a useful tool for digital soil mapping. Currently, the soil spectral library is being developed using legacy soil organic carbon (OC) and clay content data and vis-NIR (350-2500 nm) spectra, but in future we aim to include other soil properties and mid-IR (2500-25000 nm) spectra. The group already has more than 40 collaborators from six continents and 20 countries and the library consists of 5223 spectra from 43 countries. The library accounts for spectra from approximately only 22% of the world's countries, some of which are poorly represented with only very few spectra. We would like to encourage participation from as many countries as possible, particularly, we would like contributions from counties in Central and South America, Mexico, Canada, Russia and countries in Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia. We are missing a lot of countries and for some, e.g. China we have only very few data! Do you want to join the group and contribute spectra to the global library? The requirements for contributing spectra to the global library are as follows: Spectra collected in the 350-2500 nm range every 1 nm. At least soil OC and clay content data but also any other soil chemical, physical, biological and mineralogical data, noting which analytical techniques were used. Coordinates (in WGS84 format) for each sample

  6. Main Clay Minerals in Soils of Fujian Province,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGUO; ZHANGWEIMING; 等

    1996-01-01

    The clay minerals of more than 200 soil samples collected from various sites of Fujian Province were studied by the X-ray diffraction method and transmission electron microscopy to study their distribution and evolution.Montmorillonite was found in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit,and some lateritic red soil,red soil and yellow soil with a low weathering degree.Chlorite existed mainly in coastal solonchak and paddy soil developed from marine deposit.1.4nm intergradient mineral appeared frequently in yellow soil,red soil and lateritic red soil.The content of 1.4nm intergradient mineral increased with the decrease of weathering degree from lateritic red soil to red soil to yellow soil.Hydrous micas were more in coastal solonchak,paddy soils derived from marine deposit,lacustrine deposit and river deposit.and puple soil from purple shale than in other soils.Kaolinte was the most important clay mineral in the soils iun this province.The higher the soil weathering degree,the more the kaolinite existed.From yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil,kaolinite increased gradually,Kaolinite was the predominant clay mineral accompanied by few other minerals in typical lateritic red soil. Tubular halloysite was a widespread clay mineral in soils of Fujian Province with varying quantities.The soil derived from the paent rocks rich in feldspar contained more tubular halloysite.Spheroidal halloysite was found in a red soil and a paddy soil developed from olivine basalt gibbsite in the soils in this district was largely“primary gibbsite” which formed in the early weathering stage.Gibbsite decreased with the increase of weathering degree from yellow soil to red soil to lateritic red soil.Goethite also decreased in the same sequence while hematite increased.

  7. Ecological and Social Evaluation of Coastal Tourism Destination Development: A Case Study of Balekambang, East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchman Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is an important sector in developing countries to support economic growth, and coastal areas are famous destinations in tourism. The plan and design for Balekambang coastal area as a tourism destination in East Java, Indonesia has been formulated and published. However, it seems lack ecological and social perspectives. This study examines coral reefs structure as one of the ecological parameter and tourist perspectives as social parameter for destination development evaluation. Twenty belt-transects were established along Balekambang coastline, and then divided into three sections, the east, the centre and the west sections. Every belt-transect was 200m in length and consists of 15 plots 1 x 2m. The tourist perspectives to Balekambang were determined using questionnaire among 234 respondents. Based on the Morisita similarity index, the coral reef of east section consists of 2 zones, the centre consists of 5 zones and west section consists of 4 zones. The Shannon diversity index (H’ among zones at every location was ranged. The diversity index of the east section ranged from 2.07 to 2.72, the central section ranged from 1.32 to 4.20, and the west section ranged from 3.13 to 4.20. Zones that were close to the coastline had lowest diversity indices than zones that located far from the coastline. Mostly, tourists stated that Balekambang was interesting, but the object of tourism should be added. Respondent knew there were forest surrounding Balekambang, and it has the possibility to develop as tourism destination. These findings argue that the forest conversion to cottage area that planned by the local government in the west section should be reviewed. It seems forest in the west section should be developed as a forest park to meet tourist needs and redistribute tourist concentration in the coastline. Keywords: Ecological and social evaluation, coastal, tourism, sustainable development, East Java.

  8. Soil development in OSL dated sandy dune substrates under Quercus robur Forest (Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, J. M.; Nierop, Ir. K.; Verstraten, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Coastal dune landscapes are very dynamic. The present distribution of vegetation and soil is the result of over 2000 years of natural processes and human management. The initial soil development was controlled by an increase of the organic matter content, which consisted mainly of decomposed roots of grasses (rhizomull), and a decrease of the soil pH to 3-4 by decalcification. This stage was followed by the development of a deciduous forest, which was dominated by Quercus robur. Since 1600 AD, a large part of the deciduous forest that dominated the east side of the coastal dune landscape transferred in expensive residential areas and urbanizations. Nevertheless some parts of the oak forest belt remained. The present forest soils are acid and the controlling soil processes are leaching of sesquioxides and storage of organic matter in mormoder humus forms. The sustainability of ecosystems is closely related to the quality of the humus form, controlling nutrient cycling and water supply. Therefore, improve of knowledge of humus form development and properties is important. We applied soil micromorphology and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to investigate more details of humus form development at two locations (Duivendrift and Hoek van Klaas) in the coastal dune area of the Amsterdamse Waterleidingduinen (near Haarlem, the Netherlands). However, to understand forest soil development, including the organic matter composition in the humus form, the age of the substrate and the forest is required. Therefore, we used tradition techniques as pollen analysis and radiocarbon dating but also the recently introduced optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating technique. OSL dating works excellent for aeolian sandy deposits with a high percentage of quartz grains. The OSL age is defined as the time after the last bleaching by solar radiation of mineral grains. Or in other words, the start of a stable period without sand drifting. In the Ah horizons we

  9. Spatial and temporal analysis of Holocene coastal development: applications to erosion assessment and cultural heritage mitigation on Svalbard

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    High geomorphic and climatic variability in Arctic coastlines makes evaluating future coastal erosion in a changing climate a challenge. Predictions must, among other things, incorporate modifications to sediment supply and accommodation space, changes in the permafrost regime, climate variability including rising air and sea temperatures, stronger winds, less sea ice, and increased precipitation. This thesis explores processes and climate variables associated with coastal development through...

  10. A Systems Approach Framework for the Transition to Sustainable Development: Potential Value Based on Coastal Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom S. Hopkins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the value of the Systems Approach Framework (SAF as a tool for the transition to sustainable development in coastal zone systems, based on 18 study sites in Europe, where the SAF was developed and tested. The knowledge gained from these experiments concerns the practical aspects of (a governance in terms of policy effectiveness, (b sustainability science in terms of applying transdisciplinary science to social-ecological problems, and (c simulation analysis in terms of quantifying dysfunctions in complex systems. This new knowledge can help broaden our perspectives on how research can be changed to better serve society. The infusion of systems thinking into research and policy making leads to a preference for multi-issue instead of single-issue studies, an expansion from static to dynamic indicators, an understanding of the boundaries between system-dependent and system-independent problems, and the inclusion of non-market evaluations. It also develops a real partnership among research, management, and stakeholders to establish a quantitative basis for collaborative decision making. Furthermore, the article argues that the transition to sustainable development for coastal systems requires consideration of the scale interdependency from individual to global and recognition of the probable global reorganizational emergence of scale-free networks that could cooperate to maximize the integrated sustainability among them.

  11. Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

    1993-06-01

    The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

  12. Development of management tools for accidental radiological contamination of the French coastal areas - Development of management tools for accidental radiological contamination in the French marine coastal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffa, C.; Charmasson, S. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/LERCM - Antenne de Radioecologie Marine, Centre Ifremer, Zone portuaire de Bregaillon, 13507 La Seyne sur Mer (France); Bailly du Bois, P.; Fievet, B. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LRC (France); Couvez, C.; Renaud, P. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SESURE/DIR (France); Didier, D. [IRSN/PRP-CRI/SESUC/BMTA (France)

    2014-07-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident led to the most important accidental release of artificial radionuclides into the sea. This accident has underlined the importance of being able to adequately reproduce the fate of radioactive releases and to estimate their consequences for the marine environment. For its Crisis Centre, the French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has operational tools, in order to help experts and decision makers in case of any atmospheric accidental release and terrestrial environment contamination. The on-going project aims to develop tools to manage any marine contamination of the French coastal areas. We should be able to evaluate and anticipate the marine post-accidental situation: contaminated areas localization and contamination levels, and possible consequences. Many sites has be considered as potential source terms into the sea: the Coastal Nuclear Power Plants, the La Hague reprocessing Plant, the Brest and Toulon Military Harbours as home-ports of nuclear powered vessels, and different river mouths (Rhone River, Gironde, Loire, Seine) that could be contaminated by upstream accidental release. To achieve this goal, two complementary approaches are developed: Marine sheets and a dedicated modelling tool (STERNE). - Marine sheets aim to summarize marine environment characteristics for the different sites, identify potential stakes for human protection such as aquaculture areas, beaches, or industrial water intakes, and ecological stakes. Whenever possible, a local climatology (main currents depending on meteorological or tide conditions) that could be a support to first environmental measurement strategy is proposed. A list of available local contacts for any operational management is also provided. - The modelling tool, STERNE (Simulation du Transport et du transfert d'Elements Radioactifs dans l'environNEment marin), must predict radionuclide dispersion and contamination of water, marine species and sediments

  13. Hazards and Bioremediation of Oil-pollutants in Soil Yellow River Delta and Coastal Wetland%黄河三角洲滨海湿地土壤石油污染危害及生物修复技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦玉广; 刘超; 李秀启; 陈秀丽; 陈有光; 董贯仓; 刘峰; 王亚楠; 冷春梅; 朱士文

    2011-01-01

    概述了黄河三角洲滨海湿地土壤石油污染现状和石油污染物对该地区土壤、水、空气以及对人类自身造成的危害,论述了石油污染土壤的各种生物修复技术特点及适用范围,并对生物修复技术的研究进展进行了热点分析,最后结合“蓝、黄”两大发展战略对黄河三角洲滨海湿地石油污染土壤修复治理进行了展望.%The status of oil-contaminated soil in the Yellow River delta and coastal wetland region and its hazards to soil, water, air, and human being in the area were overviwed in this article. Then varieties of bioremediation techniques, their characteriazation and utilization scope were outlined; and the research focus of the bioremediation was reviewed. In the end, accompanied by two national economic development strategies: "Eco-efficient Yellow River Delta Economic Zone Development Plan" & "Blue Shandong Peninsula Economic Zone Development Plan", the procspect of Oil-contaminated soil remediation was briefly presented.

  14. Development of a 3D Coupled Physical-Biogeochemical Model for the Marseille Coastal Area (NW Mediterranean Sea): What Complexity Is Required in the Coastal Zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraysse, Marion; Pinazo, Christel; Faure, Vincent Martin; Fuchs, Rosalie; Lazzari, Paolo; Raimbault, Patrick; Pairaud, Ivane

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial inputs (natural and anthropogenic) from rivers, the atmosphere and physical processes strongly impact the functioning of coastal pelagic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to develop a tool for the examination of these impacts on the Marseille coastal area, which experiences inputs from the Rhone River and high rates of atmospheric deposition. Therefore, a new 3D coupled physical/biogeochemical model was developed. Two versions of the biogeochemical model were tested, one model considering only the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and a second model that also considers the phosphorus (P) cycle. Realistic simulations were performed for a period of 5 years (2007–2011). The model accuracy assessment showed that both versions of the model were able of capturing the seasonal changes and spatial characteristics of the ecosystem. The model also reproduced upwelling events and the intrusion of Rhone River water into the Bay of Marseille well. Those processes appeared to greatly impact this coastal oligotrophic area because they induced strong increases in chlorophyll-a concentrations in the surface layer. The model with the C, N and P cycles better reproduced the chlorophyll-a concentrations at the surface than did the model without the P cycle, especially for the Rhone River water. Nevertheless, the chlorophyll-a concentrations at depth were better represented by the model without the P cycle. Therefore, the complexity of the biogeochemical model introduced errors into the model results, but it also improved model results during specific events. Finally, this study suggested that in coastal oligotrophic areas, improvements in the description and quantification of the hydrodynamics and the terrestrial inputs should be preferred over increasing the complexity of the biogeochemical model. PMID:24324589

  15. Preliminary report on arsenic and heavy metals contents in soils and stream bed sediments of Cornia, Bruna and Alma coastal plains (Southern Tuscany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dughetti F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Department of Earth Sciences of University of Florence has conducted over the past ten years, numerous studies about the distribution of arsenic and heavy metals in mineralized areas of Tuscany, particularly in the Pecora basin. The area hosts several polymetallic ore bodies and a pyrite ore deposit. The studies have identified several geochemical anomalies (As, Cu, Pb, Zn… both in the areas which host the ore bodies and in the coastal plain (Scarlino Plain. To increase the knowledge concerning the distribution of As and heavy metals in other Tuscan coastal plains, research is under way in the alluvial plains of the Bruna, Cornia and Alma rivers. The preliminary analysis have focused on soils and stream sediments, to better understand the correlations between the downstream transport of rivers and the soils. We have made physic-chemical analysis, particle size analysis, mineralogical analysis for X-ray powder diffraction, chemical analysis for the determination of major element (X-ray Fluorescence and for the determination of 35 minor elements and traces (AAS and ICP.Preliminary data show high concentrations of several elements (As, Zn, Co…. The concentrations of these elements in soils and stream bed sediments are not always consistent; in particular we have found higher concentrations in soils than in stream bed sediments in Cornia Plain, while the opposite happens in the Bruna basin. Therefore the natural processes of rocks weathering does not seem to have affected uniformly. The distribution of As and heavy metals in soils and stream bed sediments of the all three basins of interest are still under investigation.

  16. Characteristics of Organo—Mineral Complexing of Microaggregates in Paddy Soils Developed from Purple Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEICHAOFU; XIEDETI; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with characteristics of organo-mineral complexing of microaggreagtes in the paddy soils developed from purple soils in Sichuan,China,Results show that the contents of orgainc matter in microaggreagates are in the order of 1-0.25mm>smaller than 0.05mm>0.05-0.25mm,But the organic matter in 1-0.01mm microaggregates accounts for 68.1%-78.7% of that in soil.The organic matter in 0.05mm microaggregates.The contents of loosely combined humus and the ratios of loosely and tithtly combined humus markedly decline with the size of microaggregates.Fresh soil humus formed from semi-decomposed organic material or organic manure added is combined first with0.05mm microaggregates.

  17. Holocene development of the eastern Gulf of Finland coastal zone (Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchuk, Daria; Sergeev, Alexander; Gusentsova, Tatiana; Gerasimov, Dmitry; Zhamoida, Vladimir; Amantov, Aleksey; Kulkova, Marianna; Sorokin, Peter

    2014-05-01

    In 2011-2013 geoarcheological and marine geological research of the eastern Gulf of Finland coasts and near-shore bottom were undertaken. Researches were concentrated within several key-areas (Sestroretskaya Lowland, Narva-Luga Klint Bay and southern coastal zone of the Gulf (near Bolshaya Izhora village). Study areas can provide important information about Gulf of Finland Holocene coastal development as since Ancylus time (about 10000 cal.BP). Development of numerous sand accretion forms (spits, bars, dunes) of different shape, age and genesis caused formation of lagoon systems, situated now on-land due to land uplift. Coasts of lagoons in Sestroretskaya Lowland and Narva-Luga Klint Bay were inhabited by Neolithic and Early Metal people. Analysis of coastal morphology and results of geological research (GIS relief analyses, ground penetrating radar, drilling, grain-size analyses, radiocarbon dating) and geoarcheological studies allowed to reconstruct the mechanism of large accretion bodies (bars and spits) and lagoon systems formation during last 8000 years. Geoarcheological studies carried out within eastern Gulf of Finland coasts permitted to find some features of the Neolithic - Early Metal settlements distribution. Another important features of the eastern Gulf of Finland coastal zone relief are the series of submarine terraces found in the Gulf bottom (sea water depths 10 to 2 m). Analyses of the submarine terraces morphology and geology (e.g. grain-size distribution, pollen analyses and organic matter dating) allow to suppose that several times during Holocene (including preAncylus (11000 cal.BP) and preLittorina (8500 cal.BP) regressions) the sea-water level was lower than nowadays. During the maximal stage of the Littorina transgression (7600-7200 cal. BP) several open bays connected with the Littorina Sea appeared in this area. The lagoon systems and sand accretion bodies (spits and bars) were formed during the following decreasing of the sea level. Late

  18. An approach to developing numeric water quality criteria for coastal waters using the SeaWiFS Satellite Data Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Blake A; Hagy, James D; Conmy, Robyn N; Lehrter, John C; Stumpf, Richard P

    2012-01-17

    Human activities on land increase nutrient loads to coastal waters, which can increase phytoplankton production and biomass and associated ecological impacts. Numeric nutrient water quality standards are needed to protect coastal waters from eutrophication impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency determined that numeric nutrient criteria were necessary to protect designated uses of Florida's waters. The objective of this study was to evaluate a reference condition approach for developing numeric water quality criteria for coastal waters, using data from Florida. Florida's coastal waters have not been monitored comprehensively via field sampling to support numeric criteria development. However, satellite remote sensing had the potential to provide adequate data. Spatial and temporal measures of SeaWiFS OC4 chlorophyll-a (Chl(RS)-a, mg m(-3)) were resolved across Florida's coastal waters between 1997 and 2010 and compared with in situ measurements. Statistical distributions of Chl(RS)-a were evaluated to determine a quantitative reference baseline. A binomial approach was implemented to consider how new data could be assessed against the criteria. The proposed satellite remote sensing approach to derive numeric criteria may be generally applicable to other coastal waters.

  19. Weathering Rinds and Soil Development on Basaltic Andesite, Guadeloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, P. B.; Murphy, M.; Ma, L.; Engel, J.; Pereyra, Y.; Gaillardet, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    An oriented clast of basaltic andesite collected from the B horizon of a soil developed in a late Quaternary volcanoclastic debris flow on the eastern, windward side of Basse Terre Island, Guadeloupe exhibits weathering patterns like that observed in many clasts from tropical settings. The sample consists of unweathered core material overlain by a ~19 mm thick weathering rind and a narrow ≤ 2mm thick indurated horizon separating the outer portion of the rind from the overlying >10mm of soil matrix material. Elemental variations are constrained by a seven point bulk ICP-AES vertical transect extending from the core, across the rind and ~15 mm into the overlying soil matix and six parallel electron microprobe transections. The porous-hydrated fraction increases from the core to the rind to the surrounding soil from 7±4% to 45±18% to 60±15%, respectively. Like the well-studied clast from the nearby Bras David watershed (Sak et al., 2010) the isovolumetric transformation from core to rind material is marked by a narrow (Ba>K≈Mn>Mg>Si>Al≈P>Fe»Ti, consistent with the relative reactivity of phases in the clast from plagioclasepyroxeneglass>apatite>ilmenite. Unlike previously studied clasts, the preservation of the rind-soil interface permits characterization of weathering reactions between the weathering clast and surrounding soil matrix. The abrupt (weathering rind suggests that weathering processes active within clasts are distinct from surrounding soil formation processes.

  20. The development of U. S. soil erosion prediction and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Laflen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion prediction technology began over 70 years ago when Austin Zingg published a relationship between soil erosion (by water and land slope and length, followed shortly by a relationship by Dwight Smith that expanded this equation to include conservation practices. But, it was nearly 20 years before this work's expansion resulted in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE, perhaps the foremost achievement in soil erosion prediction in the last century. The USLE has increased in application and complexity, and its usefulness and limitations have led to the development of additional technologies and new science in soil erosion research and prediction. Main among these new technologies is the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP model, which has helped to overcome many of the shortcomings of the USLE, and increased the scale over which erosion by water can be predicted. Areas of application of erosion prediction include almost all land types: urban, rural, cropland, forests, rangeland, and construction sites. Specialty applications of WEPP include prediction of radioactive material movement with soils at a superfund cleanup site, and near real-time daily estimation of soil erosion for the entire state of Iowa.

  1. Storms do not alter long-term watershed development influences on coastal water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yushun; Cebrian, Just; Lehrter, John; Christiaen, Bart; Stutes, Jason; Goff, Josh

    2017-09-15

    A twelve year (2000-2011) study of three coastal lagoons in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted to assess the impacts of local watershed development and tropical storms on water quality. The lagoons have similar physical and hydrological characteristics, but differ substantially in the degree of watershed urban development and nutrient loading rates. In total the lagoons experienced 22 storm events during the period studied. Specifically, we examine (1) whether there are influences on water quality in the lagoons from watershed development, (2) whether there are influences on water quality in the lagoons from storm activity, and (3) whether water quality is affected to a greater degree by watershed development versus storm activity. The two urbanized lagoons typically showed higher water-column nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen, and phosphate compared with the non-urbanized lagoon. One of the urbanized lagoons had higher water-column chlorophyll a concentrations than the other two lagoons on most sampling dates, and higher light extinction coefficients on some sampling dates. The non-urbanized lagoon had higher water-column dissolved oxygen concentrations than other lagoons on many sampling dates. Our results suggest long-term influences of watershed development on coastal water quality. We also found some evidence of significant storm effects on water quality, such as increased nitrate, phosphate, and dissolved oxygen, and decreased salinity and water temperature. However, the influences of watershed development on water quality were greater. These results suggest that changes in water quality induced by human watershed development pervade despite the storm effects. These findings may be useful for environmental management since they suggest that storms do not profoundly alter long-term changes in water quality that resulted from human development of watersheds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding Urban Communication in Information Era: Analyzing Development Progress of Coastal Territories in the Context of West Java’s Metropolitan Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutriadi, Ridwan; Indriyani Kurniasari, Meta

    2017-07-01

    This paper explores a consequence of metropolitan and development centers policy to the development progress of coastal territories by analyzing municipal website base on urban communication functions of communicative city concept. In terms of coastal territories as a part of development center, efforts have to be made in enhancing the role and function of municipal website to show their development progress. Perceptual analysis is taken as a method to measure their position, especially kabupaten/kota as coastal territories in regional context (West Java Province). The results indicate that the availability of public information in coastal territories cities lower than other cities in metropolitan area. Innovation in specifying coastal features has to be promoted in illustrating development progress of coastal territories as a part of development centers in West Java Province.

  3. Seasonal Development of Microbial Activity in Soils of Northern Norway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. B(O)LTER; N. SOETHE; R. HORN; C. UHLIG

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal development of soil microbial activity and bacterial biomass in sub-polar regions was investigated to determine the impacts of biotic and abiotic factors, such as organic matter content, temperature and moisture. The study was performed during spring thaw from three cultivated meadows and two non-cultivated forest sites near Alta, in northern Norway. Samples from all five sites showed increasing respiration rates directly after the spring thaw with soil respiration activity best related to soil organic matter content. However, distributions of bacterial biomass showed fewer similarities to these two parameters. This could be explained by variations of litter exploitation through the biomass. Microbial activity started immediately after the thaw while root growth had a longer time lag. An influence of root development on soil microbes was proposed for sites where microorganisms and roots had a tight relationship caused by a more intensive root structure. Also a reduction of microbial activity due to soil compaction in the samples from a wheel track could not be observed under laboratory conditions. New methodological approaches of differential staining for live and dead organisms were applied in order to follow changes within the microbial community. Under laboratory conditions freeze and thaw cycles showed a damaging influence on parts of the soil bacteria. Additionally, different patterns for active vs.non-active bacteria were noticeable after freeze-thaw cycles.

  4. NATURAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE HALOPHYTE Salicornia bigelovii (TOR. IN COASTAL AREA OF SONORA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Omar Rueda Puente

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase knowledge about the vegetative structure and environmental conditions, two coastal areas (north and south in Sonora, Mexico, where Salicornia bigelovii develops in natural form were investigated. Based on the abundance of Salicornia, three locations were selected in the two areas. Transects in each of the three sites were developed. The sediments in the northern areas showed higher values compared with the south areas of Sonora in organic matter. Plant biomass, density, height and frequency of occurrence were higher in frequently flooded areas compared to sparsely or less often by the tides. The average total biomass ranged from 2.23 to 6.33 kg (dry weight m-2 and is composed primarily of surface components. The maximum values of biomass of Salicornia were observed in February to May in both areas. The growth of Salicornia bigelovii is influenced mainly by the frequency of flooding, duration of exposure to air during low tide, rainfall, salinity and salt content of the ambient water and sediment, respectively. The carbon content increased with plant age, while protein content decreased by 233.6%. The steady increase in human pressure on coastal areas where Salicornia and other halophytes growth, require immediate protection order to prevent vulnerabilities in their populations.

  5. Impact of coastal development on mangrove cover in Kilim river,Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Shahbudin; A.Zuhairi; B.Y.Kamaruzzaman

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of various coastal developments on mangrove cover along the Kilim River,Langkawi Island,Malaysia between 1996 and 2008.We analysed images from Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Tarre (SPOT) of Kilim River using supervised classification and Principal Component Analysis (PCA).Over 8% (176.83 ha) of mangrove cover was degraded along the Kilim River from its total area of 2153.07 ha during the past 14 years.We identified several causes of mangrove degradation,including mangrove clearing (38%),mangrove conversion to commercial area (21%),residential area (19%),agriculture (12%),aquaculture (12%) and wake current (6%).Langkawi is one of the main tourism islands in Malaysia.Tthe pace of coastal development throughout the entire island including Kilim River had suppressed the mangroves propagation over the years.Long term monitoring of mangrove ecosystems is essentials to ensure the survival and sustainability of mangrove associated biodiversity.

