WorldWideScience

Sample records for coalition survivorship summit

  1. Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Español ASCO.org Conquer Cancer Foundation ASCO Journals Donate eNews Signup f Cancer.net on Facebook t Cancer.net on Twitter q Cancer.net on YouTube g Cancer.net on Google Menu Home Types of Cancer Navigating Cancer Care Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship About Cancer ...

  2. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coyne and Meg Gaines Read the NCCS 2016 Annual Report Share Your Affordable Care Act Story NCCS 30th Anniversary NCCS Policy Comments - Read our Comments to Gov't Bodies AmazonSmile - Support NCCS When You Shop Amazon Be your own advocate. - Learn More NCCS Joins ...

  3. Coalitional negotiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mauleon, Ana; Vannetelbosch, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    We develop a two-stage negotiation model to study the impact of costly inspections on both the coalition formation outcome and the per-member payoffs. In the first stage, the players are forming coalitions and inside each coalition formed the members share the coalition benefits. We adopt the largest consistent set (LCS) to predict which coalition structures are possibly stable. We also introduce a refinement,the largest cautious consistent set (LCCS). In the second stage, the inspection game...

  4. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  5. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Favorites ACIP Recommendations Package Inserts Additional Immunization Resources Photos Adult Vaccination Screening Checklists Ask the ...

  6. Summit surprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, N

    1994-01-01

    A New Delhi Population Summit, organized by the Royal Society, the US National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, and the Indian National Science Academy, was convened with representation of 120 (only 10% women) scientists from 50 countries and about 12 disciplines and 43 national scientific academies. Despite the common assumption that scientists never agree, a 3000 word statement was signed by 50 prominent national figures and supported by 25 professional papers on diverse subjects. The statement proclaimed that stable world population and "prodigious planning efforts" are required for dealing with global social, economic, and environmental problems. The target should be zero population growth by the next generation. The statement, although containing many uncompromising assertions, was not as strong as a statement by the Royal Society and the US National Academy of Sciences released last year: that, in the future, science and technology may not be able to prevent "irreversible degradation of the environment and continued poverty," and that the capacity to sustain life on the planet may be permanently jeopardized. The Delhi statement was backed by professional papers highlighting several important issues. Dr Mahmoud Fathalla of the Rockefeller Foundation claimed that the 500,000 annual maternal deaths worldwide, of which perhaps 33% are due to "coathanger" abortions, are given far less attention than a one-day political event of 500 deaths would receive. Although biologically women have been given a greater survival advantage, which is associated with their reproductive capacity, socially disadvantaged females are relegated to low status. There is poorer nutrition and overall health care for females, female infanticide, and female fetuses are increasingly aborted in China, India, and other countries. The sex ratio in developed countries is 95-97 males to every 100 females, but in developing Asian countries the ratio is 105 males to 100

  7. Agile Coalition Environment (ACE)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Michele; Daniel, Dale

    2004-01-01

    .... Interoperability is achieved across all applications, platforms, and security domains. ACE is presented as a network capability that can be applied to the Coalition Enterprise Information Exchange System (CENTRIXS...

  8. Minority coalition governance in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Flemming Juul; Pedersen, Helene Helboe

    2014-01-01

    in this share of coalition agreement-based laws. The analyses are based on unique data on legislative as well as governmental coalition agreements entered by three Danish governments with varying parliamentary strength. This study brings the blooming literature on coalition agreements one step further......Coalition governance is a challenge for political parties because it involves cooperation and compromises between parties that have different political goals and are competitors in political elections. Coalition coordination is crucial for the intra-coalitional cooperation of the governing parties....... A key element in coalition coordination is coalition agreements, which to a varying degree constrain the behaviour of the coalition partners. This article explores the share of laws that were precisely defined in government agreements and/or legislative agreements, and sets out to explain variation...

  9. International Clean Energy Coalition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  10. Melanoma survivorship: research opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveria, Susan A; Hay, Jennifer L; Geller, Alan C; Heneghan, Maureen K; McCabe, Mary S; Halpern, Allan C

    2007-03-01

    The rising incidence and mortality rates of melanoma, the most fatal form of skin cancer, are among the greatest increases of all preventable cancers over the past decade. However, because of recent advances in early detection, secondary prevention efforts, and treatment, the number of melanoma survivors is increasing. Little research has been conducted on melanoma survivors and important opportunities exist for research in this understudied population. Here, we outline the important research opportunities related to the study of melanoma survivorship and summarize the paucity of literature currently available. A computerized literature search was performed of the MEDLINE database of the National Library of Medicine from 1966-2005. The scope of the search was limited to those studies published in English. The search was conducted using the following MeSH headings: melanoma, neoplasms, skin neoplasms, survival, and survival rate. The reference lists of relevant book chapters and review articles were further reviewed, and printed materials from recent scientific meetings addressing this topic were obtained. Several factors that affect melanoma survivors warrant further study, including: physiologic long-term effects; psychosocial, behavioral, and cognitive factors; demographic characteristics; surveillance practices; recurrences, secondary primaries, and other cancers; family members of survivors; and economic issues, access to health care/life insurance. Understanding recurrence and second primary cancer risk, psychosocial and cognitive characteristics, behaviors, surveillance patterns, economic sequelae, and family issues of melanoma survivors is important from a public health standpoint to promote the health and well-being of this cohort. Melanoma is an understudied cancer, and the incidence and mortality of this disease are increasing. Describing the long term burden of this cancer and identifying factors that contribute to them will facilitate efforts to develop

  11. Spatially dependent biotic and abiotic factors drive survivorship and physical structure of green roof vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, Jason M; Palmer, Matthew I; Giampieri, Mario A; Tuininga, Amy R; Lewis, James D

    2017-01-01

    Plant survivorship depends on biotic and abiotic factors that vary at local and regional scales. This survivorship, in turn, has cascading effects on community composition and the physical structure of vegetation. Survivorship of native plant species is variable among populations planted in environmentally stressful habitats like urban roofs, but the degree to which factors at different spatial scales affect survivorship in urban systems is not well understood. We evaluated the effects of biotic and abiotic factors on survivorship, composition, and physical structure of two native perennial species assemblages, one characterized by a mixture of C 4 grasses and forbs (Hempstead Plains, HP) and one characterized by a mixture of C 3 grasses and forbs (Rocky Summit, RS), that were initially sown at equal ratios of growth forms (5:1:4; grass, N-fixing forb and non-N-fixing forb) in replicate 2-m 2 plots planted on 10 roofs in New York City (New York, USA). Of 24 000 installed plants, 40% survived 23 months after planting. Within-roof factors explained 71% of variation in survivorship, with biotic (species identity and assemblage) factors accounting for 54% of the overall variation, and abiotic (growing medium depth and plot location) factors explaining 17% of the variation. Among-roof factors explained 29% of variation in survivorship and increased solar radiation correlated with decreased survivorship. While growing medium properties (pH, nutrients, metals) differed among roofs there was no correlation with survivorship. Percent cover and sward height increased with increasing survivorship. At low survivorship, cover of the HP assemblage was greater compared to the RS assemblage. Sward height of the HP assemblage was about two times greater compared to the RS assemblage. These results highlight the effects of local biotic and regional abiotic drivers on community composition and physical structure of green roof vegetation. As a result, initial green roof plant

  12. Legislative coalitions with incomplete information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragu, Tiberiu; Laver, Michael

    2017-03-14

    In most parliamentary democracies, proportional representation electoral rules mean that no single party controls a majority of seats in the legislature. This in turn means that the formation of majority legislative coalitions in such settings is of critical political importance. Conventional approaches to modeling the formation of such legislative coalitions typically make the "common knowledge" assumption that the preferences of all politicians are public information. In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework to investigate which legislative coalitions form when politicians' policy preferences are private information, not known with certainty by the other politicians with whom they are negotiating over what policies to implement. The model we develop has distinctive implications. It suggests that legislative coalitions should typically be either of the center left or the center right. In other words our model, distinctively, predicts only center-left or center-right policy coalitions, not coalitions comprising the median party plus parties both to its left and to its right.

  13. Halftime - a balance in matters nuclear of the grand coalition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2007-01-01

    On November 11, 2005, the coalition partners, CDU/CSU and SPD, signed the agreement establishing a coalition in the German federal parliament under the heading of ''Together for Germany''. Among other things, this raised the question of what would happen in the fields of energy policy and nuclear power. After 2 years of a grand coalition, it is time to draw some interim conclusions. The coalition agreement contains statements to the effect that energy policy means fundamental economic, structural and climate policies, and that secure, low-cost, non-polluting energy supplies are elementary prerequisites of a modern, capable national economy. A sustainable overall energy policy concept should be based on a balanced energy mix. This overall concept, one of the results of ''energy summit'' talks with Federal Chancellor Merkel, was announced for the end of 2007. The 3 energy summit discussions with Federal Chancellor Merkel deliberately avoided the subject of nuclear power. There is no debate about the implications of nuclear energy. This in no way improved the status of nuclear power in Germany. What remains is hope for the second half of this government's term of office. The beginning of that term is marked by the McKinsey study, initiated by the Federation of German Industries (BDI), on ''Cost and Potential of Avoiding Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Germany,'' which says that operating German nuclear power plants for 60 or even 45 years would result in a CO2 avoidance potential for 2020 which would be approximately 90 million tons higher, and in avoidance costs lower by 4.5 billion euro per year. (orig.)

  14. A Resolution Prover for Coalition Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Nalon, Cláudia; Zhang, Lan; Dixon, Clare; Hustadt, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    We present a prototype tool for automated reasoning for Coalition Logic, a non-normal modal logic that can be used for reasoning about cooperative agency. The theorem prover CLProver is based on recent work on a resolution-based calculus for Coalition Logic that operates on coalition problems, a normal form for Coalition Logic. We provide an overview of coalition problems and of the resolution-based calculus for Coalition Logic. We then give details of the implementation of CLProver and prese...

  15. PFAS National Leadership Summit Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be hosting a National Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. to take action on Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in the environment. Below are the meeting materials for the Summit.

  16. Family support in cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Kazilan, Fitrisehara

    2011-01-01

    This paper raises issues about the role of family members in providing support for breast cancer survivors. Data were collected from 400 breast cancer survivors in Peninsular Malaysia through a custom-designed questionnaire fielded at hospitals and support group meetings. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The analyses show that all family members could be supportive, especially in decision making and help with emotional issues. The spouse was the main support provider among the family members (others were children, parents, siblings and more distant relatives). The results also indicated that a significant percentage practiced collaborative decision-making. Breast cancer survivors needed their family members' support for information on survivorship strategies such as managing emotions, health, life style and dietary practice. The family members' supportive role may be linked to the Malaysian strong family relationship culture. For family members to contribute more adequately to cancer survivorship, it is suggested that appropriate educational intervention also be provided to them.

  17. Climate Summit in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delman, Jørgen

      Together with the United States, China has moved to centre stage in the running up to the Climate Summit in Copenhagen 7-18 December 2009. To make the Summit a success, the two countries have started signalling positive commitment to formulation of quantitative targets and engage constructively...... in elaborating a reasonably ambitious, yet realistic framework for the implementation of a new global post-Kyoto regime that will have to take effect from 2012. China's leadership has already acknowledged that climate change may exacerbate an exceedingly unsustainable development path over the next decades...... if action is not taken to change its course dramatically. The challenges are formidable, yet the window of opportunity to take action is quite narrow. For these reasons and due to international pressure, China's position on climate change has been made gradually clearer as the climate negotiations have...

  18. Cancer survivorship: challenges and changing paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Scott M; Miller, David C; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Montie, James E; Wei, John T

    2008-02-01

    We summarize the potential issues faced by cancer survivors, define a conceptual framework for cancer survivorship, describe challenges associated with improving the quality of survivorship care and outline proposed survivorship programs that may be implemented going forward. We performed a nonsystematic review of current cancer survivorship literature. Given the comprehensive scope and high profile, the recent report by the Institute of Medicine, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, served as the principal guide for the review. In recognition of the increasing number of cancer survivors in the United States survivorship has become an important health care concern. The recent report by the Institute of Medicine comprehensively outlined deficits in the care provided to cancer survivors, and proposed mechanisms to improve the coordination and quality of followup care for this increasing number of Americans. Measures to achieve these objectives include improving communication between health care providers through a survivorship care plan, providing evidence based surveillance guidelines and assessing different models of survivorship care. Implementing coordinated survivorship care broadly will require additional health care resources, and commitment from health care providers and payers. Research demonstrating the effectiveness of survivorship care will be important on this front. Potential shortcomings in the recognition and management of ongoing issues faced by cancer survivors may impact the overall quality of long-term care in this increasing population. Although programs to address these issues have been proposed, there is substantial work to be done in this area.

  19. Development of community plans to enhance survivorship from colorectal cancer: community-based participatory research in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerich, Eugene J; Kluhsman, Brenda C; Bencivenga, Marcyann; Allen, Regina; Miele, Mary Beth; Farace, Elana

    2007-09-01

    In 2002, 10.4% of the 10 million persons alive who have ever been diagnosed with cancer had colorectal cancer (CRC). Barriers, such as distance, terrain, access to care and cultural differences, to CRC survivorship may be especially relevant in rural communities. We tested the hypothesis that teams from rural cancer coalitions and hospitals would develop a Community Plan (CP) to enhance CRC survivorship. We used community-based participatory research and the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to train teams from rural cancer coalitions and hospitals in Pennsylvania and New York. We measured knowledge at three points in time and tested the change with McNemar's test, corrected for multiple comparisons (p < 0.0167). We also conducted a qualitative review of the CP contents. Fourteen (93.3%) of the 15 coalitions or hospitals initially recruited to the study completed a CP. Knowledge in public health, sponsorship of A National Action Plan for Cancer Survivorship, and CRC survivorship and treatment increased. Teams identified perceived barriers and community assets. All teams planned to increase awareness of community assets and almost all planned to enhance treatment-related care and psychosocial care for the CRC survivor; 50% planned to enhance primary care and CRC screening. The study demonstrated the interest and ability of rural organizations to plan to enhance CRC survivorship, including linkage of CRC survivorship to primary care. Rural cancer coalitions and hospitals may be a vehicle to develop local action for A National Action Plan. Access to more comprehensive care for CRC cancer survivors in rural communities appears to be facilitated by the community-based initiative described and investigated in this study. Efforts such as these could be replicated in other rural communities and may impact the care and quality of life of survivors with many types of cancers. While access to health services may be increased through community-based initiatives, we still need to measure

  20. National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Continues Support of National Campaign to End Veteran Homelessness Nov. 14, 2017 This Veterans Day, Harbor Freight ... support of the national campaign to end veteran homelessness through generous contributions to the National Coalition for ...

  1. A Resolution Prover for Coalition Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Nalon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a prototype tool for automated reasoning for Coalition Logic, a non-normal modal logic that can be used for reasoning about cooperative agency. The theorem prover CLProver is based on recent work on a resolution-based calculus for Coalition Logic that operates on coalition problems, a normal form for Coalition Logic. We provide an overview of coalition problems and of the resolution-based calculus for Coalition Logic. We then give details of the implementation of CLProver and present the results for a comparison with an existing tableau-based solver.

  2. Research Reactors Coalitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio, Andrea; Bradley, E.; Vyshniauskas, Judy; Ridikas, Danas

    2013-01-01

    When considering the potential role of an existing RR or possibly the construction of a new RR, it is clear that a nuclear science and technology programme (including nuclear power) could benefit provided the RR is safely and competently managed, well utilised and adequately funded. Based on MSs experience, a domestic RR may not be required to develop a nuclear power programme, provided the decision takes advantage of foreign expertise, including access to foreign RRs facilities and RRs regional/international networks. If a country decides to gain access to a foreign research reactor, it may need considering the potential risk of change in the political relationship with the host country that could compromise the achievement of its national relevant objectives. This risk may be offset by availability of many options within one or more regional/international RRs networks and coalitions. Examples include the use of existing RRs in vendor, non-vendor countries and, in some cases non-nuclear power countries, to develop human resources in support of the introduction of nuclear power elsewhere. International RR networking trends are most evident with high flux, higher capability, and more complex fuel and material testing RRs being shared through international partnerships. However, networks involving low-medium power RRs for education and training purposes are also gaining a more prominent role to support nuclear capacity building in newcomer MSs. Networking through the internet seems also to be a promising way to support, as complementary offer to direct access to RRs facilities, MSs nuclear capacity building objectives (e.g. the IRL project)

  3. Vienna Summit Declaration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-21

    The leaders of the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (USA) met June 2006 in Vienna to respond to the concerns of their citizens for peace, security, stability and prosperity in an increasingly globalised world. They welcome that over the past year the Transatlantic Partnership has delivered real results as shown by the political and economic Progress Reports issued during the summit (http://www.eu2006.at/en/The{sub C}ouncil{sub P}residency/EU-USSummit/index.html). They remain committed to finding common or complementary lines of action in many areas. Over the last year there have been many examples of how productive the relationship is, in the Middle East, Iran, the Western Balkans, Belarus, on the frozen conflicts, and Sudan, as well as in the efforts to promote transatlantic trade and investment under last Summit's Economic Initiative. They have decided to further strengthen the strategic Partnership by adopting a number of priority actions to support cooperation in the following four areas: Promoting peace, human rights and democracy worldwide; Confronting global challenges, including security; Fostering prosperity and opportunity; and Promoting strategic cooperation on energy and energy security, climate change and sustainable development.

  4. Vienna Summit Declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The leaders of the European Union (EU) and the United States of America (USA) met June 2006 in Vienna to respond to the concerns of their citizens for peace, security, stability and prosperity in an increasingly globalised world. They welcome that over the past year the Transatlantic Partnership has delivered real results as shown by the political and economic Progress Reports issued during the summit (http://www.eu2006.at/en/The_Council_Presidency/EU-USSummit/index.html). They remain committed to finding common or complementary lines of action in many areas. Over the last year there have been many examples of how productive the relationship is, in the Middle East, Iran, the Western Balkans, Belarus, on the frozen conflicts, and Sudan, as well as in the efforts to promote transatlantic trade and investment under last Summit's Economic Initiative. They have decided to further strengthen the strategic Partnership by adopting a number of priority actions to support cooperation in the following four areas: Promoting peace, human rights and democracy worldwide; Confronting global challenges, including security; Fostering prosperity and opportunity; and Promoting strategic cooperation on energy and energy security, climate change and sustainable development

  5. Ebook Summit: Our Ebook Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Over 2000 participants made the daylong programming at the "Library Journal"/"School Library Journal" Virtual Ebook Summit, September 29, a robust conversation and not just within the summit interface but also in tweets with the #ebooksummit hashtag (and beyond) and in libraries across the country where participants logged in to take part. The…

  6. Energy and the World Summit on Sustainable Development: what next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding-Fecher, Randall; Winkler, Harald; Mwakasonda, Stanford

    2005-01-01

    Given the importance of energy issues to sustainable development, energy was a priority issue at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in August 2002. The objective of this paper is to examine the outcomes of the Summit on energy, and to assess them against proposals to address the lack of access to modern energy and the need to move toward a cleaner energy system. We find that lack of political leadership from key countries prevented agreement not only on targets for renewable energy, but also on a programme to promote access. The achievements of the Summit were limited to enabling activities such as capacity building and technology transfer, rather than substantive agreements. While WSSD put energy higher on the agenda than before, no institutional home or programme to take the issues forward has emerged. This therefore remains a critical challenge to be addressed. Achieving this broad goal will require building a coalition to promote cleaner energy, and committing resources to programme for energy access. Based on analysis of proposals and the negotiations, we propose several key areas where progress is still possible and necessary, including: shifting more international public and private energy financing toward access investments and cleaner energy investments, advancing regional approaches to access and renewable energy targets, and a range of mechanisms to strengthen institutional capacity for integrating energy and sustainable development

  7. Subtalar Coalition: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CG Chua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Subtalar coalition is an uncommon condition that usually manifests in early adolescence(1. Frequently, this condition is missed. Delayed diagnosis may result in osteoarthritis requiring triple arthrodesis. Here, we report two patients with subtalar coalition. The first patient is a 12 year old boy who presented with right ankle pain for one year and was treated with excision of the coalition and bone wax insertion at the excision site. We followed up the patient for two years and the result was excellent with full range of movement of his right ankle and subtalar joint attained within two months. He returned to athletic activity by six months and was discharged with no complications after two years. The second patient is a 15 year old girl who presented with bilateral ankle pain and swelling for three years and was treated with excision of the coalition and subtalar interpositional arthroplasty bilaterally. She defaulted follow up after seven months as she was very satisfied with the result. We wish to highlight this condition which may be misdiagnosed as flexible flat foot or ankle sprain.

  8. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    To discuss lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-specific survivorship issues including: integrating sexual and gender minority identities with cancer survivor identities; coordinating medical care and disclosing identities to health care providers; dealing with late effects of treatment; and addressing LGBT family and relationship issues. Published articles, quotes from an online survey of 311 LGBT survivors. The transition from active cancer treatment to survivorship presents challenges, and LGBT cancer survivors may face additional challenges as they enter the survivorship phase. Oncology nurses can improve the quality of survivorship care delivered to LGBT survivors and their caregivers by addressing the disparities and gaps in health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Survivorship care needs among LGBT cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seay, Julia; Mitteldorf, Darryl; Yankie, Alena; Pirl, William F; Kobetz, Erin; Schlumbrecht, Matthew

    2018-05-23

    To better understand survivorship care needs among LGBT cancer survivors. We administered an anonymous online survey. LGBT cancer survivors living in the United States. Participants were recruited via the National LGBT Cancer Project. The survey measured sociodemographic characteristics, social support, posttraumatic stress, and survivorship care needs. Approximately 72% of our 114 participants were cisgender male and 87% were white. Almost all participants reported at least some unmet survivorship care needs (73%), with over half of participants reporting unmet psychological and sexuality care needs. Participants who reported their oncologist was not LGBT-competent had greater unmet needs (t(82) = 2.5, p = 0.01) and greater posttraumatic stress (t(91) = 2.1, p = 0.035). LGBT cancer survivors have significant unmet survivorship care needs, and lack of oncologist LGBT-competence is associated with unmet needs. Implications for Psychosocial Providers: Our results suggest the need for LGBT competency training for providers.

  10. Coalitions to engineer the climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Cruz, J. B.; Ricke, K.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    Solar geoengineering is the deliberate reduction of the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by Earth's climate system with the aim of reducing impacts of anthropogenic climate change. The international politics of solar geoengineering differ markedly from those of greenhouse-gas emissions reductions. A central question is who will decide whether and how much solar geoengineering will be deployed. It is unlikely that a single small actor could implement and sustain global-scale geoengineering that harms much of the world without intervention from harmed world powers. Thus, in practice, some minimum amount of aggregate power would be needed to successfully impose will upon the rest of the world. Here we formulate a series of games, calibrated with physical and economic models of climate change, to evaluate how international coalitions to implement geoengineering may form. In the scenarios examined, climate models are assumed to correctly predict the future and damage is parameterized in terms of regional temperature and precipitation changes only, and do not consider other, possibly formidable, risks. The coalitions set the "global thermostat" to maximize benefit to coalition members. As a result, non-members would be better off under a global optimum solution, but would be worse off with no geoengineering at all. Nonetheless, it appears unlikely that solar geoengineering could be implemented by actors who are perceived in advance to be harming the interests of a majority of the world's powers.; Comparison of results under a globally optimal versus >50% military-spending power coalition over 6 decades of solar geoengineering implementation. (a) shows how the amount of solar geoengineering (in units of stratospheric aerosol optical depth, AOD) implemented by a Power Proportionate Distribution coalition under a military-spending-weighted power scheme (dotted), compared to the amount that minimizes net global damages (thick grey) (the population and GDP

  11. National Tribal Building Codes Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Tribal Building Codes summit statement developed to support tribes interested in adopting green and culturally-appropriate building systems to ensure safe, sustainable, affordable, and culturally-appropriate buildings on tribal lands.

  12. Port Stakeholder Summit - April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  13. Coalition Within a Coalition: The Baltics in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Busygina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of small power problem focusing on the behav­iour of small power states within coalitions and their proneness to free riding. To pursue an independent agenda and increase their significance within large associa­tions, the authors argue, small powers tend to create ‘coalitions within coalitions’, essentially acting as free riders and transferring costs and political responsibility for decision-making to larger players. Such an asymmetric strategy makes it possi­ble for small powers to advance their interests within alliances and save resources. The authors test this hypothesis on the behaviour of the Baltics in the European Union. It is demonstrated that Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia have created a stable small coalition within the EU and actively form ad hoc alliances with the leading states to push union-level decisions, as it was the case with settling the migrant issue. In other areas, these states tend to benefit from the free rider behaviour.

  14. Religious coalition opposes gene patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1995-05-19

    The biotechnology industry is concerned about a coalition of mainstream religious leaders, working with Jeremy Rifkin of the Foundation of Economic Trends, who oppose the patenting of human and animal life forms, body parts, and genes. The coalition called a press conference on May 18 to ask the government to prohibit the current patenting practices for genetic engineering. The biotechnology industry argues that patents indicate that a company's research tool has significant value, and encourages capitalists to invest their dollars in the development of new treatments for diseases. They also argue that the 29 biotech drugs that are on the market have been developed as a result of patents on genes. Although most business leaders are united in opposing restrictions, many scientists are divided, citing both religious and scientific reasons.

  15. On the nature of voters' coalition preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, Carolina; Aichholzer, Julian

    2017-07-03

    An expanding literature indicates that in multiparty systems with coalition governments, citizens consider the post-electoral bargaining process among parties when casting their vote. Yet, we know surprisingly little about the nature of voters' coalition preferences. This paper uses data from the Austrian National Election Study to examine the determinants as well as the independence of preferences for coalitions as political object. We find that coalition preferences are strongly informed by spatial considerations; but additional non-ideological factors, such as party and leader preferences, also play a fundamental role. We also find that coalitions enjoy a certain degree of independence from other objects of vote choice and they do not always represent a simple average score on the feeling thermometer of the constituent parties. There are, however, substantial differences among voters, with party identifiers and those with extreme ideology being less likely to consider coalitions as separate entities from their component parties.

  16. On the nature of voters’ coalition preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, Carolina; Aichholzer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An expanding literature indicates that in multiparty systems with coalition governments, citizens consider the post-electoral bargaining process among parties when casting their vote. Yet, we know surprisingly little about the nature of voters’ coalition preferences. This paper uses data from the Austrian National Election Study to examine the determinants as well as the independence of preferences for coalitions as political object. We find that coalition preferences are strongly informed by spatial considerations; but additional non-ideological factors, such as party and leader preferences, also play a fundamental role. We also find that coalitions enjoy a certain degree of independence from other objects of vote choice and they do not always represent a simple average score on the feeling thermometer of the constituent parties. There are, however, substantial differences among voters, with party identifiers and those with extreme ideology being less likely to consider coalitions as separate entities from their component parties. PMID:28824702

  17. Complexity in Coalition Operations: The Campaign of the Sixth Coalition Against Napoleon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    The Campaign of the Sixth Coalition, from the Summer of 1813 until the abdication of Napoleon in April 1814, offers some important and valid insights into the successful execution of coalition warfare...

  18. Coalitions: Organizational, Political, Command & Control Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    coalitions, leur histoire récente, les caractéristiques et les défis des coalitions militaires et, enfin, les obstacles rencontrés par les...caractéristiques générales. Une brève histoire des coalitions militaires du 20ième siècle est présentée, suivie d’une évaluation de leur évolution

  19. The paradoxes and promise of community coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavis, D M

    2001-04-01

    Community coalitions, as they are currently applied, are unique organizations whose ability to promote community change is different from other types of community organizations. This article explores those differences and elaborates how community coalitions can use those differences to transform conflict into greater capacity, equity, and justice. Concerns are also raised in this article about how community coalitions can intentionally and unintentionally protect the status quo and contain the empowerment of grassroots leadership and those of marginalized groups. There is a need for more theory, research, and discourse on how community coalitions can transform conflict into social change and how they can increase the power of grassroots and other citizen-lead organizations.

  20. Fiftieth Anniversary at the summit

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Neither fear of heights nor the cold succeeded in cooling the ardour of four brave climbers from CERN who celebrated CERN's 50th Anniversary at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro (5,895 metres). On the way back from the summit, Miguel Cerqueira Bastos (AB/PO), David Collados Polidura (IT/GM), Sandra Sequeira Tavares (PH/CMI) and Daniel Cano Ott (n_TOF) raised the official CERN Jubilee flag at 4750 metres altitude. How long will it be before a CERN flag is planted on the moon?

  1. Summit Station Skiway Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    of fuel delivered to Summit via LC-130 at a price of $32/gal. (Lever et al. 2016), the cost for constructing and maintaining the skiway for the 2014...CRREL TR-16-9 18 The costs associated with the Twin Otter include a day rate plus an hourly mission rate, a per passenger rate, airport fees, fuel, a...ER D C/ CR RE L TR -1 6- 9 Engineering for Polar Operations, Logistics, and Research (EPOLAR) Summit Station Skiway Cost Analysis Co ld

  2. Earth Summit Science, policy discussed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leath, Audrey T.

    The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, the “Earth Summit,” convenes in Rio de Janeiro on June 3. President Bush has pledged to attend part of the 2-week conference. The highlight of the summit will be the signing of an international framework convention to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. The final elements of the agreement were negotiated in New York last week by representative of 143 countries. In anticipation of the Rio conference, the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources held two standing-roomonly hearings, reviewing the scientific basis for global warming due to greenhouse gases and discussing the details of the proposed convention.

  3. Preparing tomorrow's transportation workforce : a Midwest summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Preparing Tomorrows Transportation Workforce: A Midwest Summit, held April 2728, 2010, in Ames, Iowa, was one of several : regional transportation workforce development summits held across the United States in 2009 and 2010 as part of a coordin...

  4. Higher Ambitions Summit. Rapporteur Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The Sutton Trust and Pearson two-day summit on higher ambitions in apprenticeships and vocational education drew more than 120 leaders in education, training and employment, policy makers, academics, and researchers to London. Delegates heard from political leaders stressing the importance they attach to high-quality apprenticeships. Presentations…

  5. Conservative treatment of patients with tarsal coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sapogoosky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tarsal coalition is a pathological condition with abnormal fusion between two or more tarsal bones. The aim of the study was to evaluate effectiveness of conservative treatment in patients with tarsal coalitions. The treatment included reducing the intensity of physical activity, medication, orthotics, physiotherapy. For evaluation of effectiveness of the treatment, we used the AOFAS scale. The results of the study demonstrated that conservative treatment in patients with tarsal coalitions was focused onon temporary pain release. Conservative treatment has limited efficacy for patients with symptomatic tarsal coalitions because of short pain release in the majority of children (98 %. The indications for conservative treatment in patients with symptomatic tarsal coalitions should be pain and hindfoot valgus less than 15°. In other cases, conservative treatment should be considered as preoperative preparation.

  6. Wind energy aggregation: A coalitional game approach

    KAUST Repository

    Baeyens, E.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we explore the extent to which a group of N wind power producers can exploit the statistical benefits of aggregation and quantity risk sharing by forming a willing coalition to pool their variable power to jointly offer their aggregate power output as single entity into a forward energy market. We prove that wind power generators will always improve their expected profit when they aggregate their generated power and use tools from coalitional game theory to design fair sharing mechanisms to allocate the payoff among the coalition participants. We show that the corresponding coalitional game is super-additive and has a nonempty core. Hence, there always exists a mechanism for profit-sharing that makes the coalition stable. However, the game is not convex and the celebrated Shapley value may not belong to the core of the game. An allocation mechanism that minimizes the worst-case dissatisfaction is proposed. © 2011 IEEE.

  7. Measuring coalition functioning: refining constructs through factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louis D; Feinberg, Mark E; Greenberg, Mark T

    2012-08-01

    Internal and external coalition functioning is an important predictor of coalition success that has been linked to perceived coalition effectiveness, coalition goal achievement, coalition ability to support evidence-based programs, and coalition sustainability. Understanding which aspects of coalition functioning best predict coalition success requires the development of valid measures of empirically unique coalition functioning constructs. The goal of the present study is to examine and refine the psychometric properties of coalition functioning constructs in the following six domains: leadership, interpersonal relationships, task focus, participation benefits/costs, sustainability planning, and community support. The authors used factor analysis to identify problematic items in our original measure and then piloted new items and scales to create a more robust, psychometrically sound, multidimensional measure of coalition functioning. Scales displayed good construct validity through correlations with other measures. Discussion considers the strengths and weaknesses of the refined instrument.

  8. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G.; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L.; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality data among LGBT persons are lacking. This absence of cancer incidence data impedes research and policy development, LGBT communities' awareness and activation, and interventions to address cancer disparities. In this context, in 2014, a 2-day National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities was convened by a planning committee for the purpose of accelerating progress in identifying and addressing the LGBT communities' concerns and needs in the spheres of cancer research, clinical cancer care, healthcare policy, and advocacy for cancer survivorship and LGBT health equity. Summit participants were 56 invited persons from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, representatives of diverse identities, experiences, and knowledge about LGBT communities and cancer. Participants shared lessons learned and identified gaps and remedies regarding LGBT cancer concerns across the cancer care continuum from prevention to survivorship. This white paper presents background on each of the Summit themes and 16 recommendations covering the following: sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in national and state health surveys and research on LGBT communities and cancer, the clinical care of LGBT persons, and the education and training of healthcare providers.

  9. Issues of Selection in Human Survivorship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Oluf

    , and Iceland during the past 250 years and in Japan any ten years between 1950 and 1990 is approached appropriately by the model. Reduced natural selection may account for a substantial part of the empirical mortality change in the course of the demographic transition. Survivorship in the late nineteenth......Is variation in empirical mortality across populations consistent with a hypothesis of selec-tion? To examine this proposition an extended frailty mortality model is put forward; incor-porating biological frailty; a common non-parametric hazard, joint for men and women, rep-resenting endogenous...... and the twentieth century ties selection to major medical advances and rapid recent mortality decline, probably with consequences for future health and survivorship....

  10. Developmental Stages and Work Capacities of Community Coalitions: How Extension Educators Address and Evaluate Changing Coalition Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Allison; Riffe, Jane; Peck, Terrill; Kaczor, Cheryl; Nix, Kelly; Faulkner-Van Deysen, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Extension educators provide resources to community coalitions. The study reported here adds to what is known about community coalitions and applies an assessment framework to a state-level coalition-based Extension program on healthy relationships and marriages. The study combines the Internal Coalition Outcome Hierarchy (ICOH) framework with four…

  11. Wind energy aggregation: A coalitional game approach

    KAUST Repository

    Baeyens, E.; Bitar, E.Y.; Khargonekar, P.P.; Poolla, K.

    2011-01-01

    power output as single entity into a forward energy market. We prove that wind power generators will always improve their expected profit when they aggregate their generated power and use tools from coalitional game theory to design fair sharing

  12. Course of Action Analysis for Coalition Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagenhals, Lee W; Reid, Tom; Smillie, Robert J; Levis, Alexander H

    2001-01-01

    ...) of the Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Command. The goal of DSCCO is to apply and integrate organizational design concepts and decision support technologies in planning and executing multi-national coalition operations...

  13. Negotiating Rights : Building Coalitions for Improving Maternal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Negotiating Rights : Building Coalitions for Improving Maternal Health Services ... the state of maternal health in the country reflects poorly on public health priorities. ... A number of international agencies and civil society organizations are ...

  14. International Land Coalition: Women's access to land

    OpenAIRE

    International Land Coalition (ILC)

    2008-01-01

    Metadata only record The International Land Coalition (ILC) started as the Popular Coalition to Eradicate Hunger and Poverty. This is a global alliance of intergovernmental, governmental and civil-society organizations committed to rural poverty eradication. On their website, (on the left click on documents) the link presents a list of resources related to the role of women and access to land. There are case studies and country reports in Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Kenya and Nepal, as wel...

  15. Northeast Solar Energy Market Coalition (NESEMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabago, Karl R. [Pace Energy and Climate Center Pace University School of Law

    2018-03-31

    The Northeast Solar Energy Market Coalition (NESEMC) brought together solar energy business associations and other stakeholders in the Northeast to harmonize regional solar energy policy and advance the solar energy market. The Coalition was managed by the Pace Energy and Climate Center, a project of the Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law. The NESEMC was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative as a cooperative agreement through 2017 as part of Solar Market Pathways.

  16. National Farmers Market Summit Proceedings Report

    OpenAIRE

    Tropp, Debra; Barham, James

    2008-01-01

    The USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), in partnership with the Farmers Market Consortium, hosted the National Farmers Market Summit November 7–9, 2007, in Baltimore, MD. The Summit assembled key stakeholders from the farmers market community to convene a national conversation on issues and challenges facing today’s farmers markets. The National Farmers Market Summit had three broad objectives: (1) Identify farmers market needs and existing gaps in assistance, (2) Prioritize future res...

  17. 11. International Oil Summit 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    In his introduction at the 11. international oil summit 2010, Mr N. Ait-Laoussine (President of Nalcosa and past Energy Minister in Algeria) has summarized the main points which will be approached during the meeting: 1)after the crisis of 2008, what will be the challenges of the petroleum industry? the environmental constraints? the availability of the new technologies? Will the prices volatility be permanent? 2)what will be the strategy at middle/long term of the national petroleum companies, of the international petroleum companies and of the service companies (partnership, research and innovation,....)? (O.M.)

  18. The First National Pain Medicine Summit--final summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippe, Philipp M; Brock, Charles; David, Jose; Crossno, Ronald; Gitlow, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    Pain is ubiquitous. At some point in time it affects everyone. For many millions pain becomes chronic, a scourge that impacts every facet of life-work, hobbies, family relations, social fabric, finances, happiness, mood, and even the very essence of identity. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), pain is one of our most important national public health problems, a silent epidemic. In 1998, NIH reported that the annual amount spent on health care, compensation, and litigation related to pain had reached one hundred billion dollars ($100,000,000,000). Considering that health care costs have doubled since then, it is not unreasonable to assume that the costs related to pain care have doubled as well. Millions of patients suffer needlessly with acute pain, with cancer pain, and with chronic pain. The ineffective management of pain results in an escalating cascade of health care issues. Acute pain that is not treated adequately and promptly results in persistent pain that eventually causes irreversible changes in the nervous system. This translates into progressive bio-psycho-social epiphenomena resulting in further pain and disability. It creates a vicious cycle transforming a functional human being into an invalid who becomes a burden to family, to society, and to oneself. In the face of adequate medical science, adequate technical skills, and adequate resources the reality of delayed and inadequate pain care is paradoxical. This dilemma deserves close scrutiny and effective remediation. The American Medical Association (AMA), long dedicated to the need to improve pain care in this country, has been faced with this reality. It was from this vision that the idea of holding a Pain Medicine Summit was conceived. Resolution 321 (A-08) set in motion a process that would bring together a diverse group of stakeholders for the purpose of discussing the present and future status of pain care; a process that culminated in a broad-based coalition of physicians

  19. Halftime - a balance in matters nuclear of the grand coalition; Halbzeit - Bilanz der Grossen Koalition in Sachen Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, W.

    2007-10-15

    On November 11, 2005, the coalition partners, CDU/CSU and SPD, signed the agreement establishing a coalition in the German federal parliament under the heading of ''Together for Germany''. Among other things, this raised the question of what would happen in the fields of energy policy and nuclear power. After 2 years of a grand coalition, it is time to draw some interim conclusions. The coalition agreement contains statements to the effect that energy policy means fundamental economic, structural and climate policies, and that secure, low-cost, non-polluting energy supplies are elementary prerequisites of a modern, capable national economy. A sustainable overall energy policy concept should be based on a balanced energy mix. This overall concept, one of the results of ''energy summit'' talks with Federal Chancellor Merkel, was announced for the end of 2007. The 3 energy summit discussions with Federal Chancellor Merkel deliberately avoided the subject of nuclear power. There is no debate about the implications of nuclear energy. This in no way improved the status of nuclear power in Germany. What remains is hope for the second half of this government's term of office. The beginning of that term is marked by the McKinsey study, initiated by the Federation of German Industries (BDI), on ''Cost and Potential of Avoiding Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Germany,'' which says that operating German nuclear power plants for 60 or even 45 years would result in a CO2 avoidance potential for 2020 which would be approximately 90 million tons higher, and in avoidance costs lower by 4.5 billion euro per year. (orig.)

  20. World Summit embraces Open Access, libraries

    CERN Multimedia

    Kaser, D

    2004-01-01

    "The long-anticipated "first phase" meeting of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in Geneva in December, was supposed to have been about equal access. It turned out being equally about open access as leading scientific organizations pushed their open-access initiative onto the World Summit agenda" (1 page)

  1. Taking Our Seat at the Table: Community Cancer Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Katie M; Smith, Caitlin

    Cancer survivors are at risk for occupational performance issues related to activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, work, and social and community participation. Occupational therapy practitioners can address these performance issues by offering services within existing community cancer survivorship programs that focus on adaptive and compensatory strategies to facilitate meaningful lifestyles and optimize health and well-being. Occupational therapy services do not currently exist at these community sites, nor are occupational therapy practitioners recognized as providers in existing community cancer survivorship programs. Recognition of practitioners' distinct value in cancer survivorship, advocacy for occupational therapy services in the community, development of supporting documentation for occupational therapy's role in community survivorship, and research on the efficacy of interventions in community cancer survivorship are needed to expand occupational therapy's role with this growing population. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  2. Maritime Coalitions: When is Unity of Command Required

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gahlinger, Gregory J

    2007-01-01

    .... The concepts of Unity of Command, Unity of Effort and Parallel, Lead Nation, or Integrated coalition command structures are viable across a broad spectrum of maritime coalition operations but do have...

  3. Impact of coalition interoperability on PKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Edward J.

    2003-07-01

    This paper examines methods for providing PKI interoperability among units of a coalition of armed forces drawn from different nations. The area in question is tactical identity management, for the purposes of confidentiality, integrity and non-repudiation in such a dynamic coalition. The interoperating applications under consideration range from email and other forms of store-and-forward messaging to TLS and IPSEC-protected real-time communications. Six interoperability architectures are examined with advantages and disadvantages of each described in the paper.

  4. Rethinking the Factors of Success: Social Support and Community Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa; DeWeese, Amanda; Goodman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coalitions are often the strategy of choice when needs are great, resources are few, and individual efforts have proven unsuccessful in addressing serious health issues. Despite the widespread use of coalitions and extensive research, no definitive list of factors predicting coalition success has been identified. One factor, social…

  5. Pressures on TV Programs: Coalition for Better Television's Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, John M., Jr.