  6. Development of an Objective High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.; White, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drought detection, analysis, and mitigation has become a key challenge for a diverse set of decision makers, including but not limited to operational weather forecasters, climatologists, agricultural interests, and water resource management. One tool that is heavily used is the United States Drought Monitor (USDM), which is derived from a complex blend of objective data and subjective analysis on a state-by-state basis using a variety of modeled and observed precipitation, soil moisture, hydrologic, and vegetation and crop health data. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center currently runs a real-time configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The LIS-Noah is run at 3-km resolution for local numerical weather prediction (NWP) and situational awareness applications at select NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices over the Continental U.S. (CONUS). To enhance the practicality of the LIS-Noah output for drought monitoring and assessing flood potential, a 30+-year soil moisture climatology has been developed in an attempt to place near real-time soil moisture values in historical context at county- and/or watershed-scale resolutions. This LIS-Noah soil moisture climatology and accompanying anomalies is intended to complement the current suite of operational products, such as the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2), which are generated on a coarser-resolution grid that may not capture localized, yet important soil moisture features. Daily soil moisture histograms are used to identify the real-time soil moisture percentiles at each grid point according to the county or watershed in which the grid point resides. Spatial plots are then produced that map the percentiles as proxies to the different USDM categories. This presentation will highlight recent developments of this gridded, objective soil moisture index, comparison to subjective

  7. Nonlinear Time Domain Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) Deep Soil Site Methodology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, Robert Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Currently the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry perform seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis using equivalent linear numerical analysis tools. For lower levels of ground motion, these tools should produce reasonable in-structure response values for evaluation of existing and new facilities. For larger levels of ground motion these tools likely overestimate the in-structure response (and therefore structural demand) since they do not consider geometric nonlinearities (such as gaping and sliding between the soil and structure) and are limited in the ability to model nonlinear soil behavior. The current equivalent linear SSI (SASSI) analysis approach either joins the soil and structure together in both tension and compression or releases the soil from the structure for both tension and compression. It also makes linear approximations for material nonlinearities and generalizes energy absorption with viscous damping. This produces the potential for inaccurately establishing where the structural concerns exist and/or inaccurately establishing the amplitude of the in-structure responses. Seismic hazard curves at nuclear facilities have continued to increase over the years as more information has been developed on seismic sources (i.e. faults), additional information gathered on seismic events, and additional research performed to determine local site effects. Seismic hazard curves are used to develop design basis earthquakes (DBE) that are used to evaluate nuclear facility response. As the seismic hazard curves increase, the input ground motions (DBE’s) used to numerically evaluation nuclear facility response increase causing larger in-structure response. As ground motions increase so does the importance of including nonlinear effects in numerical SSI models. To include material nonlinearity in the soil and geometric nonlinearity using contact (gaping and sliding) it is necessary to develop a nonlinear time domain methodology. This

  8. Submergence Vulnerability Index development and application to Coastwide Reference Monitoring System Sites and Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; McGinnis, Thomas E.; Snedden, Gregg A.

    2013-01-01

    Since its implementation in 2003, the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) in Louisiana has facilitated the creation of a comprehensive dataset that includes, but is not limited to, vegetation, hydrologic, and soil metrics on a coastwide scale. The primary impetus for this data collection is to assess land management activities, including restoration efforts, across the coast. The aim of the CRMS analytical team is to provide a method to synthesize this data to enable multiscaled evaluations of activities in Louisiana’s coastal wetlands. Several indices have been developed to facilitate data synthesis and interpretation, including a Floristic Quality Index, a Hydrologic Index, and a Landscape Index. This document details the development of the Submergence Vulnerability Index, which incorporates sediment-elevation data as well as hydrologic data to determine the vulnerability of a wetland based on its ability to keep pace with sea-level rise. The objective of this document is to provide Federal and State sponsors, project managers, planners, landowners, data users, and the rest of the coastal restoration community with the following: (1) data collection and model development methods for the sediment-elevation response variables, and (2) a description of how these response variables will be used to evaluate CWPPRA project and program effectiveness.

  9. Geochemical Implication of Rare Earth Elements in Process of Soil Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄成敏; 龚子同

    2001-01-01

    The geochemical characteristics and behavior of rare earth elements (REE) in soils developed on the basalts in the northern part of Hainan Island erupted in different time were studied as well as the REE partition in the soil-formation process and its implication on soil development degree. The results show that the total REE content in soils is correlative with soil age significantly and can be selected as the index to show soil evolution. With the soil developing intensively, light rare earth elements (LREE) gain and heavy rare earth elements (HREE) lose. The trends of positive Ce-anomaly and negative Eu-anomaly are remarkable with soil development.

  10. Developments and departures in the philosophy of soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditional soil science curriculums provide comprehensive instruction on soil properties, soil classification, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in soils. This reductionist perspective is sometimes balanced with a more holistic perspective that focuses on soils as natu...

  11. Spatio-Temporal Characteristics of Rural Economic Development in Eastern Coastal China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guogang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the regional differences of rural economic development can be easily determined, a challenging problem for research studies regarding rural economic development has been the inter-relatedness between different areas, and this challenge has been noted remarkably little in research data to date. As an empirical investigation, this study analyzes the spatio-temporal characteristics of rural economic development from a period beginning in 1978 to the year 2012, in the eastern coastal region of China. In order to determine the special differentiation characteristics of rural economic development, three indexes, namely the Gini coefficient (G, Tsui–Wang index (TW and Theil index (T, were employed. To explore the inter-relatedness among the different areas, we selected a spatial autocorrelation model. The results indicated that, to a large extent, rural economic development from 1978 to 2012 in the eastern coastal region of China was greatly influenced, and the per capita annual net income changed significantly, due to the process of rapid urbanization and industrialization. Generally speaking, the annual net income constantly increased, from 87.7 USD in 1978 to 1628.1 USD in 2012. However, the calculation results indicated that the per capita income gap in the same province decreased, while the gap between the provinces presented an aggregate trend. The regional polarization widened continuously. It was also found that the spatial positive autocorrelation for the regional economy was significant, with a waving and ascending trend, and the neighbor effect of regional economic growth was continuously strengthened. Qualitative analysis of the driving mechanism was applied, and it was determined that there are three primary factors affecting the development of the rural regions, namely resource endowments, economic location and policies.

  12. Soil erosion in developing countries: A politicoeconomic explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Gopal B.; Weber, Karl E.

    1991-07-01

    Soil erosion is accelerating in developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. It has threatened the livelihood of millions of peasants, for agriculture is their economic mainstay. A probe into the forces causing erosion reveals that the elite’s resolve to accumulate ever more wealth and to maintain, consolidate, or expand their sociopolitical power and the necessity of the poor to fulfill their requirements of food, fuelwood, and fodder are the two major factors accelerating soil erosion. Unless the vast masses of poor people are integrated into the national mainstream through the implementation of equitable and redistributive development policies, it is impossible to control the accelerating rate of soil erosion and thus to achieve the objective of sustainable development.

  13. Phosphorus sorption-desorption and effects of temperature, pH and salinity on phosphorus sorption in marsh soils from coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Ye, Xiaofei; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-12-01

    Wetland soils act as a sink or source of phosphorus (P) to the overlaying water due to phosphorus sorption-desorption processes. Litter information is available on sorption and desorption behaviors of phosphorus in coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate phosphorus sorption-desorption processes, fractions of adsorbed phosphorus, and the effects of salinity, pH and temperature on phosphorus sorption on soils in tidal-flooding wetlands (TW), freshwater-flooding wetlands (FW) and seasonal-flooding wetlands (SW) in the Yellow River Delta. Our results showed that the freshly adsorbed phosphorus dominantly exists in Occluded-P and Fe/AlP and their percentages increased with increasing phosphorus adsorbed. Phosphorus sorption isotherms could be better described by the modified Langmuir model than by the modified Freundlich model. A binomial equation could be properly used to describe the effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on phosphorus sorption. Phosphorus sorption generally increased with increasing salinity, pH, and temperature at lower ranges, while decreased in excess of some threshold values. The maximum phosphorus sorption capacity (Qmax) was larger for FW soils (256 mg/kg) compared with TW (218 mg/kg) and SW soils (235 mg/kg) (p < 0.05). The percentage of phosphorus desorption (Pdes) in the FW soils (7.5-63.5%) was much lower than those in TW (27.7-124.9%) and SW soils (19.2-108.5%). The initial soil organic matter, pH and the exchangeable Al, Fe and Cd contents were important factors influencing P sorption and desorption. The findings of this study indicate that freshwater restoration can contribute to controlling the eutrophication status of water bodies through increasing P sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Soil fertility and the role of soils for food security in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittonell, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    Addressing current and future food security is not just a matter of producing more food globally. Agricultural productivity must increase where food is most needed, and where both rural and urban populations are expected to increase the fastest in the near future. This is the situation in most of sub-Saharan Africa and in several other regions of Latin America, Asia and the Pacific. There are some common denominators to these regions. In the first place, the inability of the majority of farmers to access and/or to afford agricultural inputs. Second, the severity with which climate change impacts on some of these regions. Third, the extent of soil degradation, which is estimated at 25% of the arable land in the world. And finally, the fact that some of these regions are hosting valuable biodiversity and/or delivering ecosystem services of global or regional importance, which often leads to competing claims between the local and international communities. It has been repeatedly shown that the technologies of industrial agriculture as practiced in developed regions are ineffective at sustaining soil productivity in the context of smallholder family agriculture. Restoring soil productivity and ecosystem functions in these contexts requires new ways of managing soil fertility. These include: (i) innovative forms of 'precision' agriculture that consider the diversity, heterogeneity and dynamics of smallholder farming systems; (ii) a systems approach to nutrient acquisition and management; (iii) agroecological strategies for the restoration of degraded soils and the maintenance of soil physical properties; and (iv) to capitalize on the recent and growing understanding on soil trophic networks to increase nutrient and water use efficiency. I will provide examples on advances in these fronts, and discuss the challenges ahead their broad implementation by farmers in developing regions.

  15. Historical Perspectives and Future Needs in the Development of the Soil Series Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudette, Dylan E.; Brevik, Eric C.; Indorante, Samuel J.

    2016-04-01

    The soil series concept is an ever-evolving understanding of soil profile observations, their connection to the landscape, and functional limits on the range in characteristics that affect management. Historically, the soil series has played a pivotal role in the development of soil-landscape theory, modern soil survey methods, and concise delivery of soils information to the end-user-- in other words, soil series is the palette from which soil survey reports are crafted. Over the last 20 years the soil series has received considerable criticism as a means of soil information organization (soil survey development) and delivery (end-user application of soil survey data), with increasing pressure (internal and external) to retire the soil series. We propose that a modern re-examination of soil series information could help address several of the long-standing critiques of soil survey: consistency across survey vintage and political divisions and more robust estimates of soil properties and associated uncertainty. A new library of soil series data would include classic narratives describing morphology and management, quantitative descriptions of soil properties and their ranges, graphical depiction of the relationships between associated soil series, block diagrams illustrating soil-landscape models, maps of series distribution, and a probabilistic representation of a "typical" soil profile. These data would be derived from re-correlation of existing morphologic and characterization data informed by modern statistical methods and regional expertise.

  16. Spatio-temporal development of vegetation die-off in a submerging coastal marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Lennert; Kirwan, Matthew; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Temmerman, Stijn

    2017-01-01

    In several places around the world, coastal marsh vegetation is converting to open water through the formation of pools. This is concerning, as vegetation die-off is expected to reduce the marshes' capacity to adapt to sea level rise by vegetation-induced sediment accretion. Quantitative analyses of the spatial and temporal development of marsh vegetation die-off are scarce, although these are needed to understand the bio-geomorphic feedback effects of vegetation die-off on flow, erosion, and sedimentation. In this study, we quantified the spatial and temporal development of marsh vegetation die-off with aerial images from 1938 to 2010 in a submerging coastal marsh along the Blackwater River (Maryland, U.S.A). Our results indicate that die-off begins with conversion of marsh vegetation into bare open water pools that are relatively far (> 75 m) from tidal channels. As vegetation die-off continues, pools expand, and new pools emerge at shorter and shorter distances from channels. Consequently larger pools are found at larger distances from the channels. Our results suggest that the size of the pools and possibly the connection of pools with the tidal channel system have important bio-geomorphic implications and aggravate marsh deterioration. Moreover, we found that the temporal development of vegetation die-off in moderately degraded marshes is similar as the spatial die-off development along a present-day gradient, which indicates that the contemporary die-off gradient might be considered a chronosequence that offers a unique opportunity to study vegetation die-off processes.

  17. Evolution of Fractal Parameters through Development Stage of Soil Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, Abelardo; Florentino, Adriana; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    Soil surface characteristics are subjected to changes driven by several interactions between water, air, biotic and abiotic components. One of the examples of such interactions is provided through biological soil crusts (BSC) in arid and semi-arid environments. BSC are communities composed of cyanobacteria, fungi, mosses, lichens, algae and liverworts covering the soil surface and play an important role in ecosystem functioning. The characteristics and formation of these BSC influence the soil hydrological balance, control the mass of eroded sediment, increase stability of soil surface, and influence plant productivity through the modification of nitrogen and carbon cycle. The site of this work is located at Quibor and Ojo de Agua (Lara state, Venezuela). The Quibor Depression in Venezuela is a major agricultural area being at semi-arid conditions and limited drainage favor the natural process of salinization. Additionally, the extension and intensification of agriculture has led to over-exploitation of groundwater in the past 30 years (Méndoza et al., 2013). The soil microbial crust develops initially on physical crusts which are mainly generated since wetting and drying, being a recurrent feature in the Quíbor arid zone. The microbiotic crust is organic, composed of macro organisms (bryophytes and lichens) and microorganisms (cyanobacteria, fungi algae, etc.); growing on the ground, forming a thickness no greater than 3 mm. For further details see Toledo and Florentino (2009). This study focus on characterize the development stage of the BSC based on image analysis. To this end, grayscale images of different types of biological soil crust at different stages where taken, each image corresponding to an area of 12.96 cm2 with a resolution of 1024x1024 pixels (Ospina et al., 2015). For each image lacunarity and fractal dimension through the differential box counting method were calculated. These were made with the software ImageJ/Fraclac (Karperien, 2013

  18. Lead isotopic compositions of soil and near-surface till profiles from a watershed containing arsenic-enriched groundwater in coastal Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuso, Robert; Foley, Nora; Wandless, Gregory; Dillingham, Jeremy; Colvin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Lead isotope compositions of soils and near-surface tills from an area of coastal Maine known to have groundwater with anomalously high arsenic contents were measured in order to determine the source of the lead and, by inference, possible sources of arsenic. Five soil and till sites were selected for detailed chemical and isotopic analysis. To construct profiles of the soil and till horizons, five samples were collected at 10-cm intervals from the surface to the base of each horizon. Total lead and arsenic concentrations and lead isotopic compositions were measured for 48 leaches and bulk residues. The soils and tills are underlain by sulfidic schists of the Penobscot Formation. Several generations of minerals containing arsenic and lead exist in the regional bedrock, including rock-forming silicates (feldspar and micas), sulfide minerals formed during diagenesis (for example, arsenic-rich pyrite), and sulfide and oxide minerals that formed as a result of Silurian metamorphic and igneous events (for example, arsenopyrite, galena, iron-oxides, and arsenic-sulfides). A young group of secondary minerals (for example, iron-hydroxides, arsenic-hydroxides, lead-sulfate, and arsenic-jarosite) formed from recent weathering and pedogenic processes.

  19. Involvement of the European Confederation of the Soil Science Societies in soil protection policy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Pascal

    2017-04-01

    The European Confederation of the Soil Science Societies (ECSSS) was founded not only to organize the Eurosoil congress, but also to continuously support and promote the soil causes in the European area. A work is in progress to define the best way to achieve this goal, with integrating voices of the European structures and networks, and the national societies. One of the major objectives is to develop a modern approach of soil protection, including leading experimentations shared with all the members, and active lobbying. Such an approach requires the buildup of an efficient interface with policy makers, stake holders, engineering and science, which should be concretized in a new the dimension of the Eurosoil congress. This communication will sketch the on-going work, with reviewing the perspectives, conditions, strengths, questions and difficulties identified.

  20. Utilizing Land:Water Isopleths for Storm Surge Model Development in Coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siverd, C. G.; Hagen, S. C.; Bilskie, M. V.; Braud, D.; Peele, H.; Twilley, R.

    2016-12-01

    In the Mississippi River Delta (MRD) Land:Water (L:W) isopleths (Gagliano et al., 1970, 1971) can be used to better understand coastal flood risk from hurricanes than simple estimates of land loss (Twilley et al., 2016). The major goal of this study is to develop a methodology that utilizes L:W isopleths to simplify a detailed present day storm surge model of coastal Louisiana. A secondary goal is to represent marsh fragmentation via L:W isopleths for modeling (for example) storm surge. Isopleths of L:W were derived for the year 2010 and include 1%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, 99% (1% being mostly water and 99% being mostly land). Thirty-six models were developed via permutations of two isopleths selected with no repetition between 1% and 99%. The selected two isopleths result in three polygons which represent "open water/transition", "marsh", and "land". The ADvaced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) code (Luettich and Westerink, 2006) was used to perform storm surge simulations. Hydrologic basins, specifically Hydrologic Unit Code 12 (HUC12s), were used to quantify the water surface elevation, depth, volume, area and retention time across south Louisiana for each storm simulation and to provide a basin by basin comparison for the detailed model vs. simplified model results. This methodology aids in identifying the simplified model that most closely resembles the detailed model. It can also be used to develop comparable storm surge models for historical eras prior to the advent of modern remote sensing technology for the purpose of storm surge analysis throughout time.

  1. Coastal aquaculture development in eastern Africa and the Western Indian Ocean: prospects and problems for food security and local economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnback, Patrik; Bryceson, Ian; Kautsky, Nils

    2002-12-01

    This paper reviews the experience and status of coastal aquaculture of seaweeds, mollusks, fish and crustaceans in eastern Africa and the islands of the western Indian Ocean. In many respects, coastal aquaculture is still in its infancy in the region, and there is a pressing need to formulate development strategies aimed at improving the income and assuring the availability of affordable protein to coastal communities. This paper also draws from positive and negative experiences in other parts of the world. The requirements of feed and fry, and the conversion of mangroves are used to illustrate how some aquaculture activities constitute a net loss to global seafood production. The paper presents both general and specific sustainability guidelines based on the acknowledgement of aquaculture as an ecological process. It is concluded that without clear recognition of its dependence on natural ecosystems, the aquaculture industry is unlikely to develop to its full potential in the region.

  2. Coastal plain pond water quality and mercury contend of biota of the Long Island Central Pine Barrens and Mashomack Preserve: Effects of atmospheric deposition and human development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Siemion, Jason; Lane, Oksana P.

    2015-01-01

    Pine barrens are considered an imperiled ecosystem in the northeastern U.S. The Suffolk County Pine Barrens, once the second largest in the Northeast, were substantially reduced and fragmented by development during the 20th century. The coastal plain ponds being considered in this study occur in central Suffolk County within the Long Island Central Pine Barrens region. This highly unique natural environment, embedded with forests and woodlands, resulted from its glacial origins and a land use history that predates European colonization. Included in this study was The Nature Conservancy’s Mashomack Preserve, located on Shelter Island between Peconic Bay and Gardiner’s Bay. There are no freshwater ponds in the Mashomack Preserve, but this area was included with the Central Pine Barrens investigation, because Shelter Island has a similar geologic and land-use history that has resulted in a similarly unique low-nutrient forest and woodland ecosystem with extremely coarse-textured soils.

  3. Soil seed banks and their germination responses to cadmium and salinity stresses in coastal wetlands affected by reclamation and urbanization based on indoor and outdoor experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Junhong, E-mail: junhongbai@163.com; Huang, Laibin, E-mail: seahuanglaibin@gmail.com; Gao, Zhaoqin; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Zhao, Qingqing

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • A higher germination rate of soil seed bank was observed in the indoor experiment. • The outdoor experiment showed larger number and destiny of germinated seedlings. • Urbanization had greater impacts on soil seed banks than wetland reclamation. • Soil seed banks for wetland restoration were more suitable in the reclaimed region. • Suitable salt or Cd levels could activate seedling emergence in the soil seed bank. - Abstract: Indoor and outdoor seedling emergence experiments were conducted to thoroughly investigate germination patterns as affected by reclamation and urbanization, the ecological characteristics of soil seed banks, and their relationships with environmental factors in both urbanized and reclaimed regions of the Pearl River Delta in coastal wetlands. The germination rate of the soil seed bank was higher in the indoor experiment compared with that in the outdoor experiment, whereas the number and destiny of the germinated seedlings were greater in the outdoor experiment. The species diversity and number, as well as the richness and evenness indices, were higher in the urbanized region compared with the reclaimed region. However, the dominance and Sørensen similarity indices were greater in the reclaimed region compared with those indices in the urbanized region. Higher salinity and Cadmium (Cd) levels could inhibit seed germination; however, their suitable ranges (i.e. [0–2000 mg kg{sup −1}] for salinity and [0–4.0 mg kg{sup −1}] for available Cd) can activate seedling emergence, and more seedlings germinated under the intersectional levels at 0.34 mg kg{sup −1} available Cd and 778.6 mg kg{sup −1} salinity. Seawater intrusion caused by the sea level rise will possibly result in the salt-tolerant community in this area due to increasing salinity.

  4. Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oumeraci, H.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rouck, J. De;

    1995-01-01

    The paper attempts to present an overview of five research projects supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate General XII, under the MAST 2- Programme (Marine Sciences and Technology), with the overall objective of contributing to the development of improved rational me...... methods for the design of coastal structures....

  5. Development and Climate Change in Uruguay. Focus on Coastal Zones, Agriculture and Forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawala, S.; Moehner, A.; Gagnon-Lebrun, F. [OECD Environment Directorate, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development OECD, Paris (France); Van Aalst, M. [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Smith, J.; Hagenstad, M. [Stratus Consulting, Boulder, CO (United States); Baethgen, W.E.; Martino, D.L. [Carbosur Consulting, Montevideo (Uruguay); Lorenzo, E. [Instituto de Mecanica de los Fluidos e Ingenieria Ambiental IMFIA, Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2004-07-01

    This document is an output from the OECD Development and Climate Change project, an activity jointly overseen by the EPOC Working Party on Global and Structural Policies (WPGSP), and the DAC Network on Environment and Development Co-operation (ENVIRONET). The overall objective of the project is to provide guidance on how to mainstream responses to climate change within economic development planning and assistance policies, with natural resource management as an overarching theme. This report presents the integrated case study for Tanzania carried out under an OECD project on Development and Climate Change. This report presents the integrated case study for Uruguay carried out under an OECD project on Development and Climate Change. The report is structured around a three-tiered framework. First, recent climate trends and climate change scenarios for Uruguay are assessed and key sectoral impacts are identified and ranked along multiple indicators to establish priorities for adaptation. Second, donor portfolios are analyzed to examine the proportion of development assistance activities affected by climate risks. A desk analysis of donor strategies and project documents as well as national plans is conducted to assess the degree of attention to climate change concerns in development planning and assistance. Third, an in-depth analysis is conducted for adaptation in coastal zones as well as for mainstreaming carbonsequestration within the agriculture and forestry sectors.

  6. Soil food web structure during ecosystem development after land abandonment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtkamp, R.; Kardol, P.; Van der Wal, A.; Dekker, S.C.; Van der Putten, W.H.; de Ruiter, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    The re-establishment of natural species rich heathlands on abandoned agricultural land is a common land use change in North-West Europe. However, it can take several decades to re-establish natural species rich heathland vegetation. The development rate has found to depend both on soil food web comp

  7. The implementation of artificial neural networks to model methane oxidation in landfill soil covers[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, A.; Albanna, M.; Warith, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The disposal of solid waste significantly contributes to the total anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}), a greenhouse gas that negatively affects climate change. The oxidation of methane in landfill bio-covers takes place through the use of methanotrophic bacteria which provides a sink for methane. The rate at which methane is biologically oxidized depends on several parameters. This study provided a better understanding of the oxidation of methane in landfill soil covers through modeling methane oxidation with artificial neural networks (ANNs). An ANN was trained and tested to model methane oxidation in various batch scale systems for 3 types of soils. Input data consisted of temperature, moisture content, soil composition and the nutrient content added to the system. Model results were in good agreement with experimental results reported by other researchers. It was concluded that the use of ANNs to model methane oxidation in batch scale bio-covers can address the large number of complicated physical and biochemical processes that occur within the landfill bio-cover. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. Development and application of soil coupled heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu

    2017-05-01

    Soil coupled heat pump technology is a new clean heating mode, is the world's most energy efficient heating one of the ways. And because of the use of renewable geothermal resources with high heating performance so more and more people's attention. Although the use of soil-coupled heat pumps has been in use for more than 50 years (the first application in the United States), the market penetration of this technology is still in its infancy. This paper will focus on the development, characteristics and application of the coupled heat pump.

  9. Application of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT Model on a small tropical island (Great River Watershed, Jamaica as a tool in Integrated Watershed and Coastal Zone Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orville P. Grey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Great River Watershed, located in north-west Jamaica, is critical for development, particularly for housing, tourism, agriculture, and mining. It is a source of sediment and nutrient loading to the coastal environment including the Montego Bay Marine Park. We produced a modeling framework using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT and GIS. The calculated model performance statistics for high flow discharge yielded a Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE value of 0.68 and a R² value of 0.70 suggesting good measured and simulated (calibrated discharge correlation. Calibration and validation results for streamflow were similar to the observed streamflows. For the dry season the simulated urban landuse scenario predicted an increase in surface runoff in excess of 150%. During the wet season it is predicted to range from 98 to 234% presenting a significant risk of flooding, erosion and other environmental issues. The model should be used for the remaining 25 watersheds in Jamaica and elsewhere in the Caribbean. The models suggests that projected landuse changes will have serious impacts on available water (streamflow, stream health, potable water treatment, flooding and sensitive coastal ecosystems.

  10. Model of Coastal Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Based on the Potential of Local Port and marine Tourism Port, Case Study: Fort Rotterdam Makassar and the Surrounding Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arief, A. B.; Yudono, A.; Akil, A.; Ramli, I.

    2017-08-01

    The lack of social and public facilties of seven small islands around Makassar, causing the commuters to experience inefficiency in fulfilling their basic needs in the mainland of Makassar city. The purpose of this study is finding the location of coastal TOD in accordance with the principles of development model of coastal TOD. The result showed that inefficiency of time, cost and distance could be eliminated by applying vertical, united and integrated development model of coastal TOD. Using survey, interview and literature study through expert system analysis based on GIS deliniates coastal TOD.

  11. Natural and human-induced hypoxia and consequences for coastal areas: synthesis and future development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, J.Z.; Gilbert, D.; Gooday, A.J.; Levin, L.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Scranton, M.; Ekau, W.; Pena, A.; Dewitte, B.; Oguz, T.; Monteiro, P.M.S.; Urban, E.; Rabalais, N.; Ittekkot, V.; Kemp, W.M.; Ulloa, O.; Elmgren, R.; Escobar-Briones, E.; Van der Plas, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia has become a world-wide phenomenon in the global coastal ocean and causes a deterioration of the structure and function of ecosystems. Based on the collective contributions of members of SCOR Working Group #128, the present study provides an overview of the major aspects of coastal hypoxia i

  12. Development of an ensemble prediction system for ocean surface waves in a coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Arno

    2015-04-01

    An ensemble prediction system for ocean surface waves has been developed and applied on a local scale to the German Bight and the western Baltic Sea. U10-wind fields generated by the COSMO-DE-EPS upstream forecast chain of the German Met Service (DWD: Deutscher Wetterdienst) have been used as the driving force for the third-generation spectral wave model WAM. The atmospheric chain includes four different global models that provide boundary values for four regional COSMO-EU realisations. Each of those drive five COSMO-DE members, respectively, with different sets of physical parameterisations, so that finally 20 members are available to run 20 corresponding wave ensemble members of the coastal wave model CWAM (Coastal WAve Model) for the German Bight and the western Baltic Sea. It is the first time that in an ensemble prediction system for ocean waves, an atmospheric model of such a fine spatial resolution of 2.8 km has been combined with a wave model running on a model grid with a mesh size of 900 m only. Test runs with the wave ensemble prediction system have been executed for two entire months (April 2013 and June 2014) and for an 8-day storm case (Xaver) in December 2013 in order to check whether such a system could be a reasonable step to improve the future operational wave forecasts of the DWD. The results computed by the different wave model members agree fairly well with available buoy data. The differences between the results for the integrated wave parameters of the individual members are small only, but more pronounced in extreme storm situations. Finally, the statistical analysis of the comparisons with measurements show without exception slightly improved values for the ensemble mean of the wave ensemble members compared with the usual deterministic routine control run.

  13. The School for Field Studies Centre for Coastal Studies: A Case Study of Sustainable Development Education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, T. A.; Ollervides, F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To present the School for Field Studies-Centre for Coastal Studies (SFS-CCS) study abroad Mexico program, and consider its relative success as a sustainable development education program. Design/methodology/approach: The SFS-CCS academic model and results of its implementation are presented. Program success is discussed by applying…

  14. Asia-Pacific mussel watch: monitoring of butyltin contamination in coastal waters of Asian developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Monirith, In; Ismail, Ahmad; Muchtar, Muswerry; Zheng, Jinshu; Richardson, Bruce J; Subramanian, Annamalai; Prudente, Maricar; Hue, Nguyen Duc; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2002-10-01

    Butyltin compounds (BTs) including mono-, di-, and tributyltin and total tin (sigmaSn), were determined in green mussels (Perna viridis) from various Asian developing countries, such as Cambodia, China (Hong Kong and southern China), Malaysia, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam, to elucidate the contamination status, distribution, and possible sources and to assess the risks on aquatic organisms and humans. Butyltin compounds were detected in green mussels collected from all the sampling location investigated, suggesting widespread contamination of BTs along the coastal waters of Asian developing countries. Among butyltin derivatives, tributyltin (TBT) was the predominant compound, indicating its ongoing usage and recent exposures in Asian coastal waters. Higher concentrations of BTs were found in mussels collected at locations with intensive maritime activities, implying that the usage of TBT as a biocide in antifouling paints was a major source of BTs. In addition, relatively high concentrations of BTs were observed in mussels from aquaculture areas in Hong Kong and Malaysia, as it has been reported in Thailand. With the recent improvement in economic status in Asia, it is probable that an increase in TBT usage will occur in aquaculture. Although contamination levels were generally low in mussel samples from most of the Asian developing countries, some of those from polluted areas in Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand revealed levels comparable to those in developed nations. Furthermore, the concentrations of TBT in some mussels from polluted areas exceeded the threshold for toxic effects on organisms and estimated tolerable average residue levels as seafoods for human consumption. A significant correlation was observed between the concentrations of sigmaBTs and sigmaSn in mussels, and sigmaBTs were made up mostly 100% of sigmaSn in mussels taken from locations having intensive maritime/human activities. This suggests that

  15. Land management effects on near-surface soil properties of southern U.S. coastal plain kandiudults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Levi; J. Shaw; C. Wood; S. Herman; E. Carter; Y. Feng

    2010-01-01

    A comparative assessment of land management systems and relatively undisturbed ecosystems is useful for evaluating anthropogenic impacts on soil properties (Larson and Pierce, 1994). Such information is useful for the restoration and evaluation of C sequestration potential. Comparison of disturbed with natural ecosystems allows the measurement of soil properties...

  16. STUDY ON URBAN LAND SAVING IN THE ECONOMIC DEVELOPED COASTAL REGION OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the initial period of industrialization a great deal of land is needed for Chinese industry development as well as land resource per person of China is much lower than the average value in the world, thus it is necessary to save land in Chinese urban construction. This paper mainly discussed the features of urban land use in economic developed coastal cities: one is that the index of urban land per person in middle-small cities was higher than in large cities; another is that urban land has not been used highly and strongly; the third is that the industrial land occupied an irrationally large percentage of whole urban land; the final is that rural enterprises took up a quantity of land. Thereafter, this paper put forward five land-saving measures: first, to adopt the idea of saving land; next, to adjust the land-use structure when redeveloping the old city and alternate some land use when adjusting the industry structure of the city; the third, to develop the system of payment for using land and the management of urban planning; finally to enhance the effective regional plan and the urban landuse plan.

  17. Salt marsh dieback in coastal Louisiana: survey of plant and soil conditions in Barataria and Terrebonne basins, June 2000-September 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.; Mendelssohn, Irving A.; Materne, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Sudden and extensive dieback of the perennial marsh grass, Spartina alterniflora Loisel (smooth cordgrass), which dominates regularly flooded salt marshes along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines, occurred in the coastal zone of Louisiana. The objectives of this study were to assess soil and plant conditions in dieback areas of the Barataria-Terrebonne estuarine system as well as vegetative recovery during and after this dieback event. Multiple dieback sites were examined along 100 km of shoreline from the Atchafalaya River to the Mississippi River during the period from June 2000 through September 2001. The species primarily affected was S. alterniflora; sympatric species such as Avicennia germinans (L.) Stearn (black mangrove) and Juncus roemerianus Scheele (needlegrass rush) showed no visible signs of stress. The pattern of marsh dieback was distinctive with greatest mortality in the marsh interior, suggesting a correlation with local patterns of soil chemistry and/or hydrology. Little or no expansion of dieback occurred subsequent to the initial event, and areas with 50 percent or less mortality in the fall of 2000 had completely recovered by April 2001. Recovery was slower in interior marshes with 90 percent or greater mortality initially. However, regenerating plants in dieback areas showing some recovery were robust, and reproductive output was high, indicating that the causative agent was no longer present and that post-dieback soil conditions were actually promoting plant growth. Stands of other species within or near some dieback sites remained largely unchanged or expanded (A. germinans) into the dead salt marsh. The cause of the dieback is currently unknown. Biotic agents and excessive soil waterlogging/high sulfide were ruled out as primary causes of this acute event, although they could have contributed to overall plant stress and/or interacted with the primary agent to cause plant mortality. Our observations over the 15 month study

  18. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  19. Coastal Conditions 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Dataset developed by California Coastal Commission's Melanie Coyne by attaching names to a dynamically segmented coastline using the Department of Navigation and...

  20. Development of internal forest soil reference samples and testing of digestion methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.E. Hislop; J.W. Hornbeck; S.W. Bailey; R.A. Hallett

    1998-01-01

    Our research requires determinations of total elemental concentrations of forest soils. The lack of certified forest soil reference materials led us to develop internal reference samples. Samples were collected from three soil horizons (Oa, B, and C) at three locations having forested, acidic soils similar to those we commonly analyze. A shatterbox was used to...

  1. Spatial pattern formation of coastal vegetation in response to external gradients and positive feedbacks affecting soil porewater salinity: A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Smith, T. J.; Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal vegetation of South Florida typically comprises salinity-tolerant mangroves bordering salinity-intolerant hardwood hammocks and fresh water marshes. Two primary ecological factors appear to influence the maintenance of mangrove/hammock ecotones against changes that might occur due to disturbances. One of these is a gradient in one or more environmental factors. The other is the action of positive feedback mechanisms, in which each vegetation community influences its local environment to favor itself, reinforcing the boundary between communities. The relative contributions of these two factors, however, can be hard to discern. A spatially explicit individual-based model of vegetation, coupled with a model of soil hydrology and salinity dynamics is presented here to simulate mangrove/hammock ecotones in the coastal margin habitats of South Florida. The model simulation results indicate that an environmental gradient of salinity, caused by tidal flux, is the key factor separating vegetation communities, while positive feedback involving the different interaction of each vegetation type with the vadose zone salinity increases the sharpness of boundaries, and maintains the ecological resilience of mangrove/hammock ecotones against small disturbances. Investigation of effects of precipitation on positive feedback indicates that the dry season, with its low precipitation, is the period of strongest positive feedback. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. (outside the USA).

  2. 河北沿海区耕地土壤质量综合评价%Comprehensive Evaluation of Soil Quality in Coastal Region of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀萍; 张国新; 鲁雪林; 刘雅辉; 王贵政

    2013-01-01

    为了系统掌握河北沿海耕地土壤质量的现状,获取土壤质量提升的优化调控措施。采用GIS与模糊综合评判相结合的方法,对河北沿海区耕地土壤质量进行模糊综合评价与分级,获得土壤质量综合评判分级图。结果表明,研究区域耕地土壤质量状况总体较低,有机质中等偏低,全氮较为贫乏,有效磷和速效钾相对丰富,土壤全盐含量已达到中度盐渍化土标准,地下水矿化度高且埋深浅。土壤盐分、地下水矿化度与地下水埋深是土壤质量的主要限制因子。研究区不同行政区土壤质量状况具有明显差异性,其pH变异系数最小,全盐含量变异系数最大,其空间分布规律与土壤全盐含量相似;研究区土壤质量最差的区域是沧州沿海中东部、唐山沿海南部,其面积约占总耕地总面积的5.3%。土壤质量分级图可用于研究区中低产田改造、盐碱地综合治理,土壤质量较差的区域采取先种盐生植物、再种经济植物的“梯次推进”植物利用模式,通过逐步改善土壤理化性质,提高土壤质量。全面掌握区域的土壤质量状况,对河北沿海盐碱地土壤改良和科学管理提供依据。%This study was to systematically comprehend soil quality status in coastal region of Hebei Province, and acquire management measures to improve soil quality. With the application of fuzzy synthetic evaluation method and GIS technology, fuzzy synthetic evaluation and classification of regional soil quality was conducted, and spatial patterns of synthetic evaluation results of regional soil quality was obtained. The results indicated that, soil quality status of farmland across the study area was generally low, soil organic matter and N nutrient was low, available phosphorus and quick-acting potassium were abundant, content of total salt was up to the standard of medium saline soil, groundwater depth was shallower and

  3. Development of differential coastal cooling above sloping bottom: laboratory and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Natilya

    2013-04-01

    horizontal exchange was calculated using deformation of tracks of tracers (potassium permanganate crystals) at appropriate time intervals, recorded by video- and photo-cameras. Total duration of every experimental run was about 1-2 hours, of which the process of the establishment of the horizontal temperature profile in the region above the slope took about 20-30 min. Equality of time rates of change of surface water temperature in deep and in shallow parts was taken as an indicator that the development of the exchange flow has reached its (quasi)steady state. Thus, the shape of the shallow-deep surface temperature profile in (quasi)steady exchange regime becomes also stable. It turned out from the experiments, that, in (quasi)steady state, the shape of any individual section of the profile is completely similar to the shape of the full profile, whereas during the process of the establishment this profile has fractures, sections with high temperature gradients or parts with almost linear temperature increase with the distance from the shore. This way, in natural basins for example, an information on the SST field in coastal zone during autumnal cooling can, with some level of confidence, tell whether the steady-state regime of horizontal exchange between open and coastal zone has developed in the given area. Numerical simulations using 3-dimensional non-hydrostatic MIKE3-FlowModel (www.dhi.dk) were carried out in order to reproduce both (i) the described laboratory experiments and (ii) the process of autumnal cooling in channel-shaped basin with all sizes and depths, reproducing that of the coastal area off the Curonian Spit (South-Eastern Baltic Sea). Results of simulation of the laboratory experiment are in a good agreement with the observed process; however, change to "natural" basin scale has brought many complications to the process of the development of the horizontal surface temperature profile even in much simplified (channel-like) basin. It seems that (quasi

  4. Depth-distribution patterns and control of soil organic carbon in coastal salt marshes with different plant covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out in three kinds of salt marshes according to the vegetation covers, including Phragmites australis salt marsh (PSM), Suaeda salus salt marsh (SSM) and Tamarix chinensis-Suaeda salus salt marsh (TSSM). We applied allometric function, exponential function and logistic function to model the depth distribution of the SOCv and SOCc for each salt marsh, respectively. The results showed that the exponential function fits the depth distribution of the SOCv more well than other two functions. The SOCc can be fitted very well by all three functions for three salt marsh (Adj. R2 > 0.99), of which the allometric function was the best one. The mean topsoil concentration factors (TCFs) of three salt marshes were beyond 0.1, which means the SOC enrichment in surface soils due to plant cycling, but TCFs in PSM were significantly higher than those in SSM (P soils. The results of general linear model (GLM) suggested that four soil properties (soil water content, pH, soil salt content and silt+clay) and their interactive effects explained about 80% of the total variation of SOC stock in the top 20 cm soils and the 20–100 cm soil layers. PMID:27708421

  5. Depth-distribution patterns and control of soil organic carbon in coastal salt marshes with different plant covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Jia, Jia; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2016-10-01

    This study was carried out in three kinds of salt marshes according to the vegetation covers, including Phragmites australis salt marsh (PSM), Suaeda salus salt marsh (SSM) and Tamarix chinensis-Suaeda salus salt marsh (TSSM). We applied allometric function, exponential function and logistic function to model the depth distribution of the SOCv and SOCc for each salt marsh, respectively. The results showed that the exponential function fits the depth distribution of the SOCv more well than other two functions. The SOCc can be fitted very well by all three functions for three salt marsh (Adj. R2 > 0.99), of which the allometric function was the best one. The mean topsoil concentration factors (TCFs) of three salt marshes were beyond 0.1, which means the SOC enrichment in surface soils due to plant cycling, but TCFs in PSM were significantly higher than those in SSM (P < 0.05). Nearly 30% of SOC was concentrated in the top 20 cm soils. The results of general linear model (GLM) suggested that four soil properties (soil water content, pH, soil salt content and silt+clay) and their interactive effects explained about 80% of the total variation of SOC stock in the top 20 cm soils and the 20–100 cm soil layers.

  6. Development of a multi-objective optimization algorithm using surrogate models for coastal aquifer management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourakos, George; Mantoglou, Aristotelis

    2013-02-01

    SummaryThe demand for fresh water in coastal areas and islands can be very high due to increased local needs and tourism. A multi-objective optimization methodology is developed, involving minimization of economic and environmental costs while satisfying water demand. The methodology considers desalinization of pumped water and injection of treated water into the aquifer. Variable density aquifer models are computationally intractable when integrated in optimization algorithms. In order to alleviate this problem, a multi-objective optimization algorithm is developed combining surrogate models based on Modular Neural Networks [MOSA(MNNs)]. The surrogate models are trained adaptively during optimization based on a genetic algorithm. In the crossover step, each pair of parents generates a pool of offspring which are evaluated using the fast surrogate model. Then, the most promising offspring are evaluated using the exact numerical model. This procedure eliminates errors in Pareto solution due to imprecise predictions of the surrogate model. The method has important advancements compared to previous methods such as precise evaluation of the Pareto set and alleviation of propagation of errors due to surrogate model approximations. The method is applied to an aquifer in the Greek island of Santorini. The results show that the new MOSA(MNN) algorithm offers significant reduction in computational time compared to previous methods (in the case study it requires only 5% of the time required by other methods). Further, the Pareto solution is better than the solution obtained by alternative algorithms.

  7. Constraints to the implementation of effective environmental management in coastal areas of developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela de L.R. Wagener

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the limitations the scarcity of reliable scientific information poses to the implementation of effective and sustainable coastal management programmes in developing countries. Alternatives to the current monitoring approaches are suggested as to improve information level on the state of the environment and to decrease data gap on past conditions. The paper aims at encouraging the redesign of monitoring practices in developing countries as to be ground on the best actual scientific knowledge.O presente texto trata das limitações, impostas pela escassez de informação científica confiável, à implementação de programas eficazes e sustentáveis de gestão costeira em paises em desenvolvimento. São sugeridas alternativas às abordagens correntes de monitoramento, as quais visam aprimorar o nível de conhecimento sobre o estado do meio ambiente e decrescer a carência de dados sobre suas condições pretéritas. As discussões apresentadas pretendem encorajar o redesenho das práticas de monitoramento em países em desenvolvimento de forma que passem a se fundamentar no melhor conhecimento científico atual.

  8. Developing an index model for flood risk assessment in the western coastal region of Mazandaran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi-Pouya Alireza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents an index model developed for the assessment of risk caused by river floods. The main purpose of this model is to evaluate the flood risk in the western coastal region of Mazandaran Province/Iran. The model assesses the risk at triple components, i.e. the flood occurrence probability, vulnerability and consequences, through identification and evaluation of effective criteria categorized into seven indexes (environmental, technical, economic, social, depth, population and sensitivity ones that are involved in all stages of flooding (source, pathway and receptor. The flood risk in the developed model is defined by a dimensionless magnitude called as risk score between 0 and 100 for each zone of the area under assessment by calculating and combining of two newly defined factors: occurrence and vulnerability factor and impact factor. The model was applied in a case study, the Nowshahr flood in 2012. The results showed that: (i the flood risk zoning was compared with observed data for aspect of the damages, and general agreement between them was obtained; (ii for urban zones, which surrounded by two rivers, would easily be in critical condition and rescue operations face difficulties; and (iii it is necessary to review the location of the emergency services, according the flood risk zoning.

  9. Morphological characteristics and development of coastal nabkhas, north-east Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Awadhi, Jasem M.; Al-Dousari, Ali M.

    2013-04-01

    The coastal aeolian nabkhas, in Kuwait, are mostly elongated, with an average length of about 10 m, an average width of 3.7 m, and an average height of 0.65 m. The horizontal component of the nabkha dune (HC: the mean of the length and width of nabkha dune), developed around Nitraria retusa, was measured and compared with the height of the shrub. A second-polynomial function was found to best fit the set of data. The fitting identified three trends of the development of the nabkhas. Initially, as the height of shrubs (H) increases, the HC increases linearly until it reaches approximately 10 m. When H exceeds 2 m, the effect of shrub height becomes ineffective in trapping more sediments; that is, reaching an equilibrium condition, before a decrease in shrub height effectiveness occurs. Sediments of the nabkha crest and wings, left and right sides, are subjected to high energy winds, and therefore, they are generally coarser and better sorted than those of the tail or the nose. Minor differences are noted in the textural characteristics and the mineral composition of nabkha sediments and those of other aeolian landforms found in upwind nabkha field; this indicates that the sediments were derived from the nearby sources.

  10. Development 3D model of adaptation of the Azerbaijan coastal zone at the various levels of Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammadov, Ramiz

    2013-04-01

    coastal areas at hydraulic engineering projects the sea level should be considered as multistage process, what we have considered by development of adaptation of a coastal zone The exact three-dimensional map of a coastal zone has been created. For different scenario sea levels, or example, -30.0; -29.0; -28.0; -27.0; -26.0; -25.0 and -24.0 exact coastal lines have been certain. Further maps of a vegetative cover, ground, social and economic and ecological conditions have been developed for different level and respective alterations are certain. More vulnerable coastal zone, flooded area and socio-economic damage were estimated.

  11. Influence of morphodynamic variability over seasonal beach sediments and its probable effect on coastal development

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gujar, A.R.; Ganesan, P.; Iyer, S.D.; Gaonkar, S.S.; Ambre, N.V.; Loveson, V.J.; Mislankar, P.G.

    Seasonal variations and effect of oceanographic processes such as erosion and/or accretion along beaches are important to understand their impact on coastal morphological variations. Detailed investigations were taken up to analyse the volumetric...

  12. Climate change risks to United States infrastructure: impacts on coastal development, roads, bridges, and urban drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in temperature, precipitation, sea level, and coastal storms will likely increase the vulnerability of infrastructure across the United States. Using four models of vulnerability, impacts, and adaptation of infrastructure, its deployment, and its role in protecting econom...

  13. Temporal development of coastal ecosystems in the Baltic Sea - an assessment of patterns and trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Jens; Bergström, Lena; Tomczak, Maciej;

    2014-01-01

    Coastal areas are amongst the most biologically productive aquatic systems worldwide, but face strong and varaible anthropogenic pressures. Many marine ecosystems worlwide has gone through substantial structural changes during recent decades, but few studies have addressed the temporal developmen...

  14. Development of Ecological Reference Models and an Assessment Framework for Streams on the Atlantic Coastal Plain

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Military installations in the Sand Hills ecoregion of the Atlantic Coastal Plain protect unique ecosystems including blackwater streams. The Department of Defense is...

  15. Development of 3D beach evolution model for sand nourishments and its application to morphodynamics around coastal structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroiwa, M.; Matsubara, Y.; Fujitani, H.; H. Mase

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model to predict three-dimensional (3D) beach evolution after sand nourishment was developed. The injection process of sand to near shoreline or offshore area was expressed by the sediment flux in the conservation equation associated with sediment transports and water depth changes, furthermore, sand dredging process was considered. In this study, First, computation of beach evolution around a coastal structure with and without nourishment was carried out. Secondly, the develop...

  16. Climate extremes and challenges to infrastructure development in coastal cities in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmen Rahman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the coastal cities in Bangladesh are situated on the riverbanks of low-lying tidal zones at an average elevation of 1.0–1.5 m from the sea level. Construction and management of buildings, roads, power and telecommunication transmission lines, drainage and sewerage and waste management are very difficult and vulnerable to climate change disasters. Cyclonic storms associated with tidal floods impact seriously the infrastructures and thus the livelihoods. Although coastal cities are the ultimate shelters of the coastal people during the extremes events, the coastal cities are not safe and cannot support them due to poor infrastructure. This study analyses the challenges coastal urbanization faces under different situations like cyclones, floods and water-logging, salinity, land-sliding and erosion etc. during the disasters and their effects on city lives for water supply and sanitation, power and electricity and waste management etc., and puts forward recommendations towards sustainable planning of coastal cities.

  17. Coastal Morphology and Coastal Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Graaff, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lecture notes ct5309. Tides, currents and water; coastal problems; sediment transport processes; coastal transport modes; longshore transport; cross-shore transport; fundamentals of mud; channels and trenches; coastal protection; application of structures; application of nourishments.

  18. Development of a GIS-based integrated framework for coastal seiches monitoring and forecasting: A North Jiangsu shoal case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Rufu; Lin, Liangzhao

    2017-06-01

    Coastal seiches have become an increasingly important issue in coastal science and present many challenges, particularly when attempting to provide warning services. This paper presents the methodologies, techniques and integrated services adopted for the design and implementation of a Seiches Monitoring and Forecasting Integration Framework (SMAF-IF). The SMAF-IF is an integrated system with different types of sensors and numerical models and incorporates the Geographic Information System (GIS) and web techniques, which focuses on coastal seiche events detection and early warning in the North Jiangsu shoal, China. The in situ sensors perform automatic and continuous monitoring of the marine environment status and the numerical models provide the meteorological and physical oceanographic parameter estimates. A model outputs processing software was developed in C# language using ArcGIS Engine functions, which provides the capabilities of automatically generating visualization maps and warning information. Leveraging the ArcGIS Flex API and ASP.NET web services, a web based GIS framework was designed to facilitate quasi real-time data access, interactive visualization and analysis, and provision of early warning services for end users. The integrated framework proposed in this study enables decision-makers and the publics to quickly response to emergency coastal seiche events and allows an easy adaptation to other regional and scientific domains related to real-time monitoring and forecasting.

  19. The relationship of crime and oil development in the coastal regions of Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Asha D.

    This project examines the relationship between patterns of crime and the development of the oil and gas extraction industry in the coastal regions of Louisiana. The suggestion of a link between these phenomena has often been made, but little systematic research has been conducted to determine if there is indeed a crime-oil development nexus. Limited previous research has focused primarily on the issue of "boom and bust" cycles on some forms of deviant behavior, but the data and the methods used were inadequate, and thus, the resulting conclusions were often misleading or possibly erroneous. During the course of this project, a comprehensive database is constructed that facilitates a longitudinal analysis of concomitant variation in crime patterns and oil extraction activity. Annual crime data are obtained at the parish and county level for all years beginning in 1974 and merged with corresponding social and economic data. This dataset allows for a multivariate pooled time series analysis, with adequate controls, to determine the degree of influence between oil activity and crime patterns. The results from the analysis suggest that changes in oil activity and high levels of labor market involvement in the offshore oil industry are not strongly associated with community disruption in the form of crime. The only statistically significant effects due to changes in oil activity are decreased levels of homicide and aggravated assault. Oil development is not associated with any other crime in the analysis despite accounting for the boom and bust cycles of the oil industry over a 25 year period for 12 parishes that are highly involved in the industry. As the industry becomes more active and undergoes an increased labor demand, incidents of homicide and assault decline in the community. This finding does not support some previous boomtown model research that argues that energy development causes higher rates of social disruption, including higher crime rates (Seydlitz et al

  20. Biomass production, nutrient cycling, and carbon fixation by Salicornia brachiata Roxb.: A promising halophyte for coastal saline soil rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Aditya P; Chaudhary, Doongar R; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-08-02

    In order to increase our understanding of the interaction of soil-halophyte (Salicornia brachiata) relations and phytoremediation, we investigated the aboveground biomass, carbon fixation, and nutrient composition (N, P, K, Na, Ca, and Mg) of S. brachiata using six sampling sites with varying characteristics over one growing season in intertidal marshes. Simultaneously, soil characteristics and nutrient concentrations were also estimated. There was a significant variation in soil characteristics and nutrient contents spatially (except pH) as well as temporally. Nutrient contents in aboveground biomass of S. brachiata were also significantly differed spatially (except C and Cl) as well as temporally. Aboveground biomass of S. brachiata ranged from 2.51 to 6.07 t/ha at maturity and it was positively correlated with soil electrical conductivity and available Na, whereas negatively with soil pH. The K/Na ratio in plant was below one, showing tolerance to salinity. The aboveground C fixation values ranged from 0.77 to 1.93 C t/ha at all six sampling sites. This study provides new understandings into nutrient cycling-C fixation potential of highly salt-tolerant halophyte S. brachiata growing on intertidal soils of India. S. brachiata have a potential for amelioration of the salinity due to higher Na bioaccumulation factor.