    In 1981, the conservative Coalition for Better Television (CBTV) threatened an economic boycott against advertisers who marketed their wares on programs that the coalition felt had excessive sex and violence. Because television networks are dependent on advertising, the coalition believed economic pressure on advertisers would force a…

  6. Advocacy coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate: Exploring coalition structure, policy beliefs, resources, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, Denise D; Lewis, LaVonna B; Cousineau, Michael R; Nichol, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Advocacy coalitions often play an important role in the state health policymaking process, yet little is known about their structure, composition, and behavior. In 2008, California became the first state to enact a menu labeling law. Using the advocacy coalition framework, we examine different facets of the coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate. We use a qualitative research approach to identify coalition members and explore their expressed beliefs and policy arguments, resources, and strategies by analyzing legislative documents (n = 87) and newspaper articles (n = 78) produced between 1999 and 2009. Between 2003 and 2008, six menu labeling bills were introduced in the state's legislature. We found the issue received increasing media attention during this period. We identified two advocacy coalitions involved in the debate-a public health (PH) coalition and an industry coalition. State organizations acted as coalition leaders and participated for a longer duration than elected officials. The structure and composition of each coalition varied. PH coalition leadership and membership notably increased compared to the industry coalition. The PH coalition, led by nonprofit PH and health organizations, promoted a clear and consistent message around informed decision making. The industry coalition, led by a state restaurant association, responded with cost and implementation arguments. Each coalition used various resources and strategies to advance desired outcomes. PH coalition leaders were particularly effective at using resources and employing advocacy strategies, which included engaging state legislators as coalition members, using public opinion polls and information, and leveraging media resources to garner support. Policy precedence and a local policy push emerged as important policymaking strategies. Areas for future research on the state health policymaking process are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Advocacy Coalitions involved in California’s Menu Labeling Policy Debate: Exploring Coalition Structure, Policy Beliefs, Resources, and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, Denise D.; Lewis, LaVonna B.; Cousineau, Michael R.; Nichol, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    Advocacy coalitions often play an important role in the state health policymaking process, yet little is known about their structure, composition, and behavior. In 2008, California became the first state to enact a menu labeling law. Using the advocacy coalition framework, we examine different facets of the coalitions involved in California’s menu labeling policy debate. We use a qualitative research approach to identify coalition members and explore their expressed beliefs and policy arguments, resources, and strategies by analyzing legislative documents (n=87) and newspaper articles (n=78) produced between 1999 and 2009. Between 2003 and 2008, six menu labeling bills were introduced in the state’s legislature. We found the issue received increasing media attention during this period. We identified two advocacy coalitions involved in the debate—a public health (PH) coalition and an industry coalition. State organizations acted as coalition leaders and participated for a longer duration than elected officials. The structure and composition of each coalition varied. PH coalition leadership and membership notably increased compared to the industry coalition. The PH coalition, led by nonprofit PH and health organizations, promoted a clear and consistent message around informed decision making. The industry coalition, led by a state restaurant association, responded with cost and implementation arguments. Each coalition used various resources and strategies to advance desired outcomes. PH coalition leaders were particularly effective at using resources and employing advocacy strategies, which included engaging state legislators as coalition members, using public opinion polls and information, and leveraging media resources to garner support. Policy precedence and a local policy push emerged as important policymaking strategies. Areas for future research on the state health policymaking process are discussed. PMID:28161674

  8. The coalitional value theory of antigay bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winegard, Bo; Reynolds, Tania; Baumeister, Roy F.; Plant, E. Ashby

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that antigay bias follows a specific pattern (and probably has throughout written history, at least in the West): (a) men evince more antigay bias than women; (b) men who belong to traditionally male coalitions evince more antigay bias than those who do not; (c) antigay bias is

  9. Institutional Support : Advocates Coalition for Development and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE) is an independent policy research and advocacy organization based in Kampala, Uganda, with a reputation for producing good quality research to underpin its advocacy work. To date, the organization has relied on project-specific funds for its operation, ...

  10. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  11. Core stability in hedonic coalition formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woeginger, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    In many economic, social and political situations individuals carry out activities in groups (coalitions) rather than alone and on their own. Examples range from households and sport clubs to research networks, political parties and trade unions. The underlying game theoretic framework is known as

  12. Improving Organisational Effectiveness of Coalition Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisig, E.; Ann-Renée; Hof, T.; Seiler, S.; Yanakiev, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Transformation of military operations demands new tools to support the performance of coalition forces in multinational operations. This paper contributes to one of the fundamental objectives of SAS-081/RSY, namely to the objective to share experience from the implementation of methods and tools and

  13. Enlargement Issues at NATO's Bucharest Summit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gallis, Paul; Belkin, Paul; Ek, Carl; Kim, Julie; Nichol, Jim; Woehrel, Steven

    2008-01-01

    NATO will hold a summit in Bucharest on April 2-4, 2008, and a principal issue will be the consideration of the candidacies for membership of Albania, Croatia, and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia...

  14. Global Summit on Student Affairs and Services

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    introduced to the 3rd Global Summit on Student Affairs and Services that was hosted by Stellenbosch University (SU) in Cape Town, South Africa, this past .... students to act as partners and change agents in their educational experience.

  15. Cancer survivorship: history, quality-of-life issues, and the evolving multidisciplinary approach to implementation of cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Mary Ann

    2009-07-01

    To discuss the history of cancer survivorship, related quality-of-life issues, and cancer survivorship care plans (CSCPs). CINAHL, PubMed, published articles, and Web sites. A cancer survivor is an individual who has been diagnosed with cancer, regardless of when that diagnosis was received, who is still living. Cancer survivorship is complex and involves many aspects of care. Major areas of concern for survivors are recurrence, secondary malignancies, and long-term treatment sequelae that affect quality of life. Four essential components of survivorship care are prevention, surveillance, intervention, and coordination. A CSCP should address the survivor's long-term care, such as type of cancer, treatments received, potential side effects, and recommendations for follow-up. It should include preventive practices, how to maintain health and well-being, information on legal protections regarding employment and health insurance, and psychosocial services in the community. Survivorship care for patients with cancer requires a multidisciplinary effort and team approach. Enhanced knowledge of long-term complications of survivorship is needed for healthcare providers. Further research on evidence-based practice for cancer survivorship care also is necessary. Nurses can review CSCPs with patients, instruct them when to seek treatment, promote recommended surveillance protocols, and encourage behaviors that lead to cancer prevention and promote well-being for cancer survivors.

  16. Complexities of coalition building: leaders' successes, strategies, struggles, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, T; Rosenthal, B B

    2001-01-01

    Government and private funding initiatives are promoting coalitions, collaborations, and other interorganizational approaches to address complex community, social services, and health issues. Social work organizers and administrators are increasingly leading coalitions themselves or representing their organizations in collaborative planning and problem solving, often without understanding how to manage the complexities involved in interorganizational relationships. This article reports on aspects of a larger quantitative and qualitative research project that studied coalition dynamics, operations, and outcomes. Coalition leaders interviewed defined success in multiple ways. Competent leadership was the factor most often identified with coalition success.

  17. Incentives and stability of international climate coalitions: An integrated assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosetti, Valentina; Carraro, Carlo; De Cian, Enrica; Massetti, Emanuele; Tavoni, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the incentives to participate in an international climate agreement and the stability of the resulting climate coalition using the integrated assessment model WITCH. Coalition stability is assessed under alternative assumptions concerning the pure rate of time preference, the aggregation of social welfare, and the severity of climate damages. The profitability, stability, and strong potential internal stability of a number of coalitions, those potentially effective in reducing GHG emissions, is explored in the paper. The main conclusion is that only the grand coalition, i.e. a coalition where all world regions cooperate to reduce emissions, can maintain GHG concentration below 550 ppm CO 2 -eq. However, this coalition is not internally stable, even when allowing for monetary transfers across world regions. Nonetheless, the paper also shows that strongly potentially internally stable coalitions exist, though of smaller size, which can mitigate global warming and limit GHG concentrations to 600 ppm CO 2 -eq. - Highlights: ► We analyse climate coalitions with an integrated assessment model. ► Coalitions’ profitability and stability is analysed under alternative assumptions. ► Effective coalitions should include larger emitters (such as India and China). ► A coalition that achieves 550 ppm CO 2 -eq is not internally stable. ► A stable coalition can achieve around 518 ppme in 2050 and 600 ppme in 2100

  18. Progress in Promoting Research Reactor Coalitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira; Adelfang, Pablo; Alldred, Kevin; Mote, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    This presentation treats of the IAEA's role in Promoting Research Reactor (RR) coalitions, presents the strategic view, the types of coalitions, the 2007-2008 activities and Results, and the upcoming activities. The RR Coalitions Progress is presented first (Initial discussions, project design, approval of NTI grant request, informal consultations and development of 'national' proposals, Number of 'models' identified, exploratory missions/meetings, initial implementation of several coalitions, IAEA coordination, ideas/proposals/ventures, initial support. Some countries, institutes, or users want access to reactor capabilities without, or in advance of, building a domestic facility. Some countries, institutes, or users need access to alternative capabilities to permit the closure/consolidation of marginal facilities. Cooperative arrangements will result in increased utilization for each participant. The results from the reactor view are as follows: cover increases in order levels or scientific research; cover facility outages (planned or un-planned); delegate 'less profitable' products and services; access capacity for new products and services; reduce transport needs by geographical optimization; reduce investment needs by contracting for complementary capabilities; reduce costs of medical radio-isotope for R and D; share best practices in operations and safety. The results from the stakeholder View are: Better information on what reactors can offer/provide; greater range of services; more proactive product and service support; greater reliability in supplies of products and services. The types of coalitions are of different forms to meet needs, capabilities, objectives of members. In general they start small, evolve, change form, expand as confidence grows. The role of the Scientific consortium is to: distribute excess demand, test new concepts for implementation at high-flux reactors, direct requests for access to most appropriate RR, share best practices

  19. A Patient-Centered Perspective on Cancer Survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Zebrack

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients’ physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people’s experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  20. A patient-centered perspective on cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrack, Brad

    2015-04-15

    Survivorship is a complicated notion because people often confuse a process of survivorship with a mythic identity of being a cancer survivor. This confusion may be a distraction to addressing the real-life struggles and challenges experienced by all people diagnosed with cancer. A more expansive perspective of survivorship, one that attends to patients' physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and existential challenges throughout a continuum of care, would be more in line with what is known empirically about people's experiences with cancer. In an effort to gain a patient-centered perspective on cancer, and one that emphasizes multiple dimensions of cancer survivorship, the author reports findings from a non-scientific social media poll (via Facebook and personal emails) in which survivors and colleagues working in the field of cancer survivorship answered the question: What does cancer survivorship mean to you? The comments are enlightening and useful for guiding the development of a patient-centered, and, thus, more comprehensive, approach to caring for people affected by cancer.

  1. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition.

  2. Lessons Learned and Challenges in Building a Filipino Health Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, David E.; Abesamis-Mendoza, Noilyn; Ursua, Rhodora; Divino, Lily Ann M.; Cadag, Kara; Gavin, Nicholas P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, community-based coalitions have become an effective channel to addressing various health problems within specific ethnic communities. The purpose of this article is twofold: (a) to describe the process involved in building the Kalusugan Coalition (KC), a Filipino American health coalition based in New York City, and (b) to highlight the lessons learned and the challenges from this collaborative venture. The challenges described also offer insights on how the coalition development process can be greatly affected by the partnership with an academic institution on a community-based research project. Because each cultural group has unique issues and concerns, the theoretical framework used by KC offers creative alternatives to address some of the challenges regarding coalition infrastructures, leadership development, unexpected change of coalition dynamics, and cultural nuances. PMID:19098260

  3. Coalition Cooperation Defines Roadmap for E85 and Biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-06-01

    This Clean Cities success story relates how Colorado's Colorado Biofuels Coalition was formed and provides guidance on forming other such coalitions. This Colorado's coalition sucessfully increase the number of fueling stations providing biofuels and has goals to the number even more. Plans also include assisting with financing infrastructure, making alternative fuels available to more fleets, and educating about E85 and biodiesel use.

  4. Testicular Cancer Survivorship: Research Strategies and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Clair; Allan, James M.; Dahl, Alv A.; Feldman, Darren R.; Oldenburg, Jan; Daugaard, Gedske; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Dolan, M. Eileen; Hannigan, Robyn; Constine, Louis S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Okunieff, Paul; Armstrong, Greg; Wiljer, David; Miller, Robert C.; Gietema, Jourik A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Nichols, Craig R.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    2010-01-01

    Testicular cancer represents the most curable solid tumor, with a 10-year survival rate of more than 95%. Given the young average age at diagnosis, it is estimated that effective treatment approaches, in particular, platinum-based chemotherapy, have resulted in an average gain of several decades of life. This success, however, is offset by the emergence of considerable long-term morbidity, including second malignant neoplasms, cardiovascular disease, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, pulmonary toxicity, hypogonadism, decreased fertility, and psychosocial problems. Data on underlying genetic or molecular factors that might identify those patients at highest risk for late sequelae are sparse. Genome-wide association studies and other translational molecular approaches now provide opportunities to identify testicular cancer survivors at greatest risk for therapy-related complications to develop evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventional strategies. We review research priorities identified during an international workshop devoted to testicular cancer survivors. Recommendations include 1) institution of lifelong follow-up of testicular cancer survivors within a large cohort setting to ascertain risks of emerging toxicities and the evolution of known late sequelae, 2) development of comprehensive risk prediction models that include treatment factors and genetic modifiers of late sequelae, 3) elucidation of the effect(s) of decades-long exposure to low serum levels of platinum, 4) assessment of the overall burden of medical and psychosocial morbidity, and 5) the eventual formulation of evidence-based long-term follow-up guidelines and interventions. Just as testicular cancer once served as the paradigm of a curable malignancy, comprehensive follow-up studies of testicular cancer survivors can pioneer new methodologies in survivorship research for all adult-onset cancer. PMID:20585105

  5. Advocacy coalitions and wind power development: Insights from Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegen, Maya; Audet, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of wind energy acceptance in the Canadian province of Quebec and, in particular, the impact of different models of wind power development on the degree of social acceptance. We show that the dominant advocacy coalition, which favors a hard path energy development in general, enforces a large-scale development of wind energy. Two other coalitions - a soft path coalition and a nationalist coalition - oppose this development, but not wind energy per se. We argue that difference in belief systems explains their opposition rather than planning issues or NIMBY concerns. We also contend that, despite its predominance over (wind) energy policy, the hard path coalition is willing to learn and make concessions towards the soft path coalition, but not towards the nationalist coalition. - Highlights: → We address social acceptance of wind energy. → We illustrate the interaction of advocacy coalitions. → Different advocacy coalitions support different models of wind energy development. → Models of wind energy development influence the degree of social acceptance. → Opposition is not aimed at wind energy per se, but at the hard path model.

  6. Concept analysis of cancer survivorship and contributions to oncological nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rafaela Azevedo Abrantes; da Conceição, Vander Monteiro; Araujo, Jeferson Santos; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to analyse the concept of cancer survivorship using Rodgers' evolutionary concept analysis model. The lack of a consensus definition as well as the confusion and debate concerning the definitions of "survivor" and "cancer survivorship" hinder an understanding of the intrinsic needs associated with the latter. Concept analysis. A systematic literature search was performed using the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS, and PsycINFO with studies published between 2000 and 2014. The final sample contained 39 studies that were analysed on the basis of Rodgers' model and inductive thematic analysis, discussed through the lens of the medical anthropology concept of culture. Cancer survivorship is a broad concept that can be understood using 8 themes: changes in life plans, positive and negative aspect dualities, life reflections, identity change, individual experiences, symptom control, the need for support, and quality of care. These themes are summarized using 2 attributes: liminality process and culturally congruent care. This article contributes to understanding of cancer survivorship and the processes that are intrinsic to this concept. It calls for future investigations to enhance cancer survivorship across its 2 domains at the personal (patient's life) and clinical (nursing practice) levels. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM), held in Washington, DC 7th-9th December 2010. The meeting brought together 57 scientists and managers from leading US and European government and non-governmental organizations, universitie...

  8. Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit

    CERN Document Server

    European Gender Summit, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Report from the 2012 European Gender Summit to the European Parliament and the Council, the European Commission, the Council of Europe, EU Member and Associate States, Science Institutions. Developing Systematic Implementation Strategy to Advance EU Policy on Gender Equality in Science, as part of HORIZON 2020, European Research Area and Innovation Union.

  9. Geneva summit aims to bridge 'digital divide'

    CERN Multimedia

    Williams, F

    2003-01-01

    "With almost all the political hurdles swept aside in negotiations last weekend, the huge World Summit on the Information Society that opens in Geneva today will be clearly focused on its initial objective - boosting the use of information and communication technologies in the developing world" (1 page).

  10. Arthroscopic Talocalcaneal Coalition Resection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knörr, Jorge; Soldado, Francisco; Menendez, Mariano E; Domenech, Pedro; Sanchez, Mikel; Sales de Gauzy, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    To present the technique and outcomes of arthroscopic talocalcaneal coalition (TCC) resection in pediatric patients. We performed a prospective study of 16 consecutive feet with persistent symptomatic TCCs in 15 children. The mean age was 11.8 years (range, 8 to 15 years), and the mean follow-up period was 28 months (range, 12 to 44 months). A posterior arthroscopic TCC resection was performed. The plantar footprint, subtalar motion, pain, and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot scale score were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans were used to classify the coalition according to the Rozansky classification, to measure the percentage of involvement of the surface area, and to determine the degree of hindfoot valgus. Postoperative CT scans at 1 year (n = 15) and 3 years (n = 5) were used to assess recurrences. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated. The TCC distribution according to the Rozansky classification was type I in 7 cases, type II in 3, type III in 3, and type IV in 3. In all cases the arthroscopic approach enabled complete coalition resection. All patients increased by at least 1 stage in the footprint classification and showed clinical subtalar mobility after surgery. All patients showed a statistically significant improvement in pain after surgery except for 1 patient in whom complex regional pain syndrome developed (P < .001). The mean American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society score was 56.8 (range, 45 to 62) preoperatively versus 90.9 (range, 36 to 100) postoperatively, showing a statistically significant increase (P < .001). Preoperative CT scans showed that all TCCs involved the medial subtalar joint facet, with mean involvement of 40.8% of the articular surface. All postoperative CT scans showed complete synostosis resections with no recurrences at final follow-up. At final follow-up, all patients were either satisfied (n = 4 [27%]) or extremely satisfied (n = 10 [67

  11. Strongly Essential Coalitions and the Nucleolus of Peer Group Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Solymosi, T.; Tijs, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Most of the known efficient algorithms designed to compute the nucleolus for special classes of balanced games are based on two facts: (i) in any balanced game, the coalitions which actually determine the nucleolus are essential; and (ii) all essential coalitions in any of the games in the class

  12. Accomplishments and future suggestions of 2012 seoul nuclear security summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae San [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The second Seoul Nuclear Security Summit was held in Seoul, March 26{approx}27, 2012. It was a very big political event for nuclear security. National and International organization leaders had a time to discuss in depth issues about nuclear security; nuclear terrorism, illicit trafficking of nuclear /radiological materials, sabotages for nuclear facilities, etc. Why did many national leaders still take part in the second nuclear security summit compared to Washington summit and what is the importance of nuclear security? This paper will be the answer from those questions and handle the background, outcomes and future tasks of nuclear security summit. And suggestions for the next summits were considered in the conclusion part.

  13. Accomplishments and future suggestions of 2012 seoul nuclear security summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae San

    2012-01-01

    The second Seoul Nuclear Security Summit was held in Seoul, March 26∼27, 2012. It was a very big political event for nuclear security. National and International organization leaders had a time to discuss in depth issues about nuclear security; nuclear terrorism, illicit trafficking of nuclear /radiological materials, sabotages for nuclear facilities, etc. Why did many national leaders still take part in the second nuclear security summit compared to Washington summit and what is the importance of nuclear security? This paper will be the answer from those questions and handle the background, outcomes and future tasks of nuclear security summit. And suggestions for the next summits were considered in the conclusion part

  14. The Bigger, the Better: Coalitions in the GATT/WTO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Cepaluni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available What does it take to make a coalition successful? Bigger coalitions are more likely to be successful because the GATT/WTO is a consensus-based institution and countries are informally penalized if they isolate themselves. Through a Bayesian statistical analysis, the article corroborates the above hypothesis. To further investigate the research question, qualitative case studies of the G-10 in the Uruguay Round and the Public Health Coalition in the Doha Round are conducted. These cases show that the more convincing the framing of a position, the better are the chances of coalitions keeping a large number of followers and supporters, thereby affecting their odds of success. By building a unique database and applying a new research design to the topic, the study rigorously tests theories about coalitions that had previously only been proposed but not empirically analyzed.

  15. Gompertz' survivorship law as an intrinsic principle of aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, Arthur A.; Snieder, Harold; Korf, Jakob

    We defend the hypothesis that life-spanning population survivorship curves, as described by Gompertz' law and composed from cross-sectional data (here mortality), reflect an intrinsic aging principle active in each subject of that population. In other words Gompertz' law reflects aging of a

  16. Post-settlement survivorship in two Caribbean broadcasting corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margaret W.

    2014-12-01

    The post-settlement phase of broadcast-spawned coral life histories is poorly known due to its almost complete undetectability and, hence, presumed low abundance in the field. We used lab-cultured settled polyps of two important Caribbean reef-building species with negligible larval recruitment to quantify early post-settlement survivorship (6-9 weeks) over multiple years/cohorts and differing orientation on a reef in the Florida Keys. Orbicella faveolata showed significantly and consistently better survivorship in vertical rather than horizontal orientation, but no discernable growth overall. Meanwhile, Acropora palmata showed no significant difference in survivorship between orientations, but significantly greater growth in the horizontal orientation. Both species showed significant variation in mean survivorship between cohorts of different years; 0-47 % for O. faveolata and 12-49 % for A. palmata over the observed duration. These results demonstrate wide variation in success of cohorts and important differences in the larval recruitment capacities of these two important but imperiled reef-building species.

  17. Survivorship and functional outcomes of patellofemoral arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der List, J P; Chawla, H; Zuiderbaan, H A; Pearle, A D

    2017-08-01

    Historically poor results of survivorship and functional outcomes of patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) have been reported in the setting of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. More recently, however, fairly good results of PFA were reported, but the current status of PFA outcomes is unknown. Therefore, a systematic review was performed to assess overall PFA survivorship and functional outcomes. A search was performed using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane systems, and the registries were searched. Twenty-three cohort studies and one registry reported survivorship using Kaplan-Meier curve, while 51 cohort studies reported functional outcomes of PFA. Twelve studies were level II studies, while 45 studies were level III or IV studies. Heterogeneity was mainly seen in type of prosthesis and year the cohort started. Nine hundred revisions in 9619 PFAs were reported yielding 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-year PFA survivorships of 91.7, 83.3, 74.9 and 66.6 %, respectively, and an annual revision rate of 2.18. Functional outcomes were reported in 2587 PFAs with an overall score of 82.2 % of the maximum score. KSS and Knee Function Score were 87.5 and 81.6 %, respectively. This systematic review showed that fairly good results of PFA survivorship and functional outcomes were reported at short- and midterm follow-up in the setting of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Heterogeneity existed mainly in prosthesis design and year the cohort started. These results provide a clear overview of the current status of PFA in the setting of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis. IV.

  18. Nuclear terrorism: after the Washington summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In this note, the author comments the issues addressed by the 2016 Nuclear Safety Summit (NSS) of Washington, and the content of its final statement. He notices that the scope of addressed topics has evolved since the first summits (issues related to highly enriched uranium and to plutonium), that not only technological but also political and diplomatic issues are taken into account, and that GNOs are always more involved. The author briefly comments some aspects of the content of the final statement: threat of nuclear terrorism, improvement of nuclear safety since 2010, recall of the three main pillars of the non proliferation Treaty (non proliferation, disarmament, specific uses of nuclear energy), implementation of nuclear safety under at the own responsibility and duty of countries possessing nuclear materials. Finally, the author discusses how the NSS process will go on, and evokes remaining questions regarding the existence of an actual international constraining regime, and financial and functional issues

  19. Snow Drift Management: Summit Station Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    management Snow surveys Transport analysis Winds -- Speed 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...that about 25% of the estimated snow that the wind transports to Summit each winter is deposited and forms drifts, mostly in close proxim- ity to...the structures. This analysis demonstrates that weather data ( wind speed and direction) and a transport analysis can aid in estimating the vol- ume of

  20. Mock climate summit: teaching and assessing learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, D.; Gautier, C.; Bazerman, C.

    2003-04-01

    This paper will demonstrate the effectiveness of a Mock Climate Summit as a pedagogical approach for teaching the science and policy aspects of global climate change. The Mock Climate Summit is a student-centered course simulating the Conference of the Parties (COP) where international environmental protocols are negotiated. Compared to traditional lecture-based methods common in the geoscience classroom, the Mock Climate Summit uses negotiations and arguments to teach the interactions between these two “spheres” and demonstrate the depth and breadth of these interactions. Through a detailed assessment of students’ dialogue transcribed from video and audio tapes, we found that the nature of the student dialogue matures rapidly as they are given multiple opportunities to present, negotiate and argue a specific topic. Students’ dialogue progress from hypothetical (what-if) scenarios to action-oriented scenarios and implementation plans. The progression of the students’ dialogue shows increased comfort with the communities’ discourse as they take ownership of the point-of-view associated with their assumed roles.

  1. CERN's Tree of Science at the Summit

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The World Summit on the Information Society held its closing session at Palexpo on 12 December. During the Summit, CERN organised the SIS Forum, the Tree of Science, at Palexpo. Kofi Annan and Tim Berners-Lee, sending a message to 800 schools around the world, from the first Web server will remain one of the abiding images of the Science Stand organised by CERN as part of the World Summit on the Information Society last December. According to its designer, François Fluckiger (IT Department) this stand was not intended purely as an exhibition or as a lecture point but as a forum. Thirty-two scientific institutions throughout the world made their own contributions to the information society over the five days of the exhibition. In all, 42 science projects were exhibited to several thousand visitors under four themes: education and culture; health; environment, development and risks; fundamental sciences and enabling technologies. CERN's stand represented a tree with a trunk in the centre with scre...

  2. Towards a Formal Model of Privacy-Sensitive Dynamic Coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of dynamic coalitions (also virtual organizations describes the temporary interconnection of autonomous agents, who share information or resources in order to achieve a common goal. Through modern technologies these coalitions may form across company, organization and system borders. Therefor questions of access control and security are of vital significance for the architectures supporting these coalitions. In this paper, we present our first steps to reach a formal framework for modeling and verifying the design of privacy-sensitive dynamic coalition infrastructures and their processes. In order to do so we extend existing dynamic coalition modeling approaches with an access-control-concept, which manages access to information through policies. Furthermore we regard the processes underlying these coalitions and present first works in formalizing these processes. As a result of the present paper we illustrate the usefulness of the Abstract State Machine (ASM method for this task. We demonstrate a formal treatment of privacy-sensitive dynamic coalitions by two example ASMs which model certain access control situations. A logical consideration of these ASMs can lead to a better understanding and a verification of the ASMs according to the aspired specification.

  3. Introduction to linear programming: Coalitional game experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, W.

    1994-12-31

    Many solution notions in the multiperson cooperative games (in characteristic function form) make use of linear programming (LP). The popular concept of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} of a coalitional game is a special type of LP. It can be introduced in a very simple and quite exciting manner by means of a group experiment. A total of fifty dollars will be given to three randomly selected attendees who will take part in an experiment during this talk, presuming they behave in a Pareto optimal manner. Furthermore, the dual of the particular LP for the core gives rise to the idea of {open_quotes}balanced sets{close_quotes} which is an interesting combinatorial structure in its own right.

  4. The Influence of Community Context on How Coalitions Achieve HIV-Preventive Structural Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2014-01-01

    Community coalition action theory (CCAT) depicts the processes and factors that affect coalition formation, maintenance, institutionalization, actions, and outcomes. CCAT proposes that community context affects coalitions at every phase of development and operation. We analyzed data from 12 "Connect to Protect" coalitions using inductive…

  5. The bone scan in tarsal coalition: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lima, R.T.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Tarsal coalition is abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones. The union may be fibrous, cartilaginous, or osseous and can be congenital or acquired in response to infection, articular disorders, trauma, or surgery. We report a case of fibrous talocalcaneal coalition in a 15-year-old boy in whom bone scintigraphy employing pinhole lateral views confirmed the clinical diagnosis when plain radiographs showed minimal changes and computed tomography was equivocal. The diagnosis of symptomatic tarsal coalition is important in that it is a common remediable cause of peroneal spastic flat foot, a frequently encountered condition. Scintigraphy provides important information about the presence and localization of this condition. (orig.). With 3 figs

  6. The bone scan in tarsal coalition: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lima, R.T. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (United States); Mishkin, F.S. [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tarsal coalition is abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal bones. The union may be fibrous, cartilaginous, or osseous and can be congenital or acquired in response to infection, articular disorders, trauma, or surgery. We report a case of fibrous talocalcaneal coalition in a 15-year-old boy in whom bone scintigraphy employing pinhole lateral views confirmed the clinical diagnosis when plain radiographs showed minimal changes and computed tomography was equivocal. The diagnosis of symptomatic tarsal coalition is important in that it is a common remediable cause of peroneal spastic flat foot, a frequently encountered condition. Scintigraphy provides important information about the presence and localization of this condition. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  7. The Vermont transportation energy report : Vermont Clean Cities Coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The mission of the Vermont Clean Cities Coalition (VCCC) is to reduce the states reliance on : fossil fuels for transportation. This annual report provides policy makers with relevant and : timely data on the status of fuel consumption, vehicle pu...

  8. Air cargo in the Mid-America Freight Coalition region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report contains a contextual review of air cargo transportation in the 10-state Mid-America Freight Coalition (MAFC) region including the industrys recent history, security implications, and integration within the greater MAFC economy. The re...

  9. CADRE Quick-Look: Homeland Security-NORTHCOM's Coalition War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conway, John L

    2005-01-01

    .... Coalition warfare has many facets: it involves the blending of different cultures, multiple languages dialects, and disparate weapon systems, as well as differing perceptions of end states and how to...

  10. CFCC: A Covert Flows Confinement Mechanism for Virtual Machine Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ge; Jin, Hai; Zou, Deqing; Shi, Lei; Ohoussou, Alex K.

    Normally, virtualization technology is adopted to construct the infrastructure of cloud computing environment. Resources are managed and organized dynamically through virtual machine (VM) coalitions in accordance with the requirements of applications. Enforcing mandatory access control (MAC) on the VM coalitions will greatly improve the security of VM-based cloud computing. However, the existing MAC models lack the mechanism to confine the covert flows and are hard to eliminate the convert channels. In this paper, we propose a covert flows confinement mechanism for virtual machine coalitions (CFCC), which introduces dynamic conflicts of interest based on the activity history of VMs, each of which is attached with a label. The proposed mechanism can be used to confine the covert flows between VMs in different coalitions. We implement a prototype system, evaluate its performance, and show that our mechanism is practical.

  11. Endangered Species Case - Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page provides information on the Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA case, related to protection of Pacific salmon and steelhead, and links to the biological opinions issued by the NMFS and EPA’s responses.

  12. Dialogues on cancer survivorship: a new model of international cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kevin; Mattioli, Vittorio

    2013-06-01

    The authors describe the rationale and background of the present supplement to Cancer intended to stimulate a dialogue among researchers from Europe and North America regarding important issues faced by cancer survivors. Through jointly written articles addressing various aspects of cancer survivorship, each manuscript reports on the similarities, disparities, and problems viewed from the point of view of each author's respective continent. The supplement is meant to create a springboard for increased collaboration and aid in the development of a shared care model to improve the quality of cancer care, both during and after the completion of primary treatment. We hope that this effort may represent a new model of international cooperation, which is fruitful not only for the field of scientific research but also for identifying and sharing new approaches to the care and management of cancer survivorship issues, ultimately bringing improvements to quality of life of the growing population of cancer survivors. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  13. Supportive care after curative treatment for breast cancer (survivorship care): resource allocations in low- and middle-income countries. A Breast Health Global Initiative 2013 consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Patricia A; Yip, Cheng Har; Gralow, Julie R; Distelhorst, Sandra R; Albain, Kathy S; Andersen, Barbara L; Bevilacqua, Jose Luiz B; de Azambuja, Evandro; El Saghir, Nagi S; Kaur, Ranjit; McTiernan, Anne; Partridge, Ann H; Rowland, Julia H; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Vargo, Mary M; Thompson, Beti; Anderson, Benjamin O

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer survivors may experience long-term treatment complications, must live with the risk of cancer recurrence, and often experience psychosocial complications that require supportive care services. In low- and middle-income settings, supportive care services are frequently limited, and program development for survivorship care and long-term follow-up has not been well addressed. As part of the 5th Breast Health Global Initiative (BHGI) Global Summit, an expert panel identified nine key resources recommended for appropriate survivorship care, and developed resource-stratified recommendations to illustrate how health systems can provide supportive care services for breast cancer survivors after curative treatment, using available resources. Key recommendations include health professional education that focuses on the management of physical and psychosocial long-term treatment complications. Patient education can help survivors transition from a provider-intense cancer treatment program to a post-treatment provider partnership and self-management program, and should include: education on recognizing disease recurrence or metastases; management of treatment-related sequelae, and psychosocial complications; and the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Increasing community awareness of survivorship issues was also identified as an important part of supportive care programs. Other recommendations include screening and management of psychosocial distress; management of long-term treatment-related complications including lymphedema, fatigue, insomnia, pain, and women's health issues; and monitoring survivors for recurrences or development of second primary malignancies. Where possible, breast cancer survivors should implement healthy lifestyle modifications, including physical activity, and maintain a healthy weight. Health professionals should provide well-documented patient care records that can follow a patient as they transition from active treatment

  14. The Fiscal Politics of Big Governments: Do Coalitions Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Lambertini, Luisa; Azariadis, Costas

    2003-01-01

    This paper uses a closed voting rule to explain how gradual changes in the socio-economic structure of developed societies shift political coalitions and lead to rapid expansions of transfer programs. Equilibria in a lifecycle economy with three homogeneous groups of voters (retirees, skilled young workers, unskilled young workers) have three properties. One, if income inequality is sufficiently high, unskilled workers and retirees will form a dominant coalition which raises both intragenerat...

  15. Can state-supported interprofessional coalitions cure preceptor shortages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Lesli; Smith, Gigi; Garr, David; Hopla, Deborah; Kern, Donna

    2018-06-01

    The shortage of clinical preceptors compromises the current and future supply of healthcare providers and patient access to primary care. This article describes how an interprofessional coalition in South Carolina formed and sought government support to address the preceptor shortage. Some states have legislated preceptor tax credits and/or deductions to support the clinical education of future primary care healthcare providers. As a result of the coalition's work, a bill to establish similar incentives is pending in the South Carolina legislature.

  16. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony J. Bazzan; Andrew B. Newberg; William C. Cho; Daniel A. Monti

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health ...

  17. Coparenting and toddler's interactive styles in family coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivaz-Depeursinge, Elisabeth; Lopes, Francesco; Python, Maryline; Favez, Nicolas

    2009-12-01

    The current study examined the coparenting and toddler's interactive styles in family coalitions. According to structural family theory, boundaries between generations are clear in alliances, but disturbed in coalitions: the parents look to the child to regulate their conflictual relationship and the child attempts to meet this need. In a normative sample studied longitudinally during the Lausanne Trilogue Play situation (LTP, N=38), 15 coalition cases were detected. Styles of coparenting and of child's interactions were determined and compared in coalition and alliance cases at 18 months. Findings confirm the structural family model by showing the specific ways in which the coparenting and the toddler's interactive styles are associated in 3 different patterns of coalitions: binding, detouring, and triangulation. They illustrate how the child's triangular capacity, or her ability to simultaneously communicate with both parents, is used to regulate the parents' relationship. They suggest that the LTP observational paradigm is a promising assessment method of early family interactions. They point to the importance of assessing early the child's contribution to family coalitions.

  18. Cancer survivorship: a new challenge in comprehensive cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Lori A; Greer, Greta E; Rowland, Julia H; Miller, Andy; Doneski, Donna; Coughlin, Steven S; Stovall, Ellen; Ulman, Doug

    2005-10-01

    Cancer survivors are a growing population in the United States because of earlier cancer diagnosis, the aging of society, and more effective risk reduction and treatment. Concerns about the long-term physical, psychosocial, and economic effects of cancer treatment on cancer survivors and their families are increasingly being recognized and addressed by public, private, and non-profit organizations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how survivorship fits within the framework of comprehensive cancer control. We summarize three national reports on cancer survivorship and highlight how various organizations and programs are striving to address the needs of cancer survivors through public health planning, including the challenges these groups face and the gaps in knowledge and available services. As cancer survivorship issues are being recognized, many organizations have objectives and programs to address concerns of those diagnosed with cancer. However, better coordination and dissemination may decrease overlap and increase the reach of efforts and there is limited evidence for the effectiveness and impact of these efforts.

  19. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement…

  20. The social summit: a gender perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This editorial introduction to an issue of INSTRAW News notes that the UN has undertaken a year long series of important international conferences, starting with the September 1994 Conference on Population and Development. The second major conference is the World Summit for Social Development, and the third is the Fourth World Conference on Women. At these conferences, the international community is coming together to rescue the people whose lives have been threatened by the legacy of the Cold War: ethnic, religious, and cultural violence and exacerbation of the gap between rich and poor. Women are an integral part of the developing social agenda because women are a magnifying glass, rather than simply a mirror, of the problems of society. This issue of INSTRAW News provides a broad overview of how gender issues have evolved and the changes which occurred as a result. Specific gender issues are analyzed as they impact the three core items of the Social Summit agenda: attacking poverty, creating jobs, and building social solidarity.

  1. Sustainable development, a summit for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Johannesburg summit, which took place at the end of the summer of 2002, was the opportunity to spread out to the large public worldwide the notion of sustainable development, a notion that remained confidential so far. It was also a good opportunity to show that the share of energy resources is a vital point for the future. The institute of energy and environment of the French-speaking world has published a huge dossier which takes stock of the overall questions raised by the summit and answered by French-speaking experts. This article reprints some large extracts of two contributions devoted to the energy and its key role in the sustainable development. The first contribution deals with the four energy stakes of the sustainable development: the energy and the fight against poverty, the mastery of energy demand, the development of renewable energy sources, and the nuclear question. The second contribution treats of the five points of the action plan of the world energy council (CME) for the implementation of a durable energy policy in developing countries. (J.S.)

  2. The global summit on nurse faculty migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patricia E; Benton, David C; Adams, Elizabeth; Morin, Karen H; Barry, Jean; Prevost, Suzanne S; Vlasich, Cynthia; Oywer, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    As global demand for health care workers burgeons, information is scant regarding the migration of faculty who will train new nurses. With dual roles as clinicians and educators, and corresponding dual sets of professional and legal obligations, nurse faculty may confront unique circumstances in migration that can impact nations' ability to secure an adequate, stable nursing workforce. In a seminal effort to address these concerns, the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, and the International Council of Nurses invited a diverse group of international experts to a summit designed to elucidate forces that drive nurse faculty migration. The primary areas of consideration were the impact on nurse faculty migration of rapid health care workforce scale-up, international trade agreements, and workforce aging. Long-term summit goals included initiating action affecting national, regional, and global supplies of nurse educators and helping to avert catastrophic failure of health care delivery systems caused by an inadequate ability to educate next-generation nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management and governance processes in community health coalitions: a procedural justice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Bryan J; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2002-12-01

    Community-based coalitions are a popular strategy for promoting community health despite the fact that coalitions often fail to achieve measurable results. Using a procedural justice framework, this study seeks to advance knowledge about the relationship between coalition governance and management processes and indicators of coalition functioning. Member survey data from 25 coalitions participating in the Community Care Network Demonstration Program were analyzed using two-stage least squares regression. Results show that personal influence in decision making. decision process clarity, and collaborative conflict resolution were significantly associated with procedural fairness perceptions. Procedural fairness perceptions, in turn, were positively associated with member satisfaction with coalition decisions, but not personal engagement in the coalition or organizational integration of coalition goals and activities. Personal influence in decision making and collaborative conflict resolution also exhibited direct relationships with all three indicators of coalition functioning examined in the study.

  4. ACHP | Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit I Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Publications arrow Intro: Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit I—Report of Proceedings Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit I—Report of tourism promotes the preservation of communities' historic resources, educates tourists and local

  5. ACHP | Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit II Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search skip specific nav links Home arrow Publications arrow Intro: Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit II—Report of Proceedings Heritage Tourism and the Federal Government: Summit II—Report Heritage tourism promotes the preservation of communities' historic resources, educates tourists and local

  6. Proceedings and Presentations from the 2015 Homeland Security Education Summit

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Proceedings: 9th Annual Homeland Defense and Security Education Summit The 9th Annual Homeland Defense and Security Education Summit was held on September 25-26, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Orlando Florida. The theme of the event was Evolving Homeland Security…

  7. 2016 Personalized Learning & Student Success Summit: Summary from the NMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Media Consortium, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The New Media Consortium (NMC) hosted the Personalized Learning & Student Success Summit at SXSWedu on March 7-9 in Austin, Texas. The summit convened grantees and partners of the Postsecondary Strategy at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and served as a call-to-action for education leaders to first imagine if and then commit to trying…

  8. The Education Summit; A Different Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1996-05-01

    The last National Education Summit held by the Governors occurred in Charlottesville, Virginia in 1989. That Summit, chaired by then Governor Clinton, produced the national goals for education announced by President Bush. These top-down goals are unfulfilled and are, for all practical purposes, dead. The 1996 Education Summit seems different, although its recommendations may suffer the same fate of those of the 1989 Summit. The 1996 Education Summit was held at IBM's Executive Conference Center in Palisades, New York. The Governors invited 44 executives of major businesses from virtually every state. CEO's from IBM, AT&T, Bell South, Eastman Kodak, Procter & Gamble, and Boeing were a part of the planning committee. Absent, for the most part, were professional educators and their organizations. The constitution of the 1996 Education Summit sent a clear signal, viz., that the "professional educators," whatever their individual talents, as a group have failed the nation's public schools and now its time for someone else to try. The "someone else" is the group of individuals that are the ultimate consumers of the output of the American education system. The collective point of view of the attending CEO's is that companies have undergone radical changes to become globally competitive, now it's time to keep the work force equally competitive. And this can only come through radical changes in the educational system. The CEO's point out that the companies they represent live or die by the (international) standards they establish, some of which are expressed in the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM), which represents a systemic approach to the changes American industry had to undergo to stay competitive. The executives clearly have run out of patience with the current system of public education. Many feel that they are running out of talented people to fill the important jobs that this society will need to fill to keep it moving forward. That talent is not being

  9. An assessment of the Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition: outcomes and implications of a regional coalition internal and external assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Angela U; Heckert, Karen A; Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee; Hedson, Johnny; Tamang, Suresh; Palafox, Neal

    2011-11-01

    The Pacific Regional Cancer Coalition (PRCC) provides regional leadership in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) to implement the Regional Comprehensive Control Plan: 2007-2012, and to evaluate its coalition and partnerships. The Pacific Center of Excellence in the Elimination of Disparities (CEED), aims to reduce cancer disparities and conducts evaluation activities relevant to cancer prevention and control in the USAPI. The PRCC Self (internal) and Partner (external) Assessments were conducted to assess coalition functioning, regional and national partnerships, sustainability, and the role of regionalism for integrating all chronic disease prevention and control in the Pacific. Self-administered questionnaires and key informant telephone interviews with PRCC members (N=20), and representatives from regional and national partner organizations were administered (N=26). Validated multi item measures using 5-point scales on coalition and partnership characteristics were used. Chronbach's alphas and averages for the measures were computed. Internal coalition measures: satisfaction (4.2, SD=0.48) communication (4.0, SD=0.56), respect (4.0, SD=0.60) were rated more highly than external partnership measures: resource sharing (3.5, SD=0.74), regionalism (3.9, SD=0.47), use of findings (3.9, SD=0.50). The PRCC specifically identified its level of "collaboration" with external partners including Pacific CEED. External partners identified its partnership with the PRCC in the "coalition" stage. PRCC members and external partners are satisfied with their partnerships. All groups should continue to focus on building collaboration with partners to reflect a truly regional approach to sustain the commitment, the coalitions and the programming to reduce cancer in the USAPI. PRCC and partners should also work together to integrate all chronic disease prevention and control efforts in the Pacific.