  1. Increasing tsunami preparedness through educator professional development in coastal Cascadia communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Sitaula, B. A.; Butler, R. F.; Hunter, N.; Lillie, R. J.; Magura, B.; Groom, R.; Johnson, J. A.; Coe, M.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing society's ability to mitigate risks is one of the major goals of geohazard research. Therefore part of tsunami science research must be finding effective ways to communicate scientific findings to the public to be used in community preparedness plans. The "Cascadia EarthScope Earthquake and Tsunami Education Program" (CEETEP; ceetep.oregonstate.edu) has worked to bridge the gap between scientific researchers and the public by providing professional development workshops for educators from coastal communities in Oregon, Washington, and northern California. CEETEP translates cutting edge EarthScope and other geoscience research into educational resources appropriate for K-12 teachers, park and museum interpreters, and emergency management outreach educators and their learners. Local educators have the potential to reach a wide segment of coastal residents. The tsunami generated by the next Great Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake will arrive only 10-30 minutes after shaking, making mitigation and community-wide education an imperative. An essential component of CEETEP is collaboration with experts in science, pedagogy, and emergency preparedness. CEETEP provided two 4-day workshops and a follow-up Share-a-thon each year for three years (2013-2015). 151 educators participated in the program. Results from CEETEP are very encouraging. Participant content knowledge improved from 49% to 82% over the course of the workshop. Similarly, confidence in teaching about workshop topics increased from an average of 3.0 to 5.3 on a 6-point scale. Participant optimism about the efficacy and tractability of community-level planning also increased from 6.1 to 7.8 on a 9-point scale. Nearly 90% of participants continued to be active with the program through their March Share-a-thon and presented on a wide range of activities that they and their learners undertook related to earthquake and tsunami science and preparedness. Participants were also quite favorable about the

  2. USCS and the USDA Soil Classification System: Development of a Mapping Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Development Center ESDB European Soil Database FAO Food and Agriculture Organization FASST Fast All-Season Soil Strength GI Group Index HWSD Harmonized...European Soil Database), Soil Map of Chi- na, WISE (World Inventory of Soil Emission Potentials)—with information contained within the FAO -UNESCO (Food...for all types of construction (New Mexico Department of Transporta- tion 2012). They are normally classified under the A-7 category. Highly organic

  3. Soil development and fertility characteristics of a volcanic slope in Mindanao, the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Poudel, D.; WEST, L.

    1999-01-01

    Metadata only record This study analyzes thirteen pedons from four geomorphic regions (alluvial terraces, lower footslopes, upper footslopes, mountains) to investigate the relationship between soil development and soil fertility properties. The mountain soils were Utisols and Inceptisols, while the soils of the other three regions were Oxisols. The study assessed the soil components, mineral composition, pH, phosphorus fixation, potassium availability and buffering capacity, cation exchang...

  4. Comparative study of urban development and groundwater condition in coastal areas of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Capítulo, Leandro; Carretero, Silvina C.; Kruse, Eduardo E.

    2017-08-01

    The geomorphological evolution of a sand-dune barrier in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is analyzed as a factor regulating the fresh groundwater reserves available. The impact of geomorphological evolution and the consequences for the social and economic development of two coastal areas are assessed. This is one of the most important tourist destinations in the country; for study purposes, it was divided into a northern sector and a southern sector. In the southern sector, the exploitable groundwater is associated with the Holocene and upper Pleistocene geomorphological evolution, which generated three interrelated aquifer units, constituting a system whose useful thickness reaches at least 45 m. In contrast, the northern sector is restricted to two Holocene aquifer units, whose total thickness is on the order of 12 m. The morphological characteristics and the occurrence of the largest fresh groundwater reserves in the southern sector are indicators of better conditions for economic growth, which is mainly reflected on the expansion of real estate ventures. The relationships of transmissivity vs area of real estate ventures (Arev), and total water consumption vs Arev, are indicators for the sustainable management of the water resources. The approach chosen may be used by decision makers in other regions to assess the feasibility of future tourism projects on the basis of the availability of water resources associated with geomorphological features.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Visualisation of Coastal Flows in Tidal Channels Supporting Ocean Energy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Zangiabadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics in coastal regions are strongly influenced by the topography of the seabed and understanding the fluid dynamics is necessary before installation of tidal stream turbines (TST. In this paper, the bathymetry of a potential TST deployment site is used in the development of the a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics model. The steady state k-ϵ and transient Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence methods are employed and compared. The simulations are conducted with a fixed representation of the ocean surface, i.e., a rigid lid representation. In the vicinity of Horse Rock a study of the pressure difference shows that the small change in height of the water column is negligible, providing confidence in the simulation results. The stream surface method employed to visualise the results has important inherent characteristics that can enhance the visual perception of complex flow structures. The results of all cases are compared with the flow data transect gathered by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP. It has been understood that the k-ϵ method can predict the flow pattern relatively well near the main features of the domain and the LES model has the ability to simulate some important flow patterns caused by the bathymetry.

  6. Comparative study of urban development and groundwater condition in coastal areas of Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Capítulo, Leandro; Carretero, Silvina C.; Kruse, Eduardo E.

    2017-02-01

    The geomorphological evolution of a sand-dune barrier in Buenos Aires, Argentina, is analyzed as a factor regulating the fresh groundwater reserves available. The impact of geomorphological evolution and the consequences for the social and economic development of two coastal areas are assessed. This is one of the most important tourist destinations in the country; for study purposes, it was divided into a northern sector and a southern sector. In the southern sector, the exploitable groundwater is associated with the Holocene and upper Pleistocene geomorphological evolution, which generated three interrelated aquifer units, constituting a system whose useful thickness reaches at least 45 m. In contrast, the northern sector is restricted to two Holocene aquifer units, whose total thickness is on the order of 12 m. The morphological characteristics and the occurrence of the largest fresh groundwater reserves in the southern sector are indicators of better conditions for economic growth, which is mainly reflected on the expansion of real estate ventures. The relationships of transmissivity vs area of real estate ventures (Arev), and total water consumption vs Arev, are indicators for the sustainable management of the water resources. The approach chosen may be used by decision makers in other regions to assess the feasibility of future tourism projects on the basis of the availability of water resources associated with geomorphological features.

  7. Arsenic in the water-soil-plant system and the potential health risks in the coastal part of Chianan Plain, Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sandeep; Das, Suvendu; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chakraborty, Sukalyan; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2013-11-01

    The present study investigates the bioavailability, soil to plant transfer and health risks of arsenic (As) in the coastal part of Chianan Plain in southwestern Taiwan. Groundwater used for irrigation, surface soils from agricultural lands and locally grown foodstuffs were collected from eight locations and analyzed for As to assess the risks associated with consuming these items. The concentration of As in groundwater ranged from 13.8 to 881 μg/L, whereas surface soil showed total As content in the range of 7.92-12.7 mg/kg. The available As content in surface soil accounted for 0.06-6.71% of the total As content, and was significantly correlated with it (R2 = 0.65, p < 0.05). Among the leachable fraction, the organic matter (3.23-54.8%) and exchangeable portions of oxides (6.03-38.4%) appear to be the major binding phases of As. The average As content in fourteen studied crops and vegetables varied from 10.3 to 151 μg/kg with maximum in mustard and minimum in radish. All the plants showed considerably higher As content (21.5 ± 3.64-262 ± 36.2 μg/kg) in their roots compared to the edible parts (9.15 ± 1.44-75.8 ± 22.9 μg/kg). The bioaccumulation factor (BAF) based on total As (ranging from 0.0009 to 0.144) and available As in soil (ranging from 0.039 to 0.571) indicate that mustard, rice, amaranth and spinach are the highest accumulators of As. Although the health risk index (HRI) of the studied crops and vegetables ranged from only 0.0068-0.454, with the maximum in rice, the combined HRI indicates an alarming value of 0.88. Therefore, the possible health risks due to long-term consumption of rice and other As-rich foodstuffs could be overcome by controlling the contamination pathways in the water-soil-plant system.

  8. Assessing Sustainable Developments in a Coastal Region: the Garolim Bay in the West Coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Garolim Bay is a semi-enclosed bay located in the west coast of Korea and has a spring tidal range over 6 m. It is well known for vast tidal flats and healthy ecosystems that supports high productive and diverse marine lives. Due to its large tidal range it was considered favorable site for the construction of tidal power plant and went through controversies over decades. Local fishermen depending on their livelihood over generations strongly opposed the construction, so did the most environmental groups. They argued that construction of the tidal barrage at the entrance of the bay will reduce the tidal range resulting in increase of mud content of bottom sediments and disruption of marine lives. On the other hand, the power generation industry and some local residents supported the construction arguing that the tidal power is renewable energy and contributes to reduction of CO2 emission along with economic benefits from tourists' sightseeing of the tidal power plant. The application of the tidal power plant construction at the Garolim Bay was not approved by the Korean government due to the concerns of environmental impacts on the marine lives of the Garolim Bay region. This study briefly reviews developments associated with the tidal power plant construction in the Garolim Bay and considers how to approach the assessment of the sustainable development of the coastal region of the Garolim Bay in accordance with UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) 2030 with appropriate goals, targets and monitoring indicators. It will be of keen interests to policy makers of central and local governments as well as local residents to monitor and find out the benefits pursuing SDG in the Garolim Bay where conflicts of interests among stakeholders persisted, and may exemplify the case for other regions of similar situations.

  9. Sustainable development of Philippine coastal resources: Subsidiarity in ethnoecology through inclusive participatory education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Joey; Bautista, Pauline; Pajaro, Marivic; Raquino, Mark; Watts, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The Philippines is an archipelago of more than 7,100 islands, with a population of over 100 million people dependent upon marine resources which are characterised by a decline in both biodiversity and abundance. The resultant large sector of fisherfolk is generally impoverished with limited education, which makes coastal adult education and lifelong learning a national priority. This article considers the Filipino fisherfolk community as a culture to identify potential input strategies regarding education development for marine science concepts. In a study piloting cultural consensus theory applications with a well-established fisherfolk organisation, the authors focus on the lack of dialogue engaging Philippine fisherfolk with standards of international marine science, bioregional resource partitioning and reflexive in-country education development. Cross-cultural strategies considered in this paper include exploring paraprofessional approaches to adult education, accommodating several dialects/languages and drawing on international science concepts. While earlier adult education initiatives aimed at fisherfolk may have had limited success in part due to a lack of cultural context, this pilot study is innovative in that it applies an existing Filipino form of social artistry to fisherfolk identity, expression and communication. Siningbayan [ Sining = art, bayan = nation or town], or art whose canvas is society evolved through the Philippine history of organic networking and participation. Results confirm that a structured ethnoecological research design combined with Siningbayan appear effective for identifying education and curriculum specifics both for the fisherfolk sector of Filipino society and for professional marine science; their common goal being improved resource management. The authors place particular emphasis on subsidiarity, considering how best to transfer information to individual fisherfolk and their communities, as well as exploring their scaled

  10. Development of fugal strains in biochar amended soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ana Z.; De la Rosa, José M.; Paneque, Marina; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    results are of significant interest for agriculture and demands microbiological tests prior to using biochar for increasing the carbon sequestration potential of soils or for agronomic purposes, since C stabilization and soil biological properties may be affected by specific biochars. References: [1] Lehmann J., Joseph S., 2009. Biochar systems. In "Biochar for Environmental Management: Science and Technology" (C. J. Lehmann and S. Joseph, Eds.), Earthscan, London. [2] Glaser B., Lehmann J., Zech W., 2002. Biol. Fert. Soils. 35, 219-230. [3] Saiz-Jimenez C., Miller AZ., Martin-Sanchez PM., Hernandez-Marine M., 2012. Environ. Microbiol. 14:3220-3231. [4] Rodriguez A., Perestelo F., Carnicero A., Regalado V., Perez R., De la Fuente G. Falcon M.A., 1996. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 21:213-219. [5] Scarlett K., Tesoriero L., Daniel R., Guest D., 2013. Eur. J. Plant Pathol. 137:315-324. Acknowledgements: The Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (PCIG12-GA-2012-333784-Biocharisma project and PIEF-GA-2012-328689-DECAVE project), MINECO and the European Development Fund (Project PCGL2012-37041) are thanked for the financial support.

  11. Development of Low Cost Soil Stabilization Using Recycled Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, F.; Yahaya, A. S.; Safari, A.

    2016-07-01

    Recycled tyres have been used in many geotechnical engineering projects such as soil improvement, soil erosion and slope stability. Recycled tyres mainly in chip and shredded form are highly compressible under low and normal pressures. This characteristic would cause challenging problems in some applications of soil stabilization such as retaining wall and river bank projects. For high tensile stress and low tensile strain the use of fiberglass would be a good alternative for recycled tyre in some cases. To evaluate fiberglass as an alternative for recycled tyre, this paper focused on tests of tensile tests which have been carried out between fiberglass and recycled tyre strips. Fibreglass samples were produced from chopped strand fibre mat, a very low-cost type of fibreglass, which is cured by resin and hardener. Fibreglass samples in the thickness of 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm were developed 100 mm x 300 mm pieces. It was found that 3 mm fibreglass exhibited the maximum tensile load (MTL) and maximum tensile stress (MTS) greater than other samples. Statistical analysis on 3 mm fibreglass indicated that in the approximately equal MTL fibreglass samples experienced 2% while tyre samples experienced 33.9% ultimate tensile strain (UTST) respectively. The results also showed an approximately linear relationship between stress and strain for fibreglass samples and Young's modulus (E), ranging from 3581 MPa to 4728 MPa.

  12. Climate and soil moisture environment during develop-ment of the fifth palaeosol in Guanzhong Plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on weathering characteristics of the fifth palaeosol layer (S5) of four sections in Guanzhong Plain, the thickness of the weathered profile of the paleosol is determined to be greater than the ordi- nary soil, a weathered and leached loess layer thicker than 2 m. The distribution depth of the red argil- lans, the weathered and leached loess layer, Fe2O3, CaCO3 and Sr content under the S5 all indicate that the precipitation in Guanzhong Plain was over 900 mm at that time. The distribution depth of gravity water zone reached 4.2 m at least, and the soil moisture content was generally more than 20% within the range of 4.2 m. At that time there was sufficient soil moisture and no dried earth layer developed in Guanzhong Plain, suitable for the forest to develop. When this soil developed, the mean annual pre- cipitation was more than the annual soil moisture evaporation. The value of soil moisture balance was positive and the atmospheric precipitation could supply the underground water normally. Soil water was weak acidic in the middle and late stages when S5 developed in Guanzhong Plain. It was a kind of subtropical climate and even more humid and warmer than the northern edge of the subtropical climate zone in Guanzhong Plain when the S5 developed. At that time the subtropical climate was prevailing over the northern side and southern side of Qingling Mountains, showing the Mountains no longer to be the boundary between the subtropical zone and the temperate zone in China. The summer monsoon acted intensely and could go over Qingling Mountains frequently bring abundant precipitation.

  13. The Numerical Scheme Development of a Simplified Frozen Soil Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qian; SUN Shufen; DAI Qiudan

    2009-01-01

    In almost all frozen soil models used currently,three variables of temperature,ice content and moisture content are used as prognostic variables and the rate term,accounting for the contribution of the phase change between water and ice,is shown explicitly in both the energy and mass balance equations.The models must be solved by a numerical method with an iterative process,and the rate term of the phase change needs to be pre-estimated at the beginning in each iteration step.Since the rate term of the phase change in the energy equation is closely related to the release or absorption of the great amount of fusion heat,a small error in the rate term estimation will introduce greater error in the energy balance,which will amplify the error in the temperature calculation and in turn,cause problems for the numerical solution convergence.In this work,in order to first reduce the trouble,the methodology of the variable transformation is applied to a simplified frozen soil model used currently,which leads to new frozen soil scheme used in this work.In the new scheme,the enthalpy and the total water equivalent are used as predictive variables in the governing equations to replace temperature,volumetric soil moisture and ice content used in many current models.By doing so,the rate terms of the phase change are not shown explicitly in both the mass and energy equations and its pre-estimation is avoided.Secondly,in order to solve this new scheme more functionally,the development of the numerical scheme to the new scheme is described and a numerical algorithm appropriate to the numerical scheme is developed.In order to evaluate the new scheme of the frozen soil model and its relevant algorithm,a series of model evaluations are conducted by comparing numerical results from the new model scheme with three observational data sets.The comparisons show that the results from the model are in good agreement with these data sets in both the change trend of variables and their

  14. Developing an Enzyme Mediated Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, M. A.; Post, W. M.; Wang, G.; Jagadamma, S.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schadt, C. W.

    2012-12-01

    We developed the Microbial-ENzyme-mediated Decomposition (MEND) model in order to mechanistically model the decomposition of soil organic carbon (C). This presentation is an overview of the concept and development of the model and of the design of complementary lab-scale experiments. The model divides soil C into five pools of particulate, mineral-associated, dissolved, microbial, and enzyme organic C (Wang et al. 2012). There are three input types - cellulose, lignin, and dissolved C. Decomposition is mediated via microbial extracellular enzymes using the Michaelis-Menten equation, resulting in the production of a common pool of dissolved organic C. Parameters for the Michaelis-Menten equation are obtained through a literature review (Wang and Post, 2012a). The dissolved C is taken up by microbial biomass and proportioned according to microbial maintenance and growth, which were recalculated according to Wang and Post (2012b). The model allows dissolved C to undergo adsorption and desorption reactions with the mineral-associated C, which was also parameterized based upon a literature review and complementary laboratory experiments. In the lab, four 14C-labeled substrates (cellulose, fatty acid, glucose, and lignin-like) were incubated with either the particulate C pool, the mineral-associated C pool, or to bulk soils. The rate of decomposition was measured via the production of 14CO2 over time, along with incorporation into microbial biomass, production of dissolved C, and estimation of sorbed C. We performed steady-state and dynamic simulations and sensitivity analyses under temperature increases of 1-5°C for a period of 100 y. Simulations indicated an initial decrease in soil organic C consisting of both cellulose and lignin pools. Over longer time intervals (> 6 y), however, a shrinking microbial population, a concomitant decrease in enzyme production, and a decrease in microbial carbon use efficiency together decreased CO2 production and resulted in greater

  15. Characterization of interactions between soil solid phase and soil solution in the initial ecosystem development phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Claudia; Schaaf, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    In the initial phase of soil formation interactions between solid and liquid phases and processes like mineral weathering, formation of reactive surfaces and accumulation of organic matter play a decisive role in developing soil properties. As part of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR 38) 'Patterns and processes of initial ecosystem development' in an artificial catchment, these interactions are studied at the catchment 'Chicken Creek' (Gerwin et al. 2009). To link the interactions between soil solid phase and soil solution at the micro-scale with observed processes at the catchment scale, microcosm experiments under controlled laboratory conditions were carried out. Main objectives were to determine the transformation processes of C and N from litter decomposition within the gaseous, liquid and solid phase, the interaction with mineral surfaces and its role for the establishment of biogeochemical cycles. The microcosm experiments were established in a climate chamber at constant 10 ° C. In total 48 soil columns (diameter: 14.4 cm; height: 30 cm) were filled with two different quaternary substrates (sand and loamy sand) representing the textural variation within the catchment at a bulk density of 1.4-1.5 g*cm-3. The columns were automatically irrigated four times a day with 6.6 ml each (corresponding to 600 mm*yr-1). The gaseous phase in the headspace of the microcosms was analysed continuously for CO2 and N2O contents. C and N transformation processes were studied using 13C and 15N labelled litter of two different plant species occurring at the catchment (Lotus corniculatus, Calamagrostis epigejos) that was incorporated into the microcosm surface. All treatments including a control ran with four replicates over a period of 40 weeks. Two additional microcosms act as pure litter controls where substrate was replaced by glass pearls. Litter and substrate were analysed before and after the experiment. Percolate was continuously collected and

  16. Development of an Analytical Method for Explosive Residues in Soil,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    AD- A193 738 DEVELOPMENT OF N NLYTICL METHOD FOR EXPLOSIVE 1’ R SIDUES IN SOIL(U) COLD REGIONS RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING LAD HNOVER NH T F JENKINS ET...Duatibtion Un mited elf 8 13 1** - 1 ’ t ’,’" "’ ’’ ’ S.T , For conversion of SI metric units to U.S.IBritish customary units of measurement consult ASTM ...I NO 2 Figure B15. 2,6-DNT. Figure B16 . 2,6-DAmNT. 0 Figure B17. Cyclohexanone. 5 9 V’ ’ ~ A facsimile catalog card in Library of Congress MARC

  17. Coastal Blue Carbon: Climate and Coastal Resilience National and International Policy Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Grier, A.; McCarty, A.

    2014-12-01

    There is growing interest nationally and internationally in leveraging the carbon benefits (termed "blue carbon") of coastal habitats in climate and coastal resilience policies. Coastal wetlands (specifically mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows) have unique characteristics that make them incredibly efficient, natural carbon sinks with most carbon stored belowground in soils. Protecting and restoring these ecosystems around the globe will help maintain all the societal benefits these ecosystems provide including the natural climate mitigation benefits, but also the food security, water quality, and storm protection benefits that enhance coastal communities and economies. This presentation will focus on some emerging policy opportunities including: (1) incorporation of coastal wetland carbon in U.S. national climate, resilience, and conservation efforts; (2) potential steps to incorporate coastal wetlands in national greenhouse gas inventories as suggested by the 2013 International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Wetlands Supplement; and (3) dialogue at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) about blue carbon habitats and their potential for inclusion. The presentation will conclude by highlighting some of the most pressing blue carbon scientific gaps that need to be filled in order to support these developing policies.

  18. Microbial Community Dynamics in Soil Depth Profiles Over 120,000 Years of Ecosystem Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Turner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Along a long-term ecosystem development gradient, soil nutrient contents and mineralogical properties change, therefore probably altering soil microbial communities. However, knowledge about the dynamics of soil microbial communities during long-term ecosystem development including progressive and retrogressive stages is limited, especially in mineral soils. Therefore, microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community composition (pyrosequencing as well as their controlling soil properties were investigated in soil depth profiles along the 120,000 years old Franz Josef chronosequence (New Zealand. Additionally, in a microcosm incubation experiment the effects of particular soil properties, i.e., soil age, soil organic matter fraction (mineral-associated vs. particulate, O2 status, and carbon and phosphorus additions, on microbial abundances (quantitative PCR and community patterns (T-RFLP were analyzed. The archaeal to bacterial abundance ratio not only increased with soil depth but also with soil age along the chronosequence, coinciding with mineralogical changes and increasing phosphorus limitation. Results of the incubation experiment indicated that archaeal abundances were less impacted by the tested soil parameters compared to Bacteria suggesting that Archaea may better cope with mineral-induced substrate restrictions in subsoils and older soils. Instead, archaeal communities showed a soil age-related compositional shift with the Bathyarchaeota, that were frequently detected in nutrient-poor, low-energy environments, being dominant at the oldest site. However, bacterial communities remained stable with ongoing soil development. In contrast to the abundances, the archaeal compositional shift was associated with the mineralogical gradient. Our study revealed, that archaeal and bacterial communities in whole soil profiles are differently affected by long-term soil development with archaeal communities probably being better adapted to

  19. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that

  20. Substrate Geochemistry and Soil Development in Boreal Forest and Tundra Ecosystems in the Yukon-Tanana Upland and Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, L.P.; Crock, J.G.; Wang, B.; Day, W.C.; Eberl, D.D.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We report on soil development as a function of bedrock type and the presence of loess in two high latitude ecosystems (boreal forest and tundra) and from two regions in Alaska?the Yukon-Tanana Upland (YTU, east-central Alaska) and the Seward Peninsula (SP, far-west coastal Alaska). This approach to the study of 'cold soils' is fundamental to the quantification of regional geochemical landscape patterns. Of the five state factors in this study, bedrock and biota (ecosystem; vegetation zone) vary whereas climate (within each area) and topography are controlled. The influence of time is assumed to be controlled, as these soils are thousands of years old (late Quaternary to Holocene). The primary minerals in soils from YTU, developed over loess and crystalline bedrock (metamorphic and intrusive), are quartz, plagioclase, and 2:1 clays; whereas in the SP, where loess and metasedimentary bedrock (schist and quartzite) predominate, they are quartz and muscovite. The A horizon of both regions is rich in peat. Examination of the ratio of mobile (K2O, CaO, and Fe2O3) to immobile (TiO2) major oxides, within each region, shows that very little difference exists in the chemical weathering of soils developed between the two ecosystems examined. Differences were observed between tundra soils developed in the two regions. These differences are most probably due to the dissimilarity in the geochemical importance of both loess and bedrock. A minimal loss of cadmium with soil depth is seen for soils developed over YTU crystalline bedrock in the boreal forest environments. This trend is related to the mobility of cadmium in these soils as well as to its biogenic cycling. Major differences were observed in the proportion of cadmium and zinc among the A, B, and C horizon material sequestered in various soil fractions as measured by sequential soil extractions. These trends followed such variables as the decrease with depth in organic matter, the change in clay minerals, and the change

  1. Distribution of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria across a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS environment: implications for passive bioremediation by tidal inundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen eLing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS constitute a serious and global environmental problem. Oxidation of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air generates sulfuric acid with consequently negative impacts on coastal and estuarine ecosystems. Tidal inundation represents one current treatment strategy for CASS, with the aim of neutralizing acidity by triggering microbial iron- and sulfate-reduction and inducing the precipitation of iron-sulfides. Although well-known functional guilds of bacteria drive these processes, their distributions within CASS environments, as well as their relationships to tidal cycling and the availability of nutrients and electron acceptors, are poorly understood. These factors will determine the long-term efficacy of passive CASS remediation strategies. Here we studied microbial community structure and functional guild distribution in sediment cores obtained from ten depths ranging from 0-20 cm in three sites located in the supra-, inter- and sub-tidal segments, respectively, of a CASS-affected salt marsh (East Trinity, Cairns, Australia. Whole community 16S rRNA gene diversity within each site was assessed by 454 pyrotag sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in the context of local hydrological, geochemical and lithological factors. The results illustrate spatial overlap, or close association, of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in an environment rich in organic matter and controlled by parameters such as acidity, redox potential, degree of water saturation, and mineralization. The observed spatial distribution implies the need for empirical understanding of the timing, relative to tidal cycling, of various terminal electron-accepting processes that control acid generation and biogeochemical iron and sulfur cycling.

  2. Sinking coastal cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkens, Gilles; Bucx, Tom; Dam, Rien; De Lange, Ger; Lambert, John

    2014-05-01

    In many coastal and delta cities land subsidence now exceeds absolute sea level rise up to a factor of ten. Without action, parts of Jakarta, Ho Chi Minh City, Bangkok and numerous other coastal cities will sink below sea level. Land subsidence increases flood vulnerability (frequency, inundation depth and duration of floods), with floods causing major economic damage and loss of lives. In addition, differential land movement causes significant economic losses in the form of structural damage and high maintenance costs. This effects roads and transportation networks, hydraulic infrastructure - such as river embankments, sluice gates, flood barriers and pumping stations -, sewage systems, buildings and foundations. The total damage worldwide is estimated at billions of dollars annually. Excessive groundwater extraction after rapid urbanization and population growth is the main cause of severe land subsidence. In addition, coastal cities are often faced with larger natural subsidence, as they are built on thick sequences of soft soil. Because of ongoing urbanization and population growth in delta areas, in particular in coastal megacities, there is, and will be, more economic development in subsidence-prone areas. The impacts of subsidence are further exacerbated by extreme weather events (short term) and rising sea levels (long term).Consequently, detrimental impacts will increase in the near future, making it necessary to address subsidence related problems now. Subsidence is an issue that involves many policy fields, complex technical aspects and governance embedment. There is a need for an integrated approach in order to manage subsidence and to develop appropriate strategies and measures that are effective and efficient on both the short and long term. Urban (ground)water management, adaptive flood risk management and related spatial planning strategies are just examples of the options available. A major rethink is needed to deal with the 'hidden' but urgent

  3. Application of risk perception and communication strategies to manage disease outbreaks of coastal shrimp farming in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahsan, Dewan

    2008-01-01

      Risk and uncertainty are very common issues in coastal shrimp industry like in any other business. A variety of risks are associated in shrimp farming like, production risks, technical risks, economical risks and disease of shrimp. However, risk of economic losses due to shrimp mortality (for...... diseases) is the major concern of shrimp producers of developing countries like Bangladesh, India, Thailand, China and many other countries. The risk of disease outbreaks in shrimp farms could be effectively prevented and managed by early identification of disease occurrence and by rapid communication...... of such a risk to the shrimp farmers. The risk perception and communication concepts could be applied to identify and to manage the disease occurrence in the initial stage. This conceptual paper provides the models to prevent and to manage shrimp diseases in coastal shrimp farming of Bangladesh and other...

  4. Coastal Mapping for Baseline Geoscience Knowledge to Support Community Hazard Assessment and Sustainable Development, Eastern Baffin Island, Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, D. L.; Bell, T.; Campbell, D. C.; Cowan, B.; Deering, R. L.; Hatcher, S. V.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.; Irvine, M.; Manson, G. K.; Smith, I. R.; Edinger, E.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2012 we have carried out extensive multibeam bathymetric and backscatter surveys in coastal waters of eastern Baffin Island, supplemented by sub-bottom imaging and coring. Shore-zone surveys have been undertaken in proximity to the communities of Iqaluit and Qikiqtarjuaq, following earlier work in Clyde River. These support benthic habitat mapping, geological exploration, analysis of past and present sea-level trends, and assessment of coastal hazards relating to climate change and seabed instability. Outputs include a seamless topographic-bathymetric digital elevation model (DEM) of extensive boulder-strewn tidal flats in the large tidal-range setting at Iqaluit, supporting analysis of coastal flooding, wave run-up, and sea-ice impacts on a rapidly developing urban waterfront in the context of climate change. Seabed mapping of inner Frobisher Bay seaward of Iqaluit reveals a potential local tsunami hazard in widespread submarine slope failures, the triggers, magnitudes, and ages of which are the subject of ongoing research. In fjords of the Cumberland Peninsula, this project has mapped numerous submerged delta terraces at 19 to 45 m present water depth. These attest to an early postglacial submerged shoreline, displaced by glacial-isostatic adjustment. It rises linearly over a distance of 100 km east to west, where a submerged boulder barricade on a -16 m shoreline was discovered at a proposed port site in Broughton Channel near Qikiqtarjuaq. Palaeotopographic mapping using the multibeam data revealed an enclosed estuarine environment quite different from the present-day open passage swept by tidal currents. At Clyde River, combined seabed and onshore DEMs with geohazard mapping provided foundation data for community assessment and planning under a local knowledge co-production initiative. The geohazard work identified portions of the town-site more vulnerable to both coastal flooding and potential thaw subsidence, while the shallow delta terrace suggested a

  5. Early soil knowledge and the birth and development of soil science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brevik, E.C.; Hartemink, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    Soils knowledge dates to the earliest known practice of agriculture about 11,000 BP Civilizations all around the world showed various levels of soil knowledge by the 4th century AD, including irrigation, the use of terraces to control erosion, various ways of improving soil fertility, and ways to cr

  6. Early soil knowledge and the birth and development of soil science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brevik, E.C.; Hartemink, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    Soils knowledge dates to the earliest known practice of agriculture about 11,000 BP Civilizations all around the world showed various levels of soil knowledge by the 4th century AD, including irrigation, the use of terraces to control erosion, various ways of improving soil fertility, and ways to

  7. GS Soil - Assessment and strategic development of INSPIRE compliant Geodata-Services for European Soil Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Paul Henning; Münier, Bernd

    in Annex II and III. According to this, the thematic focus of GS Soil is set on soil as an important parameter according to climate, land use, geology and geomorphology. At the same time soils are the basis for food production and consumer health, for the ecological and economical balance and for many...

  8. Developing a framework for monitoring coastal habitats using aerial imagery and object-based image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Anders

    of decreased habitat dynamics exists. A valuable source of land cover changes are historical aerial imagery of which Denmark has unique datasets.This poster presents an object-based image analysis approach for mapping and monitoring af coastal habitat stucture, which integrates the high spectral resolution...

  9. Development of a Coupled Ocean-Hydrologic Model to Simulate Pollutant Transport in Singapore Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive agricultural, economic and industrial activities in Singapore and Malaysia have made our coastal areas under high risk of water pollution. A coupled ocean-hydrologic model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of flow and pollutant transport in Singapore coastal waters. The hydrologic SWAT model is coupled with the coastal ocean SUNTANS model by outputting streamflow and pollutant concentrations from the SWAT model and using them as inputs for the SUNTANS model at common boundary points. The coupled model is calibrated with observed sea surface elevations and velocities, and high correlation coefficients that exceed 0.97 and 0.91 are found for sea surface elevations and velocities, respectively. The pollutants are modeled as Gaussian passive tracers, and are released at five upstream locations in Singapore coastal waters. During the Northeast monsoon, pollutants released in Source 1 (Johor River), Source 2 (Tiram River), Source 3 (Layang River) and Source 4 (Layau River) enter the Singapore Strait after 4 days of release and reach Sentosa Island within 9 days. Meanwhile, pollutants released in Source 5 (Kallang River) reach Sentosa Island after 4 days. During the Southwest monsoon, the dispersion time is roughly doubled, with pollutants from Sources 1 - 4 entering the Singapore Strait only after 12 days of release due to weak currents.

  10. Offshore coastal wind speed gradients: Issues for the design and development of large offshore windfarms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, R.J.; Badger, Jake; Pryor, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    Simulations, from mesoscale numerical models, and analyses of in-situ and remote sensing data from offshore wind farms in Denmark, are used to examine both horizontal and vertical gradients of wind speeds in the coastal zone. Results suggest that the distance from the coastline over which wind...

  11. Nutrient dynamics and phytoplankton development along an estuary–coastal zone continuum: A model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.; Lacroix, G.; Gypens, N.; Regnier, P.; Lancelot, C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a first attempt to quantify the biogeochemical transformations and fluxes of carbon and nutrients along the entire mixing zone of the shallow, tidally-dominated estuary–coastal zone continuum of the Scheldt (Belgium/The Netherlands). A fully transient, two-dimensional, nested-gri

  12. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane De Steven; Rebecca R. Sharitz

    2007-01-01

    Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous...

  13. 木霉制剂改良滨海盐渍土台田生态效应%Ecological effect of Trichoderma agent on platform field soil improvement in saline coastal area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建爱; 段友臣; 郭峰; 杨武汉; 陈为京; 万书波

    2016-01-01

    Application of biological agents to improve saline soil is a relatively fast, economical, simple method with long-term effectiveness. Trichoderma spp. are free-living fungi that are highly active in interaction among root, soil and foliar environments. Biological agents application in agricultural systems is a potential method to ameliorate saline soil, eventually benefiting the environment or ecosystem by regulating soil physical and chemical properties and microbial population. In this study, broadcast granule preparation of Trichoderma agent (containing at least 1×107 colony-forming units of active ingredients for per gram dry weight) was applied to soil of moderately saline coastal platform fields to explore effect of Trichoderma agent on soil properties of moderately saline coastal platform field. Arable layers soils were sampled, which included moderately saline coastal platform field with (T1010) and without (CK) Trichoderma agent under peanut cropping (sandy loam soil with salt content of 2.99 g·kg-1), flood land in coastal saline area (sandy loam soil with salt content of 26.19 g·kg-1), reclaimed field in coastal slight saline area under continuous cotton cropping (light loam soil with salt content of 1.75 g·kg-1), non-saline solar-greenhouse soil under continuous tomato cropping (loam soil with salt content of 0.98 g·kg-1). All the plot samples were repeated four times, and the physical, chemical and biological properties tested in laboratory. The results showed that Trichoderma agent amended soil physical properties. Compared with CK, T1010 increased soil compaction by 177.04%, content of water stable aggregate of ≥0.25 mm by 265.78%, soil moisture content by 320.83%. In this study, soil chemical properties also changed. The contents of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and organic matter increased by 96.14%, 42.17%, 105.65% and 63.79%, respectively, under T1010 compared with those under CK. Under T1010, soil bacteria, actinomyce, fungi and

  14. Assessment Of Physico-Chemical Property Of Water Samples From Port Harcourt Bonny And Opobo Coastal Areas For Sustainable Coastal Tourism Development In Rivers State Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinwanne

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study evaluated some physico-chemical properties of water samples from Port Harcourt Bonny and Opobo to determine the safety of water from the areas for sustainable coastal tourism development in Rivers State Nigeria. Three water samples were collected with three sterilized plastic containers with a capacity of 25cl which were subjected to laboratory tests to know their constituents. The parameters tested were appearance temperature colour turbidity conductivity PH alkalinity lead Pb Chromium Cr Cadmium Cd Ammonia BODs and Dissolved Oxygen. The results of the water samples were compared with World Health Organization WHO water quality standard and the Nigeria National Water Quality standard to determine the safety of the water for human consumption and tourism development. The study revealed that Port Harcourt site has more prospects for tourism development more than Opobo study site because the Ph alkalinity and BODs levels were lower than that of Opobo making the water safer except that the amount of dissolved oxygen was a little high in Opobo and turbidity was not detected in Opobo. The study revealed that Bonny water was very dense in appearance dark brown in colour highly turbid basic and with mean concentration of the heavy metals Lead chromium and cadmium higher than the recommended World Health Organization WHO water quality standard and the Nigeria National Water Quality standard and therefore not safe for drinking and swimming. Treated portable water should be provided for the people of Port Harcourt Opobo and Bonny especially people from Bonny area and development of tourism in the state to save the people and tourists from imminent danger of fecal contaminants and toxic substances.

  15. Development and application of a soil organic matter-based soil quality index in mineralized terrane of the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecker, S.W.; Stillings, Lisa L.; Amacher, M.C.; Ippolito, J.A.; DeCrappeo, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil quality indices provide a means of distilling large amounts of data into a single metric that evaluates the soil’s ability to carry out key ecosystem functions. Primarily developed in agroecosytems, then forested ecosystems, an index using the relation between soil organic matter and other key soil properties in more semi-arid systems of the Western US impacted by different geologic mineralization was developed. Three different sites in two different mineralization types, acid sulfate and Cu/Mo porphyry in California and Nevada, were studied. Soil samples were collected from undisturbed soils in both mineralized and nearby unmineralized terrane as well as waste rock and tailings. Eight different microbial parameters (carbon substrate utilization, microbial biomass-C, mineralized-C, mineralized-N and enzyme activities of acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, and fluorescein diacetate) along with a number of physicochemical parameters were measured. Multiple linear regression models between these parameters and both total organic carbon and total nitrogen were developed, using the ratio of predicted to measured values as the soil quality index. In most instances, pooling unmineralized and mineralized soil data within a given study site resulted in lower model correlations. Enzyme activity was a consistent explanatory variable in the models across the study sites. Though similar indicators were significant in models across different mineralization types, pooling data across sites inhibited model differentiation of undisturbed and disturbed sites. This procedure could be used to monitor recovery of disturbed systems in mineralized terrane and help link scientific and management disciplines.

  16. Developing High-resolution Soil Database for Regional Crop Modeling in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, E.; Ines, A. V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The most readily available soil data for regional crop modeling in Africa is the World Inventory of Soil Emission potentials (WISE) dataset, which has 1125 soil profiles for the world, but does not extensively cover countries Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania in East Africa. Another dataset available is the HC27 (Harvest Choice by IFPRI) in a gridded format (10km) but composed of generic soil profiles based on only three criteria (texture, rooting depth, and organic carbon content). In this paper, we present a development and application of a high-resolution (1km), gridded soil database for regional crop modeling in East Africa. Basic soil information is extracted from Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS), which provides essential soil properties (bulk density, soil organic carbon, soil PH and percentages of sand, silt and clay) for 6 different standardized soil layers (5, 15, 30, 60, 100 and 200 cm) in 1km resolution. Soil hydraulic properties (e.g., field capacity and wilting point) are derived from the AfSIS soil dataset using well-proven pedo-transfer functions and are customized for DSSAT-CSM soil data requirements. The crop model is used to evaluate crop yield forecasts using the new high resolution soil database and compared with WISE and HC27. In this paper we will present also the results of DSSAT loosely coupled with a hydrologic model (VIC) to assimilate root-zone soil moisture. Creating a grid-based soil database, which provides a consistent soil input for two different models (DSSAT and VIC) is a critical part of this work. The created soil database is expected to contribute to future applications of DSSAT crop simulation in East Africa where food security is highly vulnerable.

  17. Development of a deterministic downscaling algorithm for remote sensing soil moisture footprint using soil and vegetation classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yongchul; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2013-10-01

    Soil moisture (SM) at the local scale is required to account for small-scale spatial heterogeneity of land surface because many hydrological processes manifest at scales ranging from cm to km. Although remote sensing (RS) platforms provide large-scale soil moisture dynamics, scale discrepancy between observation scale (e.g., approximately several kilometers) and modeling scale (e.g., few hundred meters) leads to uncertainties in the performance of land surface hydrologic models. To overcome this drawback, we developed a new deterministic downscaling algorithm (DDA) for estimating fine-scale soil moisture with pixel-based RS soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET) products using a genetic algorithm. This approach was evaluated under various synthetic and field experiments (Little Washita-LW 13 and 21, Oklahoma) conditions including homogeneous and heterogeneous land surface conditions composed of different soil textures and vegetations. Our algorithm is based on determining effective soil hydraulic properties for different subpixels within a RS pixel and estimating the long-term soil moisture dynamics of individual subpixels using the hydrological model with the extracted soil hydraulic parameters. The soil moisture dynamics of subpixels from synthetic experiments matched well with the observations under heterogeneous land surface condition, although uncertainties (Mean Bias Error, MBE: -0.073 to -0.049) exist. Field experiments have typically more variations due to weather conditions, measurement errors, unknown bottom boundary conditions, and scale discrepancy between remote sensing pixel and model grid resolution. However, the soil moisture estimates of individual subpixels (from the airborne Electronically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) footprints of 800 m × 800 m) downscaled by this approach matched well (R: 0.724 to -0.914, MBE: -0.203 to -0.169 for the LW 13; R: 0.343-0.865, MBE: -0.165 to -0.122 for the LW 21) with the in situ local scale soil

  18. Fuzzy indicator approach: development of impact factor of soil amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil amendments have been shown to be useful for improving soil condition, but it is often difficult to make management decisions as to their usefulness. Utilization of Fuzzy Set Theory is a promising method for decision support associated with utilization of soil amendments. In this article a tool ...

  19. Development and application of a shipboard method for spectrophotometric determination of trace dissolved manganese in estuarine and coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing; Zhu, Yong; Zhou, Tingjin

    2015-01-01

    A shipboard method for the determination of trace dissolved manganese in estuarine and coastal waters was developed using a technique of reverse flow injection analysis, which adopted a 1-m liquid waveguide capillary cell and spectrophotometric detection of manganese derivation with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN). The design of dual-sample-carrier speeded up the sample throughput and eliminated the Schlieren effect. The salinity of estuarine and coastal waters caused a huge increase in the blank absorption value at the maximum absorption wavelength; therefore, a less sensitive detection wavelength was selected to achieve a low blank value while the method sensitivity was not significantly decreased. Method parameters were optimized. The salinity effect from estuarine and coastal waters was carefully investigated, and interference from iron was evaluated. The proposed method had high sensitivity with a detection limit of 3.0 nmol L-1 and a wide linear range of 10-1500 nmol L-1 for dissolved manganese in seawater (S=35). The analytical results of five water samples with different salinities obtained using the proposed method showed good agreement with those using a reference ICP-MS method. The sample throughput of the proposed method was 120 h-1, which was capable of obtaining high spatial and temporal resolution data in shipboard analysis. The proposed method had the advantages of convenient application in estuarine and coastal waters with different salinities, low detection limit, as well as high sample throughput. The proposed method was successfully applied to a 24 h on-line analysis and a shipboard underway analysis of dissolved manganese in the Jiulongjiang Estuary.

  20. Water erosion and soil water infiltration in different stages of corn development and tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. de Carvalho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study evaluated soil and water losses, soil water infiltration and infiltration rate models in soil tillage systems and corn (Zea mays, L. development stages under simulated rainfall. The treatments were: cultivation along contour lines, cultivation down the slope and exposed soil. Soil losses and infiltration in each treatment were quantified for rains applied using a portable simulator, at 0, 30, 60 and 75 days after planting. Infiltration rates were estimated using the models of Kostiakov-Lewis, Horton and Philip. Based on the obtained results, the combination of effects between soil tillage system and corn development stages reduces soil and water losses. The contour tillage system promoted improvements in soil physical properties, favoring the reduction of erosion in 59.7% (water loss and 86.6% (soil loss at 75 days after planting, and the increase in the stable infiltration rate in 223.3%, compared with the exposed soil. Associated to soil cover, contour cultivation reduces soil and water losses, and the former is more influenced by management. Horton model is the most adequate to represent soil water infiltration rate under the evaluated conditions.

  1. Pollen deposition in tauber traps and surface soil samples in the Mar Chiquita coastal lagoon area, pampa grasslands (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Latorre

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimations of airborne pollen loadings deposited in Tauber traps were studied in a coastal lagoon from south-eastern Pampa grasslands, Argentina, in order to assess their relationship with surface samples and to interpret the representativeness of local, regional and extraregional vegetation. Three different environments were considered: a coastal dune barrier with a psammophytic community, a salt marsh with a halophytic community in Mar Chiquita lagoon, and a freshwater community at Hinojales freshwater lake. Based on a record of surface samples taken from a previous paper, a parametric model was built to classify Tauber samples gathered from the natural vegetation communities of the study area. Results revealed that just like their surface counterparts, Tauber trap records qualitatively reflect the predominant vegetation types, although ecological groups feature different quantitative representations depending on the record type. Pollen loadings showed that airborne pollen transport was predominantly of local range, in accordance with previous results from the same study area. Airborne - surface samples relationships enrich our knowledge of the present environment that could be useful to improve paleoecological interpretations of the area.Se estimó el depósito polínico atmosférico de trampas Tauber en una laguna costera del sudeste de la estepa pampeana argentina, con el objetivo de analizar su relación con muestras de polen superficial e interpretar la representatividad de la vegetación local, regional y extraregional. Se consideraron tres ambientes diferentes: una barrera costera de dunas con vegetación psamofítica, la marisma de la laguna costera Mar Chiquita, con vegetación halofítica, y la laguna continental Hinojales, con vegetación hidrofítica. En base a las muestras de superficie y análisis de un trabajo previo, se construyó un modelo paramétrico para clasificar las muestras Tauber tomadas en la vegetación natural del

  2. Coastal Processes with Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Robert G.; Dalrymple, Robert A.

    2004-03-01

    The world's coastlines, dividing land from sea, are geological environments that are unique in their composition and the physical processes affecting them. At the dynamically active intersection of land and the oceans, humans have been building structures throughout history. Initially used for naval and commercial purposes, more recently recreation and tourism have increased activity in the coastal zone dramatically. Shoreline development is now causing a significant conflict with natural coastal processes. This text on coastal engineering will help the reader understand these coastal processes and develop strategies to cope effectively with shoreline erosion. The book is organized in four parts: (1) an overview of coastal engineering, using case studies to illustrate problems; (2) hydrodynamics of the coastal zone, reviewing storm surges, water waves, and low frequency motions within the nearshore and surf zone; (3) coastal responses including equilibrium beach profiles and sediment transport; (4) applications such as erosion mitigation, beach nourishment, coastal armoring, tidal inlets, and shoreline management.

  3. Large-scale coastal behaviour in relation to coastal zone management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stive, M.J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The development of coastal erosion management - addressing typical traditional erosion problems - towards coastal zone management addressing the evaluation of alternative solutions to guarantee a variety of coastal zone functions on their economic time scale - has necessitated the formulation of lar

  4. Large-scale coastal behaviour in relation to coastal zone management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stive, M.J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The development of coastal erosion management - addressing typical traditional erosion problems - towards coastal zone management addressing the evaluation of alternative solutions to guarantee a variety of coastal zone functions on their economic time scale - has necessitated the formulation of lar

  5. Developing Remote Sensing Products for Monitoring and Modeling Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Vulnerability to Climate Change and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeau-Chavez, L. L.; Miller, M. E.; Battaglia, M.; Banda, E.; Endres, S.; Currie, W. S.; Elgersma, K. J.; French, N. H. F.; Goldberg, D. E.; Hyndman, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Spread of invasive plant species in the coastal wetlands of the Great Lakes is degrading wetland habitat, decreasing biodiversity, and decreasing ecosystem services. An understanding of the mechanisms of invasion is crucial to gaining control of this growing threat. To better understand the effects of land use and climatic drivers on the vulnerability of coastal zones to invasion, as well as to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of invasion, research is being conducted that integrates field studies, process-based ecosystem and hydrological models, and remote sensing. Spatial data from remote sensing is needed to parameterize the hydrological model and to test the outputs of the linked models. We will present several new remote sensing products that are providing important physiological, biochemical, and landscape information to parameterize and verify models. This includes a novel hybrid radar-optical technique to delineate stands of invasives, as well as natural wetland cover types; using radar to map seasonally inundated areas not hydrologically connected; and developing new algorithms to estimate leaf area index (LAI) using Landsat. A coastal map delineating wetland types including monocultures of the invaders (Typha spp. and Phragmites austrailis) was created using satellite radar (ALOS PALSAR, 20 m resolution) and optical data (Landsat 5, 30 m resolution) fusion from multiple dates in a Random Forests classifier. These maps provide verification of the integrated model showing areas at high risk of invasion. For parameterizing the hydrological model, maps of seasonal wetness are being developed using spring (wet) imagery and differencing that with summer (dry) imagery to detect the seasonally wet areas. Finally, development of LAI remote sensing high resolution algorithms for uplands and wetlands is underway. LAI algorithms for wetlands have not been previously developed due to the difficulty of a water background. These products are being used to

  6. Coastal Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction, waves, sediment transport, littoral transport, lonshore sediment transport, onshore-offshore sediment transport, coastal changes, dune erosion and storm surges, sedimentation in channels and trenches, coastal engineering in practice.

  7. Soil organic carbon storage changes in coastal wetlands of the modern Yellow River Delta from 2000 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating atmospheric CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. The storages and dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC of 0–30 cm soil depth in different landscape types including beaches, reservoir and pond, reed wetland, forest wetland, bush wetland, farmland, building land, bare land (severe saline land and salt field in the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD were studied based on the data of the regional survey and laboratory analysis. The landscape types were classified by the interpretation of remote sensing images of 2000 and 2009, which were calibrated by field survey results. The results revealed an increase of 10.59 km2 in the modem YRD area from 2000 to 2009. The SOC density varied ranging from 0.73 kg m−2 to 4.25 kg m−2 at depth of 0–30 cm. There were approx. 3.559 × 106 t and 3.545 × 106 t SOC stored in the YRD in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The SOC storages changed greatly in beaches, bush wetland, farm land and salt field which were affected dominantly by anthropogenic activities. The area of the YRD increased greatly within 10 years, however, the small increase of SOC storage in the region was observed due to landscape changes, indicating that the modern YRD was a potential carbon sink and anthropogenic activity was a key factor for SOC change.

  8. Soil organic carbon storage changes in coastal wetlands of the modern Yellow River Delta from 2000 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. The storages and dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC of 0–30 cm soil depth in different landscape types including beaches, reservoir and pond, reed wetland, forest wetland, bush wetland, farmland, building land, bare land (severe saline land and salt field in the modern Yellow River Delta (YRD, were studied based on the data of the regional survey and laboratory analysis. The landscape types were classified by the interpretation of remote sensing images of 2000 and 2009, which was calibrated by field survey results. The results revealed an increase of 10.59 km2 in the modem YRD area from 2000 to 2009. The SOC density varied ranging from 0.73 kg m−2 to 21.60 kg m−2 at depth of 30 cm. There were ~3.97 × 106 t and 3.98 × 106 t SOC stored in the YRD in 2000 and 2009, respectively. The SOC storages changed greatly in beaches, bush wetland, farm land and salt field which were affected dominantly by anthropogenic activities. The area of the YRD increased greatly within 10 yr, however, the small increase of SOC storage in the region was observed due to landscape changes, indicating that the modern YRD was a potential carbon sink and anthropogenic activity was a key factor for SOC change.