  10. Coalition Formation and Spectrum Sharing of Cooperative Spectrum Sensing Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhensheng Jiang; Wei Yuan; Leung, Henry; Xinge You; Qi Zheng

    2017-05-01

    In cognitive radio networks, self-interested secondary users (SUs) desire to maximize their own throughput. They compete with each other for transmit time once the absence of primary users (PUs) is detected. To satisfy the requirement of PU protection, on the other hand, they have to form some coalitions and cooperate to conduct spectrum sensing. Such dilemma of SUs between competition and cooperation motivates us to study two interesting issues: 1) how to appropriately form some coalitions for cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS) and 2) how to share transmit time among SUs. We jointly consider these two issues, and propose a noncooperative game model with 2-D strategies. The first dimension determines coalition formation, and the second indicates transmit time allocation. Considering the complexity of solving this game, we decompose the game into two more tractable ones: one deals with the formation of CSS coalitions, and the other focuses on the allocation of transmit time. We characterize the Nash equilibria (NEs) of both games, and show that the combination of these two NEs corresponds to the NE of the original game. We also develop a distributed algorithm to achieve a desirable NE of the original game. When this NE is achieved, the SUs obtain a Dhp-stable coalition structure and a fair transmit time allocation. Numerical results verify our analyses, and demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm.

  11. Rivalry of Advocacy Coalitions in the Czech Pension Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potůček Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic, as many other countries of Central and Eastern Europe, faced and is still facing a pension-reform challenge. The diversification of pension pillars led to the massive displacements of participant contributions from the public PAYG pension pillars to the newly constructed private, defined-contribution, fully-funded pillars. In the Czech Republic, the adoption of the relevant law was preceded by serious political conflict between supporters and opponents of this step (both among different political actors and among professionals. In an analysis of the conflict we critically apply the Advocacy Coalition Framework. We work mainly with the analysis of policy documents, public statements of the individual actors and an analysis of voting on the relevant law in both chambers of the Czech Parliament towards the identification of the crystallization process of two clear-cut coalitions between actors from both sides of the spectrum. The Advocacy Coalition Framework in exploring the dynamics of the public-policy process proved to be able to explain situations where there is sharp political conflict. Through the lens of the devil-shift of both camps (advocacy coalitions with different beliefs, each fell into extreme positions within the coalition to affirm the correctness of their arguments and positions.

  12. Nuclear Power Plant Performance: Ascending The Summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T. M.

    1986-01-01

    When we look back over the years and consider the progress we have made in improving nuclear plant performance, I'm sure that many of you must feel the same mixture of elation and apprehension the mountain climber feels when he finally confronts his summit. In the curse of the last 10 years, many of US have watched availability averages rise from 50% to 60%, to 65% -- and recently, to 70%, 80% and beyond. Yet, as impressive an accomplishment as that is, there comes, I think, a growing realization that the steady increases we have achieved up to now may, in fact, have been the easy part of the journey, the trek from base camp -- and that within a very small handful of years, we may find ourselves pushing plant performance right to the limit, only to discover that it is pushing back

  13. Building successful coalitions for promoting advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Lucille; Fowler, Kathryn J; Kokanovic, Obrad

    2006-01-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) has had few successful initiatives. This qualitative study explores the challenges and successes of an advance care planning coalition in Wisconsin called Life Planning 2000 using key informant interviews (n = 24) and grounded theory. Major themes included: commitment (the need for leadership, recruitment of key members, and funding); cohesiveness (disparate groups collaborating toward a common purpose), and outcomes (shift in paradigm from signing documents to process of advanced care planning, new-found collaborative relationships, and educational tool development). Coalitions need to define short-, intermediate-, and long-term goals that result in measurable outcomes and an evaluation process. Resources must be commensurate with goals. Strong leadership, paid staff adequate funding, and the collaboration of diverse groups working toward common goals are the basic requirements of a successful coalition.

  14. United we stand : Corporate Monitoring by Shareholder Coalitions in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespi, R.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates whether voting coalitions are formed by shareholders in order to discipline incumbent management. Shapley values capturing the relative power of shareholder coalitions by category of owner, outperform models with percentage ownership stakes and models measuring the relative

  15. 78 FR 69660 - Association of Businesses Advocating Tariff Equity, Coalition of Miso Transmission Customers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... Businesses Advocating Tariff Equity, Coalition of Miso Transmission Customers, Illinois Industrial Energy... LLC, Duke Energy Business Services, LLC, Entergy Arkansas, Inc., Entergy Gulf States Louisiana, LLC....206 (2013), Association of Businesses Advocating Tariff Equity, Coalition of Miso Transmission...

  16. Colorectal cancer patients' preferences for type of caregiver during survivorship care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieldraaijer, T.; Duineveld, L. A. M.; Donkervoort, S. C.; Busschers, W. B.; van Weert, H. C. P. M.; Wind, J.

    2018-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors are currently included in a secondary care-led survivorship care programme. Efforts are underway to transfer this survivorship care to primary care, but met with some reluctance by patients and caregivers. This study assesses (1) what caregiver patients prefer to

  17. A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Challenges Facing Comparative Cancer Survivorship Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syse, A.; Syse, A.; Geller, B.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer survivorship research includes the study of physical, psychosocial, and economic consequences of cancer diagnosis and treatment among pediatric and adult cancer survivors. Historically, the majority of cancer survivorship studies were from the United States, but survivorship issues are increasingly being addressed in other developed countries. Cross-cultural studies remain, however, scarce. The degree to which knowledge attained may or may not be transferred across cultures, countries, or regions is not known. Some important challenges for comparative research are therefore discussed in a cross-cultural perspective. Several substantive and methodological challenges that complicate the execution of cross-cultural cancer survivorship research are presented with examples and discussed to facilitate comparative research efforts in the establishment of new survivorship cohorts and in the planning and implementation of survivorship studies. Comparative research is one key to understanding the nature of cancer survivorship, distinguishing modifiable from non modifiable factors at individual, hospital, societal, and system levels and may thus guide appropriate interventions. Lastly, suggested future courses of action within the field of comparative cancer survivorship research are provided.

  18. Cancer survivorship: Advancing the concept in the context of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Amanda; Payne, Sheila; Brady, Anne-Marie

    2017-08-01

    Previous conceptualizations of cancer survivorship have focused on heterogeneous cancer survivors, with little consideration of the validity of conclusions for homogeneous tumour groups. This paper aims to examine the concept of cancer survivorship in the context of colorectal cancer (CRC). Rodgers' (1989) Evolutionary Method of Concept Analysis guided this study. A systematic search of PUBMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library was conducted in November 2016 to identify studies of CRC survivorship. The Braun and Clarke (2006) framework guided the analysis and interpretation of data extracted from eighty-five publications. Similar to general populations of cancer survivors, CRC survivors experience survivorship as an individual, life-changing process, punctuated by uncertainty and a duality of positive and negative outcomes affecting quality of life. However, CRC survivors experience specific concerns arising from the management of their disease. The concept of cancer survivorship has evolved over the past decade as the importance of navigating the healthcare system and its resources, and the constellation of met and unmet needs of cancer survivors are realised. The results highlight core similarities between survivorship in the context of CRC and other tumour groups, but underlines issues specific to CRC survivorship. Communication and support are key issues in survivorship care which may detrimentally affect CRC survivors' well-being if they are inadequately addressed. Healthcare professionals (HCP's) therefore have a duty to ensure cancer survivors' health, information and supportive care needs are met in the aftermath of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Winter Camp: A Blog from the Greenland Summit, Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lora

    2009-01-01

    An earlier issue presents the first half of the author's experience living and working at the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Greenland Summit Camp. The author is a remote-sensing glaciologist at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. She took measurements that will be used to validate data collected by NASA s Aqua, Terra, and Ice, Clouds, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) satellites with ground-truth measurements of the Greenland Ice Sheet she made at Summit Camp from November 2008-February 2009. This article presents excerpts from the second half of her stay and work at the Greenland Summit.

  20. Proceedings Report from the Sustainability Education Summit, September 20-21, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The first-ever U. S. Department of Education summit on sustainability, "Sustainability Education Summit: Citizenship and Pathways for a Green Economy," was held on Sept. 20-21, 2010, in Washington, D.C. The Sustainability Education Summit (the Summit) brought together leaders from higher education, business and industry, labor,…

  1. A coalition formation game for transmitter cooperation in OFDMA uplink communications

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali; Tembine, Hamidou; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2014-01-01

    the nodes is modelled using coalitional game theory. In this game, each coalition tries to maximize its utility in terms of rate. In the absence of cooperation cost, it can be shown that the grand coalition is sum-rate optimal and stable, i.e., the mobile

  2. Using a predictive model of clinician intention to improve continuing health professional education on cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buriak, S E; Potter, J; Bleckley, M Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivorship is a chronic disease that places patients in limbo between oncologists and primary care clinicians. Strategies have been proposed to ease the shift in coordination of care, including broad-based educational outreach to primary care providers. Guided by the theory of planned behavior (TPB), predictors of intention to provide survivorship care, including credentials, experience, perception of barriers, and personal survivorship status, were evaluated using logistic regression with a cohort of physicians, nurse practitioners, and registered nurses participating in an unprecedented online continuing medical education/continuing education survivorship care course. Results showed that physicians were significantly less likely to express intent to provide survivorship care (odds ratio [OR] = .237, p = .0001) compared to the other groups. Overall, clinicians with 6-10 years of experience were 3 times more likely to express intent to provide survivorship care (OR = 2.86, p = .045) than those with less or more experience. When clinicians perceived the presence of a barrier, they were nearly twice as likely to have diminished intent (OR = 1.89, p = .035). Most participants (66%; n = 1185) selected two barriers: lack of survivorship care plans and treatment summaries (45.4%; n = 821) and lack of education (20.1%; n = 364). Barriers to the delivery of survivorship care can influence clinicians' intention to provide survivorship care, which varied by years of experience in this study. Interdisciplinary educational strategies featuring midcareer provider champions who have successfully incorporated survivorship care and can offer specific solutions to these barriers are recommended for future interventions. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  3. Port Stakeholder Summit: Advancing More Sustainable Ports (April 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's National Port Stakeholders Summit, Advancing More Sustainable Ports, focused on actions to protect air quality while reducing climate risk and supporting economic growth, making ports more environmentally sustainable.

  4. Report of the DHS National Small Vessel Security Summit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brownstein, Charles; Baker, John; Hull, Peter; Minogue, Nicholas; Murphy, George; Winston, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the National Small Vessel Security Summit (NSVSS) was to engage private, commercial and government stakeholders in discussions on a range of issues involving the security risks posed by small vessels in the U.S...

  5. Hospital-Based Coalition to Improve Regional Surge Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Learning

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surge capacity for optimization of access to hospital beds is a limiting factor in response to catastrophic events. Medical facilities, communication tools, manpower, and resource reserves exist to respond to these events. However, these factors may not be optimally functioning to generate an effective and efficient surge response. The objective was to improve the function of these factors.Methods: Regional healthcare facilities and supporting local emergency response agencies developed a coalition (the Healthcare Facilities Partnership of South Central Pennsylvania; HCFP¬SCPA to increase regional surge capacity and emergency preparedness for healthcare facilities. The coalition focused on 6 objectives: (1 increase awareness of capabilities and assets, (2 develop and pilot test advanced planning and exercising of plans in the region, (3 augment written medical mutual aid agreements, (4 develop and strengthen partnership relationships, (5 ensure National Incident Management System compliance, and (6 develop and test a plan for effective utilization of volunteer healthcare professionals.Results: In comparison to baseline measurements, the coalition improved existing areas covered under all 6 objectives documented during a 24-month evaluation period. Enhanced communications between the hospital coalition, and real-time exercises, were used to provide evidence of improved preparedness for putative mass casualty incidents.Conclusion: The HCFP-SCPA successfully increased preparedness and surge capacity through a partnership of regional healthcare facilities and emergency response agencies.

  6. Sustaining Physics Teacher Education Coalition Programs in Physics Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Plisch, Monica; Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of increasing the number of physics teachers educated per year at institutions with thriving physics teacher preparation programs may inspire and support other institutions in building thriving programs of their own. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society (APS) and the…

  7. Vocational Home Economics Education. Coalition Statement. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Economics Education Association, Gainesville, VA.

    This pamphlet contains the statement of the Coalition of the American Home Economics Association, American Vocational Association, and Home Economics Education Association regarding the scope and definition of vocational home economics education. It is intended to serve as a basis for professional action. Sections of this statement address the…

  8. Posteromedial subtalar coalition: imaging appearances in three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To define the imaging appearances in three cases of posteromedial subtalar coalition.Design. Three patients who presented with hindfoot pain were found to have non-osseous coalition involving the posteromedial hindfoot. This entity is distinct from conventional middle facet coalition as the sustentaculum is uninvolved.Results. Plain radiographs, available in two cases, demonstrated subtle irregularity of the posterior facet. MRI (three cases) demonstrated a mixed bony and cartilaginous mass lying posterior to the sustentaculum. There was trabecular oedema within the mass and adjacent talus, and narrowing of the space between the middle and posterior facets. Prominence and dilatation of the posterior tibial veins with tenosynovitis of the adjacent tibialis posterior tendon was seen. CT demonstrated the bony mass but did not detect the adjacent bony oedema.Conclusion. Posteromedial subtalar coalition may present with hindfoot pain and stiffness. The presence of a pseudarthrosis posterior to a normal middle facet is characteristic. The abnormality can be difficult to detect on plain radiographs. (orig.)

  9. Posteromedial subtalar coalition: imaging appearances in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.G. [Dept. of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To define the imaging appearances in three cases of posteromedial subtalar coalition.Design. Three patients who presented with hindfoot pain were found to have non-osseous coalition involving the posteromedial hindfoot. This entity is distinct from conventional middle facet coalition as the sustentaculum is uninvolved.Results. Plain radiographs, available in two cases, demonstrated subtle irregularity of the posterior facet. MRI (three cases) demonstrated a mixed bony and cartilaginous mass lying posterior to the sustentaculum. There was trabecular oedema within the mass and adjacent talus, and narrowing of the space between the middle and posterior facets. Prominence and dilatation of the posterior tibial veins with tenosynovitis of the adjacent tibialis posterior tendon was seen. CT demonstrated the bony mass but did not detect the adjacent bony oedema.Conclusion. Posteromedial subtalar coalition may present with hindfoot pain and stiffness. The presence of a pseudarthrosis posterior to a normal middle facet is characteristic. The abnormality can be difficult to detect on plain radiographs. (orig.)

  10. An alternative model of the formation of political coalitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Rijt, J.W.

    Most models of the formation of political coalitions use either Euclidean spaces or rely purely on game theory. This limits their applicability. In this article, a single model is presented which is more broadly applicable. In principle any kind of set can be used as a policy space. The model is

  11. Values for graph-restricted games with coalition structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna

    We consider a new model for TU games with both coalition and cooperation structures that applies to different network situations, in particular, to sharing an international river with multiple users without international firms. Our approach to the value for such a game is close to that of Myerson

  12. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4 Section 1370.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES...

  13. Toward Community Research and Coalitional Literacy Practices for Educational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Yee, Mary; Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Community-based research can provide an avenue for understanding the complexities of students' and families' lives and working together for educational justice through what we refer to as coalitional literacy practices. In this article, we share a critical incident about a student's absence from school as an illustrative case of the grass-roots…

  14. Challenge and threat responses to anger communication in coalition formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, I.; Scheepers, D.

    2013-01-01

    Research on multiparty negotiation has investigated how parties form coalitions to secure payoffs but has not assessed the underlying self-regulatory and physiological principles. Integrating insights from research on the social functions of emotions and the bio-psychosocial model as proposed by

  15. Examining Capacity and Functioning of Bicycle Coalitions: A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bopp

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBicycle coalitions represent a strong partner in creating bike-friendly communities through advocacy for physical infrastructure, encouragement for biking, or education about safety. Despite their versatility, little is known about their functioning. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine capacity, strengths, and weaknesses of these organizations.MethodsBicycle coalitions/advocacy groups from English-speaking countries were recruited to take part in an online survey via email invitation. The survey addressed basic information about the coalition (community demographics, location, leadership, communication strategies, coalition priorities, barriers to programming/activities, and partners.ResultsCoalitions (n = 56 from four countries completed the survey. Most coalitions operated as a non-profit (n = 44, 95.7%, 45% (n = 21 have paid staff as leaders, while 37% (n = 17 have volunteers as leaders. The following skills were represented in coalitions’ leadership: fundraising (n = 31, 53.4%, event planning (n = 31, 53.4%, urban planning (n = 26, 44%, and policy/legislation expertise (n = 26, 44.8%. Education (n = 26, 63.4% and encouragement (n = 25, 61.6% were viewed as top priorities and the safety of bicyclists (n = 21, 46.7% and advocacy for infrastructure and policy (n = 22, 48.9% is the focus of most activities. A lack of financial resources (n = 36, 81.8% and capable personnel (n = 25, 56.8% were significant barriers to offering programming in the community and that the availability of grants to address issues (n = 38, 86.4% would be the top motivator for improvements.ConclusionBike coalitions represent a critical partner in creating activity-friendly environments and understanding their capacity allows for creating skill/capacity building intervention programs, development of effective toolkits and fostering strong collaborations to address physical inactivity.

  16. G8 SUMMIT MEETING AT EVIAN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Swiss and French authorities have informed CERN that plans are in hand for the safety and traffic arrangements associated with the G8 Summit Meeting, which will be held in Evian between 1 and 3 June 2003. Detailed information will be communicated in the coming weeks. However, changes to traffic arrangements on certain sections of the road network in the Canton of Geneva (particularly the left bank) and the neighbouring parts of France (specially Haute-Savoie) from 22 May 2003 can already be predicted. All pertinent information and any recommendations by the authorities concerned will be brought to the attention of the personnel as soon as possible. In the mean time, those concerned can consult the various Web sites devoted to this event, especially: - http://www.g8.fr/evian/english/home.html (French site); - http://www.g8info.ch/accueil.htm (Swiss site). Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ Tel. 72848

  17. Canada's green plan and the earth summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In June 1992 one of the largest international conferences ever held took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It was attended by the heads of state of more than 100 countries. The ambitious aim of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) -- the Earth Summit -- was to try to reconcile the need for global environmental protection with the need for continuing economic development. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief account of the results of Rio and the way Canadians participated. In addition, this document outlines the immediate priorities of the Government of Canada and the actions under way. It is not meant to be a comprehensive response to the entire Rio agenda. Rather, it is intended to report to Canadians on the steps the government has taken so far and, where possible, the direction in which it is headed. On the number of important issues, the government's plans are well advanced. For example, action is well under way on the Convention on Climate Change, as high-lighted in the Green Plan's National Action Strategy on Global Warming. On a number of other issues, it is clear that there is work to be done. The government is committed to completing the task through continuing action and leadership

  18. Coalition Building for Health: A Community Garden Pilot Project with Apartment Dwelling Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Lynne K; Blood-Siegfried, Jane; Champagne, Mary; Al-Jumaily, Maha; Biederman, Donna J

    2015-01-01

    Refugees often experience compromised health from both pre- and post-migration stressors. Coalition theory has helped guide the development of targeted programs to address the health care needs of vulnerable populations. Using the Community Coalition Action Theory as a framework, a coalition was formed to implement a community garden with apartment-dwelling refugees. Outcomes included successful coalition formation, a community garden, reported satisfaction from all gardeners with increased vegetable intake, access to culturally meaningful foods, and evidence of increased community engagement. The opportunity for community health nurses to convene a coalition to affect positive health for refugees is demonstrated.

  19. Clean air renewable energy (CARE) coalition : a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, G. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Pollock, D. [Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This paper highlights the opportunity for new partnerships between business and non-governmental organizations in the field of sustainable development through the growing convergence of interests. The authors also briefly describe both Suncor Energy and the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development stances on sustainable development. Since 1990, both organizations have collaborated on the future of the emerging renewable energy industry. Renewable energy represents an energy source diversification through the regional creation of jobs and improved air quality and associated benefits resulting from the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Air Renewable Energy Coalition (Coalition) was established in December 2000 in order to assess the barriers to capital investment in the renewable energy industry. It was revealed that the international community as a whole was further ahead than Canada in terms of renewable support, production and export of technology and services. Some of the challenges facing the industry are: low demand for renewables and low supply. The coalition allowed for the joint identification of desired policy changes, such as new tax incentives for renewable energy supply and demand. Efforts were made in inviting the support of industry, municipalities and environmental non governmental organizations. The list of members that have joined the coalition to date was shown. The coalition is asking for consumer green energy credit, designed for the creation of demand and the education of the general public, and producer incentives to increase supply. The proposals were explained, as well as the strategic principles underlying them. A new tax incentive was announced in the December 2001 Canadian federal budget. The authors concluded by mentioning some future opportunities and the lessons learned on the importance of the right partners, of broad-based advocacy, of targeted and focuses messages, and of evolutionary change.

  20. Clean air renewable energy (CARE) coalition : a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, G.; Pollock, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper highlights the opportunity for new partnerships between business and non-governmental organizations in the field of sustainable development through the growing convergence of interests. The authors also briefly describe both Suncor Energy and the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development stances on sustainable development. Since 1990, both organizations have collaborated on the future of the emerging renewable energy industry. Renewable energy represents an energy source diversification through the regional creation of jobs and improved air quality and associated benefits resulting from the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Air Renewable Energy Coalition (Coalition) was established in December 2000 in order to assess the barriers to capital investment in the renewable energy industry. It was revealed that the international community as a whole was further ahead than Canada in terms of renewable support, production and export of technology and services. Some of the challenges facing the industry are: low demand for renewables and low supply. The coalition allowed for the joint identification of desired policy changes, such as new tax incentives for renewable energy supply and demand. Efforts were made in inviting the support of industry, municipalities and environmental non governmental organizations. The list of members that have joined the coalition to date was shown. The coalition is asking for consumer green energy credit, designed for the creation of demand and the education of the general public, and producer incentives to increase supply. The proposals were explained, as well as the strategic principles underlying them. A new tax incentive was announced in the December 2001 Canadian federal budget. The authors concluded by mentioning some future opportunities and the lessons learned on the importance of the right partners, of broad-based advocacy, of targeted and focuses messages, and of evolutionary change

  1. Cancer Supportive and Survivorship Care in Singapore: Current Challenges and Future Outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiley Wei-Jen Loh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a relatively young nation, Singapore has established itself as a leading multifaceted medical hub, both regionally and globally. Although Singapore continues to pursue excellence in oncology care, cancer supportive care and survivorship care remain in the infancy stage. In an effort to advance this important aspect of oncology care in Singapore, the first cancer supportive and survivorship care forum was held in December 2016, involving 74 oncology practitioners. The primary goals of this forum were to raise awareness of the importance of cancer supportive and survivorship care and to provide a platform for oncology practitioners of diverse backgrounds to converge and address the challenges associated with the delivery of cancer supportive and survivorship care in Singapore. Key challenges identified during this forum included, but were not limited to, care fragmentation in an oncologist-centric model of care, poor integration of allied health and rehabilitation services, passive engagement of community partners, lack of specialized skill sets and knowledge in supportive and survivorship care, and patient-related barriers such as poor health literacy. The survivorship care model commonly used in Singapore places an imbalanced emphasis on surveillance for cancer recurrence and second primary cancers, with little attention given to the supportive and survivorship needs of the survivors. In summary, these challenges set the stage for the development and use of a more survivor-centric model, one that focuses not only on cancer surveillance, but also on the broad and unique physical and psychosocial needs of survivors of cancer in Singapore.

  2. Coincidence of role expectations between staff and volunteer members of drug free community coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marc B; Sapere, Heather; Daviau, John

    2017-08-01

    Community coalitions have proliferated as a means of addressing a range of complex community problems. Such coalitions often consist of a small paid staff and volunteer members. The present study examines one likely contributor to coalition effectiveness: the degree of agreement on role expectations between paid staff and volunteer members. Role confusion occurs when paid staff and volunteers differ in their expectations of who is responsible for accomplishing specific tasks. Staff and volunteer members from 69 randomly selected Drug Free Coalitions in the United States as well as 21 Drug Free Coalitions in Connecticut were asked to respond to an online survey asking about 37 specific coalition tasks critical for effective coalition functioning and the degree to which paid staff and/or voluntary members should be responsible for accomplishing each. Our final sample consisted of 476 individuals from 35 coalitions. Using coalitions as the unit of analysis, we found significant differences between paid staff and volunteer coalition members on nine tasks reflecting four domains: meeting leadership and participation, (2) planning and implementation leadership, (3) publicity/media relations, and (4) logistical functions. Implications of these differences and ways that evaluators could help coalitions deal with differing role expectations were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Occupational Therapy's Role in Cancer Survivorship as a Chronic Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Mary Frances; Newman, Robin; Longpré, Sheila M; Polo, Katie M

    Improved medical care has resulted in a documented increase in cancer survivors in the United States. Cancer survivors face challenges in participation across all facets of life as a result of the cancer and subsequent cancer treatments. Long-term and late-term sequelae can result in impairments in neurological systems, decreased stamina, loss of range of motion, and changes in sensation and cognition. These impairments are often long lasting, which categorizes cancer survivorship as a chronic condition. This categorization presents treatment challenges, especially in creating rehabilitation and habilitation service options that support cancer survivors. Occupational therapy provides a unique focus that can benefit cancer survivors as they face limitations in participation in all aspects of daily living. Research, advocacy, and education efforts are needed to focus on the specific rehabilitation and habilitation needs of cancer survivors to increase access to occupational therapy's distinct value. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. Multivariate survivorship analysis using two cross-sectional samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M E

    1999-11-01

    As an alternative to survival analysis with longitudinal data, I introduce a method that can be applied when one observes the same cohort in two cross-sectional samples collected at different points in time. The method allows for the estimation of log-probability survivorship models that estimate the influence of multiple time-invariant factors on survival over a time interval separating two samples. This approach can be used whenever the survival process can be adequately conceptualized as an irreversible single-decrement process (e.g., mortality, the transition to first marriage among a cohort of never-married individuals). Using data from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (Ruggles and Sobek 1997), I illustrate the multivariate method through an investigation of the effects of race, parity, and educational attainment on the survival of older women in the United States.

  5. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

  6. Developing and maintaining state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlek, J B; Galano, J

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions. Key informants in five states throughout the southern United States were given semi-structured interviews regarding the adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions in their states. From these interviews and other documents, conclusions were drawn regarding the nature and importance of the environments within which these coalitions operate, the universe of activities in which coalitions engage, and the stages of development of these coalitions. Katz and Kahn's model of social organizations served as the basis for understanding coalitions in terms of these three considerations. Future research should consider the utility of organizational models that can explain more fully the organization--committee hybrid structure that tends to characterize these coalitions.

  7. Long-term survivorship of stemless anatomical shoulder replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sascha; Beck, Verena; Wegner, Alexander; Dudda, Marcel; Patsalis, Theodor; Jäger, Marcus

    2018-01-24

    Like in many other joints, current shoulder replacement designs aim at bone preservation. According to the literature available, stemless total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) compares favourably with stemmed designs in terms of function and survivorship of the implant. However, long-term results of stemless shoulder arthroplasty are still missing. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate long-term results of stemless anatomical TSA. Between 2006 and 2009, 51 shoulders in 46 patients were resurfaced using the Biomet Total Evolutive Shoulder System (TESS). Thirty-one shoulders in 26 patients who were aged 66.7 ± 10.0 (range 34-82) years were available for review at a mean follow-up of 94.7 ± 11.3 (76-124) months. The implant survival rate was 93.5% at eight years. The overall revision rate of the TESS implant was 9.7%. Radiolucent lines were found on the glenoid side of the TESS arthroplasty in 90.9% of the cases. All stemless humeral corolla implants showed solid fixation at follow-up. Clinical scores significantly improved at long-term follow-up (VAS from 8.1 ± 0.9 to 1.0 ± 1.2, p < 0.001; Quick-DASH from 67.9 ± 13.5 to 18.7 ± 16.5, p < 0.001 and Constant score from 14.7 ± 6.1 to 68.8 ± 13.2, p < 0.001). Stemless TSA has stood the test of time at eight years in terms of clinical scores, radiographic loosening, complication rates and implant survivorship.

  8. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  9. Intercell scheduling: A negotiation approach using multi-agent coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yunna; Li, Dongni; Zheng, Dan; Jia, Yunde

    2016-10-01

    Intercell scheduling problems arise as a result of intercell transfers in cellular manufacturing systems. Flexible intercell routes are considered in this article, and a coalition-based scheduling (CBS) approach using distributed multi-agent negotiation is developed. Taking advantage of the extended vision of the coalition agents, the global optimization is improved and the communication cost is reduced. The objective of the addressed problem is to minimize mean tardiness. Computational results show that, compared with the widely used combinatorial rules, CBS provides better performance not only in minimizing the objective, i.e. mean tardiness, but also in minimizing auxiliary measures such as maximum completion time, mean flow time and the ratio of tardy parts. Moreover, CBS is better than the existing intercell scheduling approach for the same problem with respect to the solution quality and computational costs.

  10. Overlapping coalition formation games in wireless communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tianyu; Saad, Walid; Han, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    This brief introduces overlapping coalition formation games (OCF games), a novel mathematical framework from cooperative game theory that can be used to model, design and analyze cooperative scenarios in future wireless communication networks. The concepts of OCF games are explained, and several algorithmic aspects are studied. In addition, several major application scenarios are discussed. These applications are drawn from a variety of fields that include radio resource allocation in dense wireless networks, cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio networks, and resource management for crowd sourcing. For each application, the use of OCF games is discussed in detail in order to show how this framework can be used to solve relevant wireless networking problems. Overlapping Coalition Formation Games in Wireless Communication Networks provides researchers, students and practitioners with a concise overview of existing works in this emerging area, exploring the relevant fundamental theories, key techniqu...

  11. Coalition Logistics: A Case Study in Operation Restore Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-03

    prerequisites forbid the intake of certain foods include Israel (no pork, Kosher prepared), Muslim nations (no pork, Halal prepared), and Hindu nations (no beef...communications. The critical life support supplies, such as food , water, and medicine, were pushed into the theater along with the transportation and...dictates a common sense burden-sharing philosophy.ś In a coalition operation, countries share common resources such as food , water, blood, transportation

  12. Career advancement opportunities and the ACVP/STP Coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockerell, Gary

    2014-07-01

    A new service to facilitate career advancement opportunities has been implemented by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists (ACVP)/Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) Coalition for Veterinary Pathology Fellows. This service will allow rapid communication of these opportunities between veterinary pathologists in academia, industry, and government, and will be useful to trainees as well as established pathologists. © 2014 by The Author(s).

  13. Modal extensions of Lukasiewicz logic for modelling coalitional power

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Teheux, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2017), s. 129-154 ISSN 0955-792X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/12/1309 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Coalition Logic * Lukasiewicz modal logic * effectivity function Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.909, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/kroupa-0471671.pdf

  14. Sustaining Physics Teacher Education Coalition programs in physics teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel E. Scherr; Monica Plisch; Renee Michelle Goertzen

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of increasing the number of physics teachers educated per year at institutions with thriving physics teacher preparation programs may inspire and support other institutions in building thriving programs of their own. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT), has supported transformation of physics teacher preparation programs at a number of institutions aro...

  15. Core of Coalition Games on MV-algebras

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2011), s. 479-492 ISSN 0955-792X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : coalition game * core * MV-algebra Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.611, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/MTR/kroupa-0359839.pdf

  16. Cyborg Dreams in Asian American Transnationality: Transgression, Myth, Simulation, Coalition

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Mary

    2012-01-01

    By deploying a cyberculture theory of cyborg politics in my literary analyses of Asian American literature, I deconstruct Asian American subjectivity through the trope of transnationality. In the Asian American transnational, I locate four prominent traits of Donna Haraway's socialist feminist cyborg: boundary transgression, the recognition and re-scripting of myth, simulations of identity, and coalitions of affinity. By adopting the language of cyberculture, I envision Asian American literat...

  17. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Advocates Coalition for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le financement contribuera à renforcer le rôle de l'Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE) en tant qu'organisme crédible de recherche sur les politiques publiques en Ouganda, en améliorant sa capacité à fournir des recherches de qualité supérieure, influentes et utiles en matière de politiques.

  18. The state of survivorship care in radiation oncology: Results from a nationally distributed survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melissa A; Rosenthal, Seth A; Vapiwala, Neha; Monzon, Brian T; Berman, Abigail T

    2018-04-18

    Survivorship care has become an increasingly critical component of oncologic care as well as a quality practice and reimbursement metric. To the authors' knowledge, the current climate of survivorship medicine in radiation oncology has not been investigated fully. An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based survey examining practices and preparedness in survivorship care was distributed to radiation oncology practices participating in the American College of Radiology Radiation Oncology Practice Accreditation program between November 2016 and January 2017. A total of 78 surveys were completed. Among these, 2 were nonphysicians, resulting in 76 evaluable responses. Radiation oncologists (ROs) frequently reported that they are the primary provider in the evaluation of late toxicities and the recurrence of primary cancer. Although approximately 68% of ROs frequently discuss plans for future care with survivors, few provide a written survivorship care plan to their patients (18%) or the patients' primary care providers (24%). Patient prognosis, disease site, and reimbursement factors often influence the provision of survivorship care. Although ROs report that several platforms offer training in survivorship medicine, the quality of these resources is variable and extensive instruction is rare. Fewer than one-half of ROs believe they are expertly trained in survivorship care. ROs play an active role within the multidisciplinary team in the cancer-related follow-up care of survivors. Investigation of barriers to the provision of survivorship care and optimization of service delivery should be pursued further. The development of high-quality, easily accessible educational programming is needed so that ROs can participate more effectively in the care of cancer survivors. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  19. People, poverty and the Earth Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J

    1992-01-01

    UNCED is about human beings managing their affairs so that all can achieve a reasonably good life without destroying the life-supporting environment. Currently human activities are approaching an upset of environmental balance through production of greenhouse gases, depletion of the ozone layer, and reduction of natural resources. Equity is the right to a decent life for the current human population of 5.5 billion and the future 10 billion expected within the next 50 years. A minimum use of environmental space/person is required. The Earth Summit will be a broad statement of environmental policy. Agenda 21 includes 115 action programs within 40 chapters. Separate conventions will be held on climate and biodiversity. The secretariat of UNCED has been working primarily with Agenda 21. Population issues are emphasized in Chapter 5 ("Demographic Dynamics and Sustainability") of the first section in Agenda 21 on Social and Economic Dimensions. The program areas include 1) research on the links between population, the environment, and development; 2) formulation by governments of integrated national policies on environment and development, which account for demographic trends, and promotion of population literacy; and 3) implementation of local level programs to ensure access to education and information and services in order to plan families freely and responsibly. Increases in funding for the population program are anticipated to be US $9 billion by the year 2000 and about US $7 billion/year until then. The year 2000 will bring with it a doubling of urban population in developing countries. There are challenges and opportunities to expand private sector job creation, education, clean water, and family health services. In addition to managing human settlements, there is also management of fragile ecosystems, which means relieving the pressure on these lands through urban migration or relocation to richer agricultural areas. The goal for agriculture is to triple food

  20. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N. [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rossi, Ignacio [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  1. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rossi, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  2. The regenerative medicine coalition. Interview with Frank-Roman Lauter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, Frank-Roman

    2012-11-01

    Frank-Roman Lauter, Secretary General of the recently launched Regenerative Medicine Coalition, explains how the coalition was formed and what they hope to achieve. Frank-Roman Lauter has served as Secretary General of the Regenerative Medicine Coalition since 2012, and as Head of Business Development at Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies since 2007. Frank-Roman Lauter's interest is the organization of academic infrastructures to promote efficient translation of research findings into new therapies. He co-organizes joined strategy development for regenerative medicine clusters from seven European countries (FP7-EU Project) and has initiated cooperation between the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the German Federal Ministry for Education & Research, resulting in a joined funding program. Recently, he cofounded the international consortium of Regenerative Medicine translational centers (RMC; www.the-rmc.org ). Trained as a molecular biologist at the Max-Planck Institute in Berlin-Dahlem and at Stanford, he has 16 years of experience as an entrepreneur and life science manager in Germany and the USA.

  3. sCO2 Power Cycles Summit Summary November 2017.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Cruz, Carmen Margarita; Rochau, Gary E.; Lance, Blake

    2018-04-01

    Over the past ten years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has helped to develop components and technologies for the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) power cycle capable of efficient operation at high temperatures and high efficiency. The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy collaborated in the planning and execution of the sCO2 Power Cycle Summit conducted in Albuquerque, NM in November 2017. The summit brought together participants from government, national laboratories, research, and industry to engage in discussions regarding the future of sCO 2 Power Cycles Technology. This report summarizes the work involved in summit planning and execution, before, during, and after the event, including the coordination between three DOE offices and technical content presented at the event.

  4. Rehabilitation medicine summit: building research capacity Executive Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemp John D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The general objective of the "Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity" was to advance and promote research in medical rehabilitation by making recommendations to expand research capacity. The five elements of research capacity that guided the discussions were: 1 researchers; 2 research culture, environment, and infrastructure; 3 funding; 4 partnerships; and 5 metrics. The 100 participants included representatives of professional organizations, consumer groups, academic departments, researchers, governmental funding agencies, and the private sector. The small group discussions and plenary sessions generated an array of problems, possible solutions, and recommended actions. A post-Summit, multi-organizational initiative is called to pursue the agendas outlined in this report (see Additional File 1. Additional File 1 A table outlining the Final Action Plan of the Rehabilitation Medicine Summit: Building Research Capacity held on April 28–29, 2005 in Washington, DC. Click here for file

  5. Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of a large map sheet and a pamphlet. The map shows the geology, some photographs, description of map units, and correlation of map units. The pamphlet gives the full text about the geologic map. The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water; the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones.

  6. Theories of coalition formation: An empirical test using data from Danish local government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjæveland, Asbjørn; Serritzlew, Søren; Blom-Hansen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Theories of coalition formation represent a diverse set of arguments about why some government coalitions form while others do not. In this article, the authors present a systematic empirical test of the relative importance of the various arguments. The test is designed to avoid a circularity...... problem present in many coalition studies - namely that the theories are tested on data of national government coalitions in postwar Europe: the very data that gave rise to the theories in the first place. Instead, the authors focus on government coalitions at the municipal level. They base their analysis...... on office and policy motives. At the same time, the analysis raises the question of whether actors really seek minimal coalitions....

  7. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F; Hursting, Stephen D

    2015-05-04

    Women with evidence of high intake ratios of the marine omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) relative to the omega-6 arachidonic acid have been found to have a reduced risk of breast cancer compared with those with low ratios in some but not all case-control and cohort studies. If increasing EPA and DHA relative to arachidonic acid is effective in reducing breast cancer risk, likely mechanisms include reduction in proinflammatory lipid derivatives, inhibition of nuclear factor-κB-induced cytokine production, and decreased growth factor receptor signaling as a result of alteration in membrane lipid rafts. Primary prevention trials with either risk biomarkers or cancer incidence as endpoints are underway but final results of these trials are currently unavailable. EPA and DHA supplementation is also being explored in an effort to help prevent or alleviate common problems after a breast cancer diagnosis, including cardiac and cognitive dysfunction and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The insulin-sensitizing and anabolic properties of EPA and DHA also suggest supplementation studies to determine whether these omega-3 fatty acids might reduce chemotherapy-associated loss of muscle mass and weight gain. We will briefly review relevant omega-3 fatty acid metabolism, and early investigations in breast cancer prevention and survivorship.

  8. Social factors matter in cancer risk and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lorraine T; Gehlert, Sarah; Neuhouser, Marian L; Oh, April; Zanetti, Krista; Goodman, Melody; Thompson, Beti; Visvanathan, Kala; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2018-07-01

    Greater attention to social factors, such as race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position, and others, are needed across the cancer continuum, including breast cancer, given differences in tumor biology and genetic variants have not completely explained the persistent Black/White breast cancer mortality disparity. In this commentary, we use examples in breast cancer risk assessment and survivorship to demonstrate how the failure to appropriately incorporate social factors into the design, recruitment, and analysis of research studies has resulted in missed opportunities to reduce persistent cancer disparities. The conclusion offers recommendations for how to better document and use information on social factors in cancer research and care by (1) increasing education and awareness about the importance of inclusion of social factors in clinical research; (2) improving testing and documentation of social factors by incorporating them into journal guidelines and reporting stratified results; and (3) including social factors to refine extant tools that assess cancer risk and assign cancer care. Implementing the recommended changes would enable more effective design and implementation of interventions and work toward eliminating cancer disparities by accounting for the social and environmental contexts in which cancer patients live and are treated.

  9. Lessons Learned from the Young Breast Cancer Survivorship Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisiger-Camata, Silvia; Nolan, Timiya S; Vo, Jacqueline B; Bail, Jennifer R; Lewis, Kayla A; Meneses, Karen

    2017-11-30

    The Young Breast Cancer Survivors Network (Network) is an academic and community-based partnership dedicated to education, support, and networking. The Network used a multi-pronged approach via monthly support and networking, annual education seminars, website networking, and individual survivor consultation. Formative and summative evaluations were conducted using group survey and individual survivor interviews for monthly gatherings, annual education meetings, and individual consultation. Google Analytics was applied to evaluate website use. The Network began with 4 initial partnerships and grew to 38 in the period from 2011 to 2017. During this 5-year period, 5 annual meetings (598 attendees), 23 support and networking meetings (373), and 115 individual survivor consultations were conducted. The Network website had nearly 12,000 individual users and more than 25,000 page views. Lessons learned include active community engagement, survivor empowerment, capacity building, social media outreach, and network sustainability. The 5-year experiences with the Network demonstrated that a regional program dedicated to the education, support, networking, and needs of young breast cancer survivors and their families can become a vital part of cancer survivorship services in a community. Strong community support, engagement, and encouragement were vital components to sustain the program.

  10. Gender and Role Differences in Couples' Communication During Cancer Survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung-won; Paek, Min-so; Shon, En-jung

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with cancer and their partners often experience communication difficulties. However, questions still remain regarding the influence of gender and role in cancer survivor-partner communication within couples. The current study intended to examine the communication patterns in breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer survivor-partner couples during cancer survivorship and whether gender and role differences in couples communication exist. The dominant-less dominant method of sequential mixed design was used. Ten couples who were recruited from the University Hospital registry in Cleveland, Ohio, participated in both mail surveys and individual interviews. Family and cancer-related communication was assessed in the quantitative phase. Both male survivors and partners demonstrated better family communication scores compared with their female counterparts, whereas there were no gender differences in the cancer-related communication scores. In the qualitative phase, 3 major themes were identified: (1) selective sharing of cancer-related issues, (2) initiation of cancer-related communication, and (3) emotional reaction in communication. The patterns associated with these themes differed between the male survivor-female partner and female survivor-male partner couples. This study provides new knowledge about family and cancer-related communication. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding different perspectives in the quality of communication by gender and role. Exploring couples' communication patterns by gender and role stimulates the research and the development of effective consumer-centered communication interventions. The findings provide assessment tools to inform dyadic communication patterns for clinical and scientific purposes.