  9. Development of base maps' role in soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brad; Brevik, Eric

    2014-05-01

    One of the ultimate goals of soil science is the production of accurate soil maps, but historically these thematic maps have relied upon base maps for positional reference and later for parameters that help predict soil properties. This presentation reviews the history of base maps and the dependence of soil mapping on them. The availability of geographic technology for producing these base maps has constrained and directed the geographic study of soil. A lack of accurate methods for determining location limited early geographic description of soils to narratives. The availability of accurate topographic maps in the late 18th century, fueled by governments' interests in documenting national boundaries and popular interest in world atlases, provided the first base maps for soil geographers. These soil maps primarily used the topographic maps as a spatial reference onto which the thematic details were drawn. Due to the late start of a systematic topographic survey in the United States, early Soil Survey maps depended upon plat maps for spatial reference. The adoption of aerial photographs in the process of soil mapping increased the role of base maps as predictive parameters. In the current geospatial revolution, global positioning systems and geographic information systems have nearly replaced the need for base maps to provide spatial reference. Today, base maps are more likely to be used as parameters in landscape models for predicting the spatial distribution of soil properties and classes. As model parameters for digital soil maps, base maps constitute the library of predictive variables and constrain the supported resolution of the soil map. This change in the relationship between base maps and the soil map is a paradigm shift that affects fundamental definitions of geography, such as scale, resolution, and detectable features. These concepts are the essential tools used to study the spatial characteristics of Earth Systems.

  10. Exploring scenarios of light pollution from coastal development reaching sea turtle nesting beaches near Cabo Pulmo, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Verutes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New coastal development may offer economic benefits to resort builders and even local communities, but these projects can also impact local ecosystems, key wildlife, and the draw for tourists. We explore how light from Cabo Cortés, a proposed coastal development in Baja California Sur, Mexico, may alter natural light cues used by sea turtle hatchlings. We adapt a viewshed approach to model exterior light originating from the resort under plausible zoning scenarios. This spatially explicit information allows stakeholders to evaluate the likely impact of alternative development options. Our model suggests that direct light’s ability to reach sea turtle nesting beaches varies greatly by source location and height—with some plausible development scenarios leading to significantly less light pollution than others. Our light pollution maps can enhance decision-making, offering clear guidance on where to avoid elevated lamps or when to recommend lighting restrictions. Communities can use this information to participate in development planning to mitigate ecological, aesthetic and economic impacts from artificial lighting. Though tested in Mexico, our approach and free, open-source software can be applied in other places around the world to better understand and manage the threats of light pollution to sea turtles.

  11. Development of soil and terrain digital database for major food-growing regions of India for resource planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandran, P.; Tiwary, P.; Bhattacharyya, T.; Mandal, C.; Prasad, J.; Ray, S.K.; Sarkar, D.; Pal, D.K.; Dijkshoorn, J.A.; Batjes, N.H.; Bindraban, P.S.; Thakre, S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil information system in SOTER (soil and terrain digital database) framework is developed for the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) and black soil regions (BSR) of India with the help of information from 842 georeferenced soil profiles including morphological, physical and chemical properties of soils in

  12. Development of a composite soil degradation assessment index for cocoa agroecosystems in southwestern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenrele Adeniyi, Sunday; de Clercq, Willem Petrus; van Niekerk, Adriaan

    2017-08-01

    Cocoa agroecosystems are a major land-use type in the tropical rainforest belt of West Africa, reportedly associated with several ecological changes, including soil degradation. This study aims to develop a composite soil degradation assessment index (CSDI) for determining the degradation level of cocoa soils under smallholder agroecosystems of southwestern Nigeria. Plots where natural forests have been converted to cocoa agroecosystems of ages 1-10, 11-40, and 41-80 years, respectively representing young cocoa plantations (YCPs), mature cocoa plantations (MCPs), and senescent cocoa plantations (SCPs), were identified to represent the biological cycle of the cocoa tree. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0 to 20 cm in each plot and analysed in terms of their physical, chemical, and biological properties. Factor analysis of soil data revealed four major interacting soil degradation processes: decline in soil nutrients, loss of soil organic matter, increase in soil acidity, and the breakdown of soil textural characteristics over time. These processes were represented by eight soil properties (extractable zinc, silt, soil organic matter (SOM), cation exchange capacity (CEC), available phosphorus, total porosity, pH, and clay content). These soil properties were subjected to forward stepwise discriminant analysis (STEPDA), and the result showed that four soil properties (extractable zinc, cation exchange capacity, SOM, and clay content) are the most useful in separating the studied soils into YCP, MCP, and SCP. In this way, we have sufficiently eliminated redundancy in the final selection of soil degradation indicators. Based on these four soil parameters, a CSDI was developed and used to classify selected cocoa soils into three different classes of degradation. The results revealed that 65 % of the selected cocoa farms are moderately degraded, while 18 % have a high degradation status. The numerical value of the CSDI as an objective index of soil degradation

  13. Development of a composite soil degradation assessment index for cocoa agroecosystems in southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Adeniyi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa agroecosystems are a major land-use type in the tropical rainforest belt of West Africa, reportedly associated with several ecological changes, including soil degradation. This study aims to develop a composite soil degradation assessment index (CSDI for determining the degradation level of cocoa soils under smallholder agroecosystems of southwestern Nigeria. Plots where natural forests have been converted to cocoa agroecosystems of ages 1–10, 11–40, and 41–80 years, respectively representing young cocoa plantations (YCPs, mature cocoa plantations (MCPs, and senescent cocoa plantations (SCPs, were identified to represent the biological cycle of the cocoa tree. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0 to 20 cm in each plot and analysed in terms of their physical, chemical, and biological properties. Factor analysis of soil data revealed four major interacting soil degradation processes: decline in soil nutrients, loss of soil organic matter, increase in soil acidity, and the breakdown of soil textural characteristics over time. These processes were represented by eight soil properties (extractable zinc, silt, soil organic matter (SOM, cation exchange capacity (CEC, available phosphorus, total porosity, pH, and clay content. These soil properties were subjected to forward stepwise discriminant analysis (STEPDA, and the result showed that four soil properties (extractable zinc, cation exchange capacity, SOM, and clay content are the most useful in separating the studied soils into YCP, MCP, and SCP. In this way, we have sufficiently eliminated redundancy in the final selection of soil degradation indicators. Based on these four soil parameters, a CSDI was developed and used to classify selected cocoa soils into three different classes of degradation. The results revealed that 65 % of the selected cocoa farms are moderately degraded, while 18 % have a high degradation status. The numerical value of the CSDI as an objective

  14. Modern, Sangamon and Yarmouth soil development in loess of unglaciated southwestern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimley, David A.; Follmer, Leon R.; Hughes, Randall E.; Solheid, Peter A.

    2003-02-01

    The Thebes Section in unglaciated southwestern Illinois contains a well preserved ˜500 kyr loess-paleosol sequence with four loesses and three interglacial soils. Various magnetic, mineralogical, and elemental properties were analyzed and compared over the thickness of soil sola. These proxies for soil development intensity have the following trend: Yarmouth Geosol>Sangamon Geosol>modern soil. Quartz/plagioclase, Zr/Sr, and TiO 2/Na 2O ratios were most sensitive to weathering. Frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility and anhysteretic remanent magnetization, greatest in A horizons, also correspond well with soil development intensity. Neoformed mixed-layered kaolinite/expandables, suggestive of a warm/humid climate, were detected in the Sangamon and Yarmouth soil sola. Clay illuviation in soils was among the least sensitive indicators of soil development. Differences in properties among interglacial soils are interpreted to primarily reflect soil development duration, with climatic effects being secondary. Assuming logarithmic decreases in weathering rates, the observed weathering in the Sangamon Geosol is consistent with 50 kyr of interglacial weathering (Oxygen Isotope Stage 5) compared to 10 kyr for the modern soil (Oxygen Isotope Stage 1). We propose that the Yarmouth Geosol in the central Midwest formed over 180 kyr of interglacial weathering (including oxygen isotope stages 7, 9, and 11).

  15. Construction of an Environmentally Sustainable Development on a Modified Coastal Sand Mined and Landfill Site – Part 1. Planning and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneMarie Clements

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Magenta Shores development fronts 2.3 km of Tuggerah Beach on a formerly sand mined and landfill site in an urban growth area on the central coast of New South Wales. To increase the natural defences against storm waves and mass sand movements, the incipient foredune was retained and the parallel beach ridge landform was re-established by mimicking natural processes. Analysis of waste and resources led to a coordinated large-scale onsite re-use, recycling and waste management program that reduced landfill, transportation and natural resource requirements. Bitou bush removed from the Coastal Protection Zone was incorporated into golf course soils to improve grass growth. Leachate in the groundwater from the former landfill was diverted away from Tuggerah Lake and re-used in golf course irrigation. Upgrade of the local sewer treatment plant and installation of a public dual pipeline servicing Magenta and the adjoining township satisfied irrigation demands and provided non-potable water for the existing and expanding urban community. The sustainability challenges of the project were met through clear identification of existing environmental risks, application of scientific research, integrated team management and stakeholders’ cooperation.

  16. Composition and structure of agents responsible for development of water repellency in soils following oil contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvina, Marina; Todoruk, Tiona R; Langford, Cooper H

    2003-07-01

    Soil from the Ellerslie site of experimental oil contamination in Alberta developed water repellency some years after initial remediation. The water-repellent soils were compared to clean soils and contaminated but wettable soils by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The effects of extraction with CH2Cl2 (for petroleum hydrocarbons), NaOH (for natural organic matter), and 2-propanol/ammonia (IPA/NH3) on wettability were evaluated by the molarity of the ethanol droplet (MED) test. Soil extracts and whole soils, after extraction, were examined using NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). On the basis of the structure--MED correlations, a model of a thin-layer natural organic matter--petroleum products complex formed under strong drying conditions is proposed to account for the development of water repellency. Studies of two similar soils from accidental oil spills are supportive.

  17. Development of a Climate Change Adaptation Strategy for Management of Coastal Marsh Systems in Southern New England USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sea level rise is accelerating throughout the U.S. Northeast causing shoreline erosion, increased coastal flooding, and marsh vulnerability to the impact of storms. Coastal marshes provide flood abatement, carbon and nutrient sequestration, water quality maintenance, and habitat ...

  18. Integration of Soil Information System and Interactive Self—Organizing Data for Agricultural Developing Zones in Red Soil Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIZHOU; WANGRENCHAO; 等

    1999-01-01

    Integration of soil information system (SIS) and interactive self-organizing data(ISODATA) was studied to establish proper agricultural developing zones in red soil region of southern China which are of crucial importance to farmers,researchers,and decision maders while utilizing and managing red soil resources.SIS created by using ARC/INFO was used to provide data acquisition,systematic model parameter assignment,and visual display of analytic results.Topography,temperature,soil component(e.g.,organic matter and pH) and condition of agricultural production were selected as parameters of ISODATA model.Taking Longyou County,Zhejiang Province as the case study area,the effect of the integration and recommendations are discussed for future research.

  19. Aboveground Deadwood Deposition Supports Development of Soil Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Wehde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Unicellular saprobic fungi (yeasts inhabit soils worldwide. Although yeast species typically occupy defined areas on the biome scale, their distribution patterns within a single type of vegetation, such as forests, are more complex. In order to understand factors that shape soil yeast communities, soils collected underneath decaying wood logs and under forest litter were analyzed. We isolated and identified molecularly a total of 25 yeast species, including three new species. Occurrence and distribution of yeasts isolated from these soils provide new insights into ecology and niche specialization of several soil-borne species. Although abundance of typical soil yeast species varied among experimental plots, the analysis of species abundance and community composition revealed a strong influence of wood log deposition and leakage of organic carbon. Unlike soils underneath logs, yeast communities in adjacent areas harbored a considerable number of transient (phylloplane-related yeasts reaching 30% of the total yeast quantity. We showed that distinguishing autochthonous community members and species transient in soils is essential to estimate appropriate effects of environmental factors on soil fungi. Furthermore, a better understanding of species niches is crucial for analyses of culture-independent data, and may hint to the discovery of unifying patterns of microbial species distribution.

  20. Potential drug development candidates for human soil-transmitted helminthiases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Olliaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Few drugs are available for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH; the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole are the only drugs being used for preventive chemotherapy as they can be given in one single dose with no weight adjustment. While generally safe and effective in reducing intensity of infection, they are contra-indicated in first-trimester pregnancy and have suboptimal efficacy against Trichuris trichiura. In addition, drug resistance is a threat. It is therefore important to find alternatives.We searched the literature and the animal health marketed products and pipeline for potential drug development candidates. Recently registered veterinary products offer advantages in that they have undergone extensive and rigorous animal testing, thus reducing the risk, cost and time to approval for human trials. For selected compounds, we retrieved and summarised publicly available information (through US Freedom of Information (FoI statements, European Public Assessment Reports (EPAR and published literature. Concomitantly, we developed a target product profile (TPP against which the products were compared.The paper summarizes the general findings including various classes of compounds, and more specific information on two veterinary anthelmintics (monepantel, emodepside and nitazoxanide, an antiprotozoal drug, compiled from the EMA EPAR and FDA registration files.Few of the compounds already approved for use in human or animal medicine qualify for development track decision. Fast-tracking to approval for human studies may be possible for veterinary compounds like emodepside and monepantel, but additional information remains to be acquired before an informed decision can be made.

  1. Ecosystem development in roadside grasslands: Biotic control, plant-soil interactions, and dispersal limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Palacios, P.; Bowker, M.A.; Maestre, F.T.; Soliveres, S.; Valladares, F.; Papadopoulos, J.; Escudero, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roadside grasslands undergoing secondary succession are abundant, and represent ecologically meaningful examples of novel, human-created ecosystems. Interactions between plant and soil communities (hereafter plant-soil interactions) are of major importance in understanding the role of biotic control in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about these links in the context of ecosystem restoration and succession. The assessment of the key biotic communities and interactions driving ecosystem development will help practitioners to better allocate the limited resources devoted to roadside grassland restoration. We surveyed roadside grasslands from three successional stages (0-2, 7-9, and > 20 years) in two Mediterranean regions of Spain. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate how interactions between plants, biological soil crusts (BSCs), and soil microbial functional diversity (soil microorganisms) affect indicators of ecosystem development and restoration: plant similarity to the reference ecosystem, erosion control, and soil C storage and N accumulation. Changes in plant community composition along the successional gradient exerted the strongest influence on these indicators. High BSC cover was associated with high soil stability, and high soil microbial functional diversity from late-successional stages was associated with high soil fertility. Contrary to our expectations, the indirect effects of plants, mediated by either BSCs or soil microorganisms, were very weak in both regions, suggesting a minor role for plant-soil interactions upon ecosystem development indicators over long periods. Our results suggest that natural vegetation dynamics effectively improved ecosystem development within a time frame of 20 years in the grasslands evaluated. They also indicate that this time could be shortened if management actions focus on: (1) maintaining wellconserved natural areas close to roadsides to enhance plant compositional changes towards late

  2. Ecosystem development in roadside grasslands: biotic control, plant–soil interactions and dispersal limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palacios, Pablo; Bowker, Matthew A.; Maestre, Fernando T.; Soliveres, Santiago; Valladares, Fernando; Papadopoulos, Jorge; Escudero, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Roadside grasslands undergoing secondary succession are abundant, and represent ecologically meaningful examples of novel, human-created ecosystems. Interactions between plant and soil communities (hereafter plant–soil interactions) are of major importance in understanding the role of biotic control in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about these links in the context of ecosystem restoration and succession. The assessment of the key biotic communities and interactions driving ecosystem development will help practitioners to better allocate the limited resources devoted to roadside grassland restoration. We surveyed roadside grasslands from three successional stages (0–2, 7–9 and > 20 years) in two Mediterranean regions of Spain. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate how interactions between plants, biological soil crusts [BSCs], and soil microbial functional diversity [soil microorganisms] affect indicators of ecosystem development and restoration: plant similarity to the reference ecosystem, erosion control and soil C storage and N accumulation. Changes in plant community composition along the successional gradient exerted the strongest influence on these indicators. High BSC cover was associated with high soil stability, and high soil microbial functional diversity from late-successional stages was associated with high soil fertility. Contrary to our expectations, the indirect effects of plants, mediated by either BSCs or soil microorganisms, were very weak in both regions, suggesting a minor role for plant–soil interactions upon ecosystem development indicators over long periods. Our results suggest that natural vegetation dynamics effectively improved ecosystem development within a time frame of 20 years in the grasslands evaluated. They also indicate that this time could be shortened if management actions focus on: 1) maintain well-conserved natural areas close to roadsides to enhance plant compositional changes towards late

  3. Developing Coastal Adaptation to Climate Change in the New York City Infrastructure-Shed: Process, Approach, Tools, and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Solecki, William D.; Blake, Reginald; Bowman, Malcolm; Faris, Craig; Gornitz, Vivien; Horton, Radley; Jacob, Klaus; LeBlanc, Alice; Leichenko, Robin; hide

    2010-01-01

    While current rates of sea level rise and associated coastal flooding in the New York City region appear to be manageable by stakeholders responsible for communications, energy, transportation, and water infrastructure, projections for sea level rise and associated flooding in the future, especially those associated with rapid icemelt of the Greenland and West Antarctic Icesheets, may be beyond the range of current capacity because an extreme event might cause flooding and inundation beyond the planning and preparedness regimes. This paper describes the comprehensive process, approach, and tools developed by the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) in conjunction with the region s stakeholders who manage its critical infrastructure, much of which lies near the coast. It presents the adaptation approach and the sea-level rise and storm projections related to coastal risks developed through the stakeholder process. Climate change adaptation planning in New York City is characterized by a multi-jurisdictional stakeholder-scientist process, state-of-the-art scientific projections and mapping, and development of adaptation strategies based on a risk-management approach.

  4. Foliage maturity of Quercus ilex affects the larval development of a Croatian coastal population of Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera: Erebidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar is one of the most important forest pests in the world. Numerous previous studies focused only on different host tree species, but small number of them on foliage age. Since recent genetic analyses showed that there are significant differences between Croatian continental and coastal population we investigated coastal population since there was no previous research. For this research juvenile and mature foliage of Holm oak (Quercus ilex was used. Larval development was investigated in two laboratory experiments. One experiment involved rearing trials consisting of 50 individual larvae per treatment while a parallel experiment investigated gregarious feeding conditions using 120 larvae in a rearing treatment. Larval mortality was lower and development time shorter for individuals reared on juvenile foliage. High pupation success in both the individual and group rearing experiment for larvae reared on juvenile foliage was also observed. To conclude, our results showed high mortality, poor larval development and low pupation success in larvae reared on mature foliage. This research is significant because in the aspect of ongoing climate changes there is a possibility that gypsy moth will move to the north and shift its distribution by expanding into new climatic area.

  5. The development of policy approaches for reducing nitrogen pollution to coastal waters of the USA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert; W.; Howarth

    2005-01-01

    Two-thirds of the coastal rivers and bays in the United States are degraded from nutrient pollution, and nitrogen inputs these waters continue to increase. The nitrogen comes from a variety of sources, including runoff from agricultural fields, concentrated animal feeding operations, atmospheric deposition from fossil fuel combustion, and sewage and septic wastes.Technical solutions for nitrogen pollution exist at reasonable cost. That most of these solutions have not yet been implemented to any significant extent across the United States suggests that new policy approaches are necessary. The best solution may involve a combination of voluntary and mandatory approaches, applying different approaches to different sources of nitrogen poilution. A watershed-based approach that relies heavily on voluntary mechanisms (such as crop-yield insurance to reduce over-fertilization) is likely to be the most effective for some sources of nitrogen (such as runoff from agricultural fields), while a uniform national regulatory approach may be better for others (such as NOx emissions from fossil fuel combustion). Implementation of management strategies should be carefully coupled to monitoring programs to assess the effectiveness of these strategies. While both nitrogen and phosphorus are important to control, the focus should be on nitrogen management, in part because nitrogen is more generally the causal agent of coastal eutrophication. Also, while nitrogen-control practices tend to also reduce phosphorus pollution, phosphorus-control practices often have little effect on nitrogen.Although current scientific and technical knowledge is sufficient to begin to make substantial progress toward solving coastal nitrogen pollution, progress will be made more quickly and more cost effectively with increased investment in appropriate scientific research.

  6. FORUM paper: The significance of soils and soil science towards realization of the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This FORUM paper discusses how the soil science profession can address the challenges of the recently adopted UN Sustainable Development Goals in the most effective manner. The broad Sustainable Development Goals are intended to be a guideline for all governments. Some Goals are mainly socio-economi...

  7. Development and evaluation of clear-water pier and contraction scour envelope curves in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Provinces of South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation collected clear-water pier- and contraction-scour data at 116 bridges in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Physiographic Provinces of South Carolina. Pier-scour depths collected in both provinces ranged from 0 to 8.0 feet. Contraction-scour depths collected in the Coastal Plain ranged from 0 to 3.9 feet. Using hydraulic data estimated with a one-dimensional flow model, predicted clear-water scour depths were computed with scour equations from the Federal Highway Administration Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 and compared with measured scour. This comparison indicated that predicted clear-water scour depths, in general, exceeded measured scour depths and at times were excessive. Predicted clear-water contraction scour, however, was underpredicted approximately 30 percent of the time by as much as 7.1 feet. The investigation focused on clear-water pier scour, comparing trends in the laboratory and field data. This comparison indicated that the range of dimensionless variables (relative depth, flow intensity, relative grain size) used in laboratory investigations of pier scour, were similar to the range for field data in South Carolina, further indicating that laboratory relations may have some applicability to field conditions in South Carolina. Variables determined to be important in developing pier scour in laboratory studies were investigated to understand their influence on the South Carolina field data, and many of these variables appeared to be insignificant under field conditions in South Carolina. The strongest explanatory variables were pier width and approach velocity. Envelope curves developed from the field data are useful tools for evaluating reasonable ranges of clear-water pier and contraction scour in South Carolina. A modified version of the Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18 pier-scour equation also was developed as a tool for evaluating clearwater pier

  8. Quantification of risks to coastal areas and development: wave run-up and erosion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the Coelho et al. (2006) method is to assess the degree of exposure and vulnerability to coastal processes using the following nine indicators as the basis: foreshore elevation; distance (e.g. infrastructure) to shore; tidal range; wave.... However, flooding/inundation vulnerability is already accounted for in the elevation and distance to shore. Thus, only the Bruun erosion potential needs to be assessed: for a specific amount of sea level rise, the erosion is directly related to inshore...

  9. Analysis of Coupling between Soil and Water Conservation and Economic-social Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Xihua; Zhang Daimin; Wan Han; Chen Tingting; Yan Fujiang

    2009-01-01

    The coupling relation exists in water and soil conservation and economic-social development.The article analyses the relation of soil and water conservation and economic-social development stages as well as the coupling analytical method.Then calculates the expecting income by dispersing Markov decision and calculates the correlation coefficient and the relationship degree.The article obtains the relationship of soil and water conservation investments and all kinds of incomes.Finally,it analyzes the important meaning in socio-economic development of water and soil conservation.

  10. Strength and Stiffness Development in Soft Soils: A FESEM aided Soil Microstructure Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Ho, M. H.; Bai, X.; Bakar, I.

    2016-07-01

    This paper opens with an overview of the debatable definition of soft soil that goes beyond a (CH) organic / inorganic clay and OH peat to include weakly cemented periglacial deposits of loess and alike. It then outlines the findings obtained from stiffness test on cement-stabilised soft clay. The findings are complemented with a microstructure viewpoint obtained using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Research also comprised of making cylindrical stabilised clay samples, prepared in the laboratory with various rubber chips contents and cement, and then aged for 28 days. The samples were then subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS) test and observations were also made of its microstructure using the FESEM. The impact of the soil microstructure on the stiffness result was studied both with the stabilized soil and also of some of the natural undisturbed loess soils. Sustainability aspect and the potential of the use of rubber chips and sand as additives to cement stabilisation are also discussed. The overall test results indicated that rubber chips and sand contributed to the improvement in unconfined compressive strength (qu). The derogatory influence of moisture on the stiffness of the stabilised clay was studied simultaneously. SEM micrographs are presented that show bonding of cement, rubber chips/ sand and soft clay, granular units and aggregated / agglomerated units in loess. The paper concludes with observations on the dependence of soil microstructure on the soil strength and deformability and even collapsibility of the loess. Current practices adopted as engineering solutions to these challenging soils are outlined.

  11. 苏北滨海土壤碳酸钙含量反射光谱估算研究%Estimation of CaCO3 Content in Coastal Soil of North Jiangsu with Relfectance Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪长桥; 郑光辉; 陈昌春

    2016-01-01

    土壤属性的快速、精确测定是实现现代精细农业的基础。本研究分析了江苏省北部滨海土壤的属性特征以及碳酸钙的可见-近红外反射光谱特征,探讨利用可见-近红外光谱估算滨海土壤碳酸钙含量的可行性,比较不同光谱反射率数据集、不同预处理方法以及不同建模方法定量反演的优劣。结果表明:(1)苏北滨海土壤有机质含量较低、碳酸钙含量较高,其光谱曲线在2340 nm处有较明显的碳酸钙吸收特征;(2)滨海土壤碳酸钙含量与土壤的可见-近红外波段反射率呈正相关,且碳酸钙含量高低对于土壤的近红外波段反射率的影响高于可见光波段;(3)可见-近红外反射光谱可用于估算滨海土壤碳酸钙含量。就建模结果而言,381~2459 nm波段反射光谱数据集、log(1/R)预处理、偏最小二乘回归三者结合的效果比较理想。%Abstract[Objective]Rapid and accurate measurement of soil properties is fundamental to modern precision agriculture. CaCO3 is a major component of the carbonate in soil and has some important effects on a series of physical,chemical and biological properties of soil,such as soil pH,characteristics of soil colloids,soil nutrition and soil heavy metals absorption capacity. The traditional method for measuring soil CaCO3 content is mainly based on chemical analysis,which is often rather costly,time-consuming and destructive. Therefore,the method is far from efficient to meet the requirement of modern precision agriculture. The technology of soil reflection spectroscopy can be used to make up the shortages of the traditional method,and provide a new approach for the study of pedology. This paper is oriented to explore feasibility of using visible-near infrared reflection spectra to estimate CaCO3 content in coastal soil in North Jiangsu,to evaluate impacts of reflection spectra data sets,pre-processing methods on accuracy of the

  12. Topics in coastal engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, E.W.

    1972-01-01

    Harbors, development of longshore current formulas, radiation stress, determination of currents along a coast, longshore sand transportation, local coastal accretion, beaches with groins, wave forces on piles, offshore constructions, offshore moorings, submarine pipelines.