  11. Coalition-based multimedia peer matching strategies for P2P networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunggon; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of matching users for multimedia transmission in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks and identify strategies for fair resource division among the matched multimedia peers. We propose a framework for coalition formation, which enables users to form a group of matched peers where they can interact cooperatively and negotiate resources based on their satisfaction with the coalition, determined by explicitly considering the peer's multimedia attributes. In addition, our proposed approach goes a step further by introducing the concept of marginal contribution, which is the value improvement of the coalition induced by an incoming peer. We show that the best way for a peer to select a coalition is to choose the coalition that provides the largest division of marginal contribution given a deployed value-division scheme. Moreover, we model the utility function by explicitly considering each peer's attributes as well as the cost for uploading content. To quantify the benefit that users derive from a coalition, we define the value of a coalition based on the total utility that all peers can achieve jointly in the coalition. Based on this definition of the coalition value, we use an axiomatic bargaining solution in order to fairly negotiate the value division of the upload bandwidth given each peer's attributes.

  12. Coalitions in the quantum Minority game: Classical cheats and quantum bullies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flitney, Adrian P.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    In a one-off Minority game, when a group of players agree to collaborate they gain an advantage over the remaining players. We consider the advantage obtained in a quantum Minority game by a coalition sharing an initially entangled state versus that obtained by a coalition that uses classical communication to arrive at an optimal group strategy. In a model of the quantum Minority game where the final measurement basis is randomized, quantum coalitions outperform classical ones when carried out by up to four players, but an unrestricted amount of classical communication is better for larger coalition sizes

  13. 77 FR 68117 - Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... from the Blue Summit's wind energy generator (Blue Summit Facility) located within the Southwest Power... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL13-17-000] Blue Summit Wind, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on November 6, 2012, pursuant to...

  14. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' - a constructivist grounded theory of surviving critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Susanne; Salisbury, Lisa G; Rattray, Janice; Walsh, Timothy S; Huby, Guro; Ramsay, Pamela

    2017-10-01

    To theorise intensive care unit survivorship after a critical illness based on longitudinal qualitative data. Increasingly, patients survive episodes of critical illness. However, the short- and long-term impact of critical illness includes physical, psychological, social and economic challenges long after hospital discharge. An appreciation is emerging that care needs to extend beyond critical illness to enable patients to reclaim their lives postdischarge with the term 'survivorship' being increasingly used in this context. What constitutes critical illness survivorship has, to date, not been theoretically explored. Longitudinal qualitative and constructivist grounded theory. Interviews (n = 46) with 17 participants were conducted at four time points: (1) before discharge from hospital, (2) four to six weeks postdischarge, (3) six months and (4) 12 months postdischarge across two adult intensive care unit setting. Individual face-to-face interviews. Data analysis followed the principles of Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory. 'Intensive care unit survivorship' emerged as the core category and was theorised using concepts such as status passages, liminality and temporality to understand the various transitions participants made postcritical illness. Intensive care unit survivorship describes the unscheduled status passage of falling critically ill and being taken to the threshold of life and the journey to a life postcritical illness. Surviving critical illness goes beyond recovery; surviving means 'moving on' to life postcritical illness. 'Moving on' incorporates a redefinition of self that incorporates any lingering intensive care unit legacies and being in control of one's life again. For healthcare professionals and policymakers, it is important to realise that recovery and transitioning through to survivorship happen within an individual's time frame, not a schedule imposed by the healthcare system. Currently, there are no care pathways or policies in

  15. Contrasting Seasonal Survivorship of Two Migratory Songbirds Wintering in Threatened Mangrove Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Calvert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance migrants wintering in tropical regions face a number of critical conservation threats throughout their lives, but seasonal estimates of key demographic parameters such as winter survival are rare. Using mist-netting-based mark-recapture data collected in coastal Costa Rica over a six-year period, we examined variation in within- and between-winter survivorship of the Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea; 753 young and 376 adults banded, a declining neotropical habitat specialist that depends on threatened mangrove forests during the nonbreeding season. We derived parallel seasonal survivorship estimates for the Northern Waterthrush (Seiurus noveboracensis; 564 young and 93 adults banded, a cohabitant mangrove specialist that has not shown the same population decline in North America, to assess whether contrasting survivorship might contribute to the observed differences in the species’ population trajectories. Although average annual survival probability was relatively similar between the two species for both young and adult birds, monthly estimates indicated that relative to Northern Waterthrush, Prothonotary Warblers exhibited: greater interannual variation in survivorship, especially within winters; greater variation in survivorship among the three study sites; lower average between-winter survivorship, particularly among females, and; a sharp decline in between-winter survivorship from 2003 to 2009 for both age groups and both sexes. Rather than identifying one seasonal vital rate as a causal factor of Prothonotary Warbler population declines, our species comparison suggests that the combination of variable within-winter survival with decreasing between-winter survival demands a multi-seasonal approach to the conservation of this and other tropical-wintering migrants.

  16. 77 FR 51731 - All-Terrain Vehicle Safety Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ...; Physical sizing of ATVs 2. Consumer Awareness Suggested topics: Point-of-purchase information; on-product... safety require additional research that is beyond the Commission's current budget and resources. CPSC.... The Summit will take place over 2 days and will feature a mix of rulemaking and nonrulemaking topic...

  17. Dynamics of ozone and nitrogen oxides at Summit, Greenland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Van Brie; Helmig, Detlev; Toro, Claudia; Doskey, Paul; Kramer, Louisa; Murray, Keenan; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Seok, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A multi-year investigation of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in snowpack interstitial air down to a depth of 2.8 m was conducted at Summit, Greenland, to elucidate mechanisms controlling the production and destruction of these important trace gases within the snow.

  18. Modernizing the G8 Summit Process | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Modernizing the G8 Summit Process. This project is based on the premise that emerging countries must be full participants in key agenda-setting bodies if international governance mechanisms are to be realistic and relevant. The project brings together leaders, senior advisors, experts, researchers and opinion leaders to ...

  19. Gender Summit 2011: Equality Research and Innovation Through Equality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tenglerová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2011), s. 72-74 ISSN 1210-6658. [European Gender Summit 2011: Equality Research and Innovation Through Equality . Brusel, 07.11.2011-08.11.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK08007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : gender equality * science * policy Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography

  20. Summary points and consensus recommendations from the international protein summit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurt, Ryan T; McClave, Stephen A; Martindale, Robert G; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Dickerson, Roland N; Heyland, Daren K; Hoffer, L John; Moore, Frederick A; Morris, Claudia R; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Patel, Jayshil J; Phillips, Stuart M; Rugeles, Saúl J; Sarav Md, Menaka; Weijs, Peter J M; Wernerman, Jan; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; McClain, Craig J; Taylor, Beth

    2017-01-01

    The International Protein Summit in 2016 brought experts in clinical nutrition and protein metabolism together from around the globe to determine the impact of high-dose protein administration on clinical outcomes and address barriers to its delivery in the critically ill patient. It has been

  1. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  2. 2014 Mid-Atlantic Telehealth Resource Center Annual Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Hsu Wibberly

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mid-Atlantic Resource Center (MATRC; http://www.matrc.org/ advances the adoption and utilization of telehealth within the MATRC region and works collaboratively with the other federally funded Telehealth Resource Centers to accomplish the same nationally. MATRC offers technical assistance and other resources within the following mid-Atlantic states: Delaware, District of Columbia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.   The 2014 MATRC Summit “Adding Value through Sustainable Telehealth” will be held March 30-April 1, 2014, at the Fredericksburg Expo & Conference Center, Fredericksburg, VA. The Summit will explore how telehealth adds value to patients, practitioners, hospitals, health systems, and other facilities. Participants will experience a highly interactive program built around the case history of “Mr. Doe” as he progresses through the primary care, inpatient hospitalization, and post-discharge environments. The Summit will conclude with a session on financial and business models for providing sustainable telehealth services.   For further information and registration, visit: http://matrc.org/component/content/article/2-uncategorised/80-mid-atlantic-telehealth-resource-summit-2014    

  3. Global Summit on Student Affairs and Services: Prof. Adam Habib's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-01

    Nov 1, 2016 ... He was a keynote speaker at the 2016 Global Summit on Student Affairs and Services held from 27–28 October ... and Services, with 50 student affairs leaders in attendance. To survive the 21st century, .... While Habib knew there was tax avoidance, if increased taxes resulted in a 20% contraction in gross ...

  4. Global Summit on Student Affairs and Services | Moscaritolo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Summit on Student Affairs and Services. Lisa Bardill Moscaritolo, Karen Davis. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  5. Globalization and Summit Reform: An Experiment in International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2 juin 2008 ... Featuring a Foreword by Dr Gordon Smith, an Afterword by the Right Honourable Paul Martin, former Prime Minister of Canada, and a glossary of terms, Globalization and Summit Reform provides a unique, insiders' perspective on the process of international governance and its future prospects. A course ...

  6. This too shall pass: a grounded theory study of Filipino cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B; Jimenez, Benito Christian B; Jocson, Kathlyn P; Junio, Aileen R; Junio, Drazen E; Jurado, Jasper Benjamin N; Justiniano, Angela Bianca F

    2013-03-01

    Considering the paucity of studies dealing with the holistic aspect of the cancer experience, this grounded theory study seeks to conceptualize the process of cancer survivorship among Filipinos. Twenty-seven Filipino cancer survivors were purposively selected, and a two-part instrument, specifically robotfoto and focus group interviews, was used to gather data. The Glaserian method of grounded theory analysis was used, and extended texts were analyzed inductively via a dendrogram. Member checking and correspondence were observed to validate the surfacing stages, leading to the conceptualization of a theoretical model termed as the Ribbon of Cancer Survivorship. The said model describes the trifling (living before), transfusing (accepting the reality), transforming (being strong), and transcending (living beyond) phases of cancer survivorship. Ten interesting substages were also identified, namely: tainting, desolating, disrupting, and embracing for the transfusing phase; tormenting, distressing, awakening, and transfiguring for the transforming phase, and trembling and enlivening for the transcending phase. The resulting theoretical model has clearly and successfully described the entire process of cancer survivorship among Filipinos. It is hoped that the model be used as a reference for future studies about cancer survivorship and as a guide for nurses in providing a more empathetic care among cancer patients.

  7. Survivorship Care Plan Information Needs: Perspectives of Safety-Net Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Nancy J; Napoles, Tessa M; Banks, Priscilla J; Orenstein, Fern S; Luce, Judith A; Joseph, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) 2005 recommendation, few care organizations have instituted standard survivorship care plans (SCPs). Low health literacy and low English proficiency are important factors to consider in SCP development. Our study aimed to identify information needs and survivorship care plan preferences of low literacy, multi-lingual patients to support the transition from oncology to primary care and ongoing learning in survivorship. We conducted focus groups in five languages with African American, Latina, Russian, Filipina, White, and Chinese medically underserved breast cancer patients. Topics explored included the transition to primary care, access to information, knowledge of treatment history, and perspectives on SCPs. Analysis of focus group data identified three themes: 1) the need for information and education on the transition between "active treatment" and "survivorship"; 2) information needed (and often not obtained) from providers; and 3) perspectives on SCP content and delivery. Our data point to the need to develop a process as well as written information for medically underserved breast cancer patients. An SCP document will not replace direct communication with providers about treatment, symptom management and transition, a communication that is missing in participating safety-net patients' experiences of cancer care. Women turned to peer support and community-based organizations in the absence of information from providers. "Clear and effective" communication of survivorship care for safety-net patients requires dedicated staff trained to address wide-ranging information needs and uncertainties.

  8. Inter-Party Conflict Management in Coalition Governments: Analyzing the Role of Coalition Agreements in Belgium, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Moury

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we focus on manifest interparty conflict over policy issues and the role of coalition agreements in solving these conflicts. We present empirical findings on the characteristics of coalition agreements including deals over policy controversy and on inter-party conflict occurring during the lifetime of governments in Germany, Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands. We analyze the ways in which parties in government were or were not constrained by written deals over disputed issues. Coalition agreements from all four countries include specific policy deals, one third of which are precisely defined. These policy deals concern both consensual and controversial issues. Our central finding is that, in the case of intra-party conflict, parties almost always fall back on the initial policy deals when these exist. As such, policy statements of the coalition agreement facilitate decision making in each of the countries studied.

  9. Competitive Outcomes and Endogenous Coalition Formation in an n-Person Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, N.; Trockel, W.; Yang, Z.F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study competitive outcomes and endogenous coalition formation in a cooperative n-person transferable utility (TU) game from the viewpoint of general equilibrium theory.For any given game, we construct a competitive exchange coalition production economy corresponding to the game.

  10. A Qualitative Examination of the Implementation of a Community-Academic Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Katherine M.; Volpe, Tiziana

    2004-01-01

    Many recent grant initiatives have mandated coalition building as a key component of their health promotion efforts. Health service leaders are increasingly representing their organizations on coalitions and need to better understand the complexities involved in their creation and management. In this paper we focus on the implementation of a…

  11. The DELTA PREP Initiative: Accelerating Coalition Capacity for Intimate Partner Violence Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakocs, Ronda; Freire, Kimberley E.

    2018-01-01

    Background The DELTA PREP Project aimed to build the prevention capacity of 19 state domestic violence coalitions by offering eight supports designed to promote prevention integration over a 3-year period: modest grant awards, training events, technical assistance, action planning, coaching hubs, the Coalition Prevention Capacity Assessment, an online workstation, and the online documentation support system. Objectives Using quantitative and qualitative data, we sought to explain how coalitions integrated prevention within their structures and functions and document how DELTA PREP supports contributed to coalitions’ integration process. Results We found that coalitions followed a common pathway to integrate prevention. First, coalitions exhibited precursors of organizational readiness, especially having prevention champions. Second, coalitions engaged in five critical actions: engaging in dialogue, learning about prevention, forming teams, soliciting input from the coalition, and action planning. Last, by engaging in these critical actions, coalitions enhanced two key organizational readiness factors—developing a common understanding of prevention and an organizational commitment to prevention. We also found that DELTA PREP supports contributed to coalitions’ abilities to integrate prevention by supporting learning about prevention, fostering a prevention team, and engaging in action planning by leveraging existing opportunities. Two DELTA PREP supports—coaching hubs and the workstation—did not work as initially intended. From the DELTA PREP experience, we offer several lessons to consider when designing future prevention capacity-building initiatives. PMID:26245934

  12. Smart transactive energy framework in grid-connected multiple home microgrids under independent and coalition operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzband, Mousa; Azarinejadian, Fatemeh; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a smart Transactive energy (TE) framework in which home microgrids (H-MGs) can collaborate with each other in a multiple H-MG system by forming coalitions for gaining competitiveness in the market. Profit allocation due to coalition between H-MGs is an important issue...

  13. Two hardness results for core stability in hedonic coalition formation games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deineko, V.G.; Woeginger, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    We establish NP-completeness of two problems on core stable coalitions in hedonic games. In the first problem every player has only two acceptable coalitions in his preference list, and in the second problem the preference structures arise from the distances in an underlying metric space.

  14. KSCO 2002: Second International Conference on Knowledge Systems for Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    based on selected classic coalition theories is, for example, COALA (Klusch & Vielhak, 1997). 94 unique for any 3-agent game (A,v), assigns...1997) COALA - Simulation Environment for Coalition Formation Among Autonomous Information Agents. http://www.dfki.de/~klusch/ COALA / Kraus, S

  15. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply project: An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, J C; Mench, J A; Karcher, D

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, empirical information on the sustainability of commercial-scale egg production is lacking. The passage of state regulations specific to hen housing created urgency to better understand the effects of different housing systems on the sustainability of the egg supply, and stimulated the formation of a coalition, the Coalition for a Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), to conduct research on this topic. The CSES is a multi-stakeholder group with 27 members, including food manufacturers, research institutions, scientists, restaurants, food service, retail food companies, egg suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations. A commercial-scale study was developed to better understand the effect of 3 housing systems (conventional cage, enriched colony, and cage-free aviary) on 5 areas related to a sustainable egg supply. These 5 sustainability areas represent effects on people, animals, and the environment: animal health and well-being, environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and food affordability. Five teams of scientists, each associated with a sustainability area, conducted an integrated field study at a commercial site in the upper Midwest through 2 flock cycles in 3 housing systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the CSES project to serve as an introduction for the papers that follow in this volume of Poultry Science. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  16. Set-Theoretic Inequalities in Stochastic Noncooperative Games with Coalition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailada Treerattrakoon

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We model and analyze antagonistic stochastic games of three players, two of whom form a coalition against the third one. The actions of the players are modeled by random walk processes recording the cumulative damages to each player at any moment of time. The game continues until the single player or the coalition is defeated. The defeat of any particular player takes place when the associated process (representing the collateral damage crosses a fixed threshold. Once the threshold is exceeded at some time, the associated player exits the game. All involved processes are being “observed by a third party process” so that the information regarding the status of all players is restricted to those special epochs. Furthermore, all processed are modulated (with their parameters being modified in due course of the game. We obtain a closed form joint functional of the named processes at key reference points.

  17. Dynamic and adaptive policy models for coalition operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Calo, Seraphin; Chakraborty, Supriyo; Bertino, Elisa; Williams, Chris; Tucker, Jeremy; Rivera, Brian; de Mel, Geeth R.

    2017-05-01

    It is envisioned that the success of future military operations depends on the better integration, organizationally and operationally, among allies, coalition members, inter-agency partners, and so forth. However, this leads to a challenging and complex environment where the heterogeneity and dynamism in the operating environment intertwines with the evolving situational factors that affect the decision-making life cycle of the war fighter. Therefore, the users in such environments need secure, accessible, and resilient information infrastructures where policy-based mechanisms adopt the behaviours of the systems to meet end user goals. By specifying and enforcing a policy based model and framework for operations and security which accommodates heterogeneous coalitions, high levels of agility can be enabled to allow rapid assembly and restructuring of system and information resources. However, current prevalent policy models (e.g., rule based event-condition-action model and its variants) are not sufficient to deal with the highly dynamic and plausibly non-deterministic nature of these environments. Therefore, to address the above challenges, in this paper, we present a new approach for policies which enables managed systems to take more autonomic decisions regarding their operations.

  18. Advancing Immigrant Worker Rights through Labor-Community Coalition: Comparative Case Studies of the CLEAN Carwash Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Mindy Minyi

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, a coalition known as the CLEAN Carwash Campaign has been organizing car wash workers in Los Angeles. How did CLEAN manage the divergent interests of its coalition members and strategize? What is it about CLEAN that led the labor-community coalition to achieve gains for carwasheros when conventional wisdom dictates that low wage immigrant workers were too vulnerable to be unionized? Given the dearth of empirical research into how social movement coalitions strategize and how campai...

  19. Proceedings of the 2015 international summit on fibropapillomatosis: Global status, trends, and population impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, Stacy A.; Work, Thierry M.; Brunson, Shandell; Foley, Allen M.; Balazs, George H.

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 International Summit on Fibropapillomatosis (FP) was convened in Honolulu, Hawaii June 11-14, 2015. Scientists from around the world were invited to present results from sea turtle monitoring and research programs as they relate to the global status, trends, and population impacts of FP on green turtles. The participants engaged in discussions that resulted in the following conclusions: 1.Globally, FP has long been present in wild sea turtle populations the earliest mention was in the late 1800s in the Florida Keys. 2.FP primarily affects medium-sized immature turtles in coastal foraging pastures. 3.Expression of FP differs across ocean basins and to some degree within basins. Turtles in the Southeast US, Caribbean, Brazil, and Australia rarely have oral tumors (inside the mouth cavity), whereas they are common and often severe in Hawaii. Internal tumors (on vital organs) occur in the Atlantic and Hawaii, but only rarely in Australia. Liver tumors are common in Florida but not in Hawaii. 4.Recovery from FP through natural processes, when the affliction is not severe, has been documented in wild populations globally. 5.FP causes reduced survivorship, but documented mortality rates in Australia and Hawaii are low. The mortality impact of FP is not currently exceeding population growth rates in some intensively monitored populations (e.g., Florida, Hawaii) as evidenced by increasing nesting trends despite the incidence of FP in immature foraging populations. 6.Pathogens, hosts, and potential disease and environmental cofactors have the capacity to change; while we are having success now, there needs to be continued monitoring to detect changes in the distribution, occurrence, and severity of the disease. 7.While we do not have clear evidence to provide the direct link, globally, the preponderance of sites with a high frequency of FP tumors are areas with some degree of degradation resulting from altered watersheds. Watershed management and responsible coastal

  20. Local Self-Government as an Architect of Coalitions for Local Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gąsior-Niemiec

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the new role played by local self-government units in Poland. Main factors that determine the public authorities’ capacity to become architects of coalitions for local development are identified. Coalitions are defined as partnerships linking and mobilizing stakeholders anchored in three sectors: public, economic and non-governmental. The coalition-making role of the public organs is investigated on the basis of Local Action Groups (LAGs, which are pro-developmental cross-sector organizations established in rural areas of the Podkarpackie (Sub-Carpathian Voivodesh ip, Poland. Findings are presented that draw on quantitative and qualitative results of the research project that investigated mechanisms involved in the operation of the cross-s ector coalitions. The dominant role of the public authorities in those coalitions is demonstrated. The Community-led Local Development model is referred to as the future framework for LAGs.

  1. Marching toward reproductive justice: coalitional (re) framing of the March for Women's Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Zakiya T

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how coalition frames develop and what happens to that frame after the formal coalition ends. To that end, I analyze the frame shift around the 2004 March for Women's Lives (March). The March initially focused on established ideas of reproductive rights around which the four national mainstream co-sponsors previously organized. However, after a newer reproductive justice organization joined the coalition, material and organizing reflected a shift in framing to reproductive justice. How did this change happen? What are the impacts of this event for the women's movement? Through document analysis and interviews, I trace the negotiations that facilitated this framing shift. I argue that this new coalition frame translated into positive lasting changes in organizing for women's reproductive health even as the coalition dissolved and some of the tensions within the larger women's movement remain.

  2. Learning from Iraq and Afghanistan: Four Lessons for Building More Effective Coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Nathan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite many tactical and operational successes by brave military and civilian personnel, post-9/11 operations by U.S. led coalitions in Iraq and Afghanistan did not achieve their intended outcomes. Although many efforts are underway by discrete organizations within coalition countries to identify and learn their own lessons from these conflicts, comparatively less attention is paid to broader lessons for successful coalitions. Given that the U.S. and its allies will most certainly form coalitions in the future for a range of different contingency scenarios, these lessons are equally deserving of close examination. This article identifies four interrelated lessons from Iraq and Afghanistan that can be utilized to inform more effective coalition development and employment.

  3. The state of cancer survivorship programming in Commission on Cancer-accredited hospitals in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Logan J; Patterson, Angela; Lipscomb, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    In Georgia, there are more than 356,000 cancer survivors. Although many encounter challenges as a result of treatment, there is limited data on the availability of survivorship programming. This paper highlights findings from two surveys assessing survivorship care in Commission on Cancer (CoC)-accredited hospitals in Georgia. In 2010, 38 CoC-accredited hospitals were approached to complete a 36-item survey exploring knowledge of national standards and use of survivorship care plans (SCPs), treatment summaries (TSs), and psychosocial assessment tools. In 2012, 37 CoC-accredited hospitals were asked to complete a similar 21-item survey. Seventy-nine percent (n = 30) of cancer centers completed the 2010 survey. Sixty percent (n = 18) reported having a cancer survivorship program in place or in development. Forty-three percent (n = 13) provided survivors with a SCP and 40% (n = 12) a TS. Sixty percent (n = 18) reported either never or rarely using a psychosocial assessment tool. Sixty-two percent (n = 23) completed the 2012 survey. Ninety-six percent (n = 22) were aware of the new CoC guideline 3.3. Thirty-nine percent (n = 9) provided a SCP and/or TS. Eighty-seven percent (n = 20) stated they were very confident or somewhat confident their organization could implement a SCP and/or TS by 2015. The data indicated the importance of collaboration and shared responsibility for survivorship care. Broad implementation of SCPs and TSs can help address the late and long-term effects of treatment. Increasing knowledge on survivorship care is imperative as the Georgia oncology community engages oncologists and primary care providers to achieve higher quality of life for all survivors.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to implementing cancer survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M; Dittus, Kim L; Sprague, Brian L; Pollack, Lori A; Hawkins, Nikki A; Geller, Berta M

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Descriptive pilot study. Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3-6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver SCPs, transitioning patients from oncology care to a PCP in a shared-care model of optimal wellness. Institution support for

  5. Extension Professionals and Community Coalitions: Professional Development Opportunities Related to Leadership and Policy, System, and Environment Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, Carol A.; Lobb, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Community coalitions play an important role in community-wide strategies to promote health and wellbeing, and Extension professionals may provide leadership, technical assistance, and other support to coalitions. Extension professionals across a Midwestern state were invited to participate in an online survey about their coalition involvement and…

  6. A 2040 Vision for the I-95 Coalition Region : Supporting Economic Growth in a Carbon-Constrained Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The I-95 Corridor Coalitions Vision project is a departure from the Coalitions historic role that focused primarily on shorter-term operational improvements in the corridor. In the past, most of the day-to-day issues confronting the Coalition m...

  7. Cancer survivorship care-planning: Practice, research, and policy implications for social work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard W; Pritzker, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing numbers of cancer survivors are living longer than 5 years from their diagnosis date. This has resulted in a growing population of cancer survivors, expected to reach 19 million by 2024. Survivors frequently experience late effects caused by cancer and its treatment, reducing survivors' quality of life in multiple domains. Survivorship care-plans may aid the many physical, psychosocial, and financial needs that emerge posttreatment. However, the lack of reimbursement mechanisms, the limited amount of effectiveness research, and minimal guidelines for content and delivery are barriers to the widespread provision of survivorship care-plans. Challenges and opportunities for social work practice, research, and policy are identified and discussed.

  8. Rise to SUMMIT: the Sydney University Multiple-Mirror Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna M.; Davis, John

    2000-07-01

    The Sydney University Multiple Mirror Telescope (SUMMIT) is a medium-sized telescope designed specifically for high resolution stellar spectroscopy. Throughout the design emphasis has been placed on high efficiency at low cost. The telescope consists of four 0.46 m diameter mirrors mounted on a single welded steel frame. Specially designed mirror cells support and point each mirror, allowing accurate positioning of the images on optical fibers located at the foci of the mirrors. Four fibers convey the light to the future location of a high resolution spectrograph away from the telescope in a stable environment. An overview of the commissioning of the telescope is presented, including the guidance and automatic mirror alignment and focussing systems. SUMMIT is located alongside the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer at the Paul Wild Observatory, near Narrabri, Northern New South Wales.

  9. Text of the joint U.S.-Soviet summit statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The document reproduces the text of the joint U.S.-Soviet summit statement issued on 10 December 1987 at the conclusion of the meeting between the President of the United States and the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Washington, December 7-10, 1987). It refers to the arms control (including nuclear weapons), human rights and humanitarian concerns, regional issues, bilateral affairs and further meetings

  10. [Synostosis and tarsal coalitions in children. A study of 68 cases in 47 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvreau, P; Pouliquen, J C; Langlais, J; Glorion, C; de Cerqueira Daltro, G

    1994-01-01

    The authors report their experience with tarsal coalitions in children. The purpose of this study was to discuss the origins of the of the calcaneum, and to propose a simple therapeutic strategy for diagnosis and treatment. The study included 47 children (68 feet), with one or more idiopathic tarsal coalitions. All patients had physical examinations to record symptoms, morphology of the foot, mobility of the foot, gait analysis, standard radiographs, and in some cases CT scans or MRI. The average age of the patients was 11.5 years old, 7 patients had a positive family history for tarsal coalitions. 66 per cent of the patients had mild tarsal pain or a history of repeated ankle sprains. The conservative treatment concerned 28 feet: 3 casts, 2 injections of corticosteroids into the subtalar joint, insole-shoes in 3 cases, and abstention in 20 cases. The operative treatment (40 feet) consisted of resection of calcaneonavicular coalitions (24 feet) resection of talocalcaneal coalitions (3 feet), mediotarsal and subtalar arthrodesis (8 feet), resection of calcaneonavicular coalition combined with the "Cavalier'' procedure described by Judet (3 feet), calcaneal osteotomy (2 feet). The mean follow-up was 42 months. The morphology of the involved foot was normal in 33 cases, flat foot was seen in 24 cases (4 peroneal spastic flat feet), pes cavus in 3 cases, club foot in 2 cases, pes varus in 4 cases, "Z'' shaped feet in 2 cases. The radiological examination was demonstrative of tarsal coalition in 61 feet. 7 tarsal coalitions were seen during operative procedures. The location or the coalition was calcaneonavicular (57), talocalcaneal (16), talo-navicular (8), calcaneo-cuboid (7), naviculo-cuneiform (4). The secondary radiographic signs were studied for each foot. In the conservative group, 2 patients degraded their clinical status, one developed a spastic flat foot. In the surgical group, all except 2 patients had good clinical and functional results. One patient had

  11. Summit on Improving the Economics of America's Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, John; Mason, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The Summit on Improving the Economics of America's Nuclear Power Plants was convened May 19, 2016, by Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and co-sponsored by Idaho Senator Mike Crapo to stress the importance of existing nuclear reactors in meeting our nation's energy goals. The summit was also designed to identify and discuss policy options that can be pursued at federal and state levels to address economic challenges, as well as technical options that utilities can use to improve the economic competitiveness of operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) and avoid early plant retirements that are driven by temporary market conditions. The owners of NPPs face difficult economic decisions and are working to improve the performance of existing NPPs. However, it soon became clear that some of the actions taken by states and regional markets have had an impact on the economic viability of existing power plants, including carbon free NPPs. Summit speakers identified concepts and actions that could be taken at state and federal levels to improve the economics of the existing fleet within these regulated and restructured electricity markets. This report summarizes the speeches, concepts, and actions taken.

  12. Energy summit discussions with Federal Chancellor Merkel - potential legislative consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2006-01-01

    The energy summit discussions held by Federal Chancellor Merkel are to converge in a consistent energy policy concept by late 2007. The second summit held on October 9, 2006 was prepared by three working groups. Working Group 1 was to handle 'International Aspects', Working Group 2, the 'National Aspects of Energy Supply', and Working Group 3, finally, 'Research and Energy Efficiency'. The reports dealing with international aspects and with research and energy efficiency were in the focus of discussions at the summit. The report about national aspects had not yet reached the level of maturity required for discussion. None of the reports contained anything under the headings of 'Setting aside the Gorleben Moratorium' and 'Continued Exploration of the Salt Dome for a Repository' and 'Extension of the Plant Life of Our Nuclear Power Plants'. This sounds very easy and is urgently required, but it is neither announced nor seriously debated in politics. If these legislative measures were taken and the rhetoric about the broad energy mix turned into energy policy reality, many problems in climate protection, in energy supply continuity, and in competitive electricity supply could be solved more easily. (orig.)

  13. A critical evaluation of subtalar joint arthrosis associated with middle facet talocalcaneal coalition in 21 surgically managed patients: a retrospective computed tomography review. Investigations involving middle facet coalitions-part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernbach, Klaus J; Barkan, Howard; Blitz, Neal M

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition is frequently associated with rearfoot arthrosis that is often managed surgically with rearfoot fusion. However, no objective method for classifying the extent of subtalar joint arthrosis exists. No study has clearly identified the extent of posterior facet arthrosis present in a large cohort treated surgically for talocalcaneal coalition through preoperative computerized axial tomography. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 21 patients (35 feet) with coalition who were surgically treated over a 12-year period for coalition on at least 1 foot. Using a predefined original staging system, the extent of the arthrosis was categorized into normal or mild (Stage I), moderate (Stage II), and severe (Stage III) arthrosis. The association of stage and age is statistically significant. All of the feet with Stage III arthrosis had fibrous coalitions. No foot with osseous coalition had Stage III arthrosis. The distribution of arthrosis staging differs between fibrous and osseous coalitions. Only fibrous coalitions had the most advanced arthrosis (Stage III), whereas osseous coalitions did not. This suggests that osseous coalitions may have a protective effect in the prevention of severe degeneration of the subtalar joint. Concomitant subtalar joint arthrosis severity progresses with age; surgeons may want to consider earlier surgical intervention to prevent arthrosis progression in patients with symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition.

  14. Evolution of fairness and coalition formation in three-person ultimatum games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Okada, Akira; Shirata, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-07

    We consider the evolution of fairness and coalition formation in a three-person ultimatum game in which the coalition value depends on its size. Traditional game theory, which assumes selfish and rational players, predicts the largest and efficient coalition with a proposer exploiting most of the total value. In a stochastic evolutionary model (the frequency-dependent Moran process with mutations) where players make errors in estimating the payoffs and strategies of others, evolutionary selection favors the formation of a two-person subcoalition under weak selection and in the low mutation limit if and only if its coalition value exceeds a high proportion (0.7) of that of the largest coalition. Proposers offer 30-35% of the subcoalition value to a coalition member, excluding a non-member. Multilateral bargaining is critically different from the bilateral one. Coalition-forming behavior may cause economic inefficiency and social exclusion. Stochastic evolutionary game theory thus provides theoretical support to explain the behavior of human subjects in economic experiments of a three-person ultimatum game. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Beyond Brazilian Coalition Presidentialism: the Appropriation of the Legislative Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Silveira e Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though they possess several power resources, Brazilian Presidents also elaborate their legislative proposals based upon bills already being processed in Congress through a phenomenon called Appropriation of the legislative agenda. In this paper I examine the conditions under which this phenomenon occurs by means of a typology and a qualitative comparative analysis (QCA. I conclude that Appropriation provides the President with the expansion of the formal support base by controlling the agenda of allied and opposition parties as well as obtaining the "paternity" of several policies already in motion in Congress, thus enabling a public association of the President's actions and his or her party with the possibility of social benefits. Be it in the pursuit of promising agendas or for the maintenance of their own dominance, Appropriation shows that Brazilian Presidents must go beyond coalition presidentialism.

  16. [Contribution of the Peruvian Multisectorial Coalition against Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinillos-Ashton, Luis; Limache-García, Abel

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is a public health problem due to its high incidence and mortality, its high social and economic cost, and the lack of intra and intersectorial strategies resulting in failure to access information and screening tests. For this reason, it is necessary to address this problem with a comprehensive and sustainable approach. After performing a diagnosis of the human and material resources at the national level, and after having observed the attitude of healthcare decisors, the Multisector Coalition against Cancer was created with the participation of the public and nonpublic sector. A strategic plan was developed, followed by a national plan for strengthening cancer prevention and control. As a result, intersectorial work and health promotion oriented to cancer prevention through information, education and communication were strengthened. Service supply was improved and optimized through decentralization of oncological care.

  17. Stable structures of coalitions in competitive and altruistic military teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurangzeb, M.; Mikulski, D.; Hudas, G.; Lewis, F. L.; Gu, Edward

    2013-05-01

    In heterogeneous battlefield teams, the balance between team and individual objectives forms the basis for the internal topological structure of teams. The stability of team structure is studied by presenting a graphical coalitional game (GCG) with Positional Advantage (PA). PA is Shapley value strengthened by the Axioms of value. The notion of team and individual objectives is studied by defining altruistic and competitive contribution made by an individual; altruistic and competitive contributions made by an agent are components of its total or marginal contribution. Moreover, the paper examines dynamic team effects by defining three online sequential decision games based on marginal, competitive and altruistic contributions of the individuals towards team. The stable graphs under these sequential decision games are studied and found to be structurally connected, complete, or tree respectively.

  18. Combined osteochondral allograft and meniscal allograft transplantation: a survivorship analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getgood, Alan; Gelber, Jonathon; Gortz, Simon; De Young, Alison; Bugbee, William

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) and osteochondral allografting (OCA) as individual treatment modalities for select applications is well established. MAT and OCA are considered symbiotic procedures due to a complementary spectrum of indications and reciprocal contraindications. However, few outcomes of concomitant MAT and OCA have been reported. This study is a retrospective review of patients who received simultaneous MAT and OCA between 1983 and 2011. Forty-eight (twenty-nine male: nineteen female) patients with a median age of 35.8 years (15-66) received combined MAT and OCA procedures between 1983 and 2011. Forty-three patients had received previous surgery with a median of 3 procedures (1-11 procedures). The underlying diagnosis was trauma (tibial plateau fracture) in 33 % with osteoarthritis predominating in 54.2 % of cases. Thirty-one patients received a lateral meniscus, 16 received a medial meniscus and one patient received bilateral MAT. The median number of OCAs was two per patient (1-5 grafts), with a median graft area of 15 cm(2) (0.7-41 cm(2)). There were 21 unipolar, 24 bipolar (tibiofemoral) and three multifocal lesions. Thirty-six MATs constituted a compound tibial plateau OCA with native meniscus attached. At follow-up, failure was defined as any procedure resulting in removal or revision of one or more of the grafts. Patients completed the modified Merle d'Aubigné and Postel (18-point) scale, Knee Society Function (KS-F) score, and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Patient satisfaction was also captured. Twenty-six of 48 patients (54.2 %) required reoperation, but only 11 patients (22.9 %) were noted to have failed (10 MAT and 11 OCA). The mean time to failure was 3.2 years (95 % CI 1.5-4.9 years) and 2.7 years (95 % CI 1.3-4.2 years) for MAT and OCA, respectively. The 5-year survivorship was 78 and 73 % for MAT and OCA respectively, and 69 and 68 % at 10 years. Six of

  19. Effect of non-nutritive sugars to decrease the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we investigated the effects of non-nutritive sugars and sugar alcohols on the survivorship of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, and found erythritol and erythrose as potentially toxic to the fly. In a dose-dependent study, erythritol and erythrose significantly reduced fly ...

  20. Breast cancer survivorship: the role of perceived discrimination and sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabson, Jennifer M; Donatelle, Rebecca J; Bowen, Deborah

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer disproportionately affects sexual minority women (SMW) compared to heterosexual women and a small but growing literature indicates that SMW may have diminished survivorship outcomes; outcomes that are measurably and importantly different from heterosexual breast cancer survivors. However, it remains unknown how sexual orientation influences breast cancer survivorship outcomes such as quality of life. One possible route of influence is SMW's perceived discrimination in the health care setting. This cross-sectional study examines SMW perceptions of discrimination as one of the multiple facets of the breast cancer survivorship process. This study assessed SMW breast cancer survivor's perceptions of discrimination during their breast cancer treatment experience and secondarily, examined the role of this perceived discrimination on SMW's quality of life. Sixty-eight purposefully sampled sexual minority breast cancer survivors completed assessments of quality of life, perceived discrimination, perceived social support and perceived stress via an online survey. Statistical analyses point to perceived discrimination and perceived social support as important indicators for predicting SMW's quality of life. Future research on SMW's breast cancer survivorship should include measures of perceived discrimination.

  1. Translocation as a conservation tool for Agassiz's desert tortoises: Survivorship, reproduction, and movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. E. Nussear; C. R. Tracy; P. A. Medica; D. S. Wilson; R. W. Marlow; P. S. Corn

    2012-01-01

    We translocated 120 Agassiz's desert tortoises to 5 sites in Nevada and Utah to evaluate the effects of translocation on tortoise survivorship, reproduction, and habitat use. Translocation sites included several elevations, and extended to sites with vegetation assemblages not typically associated with desert tortoises in order to explore the possibility of moving...

  2. Oncology nurses′ recognition of long-term cancer survivorship care in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako Miura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aims to assess the knowledge of definition of cancer survivors among Japanese oncology nurses and their roles in long-term cancer survivorship care. Methods: A structured self-administered and self-report questionnaire created by the study investigators was given to members of the Japanese Society of Cancer Nursing. The subjects were 81 female oncology nurses. Results: Forty-nine nurses had 11 or more years of nursing experience, while 27 nurses had cancer-related nursing certifications such as, certification in oncology nursing specialist. This study population had rather rich experience in oncology nursing. Sixty-two nurses defined a cancer survivor from the time of diagnosis, while the nurses′ recognition of long-term survivorship care was poor, compared with nursing care at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and end of life. Conclusions: The nurses were aware of the needs to recognize and address issues faced by long-term cancer survivors and for nursing study, but very few put the effective patient education and interventions into practice. It is because oncology nurses have few chances to see cancer survivors who go out of the hands of healthcare professionals. In increasing the number of long-term survivors, long-term survivorship care is needed in addition to incorporating such education into undergraduate and graduate programs. Further study on the knowledge of long-term cancer survivorship care and nursing practices are required.

  3. Modelling the survivorship of Nigeria children in their first 10 years of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fagbamigbe

    Conflict of Interest: Authors declared no conflict of interest ... Keywords: Survivorship, Nigeria, children mortality, Kaplan Meier, Brass Indirect method, Prediction ... variables or sex of older siblings, post- neonatal mortality is 12% higher and 2nd ... Relationship between maternal education and child survival in developing ...

  4. Cancer Survivorship Care: Person Centered Care in a Multidisciplinary Shared Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loonen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of childhood and adult-onset cancer are at lifelong risk for the development of late effects of treatment that can lead to serious morbidity and premature mortality. Regular long-term follow-up aiming for prevention, early detection and intervention of late effects can preserve or improve health. The heterogeneous and often serious character of late effects emphasizes the need for specialized cancer survivorship care clinics. Multidisciplinary cancer survivorship care requires a coordinated and well integrated health care environment for risk based screening and intervention. In addition survivors engagement and adherence to the recommendations are also important elements. We developed an innovative model for integrated care for cancer survivors, the “Personalized Cancer Survivorship Care Model”, that is being used in our clinic. This model comprises 1. Personalized follow-up care according to the principles of Person Centered Care, aiming to empower survivors and to support self management, and 2. Organization according to a multidisciplinary and risk based approach. The concept of person centered care is based on three components: initiating, integrating and safeguarding the partnership with the patient. This model has been developed as a universal model of care that will work for all cancer survivors in different health care systems. It could be used for studies to improve self efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of cancer survivorship care.