  13. Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility is used to aid in the planning of harbor development and in the design and layout of breakwaters, absorbers, etc.. The goal is...

  14. Social Capital and Public Participation on Planning in Coastal Area Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayitno, Gunawan; Syaifurridzal, M.

    2017-07-01

    Indonesia is one country to the world that rich with natural resources, especially on marine and coastal resources. But, the condition of rural inhabitants in coastal area still low in economic condition and public facilities and others not suitable for good living environment. The goal of this paper is to integrate the concept of social capital and public participation in the community activities. Social capital, which is interpreted with the term of the trust, networks and norm as governing human behavior is significant to motivate and coordinate collective action towards collaboration. Collective action or collaboration among people in the communities could solve the problem together. In the Grootaert research, with the title “Social Capital, Household Welfare and Poverty in Indonesia” (1999) found that active participation in decision making and memberships in heterogeneous organizations further reduce the likelihood to be poor. In this research, we found the same from Grootaert finding, that social capital (trust) has positive impact to community activities (path point 0.56) in this research location.

  15. Late Quaternary development of the Croatan Beach Ridge Complex, Bogue Sound, Bogue Banks, NC, USA and implications for coastal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Kelly B.; Mallinson, David J.; Culver, Stephen J.

    2016-06-01

    Foraminiferal, sedimentological, geophysical, and geochronologic data were utilized to elucidate the late Quaternary geologic development of the Croatan Beach Ridge Complex (CBRC), Bogue Sound, and Bogue Banks, North Carolina, USA. The CBRC is a relict beach ridge feature located on the mainland. It is separated from the modern barrier island, Bogue Banks, by Bogue Sound. Seventeen cores along shore-normal and shore-parallel transects provided material for sedimentologic and foraminiferal analysis and resulted in the recognition of seven depositional facies representing a variety of coastal depositional environments. Chronologic and depositional facies data suggest the CBRC was initiated during MIS 5a and rapid southward progradation produced a cape structure. Eolian reactivation of the upper sand of the CBRC occurred during the last glacial maximum (∼18 ka). The age of flood tide delta deposits in Bogue Sound suggests that the Holocene barrier island, Bogue Banks, had formed by ∼6 ka. Shoreface ravinement resulted in a shoreface landward of the present shoreline by ∼3.5 ka. Seaward and westward spit progradation of Bogue Banks began ∼1.7 ka and continued to ∼1.3 ka. Normal marine salinity conditions were present in Bogue Sound ∼1.1 ka, suggesting removal of at least the narrowest parts of the barrier island, coeval with a previously documented segmentation of the southern Outer Banks barrier islands. Previous work has linked this segmentation to climate warming and increased tropical storm activity during the Medieval Climate Anomaly. This study illustrates the complex response of this coastal system to Pleistocene and Holocene sea-level and climate change over two major sea-level cycles. In particular, the regional geomorphology during MIS5a and the Holocene sea-level highstand differ significantly and this, in large part, was controlled by the antecedent geologic framework, resulted in the contrasting more localized coastal geomorphic response.

  16. Development of metabarcoding for tracking changes of soil fauna community under stress by application of ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, J; de Groot, G.A.; Hansen, L. H.

    developed. We therefore will start out by comparing the morphospecies approach with three molecular approaches, differing in the types of DNA extracted from soil samples: total soil DNA, extracellular DNA and DNA gained from animals collected from the soil. In order to target all faunal groups, we use a set......Ash is a waste product from combustion of bio-fuel in power plants. Application of ash on soil ensures nutrient recycling, but detrimental ecotoxicological consequences may arise since ash is a complex mixture that may contain compounds affecting soil invertebrates and their food and habitat...... condition. Here, we study the effects of ash on the abundance and composition of the soil fauna community. Over time, we will compare control plots with plots receiving three different concentrations of ash. Targeting soil fauna community includes protozoa, nematodes, enchytraeids, collembolans, mites...

  17. Structural soil crust development from raindrop impacts using two-dimensional discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seungcheol; Sjoblom, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical nature of crust formation as a result of raindrop impacts was simulated within a discrete element modeling environment. Simulations were conducted in two-dimensions (2D) using both linear and non-linear elastic contact models. The 2D approach was found to minimize the computational effort required and maximize the number of particles in the soil profile. For the non-linear model, the effect of the coefficient of restitution (COR) for soil-rain and soil-soil was investigated. Finally, the comparison between the linear and nonlinear elastic contact model was presented. The simulation indicated that the COR for rain-soil had negligible effect on the crust development but the computational time was exponentially increased with increasing coefficient value. In contrast, the COR for soil-soil had a dominant influence on the crust development. To validate the numerical results, a micro computerized tomography (microCT) technique was applied to characterize the changes in pore structure to a USCS SP soil after exposure under a rainfall simulator. Additionally, the effect of cyclic wetting and drying (without rainfall) on the changes in porosity was investigated. The experimental results showed that the rainfall simulator sufficiently densified the soil but the effect of cyclic wetting and drying was negligible. The numerical simulations showed similar changes in porosity along the depth of the soil profile as compared with the experimental results thus validating the DEM technique to simulate crust development.

  18. High resolution digital soil mapping as a future instrument for developing sustainable landuse strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, Philipp; Funke, Lisa-Marie; Baumann, Frank; Schmidt, Karsten; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Climate change, increase in population and intensification of land use pose a great challenge for sustainable handling of soils. Intelligent landuse systems are able to minimize and/or avoid soil erosion and loss of soil fertility. A successful application of such systems requires area-wide soil information with high resolution. Containing three consecutive steps, the project INE-2-H („innovative sustainable landuse") at the University of Tuebingen is about creating high-resolution soil information using Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) techniques to develop sustainable landuse strategies. Input data includes soil data from fieldwork (texture and carbon content), the official digital soil and geological map (1:50.000) as well as a wide selection of local, complex and combined terrain parameters. First, soil maps have been created using the DSM approach and Random Forest (RF). Due to high resolution (10x10 m pixels), those maps show a more detailed spatial variability of soil information compared to the official maps used. Root mean square errors (RMSE) of the modelled maps vary from 2.11 % to 6.87 % and the coefficients of determination (R²) go from 0.42 to 0.68. Second, soil erosion potentials have been estimated according to the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE). Long-term average annual soil loss ranges from 0.56 to 24.23 [t/ha/a]. Third, combining high-resolution erosion potentials with expert-knowledge of local farmers will result in a landuse system adapted to local conditions. This system will include sustainable strategies reducing soil erosion and conserving soil fertility.

  19. Mercury in ground water, septage, leach-field effluent, and soils in residential areas, New Jersey coastal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, J.L.; Szabo, Z.; Schneider, D.; Atkinson, W.D.; Gallagher, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Water samples were collected from domestic wells at an unsewered residential area in Gloucester County, New Jersey where mercury (Hg) concentrations in well water were known to exceed the USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2000 ng/L. This residential area (the CSL site) is representative of more than 70 such areas in southern New Jersey where about 600 domestic wells, sampled previously by State and county agencies, yielded water containing Hg at concentrations that exceed the MCL. Recent studies indicate that background concentrations of Hg in water from this unconfined sand and gravel aquifer system are sampling was conducted at the CSL site in order to better understand sources of Hg and potential Hg transport mechanisms in the areas with Hg-contaminated ground water. At the CSL site, concentrations of Hg were substantially lower (although still exceeding the MCL in some cases) in filtered water samples than in the unfiltered water samples collected previously from the same wells. Surfactants and elevated concentrations of sodium, chloride, nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate in water from domestic and observation wells indicated septic-system effects on water quality; detections of sulfide indicated localized reducing conditions. Hg concentrations in septage and leach-field effluent sampled at several other households in the region were low relative to the contaminant-level Hg concentrations in water from domestic wells. Relations of Hg concentrations in leach-field effluent to iron concentrations indicate that reductive dissolution of iron hydroxides in soils may release Hg to the percolating effluent. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing a parameterization approach of soil erodibility for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  1. Developing soil erodibility prediction equations for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil erodibility is a key factor for estimating soil erosion using physically based models. In this study, a new parameterization approach for estimating erodibility was developed for the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model (RHEM). The approach uses empirical equations that were developed by apply...

  2. [The effect of soil inoculation with microbial pesticide destructors on plant growth and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisina, T O; Garan'kina, N G; Kruglov, Iu V

    2001-01-01

    Soil inoculation with liquid cultures of Bacillus megaterium 501 and Exophiala nigrum A-29 capable of degrading several organophosphorus pesticides accelerated growth and development of experimental plants, formation of their generative organs, and improved their productivity. This was particularly observed under stress plant growth conditions on phytotoxic peach substrates. The microorganisms inoculated can probably degrade phytotoxins present in soils, thereby favoring the plant development.

  3. Aggregate Development and Organic Matter Storage in Mediterranean Mountain Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.M.POCH; M.ANT(U)NEZ

    2010-01-01

    Soil aggregation and organic matter of soils from the pre-Pyrenean range in Catalonia (NE Spain) were studied, in order to assess their quality as carbon sinks and also to select the best soil management practices to preserve their quality.Aggregate stability, organic carbon and micromorphology were investigated. The highest amount of organic carbon was found in alluvial, deep soils (228 Mg C ha-1), and the lowest was in a shallow, stony soil with a low plant cover (78 Mg C ha-1). Subsurface horizons of degraded soils under pastures were the ones with smaller and less-stable aggregates.Fresh residues of organic matter (OM) were found mostly in interaggregate spaces. Within the aggregates there were some organic remains that were beginning to decompose, and also impregnative nodules of amorphous OM. Although OM was evenly distributed among the aggregate fractions, the larger blocky peels had more specific surface, contained less decomposed OM and had a lower organic/mineral interphase than smaller crumb aggregates, which were also more stable.Soil carbon storage was affected primarily by the OM inputs in the surface horizons. In order to store organic carbon over the mid- and long-term periods, the mechanisms favouring structuration through biological activity and creating small aggregates with intrapedal stable microporosities seemed to be the most effective.

  4. Transplantation of benthic species to mitigate impacts of coastal development in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M.H Gayle

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining regional competitiveness and economic viability for Port Bustamante -Kingston Harbour, Jamaica,required improved accessibility to "Post Panamax "(too large to pass through the Panama Canalcontainer vessels.Removal of the northern portion of the shallow coral reef at Rackham ’s Cay,which was partially obstructing the western end of the east ship channel,was proposed.This aesthetically valuable reef was used by local fishermen and comprises part of the declared Palisadoes -Port Royal Protected Area.The proposal to transplant certain of the benthic species was advanced to mitigate loss of viable reef components.Between December 2001 and February 2002,sixty thousand items,consisting of reef building massive and branching corals; gorgonians;urchins (Diadema and Tripneustes spp.and Thalassia meristems were relocated.During dredging,sedimentation rates from suspended solids in the water column were 0.003 g/cm² /day at the control site and 0.008 g/cm² /day at the dredge site.Coral cover in the relocation area increased from 15%to 20%while bare substrate decreased from 27%to 21%.This paper documents the mitigation required;some factors controlling the ecology of Rackham ’s Cay reef;the methodology of the relocation process;and the level of post-dredging survivorship of relocated corals.Political and economic realities of some proposed developments often over-ride ecological considerations. Transplantation of important marine benthic species although time consuming, technically challenging,and expensive,may be one way for developers and ecologists to achieve sometimes disparate goals.This project cost US$1.7 million.The "items "moved were neither unique nor endemic and remain vulnerable to natural and anthropogenic impacts.This project increased public awareness and interest regarding the ecological and economic importance of reef ecosystems.It is anticipated that future coastal and inland developments will benefit from the lessons

  5. Process and Mechanism for the Development of Physical Crusts in Three Typical Chinese Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Chong-Feng; W.J.GALE; CAI Qiang-Guo; WU Shu-Fang

    2013-01-01

    To compare the development of physical crusts in three typical cultivated soils of China,a black soil (Luvic Phaeozem),a loess soil (Haplic Luvisol),and a purple soil (Calcaric Regosol) were packed in splash plates with covered and uncovered treatments,and exposed to simulated rainfall.Meshes covered above the surfaces of half of soil samples to simulate the effects of crop residue on crusting.The results indicated a progressive breakdown of aggregates on the soil surface as rainfall continued.The bulk density and shear strength on the surface of the three soil types increased logarithmically as rainfall duration increased.During the first 30 min of simulated rainfall,the purple soil developed a 7-8 mm thick crust and the loess soil developed a 3-4 mm thick crust.The black soil developed a distinguishable,but still unstable,crust after 80 min of simulated rainfall.Soil organic matter (SOM) content,the mean weight diameter (MWD) of soil aggregates,and soil clay content were negatively correlated with the rate of crust formation,whereas the percentage of aggregate dispersion (PAD),the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP),and the silt and sand contents were positively correlated with crusting.Mechanical breakdown caused by raindrop impact was the primary mechanism of crust formation in the black soil with more stable aggregates (MWD 25.0 mm,PAD 3.1%) and higher SOM content (42.6 g kg-1).Slaking and mechanical eluviation were the primary mechanisms of crust formation in the purple soil with low clay content (103 g kg-1),cation exchange capacity (CEC,228 mmol kg-1),ESP (0.60%),and SOM (17.2 g kg-1).Mechanical breakdown and slaking were the most important in the loess soil with low CEC (80.6 mmol kg-1),ESP (1.29%),SOM (9.82 g kg-1),and high PAD (71.7%) and MWD (4.6 mm).Simulated residue cover reduced crust formation in black and loess soils,but increased crust formation in purple soil.

  6. Land crabs as key drivers in tropical coastal forest recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, E.S.; Krauss, K.W.; Green, P.T.; O'Dowd, D. J.; Sherman, P.M.; Smith, T. J.

    2009-01-01

    Plant populations are regulated by a diverse assortment of abiotic and biotic factors that influence seed dispersal and viability, and seedling establishment and growth at the microsite. Rarely does one animal guild exert as significant an influence on different plant assemblages as land crabs. We review three tropical coastal ecosystems-mangroves, island maritime forests, and mainland coastal terrestrial forests-where land crabs directly influence forest composition by limiting tree establishment and recruitment. Land crabs differentially prey on seeds, propagules and seedlings along nutrient, chemical and physical environmental gradients. In all of these ecosystems, but especially mangroves, abiotic gradients are well studied, strong and influence plant species distributions. However, we suggest that crab predation has primacy over many of these environmental factors by acting as the first limiting factor of tropical tree recruitment to drive the potential structural and compositional organisation of coastal forests. We show that the influence of crabs varies relative to tidal gradient, shoreline distance, canopy position, time, season, tree species and fruiting periodicity. Crabs also facilitate forest growth and development through such activities as excavation of burrows, creation of soil mounds, aeration of soils, removal of leaf litter into burrows and creation of carbon-rich soil microhabitats. For all three systems, land crabs influence the distribution, density and size-class structure of tree populations. Indeed, crabs are among the major drivers of tree recruitment in tropical coastal forest ecosystems, and their conservation should be included in management plans of these forests. ?? 2009 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  7. Developing SASSA: a Soil Analysis Support System for Archaeologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Wilson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is constant pressure on field archaeologists to be familiar with the core concepts of a diverse range of specialist disciplines. Soils and sediments are an integral part of archaeological sites, and soil and sedimentary analyses applied to archaeological questions are now recognised as an important branch of geoarchaeology. However, the teaching of soils in archaeology degrees is variable and many archaeologists complain they lack the confidence and skills to describe and interpret properly the deposits they excavate. SASSA (Soil Analysis Support System for Archaeologists is a free-to-use, internet-based system designed to familiarise archaeologists with the concepts and possibilities offered by the scientific study of soils and sediments associated with archaeological sites. The aims of SASSA are: ◦To provide soils training specifically for archaeologists, suitable for either a university or workplace setting. ◦To provide a freely accessible soils and archaeology knowledge base for archaeologists working in either the office or the field. ◦To support archaeologists describing and interpreting soils in the field. ◦To enhance understanding of the types of archaeological questions that soil analysis can help to address. ◦To initiate dialogue between archaeologists, geoarchaeologists, and soil scientists in order to encourage the thoughtful application of soil analyses to archaeological questions. SASSA consists of two core components: a knowledge base and a field tool. The 'front-end' of the website is the knowledge base; this uses wiki technology to allow users to add their own content and encourage dialogue between archaeologists and geoarchaeologists. The field tool uses an XML data structure and decision-tree support system to guide the user through the process of describing and interpreting soils and sediments. SASSA is designed for use on both 'static' (PC and 'mobile' (PDA and laptop hardware in order to provide in situ

  8. Approach To Development of Guidelines For Determination of Natural Attenuation Capacity and Resilience of Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putters, B.

    The natural attenuation capacity of the soil is often used to help remove contaminants from the soil and groundwater. However, the definition of natural attenuation capac- ity in terms of soil properties, and how it should be measured are still a matter of discussion. Moreover, due to the interaction between soil and pollutant during the attenuation processes, changes in soil properties may occur. The resilience of the soil determines the rate of recovery of the soil, and to what extent it regains its original capacity for attenuation. This resilience, too, is not yet defined or measureable. The objective of the research is to develop guidelines to determine the natural attenu- ation capacity and the resilience of soils. The approach comprises five steps: 1. Experimental data on degradation and adsorp- tion are collected from literature. Missing data are filled by means of regression tech- niques. 2. Based upon existing knowledge on fate and behaviour of pollutants in soil environment, data are analysed on expected relations between soil parameters: which parameters determine the processes. 3. The most important parameters are analysed in a sensitivity analysis, performed by means of a mechanistic model. The testing vari- ables in the sensitivity analysis are an expression of the natural attenuation capacity and the resilience, respectively, and will be related to time. 4. The sensitivity analy- sis is extended by development of an artificial neural network and by use of genetic algorithms. 5. Data from the realisations (model calculations with different input) are classified into guidelines.

  9. Synergies and conflicts in coping with territorial development in the coastal zone of Santa Catarina State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Marie Thuillier Cerdan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a synthesis of the most relevant results of a project inserted in an integrated research programme focusing on Rural Territorial Dynamics in Latin America. The coastal zone of Santa Catarina State, in the south of Brazil, was chosen as an experimental area to test the fitness of a model that explores the interconexions between  stakeholders, institutional arrangements and patterns of natural resources use and management. The authors address several kinds of impacts of three territorial dynamics observed in this area, bringing together issues related to economic growth, social inclusion, political descentralization, bio/sociodiversity conservation and socio-ecological viability. Moreover, they review the complexity of the synergic-antagonistic relationships involving these dynamics in the recent times.

  10. Multiple modes of water quality impairment by fecal contamination in a rapidly developing coastal area: southwest Brunswick County, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, Lawrence B; Hales, Jason C; Carey, Erin S; Loucaides, Socratis; Rowland, Kevin R; Toothman, Byron R

    2016-02-01

    Fecal contamination of surface waters is a significant problem, particularly in rapidly developing coastal watersheds. Data from a water quality monitoring program in southwest Brunswick County, North Carolina, gathered in support of a regional wastewater and stormwater management program were used to examine likely modes and sources of fecal contamination. Sampling was conducted at 42 locations at 3-4-week intervals between 1996 and 2003, including streams, ponds, and estuarine waters in a variety of land use settings. Expected fecal sources included human wastewater systems (on-site and central), stormwater runoff, and direct deposition by animals. Fecal coliform levels were positively associated with rainfall measures, but frequent high fecal coliform concentrations at times of no rain indicated other modes of contamination as well. Fecal coliform levels were also positively associated with silicate levels, a groundwater source signal, indicating that flux of fecal-contaminated groundwater was a mode of contamination, potentially elevating FC levels in impacted waters independent of stormwater runoff. Fecal contamination by failing septic or sewer systems at many locations was significant and in addition to effects of stormwater runoff. Rainfall was also linked to fecal contamination by central sewage treatment system failures. These results highlight the importance of considering multiple modes of water pollution and different ways in which human activities cause water quality degradation. Management of water quality in coastal regions must therefore recognize diverse drivers of fecal contamination to surface waters.

  11. Formation and development of salt crusts on soil surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2015-12-14

    The salt concentration gradually increases at the soil free surface when the evaporation rate exceeds the diffusive counter transport. Eventually, salt precipitates and crystals form a porous sodium chloride crust with a porosity of 0.43 ± 0.14. After detaching from soils, the salt crust still experiences water condensation and salt deliquescence at the bottom, brine transport across the crust driven by the humidity gradient, and continued air-side precipitation. This transport mechanism allows salt crust migration away from the soil surface at a rate of 5 μm/h forming salt domes above soil surfaces. The surface characteristics of mineral substrates and the evaporation rate affect the morphology and the crystal size of precipitated salt. In particular, substrate hydrophobicity and low evaporation rate suppress salt spreading.

  12. A century of soils research and development in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    test rotations in conjunction with small manure dressings and in later years fertilizers ... properties of soils were equally important and demonstrated the soundness of .... prospects of cheaper nitrogen on the world market. Table 2. The change ...

  13. Surficial gains and subsoil losses of soil carbon and nitrogen during secondary forest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Megan L; Lajtha, Kate; Kramer, Marc G; Bacon, Allan R; Heine, Paul R; Richter, Daniel Deb

    2015-02-01

    Reforestation of formerly cultivated land is widely understood to accumulate above- and belowground detrital organic matter pools, including soil organic matter. However, during 40 years of study of reforestation in the subtropical southeastern USA, repeated observations of above- and belowground carbon documented that significant gains in soil organic matter (SOM) in surface soils (0-7.5 cm) were offset by significant SOM losses in subsoils (35-60 cm). Here, we extended the observation period in this long-term experiment by an additional decade, and used soil fractionation and stable isotopes and radioisotopes to explore changes in soil organic carbon and soil nitrogen that accompanied nearly 50 years of loblolly pine secondary forest development. We observed that accumulations of mineral soil C and N from 0 to 7.5 cm were almost entirely due to accumulations of light-fraction SOM. Meanwhile, losses of soil C and N from mineral soils at 35 to 60 cm were from SOM associated with silt and clay-sized particles. Isotopic signatures showed relatively large accumulations of forest-derived carbon in surface soils, and little to no accumulation of forest-derived carbon in subsoils. We argue that the land use change from old field to secondary forest drove biogeochemical and hydrological changes throughout the soil profile that enhanced microbial activity and SOM decomposition in subsoils. However, when the pine stands aged and began to transition to mixed pines and hardwoods, demands on soil organic matter for nutrients to support aboveground growth eased due to pine mortality, and subsoil organic matter levels stabilized. This study emphasizes the importance of long-term experiments and deep measurements when characterizing soil C and N responses to land use change and the remarkable paucity of such long-term soil data deeper than 30 cm. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Anthropogenic Development on Priority Bird Species Habitats in Coastal Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Ross A.; Craft, Christopher B.

    2012-02-01

    We modeled changes in area of five habitats, tidal-freshwater forest, salt marsh, maritime shrub-scrub (shrub), maritime broadleaf forest (oak) and maritime narrowleaf (pine) forest, in coastal Georgia, USA, to evaluate how simultaneous habitat loss due to predicted changes in sea level rise (SLR) and urban development will affect priority bird species of the south Atlantic coastal plain by 2100. Development rates, based on regional growth plans, were modeled at 1% and 2.5% annual urban growth, while SLR rates, based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's A1B mean and maximum scenarios, were modeled at 52 cm and 82 cm, respectively. SLR most greatly affected the shrub habitat with predicted losses of 35-43%. Salt marsh and tidal forest also were predicted to lose considerable area to SLR (20-45 and 23-35%, respectively), whereas oak and pine forests had lesser impact from SLR, 18-22% and 11-15%, respectively. Urban development resulted in losses of considerable pine (48-49%) and oak (53-55%) habitat with lesser loss of shrub habitat (21-24%). Under maximum SLR and urban growth, shrub habitat may lose up to 59-64% compared to as much as 62-65% pine forest and 74-75% oak forest. Conservation efforts should focus on protection of shrub habitat because of its small area relative to other terrestrial habitats and use by Painted Buntings ( Passerina ciris), a Partners In Flight (PIF) extremely high priority species. Tidal forests also deserve protection because they are a likely refuge for forest species, such as Northern Parula and Acadian Flycatcher, with the decline of oak and pine forests due to urban development.

  15. Caracterização de óxidos de ferro de solos do ambiente tabuleiros costeiros Characterizing iron oxides from coastal and central plain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Metri Correa

    2008-06-01

    apresentou correlação com algumas propriedades cristalográficas das goethitas dos solos estudados, mostrando-se ser uma técnica promissora para o estudo dos óxidos de ferro.There have been several papers in the literature studying the genesis and consequences of particles cohesion in Argisols (Ultisols and Latosols (Oxisols from the Brazilian Inner and Coastal Plains. Just a few, however, provide insights into the clay fraction mineralogy, specially, the iron oxides complete characterization. The objective of this study was to investigate the chemical and crystallographic characteristics of iron oxides in red and yellow soils derived from the sediments of the Barreiras Formation or Pre-Cambrian rocks in the region of the coastal and central plateaus of several Brazilian states. The following research procedures were used: X-ray diffraction analyses in iron oxide-concentrated samples; successive extractions with CBD, and ammonium oxalate extraction in clay samples; spectral characterization by DRS; estimation of the crystallographic properties of goethite; quantification of isomorphic substitution of Fe for Al; and electronic transmission microscopy. According to the results, the following conclusions were drawn: (a goethite was the predominant iron oxide in all soils, even in those with 2.5YR hues, of which the hematite value was below 2.5 dag kg-1 clay; (b the values of the isomorphic Fe substitution by Al were 3 to 6 times higher for goethites than for hematites. These values did not agree with those estimated by mathematical models proposed in the scientific literature, which indicates the need for further studies of the relationships between crystallographic parameters of natural goethites and their chemical properties; (c the results obtained by X ray diffractometry and chemical dissolution analysis revealed that the goethites in the soils differ from those cited, to date, in the literature; (d the position of the bands obtained in the spectra of the diffuse

  16. Evaluation of harmonious development for economy-environment system in coastal cities: a case study of Tianjin Municipality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fen; Zhang Yuan; Zheng Binghui; Wang Xiqin

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of the harmonious development of economy-environment system in coastal cities in China, an index system used to evaluate the economy-environment system is built up in this paper, which includes four aspects: economy,environment, resources, and ocean industry. Based on the analysis on present condition and future trends of economic development in Tianjin and the quantification of various evaluation indices, the author applies integrated index valuation model to valuate the harmonious development of economy-environment of Tianjin. The results show that the coordinated degree of economy-environment would drop down in the future, from 0.95(superior level of harmonious development) in 2000 to 0.59(inferior level of harmonious development) in 2015, under the circumstance of the current economic development mode. The level of comprehensive development of Tianjin also presents to descend. Based on the analyzing of status and future trends of environment-economy coordinated development, the paper puts forward the countermeasures such as industry structure adjustment, increasing the level of environmental protection investment, strengthening the enforcement of environmental policies to improve the coordinated development of environment-economy in Tianjin municipality.