  5. Survivorship of Total Hip Joint Replacements Following Isolated Liner Exchange for Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadei, Leone; Kieser, David C; Frampton, Chris; Hooper, Gary

    2017-11-01

    Liner exchange for articular component wear in total hip joint replacements (THJRs) is a common procedure, often thought to be benign with reliable outcomes. Recent studies, however, suggest high failure rates of liner exchange revisions with significant complications. The primary aim of this study was, therefore, to analyze the survivorship of isolated liner exchange for articular component wear, and secondarily to assess the influence of patient demographics (gender, age, and American Society of Anaesthesiologists [ASA] ratings) on rerevisions following isolated liner exchange for wear. A retrospective review of the 15-year New Zealand Joint Registry (1999-2014) was performed, analyzing the outcomes of isolated liner exchange for articular component wear. The survivorship as defined as rerevision with component exchange was determined and 10-year Kaplan-Meier survivorship curves were constructed. These revision rates were compared to age, gender, and ASA rating groups using a log-rank test. The 10-year survivorship of THJR following liner exchange revision for liner wear was 75.3%. If a rerevision was required, the median time to rerevision was 1.33 years with a rerevision rate of 3.33 per 100 component years (95% confidence interval 2.68-4.08/100 component years). The principle reasons for rerevision were dislocation (48.4%) and acetabular component loosening (20.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in rerevision rates based on gender, age categories, or ASA scores. THJR isolated liner exchange for liner wear is not a benign procedure with a survivorship of 75.3% at 10 years. Surgeons contemplating liner exchange revisions should be cognisant of this risk and should adequately assess component position and stability preoperatively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Term Survivorship of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated with Radical Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Agranovich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the recent trends in definitive management of esophageal cancer, the records of 138 consecutive patients treated with radical intent in a single institution between 1995 and 2003 were reviewed and analyzed. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years (range 1.1 to 10.4 years. Seventy-seven patients were treated with radiation therapy (RT only and 61 with combined regimens (CRT, in which RT was combined with either radical surgery or chemotherapy, or both. The overall survival of the entire cohort was 32% over two years and 20% over five years. The survivorship in the RT group was 17% over two years and 5% over five years. In the CRT group, 51% and 35% survived over two and five years, respectively. From all the potential prognostic factors examined by univariate and multivariate analyses, only male sex and use of CRT were strongly associated with better survivorship. There was no significant difference in the outcomes among the different regimens of CRT. Survivorship was not affected by the location or histology of the tumour, clinical stage, dose of RT or use of endoluminal brachytherapy in addition to external beam RT. There was a greater tendency to use RT only more often in older patients, but patient age did not affect survivorship. The proportion of patients treated with CRT did not change significantly over the last versus the first four years of the observed period. Combined regimens are undoubtedly superior to RT as a single modality. The long-term survivorship of patients in a subgroup of our patients treated with combined modality protocols compared favourably with the previously reported results in the literature and specifically in prospective randomized trials. However, the optimal combined modality regimen is yet to be defined.

  7. Revisiting Primary Care's Critical Role in Achieving Health Equity: Pisacano Scholars' Reflections from Starfield Summit II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian; Coutinho, Anastasia J; Doohan, Noemi; Jimenez, Jonathan; Martin, Sara; Romano, Max; Wohler, Diana; DeVoe, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The second Starfield Summit was held in Portland, Oregon, in April 2017. The Summit addressed the role of primary care in advancing health equity by focusing on 4 key domains: social determinants of health in primary care, vulnerable populations, economics and policy, and social accountability. Invited participants represented an interdisciplinary group of primary care clinicians, researchers, educators, policymakers, community leaders, and trainees. The Pisacano Leadership Foundation was one of the Summit sponsors and held its annual leadership symposium in conjunction with the Summit, enabling several Pisacano Scholars to attend the Summit. After the Summit, a small group of current and former Pisacano Scholars formed a writing group to highlight key themes and implications for action discussed at the Summit. The Summit resonated as a call to action for primary care to move beyond identifying existing health inequities and toward the development of interventions that advance health equity, through education, research, and enhanced community partnerships. In doing so, the Summit aimed to build on the foundational work of Dr. Starfield, challenging us to explore the significant role of primary care in truly achieving health equity. © Copyright 2018 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  8. Advancing the Agenda. IAEA Technical Co-operation in support of the Earth Summit's Agenda 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, Andy W.; Wedekind, Lothar

    2001-09-01

    The Earth Summit took place in September 2002 in Johannesburg, South Africa to discuss the far-reaching goals of Agenda 21 - an ambitious and comprehensive plan of action covering all spheres of social, economic, and human development affecting our environment. The Summit - officially named the World Summit on Sustainable Development - was expected to attract more than 60,000 national and international delegates, including heads of State and leaders of major organizations and institutes. Agenda 21 was among the documents that governments adopted at the first Earth Summit in 1992, officially known as the UN Conference on Environment and Development, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

  9. Climate Change Student Summits: A Model that Works (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    The C2S2: Climate Change Student Summit project has completed four years of activities plus a year-long longitudinal evaluation with demonstrated positive impacts beyond the life of the project on both students and teachers. This presentation will share the lessons learned about implementing this climate change science education program and suggest that it is a successful model that can be used to scale up from its Midwestern roots to achieve measurable national impact. A NOAA Environmental Literacy grant allowed ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) to grow a 2008 pilot program involving 2 Midwestern sites, to a program 4 years later involving 10 sites. The excellent geographical coverage included 9 of the U.S. National Climate Assessment regions defined by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Through the delivery of two professional development (PD) workshops, a unique opportunity was provided for both formal and informal educators to engage their classrooms/audiences in understanding the complexities of climate change. For maximum contact hours, the PD experience was extended throughout the school year through the use of an online grouphub. Student teams were involved in a creative investigative science research and presentation experience culminating in a Climate Change Student Summit, an on-site capstone event including a videoconference connecting all sites. The success of this program was based on combining multiple aspects, such as encouraging the active involvement of scientists and early career researchers both in the professional development workshops and in the Student Summit. Another key factor was the close working relationships between informal and formal science entities, including involvement of informal science learning facilities and informal science education leaders. The program also created cutting-edge curriculum materials titled the ELF, (Environmental Literacy Framework with a focus on climate change), providing an earth systems

  10. NATO Summit – 2016: results and prospects for Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Vonsovych

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the results and prospects of the NATO Summit in Warsaw in 2016 for Ukraine. It was determined that one of the Summit’s outcomes for Ukraine can be considered categorical NATO’s condemnation of aggression acts of the Russian Federation against our country, and also that will never be legitimized its actions on the change of borders, in particular the annexation of Crimea and support of separatism in Ukraine. It is proved that the approval of the Comprehensive Assistance Package for Ukraine will contribute to the reforming of the defense and security structures based on NATO’s standards and principles, including the establishment of civilian democratic control over the armed forces and to ensure their interoperability with NATO. Reasoned argument that the presentation of the Strategic Defense Bulletin of Ukraine at the Summit is a demonstration of execution of the programming steps of Ukraine’s cooperation with NATO, but at the same time, its practical component of the full implementation raises a number of doubts. It is founded that the content of the joint statement of the Commission Ukraine – NATO at the highest level is, to a greater extent, declarative than practical. It made a conclusion that the outcomes of the NATO Summit on Ukraine could be more if the Ukrainian delegation had previously worked in more detail the practical component of their positions. It was determined that an important issue for Ukraine in the future will clearly define NATO’s position with regard to the Russian Federation. On how quickly this happens will depends the further determining (or, perhaps, transformation of the course of cooperation with NATO.

  11. Coordination and Convening of the 2016 Arctic Science Summit Week

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzman, Larry D. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2016-11-13

    The Arctic Science Summit Week, Arctic Observing Summit, Arctic Council Senior Arctic Officials, Model Arctic Council, and International Arctic Assembly were convened on the campus of the University of Alaska Fairbanks with great productivity and satisfaction of the participants. We were pleased to welcome over 1000 participants from 30 different nations and over 130 different institutions. The organization and execution of these meetings was extensive and complex involving more than 250 coordinators, volunteers and contributors from across Alaska. The participants were enthusiastic in their praise of the content and accomplishments of the meeting, but they were equally happy about the genuine welcome offered to our guests by the people of Alaska. Hosting a complex event such as this summit required an army of supporting services and we were blessed to have volunteers from Fairbanks, North Pole, Anchorage and other communities throughout Alaska helping us meet these needs. This truly was an event hosted by the people of Alaska. The significance of these events cannot be overstated. The US and global communities are finally coming to the realization of the important role that the Arctic plays in international politics, economics, and science. The Arctic has experienced tremendous changes in recent years, offering new opportunities that may be addressed through international collaborations, and serious challenges that must be addressed through active investment, adaptation and national and international coordination. Over 10% of the meeting participants were indigenous peoples, from indigenous organizations or hailed from small remote communities. This is still lower than we had hoped, but it is greater participation than similar meetings have experienced in the past. It is through such engagement that we can attack problems related to the changing environment, stagnant economies, and social ills.

  12. California: Environmental Health Coalition Clean Ports, Healthy Communities in San Diego (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Health Coalition (EHC) is a recipient of a CARE Level II cooperative agreement grant. The Clean Ports, Healthy Communities in San Diego targets the Barrio Logan and Old Town National City areas located along San Diego Bay.

  13. COalitions in COOperation Networks (COCOON): Social Network Analysis and Game Theory to Enhance Cooperation Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory

    2012-01-01

    Sie, R. L. L. (2012). COalitions in COOperation Networks (COCOON): Social Network Analysis and Game Theory to Enhance Cooperation Networks (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). September, 28, 2012, Open Universiteit in the Netherlands (CELSTEC), Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  14. Role-Based Access Control for Coalition Partners in Maritime Domain Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDaniel, Christopher R; Tardy, Matthew L

    2005-01-01

    The need for Shared Situational Awareness (SSA) in accomplishing joint missions by coalition militaries, law enforcement, the intelligence community, and the private sector creates a unique challenge to providing access control...

  15. Friends Indeed? Coalition Burden Sharing and the War In Iraq. Volume 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baltrusaitis, Daniel F

    2008-01-01

    .... This research examines the conditions that influence state burden sharing behavior for ad hoc security coalitions and examines the decision making model developed by Andrew Bennett, Joseph Lepgold, and Danny...

  16. A block chain based architecture for asset management in coalition operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Desai, Nirmit; Preece, Alun; Taylor, Ian

    2017-05-01

    To support dynamic communities of interests in coalition operations, new architectures for efficient sharing of ISR assets are needed. The use of blockchain technology in wired business environments, such as digital currency systems, offers an interesting solution by creating a way to maintain a distributed shared ledger without requiring a single trusted authority. In this paper, we discuss how a blockchain-based system can be modified to provide a solution for dynamic asset sharing amongst coalition members, enabling the creation of a logically centralized asset management system by a seamless policy-compliant federation of different coalition systems. We discuss the use of blockchain for three different types of assets in a coalition context, showing how blockchain can offer a suitable solution for sharing assets in those environments. We also discuss the limitations in the current implementations of blockchain which need to be overcome for the technology to become more effective in a decentralized tactical edge environment.

  17. 2. Coalition Collapse in the Context of Negotiation and Inter-Party Cooperation Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Biira, Catherine Promise

    2013-01-01

    Although most negotiators are primarily focused on reaching an agreement, the case of the opposition Inter-Party Cooperation coalition in Uganda demonstrates that “getting to yes” is not enough. The IPC collapsed just five months before it could participate in the very election it had been formed to commonly contest. As suggested in the previous section, while disagreement as to whether the coalition should participate in the 2011 election was publicly stated as the cause of the IPC collapse,...

  18. Survivorship and the chronic cancer patient: Patterns in treatment-related effects, follow-up care, and use of survivorship care plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Melissa A; Vachani, Carolyn C; Bach, Christina; Hampshire, Margaret K; Arnold-Korzeniowski, Karen; Metz, James M; Hill-Kayser, Christine E

    2017-11-01

    The survivorship needs of patients living with chronic cancer (CC) and their use of survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been overlooked and underappreciated. A convenience sample of 39,088 SCPs completed for cancer survivors with an Internet-based SCP tool was examined; it included 5847 CC survivors (15%; CC was defined as chronic leukemia and/or recurrent/metastatic cancer of another nature). Patient-reported treatment effects and follow-up care patterns were compared between CC survivors and survivors treated with curative intent (CI). Responses from a follow-up survey regarding SCP satisfaction and use were reviewed. CC survivors had greater odds of experiencing multiple treatment-related effects than survivors treated with CI; these effects included fatigue, cognitive changes, dyspnea, peripheral neuropathy, lymphedema, and erectile dysfunction. Nearly half of CC survivors were managed by an oncologist alone, and they were less likely than CI patients to be comanaged by a primary care provider and an oncologist. Fewer SCPs were generated by health care providers (HCPs) for CC survivors versus CI survivors. A smaller proportion of CC users versus CI users rated their experience and satisfaction with the SCP tool as very good or excellent, and CC users were less likely to share the HCP summary with their health care team. A substantial number of CC survivors, often considered incurable but treatable, seek survivorship support. Tools to facilitate participation, communication, and coordination of care are valuable for these patients, and future iterations of SCPs should be designed to address the particular circumstances of living with CC. Cancer 2017;123:4268-4276. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Subtalar coalition: usefulness of the C sign on lateral radiographs of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Min Hee; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kang, Heung Sik

    2001-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of the talocalcaneal C sign in the diagnosis of subtalar coalition, as seen on lateral radiographs of the ankle. Lateral radiographs of 12 ankles in 11 patients were included in this study. Twelve subtalar coalitions were confirmed by surgery (n=6), or by CT and/or MR (n=6). The presence of the talocalcaneal C sign on lateral ankle radiographs was determined. The C sign was continuous in six feet and interrupted in the remaining six. Subtalar coalition occurred simultaneously inthe middle and posterior subtalar joints in two cases, the posterior subtalar joint only in six, and in the middle subtalar joint only in four. In six cases confirmed at surgery, subtalar coalitions consisted of both synostosis and non-osseous fusion (synchondrosis and/or syndesmosis) and in one case of middle subtalar coalition, there was a bony bridge. The remaining six cases. confirmed at CT or MRI, involved both synostosis and non-osseous fusion (n=1) or non-osseous fusion only (n=5). In the diagnosis of subtalar coalition, the talocalcaneal C sign, seen on lateral radiographs of the ankle, is a useful indicator

  20. Bicruciate-retaining Total Knee Replacement Provides Satisfactory Function and Implant Survivorship at 23 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, James W

    2015-07-01

    One of the goals of a TKA is to approximate the function of a normal knee. Preserving the natural ligaments might provide a method of restoring close to normal function. Sacrifice of the ACL is common and practical during a TKA. However, this ligament is functional in more than 60% of patients undergoing a TKA and kinematic studies support the concept of bicruciate-retaining (that is, ACL-preserving) TKA; however, relatively few studies have evaluated patients treated with bicruciate-retaining TKA implants. I asked: (1) what is the long-term (minimum 20-year) survivorship, (2) what are the functional results, and (3) what are the reasons for revision of bicruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty prostheses? From January 1989 to September 1992, I performed 639 total knee replacements in 537 patients. Of these, 489 were performed in 390 patients using a bicruciate-retaining, minimally constrained device. During the period in question, this knee prosthesis was used for all patients observed intraoperatively to have an intact, functional ACL with between 15° varus and 15° valgus joint deformity. There were 234 women and 156 men with a mean age at surgery of 65 years (range, 42-84 years) and a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis in 89%. The patella was resurfaced in all knees. The mean followup was 23 years (range, 20-24 years). At the time of this review, 199 (51%) patients had died and 31 (8%) patients were lost to followup, leaving 160 (41%) patients (214 knees) available for review. Component survivorship was determined by competing-risks analysis and Kaplan Meier survivorship analysis with revision for any reason as the primary endpoint. Patients were evaluated every 2 years to assess ROM, joint laxity, knee stability, and to determine American Knee Society scores. The Kaplan-Meier survivorship was 89% (95% CI, 82%-93%) at 23 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint. Competing-risks survivorship was 94% (95% CI, 91%%-96 %) at 23 years. At followup, the mean

  1. Hydrothermal activity on the summit of Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, H; Tsubota, H; Nakai, T; Ishibashi, J; Akagi, T; Gamo, T; Tilbrook, B; Igarashi, G; Kodera, M; Shitashima, K

    1987-01-01

    Loihi Seamount is located about 30km southeast of the Island of Hawaii; it rises from the sea floor at a depth of 4000m and reaches a maximum elevation of 1000m blow sea level. Oceanographic studies including CTD survey of warm sites and bottom photography confirmed several hydrothermal fields on the summit of the seamount. The summit is covered with hydrothermal plumes which are extremely rich in methane, helium, carbon dioxide, iron and manganese; the maximum concentration of helium is 91.8 n1/1, the highest so far reported for open-ocean water. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio of helium injected into seawater is 14 times the atmospheric level. The 3He/heat and CO/sub 2//heat ratios in the plumes are one to two orders of magnitude greater than those at oceanic spreading centers, implying a more primitive source region for hotspot volcanism. The plumes also show negative pH anomalies up to half a pH unit from ambient owing to the high injection rate of CO/sub 2/. (4 figs, 3 photos, 1 tab, 31 refs)

  2. Outcomes and Suggestions of the Nuclear Security Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae San; Jung, Myung Tak [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Through The third Nuclear Security Summit (NSS), the measurement for the nuclear security has become more strengthening and participating countries could recognize the importance of nuclear security than before. From the NSS sessions, the leaders of participating countries and international organizations (IAEA, UN, EU and INTERPOL) had an in-depth discussion about the seriousness of the nuclear terrorism, the urgency issues for strengthening the nuclear security, etc. What issues was discussed in NSS processes since 2010 and which facts become more important than ever for nuclear security? The purpose of this paper is to provide the substantive outcomes from the 1st to 3rd NSS and suggestions for consolidating the next NSS. The summit process has helped strengthen the nuclear security measures. In the following two years before 4th NSS, there will be various follow-up activities for making an effort to implementing national commitments, joint statement, continuous outreach with IAEA/UN and agreed measures in Hague. It should produce the substantial measures for enhancing the nuclear security that are aimed to the each country. And preemptively, it is necessary to understand the each nuclear security level by using the concrete questionnaire sheets substitute for the national progress report.

  3. Report on World Homoeopathy Summit organized by Global Homeopathy Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswara Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Global Homeopathy Foundation (GHF organized the World Homoeopathy Summit (WHS at Birla Matoshree Sabhaghar, Mumbai, 400020, India on 11-12 April, 2015. Ministry of AYUSH, Central Council for Research in Homoeopathy, Central Council of Homoeopathy and Homoeopathic Pharmacopeia Laboratory were the institutional collaborators. Homoeopathic Medical Association of India, Indian Homoeopathic Medical Association and the Indian Chapter of Liga Medicorum Homeopathica Internationalis supported the event. The WHS was aimed at enhancing research aptitudes of young homoeopaths, increasing clinical proficiency of practitioners, encouraging scientists from pure and applied sciences to associate in fundamental research and also inviting government as well as non government institutions to patronize research in Homoeopathy. About 800 delegates from across the country, mainly practitioners, teaching faculties, postgraduate students, Ph.D. scholars and scientists attended the summit. Scientific sessions on nature of homoeopathic medicine, Evidence and Mechanism of its action were presented by molecular biologists, engineers, physicists, immunologists, pharmacologists, chemists, nano-technologists, zoologists, homeopaths and conventional doctors from some of the premium Universities. The conference ended with panel discussion moderated by Dr. Raj K. Manchanda and Dr. Rajesh Shah. It was recommended to encourage more scientific research and better documentation in Homoeopathy and to review the existing approaches in practice.

  4. Outcomes and Suggestions of the Nuclear Security Summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae San; Jung, Myung Tak

    2014-01-01

    Through The third Nuclear Security Summit (NSS), the measurement for the nuclear security has become more strengthening and participating countries could recognize the importance of nuclear security than before. From the NSS sessions, the leaders of participating countries and international organizations (IAEA, UN, EU and INTERPOL) had an in-depth discussion about the seriousness of the nuclear terrorism, the urgency issues for strengthening the nuclear security, etc. What issues was discussed in NSS processes since 2010 and which facts become more important than ever for nuclear security? The purpose of this paper is to provide the substantive outcomes from the 1st to 3rd NSS and suggestions for consolidating the next NSS. The summit process has helped strengthen the nuclear security measures. In the following two years before 4th NSS, there will be various follow-up activities for making an effort to implementing national commitments, joint statement, continuous outreach with IAEA/UN and agreed measures in Hague. It should produce the substantial measures for enhancing the nuclear security that are aimed to the each country. And preemptively, it is necessary to understand the each nuclear security level by using the concrete questionnaire sheets substitute for the national progress report

  5. Report of the 2014 Programming Models and Environments Summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Lethin, Richard [US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-19

    Programming models and environments play the essential roles in high performance computing of enabling the conception, design, implementation and execution of science and engineering application codes. Programmer productivity is strongly influenced by the effectiveness of our programming models and environments, as is software sustainability since our codes have lifespans measured in decades, so the advent of new computing architectures, increased concurrency, concerns for resilience, and the increasing demands for high-fidelity, multi-physics, multi-scale and data-intensive computations mean that we have new challenges to address as part of our fundamental R&D requirements. Fortunately, we also have new tools and environments that make design, prototyping and delivery of new programming models easier than ever. The combination of new and challenging requirements and new, powerful toolsets enables significant synergies for the next generation of programming models and environments R&D. This report presents the topics discussed and results from the 2014 DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Programming Models & Environments Summit, and subsequent discussions among the summit participants and contributors to topics in this report.

  6. Proceedings of the clean air and climate change summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    The Clean Air Partnership was established in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) over 10 years ago to work on issues related to air pollution and climate change. This summit presented details of the partnership's municipal activities and provided an outline of various projects conducted to reduce air pollution, increase the use of green energy, and encourage residents to reduce their ecological footprint. Climate change was discussed in relation to the recent economic crisis and recently discovered problems related to ocean acidification. The International Energy Agency (IEA) annual report was discussed in relation to peak oil and future economic crises. Advancements in green energy policy in Ontario were outlined. Sustainable housing and renewable energy projects in Germany were presented along with successful urban designs in Melbourne, New York City, and Denver. The GTA-CAC inter-governmental declaration on clean air was discussed, and an interim progress report was presented. The summit concluded with a video presentation of a collaborative artistic piece about climate change and the Arctic. 11 figs.

  7. Proceedings of the clean air and climate change summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The Clean Air Partnership was established in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) over 10 years ago to work on issues related to air pollution and climate change. This summit presented details of the partnership's municipal activities and provided an outline of various projects conducted to reduce air pollution, increase the use of green energy, and encourage residents to reduce their ecological footprint. Climate change was discussed in relation to the recent economic crisis and recently discovered problems related to ocean acidification. The International Energy Agency (IEA) annual report was discussed in relation to peak oil and future economic crises. Advancements in green energy policy in Ontario were outlined. Sustainable housing and renewable energy projects in Germany were presented along with successful urban designs in Melbourne, New York City, and Denver. The GTA-CAC inter-governmental declaration on clean air was discussed, and an interim progress report was presented. The summit concluded with a video presentation of a collaborative artistic piece about climate change and the Arctic. 11 figs.

  8. Primative components, crustal assimilation, and magmatic degassing of the 2008 Kilauea summit eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Michael C.; Thornber, Carl R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions at Kīlauea starting in 2008 reflect a shallow eruptive plumbing system inundated by a bourgeoning supply of new magma from depth. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions, host glass, and bulk lava compositions of magma erupted at both the summit and east rift zone demonstrate chemical continuity at both ends of a well-worn summit-to-rift pipeline. Analysis of glass within dense-cored lapilli erupted from the summit in March – August 2008 show these are not samplings of compositionally distinct magmas stored in the shallow summit magma reservoir, but instead result from remelting and assimilation of fragments from conduit wall and vent blocks. Summit pyroclasts show the predominant and most primitive component erupted to be a homogenous, relatively trace-element-depleted melt that is a compositionally indistinguishable from east rift lava. Based on a “top-down” model for the geochemical variation in east rift zone lava over the past 30 years, we suggest that the apparent absence of a 1982 enriched component in melt inclusions, as well as the proposed summit-rift zone connectivity based on sulfur and mineral chemistry, indicate that the last of the pre-1983 magma has been flushed out of the summit reservoir during the surge of mantle-derived magma from 2003-2007.

  9. Changing Public Discourse on the Environment: Danish Media Coverage of the Rio and Johannesburg UN Summits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Kjerulf

    2008-01-01

    Environmental degradation and unsustainable development were addressed on a global scale at the UN Summits in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and Johannesburg in 2002. This article presents analyses of Danish television coverage of these two summits and related topics viewing the media stories as exemplary...

  10. Sustaining Physics Teacher Education Coalition programs in physics teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Scherr

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms of increasing the number of physics teachers educated per year at institutions with thriving physics teacher preparation programs may inspire and support other institutions in building thriving programs of their own. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC, led by the American Physical Society (APS and the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT, has supported transformation of physics teacher preparation programs at a number of institutions around the country for over a decade. In 2012–2013, PhysTEC supported an independent study on the sustainability of its sites after project funding ends. The study sought to measure the extent to which programs have been sustained and to identify what features should be prioritized for building sustainable physics teacher preparation programs. Most of the studied sites have sustained increases in the number of physics teachers educated per year as well as funding for physics teacher preparation. About half of the programs are thriving, in that in the post-award period, they have further increased both the number of physics teachers educated per year and funding for physics teacher preparation. All studied sites that sustained increases in the number of physics teachers educated per year have two features in common: a champion of physics teacher education and institutional commitment. The thriving physics teacher preparation programs in this study implemented different elements of physics teacher preparation according to diverse local priorities and opportunities, including the unique expertise of local personnel.

  11. Domestic coalitions in the FTAA negotiations: the Brazilian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Castelan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper proposes an explanation to the domestic coalitions organised in Brazil around the FTAA negotiations, which stand as a hard case for the existing theories on political cleavages: industrialists and trade unions, albeit having shared common interests in the negotiations, did not adopt a joint strategy to foster their positions. The hypothesis to explain the political alignments in the FTAA is that the opening of the Brazilian market, which had advanced a lot in the years of negotiations, altered the priorities of workers and employers, as well as their preferences in foreign trade policy, hindering the reconciliation of class interests. Both agreed that the U.S. proposal for the FTAA was undesirable, but they completely disagreed on other issues that emerged in the political agenda during the reforms period, such as the role of the State in an open economy, the scope of labour and social rights and the social security system, the structure of taxation, etc. Some of the controversial issues were not new, but the international trade liberalisation intensified the dispute over them.

  12. Childhood cancer survivorship educational resources in North American pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship training programs: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul C; Schiffman, Joshua D; Huang, Sujuan; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Eshelman-Kent, Debra; Wright, Jennifer; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Hudson, Melissa M

    2011-12-15

    Childhood cancer survivors require life-long care by clinicians with an understanding of the specific risks arising from the prior cancer and its therapy. We surveyed North American pediatric hematology/oncology training programs to evaluate their resources and capacity for educating medical trainees about survivorship. An Internet survey was sent to training program directors and long-term follow-up clinic (LTFU) directors at the 56 US and Canadian centers with pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship programs. Perceptions regarding barriers to and optimal methods of delivering survivorship education were compared among training program and LTFU clinic directors. Responses were received from 45/56 institutions of which 37/45 (82%) programs require that pediatric hematology/oncology fellows complete a mandatory rotation focused on survivorship. The rotation is 4 weeks or less in 21 programs. Most (36/45; 80%) offer didactic lectures on survivorship as part of their training curriculum, and these are considered mandatory for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows at 26/36 (72.2%). Only 10 programs (22%) provide training to medical specialty trainees other than pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Respondents identified lack of time for trainees to spend learning about late effects as the most significant barrier to providing survivorship teaching. LTFU clinic directors were more likely than training program directors to identify lack of interest in survivorship among trainees and survivorship not being a formal or expected part of the fellowship training program as barriers. The results of this survey highlight the need to establish standard training requirements to promote the achievement of basic survivorship competencies by pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Worker life tables, survivorship, and longevity in colonies of Bombus (Fervidobombus atratus (Hymenoptera: Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Vieira da Silva-Matos

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Survivorship curves and longevity of workers were studied in two queenright and two queenless colonies of Bombus (Fervidobombus atratus. Survivorship curves for workers of all colonies were, in general, convex, indicating an increasing mortality rate with increasing age. The mean longevity for the workers from queenright colonies, 24.3 days and 17.6 days, was not significantly different from that in queenless colonies, 21.2 days and 20.2 days. In all colonies workers started foraging activities when aged 0-5 days, and the potential forager rates rose progressively with increasing age. Mortality rates within each age interval were significantly correlated with the foraging worker rates in all colonies. Only in two of the colonies (one queenright and one queenless longevity was significantly correlated with worker size. The duration of brood development period seems to be one of the most important factors influencing adult worker longevity in this bumble bee species.

  14. Disparities in the survivorship experience among Latina survivors of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olagunju, Tinuke O; Liu, Yihang; Liang, Li-Jung; Stomber, James M; Griggs, Jennifer J; Ganz, Patricia A; Thind, Amardeep; Maly, Rose C

    2018-04-06

    The authors investigated disparities in the survivorship experience among Latinas with breast cancer (BC) in comparison with non-Latinas. A cross-sectional bilingual telephone survey was conducted among 212 Latina and non-Latina women within 10 to 24 months after a diagnosis of BC (AJCC TNM staging system stage 0-III) at 2 Los Angeles County public hospitals. Data were collected using the Preparing for Life as a (New) Survivor (PLANS) scale, Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions Questionnaire (PEPPI), Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) Symptom Checklist, Satisfaction with Care and Information Scale, Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) tool, Charlson Comorbidity Index adapted for patient self-report, and the 12-item Short Form Health Survey. Controlling variables included age, stage as determined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging system, educational level, and study site in multivariate analyses. The mean ages of Latinas and non-Latinas were 51.5 years and 56.6 years, respectively. Compared with non-Latinas, Latinas reported less BC survivorship knowledge (27.3 vs 30.7; Psatisfaction with BC survivorship care (9.6 vs 8.8; P = .298), or their discussion with physicians (9.6 vs 8.1; P = .07). These ethnic group differences persisted in multivariate analyses, with the exception of PEPPI. Latina survivors of BC experienced disparities in BC knowledge and satisfaction with information received, but believed themselves to be prepared for survivorship and were as satisfied with providers, care received, and discussions with physicians as non-Latinas. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  15. Colorectal cancer patients' preferences for type of caregiver during survivorship care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieldraaijer, T; Duineveld, L A M; Donkervoort, S C; Busschers, W B; van Weert, H C P M; Wind, J

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors are currently included in a secondary care-led survivorship care programme. Efforts are underway to transfer this survivorship care to primary care, but met with some reluctance by patients and caregivers. This study assesses (1) what caregiver patients prefer to contact for symptoms during survivorship care, (2) what patient factors are associated with a preferred caregiver, and (3) whether the type of symptom is associated with a preferred caregiver. A cross-sectional study of CRC survivors at different time points. For 14 different symptoms, patients reported if they would consult a caregiver, and who they would contact if so. Patient and disease characteristics were retrieved from hospital and general practice records. Two hundred and sixty patients participated (response rate 54%) of whom the average age was 67, 54% were male. The median time after surgery was seven months (range 0-60 months). Patients were divided fairly evenly between tumour stages 1-3, 33% had received chemotherapy. Men, patients older than 65 years, and patients with chronic comorbid conditions preferred to consult their general practitioner (GP). Women, patients with stage 3 disease, and patients that had received chemotherapy preferred to consult their secondary care provider. For all symptoms, patients were more likely to consult their GP, except for (1) rectal blood loss, (2) weight loss, and (3) fear that cancer had recurred, in which case they would consult both their primary and secondary care providers. Patients appreciated all caregivers involved in survivorship care highly; with 8 out of 10 points. CRC survivors frequently consult their GP in the current situation, and for symptoms that could alarm them to a possible recurrent disease consult both their GP and secondary care provider. Patient and tumour characteristics influence patients' preferred caregiver.

  16. From diagnosis through survivorship: health-care experiences of colorectal cancer survivors with ostomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marcia; McMullen, Carmit K.; Altschuler, Andrea; Mohler, M. Jane; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The journey from diagnosis through treatment to survivorship can be challenging for colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors with permanent ostomies. Memories of both the positive and negative health-care interactions can persist years after the initial diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the health-care experiences of long-term (>5 years) CRC survivors with ostomies. Methods Thirty-three CRC survivors with ostomies who were members of Kaiser Permanente, an integrated care organization, in Oregon, southwestern Washington and northern California participated in eight focus groups. Discussions from the focus groups were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for potential categories and themes. Results Health-care-related themes described CRC survivors’ experiences with diagnosis, treatment decision-making, initial experiences with ostomy, and survivorship. Participants discussed both positive and negative health-care-related experiences, including the need for continued access to trained nurses for ostomy self-care, access to peer support, and resources related to managing persistent, debilitating symptoms. Conclusions Long-term CRC survivors with ostomies have both positive and negative health-care experiences, regardless of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and gender. Long-term support mechanisms and quality survivorship care that CRC survivors with ostomies can access are needed to promote positive adjustments and improved HRQOL. Structured abstract The current literature in CRC survivor-ship suggests that HRQOL concerns can persist years after treatment completion. The coordination of care to manage persistent late- and long-term effects are still lacking for CRC survivors living with an ostomy. Findings from this qualitative analysis will aid in the development of support strategies that foster more positive adjustments for CRC survivors living with an ostomy and support their ongoing ostomy-related needs. PMID:24442998

  17. Cancer survivorship services for indigenous peoples: where we stand, where to improve? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Bridget M; Wakefield, Claire E; McLoone, Jordana K; Garvey, Gail; Cohn, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    There are few support programs with evidence-based practices which address the needs of cancer survivors from indigenous populations. This systematic review analysed the experiences and current support services for cancer survivors from indigenous populations following the cessation of cancer treatment. The data sourced for this article was identified from a systematic search of five databases (MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, PyscINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE). Studies were selected if they described the experiences of indigenous cancer survivors, their families, and/or clinicians primarily responsible for their care. In total 208 unique abstracts were screened, from which 17 studies were identified as having fulfilled all selection criteria. Of the 17 articles reviewed, 12 described qualitative data and 5 provided quantitative data. Common themes identified included the importance of family support throughout the survivorship period, the negative effect of community stigmatization, fatalistic attitudes towards cancer, and the importance of spirituality in coping with, and understanding, the cancer experience. Potential barriers to accessing care included distance and difficulties revisiting the survivor's cancer experience due to an associated fear of cancer recurrence. Indigenous cancer survivors would benefit from survivorship programs more specifically tailored to their individual circumstances, such as personalized spiritual care, facilitation of increased involvement of family members, and connection to other indigenous cancer survivors. The results from this review indicate that there is a need for survivorship care to be shaped specifically for the needs of indigenous cancer survivors.

  18. Women with breast cancer: self-reported distress in early survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne; Crosthwaite, Kara; Stout, Robin; Jones, Rachel N; Holloman, Christopher; Shapiro, Charles; Andersen, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    To identify and compare levels of distress and sources of problems among patients with breast cancer in early survivorship. Descriptive, cross-sectional. A National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. 100 breast cancer survivors were selected to represent four time points in the cancer trajectory. Distress was self-reported using the Distress Thermometer and its 38-item problem list. Analysis of variance and chi-square analyses were performed as appropriate. Distress scores, problem reports, and time groups. Participants scored in range of the cutoff of more than 4 (range = 4.1-5.1) from treatment through three months post-treatment. At six months post-treatment, distress levels were significantly lower. Significant differences were found between groups on the total problem list score (p = 0.007) and emotional (p = 0.01) and physical subscale scores (p = 0.003). Comparison of groups at different points in the cancer trajectory found similar elevated levels from diagnosis through three months. Distress remained elevated in early survivorship but significantly decreased at six months post-treatment. Interventions to reduce or prevent distress may improve outcomes in early survivorship.

  19. Culture and Inter-Group Relations Theory as a Pathway to Improve Decision Making in Coalition Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Mara, William J; Heacox, Nancy J; Gwynne, John W; Smillie, Robert J

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. military frequently participates in coalitions involving foreign military organizations as well as domestic and foreign civilian groups, such as governmental organizations, private volunteer...

  20. Model-Checking an Alternating-time Temporal Logic with Knowledge, Imperfect Information, Perfect Recall and Communicating Coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Dima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a variant of ATL with distributed knowledge operators based on a synchronous and perfect recall semantics. The coalition modalities in this logic are based on partial observation of the full history, and incorporate a form of cooperation between members of the coalition in which agents issue their actions based on the distributed knowledge, for that coalition, of the system history. We show that model-checking is decidable for this logic. The technique utilizes two variants of games with imperfect information and partially observable objectives, as well as a subset construction for identifying states whose histories are indistinguishable to the considered coalition.

  1. Continued benefits of a technical assistance web site to local tobacco control coalitions during a state budget shortfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Young, Walter F; Bettinghaus, Erwin P; Borland, Ron; Walther, Joseph B; Helme, Donald; Andersen, Peter A; Cutter, Gary R; Maloy, Julie A

    2011-01-01

    A state budget shortfall defunded 10 local tobacco coalitions during a randomized trial but defunded coalitions continued to have access to 2 technical assistance Web sites. To test the ability of Web-based technology to provide technical assistance to local tobacco control coalitions. Randomized 2-group trial with local tobacco control coalitions as the unit of randomization. Local communities (ie, counties) within the State of Colorado. Leaders and members in 34 local tobacco control coalitions funded by the state health department in Colorado. Two technical assistance Web sites: A Basic Web site with text-based information and a multimedia Enhanced Web site containing learning modules, resources, and communication features. Use of the Web sites in minutes, pages, and session and evaluations of coalition functioning on coalition development, conflict resolution, leadership satisfaction, decision-making satisfaction, shared mission, personal involvement, and organization involvement in survey of leaders and members. Coalitions that were defunded but had access to the multimedia Enhanced Web site during the Fully Funded period and after defunding continued to use it (treatment group × funding status × period, F(3,714) = 3.18, P = .0234). Coalitions with access to the Basic Web site had low Web site use throughout and use by defunded coalitions was nearly zero when funding ceased. Members in defunded Basic Web site coalitions reported that their coalitions functioned worse than defunded Enhanced Web site coalitions (coalition development: group × status, F(1,360) = 4.81, P = .029; conflict resolution: group × status, F(1,306) = 5.69, P = .018; leadership satisfaction: group × status, F(1,342) = 5.69, P = .023). The Enhanced Web site may have had a protective effect on defunded coalitions. Defunded coalitions may have increased their capacity by using the Enhanced Web site when fully funded or by continuing to use the available online resources after defunding

  2. Culture and Inter-Group Relations Theory as a Pathway to Improve Decision Making in Coalition Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Mara, William J; Heacox, Nancy J; Gwynne, John W; Smillie, Robert J

    2000-01-01

    ... organizations, and special interest groups. Due to the wide cultural and organizational diversity of the participant groups, coalition operations pose significant challenges to the U.S. military...

  3. A Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, L.; Hehn, J.; Kass, J.; O'Grady, R.; Scotchmoor, J.; Stucky, R.

    2006-12-01

    For many of the problems facing contemporary societies, such as potential impacts of climate change, coastal degradation, reductions of fisheries stocks, volcanic and earthquake hazards in densely populated areas, quality and availability of water, and exploitation of hydrocarbon resources and development of alternative energy sources, formulation of wise public policy depends on evaluation of the state of geoscientific research in the relevant areas. In a democratic society, public discourse about and input to policy decisions on key issues affecting the public welfare requires a public that understands the scientific research process, values the contribution of science to society, and has a working knowledge of what science can and cannot yet say about specific issues. Arguably, that ideal falls short in contemporary American society. Disturbing trends in science education, low public scientific literacy, and increasing alarms about U.S. competitiveness have all been prominent national news topics in recent years. (1) A recent National Science Board report indicated that two-thirds of Americans do not understand what science is, how it is conducted, and what one can expect from it. (2) A recent Gallup poll reports widespread and increasingly prevalent belief in pseudoscience. (3) There is a growing public complacency about and disengagement from science at the very moment when the impact of science on public life is greater than ever. (4) The Business Roundtable of major U.S. companies notes that the scientific and technical building blocks of our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gathering strength. In response, a Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science COPUS has been initiated. Essential to COPUS is the premise that public understanding of science and the scientific process and an awareness of the impacts of scientific advancements on our quality of life are necessary to increase student interest in science as a

  4. Third Space Weather Summit Held for Industry and Government Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    2009-12-01

    The potential for space weather effects has been increasing significantly in recent years. For instance, in 2008 airlines flew about 8000 transpolar flights, which experience greater exposure to space weather than nontranspolar flights. This is up from 368 transpolar flights in 2000, and the number of such flights is expected to continue to grow. Transpolar flights are just one example of the diverse technologies susceptible to space weather effects identified by the National Research Council's Severe Space Weather Events—Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts: A Workshop Report (2008). To discuss issues related to the increasing need for reliable space weather information, experts from industry and government agencies met at the third summit of the Commercial Space Weather Interest Group (CSWIG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), held 30 April 2009 during Space Weather Week (SWW), in Boulder, Colo.

  5. The Challenge of "Fixing the Debt": Recommendations from the Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Donna L; Chaddock, Harry M

    2018-01-01

    With education debt repayment taking up a significant amount of veterinarians' salaries, for a significant time into the working years, concern has been building that the current debt to starting salary ratio in the veterinary profession is not sustainable. The current ratio is 1.99:1, but it can be significantly higher for students who attend schools as an out-of-state resident. In April, 180 people concerned about this issue gathered at Michigan State University's College of Veterinary Medicine for a Fix the Debt Summit, which focused on actions that would reduce this ratio to a more sustainable level. Attendees were students; new graduates; those working in veterinary academia; employers of veterinarians; and those affiliated with the profession, such as professional associations. As solutions were proposed, participants also committed to taking action within their field of influence.

  6. Economic impact of the world summit on sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JH Martins

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available South Africa hosted the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD in 2002.  This event is regarded as the single biggest conference to be held anywhere in the world. The aim of this paper is to set out the estimated economic impact of the WSSD and its parallel events on South Africa.  This impact can be expressed in monetary terms as well as employment figures.  The impact is calculated by using an input-output model and employment spin-offs determined from the IO table by using partial multipliers.  The input data were derived from a survey amongst WSSD delegates as well as information on government and private investments made.

  7. Assessing Summit Engagement with Other International Organizations in Global Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Larionova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent decades have witnessed dramatic changes all over the world. One major trend is the proliferation and diversification of actors, forums and their arrangements to address global governance challenges, which has led to fragmentation in global governance. However, such contested multilateralism has a positive dimension, as the emergence of informal multilateral institutions claiming a major role in defining the global governance agenda creates alternatives for providing common goods. New arrangements acquire their own actorness and place in the system of global governance. In certain policy areas, there is a clear trend for the new summit institutions’ leadership. The most visible recent cases include the Group of 20 (G20, the BRICS group of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC forum, with APEC gaining importance regionally and globally. These new informal groupings work on their own agenda. They also engage with established international organizations to steer global governance processes. Taken together, the transformative trends in international relations, the emergence of new actors, tensions between exclusive and inclusive clubs, and demands for the legitimacy and effectiveness of the international institutions define the relevance of the study, systematization and comparative analysis of the effectiveness of this model of cooperation among international institutions. This article builds an analytical framework by undertaking three tasks. It first reviews the key concepts. Second, it argues for a rational choice institutionalist approach. Third, it puts forward a hypothesis for research: to compensate for their inefficiencies, summit institutions engage with other international organizations in a mode they regard most efficient for attainment of their goals. The modes of those institutions’ engagement with other international organizations as reflected in the leaders

  8. A CONCEPTUAL TOOL FOR ASSESSING CLIENT PERFORMANCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT COALITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary D. Holt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the significant impact of client performance on overall project performance and the interdependence of participant%5C%27s performance in the construction project coalition %28i.e. clients%2C designers and constructors%29%2C there is a need to establish client performance measures. Based on data collected from in-depth interviews with nineteen UK architects and nine UK contractors%2C a generic tool for the on-going formal assessment of client performance is presented. It was found that this approach to performance assessment %28i.e. from the view point of other%2C non-client coalition participants%29 should lead to improved project relationships. Data analysis showed that in addition to %5C%27harder%5C%27 measures such as understanding of project requirements and finance%2C other%2C %5C%27softer%5C%27 measures of client performance %28e.g. attitude%29 were worthy of consideration since they determine the quality of participant relationships. It is recommended that the tool be used to promote more effective client performance and thus enhance coalition relationships%2C enabling continuous improvement. The ultimate aim is to develop similar tools for the assessment of all coalition participants based on a culture of openness and trust. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : assessment+tool%2C+coalition+participants%2C+client+performance%2C+perceptions%2C+performance+measures%2C+satisfaction.