  17. Incorporating Soil Hydraulic Parameter Statistics in Developing Pedo-transfer Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Zhu, J.; Ye, M.; Meyer, P. D.; Pan, F.; Hassan, A. E.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we develop artificial neural network (ANN) based pedotransfer functions (PTFs) to predict soil hydraulic properties. The PTF approach is an efficient way of translating less costly available data, such as particle-size distributions, soil textures and other geophysical measurements, to soil hydraulic parameters required for numerical simulations and other applications. The ANN PTFs need to be trained before being used to transfer indirect measurements to soil hydraulic parameters. The traditional training process, in general, is to adjust ANN's coefficients to solely minimize the difference between the estimated and measured soil hydraulic parameters. The training process, however, did not consider the distributions of soil hydraulic parameters and the trained neural networks may yield improper distributions, which may severely affect probabilistic predictions. We incorporate the distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters into the ANN PTF development. In addition, it has been observed that PTFs can introduce unrealistic correlations between the output parameters. The unwanted artificial correlations need to be penalized during the training process, since it is well known that parameter correlations have significant effect on predictions. We achieve these two goals by adding two regularization terms to the ANN objective functions. A suite of new neural network models are developed to estimate soil hydraulic parameters. These neural network models have the same input and output variables, but different objective functions, which incorporate sequentially the site soil hydraulic parameter measurements, parameter probability distributions, and parameter correlations.

  18. Open For Business? An Historical, Comparative Study of Public Access to Information about Two Controversial Coastal Developments in North-East Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper compares public access to information about two controversial coastal developments in North-east Scotland: the construction of a gas terminal by the British Gas Council and Total in the 1970s, and the current development of "the world's greatest golf course" by the tycoon Donald Trump. Method: Data has been…

  19. Combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion in a mollisol area under long-term agricultural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Wu, Yuyang; Hao, Zengchao; Zhang, Qi; Bu, Qingwei; Gao, Xiang

    2017-09-22

    Soil erosion exhibits special characteristics in the process of agricultural development. Understanding the combined impacts of land use and soil property changes on soil erosion, especially in the area under long-term agricultural cultivations, is vital to watershed agricultural and soil management. This study investigated the temporal-spatial patterns of the soil erosion based on a modified version of Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and conducted a soil erosion contribution analysis. The land use data were interpreted from Landsat series images, and soil properties were obtained from field sampling, laboratory tests and SPAW (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere-Water) model calculations. Over a long period of agricultural development, the average erosion modulus decreased from 187.7tkm(-2)a(-1) in 1979 to 158.4tkm(-2)a(-1) in 2014. The land use types were transformed mainly in the reclamation of paddy fields and the shrinking of wetlands on a large scale. Most of the soils were converted to loam from silty or clay loam and the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of most soil types decreased by 1.11% to 43.6%. The rapidly increasing area of 49.8km(2) of paddy fields together with the moderate decrease of 14.0km(2) of forests, as well as Ks values explained 87.4% of the total variance in soil erosion. Although changes in soil physical and water characteristics indicated that soil erosion loads should have become higher, the upsurge in paddy fields played an important role in mitigating soil erosion in this study area. These results demonstrated that land use changes had more significant impacts than soil property changes on soil erosion. This study suggested that rational measures should be taken to extend paddy fields and control the dry land farming. These findings will benefit watershed agricultural targeting and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Coastal Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    This book deals on "Coastal Dynamics", which will be defined in a narrow sense as a mathematical theory, which starts from given equations of motion for the sediment, which leads with the continuity equation and given boundary conditions to a calculated (eventually schematized) coastal topography,

  1. Luminescence dating of interglacial coastal depositional systems: Recent developments and future avenues of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Luminescence dating offers new opportunities to explore the evolution of Quaternary marine coastal facies and landforms. This review highlights the main advances in luminescence geochronology of interglacial coastal sediments through the analysis of 547 luminescence ages, most of which were published during the last decade. The majority of these reported luminescence investigations have been carried out along passive margin coasts. Since the turn of the century, the discovery of a normalization procedure known as Single Aliquot Regeneration (SAR) has drastically reduced data scatter and improved precision, with the consequence that quartz SAR optically-stimulated luminescence OSL has become the dating protocol of choice for the Last Interglacial (LIG) period. A more complex technique, known as thermally-transferred OSL (TT-OSL), is presumably proposed for dating older interglacials of the Mid-Pleistocene and beyond. Feldspar luminescence is increasingly being applied to dating Pleistocene sea level high stands due to a much higher dose saturation level than quartz OSL. The use of feldspar IRSL (Infrared-stimulated luminescence) is limited by the occurrence of variable, but ubiquitous anomalous fading (AF). Following the advent of AF-correction methods, several Middle Pleistocene sites have been amenable to dating, albeit with significant related uncertainties. Recently, new protocols involving the measurement of post-IR IRSL at elevated temperatures have yielded relatively coherent ages for interglacial sediments up to ca. 300 ka. Quartz OSL/TT-OSL, AF-corrected IRSL, and post-IR IRSL ages are generally correlated with periods of sea level high stands. A few ages are reported from the early and middle part of the Middle Pleistocene, as MIS11, 9 and more commonly MIS7 high stands are documented in strongly uplifting active margin coasts. However, by far the most obvious age peak corresponds to the end of the LIG. The MIS5e shoreline is probably the most studied and

  2. Strategicheskie vozmozhnosti jekonomicheskogo razvitija rossijskih pribrezhnyh zon i morskih portovo-promyshlennyh kompleksov Baltijskogo morja [Strategic opportunities for economic development of the Baltic Sea coastal zones and sea industrial and port complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogoberidze George

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one of the principal dimensions in attraction of the world economy structures is coastal territories as spaces where marine potential of a state is most pronounced. In this respect, it is vital to set the priorities of development of coastal zones taking into account the changes in the strategic situation in order to maintain the components of marine potential of the Russian Federation at the level of its national interests. The article aims to develop an indicator system of assessment of coastal zone potential, and sea industrial and port facilities in order to identify the characteristic and strategic capacities of the economic development of these territories in the complex approach. The research methodology is based on the assessment of marine potential of coastal territories as an indicator of the efficacy of its marine economic complex development with using the indicator methods as a multi-factor and multi-level spatial system. The proposed system is applied to a complex analysis of coastal territories of the Russian Baltic, the estimation of a socio-economic factor of coastal zone marine potential, as well as recommendations for long-term planning of the economic development of Russia’s coastal zones of the Baltic Sea and the organization of marine activities. This methodology can help to identify a role of coastal territories in the economy and reflect perspectives and directions of strategic development of coastal zones, and sea industrial and port facilities of the Russian Federation.

  3. Soil information in the Strategic Environmental Assessment of Rural Development Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    Soil information is essential for land planning at different administrative levels. Currently, in Europe there is a hierarchy of at least seven main territorial administrative entities which consider soil in their land planning policies. In this study, European, national and regional regulations that affect soil are discussed, considering themes, priorities, and focus areas. A better attention on the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) of the Rural Development Plans (RDP) 2014-2020 is given, by analysing the Environmental Reports produced in the framework of the SEA of the RDP 2014-2020 of some European Regions. Both old and new soil indicators are introduced, as well as the consequences of their adoption for soil science and soil scientists. It is evident from this study that soil information is treated very variably, not only because of the different kinds of available information, but mainly as a consequence of the expertise and sensitivity to the soil issues of the authors, since they can be different kinds of public or private bodies hired by regional authorities. Therefore, despite having the same reference, the SEAs are very different. In most cases, the amount of soil information is little or negligible, even when available. The ex-ante impacts are often only qualitative, or quantified only in terms of the areal extent of applied measures. On the other hand, following the European recommendations, the ongoing and ex-post reports of the monitoring activities of RDP are expected to provide a wealth of soil information, both qualitative and quantitative. Soil scientists, soil and water conservationists, and management experts will be requested to provide more sophisticated and dynamic types of information. Therefore, the SEA of RDP and similar land planning activities will provide greater scientific and technical opportunities for soil science, provided that the public bodies in charge of evaluations, namely Member States, Regions and their auditing

  4. Effects of Soil Copper Concentration on Growth, Development and Yield Formation of Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jia-kuan; YANG Lian-xin; WANG Zi-qiang; DONG Gui-chun; HUANG Jian-ye; WANG Yu-long

    2005-01-01

    Pot experiments were conducted in 2002 and 2003 to investigate the effects of soil copper(Cu) concentration on growth, development and yield formation of rice by using the japonica cultivar Wuxiangjing 14 and hybrid rice combination Shanyou 63. The plant height, leaf number, elongated internode number and heading date of rice plants were not affected at soil Cu levels below 200 mg/kg, but affected significantly at above 400 mg/kg. The inhibitory effects on rice growth and development were increased with the increment of soil Cu levels. The grain yields decreased significantly with raising soil Cu levels. The main reasons for the grain yield reductions under lower soil Cu levels (100, 200 mg/kg) were mainly due to the decrease of number of spikelets per panicle, however, under higher soil Cu levels (more than 400 mg/kg), both panicle number and number of spikelets per panicle contributed to the yield loss. The decreases of panicle number by Cu stress were mainly attributed to slow recovery from transplanting, delayed tillering and reduced maximum tiller numbers. The reduction of number of spikelets per panicle under soil Gu stress resulted from the decreases of both shoot dry weight (SDW) at the heading date and the ratio of spikelets to SDW.Total biomass at maturity decreased significantly with the increase of soil Cu levels, while economic coefficient showed non-significant decrease except under soil Cu levels above 800 mg/kg.

  5. Development of earthworm burrow systems and the influence of earthworms on soil hydrology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, T.N.

    1996-01-01

    Inoculation of earthworms can help to restore or ameliorate land qualities. Earthworms create burrows and alter the structure of the soil matrix, which influence the water infiltration, drainage, water retention and the aeration of the soil. The way and rate of the development of earthworm burrow sy

  6. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  7. The economics of soil conservation in developing countries: the case of crop residue mulching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erenstein, O.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The study contributes to the search for a methodology to assess soil conservation, particularly in developing countries. The study first assesses the economics of soil conservation in general - with special emphasis on the relationships between technology, economic analysis and policy implications.

  8. The Economics of Soil Conservation in Developing Countries: The Case of Crop Residue Mulching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erenstein, O.C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The study contributes to the search for a methodology to assess soil conservation, particularly in developing countries. The study first assesses the economics of soil conservation in general - with special emphasis on the relationships between technology, economic analysis and policy implications.

  9. Development of a land surface model with coupled snow and frozen soil physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Qi, Jia; Sun, Litao; Yang, Kun; Tian, Lide; Lin, Yanluan; Liu, Wenbin; Shrestha, Maheswor; Xue, Yongkang; Koike, Toshio; Ma, Yaoming; Li, Xiuping; Chen, Yingying; Chen, Deliang; Piao, Shilong; Lu, Hui

    2017-06-01

    Snow and frozen soil are important factors that influence terrestrial water and energy balances through snowpack accumulation and melt and soil freeze-thaw. In this study, a new land surface model (LSM) with coupled snow and frozen soil physics was developed based on a hydrologically improved LSM (HydroSiB2). First, an energy-balance-based three-layer snow model was incorporated into HydroSiB2 (hereafter HydroSiB2-S) to provide an improved description of the internal processes of the snow pack. Second, a universal and simplified soil model was coupled with HydroSiB2-S to depict soil water freezing and thawing (hereafter HydroSiB2-SF). In order to avoid the instability caused by the uncertainty in estimating water phase changes, enthalpy was adopted as a prognostic variable instead of snow/soil temperature in the energy balance equation of the snow/frozen soil module. The newly developed models were then carefully evaluated at two typical sites of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) (one snow covered and the other snow free, both with underlying frozen soil). At the snow-covered site in northeastern TP (DY), HydroSiB2-SF demonstrated significant improvements over HydroSiB2-F (same as HydroSiB2-SF but using the original single-layer snow module of HydroSiB2), showing the importance of snow internal processes in three-layer snow parameterization. At the snow-free site in southwestern TP (Ngari), HydroSiB2-SF reasonably simulated soil water phase changes while HydroSiB2-S did not, indicating the crucial role of frozen soil parameterization in depicting the soil thermal and water dynamics. Finally, HydroSiB2-SF proved to be capable of simulating upward moisture fluxes toward the freezing front from the underlying soil layers in winter.

  10. ABRASION WAVE OBSTRUCTS TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN COASTAL REGIONS OF BINUANGEUN, LEBAK - BANTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyuzar Ilahude

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Geographically, the study area is located in the southern coast of Java and also exposed to the influence of wave energy from the southeast, south and southwest. The energy flux of waves generated by surface wind components that affect the coastline and the surrounding waters of Binuangeun. The impact of the wave coming from southeast direction caused a continuous abrasion process in Binuangeun coast and its adjacent areas, included the tourism area in the eastern part of Binuangeun coast towards the center of the study area. The current movement along the coast was accompanied by sediments deposition which tends to westward. The value of sediments supply (Vq in sample area point number 9 was bigger than the sample area number 4 about 33.703 m3/year within the same direction tendency of sediments deposition. Western part of Binuangeun coastal area would presumably become the sediment accumulation point throughout the year, while the erosion process in the central part of the study area were expanding and occured seasonally.

  11. Riparian soil development linked to forest succession above and below dams along the Elwha River, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Laura G; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Perakis, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Riparian forest soils can be highly dynamic, due to frequent fluvial disturbance, erosion, and sediment deposition, but effects of dams on riparian soils are poorly understood. We examined soils along toposequences within three river segments located upstream, between, and downstream of two dams on the Elwha River to evaluate relationships between riparian soil development and forest age, succession, and channel proximity, explore dam effects on riparian soils, and provide a baseline for the largest dam removal in history. We found that older, later-successional forests and geomorphic surfaces contained soils with finer texture and greater depth to cobble, supporting greater forest floor mass, mineral soil nutrient levels, and cation exchange. Forest stand age was a better predictor than channel proximity for many soil characteristics, though elevation and distance from the channel were often also important, highlighting how complex interactions between fluvial disturbance, sediment deposition, and biotic retention regulate soil development in this ecosystem. Soils between the dams, and to a lesser extent below the lower dam, had finer textures and higher mineral soil carbon, nitrogen, and cation exchange than above the dams. These results suggested that decreased fluvial disturbance below the dams, due to reduced sediment supply and channel stabilization, accelerated soil development. In addition, reduced sediment supply below the dams may have decreased soil phosphorus. Soil δ15N suggested that salmon exclusion by the dams had no discernable effect on nitrogen inputs to upstream soils. Recent dam removal may alter riparian soils further, with ongoing implications for riparian ecosystems.

  12. Development and metabolism of the city of Khartoum (Republic of Sudan: spatial designing of the coastal territory of the Blue and White Nile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakurov Ilhomjeon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The given article reveals the development of the metabolism of the city of Khartoum, the problems of influence on the microclimate improvement elements built up coastal territory of the Blue and White Nile in Khartoum. The study shows the microclimate formation factors of Khartoum, gives an assessment of the modern state of the microclimate of the coastal zone and its changes. The article indicates that, depending on the nature of use and planning organization of coastal territories microclimatic influence of water areas can propagate over appreciable distances to the city or limitation depth in a narrow strip along the coast. In urban areas the air temperature is considerably higher and the humidity is lower than in the coastal area especially in summer, this is due to differences in physical properties of water and land. Water has a higher heat capacity, high reflectivity, the wind speed increases and increasing the humidity of air masses passing over it. Thus, in order to improve microclimatic and hygienic conditions of coastal territories in Khartoum there is the need to use the favorable impact of the Blue and White Nile.

  13. Developing a dual assimilation approach for thermal infrared and passive microwave soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Christopher Ryan

    Soil moisture plays a vital role in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface energy budget and the lack of a dense spatial and temporal network of ground-based observations provides a challenge to the initialization of the true soil moisture state in numerical weather prediction simulations. The retrieval of soil moisture using observations from both satellite-based thermal-infrared (TIR) and passive microwave (PM) sensors has been developed (Anderson et al., 2007; Hain et al., 2009; Jackson, 1993; Njoku et al., 2003). The ability of the TIR and microwave observations to diagnose soil moisture conditions within different layers of the soil profile provides an opportunity to use each in a synergistic data assimilation approach towards the goal of diagnosing the true soil moisture state from surface to root-zone. TIR and PM retrievals of soil moisture are compared to soil moisture estimates provided by a retrospective Land Information System (LIS) simulation using the NOAH LSM during the time period of 2003--2008. The TIR-based soil moisture product is provided by a retrieval of soil moisture associated with surface flux estimates from the Atmosphere-Land-Exchange-Inversion (ALEXI) model (Anderson et al., 1997; Mecikalski et al., 1999; Hain et al., 2009). The PM soil moisture retrieval is provided by the Vrijie Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA)-NASA surface soil moisture product. The VUA retrieval is based on the findings of Owe et al. (2001; 2008) using the Land Surface Parameter model (LPRM), which uses one dual polarized channel (6.925 or 10.65 GHz) for a dual-retrieval of surface soil moisture and vegetation water content. In addition, retrievals of ALEXI (TIR) and AMSR-E (PM) soil moisture are assimilated within the Land Information System using the NOAH LSM. A series of data assimilation experiments is completed with the following configuration: (a) no assimilation, (b) only ALEXI soil moisture, (c) only AMSR-E soil moisture, and (d) ALEXI

  14. Coastal Development of Daugavgrîva Island, Located Near the Gulf of Riga / Rîgas Lîèa Piekrastes Krasta Attîstîba Daugavgrîvas Salâ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bçrtiòa Laura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural as well as anthropogenic processes impact greatly sensitive coastal areas all over the world. The spectrum of natural processes involved can be classified as meteorological, geological, marine, and lithodynamic. The Baltic Sea with its Gulf of Riga is an area in which combined sea erosion and accumulation processes, as well as alluvial processes, play significant roles in the coastal development. Major anthropogenic processes include impacts from ports and coastal protection structures, such as Riga Port hydraulic structures, fairway channels and coastal defence items. During summer also additional pressure of recreational activities has increased the effect on the coastal beach. Levelling data, historical cartographical material and beach sedimentary material granulometric analysis were used to describe natural and anthropogenic effects on development of the coastal beach of Daugavgrîva Island.

  15. Floristic Quality Index: An assessment tool for restoration projects and monitoring sites in coastal Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretini, K.F.; Steyer, G.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) program was established to assess the effectiveness of individual coastal restoration projects and the cumulative effects of multiple projects at regional and coastwide scales. In order to make these assessments, analytical teams have been assembled for each of the primary data types sampled under the CRMS program, including vegetation, hydrology, landscape, and soils. These teams consist of scientists and support staff from the U.S. Geological Survey and other Federal agencies, the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration, and university academics. Each team is responsible for developing or identifying parameters, indices, or tools that can be used to assess coastal wetlands at various scales. The CRMS Vegetation Analytical Team has developed a Floristic Quality Index for coastal Louisiana to determine the quality of a wetland based on its plant species composition and abundance.

  16. Soil and water conservation investments and rural development in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerink, N.; Bao, X.; Li, R.; Lu, K.; Feng, S.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses a unique set of annual provincial data on soil and water conservation (SWC) investments during the period 1989–2005 to estimate the impact of such investments on the extent and severity of erosion, the growth rate of agricultural gross domestic product (GDP) and rural poverty reducti

  17. Challenges in the development of analytical soil compaction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Thomas; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Soil compaction can cause a number of environmental and agronomic problems (e.g. flooding, erosion, leaching of agrochemicals to recipient waters, emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, crop yield losses), resulting in significant economic damage to society and agriculture. Strategies...

  18. Soil Genesis and Development: Views Held by New Zealand Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happs, John C.

    1984-01-01

    To help plan effective teaching strategies, it is important to determine students' existing knowledge about the topic to be taught. Interviews with New Zealand students showed that they hold nonscientific ideas about soil. These student views should be respected by teachers. They should be discussed and compared with scientific viewpoints. (RM)

  19. Development of a method for detection and quantification of B. brongniartii and B. bassiana in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfora, L.; Malusà, E.; Tkaczuk, C.; Tartanus, M.; Łabanowska, B. H.; Pinzari, F.

    2016-03-01

    A culture independent method based on qPCR was developed for the detection and quantification of two fungal inoculants in soil. The aim was to adapt a genotyping approach based on SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) marker to a discriminating tracing of two different species of bioinoculants in soil, after their in-field release. Two entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana and B. brongniartii, were traced and quantified in soil samples obtained from field trials. These two fungal species were used as biological agents in Poland to control Melolontha melolontha (European cockchafer), whose larvae live in soil menacing horticultural crops. Specificity of SSR markers was verified using controls consisting of: i) soil samples containing fungal spores of B. bassiana and B. brongniartii in known dilutions; ii) the DNA of the fungal microorganisms; iii) soil samples singly inoculated with each fungus species. An initial evaluation of the protocol was performed with analyses of soil DNA and mycelial DNA. Further, the simultaneous detection and quantification of B. bassiana and B. brongniartii in soil was achieved in field samples after application of the bio-inoculants. The protocol can be considered as a relatively low cost solution for the detection, identification and traceability of fungal bio-inoculants in soil.

  20. Rhizogenesis: Exploring the physical development of the emerging root:soil interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Sacha; Helliwell, Jon; Sturrock, Craig; Whalley, Richard; Miller, Tony

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is a distinct zone of soil directly influenced by a plant root, with all below ground resources passing through this dynamic zone prior to capture by plants. Therefore the physical nature of the interface between the rhizosphere and the bulk soil is crucial for plant development. It is well known that the soil microbial community play a significant role in the evolution of the rhizosphere and some studies have shown that it is structurally a very different environment to the surrounding bulk soil. However how this evolution or genesis is influenced by the underlying soil physical properties and how this interacts with different plant species is less well understood. Actually examining the undisturbed rhizosphere has represented a major obstacle to research, due to its microscopic size and often fragile nature. Here we have employed high resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to successfully map the physical architecture of the developing rhizosphere in natural soils for the first time. We compared the temporal changes to the intact porous structure of the rhizosphere during the emergence of a developing root system, by assessing changes to the soil porous architecture across a range of soil textures and plant species. Our results indicate the physical zone of influence of a root at an early stage is more localised than previously thought possible (at the µm rather than mm scale). Soil porosity increases at the immediate root surface due to localised crack formation in both fine and coarse textured soils. As such the soil porous architecture at the root interface is enhanced and not compacted as previously considered. Subsequent densification of the soil system in response to an expanding root diameter was still observed, however this at some distance away from the root, and is primarily governed by soil particle size, soil bulk density and root diameter. This 'rhizosphere structure' and associated dynamics have important consequences for several

  1. Development of a Low-Cost Arduino-Based Sonde for Coastal Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Lockridge

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This project addresses the need for an expansion in the monitoring of marine environments by providing a detailed description of a low cost, robust, user friendly sonde, built on Arduino Mega 2560 (Mega and Arduino Uno (Uno platforms. The sonde can be made without specialized tools or training and can be easily modified to meet individual application requirements. The platform allows for internal logging of multiple parameters of which conductivity, temperature, and GPS position are demonstrated. Two design configurations for different coastal hydrographic applications are highlighted to show the robust and versatile nature of this sensor platform. The initial sonde design was intended for use on a Lagrangian style surface drifter that recorded measurements of temperature; salinity; and position for a deployment duration of less than 24 h. Functional testing of the sensor consisted of a 55 h comparison with a regularly maintained water quality sensor (i.e., YSI 6600 sonde in Mobile Bay, AL. The temperature and salinity data were highly correlated and had acceptable RMS errors of 0.154 °C and 1.35 psu for the environmental conditions. A second application using the sonde platform was designed for longer duration (~3–4 weeks; subsurface (1.5–4.0 m depths deployment, moored to permanent structures. Design alterations reflected an emphasis on minimizing power consumption, which included the elimination of the GPS capabilities, increased battery capacity, and power-saving software modifications. The sonde designs presented serve as templates that will expand the hydrographic measurement capabilities of ocean scientists, students, and teachers.

  2. Development of a Low-Cost Arduino-Based Sonde for Coastal Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockridge, Grant; Dzwonkowski, Brian; Nelson, Reid; Powers, Sean

    2016-04-13

    This project addresses the need for an expansion in the monitoring of marine environments by providing a detailed description of a low cost, robust, user friendly sonde, built on Arduino Mega 2560 (Mega) and Arduino Uno (Uno) platforms. The sonde can be made without specialized tools or training and can be easily modified to meet individual application requirements. The platform allows for internal logging of multiple parameters of which conductivity, temperature, and GPS position are demonstrated. Two design configurations for different coastal hydrographic applications are highlighted to show the robust and versatile nature of this sensor platform. The initial sonde design was intended for use on a Lagrangian style surface drifter that recorded measurements of temperature; salinity; and position for a deployment duration of less than 24 h. Functional testing of the sensor consisted of a 55 h comparison with a regularly maintained water quality sensor (i.e., YSI 6600 sonde) in Mobile Bay, AL. The temperature and salinity data were highly correlated and had acceptable RMS errors of 0.154 °C and 1.35 psu for the environmental conditions. A second application using the sonde platform was designed for longer