  9. The C sign: more specific for flatfoot deformity than subtalar coalition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.R.; Rosenberg, Z.S.; Thornhill, B.A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To assess the sensitivity and specificity of the C sign, a C-shaped line created by the outline of the talar dome and the inferior margin of the sustentaculum tali on lateral ankle radiographs, for patients with both flatfoot deformity and specifically talocalcaneal (TC) coalition.Design and patients. All patients in this retrospective study were under 35 years of age and had a lateral ankle radiograph and follow-up CT scan for a non-traumatic indication. Forty-eight cases over the past 5 years fulfilled these criteria. Two masked musculoskeletal radiologists determined the presence or absence of the C sign for each lateral radiograph by consensus. Each CT study was then assessed by a third musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence of tarsal coalition. Observations were correlated with clinical history regarding presence or absence of flatfoot deformity.Results. Ten cases of TC coalition were diagnosed, four of which demonstrated a C sign (40%). Eight cases with a C sign were encountered, four of which had TC coalition (50%) and four did not. All patients with a positive C sign had a flatfoot clinically (100%), while only eight of 24 flatfooted patients had a C sign (33%).Conclusion. The C sign is specific, but not sensitive, for flatfoot deformity, and is neither sensitive nor specific for subtalar coalition. (orig.)

  10. Business Coalitions in the Us and Their Role in Advancing a Regional Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdana NEAMTU

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis herein explores the topic of business coalitions and focuses on the role they may play in advancing a regional agenda. The structure of the paper is threefold: (1 in the introductory section I briefly explain the meaning of the concept and how it relates to other similar concepts such as public-private partnerships or growth coalitions; (2 the second part focuses on analyzing the characteristics that best define contemporary business coalitions and stresses the implications of these characteristics for the structuring or restructuring of traditional local and regional political entities; (3 the last section focuses on how planners and other public officials could use or partner with business coalitions in order to advance their own regional agenda. In the conclusion section I argue that though business coalitions are important for the development of a regional economy and regional identity, it would be a mistake to think that they alone can determine the success of a region. Regional government should continue to be pursued as it represents the only solution to problems such as social and environmental justice, tax sharing, education, and inner city redevelopment.

  11. A coalition formation game for transmitter cooperation in OFDMA uplink communications

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The SC-FDMA (single-carrier frequency division multiple access) is the access scheme that has been adopted by 3GPP (3rd generation partnership project) for the LTE (long term evolution) uplink. The SC-FDMA is an attractive alternative to OFDMA (orthogonal frequency-division multiple access) especially on the uplink owing to its low peak-to-average power ratio. This fact increases the power efficiency and reduces the cost of the power amplifiers at the mobile terminals. The use of SC-FDMA on the uplink implies that for highly loaded cells the base station allocates a single subcarrier to each user. This results in the limitation of the achievable rate on the uplink. In this work, we propose a coalition game between mobile terminals that allows them to improve their performance by sharing their subcarriers without creating any interference to each other. The proposed scheme allows a fair use of the subcarriers and leads to a significant capacity gain for each user. The cooperation between the nodes is modelled using coalitional game theory. In this game, each coalition tries to maximize its utility in terms of rate. In the absence of cooperation cost, it can be shown that the grand coalition is sum-rate optimal and stable, i.e., the mobile terminals have no incentive to leave the grand coalition.

  12. Skill improvement among coalition members in the California Healthy Cities and Communities Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Norton, Barbara L; Aronson, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Community-driven, collaborative approaches to health promotion have the potential to enhance skills among community members and, in turn, increase community capacity. This study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) Program to examine whether, and how, community problem-solving and collaboration skills are improved among coalition members and local coordinators in 20 participating communities. Methods include semi-structured interviews with coordinators and mailed surveys with coalition members (n=330 in planning phase and n=243 in implementation phase). The largest number of coordinators reported skill improvement in defining health broadly and assessing needs and assets. Similarly, coalition members reported greatest skill improvement for defining health broadly, assessing needs and assets and setting priorities and developing action plans. Modest correlations were observed between number of roles played in the local healthy cities and communities project and each skill area assessed. Time committed to the local CHCC coalition and its activities was not meaningfully correlated with any of the skills. Types of skill-building opportunities may be more important than number of hours devoted to meetings and activities in strengthening community problem-solving and collaboration skills among coalition members.

  13. Talocalcaneal Joint Middle Facet Coalition Resection With Interposition of a Juvenile Hyaline Cartilage Graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Dyane E; Wood, Ryan W; Vaardahl, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition is the most common tarsal coalition, occurring in ≤2% of the population. Fewer than 50% of involved feet obtain lasting relief of symptoms after nonoperative treatment, and surgical intervention is commonly used to relieve symptoms, increase the range of motion, improve function, reconstruct concomitant pes planovalgus, and prevent future arthrosis from occurring at the surrounding joints. Several approaches to surgical intervention are available for patients with middle facet coalitions, ranging from resection to hindfoot arthrodesis. We present a series of 4 cases, in 3 adolescent patients, of talocalcaneal joint middle facet coalition resection with interposition of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft (DeNovo(®) NT Natural Tissue Graft, Zimmer, Inc., Warsaw, IN). With a mean follow-up period of 42.8 ± 2.9 (range 41 to 47) months, the 3 adolescent patients in the present series were doing well with improved subtalar joint motion and decreased pain, and 1 foot showed no bony regrowth on a follow-up computed tomography scan. The use of a particulate juvenile hyaline cartilaginous allograft as interposition material after talocalcaneal middle facet coalition resection combined with adjunct procedures to address concomitant pes planovalgus resulted in good short-term outcomes in 4 feet in 3 adolescent patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reclaiming life on one's own terms: a grounded theory study of the process of breast cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Deborah Witt; Rosedale, Mary; Haber, Judith

    2012-05-01

    To develop a substantive theory of the process of breast cancer survivorship. Grounded theory. A LISTSERV announcement posted on the SHARE Web site and purposeful recruitment of women known to be diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. 15 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Constant comparative analysis. Breast cancer survivorship. The core variable identified was Reclaiming Life on One's Own Terms. The perceptions and experiences of the participants revealed overall that the diagnosis of breast cancer was a turning point in life and the stimulus for change. That was followed by the recognition of breast cancer as now being a part of life, leading to the necessity of learning to live with breast cancer, and finally, creating a new life after breast cancer. Participants revealed that breast cancer survivorship is a process marked and shaped by time, the perception of support, and coming to terms with the trauma of a cancer diagnosis and the aftermath of treatment. The process of survivorship continues by assuming an active role in self-healing, gaining a new perspective and reconciling paradoxes, creating a new mindset and moving to a new normal, developing a new way of being in the world on one's own terms, and experiencing growth through adversity beyond survivorship. The process of survivorship for women with breast cancer is an evolutionary journey with short- and long-term challenges. This study shows the development of an empirically testable theory of survivorship that describes and predicts women's experiences following breast cancer treatment from the initial phase of recovery and beyond. The theory also informs interventions that not only reduce negative outcomes, but promote ongoing healing, adjustment, and resilience over time.

  15. A Cross-Layer Optimization Approach for Energy Efficient Wireless Sensor Networks: Coalition-Aided Data Aggregation, Cooperative Communication, and Energy Balancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghai Gao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We take a cross-layer optimization approach to study energy efficient data transport in coalition-based wireless sensor networks, where neighboring nodes are organized into groups to form coalitions and sensor nodes within one coalition carry out cooperative communications. In particular, we investigate two network models: (1 many-to-one sensor networks where data from one coalition are transmitted to the sink directly, and (2 multihop sensor networks where data are transported by intermediate nodes to reach the sink. For the many-to-one network model, we propose three schemes for data transmission from a coalition to the sink. In scheme 1, one node in the coalition is selected randomly to transmit the data; in scheme 2, the node with the best channel condition in the coalition transmits the data; and in scheme 3, all the nodes in the coalition transmit in a cooperative manner. Next, we investigate energy balancing with cooperative data transport in multihop sensor networks. Built on the above coalition-aided data transmission schemes, the optimal coalition planning is then carried out in multihop networks, in the sense that unequal coalition sizes are applied to minimize the difference of energy consumption among sensor nodes. Numerical analysis reveals that energy efficiency can be improved significantly by the coalition-aided transmission schemes, and that energy balancing across the sensor nodes can be achieved with the proposed coalition structures.

  16. Fighting Windmills: The Coalition of Industrialists and Environmentalists in the Climate Change Issue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Urs Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2004-01-01

    environmental quality. We focus on the case of international climate negotiations and the promotion of wind-based energy. Along the lines of the Ackerman and Hassler approach, we suggest that one reason for EU eagerness to push forward ambitious reduction target levels (and thereby promote new green industries......) could be a similar coalition between industrialists and environmentalists. Such a strategy can be seen in the context of the Bootleggers and Baptist theory developed by Yandle [‘Bootleggers and Baptists: the Education of a Regulatory Economist,’ Regulation, 7, 12–16], where the Baptists (in our case...... for the coalition of industrialists and environmentalists offering both market protection and improved environmental quality. Solving the current deadlock in international climate negotiations may well imply fighting the strong coalition of industrialists and environmentalists. Such a political battle may turn out...

  17. Growing but not transforming: Fragmented ruling coalitions and economic developments in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Katusiimeh, Mesharch

    been stable enough to maintain macro-economic stability, attract aid and ensure the one-off gains from introducing peace. However, the fact that it has proved so challenging to hold the ruling coalition together has hindered the ruling elite in implementing initiatives to support transformation......In spite of decades of GDP growth, Uganda remains an agricultural economy still awaiting an economic transformation. Sustained state initiatives to promote such a transformation have been lacking. We find that the explanation for this is to be found in the nature of the ruling coalition, which has...... is to use state resources to hold the ruling coalition together. This, however, is not likely to result in an economic transformation and hence in job creation for the poor majority of Ugandans....

  18. Space, place and body: temporary coalitions, nodes in a network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerith Power

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The articles in this collection share a concern for place, space and bodies as frameworks for thinking about and conducting educational research. The authors range in experience from senior academics, independent educators, beginning and emerging new researchers spanning a range of educational sectors. The articles originate from connections forged within and between Australia and northern countries with visits back and forth between 2004 and 2010. Some of the writers have met each other in these travels and others have not. All have encountered and participated in some way in the work of the space place and body research group, which originated in 2007 as a named research ‘node’ at Monash University.   The space place and body group formed as a result of a process designed to re-imagine research in the Faculty of Education at Monash University in order to address ‘the big questions of our time’. As a leading global university with campuses in Asia and Europe as well as several in Australia, the Dean of the Faculty cited recent evidence that the field of educational research had become too narrowly focused and that new approaches were needed to enliven the field and move it forward. Individualistic research was no longer supported and groups were formed organically around coalitions of interest. The purpose of the space place and body group was to come together to generate new conceptual, theoretical and methodological resources within the core concepts of space, place and body by collaborating across our differences. In the early phase of our development we focused on linked identity (ontological and knowledge (epistemological work, at the intersection of postcolonial and poststructural approaches to place in educational research. A specific interest in alternative and creative methodologies emerged from these onto-epistemological activities.   As part of our process we initiated temporary definitions of space, place and body, to

  19. Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohrstedt, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of 'crisis exceptionalism' raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay 1 analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay 2 seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay 3 conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three essays is to posit

  20. Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohrstedt, Daniel

    2007-04-15

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of 'crisis exceptionalism' raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay 1 analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay 2 seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay 3 conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three

  1. Evaluation of DELTA PREP: A Project Aimed at Integrating Primary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence Within State Domestic Violence Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Kimberley E.; Zakocs, Ronda; Le, Brenda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn

    2018-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a public health problem since the late 20th century. To spur IPV prevention efforts nationwide, the DELTA PREP Project selected 19 state domestic violence coalitions to build organizational prevention capacity and catalyze IPV primary prevention strategies within their states. Objective DELTA PREP’s summative evaluation addressed four major questions: (1) Did coalitions improve their prevention capacity during the project period? (2) Did coalitions serve as catalysts for prevention activities within their states during the project period? (3) Was initial prevention capacity associated with the number of prevention activity types initiated by coalitions by the end of the project? (4) Did coalitions sustain their prevention activities 6 months after the end of the project period? Results DELTA PREP achieved its capacity-building goal, with all 19 participant coalitions integrating prevention within their organizations and serving as catalysts for prevention activities in their states. At 6 months follow up, coalitions had sustained almost all prevention activities they initiated during the project. Baseline prevention capacity (Beginner vs. Intermediate) was not associated with the number of prevention activity types coalitions implemented by the end of the project. Conclusion Service and treatment organizations are increasingly asked to integrate a full spectrum of prevention strategies. Selecting organizations that have high levels of general capacity and readiness for an innovation like integrating a public health approach to IPV prevention will likely increase success in building an innovation-specific capacity, and in turn implementing an innovation. PMID:26245932

  2. Creation of the Quebrada Arriba Community and Academic Partnership: An Effective Coalition for Addressing Health Disparities in Older Puerto Ricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M; González-Laboy, Yolanda; De Jesús-Rosario, Amarelis

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a community-academic coalition partnership to conduct community-based participatory research (CBPR) to address health disparities in older adults with chronic conditions living in the Quebrada Arriba community. We used the 'Developing and Sustaining CPPR Partnerships: A Skill-Building Curriculum', to create the Quebrada Arriba Community-Academic Partnership (QACAP). We assessed the meetings effectiveness and the CBPR experiences of the coalition members in the community-academic partnership. The stepwise process resulted in: the development of The Coalition for the Health and Wellbeing of Older People of Quebrada Arriba; the partnership's mission and vision; the operating procedures; the formulation of the research question, and; the action plan for obtaining funding resources. The mean levels of satisfaction for each of the items of the Meeting Effectiveness Evaluation tool were 100%. The mean agreement rating scores on variables related to having a positive experience with the coalition, members' representativeness of community interest, respectful contacts between members, the coalition's vision and mission, the participation of the members in establishing the prioritized community problem, and sharing of resources between the members was 100%. The steps used to build the QACAP provided an effective structure to create the coalition and captured the results of coalition activities. Partners' time to build trust and developing a sufficient understanding of local issues, high interest of the community members, flexibility of the partners, capitalization on the partners' strengths, and the shared decision building process were key contributors of this coalition's success.

  3. When a policy decision meets practice realities: The case of cancer survivorship care and rehabilitation needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Thorne, Sally; Maribo, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    To analyze and describe health professionals' attitudes and perspectives on the complexities of cancer survivorship and rehabilitation needs assessment in a shared cancer care context. The design and methodology for this study was Interpretive Description and the analysis was informed by Symbolic Interactionism as the theoretical framework. Between April and December 2015 an ethnographic fieldwork was carried out by the first author in haematological wards at two Danish hospitals and in two primary care settings conducting cancer survivorship care programs. Participants were 41 health professionals working with needs assessment. The findings revealed an understanding of the health professionals' attitudes and perspectives and were distinguishable in relation to three structural conditions associated with the dimensions of survivorship care: Patient Context, Workplace Priorities and Practice Culture. Despite shared beliefs that needs assessment was essential to ensure survivorship care, the differential conditions surrounding the hospital and the primary care settting impeded the wider idea of formalized needs assessment, creating barriers to a seamless link between the sectors. Meaningful resolution of these disjunctures will require broad solutions, recognizing that the organization of healthcare into disconnected systems, with their different conditions, history, habits and traditions, will certainly plague the "transition" problems in healthcare unless a wider perspective is taken. Thoughtful and informed clinicians working with decision makers and those who know the evidence and can interpret systems in context can certainly bring better options to light in order to develop high quality survivorship care that will support patients throughout their cancer trajectory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Joint Real-Time Energy and Demand-Response Management using a Hybrid Coalitional-Noncooperative Game

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fulin; Gu, Yi; Hao, Jun; Zhang, Jun Jason; Wei, Jiaolong; Zhang, Yingchen

    2015-11-11

    In order to model the interactions among utility companies, building demands and renewable energy generators (REGs), a hybrid coalitional-noncooperative game framework has been proposed. We formulate a dynamic non-cooperative game to study the energy dispatch within multiple utility companies, while we take a coalitional perspective on REGs and buildings demands through a hedonic coalition formation game approach. In this case, building demands request different power supply from REGs, then the building demands can be organized into an ultimate coalition structure through a distributed hedonic shift algorithm. At the same time, utility companies can also obtain a stable power generation profile. In addition, the interactive progress among the utility companies and building demands which cannot be supplied by REGs is implemented by distributed game theoretic algorithms. Numerical results illustrate that the proposed hybrid coalitional-noncooperative game scheme reduces the cost of both building demands and utility companies compared with the initial scene.

  5. Survivorship and complications of total hip arthroplasty in patients with dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Ronuk M; Kheir, Michael M; Tan, Timothy L; Penny, Gregory S; Chen, Chi-Lung; Shao, Hongyi; Chen, Antonia F

    2017-09-19

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a common procedure used to treat bony hip deformities and skeletal dysplasia in dwarfism. These surgeries are often more difficult than conventional THA as they may involve malformed joints and poor bone quality, and may require smaller prostheses. This study aims to investigate whether implant survivorship and revision rates vary among patients with and without dwarfism undergoing THA. A retrospective case-control study was performed for 102 THAs completed between 1997 and 2014 in patients under the height threshold of 147.32 cm. This cohort was matched 1:1.5 with patients of normal height with respect to age, gender, year of surgery, and Charlson comorbidities. All cases had a minimum follow-up of 1 year. A chart review was performed to identify patient and surgical characteristics, including outcomes. Radiographs were assessed for deformity, loosening, and periprosthetic fractures among other factors. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year survivorship of THA in patients with dwarfism was 92.9%, 92.9%, and 80.7%, respectively; and 94.4%, 86.4%, and 86.4% for controls, respectively (p = 0.95). The dwarfism cohort demonstrated an OR of 3.81 and 3.02 for revision for periprosthetic fractures (p = 0.11) and mechanical wear (p = 0.21), respectively. THA in patients with dwarfism achieves comparable results to a non-dwarfism population with regards to implant survivorship; however, there is a trend toward increased periprosthetic fractures and wear-related failures. Surgeons should be aware of this potentially higher risk in this population and take morphological differences into account during surgical planning and technique.

  6. Fragmentation in the branching coral Acropora palmata (Lamarck): growth, survivorship, and reproduction of colonies and fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirman

    2000-08-23

    Acropora palmata, a branching coral abundant on shallow reef environments throughout the Caribbean, is susceptible to physical disturbance caused by storms. Accordingly, the survivorship and propagation of this species are tied to its capability to recover after fragmentation. Fragments of A. palmata comprised 40% of ramets within populations that had experienced recent storms. While the survivorship of A. palmata fragments was not directly related to the size of fragments, removal of fragments from areas where they settled was influenced by size. Survivorship of fragments was also affected by type of substratum; the greatest mortality (58% loss within the first month) was observed on sand, whereas fragments placed on top of live colonies of A. palmata fused to the underlying tissue and did not experience any losses. Fragments created by Hurricane Andrew on a Florida reef in August 1992 began developing new growth (proto-branches) 7 months after the storm. The number of proto-branches on fragments was dependent on size, but growth was not affected by the size of fragments. Growth-rates of proto-branches increased exponentially with time (1.7 cm year(-1) for 1993-1994, 2.7 cm year(-1) for 1994-1995, 4.2 cm year(-1) for 1995-1996, and 6.5 cm year(-1) for 1996-1997), taking over 4 years for proto-branches to achieve rates comparable to those of adult colonies on the same reef (6.9 cm year(-1)). In addition to the initial mortality and reduced growth-rates, fragmentation resulted in a loss of reproductive potential. Neither colonies that experienced severe fragmentation nor fragments contained gametes until 4 years after the initial damage. Although A. palmata may survive periodic fragmentation, the long-term effects of this process will depend ultimately on the balance between the benefits and costs of this process.

  7. Mass balance and surface movement of the Greenland Ice Sheet at Summit, Central Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, C.S.; Keller, K.; Gundestrup, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    During the GRIP deep drilling in Central Greenland, the ice sheet topography and surface movement at Summit has been mapped with GPS. Measurements of the surface velocity are presented for a strain net consisting of 13 poles at distances of 25-60 km from the GRIP site. Some results are: The GRIP...... site is located approximately 2 km NW of the topographic summit; the surface velocity at the GISP 2 site is 1.7 m/yr in the W direction. The present mass balance at Summit is calculated to be -0.03+/-0.04 m/yr, i.e. close to steady state. This result is the best now available for Summit. A small...... thinning rate might be a transient response of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to the temperature increase at the Wisconsin-Holocene transition....

  8. Senior executive transportation & public safety summit : national traffic incident management leadership & innovation roadmap for success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    This report summarizes the proceedings, findings, and recommendations from a two-day Senior Executive Summit on Transportation and Public Safety, held June 26 and 27, 2012 at the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) in Washington, D.C. ...

  9. Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department, Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation by Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department showing how they established the building department, developed a code adoption and enforcement process, and hired staff to carry out the work.

  10. World Summit on the Information Society finding the best use of a global asset

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The first global summit on bridging the digital divide between rich and poor countries - the first meeting of its kind - convened in Geneva last week as governments struggled to agree on what they wanted to achieve" (2 pages)

  11. 78 FR 21906 - Six Rivers National Forest, California, Trinity Summit Range Assessment Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ..., wilderness characteristics, water quality, soil productivity, and quality fish and wildlife habitat... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Six Rivers National Forest, California, Trinity Summit Range Assessment Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Intent...

  12. Optimization Review: French Gulch/Wellington-Oro Mine Site Water Treatment Plant, Breckenridge, Summit County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    The French Gulch/Wellington-Oro Mine Site is located near the town of Breckenridge in Summit County, Colorado. Environmental contamination of surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment at the site resulted from mining activities dating to the 1880s.

  13. The effect of vessel speed on the survivorship of biofouling organisms at different hull locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Ashley D M; Piola, Richard F; Taylor, Michael D; Hewitt, Chad L; Gardner, Jonathan P A

    2010-07-01

    This study used a specially designed MAGPLATE system to quantify the en route survivorship and post-voyage recovery of biofouling assemblages subjected to short voyages (biofouling organisms amongst hull locations, biofouling cover and richness were markedly reduced on faster vessels relative to slower craft. Therefore, the potential inoculum size of non-indigenous marine species and richness is likely to be reduced for vessels that travel at faster speeds (> 14 knots), which is likely to also reduce the chances of successful introductions. Despite this, the magnitude of introductions from biofouling on fast vessels can be considered minor, especially for species richness where 90% of source-port species were recorded at destinations.

  14. Impacts and societal benefits of research activities at Summit Station, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, R. L.; Burkhart, J. F.; Courville, Z.; Dibb, J. E.; Koenig, L.; Vaughn, B. H.

    2017-12-01

    Summit Station began as the site for the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 ice core in 1989. Since then, it has hosted both summer campaign science, and since 1997, year-round observations of atmospheric and cryospheric processes. The station has been continuously occupied since 2003. While most of the science activities at the station are supported by the US NSF Office of Polar Programs, the station also hosts many interagency and international investigations in physical glaciology, atmospheric chemistry, satellite validation, astrophysics and other disciplines. Summit is the only high elevation observatory north of the Arctic circle that can provide clean air or snow sites. The station is part of the INTER-ACT consortium of Arctic research stations with the main objective to identify, understand, predict and respond to diverse environmental changes, and part of the International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) that coordinates Arctic research activities and provides a networked, observations-based view of the Arctic. The Summit Station Science Summit, sponsored by NSF, assembled a multidisciplinary group of scientists to review Summit Station science, define the leading research questions for Summit, and make community-based recommendations for future science goals and governance for Summit. The impact of several on-going observation records was summarized in the report "Sustaining the Science Impact of Summit Station, Greenland," including the use of station data in weather forecasts and climate models. Observations made at the station as part of long-term, year-round research or during shorter summer-only campaign seasons contribute to several of the identified Social Benefit Areas (SBAs) outlined in the International Arctic Observations Assessment Framework published by the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute and Sustaining Arctic Observing Networks as an outcome of the 2016 Arctic Science Ministerial. The SBAs supported by research

  15. Increasing human resource capacity in African countries: A nursing and midwifery Research Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Sun

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Evaluations provided favorable feedback regarding the process leading up to as well as the content of the Research Summit. While further long-term evaluations will be needed to determine the sustainability of this initiative, the Summit format afforded the opportunity for regional experts to meet, examine research priorities, and develop strategic action and mentorship plans. This paper describes a replicable method that could be utilized in other regions using available resources to minimize costs and modest grant funding.

  16. 6th Annual Homeland Security and Defense Education Summit, Developing an Adaptive Homeland Security Environment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    6th Annual Homeland Security and Defense Education Summit Developing an Adaptive Homeland Security Environment, Burlington, MA, September 26-28, 2013 2013 Summit Agenda Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security In Partnership With Northeastern University, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Guard Homeland Security Institute, National Homeland Defense Foundation Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and S...

  17. World Materials Summit (3rd). Held in Washington, DC on 9-12 October, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    creates bumps on the backplane of a thin monocrystalline silicon solar cell. This increases the efficiency through a light trapping mechanism. They are...atoms in motion," Brinkman said. The third and fourth days of the Summit were occupied with panel sessions, each discussing one aspect of materials...lighting; energy fuels; water; renewables; and policy and education. Some highlights of the panel reports to the Summit as a whole: • The smart

  18. "A Paradox Persists When the Paradigm Is Wrong": Pisacano Scholars' Reflections from the Inaugural Starfield Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Noemi; Coutinho, Anastasia J; Lochner, Jennifer; Wohler, Diana; DeVoe, Jennifer

    The inaugural Starfield Summit was hosted in April 2016 by the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Family Medicine and Primary Care with additional partners and sponsors, including the Pisacano Leadership Foundation (PLF). The Summit addressed critical topics in primary care and health care delivery, including payment, measurement, and team-based care. Invited participants included an interdisciplinary group of pediatricians, family physicians, internists, behaviorists, trainees, researchers, and advocates. Among the family physicians invited were both current and past PLF (Pisacano) scholars. After the Summit, a small group of current and past Pisacano scholars formed a writing group to reflect on and summarize key lessons and conclusions from the Summit. A Summit participant's statement, "a paradox persists when the paradigm is wrong," became a repeated theme regarding the paradox of primary care within the context of the health care system in the United States. The Summit energized participants to renew their commitment to Dr. Starfield's 4 C's of Primary Care (first contact access, continuity, comprehensiveness, and care coordination) and to the Quadruple Aim (quality, value, and patient and physician satisfaction) and to continue to explore how primary care can best shape the future of the nation's health care system. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Youth Climate Summits: Empowering & Engaging Youth to Lead on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretser, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Wild Center's Youth Climate Summits is a program that engages youth in climate literacy from knowledge and understanding to developing action in their schools and communities. Each Youth Climate Summit is a one to three day event that brings students and teachers together to learn about climate change science, impacts and solutions at a global and local level. Through speakers, workshops and activities, the Summit culminates in a student-driven Climate Action Plan that can be brought back to schools and communities. The summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. Student driven projects range from school gardens and school energy audits to working with NYS officials to commit to going 100% renewable electricty at the three state-owned downhill ski facilities. The summit model has been scaled and replicated in other communities in New York State, Vermont, Ohio, Michigan and Washington states as well as internationally in Finland, Germany and Sri Lanka.

  20. Canada`s green plan and the earth summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    In June 1992 one of the largest international conferences ever held took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It was attended by the heads of state of more than 100 countries. The ambitious aim of the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) -- the Earth Summit -- was to try to reconcile the need for global environmental protection with the need for continuing economic development. The purpose of this document is to provide a brief account of the results of Rio and the way Canadians participated. In addition, this document outlines the immediate priorities of the Government of Canada and the actions under way. It is not meant to be a comprehensive response to the entire Rio agenda. Rather, it is intended to report to Canadians on the steps the government has taken so far and, where possible, the direction in which it is headed. On the number of important issues, the government`s plans are well advanced. For example, action is well under way on the Convention on Climate Change, as high-lighted in the Green Plan`s National Action Strategy on Global Warming. On a number of other issues, it is clear that there is work to be done. The government is committed to completing the task through continuing action and leadership.

  1. Action and pursuit of the summit of the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saavedra, Sandra; Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    1996-01-01

    The effect to guarantee the execution and of the commitments and activities to materialize the agreements and the program 21 emanated of the summit of the earth, the international community gathered in Rio called in that program to conform a Commission of Sustainable Development (CSD) through the United Nations (UN) In its session number forty seven of 1992, the general assembly of the UN defined, by means of the resolution 471 191, the composition of the CSD, the bases for the participation of the non government organizations (ONG) in her and its relationship with other organisms of the UN. Today the commission has an own secretary and it is attributed to the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) The CSD should carry out an effective pursuit on the world execution of all the commitments acquired in the conference of Rio, evaluating, mainly, the progressive application of the program 21 to national, regional and international scale. It also promotes the development of the international cooperation and it contributes to rationalize the process of taking of intergovernmental decisions as regards sustainable development

  2. «Eastern Partnership» after the Vilnius Summit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chernova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The third summit of EU's Eastern Partnership held in Vilnius in November 2013 became a real turning point in the development of this organization. And it didn't happen due to signing of the first EU Association Agreement of its kind with the partner states but due to a sudden turn of the largest and most important of them - Ukraine - to the Russia's rival integration project. By doing so Ukraine at least temporarily joined two of the other participating countries: Armenia and Belarus, the latter of which is already in the Custom Union. At the other pole of the Eastern Partnership there are Georgia and Moldavia which initialed the Association and Free Trade agreements with the EU in Vilnius. This widening gap within the Eastern Partnership attracted everybody's attention to the EU - Russia rivalry in the post-Soviet countries which is increasingly interpreted in terms of the clash of civilizations. In this article we'd rather touch upon some of the peculiarities of the Eastern Partnership itself and its participating countries which to a large extent predetermined such an outcome. Among them is the ambiguous legacy of the European Neighbourhood Policy, lack of membership perspective in the EU as well as the nature of societies and elites in these post-Soviet states.

  3. The use of a patient-reported outcome questionnaire to assess cancer survivorship concerns and psychosocial outcomes among recent survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Steven C; Stricker, Carrie T; DeMichele, Angela M; Schapira, Marilyn; Glanz, Karen; Griggs, Jennifer J; Jacobs, Linda A

    2017-08-01

    Survivor distress is well represented in the literature, but less is known about survivors' concerns and how these relate to adaptation. Using a newly designed Survivorship Concern Scale, we examined concerns and their relationship to psychosocial adaptation among recent breast cancer (BC) survivors. One hundred forty-three stage 0-III BC survivors completed an online assessment including the Survivorship Concern Scale (0-3 scale; alpha = 0.91), unmet needs, quality of life (QoL), and anxiety and depressive symptoms within 1 year of end of treatment. Participants were predominately white (76%), middle-aged (51 years), married (70%), and college educated (79%). Eighty-two percent were stage I or II at diagnosis. Mean degree of survivorship concern was moderate (M = 1.75, SD = 0.70) though variable (range = 0.12-3.00). Survivorship concerns were not significantly related to disease, treatment, or demographic variables except income (p = 0.02). Degree of survivorship concern was significantly associated with all indices of psychosocial adaptation: unmet need (r = 0.50), physical and mental QoL (r = -0.32 and r = -0.32, respectively), depressive symptoms (r = 0.21), and anxiety symptoms (r = 0.51; all p psychosocial adaptation. Adequately addressing concerns may be a way to improve psychosocial outcomes early in the survivorship trajectory.

  4. Sex-biased survivorship and differences in migration of wild steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts from two coastal Oregon rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Neil F.; Leblanc, Camille A.; Romer, Jeremy D.; Schreck, Carl B.; Blouin, Michael S.; Noakes, David L. G.

    2016-01-01

    In salmonids with partial migration, females are more likely than males to undergo smoltification and migrate to the ocean (vs. maturing in freshwater). However, it is not known whether sex affects survivorship during smolt migration (from fresh water to entry into the ocean). We captured wild steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolts in two coastal Oregon rivers (USA) and collected fin tissue samples for genetic sex determination (2009; N = 70 in the Alsea and N = 69 in the Nehalem, 2010; N = 25 in the Alsea). We implanted acoustic tags and monitored downstream migration and survival until entry in to the Pacific Ocean. Survival was defined as detection at an estuary/ocean transition array. We found no effect of sex on smolt survivorship in the Nehalem River in 2009, or in the Alsea River in 2010. However, males exhibited significantly lower survival than females in the Alsea River during 2009. Residency did not influence this result as an equal proportion of males and females did not reach the estuary entrance (11% of males, 9% of females). The sexes did not differ in timing or duration of migration, so those variables seem unlikely to explain sex-biased survivorship. Larger males had higher odds of survival than smaller males in 2009, but the body size of females did not affect survivorship. The difference in survivorship between years in the Alsea River could be due to flow conditions, which were higher in 2010 than in 2009. Our findings suggest that sex may affect steelhead smolt survival during migration, but that the difference in survivorship may be weak and not a strong factor influencing adult sex ratios.

  5. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  6. Strategies for sustainable regional development and conditions for vital coalitions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The question that is addressed in this chapter is how processes can be stimulated in rural–urban areas which contribute to sustainable development? How can capacity to act be realized? Our hypothesis is: Specific informal networks in the form of vital coalitions between private and public actors can

  7. 77 FR 42738 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient Safety of Chicagoland (CQPS.... SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41,42...

  8. Grassroots Responsiveness to Human Rights Abuse: History of the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Laura; Martinez, Ramiro; Harner, Margaret; Harner, Melanie; Horner, Pilar; Delva, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss how a community agency based in Washtenaw County, the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigration Rights (WICIR), emerged in response to increasing punitive immigration practices and human rights abuses toward the Latino community. The article discusses how WICIR is engaged in advocacy, community…

  9. When culture does not matter: Experimental evidence from coalition formation ultimatum games in Austria and Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okada, A.; Riedl, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a cross-country comparison between Austria andJapan for an experimental 3-personcoalition formation ultimatum game. The experimental design allows thecomparison with respect to three decisions. (i)The coalition decision, (ii) proposers' demand behavior in 2- and

  10. An empirical test of new developments in coalition theory for the design of international environmental agreements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finus, M.; Sáiz Pérez, M.E.; Hendrix, E.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    We consider new developments in coalition theory for the design of international environmental agreements (IEAs). Applying an empirical model on climate change that comprises benefit and cost estimates from abatement for 12 world regions, we analyze how the design of an agreement affects the success

  11. Detecting and Mitigating Smart Insider Jamming Attacks in MANETs Using Reputation-Based Coalition Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Al Sharah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs is challenging due to the ability of adversaries to gather necessary intelligence to launch insider jamming attacks. The solutions to prevent external attacks on MANET are not applicable for defense against insider jamming attacks. There is a need for a formal framework to characterize the information required by adversaries to launch insider jamming attacks. In this paper, we propose a novel reputation-based coalition game in MANETs to detect and mitigate insider jamming attacks. Since there is no centralized controller in MANETs, the nodes rely heavily on availability of transmission rates and a reputation for each individual node in the coalition to detect the presence of internal jamming node. The nodes will form a stable grand coalition in order to make a strategic security defense decision, maintain the grand coalition based on node reputation, and exclude any malicious node based on reputation value. Simulation results show that our approach provides a framework to quantify information needed by adversaries to launch insider attacks. The proposed approach will improve MANET’s defense against insider attacks, while also reducing incorrect classification of legitimate nodes as jammers.

  12. Intermediary Organizations in Charter School Policy Coalitions: Evidence from New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBray, Elizabeth; Scott, Janelle; Lubienski, Christopher; Jabbar, Huriya

    2014-01-01

    This article develops a framework for investigating research use, using an "advocacy coalition framework" and the concepts of a "supply side" (mainly organizations) and "demand side" (policymakers). Drawing on interview data and documents from New Orleans about the charter school reforms that have developed there…

  13. Building and Maintaining an Effective Campus-Wide Coalition for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Nadine J.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Moffitt, Lauren; McLeod, Mark; Zesiger, Heather; Ammirati, Rachel; Berg, John P.; McIntosh, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Preventing suicide is a commonly shared priority among college administrators, faculty, staff, students, and family members. Coalitions are popular health promotion mechanisms for solving community-wide problems and are valuable in campus-wide suicide prevention efforts. This article provides an example of an effective suicide prevention…

  14. Self-Organizing Coalitions for Conflict Evaluation and Resolution in Femtocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Da Costa, Gustavo Wagner Oliveira; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio

    2010-01-01

    consists of a set of distributed and scalable rules for building coalitions; these rules essentially resolve the conflicts among avid femtocells competing for a limited amount of resources. The proposed scheme has been designed by targeting localized reconfigurations, thus avoiding reconfiguration storms...

  15. 78 FR 21928 - Demand Response Coalition v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. EL13-57-000] Demand Response... Demand Response Coalition \\1\\ (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against the PJM Interconnection, L.L... Plan Enhancements'') violate section 205 of the FPA and are therefore unenforceable. \\1\\ The Demand...

  16. If we work together, i will have greater power: Coalitions in networked innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory; Sloep, Peter; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies

    2018-01-01

    The present article uses agent-based social simulation to study rational behaviour in networked innovation. A simulation model that includes network characteristics and network participant’s characteristics is run using parameter sweeping, yielding 1450 simulation cases. The notion of coalitions was

  17. 75 FR 56651 - ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology... Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition (TIMTC) Annual [[Page 56652...: Beating Gridlock with a Smart Grid; U.S. DOT Truck Technology Initiatives; and State and Federal...

  18. Coalitions and the Decision making Process on the Common Flexicurity Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Mikkel Mailand

    than the regimes and cut to some extent across the usual division of countries, in that Scandinavian and the Anglo-Saxon countries form the core of one of the coalitions, whereas a number of continental countries - Belgium, Luxembourg, Italy, Greece and Spain - are now found in the core of the other...

  19. Optimal sharing of quantity risk for a coalition of wind power producers facing nodal prices

    KAUST Repository

    Bitar, E. Y.; Baeyens, E.; Khargonekar, P. P.; Poolla, K.; Varaiya, P.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that aggregation of geographically diverse wind energy resources offers compelling potential to mitigate wind power variability, as wind speed at different geographic locations tends to decorrelate with increasing spatial separation. In this paper, we explore the extent to which a coalition of wind power producers can exploit the statistical benefits of aggregation to mitigate the risk of quantity shortfall with respect to forward contract offerings for energy. We propose a simple augmentation of the existing two-settlement market system with nodal pricing to permit quantity risk sharing among wind power producers by affording the group a recourse opportunity to utilize improved forecasts of their ensuing wind energy production to collectively modify their forward contracted positions so as to utilize the projected surplus in generation at certain buses to balance the projected shortfall in generation at complementary buses. Working within this framework, we show that the problem of optimally sizing a set of forward contracts for a group of wind power producers reduces to convex programming and derive closed form expressions for the set of optimal recourse policies. We also asses the willingness of individual wind power producers to form a coalition to cooperatively offer contracts for energy. We first show that the expected profit derived from coalitional contract offerings with recourse is greater than that achievable through independent contract offerings. And, using tools from coalitional game theory, we show that the core for our game is non-empty.

  20. Optimal sharing of quantity risk for a coalition of wind power producers facing nodal prices

    KAUST Repository

    Bitar, E. Y.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that aggregation of geographically diverse wind energy resources offers compelling potential to mitigate wind power variability, as wind speed at different geographic locations tends to decorrelate with increasing spatial separation. In this paper, we explore the extent to which a coalition of wind power producers can exploit the statistical benefits of aggregation to mitigate the risk of quantity shortfall with respect to forward contract offerings for energy. We propose a simple augmentation of the existing two-settlement market system with nodal pricing to permit quantity risk sharing among wind power producers by affording the group a recourse opportunity to utilize improved forecasts of their ensuing wind energy production to collectively modify their forward contracted positions so as to utilize the projected surplus in generation at certain buses to balance the projected shortfall in generation at complementary buses. Working within this framework, we show that the problem of optimally sizing a set of forward contracts for a group of wind power producers reduces to convex programming and derive closed form expressions for the set of optimal recourse policies. We also asses the willingness of individual wind power producers to form a coalition to cooperatively offer contracts for energy. We first show that the expected profit derived from coalitional contract offerings with recourse is greater than that achievable through independent contract offerings. And, using tools from coalitional game theory, we show that the core for our game is non-empty.

  1. Adding Reports to Coalition Battle Management Language for NATO MSG-048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pullen, J.M.; Corner, D.; Singapogo, S.S.; Clarc, N.; Cordonnier, N.; Menane, M.; Khimeche, L.; Mevassvik, O.M.; Alstad, A.; Schad, U.; Frey, M.; Reus, N. M. de; Krom, P.P.J. de; Grand, N.P. le; Brook, A.

    2009-01-01

    The NATO Modeling and Simulation Group Technical Activity 48 (MSG-048) was chartered in 2006 to investigate the potential of a Coalition Battle Management Language for multinational and NATO interoperation of command and control systems with modeling and simulation. Its initial work in defining and

  2. Understanding the outcomes of advocacy coalitions in education: a comparative perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verger, A.; Novelli, M.; Verger, A.; Novelli, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we use comparative analysis lenses to better understand the nature of civil society coalitions and their impact in the educational field. The arguments provide a synthesis of core issues that have emerged from the case studies presented in earlier chapters. In particular, this

  3. Coalitions and family problem solving with preadolescents in referred, at-risk, and comparison families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuchinich, S; Wood, B; Vuchinich, R

    1994-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the mother-father coalition, parent-child coalitions, and parental warmth expressed toward the child are associated with family problem solving in families with a preadolescent child referred for treatment of behavior problems (n = 30), families with a child at-risk for conduct disorder (n = 68), and a sample of comparison families (n = 90). Referred and at-risk families displayed less effective problem solving. A regression analysis, which controlled for gender of the child, family structure, family income, marital satisfaction, and severity of child problems, showed that strong parental coalitions were linked to low levels of family problem solving in at-risk and referred families. Parent-child coalitions had little apparent impact while parental warmth was highly correlated with better family problem solving. The results may be interpreted as evidence for a tendency for parents in at-risk and referred families to "scapegoat" a preadolescent during family problem-solving sessions. This may undermine progress on family problem solutions and may complicate family-based prevention and treatment programs that use family problem-solving sessions.

  4. The Social Construction of Young People within Education Policy: Evidence from the UK's Coalition Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Since assuming power in May 2010, the UK's Coalition government has devoted considerable energy to formulating its policies with respect to young people. Evidence of this can be found in "Positive for youth: a new approach to cross-government policy for young people aged 13-19", a policy text that outlines a wide range of measures to be…

  5. Comparative Experience Factors among Black, Asian, and Hispanic Americans: Coalitions or Conflicts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Talmadge

    1992-01-01

    Compares the culture, sociology, politics, and economics of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans in the United States. Describes increased racial-ethnic national pluralism, the increased possibility of conflict between groups, and the need for dialogue and work toward coalition among these groups. (JB)

  6. Member and Affiliate Contact Directory. Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education, College Park, MD.

    This directory is designed to assist local action groups (existing local alliances; science mathematics, and technology teachers; superintendents, principals, and supervisors; guidance counselors and resource specialists; and university and college professors) in making contact with the local structure of the Triangle Coalition for Science and…

  7. Coalitions in Primary Triads: Reexamining the Theoretical Constructs From A Feminist Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Kaylene; Baldwin, Cynthia

    1997-01-01

    Examines the theoretical constructs about the effects of coalitions in the father-mother-child triad from a family systems perspective. How this triadic view interacts with the historical patriarchal structure and with issues of power is addressed from a feminist perspective. (Author/MKA)

  8. Practical Child Safety Education in England: A National Survey of the Child Safety Education Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvaney, Caroline A.; Watson, Michael C.; Walsh, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the provision of practical safety education by Child Safety Education Coalition (CSEC) organizations in England. Design: A postal survey. Setting: Providers of child practical safety education who were also part of CSEC. Methods: In February 2010 all CSEC organizations were sent a self-completion postal questionnaire which…

  9. Reactive oxygen species production and Brugia pahangi survivorship in Aedes polynesiensis with artificial Wolbachia infection types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S Andrews

    Full Text Available Heterologous transinfection with the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia has been shown previously to induce pathogen interference phenotypes in mosquito hosts. Here we examine an artificially infected strain of Aedes polynesiensis, the primary vector of Wuchereria bancrofti, which is the causative agent of Lymphatic filariasis (LF throughout much of the South Pacific. Embryonic microinjection was used to transfer the wAlbB infection from Aedes albopictus into an aposymbiotic strain of Ae. polynesiensis. The resulting strain (designated "MTB" experiences a stable artificial infection with high maternal inheritance. Reciprocal crosses of MTB with naturally infected wild-type Ae. polynesiensis demonstrate strong bidirectional incompatibility. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the MTB strain differ significantly relative to that of the wild-type, indicating an impaired ability to regulate oxidative stress. Following a challenge with Brugia pahangi, the number of filarial worms achieving the infective stage is significantly reduced in MTB as compared to the naturally infected and aposymbiotic strains. Survivorship of MTB differed significantly from that of the wild-type, with an interactive effect between survivorship and blood feeding. The results demonstrate a direct correlation between decreased ROS levels and decreased survival of adult female Aedes polynesiensis. The results are discussed in relation to the interaction of Wolbachia with ROS production and antioxidant expression, iron homeostasis and the insect immune system. We discuss the potential applied use of the MTB strain for impacting Ae. polynesiensis populations and strategies for reducing LF incidence in the South Pacific.

  10. Non-cancer drug consumption during the early trajectory of lymphoma survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioufol, Catherine; Lamy, Sébastien; Conte, Cécile; Jeanneau, Pauline; Compaci, Giselle; Delpierre, Cyrille; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Laurent, Guy; Despas, Fabien

    2017-11-22

    This study explored the use of non-cancer drugs in lymphoma survivors during the early trajectory (0 to 2 years) of cancer survivorship and determined the factors that influenced this consumption. Between January and March 2014, a cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess drug consumption in adult lymphoma survivors at the Toulouse University Hospital. This study was based on a questionnaire consisting of ten open questions related to medical prescription and/or self-medication occurring within the last 3 months. A total of 83/103 lymphoma survivors returned the questionnaire. This study showed that 91.6% of patients were drug consumers (about twice more than the general French population). Twenty percent of patients were treated with≥5 drugs. Overall drug consumption mainly concerned analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs and psychotropics. The presence of comorbidity, urban residence and female gender were associated with overall drug consumption. Moreover, half of survivors required at least one self-medication. Finally, only seven survivors (8.4%) reported no use of any medication. This study shows that, at least during the early trajectory of cancer survivorship, lymphoma patients are heavily treated with non-cancer drug therapy. This drug consumption profile may have serious implications in terms of safety, overall benefit and health economics. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Midterm Survivorship and Complications of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients With Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Timothy L; Kheir, Michael M; Modi, Ronuk; Chen, Chi-Lung; Shao, Hongyi; Chen, Antonia F

    2017-11-01

    Dwarfism is associated with skeletal dysplasias and joint deformities that frequently result in osteoarthritis requiring treatment with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). These surgeries can be challenging because of alignment deformities, poor bone stock, and smaller components. This study aims to compare TKA implant survivorship and complications between dwarf and nondwarf patients. A retrospective case-control study was performed from 1997-2014 evaluating 115 TKAs in patients under the height threshold of 147.32 cm. This cohort was compared with 164 patients of normal height. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, surgical characteristics, and outcomes. All cases had 2-year minimum follow-up. The revision rate was 8.7% in dwarfs compared with 3.7% in controls (P = .08). The 2-, 5-, and 10-year implant survivorship in dwarfs was 96.4%, 92.5%, and 90.2%, respectively; and 96.6%, 95.6%, and 94.8% for controls, respectively (P = .24). Dwarfs underwent significantly more manipulations for arthrofibrosis (P = .002). There was greater femoral (17.4% vs 2.1%, P manipulation; the increased propensity for stiffness may be associated with oversized components, as evidenced by greater component overhang. Surgeons should be aware of this increased risk and may consider using smaller or customized implants to account for the morphological differences in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Elevated temperature affects development, survivorship, and settlement of the elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata (Lamarck 1816).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Carly J; Szmant, Alina M

    2009-12-01

    Elevated seawater temperatures during the late summer have the potential to negatively affect the development and survivorship of the larvae of reef corals that are reproductive during that time of year. Acropora palmata, a major Caribbean hermatype, reproduces annually during August and September. A. palmata populations have severely declined over the past three decades, and recovery will require high recruitment rates. Such recruitment will be limited if larval supply is reduced by elevated temperatures. The effects of elevated temperatures on development, survival, and larval settlement of A. palmata were investigated by culturing newly fertilized eggs at temperatures ranging from 27.5 to 31.5 degrees C. Development was accelerated and the percentage of developmental abnormalities increased at higher temperatures. Embryo mortality peaked during gastrulation, indicating that this complex developmental process is particularly sensitive to elevated temperatures. Larvae cultured at 30 and 31.5 degrees C experienced as much as an 8-fold decrease in survivorship compared to those at 28 degrees C. Additionally, settlement was 62% at 28 degrees C compared to 37% at 31.5 degrees C. These results indicate that embryos and larvae of A. palmata will be negatively affected as sea surface temperatures continue to warm, likely reducing recruitment and the recovery potential of A. palmata on Caribbean reefs.

  13. Elevated CO2 and O3 effects on fine-root survivorship in ponderosa pine mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald L; Johnson, Mark G; Tingey, David T; Storm, Marjorie J

    2009-07-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and ozone (O(3)) concentrations are rising, which may have opposing effects on tree C balance and allocation to fine roots. More information is needed on interactive CO(2) and O(3) effects on roots, particularly fine-root life span, a critical demographic parameter and determinant of soil C and N pools and cycling rates. We conducted a study in which ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) seedlings were exposed to two levels of CO(2) and O(3) in sun-lit controlled-environment mesocosms for 3 years. Minirhizotrons were used to monitor individual fine roots in three soil horizons every 28 days. Proportional hazards regression was used to analyze effects of CO(2), O(3), diameter, depth, and season of root initiation on fine-root survivorship. More fine roots were produced in the elevated CO(2) treatment than in ambient CO(2). Elevated CO(2), increasing root diameter, and increasing root depth all significantly increased fine-root survivorship and median life span. Life span was slightly, but not significantly, lower in elevated O(3), and increased O(3) did not reduce the effect of elevated CO(2). Median life spans varied from 140 to 448 days depending on the season of root initiation. These results indicate the potential for elevated CO(2) to increase the number of fine roots and their residence time in the soil, which is also affected by root diameter, root depth, and phenology.

  14. Advance care planning within survivorship care plans for older cancer survivors: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Caoimh, Rónán; Cornally, Nicola; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Hally, Ruth; Weathers, Elizabeth; Lavan, Amanda H; Kearns, Tara; Coffey, Alice; McGlade, Ciara; Molloy, D William

    2017-11-01

    Advances in the medical treatment of cancer have increased the number of survivors, particularly among older adults, who now represent the majority of these. Survivorship care plans (SCPs) are documents that cancer patients receive summarising their care, usually at the end of treatment but preferably from initial diagnosis. These may increase patient satisfaction and represent an opportunity to initiate preventative strategies and address future care needs. Advance care planning (ACP), incorporating advance healthcare decision-making, including formal written directives, increases satisfaction and end-of-life care. This paper systematically reviews evaluations of ACP within SCPs among older (≥65 years) cancer survivors. No studies meeting the inclusion criteria were identified by search strategies conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases. One paper examined cancer survivors' mainly positive views of ACP. Another discussed the use of a SCP supported by a 'distress inventory' that included an advance care directive (living will) as an issue, though no formal evaluation was reported. Although ACP is important for older adults, no study was found that evaluated its role within survivorship care planning. Despite the risk of recurrence and the potential for morbidity and mortality, especially among older cancer survivors, ACP is not yet a feature of SCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Kīlauea summit eruption—Lava returns to Halemaʻumaʻu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Janet L.; Wessells, Stephen M.; Neal, Christina A.

    2017-10-06

    In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halemaʻumaʻu, a crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaiʻi. This new vent is one of two ongoing eruptions on the volcano. The other is on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone, where vents have been erupting nearly nonstop since 1983. The duration of these simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions on Kīlauea is unmatched in at least 200 years.Since 2008, Kīlauea’s summit eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and an active, circulating lava lake. Because of ongoing volcanic hazards associated with the summit vent, including the emission of high levels of sulfur dioxide gas and fragments of hot lava and rock explosively hurled onto the crater rim, the area around Halemaʻumaʻu remains closed to the public as of 2017.Through historical photos of past Halemaʻumaʻu eruptions and stunning 4K imagery of the current eruption, this 24-minute program tells the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake—now one of the two largest lava lakes in the world. It begins with a Hawaiian chant that expresses traditional observations of a bubbling lava lake and reflects the connections between science and culture that continue on Kīlauea today.The video briefly recounts the eruptive history of Halemaʻumaʻu and describes the formation and continued growth of the current summit vent and lava lake. It features USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists sharing their insights on the summit eruption—how they monitor the lava lake, how and why the lake level rises and falls, why explosive events occur, the connection between Kīlauea’s ongoing summit and East Rift Zone eruptions, and the impacts of the summit eruption on the Island of Hawaiʻi and beyond. The video is also available at the following U.S. Geological Survey Multimedia Gallery link (video hosted on YouTube): Kīlauea summit eruption—Lava returns to Halemaʻumaʻu

  16. Coalitional game theory as a promising approach to identify candidate autism genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anika; Sun, Min Woo; Paskov, Kelley Marie; Stockham, Nate Tyler; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Wall, Dennis Paul

    2018-01-01

    Despite mounting evidence for the strong role of genetics in the phenotypic manifestation of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the specific genes responsible for the variable forms of ASD remain undefined. ASD may be best explained by a combinatorial genetic model with varying epistatic interactions across many small effect mutations. Coalitional or cooperative game theory is a technique that studies the combined effects of groups of players, known as coalitions, seeking to identify players who tend to improve the performance--the relationship to a specific disease phenotype--of any coalition they join. This method has been previously shown to boost biologically informative signal in gene expression data but to-date has not been applied to the search for cooperative mutations among putative ASD genes. We describe our approach to highlight genes relevant to ASD using coalitional game theory on alteration data of 1,965 fully sequenced genomes from 756 multiplex families. Alterations were encoded into binary matrices for ASD (case) and unaffected (control) samples, indicating likely gene-disrupting, inherited mutations in altered genes. To determine individual gene contributions given an ASD phenotype, a "player" metric, referred to as the Shapley value, was calculated for each gene in the case and control cohorts. Sixty seven genes were found to have significantly elevated player scores and likely represent significant contributors to the genetic coordination underlying ASD. Using network and cross-study analysis, we found that these genes are involved in biological pathways known to be affected in the autism cases and that a subset directly interact with several genes known to have strong associations to autism. These findings suggest that coalitional game theory can be applied to large-scale genomic data to identify hidden yet influential players in complex polygenic disorders such as autism.

  17. Cohesion and Coalition Formation in the European Parliament: Roll-Call Votes and Twitter Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepnalkoski, Darko; Karpf, Andreas; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha

    2016-01-01

    We study the cohesion within and the coalitions between political groups in the Eighth European Parliament (2014-2019) by analyzing two entirely different aspects of the behavior of the Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) in the policy-making processes. On one hand, we analyze their co-voting patterns and, on the other, their retweeting behavior. We make use of two diverse datasets in the analysis. The first one is the roll-call vote dataset, where cohesion is regarded as the tendency to co-vote within a group, and a coalition is formed when the members of several groups exhibit a high degree of co-voting agreement on a subject. The second dataset comes from Twitter; it captures the retweeting (i.e., endorsing) behavior of the MEPs and implies cohesion (retweets within the same group) and coalitions (retweets between groups) from a completely different perspective. We employ two different methodologies to analyze the cohesion and coalitions. The first one is based on Krippendorff's Alpha reliability, used to measure the agreement between raters in data-analysis scenarios, and the second one is based on Exponential Random Graph Models, often used in social-network analysis. We give general insights into the cohesion of political groups in the European Parliament, explore whether coalitions are formed in the same way for different policy areas, and examine to what degree the retweeting behavior of MEPs corresponds to their co-voting patterns. A novel and interesting aspect of our work is the relationship between the co-voting and retweeting patterns.

  18. Patterns of interventions and the effect of coalitions and sociality on male fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Lars; Muniz, Laura; Mundry, Roger; Widdig, Anja

    2012-02-01

    In group living animals, especially among primates, there is consistent evidence that high-ranking males gain a higher reproductive output than low-ranking males. Primate studies have shown that male coalitions and sociality can impact male fitness; however, it remains unclear whether males could potentially increase their fitness by preferentially supporting and socializing with females. Here we investigate patterns of male interventions and the effect of coalitions and sociality on male fitness in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with particular focus on male-female interactions. We combined behavioural observations collected on Cayo Santiago with genetic data analysed for male reproductive output and relatedness. Our results revealed that the ten top-ranking males provided the majority of all male support observed. In contrast to other primates, male rhesus macaques mainly formed all-down coalitions suggesting that coalitions are less likely used to enhance male dominance. Males supporting females during and before their likely conception were not more likely to fertilize those females. We also found no evidence that males preferably support their offspring or other close kin. Interestingly, the most important predictor of male support was sociality, since opponents sharing a higher sociality index with a given male were more likely to be supported. Furthermore, a high sociality index of a given male-female dyad resulted in a higher probability of paternity. Overall, our results strengthen the evidence that sociality affects fitness in male primates, but also suggest that in species in which males queue for dominance, it is less likely that males derive fitness benefits from coalitions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. The coalition of industrialists and environmentalists in the climate change issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, U.S.; Tinggaard Svendsen, G.

    2003-07-01

    The political economy idea developed by Ackerman and Hassler (1981) is the starting point of this paper. It suggested that a coalition of environmentalists and industrialists successfully lobbied the US Congress. More strict technology-based standards for new sources than existing sources was the resulting policy outcome serving the common interest of the coalition because it both offered a barrier to entry for new firms and improved environmental quality. Wc focus both on cases from air and water pollution in the US confirming which seem to confirm this suggestion and the case of international climate negotiations and the promotion of wind-based energy. In the line of the Ackerman and Hassler approach wc suggest that the reason for EU eagerness to push forward ambitious reduction target levels (and thereby promote new green industries) is a similar coalition between industrialists and environmentalists. Such a strategy can be seen in the context of the Bootleggers and Baptist theory developed by Yandle (1983), where the Baptists (in our case the environmentalists) demand changes in behaviour on moral reasons. In contrast, the Bootleggers (the producers of renewable energy), who profit from the very regulation, keep a low profile. The actual heavy subsidisation of renewable energy sources, such as wind energy, can be viewed as a successful policy outcome for the coalition of industrialists and environmentalists offering both market protection and improved environmental quality. Solving the current dead-lock in international climate negotiations across the Atlantic may well imply fighting the strong coalition of industrialists and environmentalists. Such a political battle may turn out to be just as tough as fighting windmills if not clearly investigated in future research. (au)

  20. The coalition of industrialists and environmentalists in the climate change issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, U.S.; Tinggaard Svendsen, G.

    2003-01-01

    The political economy idea developed by Ackerman and Hassler (1981) is the starting point of this paper. It suggested that a coalition of environmentalists and industrialists successfully lobbied the US Congress. More strict technology-based standards for new sources than existing sources was the resulting policy outcome serving the common interest of the coalition because it both offered a barrier to entry for new firms and improved environmental quality. Wc focus both on cases from air and water pollution in the US confirming which seem to confirm this suggestion and the case of international climate negotiations and the promotion of wind-based energy. In the line of the Ackerman and Hassler approach wc suggest that the reason for EU eagerness to push forward ambitious reduction target levels (and thereby promote new green industries) is a similar coalition between industrialists and environmentalists. Such a strategy can be seen in the context of the Bootleggers and Baptist theory developed by Yandle (1983), where the Baptists (in our case the environmentalists) demand changes in behaviour on moral reasons. In contrast, the Bootleggers (the producers of renewable energy), who profit from the very regulation, keep a low profile. The actual heavy subsidisation of renewable energy sources, such as wind energy, can be viewed as a successful policy outcome for the coalition of industrialists and environmentalists offering both market protection and improved environmental quality. Solving the current dead-lock in international climate negotiations across the Atlantic may well imply fighting the strong coalition of industrialists and environmentalists. Such a political battle may turn out to be just as tough as fighting windmills if not clearly investigated in future research. (au)

  1. About Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CancerProgress.Net website to learn more about the historical pace of cancer research. Surviving cancer: What to ... during treatment Take time off for treatment and return to work afterwards Be unable to return to ...

  2. Assessment and monitoring of recreation impacts and resource conditions on mountain summits: examples from the Northern Forest, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, Christopher A.; Marion, Jeffrey L.; Goonan, Kelly A.; Manning, Robert E.; Wimpey, Jeremy; Carr, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Mountain summits present a unique challenge to manage sustainably: they are ecologically important and, in many circumstances, under high demand for recreation and tourism activities. This article presents recent advances in the assessment of resource conditions and visitor disturbance in mountain summit environments, by drawing on examples from a multiyear, interdisciplinary study of summits in the northeastern United States. Primary impact issues as a consequence of visitor use, such as informal trail formation, vegetation disturbance, and soil loss, were addressed via the adaption of protocols from recreation ecology studies to summit environments. In addition, new methodologies were developed that provide measurement sensitivity to change previously unavailable through standard recreation monitoring protocols. Although currently limited in application to the northeastern US summit environments, the methods presented show promise for widespread application wherever summits are in demand for visitor activities.

  3. Assessing Community Coalition Capacity and its Association with Underage Drinking Prevention Effectiveness in the Context of the SPF SIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Robert L; Hanley, Sean M

    2016-10-01

    Community coalitions are a prominent organizational structure through which community-based substance abuse prevention efforts are implemented. There is little empirical evidence, however, regarding the association between coalition attributes and success in achieving community-level reductions in substance abuse behaviors. In this study, we assessed the relationship between coalition capacity, based on coalition coordinator responses to 16 survey items, and reductions in underage drinking prevalence rates. The coalitions were funded through the federally sponsored Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF SIG). We first examined whether coalition capacity increased over the life of the projects. Mean capacity scores increased for all 16 capacity items examined (N = 318 coalitions), the majority of which were statistically significant. Analysis of the associations between capacity and reductions in underage drinking was limited to coalitions that targeted underage drinking and provided usable outcome measures based on student survey data for either past 30-day alcohol use (N = 129) or binge drinking (N = 100). Bivariate associations between the capacity items and prevalence reductions for each outcome were consistently positive, although many were not statistically significant. Composite measures of correlated items were then created to represent six different capacity constructs, and included in multivariate models to predict reductions in the targeted outcomes. Constructs that significantly predicted reductions in one or both outcome measures included internal organization and structure, community connections and outreach, and funding from multiple sources. The findings provide support for the expectation that high functioning community coalitions can be effective agents for producing desirable community-level changes in targeted substance abuse behaviors.

  4. The Social Development Summit and the developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabas, A P; Kulkarni, P D; Nanavatty, M C; Singh, R R

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses some concerns of the 1996 UN Summit on Social Development. Conference organizers identified the three key conference issues as poverty alleviation, social integration of the marginalized and disadvantaged, and expansion of productive employment. The goal of a "society for all" means dealing with the increasing differences between rich and poor countries, the survival of weaker economies in a competitive market system, wide variations in consumption patterns between countries, attainment of political stability while respecting ethnic identity, the rise in social problems among countries with a high human development index, and increasing joblessness. The Human Development Report for 1994 emphasizes human security. Social development is not the equivalent of human resource development nor a side issue of economic growth. The integration of ethnic groups poses social and political problems. There remains a question about what political system and culture would be best for social integration. Developed countries define poverty as the inability of people and government to provide resources and necessary services for people's productive activity. Poverty in developing countries is blamed on colonialism. Globally, developed countries control 71% of world trade. Sharing resources to meet basic needs throughout the world is not an operational ideal. The highest 20% of income earners receive 83% of the world income. The culture of poverty is the strategy used by the poor to survive. Welfare is not an end in itself but does enable the poor to improve their conditions. Development that focuses on productive employment is uncertain. Developed and developing countries do not share similar perceptions of human rights. There is a question as to who should set the priorities for social development. Sustainable social development is related to preservation of natural resources, control of population growth, and promotion of social security.

  5. Proceedings of the November 2011 Traceability Research Summit: this report is the third in a series on Traceability Summits sponsored by IFT beginning in July 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Caitlin; Bhatt, Tejas

    2013-12-01

    Fifty thought leaders in the area of food traceability met for a 3rd time to discuss methodologies and finalize the principles that define their vision for traceability. Participants in the summit included representatives from industry, trade associations, government, academia, consumer groups, and more. One main focus of this summit included a discussion on the current regulations and voluntary initiatives in place regarding traceability. Overall, it was recognized that the recommendations from this summit group would be more specific and stringent in comparison to these current regulations and initiatives. The participants sought to be leaders in the traceability arena, with their recommendations leading the industry to optimal traceability systems and methods. Participants agreed on many principles for their vision of traceability, emphasizing the importance of access to traceability data. They discussed having industry be asked for "basic" tracing data prior to the need for a large-scale investigation, having standards for sharing data, and having the data in electronic form. Participants foresaw the importance of capturing data electronically in the future, although they recognized that many firms do not currently do this. The group also saw a need for a transition period to implement changes, and to provide implementation training and resource aid to small businesses. Summit participants discussed specific definitions and examples for key data elements and critical tracking events that could be used by industry to capture tracing data at specific points within the supply chain. Overall, participants refined the goals of the summit group and started to identify specific ways to achieve those goals. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. The Impact of a Primary Care Education Program Regarding Cancer Survivorship Care Plans: Results from an Engineering, Primary Care, and Oncology Collaborative for Survivorship Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Haine, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Trowbridge, Elizabeth R; Kamnetz, Sandra A; Feldstein, David A; Sosman, James M; Wilke, Lee G; Sesto, Mary E; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2017-09-20

    Survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been recommended as tools to improve care coordination and outcomes for cancer survivors. SCPs are increasingly being provided to survivors and their primary care providers. However, most primary care providers remain unaware of SCPs, limiting their potential benefit. Best practices for educating primary care providers regarding SCP existence and content are needed. We developed an education program to inform primary care providers of the existence, content, and potential uses for SCPs. The education program consisted of a 15-min presentation highlighting SCP basics presented at mandatory primary care faculty meetings. An anonymous survey was electronically administered via email (n = 287 addresses) to evaluate experience with and basic knowledge of SCPs pre- and post-education. A total of 101 primary care advanced practice providers (APPs) and physicians (35% response rate) completed the baseline survey with only 23% reporting prior receipt of a SCP. Only 9% could identify the SCP location within the electronic health record (EHR). Following the education program, primary care physicians and APPs demonstrated a significant improvement in SCP knowledge, including improvement in their ability to locate one within the EHR (9 vs 59%, p educational program containing information about SCP existence, content, and location in the EHR increased primary care physician and APP knowledge in these areas, which are prerequisites for using SCP in clinical practice.

  7. The meta-leadership summit for preparedness initiative: an innovative model to advance public health preparedness and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobelson, Robyn K; Young, Andrea C; Marcus, Leonard J; Dorn, Barry C; Neslund, Verla S; McNulty, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    This article reports on the design, evaluation framework, and results from the Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness was a 5-year initiative based on the premise that national preparedness and emergency response is not solely the responsibility of government. From 2006 to 2011, 36 Meta-Leadership Summits were delivered in communities across the country. Summits were customized, 10-hour leadership development, networking, and community action planning events. They included participation from targeted federal, state, local, nonprofit/philanthropic, and private sector leaders who are directly involved in decision making during a major community or state-wide emergency. A total of 4,971 government, nonprofit, and business leaders attended Meta-Leadership Summits; distribution of attendees by sector was balanced. Ninety-three percent of respondents reported the summit was a valuable use of time, 91% reported the overall quality as "good" or "outstanding," and 91% would recommend the summit to their colleagues. In addition, approximately 6 months after attending a summit, 80% of respondents reported that they had used meta-leadership concepts or principles. Of these, 93% reported that using meta-leadership concepts or principles had made a positive difference for them and their organizations. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative was a value-added opportunity for communities, providing the venue for learning the concepts and practice of meta-leadership, multisector collaboration, and resource sharing with the intent of substantively improving preparedness, response, and recovery efforts.

  8. Survivorship and longevity of adult Diamesa mendotae Muttkowski, 1915 (Diptera: Chironomidae) at controlled, sub-freezing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazack, Jane E.; Kranzfelder, Petra; Anderson, Alyssa M.; Bouchard, William; Perry, James; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Ferrington, Leonard C.

    2014-01-01

    Diamesa mendotae Muttkowski, 1915 is a winter-active species common in groundwater-buffered streams of Minnesota and Wisconsin. This species is capable of surviving under snow cover for at least 28 days. Field collections of adult D. mendotae were used to determine survivorship under long-term exposure to controlled sub-freezing conditions. Specimens were placed into a controlled temperature chamber at −5 °C, batches removed at weekly intervals, and subsequently held at 6 °C to determine survivorship and longevity. Our results indicate that overall survivorship is negatively related to treatment duration of sub-freezing treatment, individuals can survive sub-freezing temperatures for at least 70 days, with total longevity of 92 days. Additionally, males had a significantly higher rate of survivorship than females within treatments. Total longevity increased with treatment time, suggesting adult D. mendotae may survive long periods of below-freezing temperatures under natural conditions before mating, which may convey population-level advantages.

  9. Factors influencing implementation of a Survivorship Care Plan : A quantitative process evaluation of the ROGY Care Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, B.H.; Ezendam, N.P.M.; Nicolaije, K.A.H.; Vos, M.C.; Pijnenborg, J.M.A.; Boll, Dorry; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to investigate the factors that influence implementation of Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) in the intervention arm of the ROGY Care trial by (1) assessing the level of SCP receipt in the ROGY Care trial and (2) identifying patient- and provider-level factors that

  10. Group size effects on survivorship and adult development in the gregarious larvae of Euselasia chrysippe (Lepidoptera, Riodinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. E. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Caterpillars living in aggregations may derive several benefits that outweigh the costs, including better survivorship and improved growth rates. I tested whether larval group size had an effect on these two vital rates in Euselasia chrysippe. These caterpillars feed gregariously during all instars and move in processionary form over the host plant...

  11. Conducting cancer control and survivorship research via cooperative groups: a report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra D

    2011-05-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if interventions are well standardized. Some protocols are better suited to cooperative groups than are others, and there are advantages and disadvantages to conducting survivorship research within the cooperative group setting. Behavioral researchers currently involved in cooperative groups, as well as program staff within the NCI, can serve as sources of information for those wishing to pursue symptom management and survivorship studies within the clinical trial setting. The structure of the cooperative groups is currently changing, but going forward, survivorship is bound to be a topic of interest and one that perhaps may be more easily addressed using the proposed more centralized structure. ©2011 AACR.

  12. A unified degree day model describes survivorship of Copitarsia corruda Pogue & Simmons (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) at different constant temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.N. G& #243; mez; R.C. Venette; J.R. Gould; D.F. Winograd

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of survivorship are critical to quantify the probability of establishment by an alien invasive species, but survival curves rarely distinguish between the effects of temperature on development versus senescence. We report chronological and physiological age-based survival curves for a potentially invasive noctuid, recently described as Copitarsia...

  13. Development and Survivorship of Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood (Thysanoptera: Thripidae in Different Growth Stages of Mango and Selected Weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affandi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The research objective was to quantify the development and survivorship rate of S. dorsalis in different phenological stages of mango and selected weeds. The research was conducted in the laboratory of PT. Trigatra Rajasa, Mango plantation in Ketowan, Arjasa, Situbondo, East Java, Indonesia from February to September 2015. The development and survivorship rate were done through observation of life span of S. dorsalis from egg to pupa. Analysis of Variance and Duncan Multiple Range Test (p = 0.05 with 5 replications were applied to ensure the significant differences among the treatments. The result showed that development and survivorship of Scirtothrips dorsalis were supported by mango flushes and flower as well as some weeds such as Leucania leucochepala, Ipomoea triloba, Achalypha indica, Desmanthus leptophyllus and Azadirachta indica as source of food. Achalypha indica was the most suitable host with development time (12.82 ± 0.21 days and survivorship (33 %. Weed Tridax procumbent, Momordica charantia and Mimosa pudica were unable to provide the living requirement for immature developmental stage of S. dorsalis.

  14. Supplemental diets containing yeast, sucrose, and soy powder enhance the survivorship, growth, and development of prey-limited cursorial spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the effects of a food spray mixture (‘wheast’) and its individual ingredients (sucrose, yeast, and toasted soy flour) on the survivorship, growth, and development of a cursorial spider, Hibana futilis Banks (Anyphaenidae). Some treatments included eggs of Helicoverpa zea, a favored prey...

  15. A dyadic approach to understanding the impact of breast cancer on relationships between partners during early survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesing, Sharon; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2016-08-25

    The shared impact of breast cancer for women and their male partners is emerging as an important consideration during the experience of a breast cancer diagnosis, particularly during survivorship. This study aimed to explore the experiences of women and their partners during early survivorship and contributes a range of insights into the lives of those intimately affected by breast cancer. In-depth interviews were completed with Australian women survivors of breast cancer (n = 8) and their partners (n = 8), between six months and five years following cessation of treatment. Questions included a focus on the women and their partners' daily experiences during early survivorship, including the management of ongoing symptoms, engagement in leisure and social interests, returning to work, communicating with each other, maintenance of the current relationship and other important roles and responsibilities. Thematic analysis was employed to determine key themes arising from the dyadic accounts of women and their partners' experiences during early breast cancer survivorship. Women and their partners experienced many changes to their previous roles, responsibilities and relationships during early breast cancer survivorship. Couples also reported a range of communication, intimacy and sexuality concerns which greatly impacted their interactions with each other, adding further demands on the relationship. Three significant themes were determined: (1) a disconnection within the relationship - this was expressed as the woman survivor of breast cancer needing to prioritise her own needs, sometimes at the expense of her partner and the relationship; (2) reformulating the relationship - this reflects the strategies used by couples to negotiate changes within the relationship; and (3) support is needed to negotiate the future of the relationship - couples emphasised the need for additional support and resources to assist them in maintaining their relationship during early

  16. The effect of structural complexity, prey density, and "predator-free space" on prey survivorship at created oyster reef mesocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Austin T.; La Peyre, Megan K.; Decossas, Gary A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between predators and their prey are influenced by the habitat they occupy. Using created oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reef mesocosms, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments that created structure and manipulated complexity as well as prey density and “predator-free space” to examine the relationship between structural complexity and prey survivorship. Specifically, volume and spatial arrangement of oysters as well as prey density were manipulated, and the survivorship of prey (grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio) in the presence of a predator (wild red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus) was quantified. We found that the presence of structure increased prey survivorship, and that increasing complexity of this structure further increased survivorship, but only to a point. This agrees with the theory that structural complexity may influence predator-prey dynamics, but that a threshold exists with diminishing returns. These results held true even when prey density was scaled to structural complexity, or the amount of “predator-free space” was manipulated within our created reef mesocosms. The presence of structure and its complexity (oyster shell volume) were more important in facilitating prey survivorship than perceived refugia or density-dependent prey effects. A more accurate indicator of refugia might require “predator-free space” measures that also account for the available area within the structure itself (i.e., volume) and not just on the surface of a structure. Creating experiments that better mimic natural conditions and test a wider range of “predator-free space” are suggested to better understand the role of structural complexity in oyster reefs and other complex habitats.

  17. Fertility preservation: A key survivorship issue for young women with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Angarita

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertility preservation in the young cancer survivor is recognized as a key survivorship issue by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Thus, health care providers should inform women about the effects of cancer therapy on fertility and should discuss the different fertility preservation options available. It is also recommended to refer women expeditiously to a fertility specialist in order to improve counseling. Women’s age, diagnosis, presence of male partner, time available and preferences regarding use of donor sperm influence the selection of the appropriate fertility preservation option. Embryo and oocyte cryopreservation are the standard techniques used while ovarian tissue cryopreservation is new, yet promising. Despite the importance of fertility preservation for cancer survivors’ quality of life, there are still communication and financial barriers faced by women who wish to pursue fertility preservation.

  18. Fertility Preservation: A Key Survivorship Issue for Young Women with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarita, Ana Milena; Johnson, Cynae A.; Fader, Amanda Nickles; Christianson, Mindy S.

    2016-01-01

    Fertility preservation in the young cancer survivor is recognized as a key survivorship issue by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Thus, health-care providers should inform women about the effects of cancer therapy on fertility and should discuss the different fertility preservation options available. It is also recommended to refer women expeditiously to a fertility specialist in order to improve counseling. Women’s age, diagnosis, presence of male partner, time available, and preferences regarding use of donor sperm influence the selection of the appropriate fertility preservation option. Embryo and oocyte cryopreservation are the standard techniques used while ovarian tissue cryopreservation is new, yet promising. Despite the importance of fertility preservation for cancer survivors’ quality of life, there are still communication and financial barriers faced by women who wish to pursue fertility preservation. PMID:27200291

  19. The impact of the survivorship care plan on health care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Mette Moustgaard; Ezendam, Nicole P M; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to assess the impact of survivorship care plan (SCP) provision and moderating factors on health care use following endometrial cancer treatment. METHODS: Women newly diagnosed with endometrial cancer were included in a pragmatic cluster randomized trial at 12...... of general practitioner, specialist, and additional health care was collected through questionnaires after diagnosis and at 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up and compared using linear multilevel regression analyses. RESULTS: Women who received an SCP had more cancer-related primary care visits compared...... to the usual care arm during the first year after diagnosis (β = 0.7, p women in the SCP group used more additional health care compared to women receiving usual care (24 vs. 11%, p = 0.04). Women with anxious symptoms (p = 0.03) and women who received radiotherapy (p = 0.01) had...

  20. An Analysis of the United States-Led Coalition Air Campaign Conducted During the 1991 War with IRAQ: Desert Storm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, John

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the 1991 United States led coalition Persian Gulf War (DESERT STORM) Air Campaign is performed to measure its adherence to basic principles of war and to determine the potential implications for the future conduct of war...

  1. The Role of Environmental Design in Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survivorship: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaveis, Arsalan; Kazem-Zadeh, Mahshad

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a better understanding of the impact that environmental design can have on the process of cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship. Cancer is considered a chronic disease in the United States, and more than 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed annually. New strategies of cancer care propose patient-centered services to achieve the best outcome, and researchers have found that environmental design can be an important part of improving this care. Searches were conducted in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases as well as in specific healthcare design journals such as Health Environments Research & Design, Environmental Psychology, and Environment and Behavior. The criteria for articles included in the review were (a) English-language articles related to facility design, which addressed (b) the topics of built environment in relation to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship, and were (c) published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2017. Finally, 10 articles were selected, and the contents were analyzed. The selected articles demonstrate that environmental design is one of the critical factors for success throughout the whole continuum of cancer care from diagnosis to end-of-treatment. Some of the specific conclusions from the review are that "neighborhood-oriented" design strategies can be beneficial (by providing accessibility to all facilities along the patient's path), that access to nature for patients, staff, and visitors alike is associated with better outcomes, and that provisions for natural lighting and noise reduction are associated with cancer patients' well-being.

  2. A Primary Care Initiative for Cancer Survivorship: A Case Study of Cancer in Obese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh M. Shubair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Men in rural and northern areas of Canada experience considerable challenges in health care access for chronic conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D, and cancer. Obese men (body mass index/BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 in rural/remote northern British Columbia (BC experience poorer health outcomes due to cancer risk compared to other men elsewhere in urban Canada. Context: Challenges faced by men who develop cancer as a complication of being obese are paramount in terms of primary care treatment of their cancers. Oftentimes cancer treatment is multi-modal and complex. Models of shared care have been proposed to provide coordinated survivorship care to the growing population of rural male cancer patients suffering from obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. Methods: Objectives: The main objective of the study was to examine the type of cancer care programs that may have focused on men with cancer in northern British Columbia (BC. A secondary objective is to identify challenges in care experienced by men with cancer during their transition from in-hospital care back to their home communities. Population: We conducted a comprehensive literature review and a qualitative focus group interview with primary care physicians (PCPs, oncologists (n=8, and a convenience sample of male cancer patients (n=6 who have underlying obesity and Metabolic Syndrome (MetS. We examined the types of cancer care programs that may have targeted such men. We further identified challenges experienced by male cancer patients while transitioning back to their home communities. Results: The focus group results outlined themes speaking to a comprehensive shared care model that goes beyond surveillance of cancer recurrence in men with obesity. Conclusion: A shared survivorship care plan or model integrates collaboration among specialists in clinical decision making and best practice for treatment of cancer in obese men.

  3. Breast Cancer Survivorship: A Comprehensive Review of Long-Term Medical Issues and Lifestyle Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodai, Balazs I; Tuso, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Long-term survival rates after a diagnosis of breast cancer are steadily rising. This is good news, but clinicians must also recognize that this brings new challenges to the medical community. As breast cancer becomes a chronic condition rather than a life-threatening illness owing to advances in early diagnosis and more effective treatments, health care practitioners must recognize and manage the long-term sequelae of the constellation of therapeutic modalities. Survivors of breast cancer represent a unique and extremely complex group of patients; not only do they have the challenge of dealing with multiple long-term side effects of treatment protocols, but many are also forced to address the preexisting comorbidities of their therapies, which often include multiple other issues. Therapies have additional and/or additive side effects that may interfere with treatments directed toward the new primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Our mandate is to establish a smooth transition from patient with breast cancer to survivor of breast cancer while providing ongoing and future guidance. Certainly, the information and resources to accomplish this transition are readily available; however, they are scattered throughout the literature and therefore are not easily accessible or available to the primary care physician. It is imperative that the information available regarding survivorship issues be accessible in an organized and useful format. This article is a modest attempt to provide a comprehensive review of the long-term medical issues relevant to survivorship after the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. A predicted shortage of oncologists by 2020 is well-recognized. Therefore, the bulk of long-term care will become dependent on the primary care physician. This shift of care means that these physicians will need to be well educated in the long-term medical issues related to breast cancer treatment. PMID:25902343

  4. Testicular cancer: A narrative review of the role of socioeconomic position from risk to survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lisa C.; Neri, Antonio J.; Tai, Eric; Glenn, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Testicular cancer (TC) is one of the most curable cancers. Given survival rates of close to 100% with appropriate therapy, ensuring proper treatment is essential. We reviewed and summarized the literature on the association of socioeconomic position (SEP) along the cancer control spectrum from risk factors to survivorship. Methods We searched PubMed from 1966 to 2011 using the following terms: testicular cancer, testicular neoplasm, poverty, and socioeconomic factors, retrieving 119 papers. After excluding papers for the non-English (10) language and non-relevance (46), we reviewed 63 papers. We abstracted information on socioeconomic position (SEP), including occupation, education, income, and combinations of the 3. Five areas were examined: risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, survival, and survivorship. Results Most studies examined area-based measures, not individual measures of SEP. The majority of studies found an increased risk of developing TC with high SEP though recent papers have indicated increased risk in low-income populations. Regarding diagnosis, recent papers have indicated that lower levels of education and SEP are risk factors for later-stage TC diagnosis and hence higher TC mortality. For treatment, 1 study that examined the use of radiation therapy (RT) in stage I seminoma reported that living in a county with lower educational attainment led to lower use of RT. For survival (mortality), several studies found that men living in lower SEP geographic areas experience lower survival and higher mortality. Conclusion The strongest evidence for SEP impact on testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) was found for the risk of developing cancer as well as survival. The association of SEP with TGCT risk appears to have changed over the last decade. Given the highly curable nature of TGCT, more research is needed to understand how SEP impacts diagnosis and treatment for TGCT and to design interventions to address disparities in TGCT outcomes and SEP

  5. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion [Fusion Working Group (FWG)] was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project

  6. Denmark’s participation in the coalition against IS reflects the country’s commitment to ‘ethical militarism’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schouenborg, Laust

    2014-01-01

    The United States has put together a coalition of several western and Arab states to support military action against Islamic State (IS) forces in Iraq and Syria. Laust Schouenborg writes on the participation of Denmark in this coalition. He argues that the decision to take part reflects a principle...... of ‘ethical militarism’ which the country has adopted in previous conflicts over the last 25 years....

  7. Albert Sabin and the Coalition to Eliminate Polio from the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Albert B. Sabin, MD, developer of the oral polio vaccine, was also a major proponent of its use in annual vaccination campaigns aimed at the elimination of polio. Sabin argued that administering his vaccine simultaneously to every child in a country would break polio's chains of transmission. Although he was already promoting mass vaccination by the 1960s, Sabin's efforts expanded considerably when he became an adviser to groups fighting polio in the Americas in the 1980s. Sabin's experiences provide a window into both the formation of the coalition that eliminated poliomyelitis from the Western Hemisphere and what can happen when biomedical researchers become public health policy advisers. Although the polio elimination coalition succeeded in part because member groups often accommodated each other's priorities, Sabin was often limited by his indifference to the interests of those he was advising and to the shortcomings of his vaccine.

  8. The political economy of local government in Croatia: winning coalitions, corruption, and taxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk Vukovic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the first comprehensive effort to provide a theoretical and empirical explanation of systemic corruption in Croatian local government. It follows the logic of the selectorate theory, according to which staying in power for long periods of time depends on creating a small group of loyal but powerful supporters (the winning coalition. Mayors that exist within such environments not only maximize their chances of staying in power; they also engage in greater corruption and set higher taxes. Its citizens are stuck in a negative spiral of corruption, high taxes, and a politician that regardless of this keeps winning elections. The paper makes two main contributions to the current literature. First it provides a theoretical extension of the selectorate theory to Croatian local government by explicitly modeling the link between corruption and winning coalitions, and second, it empirically verifies the theoretical findings using a novel matching approach called entropy balancing.

  9. Smart transactive energy framework in grid-connected multiple home microgrids under independent and coalition operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzband, Mousa; Azarinejadian, Fatemeh; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a smart Transactive energy (TE) framework in which home microgrids (H-MGs) can collaborate with each other in a multiple H-MG system by forming coalitions for gaining competitiveness in the market. Profit allocation due to coalition between H-MGs is an important issue...... for ensuring the optimal use of installed resources in the whole multiple H-MG system. In addition, considering demand fluctuations, energy production based on renewable resources in the multiple H-MG can be accomplished by demand-side management strategies that try to establish mechanisms to allow...... for a flatter demand curve. In this regard, demand shifting potential can be tapped through shifting certain amounts of energy demand from some time periods to others with lower expected demand, typically to match price values and to ensure that existing generation will be economically sufficient. It is also...

  10. Coalitional Games, Excessive Competition and a Lack of Trust: an Experimental Aproach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Ners

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the issues of the effectiveness and rationality of making choices in the conditions of competition and cooperation. It confronts the economic theory of rational choice with the empirical results from an experiment. The aim of the article is to show that excessive competition and a lack of trust cause limitation of rational choice in coalitional games. In the experiment conducted for this study purposes, a public good was used to construct a situation in which making a huge coalition is the winning strategy. Despite this fact, the research proves that under competition supported by uncertainty, which results from the lack of trust, the decision making entities behave far less rationally than the game theory would suggest. People competing with each other often take decisions irrationally.

  11. Implementing change in health professions education: stakeholder analysis and coalition building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Karyn D; Resnik, Cheryl D; Wu, Jennifer J; Roey, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    The challenges facing the health sciences education fields are more evident than ever. Professional health sciences educators have more demands on their time, more knowledge to manage, and ever-dwindling sources of financial support. Change is often necessary to either keep programs viable or meet the changing needs of health education. This article outlines a simple but powerful three-step tool to help educators become successful agents of change. Through the application of principles well known and widely used in business management, readers will understand the concepts behind stakeholder analysis and coalition building. These concepts are part of a powerful tool kit that educators need in order to become effective agents of change in the health sciences environment. Using the example of curriculum change at a school of veterinary medicine, we will outline the three steps involved, from stakeholder identification and analysis to building and managing coalitions for change.

  12. Blockchain-based framework for ontology-oriented robots’ coalition formation in cyberphysical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslya Nikolay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and functioning of intelligent robots coalition is impossible without the organization of an information interaction environment between them. To solve this problem, it is proposed to use the concept of cyberphysical framework, which involves the unification of physical and cyber (virtual environments. Intelligent robots can interact with each of the environments. The paper proposes methodology of the cyber physical smart space creation for the intelligent robots’ coalition formation and functioning, based on the concept of the “blackboard” with the support of smart contracts over the blockchain technology. It provides a new approach to the distribution of sensory, computational, information-control and service tasks between intelligent robots, embedded devices, fixed service equipment, cloud computing and information resources.

  13. Forming Social Justice Projects: Student Activists Reflect on Coalition-Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren E. Lund

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Student activists share their experiences with racism and more specifically, their attempts to form school diversity initiatives. The author outlines a problematic lack of engagement of student activists in the scholarly literature on social justice, particularly related to their undervalued role as leaders in school-based antiracist coalitions. Excerpts from in-depth interviews with seven student participants in western Canadian schools offer new understandings on the potential of school-based activists. They explain the challenges and successes in building and sustaining activist coalitions and in pursuing their social justice efforts beyond school. Their contributions represent new voices to join the ongoing conversation in educational research and community activism.

  14. Influencing the political process through coalitions: the Michigan Council for Maternal and Child Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, R S; Shaheen, P N

    1995-08-01

    Building a coalition with others is an effective tool for increasing influence at the state level of the political process. It allows for the hiring of a staff who are able to maintain a constant presence in the ever-changing state political arena, which individual physicians and other caregivers simply cannot do. It allows for the development of increased sophistication among its members, which likewise increases the ability to affect the political process. It should be done with a philosophical set of standards that preserves its integrity and focuses on its goals, which must be carefully delineated from the inception. Coalitions are an effective way to deal with public issues of maternal and child health.

  15. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  16. Massage Therapy and Canadians’ Health Care Needs 2020: Proceedings of a National Research Priority Setting Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Trish; Sumpton, Bryn; Shipwright, Stacey; Kahn, Janet; Reece, Barbara (Findlay)

    2014-01-01

    Background The health care landscape in Canada is changing rapidly as forces, such as an aging population, increasingly complex health issues and treatments, and economic pressure to reduce health care costs, bear down on the system. A cohesive national research agenda for massage therapy (MT) is needed in order to ensure maximum benefit is derived from research on treatment, health care policy, and cost effectiveness. Setting A one-day invitational summit was held in Toronto, Ontario to build strategic alliances among Canadian and international researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders to help shape a national research agenda for MT. Method Using a modified Delphi method, the summit organizers conducted two pre-summit surveys to ensure that time spent during the summit was relevant and productive. The summit was facilitated using the principles of Appreciative Inquiry which included a “4D” strategic planning approach (defining, discovery, dreaming, designing) and application of a SOAR framework (strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results). Participants Twenty-six researchers, policymakers, and other stakeholders actively participated in the events. Results Priority topics that massage therapists believe are important to the Canadian public, other health care providers, and policy makers and massage therapists themselves were identified. A framework for a national massage therapy (MT) research agenda, a grand vision of the future for MT research, and a 12-month action plan were developed. Conclusion The summit provided an excellent opportunity for key stakeholders to come together and use their experience and knowledge of MT to develop a much-needed plan for moving the MT research and professionalization agenda forward. PMID:24592299

  17. Massage therapy and canadians' health care needs 2020: proceedings of a national research priority setting summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Trish; Sumpton, Bryn; Shipwright, Stacey; Kahn, Janet; Reece, Barbara Findlay

    2014-03-01

    The health care landscape in Canada is changing rapidly as forces, such as an aging population, increasingly complex health issues and treatments, and economic pressure to reduce health care costs, bear down on the system. A cohesive national research agenda for massage therapy (MT) is needed in order to ensure maximum benefit is derived from research on treatment, health care policy, and cost effectiveness. A one-day invitational summit was held in Toronto, Ontario to build strategic alliances among Canadian and international researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders to help shape a national research agenda for MT. Using a modified Delphi method, the summit organizers conducted two pre-summit surveys to ensure that time spent during the summit was relevant and productive. The summit was facilitated using the principles of Appreciative Inquiry which included a "4D" strategic planning approach (defining, discovery, dreaming, designing) and application of a SOAR framework (strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results). Twenty-six researchers, policymakers, and other stakeholders actively participated in the events. Priority topics that massage therapists believe are important to the Canadian public, other health care providers, and policy makers and massage therapists themselves were identified. A framework for a national massage therapy (MT) research agenda, a grand vision of the future for MT research, and a 12-month action plan were developed. The summit provided an excellent opportunity for key stakeholders to come together and use their experience and knowledge of MT to develop a much-needed plan for moving the MT research and professionalization agenda forward.

  18. Frequency Resource Sharing and Allocation Scheme Based on Coalition Formation Game in Hybrid D2D-Cellular Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A distributed cooperation scheme on frequency resource sharing is proposed to improve the quality of service (QoS in device-to-device (D2D communications underlaying cellular networks. Specifically, we formulate the resource allocation problem as a coalition formation game with transferable utility, in which all users have the incentive to cooperate with some others and form a competitive group to maximize the probability of obtaining their favorite spectrum resources. Taking the cost for coalition formation into account, such as the path loss for data sharing, we prove that the core of the proposed game is empty, which shows the impossibility of grand coalition. Hence, we propose a distributed merge-and-split based coalition formation algorithm based on a new defined Max-Coalition order to effectively solve the coalition game. Compared with the exhaustive search, our algorithm has much lower computer complexity. In addition, we prove that stability and convergence of the proposed algorithm using the concept of a defection function. Finally, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme achieves a suboptimal performance in terms of network sum rate compared with the centralized optimal resource allocation scheme obtained via exhaustive search.

  19. Rise and Fall of a Coalition: The Supreme War Council and Marshal Foch, 1917-1919

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Britain and France During the First World War ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2009), 169. 5 World Peace Foundation, “The Supreme War Council...Second World War conflict. It illustrated how unified policies as a coalition from the First World War served a reminder for strategists and operational...France During the First World War ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2009); Elizabeth Greenhalgh, Foch in Command: The Forging of a First World

  20. Connecting and Reconnecting: Outfitting the Figure of the Cyborg for Transnational Coalition-building

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica E. Brophy

    2016-01-01

    This work attempts to rehabilitate Donna Haraway’s (1991) figure of the cyborg to increase the possibilities of alliances between transnational feminism and cyborg or technoscience feminism. Haraway’s cyborg offers little impetus for political investment and coalition building. This work develops an optional prosthesis of responseability for the cyborg figuration, one that enables the cyborg to invest locally. This ethic of response-ability is developed via the work of Mary Strine (1989), Ad...

  1. Coalitions and Competition in Malaysia – Incremental Transformation of a Strong-party System

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith L. WEISS

    2013-01-01

    "The seeming entrenchment of a two-coalition system in Malaysia solidifies the centrality of strongly institutionalised parties in the polity. The primary parties in Malaysia reach deeply into society and nest within dense networks of both intra-party and external organisations. Given this order - which differentiates Malaysia from its neighbours in the region - political liberalisation, if it happens, should be expected largely via electoral politics, and, specifically, through inter-party c...

  2. Three-body interactions in sociophysics and their role in coalition forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.; Samaniego-Steta, F.; del Castillo-Mussot, M.; Vázquez, G. J.

    2007-06-01

    An study of the effects of three-body interactions in the process of coalition formation is presented. In particular, we modify a spin glass model of bimodal propensities and also a Potts model in order to include a particular three-body Hamiltonian that reproduces the main features of the required interactions. The model can be used to study conflicts, political struggles, political parties, social networks, wars and organizational structures. As an application, we analyze a simplified model of the Iraq war.

  3. The Dynamic VPN Controller. Secure Information Sharing in a Coalition Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    coalitionName=" COALA "> <Security>Class A</Security> <Site siteName="SITE1"> <Remote> <Hostname>dvc.site1.com</Hostname> <IPAddress...34 COALA "> <Security>Class A</Security> <Site siteName="SITE1"> <Remote> <Hostname>dvc.site1.com</Hostname> <IPAddress>10.1.1.1

  4. When’s the Party (or Coalition? Agenda-Setting in a Highly Fragmented, Decentralized Legislature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Pachón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines committee behavior in Colombia to determine whether parties or coalitions exert agenda-setting powers despite the fact that the formal rules seemingly create little incentive for cooperation. Colombia’s party system is extremely fragmented, electoral volatility is high, and there is a long history of candidate-centered electoral rules, all of which suggests that party and coalition leaders have few tools to control the legislative agenda. Additionally, chairs do not directly control committee reports as in other presidential cases. However, the naming of ponentes (rapporteurs to write ponencias (bill reports for the committee may give leaders the opportunity to set the agendas in committees. Hence, we test whether committee chairs strategically name ponentes to control the agenda and favor their partisan or coalition interests. We test these ideas using a unique dataset covering two complete legislative sessions and thousands of bills. Overall, we find that committee chairs use the ponente process to set the agenda and privilege legislation sponsored by allies, especially the executive.

  5. Gait analysis with an integrated system for functional assessment of talocalcaneal coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, Claudia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Leardini, Alberto; Macellari, Velio; Giannini, Sandro

    2006-01-01

    There is little knowledge of the functional performance of patients with talocalcaneal coalition because of the marginal quantitative information accessible using current motion-analysis and plantar pressure-measurement techniques. A novel system was developed for comprehensively measuring foot-floor interaction during the stance phase of gait that integrates instrumentation for simultaneously measuring bony segment position, ground reaction force, and plantar pressure with synchronization of spatial and temporal variables. An advanced anatomically based analysis of foot joint rotations was also applied. Tracking of numerous anatomical landmarks allowed accurate selection of three footprint subareas and reliable estimation of relevant local forces and moments. Eight patients (11 feet) with talocalcaneal coalition were analyzed. Major impairment of the rearfoot was found in nonsurgical patients, with an everted attitude, limited plantarflexion, and overloading in all three components of ground reaction force. Surgical patients showed more normal loading patterns in each footprint subarea. This measuring system allowed for accurate inspection of the effects of surgical treatment in the entire foot and at several footprint subareas. Surgical treatment of talocalcaneal coalition seems to be effective in restoring more physiologic subtalar and forefoot motion and loading patterns.

  6. Discourse coalitions in Swiss waste management: gridlock or winds of change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygan, Mert; Stauffacher, Michael; Meylan, Grégoire

    2018-02-01

    As a complex socio-technical system, waste management is crucially important for the sustainable management of material and energy flows. Transition to better performing waste management systems requires not only determining what needs to be changed but also finding out how this change can be realized. Without understanding the political context, insights from decision support tools such as life cycle assessment (LCA) are likely to be lost in translation to decision and policy making. This study strives to provide a first insight into the political context and address the opportunities and barriers pertinent to initiating a change in Swiss waste management. For this purpose, the discourses around a major policy process are analysed to uncover the policy beliefs and preferences of actors. Discourse coalitions are delineated by referring to the Advocacy Coalition Framework (Sabatier, 1998) and using the Discourse Network Analysis (Leifeld and Haunss, 2012) method. The results display an incoherent regime (Fuenfschilling and Truffer, 2014) with divergent belief clusters on core issues in waste management. Yet, some actors holding different beliefs appear to have overlapping interests on secondary issues such as the treatment of biogenic waste or plastics. Although the current political context hinders a system-wide disruptive change, transitions can be initiated at local or regional scale by utilizing the shared interest across different discourse coalitions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Coalition contract management as a systems change strategy for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, William W; Montanea, Julie E; Sánchez-Braña, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 provided a unique opportunity for minority community-based organizations (CBOs) to work together to eliminate disparities in HIV disease. A coalition was formed in Broward County to respond to the REACH 2010 program announcement, a university was chosen to coordinate efforts, and contracts were negotiated with CBO partners to develop, implement, and evaluate a community action plan. Contract management provided stability, focus, and a mechanism for coalition partners to measure progress toward achieving project objectives. By emphasizing documentation as well as the delivery of services, however, contract conditions also placed a heavy burden on educational outreach workers, restricted the reimbursable activities of member organizations, and created friction between minority agencies and university staff. Although the coalition met many of its objectives, the introduction and enforcement of a mutually agreed on set of rules and obligations as a way of promoting systems change in Broward County failed to make a lasting impact among community partners. CBOs continued to compete with one another for HIV prevention project funding and stopped collaborating as closely with another when federal support for our REACH 2010 community demonstration project ran out.

  8. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and..., Division of Nursing, will host an invitational summit that focuses on Nursing Workforce Diversity (NWD..., thought leaders, and key workforce diversity stakeholders to identify the full range of academic and...

  9. 76 FR 47596 - Notice of Scientific Summit; The Science of Compassion-Future Directions in End-of-Life and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ...; The Science of Compassion--Future Directions in End-of-Life and Palliative Care SUMMARY: Notice is... science at the end-of-life. On August 11-12, the summit will feature keynote presentations, three plenary...), Department of Health and Human Services, will convene a scientific summit titled ``The Science of Compassion...

  10. Talent Development Research, Policy, and Practice in Europe and the United States: Outcomes from a Summit of International Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Rena F.; Stoeger, Heidrun; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this article is to convey a summary of research and conversation on talent development on the part of a small group of European and American researchers who participated in the Inaugural American European Research Summit in Washington. In the final hours of the summit, participants discussed the state of research on talent development…

  11. Biomedical imaging graduate curricula and courses: report from the 2005 Whitaker Biomedical Engineering Educational Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Angelique; Izatt, Joseph; Ferrara, Katherine

    2006-02-01

    We present an overview of graduate programs in biomedical imaging that are currently available in the US. Special attention is given to the emerging technologies of molecular imaging and biophotonics. Discussions from the workshop on Graduate Imaging at the 2005 Whitaker Educational Summit meeting are summarized.

  12. Curtain Down and Nothing Settled. Global Sustainability Governance after the 'Rio 20+20' Earth Summit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, F.

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, held in June 2012 in Rio de Janeiro, was probably the largest event in a long series of mega-summits on environmental protection and sustainable development. Roughly 44000 participants descended on Rio de Janeiro to take part in ten days of

  13. Erratum: Report on the summit on the future ofacademic medicine in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prescribed forms should be completed. 8. The ethical rules should be complied with at all times. 7. Die voorgeskrewe vorms moet voltooi word. 8. Die etiese reels moet te alle tye nagekom word. Erratum: Report on the summit on the future ofacademic medicine in SA. Please npte that this repon, which was published on ...

  14. 77 FR 13232 - Security Zones; G8/North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Summit, Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... political figures, the G8/NATO Summit is expected to draw significant domestic and international media... mitigate the threat of violence and ensure the safety and security of those who attend, participate, and... NATO; the high concentration of dignitaries and political figures; the expected interest of domestic...

  15. Participants to the 3rd HEP Information Resources Summit, 6-7 May 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    Fermilab, Photo Service

    2009-01-01

    The broad theme of the 3rd HEP Information Resources Summit was "Collaboration between Information Services." As HEP increasingly borders fields such as instrumentation and astrophysics, it was discussed what potential interrelationships and communication this group have to serve this broader research community seamlessly.

  16. Text of the Moscow nuclear safety and security summit declaration Moscow, 19-20 April 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    As requested by the Resident Representatives to the International Atomic Energy Agency of France and the Russian Federation, the two States -Co-Chairmen of the summit meeting held in Moscow from 19-20 April 1996, the text of the Moscow Nuclear Safety and Security Declaration is being circulated

  17. Using Film Clips to Teach Teen Pregnancy Prevention: "The Gloucester 18" at a Teen Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W.; Moore, Christopher C.; Anthony, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Teaching pregnancy prevention to large groups offers many challenges. This article describes the use of film clips, with guided discussion, to teach pregnancy prevention. In order to analyze the costs associated with teen pregnancy, a film clip discussion session based with the film "The Gloucester 18" was the keynote of a youth summit. The lesson…

  18. Text of the Moscow nuclear safety and security summit declaration Moscow, 19-20 April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-04

    As requested by the Resident Representatives to the International Atomic Energy Agency of France and the Russian Federation, the two States -Co-Chairmen of the summit meeting held in Moscow from 19-20 April 1996, the text of the Moscow Nuclear Safety and Security Declaration is being circulated.

  19. Summary of the 2015 International Paediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Karl, Tom R; Asante-Korang, Alfred; Everett, Allen D; Collins, Susan B; Ramirez-Correa, Genaro A; Burns, Kristin M; Cohen, Mitchell; Colan, Steven D; Costello, John M; Daly, Kevin P; Franklin, Rodney C G; Fraser, Charles D; Hill, Kevin D; Huhta, James C; Kaushal, Sunjay; Law, Yuk M; Lipshultz, Steven E; Murphy, Anne M; Pasquali, Sara K; Payne, Mark R; Rossano, Joseph; Shirali, Girish; Ware, Stephanie M; Xu, Mingguo; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2015-08-01

    In the United States alone, ∼14,000 children are hospitalised annually with acute heart failure. The science and art of caring for these patients continues to evolve. The International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was held on February 4 and 5, 2015. The 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute was funded through the Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program Endowment, a philanthropic collaboration between All Children's Hospital and the Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida (USF). Sponsored by All Children's Hospital Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program, the International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit assembled leaders in clinical and scientific disciplines related to paediatric heart failure and created a multi-disciplinary "think-tank". The purpose of this manuscript is to summarise the lessons from the 2015 International Pediatric Heart Failure Summit of Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute, to describe the "state of the art" of the treatment of paediatric cardiac failure, and to discuss future directions for research in the domain of paediatric cardiac failure.

  20. The World Solar Summit Process. The solar electricity highway for peace and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovski, B.

    1996-01-01

    Due to the growth of the world, energy demand will continue to increase. The question of providing additional energy is discussed by the World Solar Summit Process (WSSP). The actions, plans, recommendations and possible prospects of WSSP are discussed. (R.P.)

  1. The aspen mortality summit; December 18 and 19, 2006; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale L. Bartos; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2010-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station sponsored an aspen summit meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah, on December 18 and19, 2006, to discuss the rapidly increasing mortality of aspen (Populus tremuloides) throughout the western United States. Selected scientists, university faculty, and managers from Federal, State, and non-profit agencies with experience...

  2. Proceedings of resources for optimal care of acute care and emergency surgery consensus summit Donegal Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sugrue, M.; Maier, R.; Moore, E. E.; Boermeester, M.; Catena, F.; Coccolini, F.; Leppaniemi, A.; Peitzman, A.; Velmahos, G.; Ansaloni, L.; Abu-Zidan, F.; Balfe, P.; Bendinelli, C.; Biffl, W.; Bowyer, M.; DeMoya, M.; de Waele, J.; di Saverio, S.; Drake, A.; Fraga, G. P.; Hallal, A.; Henry, C.; Hodgetts, T.; Hsee, L.; Huddart, S.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Kluger, Y.; Lawler, L.; Malangoni, M. A.; Malbrain, M.; MacMahon, P.; Mealy, K.; O'Kane, M.; Loughlin, P.; Paduraru, M.; Pearce, L.; Pereira, B. M.; Priyantha, A.; Sartelli, M.; Soreide, K.; Steele, C.; Thomas, S.; Vincent, J. L.; Woods, L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Opportunities to improve emergency surgery outcomes exist through guided better practice and reduced variability. Few attempts have been made to define optimal care in emergency surgery, and few clinically derived key performance indicators (KPIs) have been published. A summit was

  3. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  4. Mid-term survivorship and clinical outcomes of cobalt-chrome and oxidized zirconium on highly crosslinked polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petis, Stephen M; Vasarhelyi, Edward M; Lanting, Brent A; Howard, James L; Naudie, Douglas D R; Somerville, Lyndsay E; McCalden, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    The choice of bearing articulation for total hip arthroplasty in younger patients is amenable to debate. We compared mid-term patient-reported outcomes and survivorship across 2 different bearing articulations in a young patient cohort. We reviewed patients with cobalt-chrome or oxidized zirconium on highly crosslinked polyethylene who were followed prospectively between 2004 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to determine predicted cumulative survivorship at 5 years with all-cause and aseptic revisions as the outcome. We compared patient-reported outcomes, including the Harris hip score (HHS), Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Short-form 12 (SF-12) scores. A total of 622 patients were followed during the study period. Mean follow-up was 8.2 (range 2.0-10.6) years for cobalt-chrome and 7.8 (range 2.1-10.7) years for oxidized zirconium. Mean age was 54.9 ± 10.6 years for cobalt-chrome and 54.8 ± 10.7 years for oxidized zirconium. Implant survivorship was 96.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94.9%-97.1%) for cobalt-chrome and 98.7% (95% CI 98.0%-99.4%) for oxidized zirconium on highly crosslinked polyethylene for all-cause revisions, and 97.2% (95% CI 96.2%-98.2%) for cobalt-chrome and 99.0% (95% CI 98.4%-99.6%) for oxidized zirconium for aseptic revisions. An age-, sex- and diagnosis-matched comparison of the HHS, WOMAC and SF-12 scores demonstrated no significant changes in clinical outcomes across the groups. Both bearing surface couples demonstrated excellent mid-term survivorship and outcomes in young patient cohorts. Future analyses on wear and costs are warranted to elicit differences between the groups at long-term follow-up.

  5. Conducting Cancer Control and Survivorship Research via Cooperative Groups: A Report from the American Society of Preventive Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Palesh, Oxana; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Mustian, Karen; Minasian, Lori; Rowland, Julia; Sprod, Lisa; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke; Sloan, Jeff; Engquist, Karen Basen; Jones, Lee; Buist, Diana; Paskett, Electra

    2011-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors expands, the need for cancer control and survivorship research becomes increasingly important. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cooperative Groups may offer a viable platform to perform such research. Observational, preventive, and behavioral research can often be performed within the cooperative group setting, especially if resources needed for evaluation are fairly simple, if protocols are easily implemented within the typical clinical setting, and if in...

  6. Distribution, survivorship and mortality sources in immature stages of the neotropical leaf miner Pachyschelus coeruleipennis Kerremans (Coleoptera: Buprestidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QUEIROZ J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution, sources of mortality, and survivorship of immatures was investigated during the reproductive season of the neotropical buprestid leaf miner, Pachyschelus coeruleipennis, that burrows in leaves of Croton floribundus (Euphorbiaceae in SE, Brazil. Immature distribution was investigated by a random sample of 120 shrubs of C. floribundus growing along forest edges. Marked leaves were followed to recorded sources of mortality and survivorship of immature stages. Females lay their eggs preferentially in the young leaves of the host plant, with mines and pupal cells having been found on the middle part of plants. Densities of eggs, active mines, and pupal cells were, respectively, 25 ± 2, 6 ± 1, and 1 ± 0.3 per 100 leaves. Predators and parasitoids accounted for the majority of losses in the immature P. coeruleipennis population. Mortality was 3 times lower in the egg stage than in the last larval instar. Predation rate was greater than parasitism but the latter increased much more during the development of immatures. Survivorship and sources of mortality were different between early and late season sample of leaf-miner immatures. Parasitism rate was greater in the late-season whereas predation was greater in early-season samples. These results are compared with mortality patterns described for other buprestid leaf miners in temperate and tropical regions.

  7. Native legume transplant survivorship and subsequent seedling recruitment on unamended coal mine soils in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, C.R.

    1997-05-01

    Transplant survivorship, growth, and reproductive performance of several indigenous high-elevation legume species grown in unamended spoil were studied at three coal mines in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Survivorship varied with species but was highest for Astragalus aboriginum (62%), Astragalus alpinus (73-57%), Astragalus vexilliflexus var. nubilus (73-63%), and Oxytropis sericea (77-62%). Mortality was greatest during the first two years for most species. The causes of transplant mortality are considered to be drought stress, deep-seated `frost-popping`/root exposure, and damage, for example, root exposure and destruction of meristematic tissues by foraging mammals such as bighorn sheep, mountain goats, grizzly bears, and marmots. Survivorship, growth, and reproductive activity were greatest at the two subalpine disturbances. Growth varied with species, but the greatest growth increments (height and diameter) were recorded during the first and second years. Reproductive activity for the Astragalus species began during the first year at one location but, in general, flowering and seed set did not begin until the second or third years. Recruitment from seed was small ({lt} 10/year). Several of these species appear to be suitable for revegetation of subalpine and alpine surface mine disturbances.

  8. Genotype and local environment dynamically influence growth, disturbance response and survivorship in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Crawford; Manzello, Derek; Lirman, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between the coral genotype and the environment is an important area of research in degraded coral reef ecosystems. We used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral genotype and site were strong drivers of coral growth and individual genotypes exhibited flexible, non-conserved reaction norms, complemented by ten-fold differences in growth between specific G-E combinations. Growth plasticity may diminish the influence of local adaptation, where foreign corals grew faster than native corals at their home sites. Novel combinations of environment and genotype also significantly affected disturbance response during and after the 2015 bleaching event, where these factors acted synergistically to drive variation in bleaching and recovery. Importantly, small differences in temperature stress elicit variable patterns of survivorship based on genotype and illustrate the importance of novel combinations of coral genetics and small differences between sites representing habitat refugia. In this context, acclimatization and flexibility is especially important given the long lifespan of corals coping with complex environmental change. The combined influence of site and genotype creates short-term differences in growth and survivorship, contributing to the standing genetic variation needed for adaptation to occur over longer timescales and the recovery of degraded reefs through natural mechanisms.

  9. Genotype and local environment dynamically influence growth, disturbance response and survivorship in the threatened coral, Acropora cervicornis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Drury

    Full Text Available The relationship between the coral genotype and the environment is an important area of research in degraded coral reef ecosystems. We used a reciprocal outplanting experiment with 930 corals representing ten genotypes on each of eight reefs to investigate the influence of genotype and the environment on growth and survivorship in the threatened Caribbean staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis. Coral genotype and site were strong drivers of coral growth and individual genotypes exhibited flexible, non-conserved reaction norms, complemented by ten-fold differences in growth between specific G-E combinations. Growth plasticity may diminish the influence of local adaptation, where foreign corals grew faster than native corals at their home sites. Novel combinations of environment and genotype also significantly affected disturbance response during and after the 2015 bleaching event, where these factors acted synergistically to drive variation in bleaching and recovery. Importantly, small differences in temperature stress elicit variable patterns of survivorship based on genotype and illustrate the importance of novel combinations of coral genetics and small differences between sites representing habitat refugia. In this context, acclimatization and flexibility is especially important given the long lifespan of corals coping with complex environmental change. The combined influence of site and genotype creates short-term differences in growth and survivorship, contributing to the standing genetic variation needed for adaptation to occur over longer timescales and the recovery of degraded reefs through natural mechanisms.

  10. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative: An Innovative Model to Advance Public Health Preparedness and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobelson, Robyn K.; Young, Andrea C.; Marcus, Leonard J.; Dorn, Barry C.; Neslund, Verla S.; McNulty, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the design, evaluation framework, and results from the Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness was a 5-year initiative based on the premise that national preparedness and emergency response is not solely the responsibility of government. From 2006 to 2011, 36 Meta-Leadership Summits were delivered in communities across the country. Summits were customized, 10-hour leadership development, networking, and community action planning events. They included participation from targeted federal, state, local, nonprofit/philanthropic, and private sector leaders who are directly involved in decision making during a major community or state-wide emergency. A total of 4,971 government, nonprofit, and business leaders attended Meta-Leadership Summits; distribution of attendees by sector was balanced. Ninety-three percent of respondents reported the summit was a valuable use of time, 91% reported the overall quality as “good” or “outstanding,” and 91% would recommend the summit to their colleagues. In addition, approximately 6 months after attending a summit, 80% of respondents reported that they had used meta-leadership concepts or principles. Of these, 93% reported that using meta-leadership concepts or principles had made a positive difference for them and their organizations. The Meta-Leadership Summit for Preparedness Initiative was a value-added opportunity for communities, providing the venue for learning the concepts and practice of meta-leadership, multisector collaboration, and resource sharing with the intent of substantively improving preparedness, response, and recovery efforts. PMID:24251597

  11. An Incidental Finding of a Talonavicular and Talocalcaneal Joint Coalition After a Tibial Pilon Fracture: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Heidi M; Micciche, Mark J

    It has been proposed that patients with talocalcaneal and talonavicular coalitions have decreased ankle joint range of motion. It has also been reported that rotational forces regularly absorbed by the talocalcaneal joint are transferred to the ankle joint in patients with coalitions, increasing the stress on the ankle joint after trauma. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 reported study has detailed the increased stress placed on the ankle joint secondary to a coalition. We present a case study of a 53-year-old female who experienced a traumatic fall and subsequent right ankle fracture. Advanced imaging studies revealed a comminuted tibial pilon fracture and talocalcaneal and talonavicular joint coalitions. She underwent open reduction and internal fixation for treatment of the fracture, and the coalitions were not treated because they were asymptomatic. She was kept non-weightbearing for 6 weeks postoperatively and was returned to a regular sneaker at 10 weeks postoperatively. The postoperative films revealed stable intact fixation and pain-free gait with no increased restriction in her ankle joint range of motion. The hardware was removed at 13 months postoperatively. She had not experienced increased pain or arthritic changes at 15 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM): a novel framework for cancer survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Salz, Talya; Basch, Ethan; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Carroll, Peter R; Tighe, Foss; Eastham, James; Rosen, Raymond C

    2010-06-17

    We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM). SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked to complete validated questionnaires online. Patient responses on these questionnaires are then analyzed in order to provide patients with real-time, online information about their progress and to provide them with tailored and standardized medical advice. Patient-level data from the questionnaires are ported in real time to the patient's health care provider to be uploaded to clinic notes. An initial version of SAM has been developed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) for aiding the clinical management of patients after surgery for prostate cancer. Pilot testing at MSKCC and UCSF suggests that implementation of SAM systems are feasible, with no major problems with compliance (> 70% response rate) or security. SAM is a conceptually simple framework for passing information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice.

  13. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation survivorship and quality of life: is it a small world after all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Lisa; Gilroy, Nicole; Dyer, Gemma; Kabir, Masura; Greenwood, Matt; Larsen, Stephen; Moore, John; Kwan, John; Hertzberg, Mark; Brown, Louisa; Hogg, Megan; Huang, Gillian; Tan, Jeff; Ward, Christopher; Gottlieb, David; Kerridge, Ian

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to gain a rich understanding of the impact that haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has on long-term survivor's quality of life (QoL). Participants included 441 survivors who had undergone HSCT for a malignant or non-malignant disease. Data were obtained by a questionnaire positing a single open-ended question asking respondents to list the three issues of greatest importance to their QoL in survivorship. Responses were analysed and organised into QoL themes and subthemes. Major themes identified included the following: the failing body and diminished physical effectiveness, the changed mind, the loss of social connectedness, the loss of the functional self and the patient for life. Each of these themes manifests different ways in which HSCT survivor's world and opportunities had diminished compared to the unhindered and expansive life that they enjoyed prior to the onset of disease and subsequent HSCT. HSCT has a profound and pervasive impact on the life of survivors-reducing their horizons and shrinking various parts of their worlds. While HSCT survivors can describe the ways in which their life has changed, many of their fears, anxieties, regrets and concerns are existential in nature and are ill-defined-making it exceeding unlikely that they would be adequately captured by standard psychometric measures of QoL post HSCT.

  14. Spatial patterns of coral survivorship: impacts of adult proximity versus other drivers of localized mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Gibbs

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Species-specific enemies may promote prey coexistence through negative distance- and density-dependent survival of juveniles near conspecific adults. We tested this mechanism by transplanting juvenile-sized fragments of the brooding corals Pocillopora damicornis and Seriatopora hystrix 3, 12, 24 and 182 cm up- and down-current of conspecific adults and monitoring their survival and condition over time. We also characterized the spatial distribution of P. damicornis and S. hystrix within replicate plots on three Fijian reef flats and measured the distribution of small colonies within 2 m of larger colonies of each species. Juvenile-sized transplants exhibited no differences in survivorship as a function of distance from adult P. damicornis or S. hystrix. Additionally, both P. damicornis and S. hystrix were aggregated rather than overdispersed on natural reefs. However, a pattern of juveniles being aggregated near adults while larger (and probably older colonies were not suggests that greater mortality near large adults could occur over longer periods of time or that size-dependent mortality was occurring. While we found minimal evidence of greater mortality of small colonies near adult conspecifics in our transplant experiments, we did document hot-spots of species-specific corallivory. We detected spatially localized and temporally persistent predation on P. damicornis by the territorial triggerfish Balistapus undulatus. This patchy predation did not occur for S. hystrix. This variable selective regime in an otherwise more uniform environment could be one mechanism maintaining diversity of corals on Indo-Pacific reefs.

  15. Electronic patient self-assessment and management (SAM: a novel framework for cancer survivorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tighe Foss

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We propose a novel framework for management of cancer survivorship: electronic patient Self-Assessment and Management (SAM. SAM is a framework for transfer of information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice. Methods Patients who participate in the SAM system are contacted by email at regular intervals and asked to complete validated questionnaires online. Patient responses on these questionnaires are then analyzed in order to provide patients with real-time, online information about their progress and to provide them with tailored and standardized medical advice. Patient-level data from the questionnaires are ported in real time to the patient's health care provider to be uploaded to clinic notes. An initial version of SAM has been developed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF for aiding the clinical management of patients after surgery for prostate cancer. Results Pilot testing at MSKCC and UCSF suggests that implementation of SAM systems are feasible, with no major problems with compliance (> 70% response rate or security. Conclusion SAM is a conceptually simple framework for passing information to and from patients in such a way as to increase both the patient's and the health care provider's understanding of the patient's progress, and to help ensure that patient care follows best practice.

  16. Survivorship care plans: are randomized controlled trials assessing outcomes that are relevant to stakeholders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Urquhart, Robin; Munoz-Plaza, Corrine; Zizzi, Alexandra R; Haines, Emily; Stover, Angela; Mayer, Deborah K; Hahn, Erin E

    2018-03-23

    The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes assessed in extant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to outcomes that stakeholders expect from survivorship care plans (SCPs). To facilitate the transition from active treatment to follow-up care for the 15.5 million US cancer survivors, many organizations require SCP use. However, results of several RCTs of SCPs' effectiveness have been null, possibly because they have evaluated outcomes on which SCPs should be expected to have limited influence. Stakeholders (e.g., survivors, oncologists) may expect outcomes that differ from RCTs' outcomes. We identified RCTs' outcomes using a PubMed literature review. We identified outcomes that stakeholders expect from SCPs using semistructured interviews with stakeholders in three healthcare systems in the USA and Canada. Finally, we mapped RCTs' outcomes onto stakeholder-identified outcomes. RCT outcomes did not fully address outcomes that stakeholders expected from SCPs, and RCTs assessed outcomes that stakeholders did not expect from SCPs. RCTs often assessed outcomes only from survivors' perspectives. RCTs of SCPs' effectiveness have not assessed outcomes that stakeholders expect. To better understand SCPs' effectiveness, future RCTs should assess outcomes of SCP use that are relevant from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. SCPs' effectiveness may be optimized when used with an eye toward outcomes that stakeholders expect from SCPs. For survivors, this means using SCPs as a map to guide them with respect to what kind of follow-up care they should seek, when they should seek it, and from whom they should seek it.

  17. The Experiences of Young Adults With Hodgkin Lymphoma Transitioning to Survivorship: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Lauren; Boulton, Mary; Lavender, Verna; Collins, Graham; Mitchell-Floyd, Tracy; Watson, Eila

    2016-09-01

    To explore the experiences of young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma during the first year following the end of initial treatment. 
. A qualitative grounded theory study.
. Interviews with patients recruited from three cancer centers in England.
. 10 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (four men and six women aged 21-39 years) recruited as part of a larger study of 28 young adult cancer survivors.
. Semistructured interviews were conducted about two months after treatment completion, and follow-up interviews were conducted seven months later. The authors' grounded theory of positive psychosocial adjustment to cancer provided the conceptual framework.
. Positive reframing, informal peer support, acceptance, and normalization helped young adults dismantle the threats of Hodgkin lymphoma during the course of treatment. However, they described losing a sense of security following treatment completion. Greater age-specific information to enable better preparation for the future was desired regarding body image, fertility, sexual relationships, work, and socializing.
. Informal support mechanisms, like peer support and patient navigator interventions, may be useful ways to further support young adults after treatment completion.
. Positive psychosocial adjustment to cancer survivorship in young adults is facilitated by having informal peer support; being able to positively reframe, accept, and normalize their experience; and being prepared for the future.

  18. How guiding coalitions promote positive culture change in hospitals: a longitudinal mixed methods interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Brewster, Amanda L; McNatt, Zahirah; Linnander, Erika L; Cherlin, Emily; Fosburgh, Heather; Ting, Henry H; Curry, Leslie A

    2018-03-01

    Quality collaboratives are widely endorsed as a potentially effective method for translating and spreading best practices for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care. Nevertheless, hospital success in improving performance through participation in collaboratives varies markedly. We sought to understand what distinguished hospitals that succeeded in shifting culture and reducing 30-day risk-standardised mortality rate (RSMR) after AMI through their participation in the Leadership Saves Lives (LSL) collaborative. We conducted a longitudinal, mixed methods intervention study of 10 hospitals over a 2-year period; data included surveys of 223 individuals (response rates 83%-94% depending on wave) and 393 in-depth interviews with clinical and management staff most engaged with the LSL intervention in the 10 hospitals. We measured change in culture and RSMR, and key aspects of working related to team membership, turnover, level of participation and approaches to conflict management. The six hospitals that experienced substantial culture change and greater reductions in RSMR demonstrated distinctions in: (1) effective inclusion of staff from different disciplines and levels in the organisational hierarchy in the team guiding improvement efforts (referred to as the 'guiding coalition' in each hospital); (2) authentic participation in the work of the guiding coalition; and (3) distinct patterns of managing conflict. Guiding coalition size and turnover were not associated with success (p values>0.05). In the six hospitals that experienced substantial positive culture change, staff indicated that the LSL learnings were already being applied to other improvement efforts. Hospitals that were most successful in a national quality collaborative to shift hospital culture and reduce RSMR showed distinct patterns in membership diversity, authentic participation and capacity for conflict management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  19. POLITICAL MONETARY CYCLES IN COALITION AND SINGLE PARTY GOVERNMENT PERIODS: A CASE STUDY ON TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMET EMRAH TAYYAR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of political monetary cycles, the government manipulates monetary policy during election periods in order to be re-elected. According to the said theory, expansionary monetary policies are implemented before the elections with opportunistic objective, while the contractionary monetary policies are implemented to stabilize the economy immediately after the elections. The use of monetary policy instruments for political purposes depends on the presence of a non-autonomous central bank, flexible exchange rate regime in the country, and the coordination between fiscal and monetary policies. Thus, the changes in the monetary policy indicators in election periods during coalition and single party governments in Turkey between 1990 and 2016 were examined in the present study. The money in circulation (M0, M1 money supply, domestic loans and inflation series were analyzed with the seasonal Box-Jenkins method for the above mentioned periods. Based on the findings of the study, political monetary cycles were not observed during the 1990-2000 coalition governments. It was determined that there were political monetary cycles during the single party government period between 2000 and 2016.Furthermore, although it could be expected that the political monetary cycles would be removed with the liberalization of the Turkish central bank on 25 April 2001, the existence of political monetary cycles during the period of 2000-2016 indicates that central bank independence was not fully achieved in Turkey. Based on another finding of the present study, the lack of political monetary cycles during the coalition government periods could lead to the failure in financing the budget deficit that increase due to political reasons with monetary policies. However, due to the existence of political monetary cycles during the single party government period, it could be argued that politically induced budget deficits changed in consistence with the

  20. Glacial erosion of high-elevation low-relief summits on passive continental margins constrained by cosmogenic nuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    We present a new, extensive in-situ cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al dataset from high-elevation low-relief summits along Sognefjorden in Norway. Contrary to previous studies of high-elevation low-relief summits in cold regions, we find only limited cosmogenic nuclide inheritance in bedrock surfaces......, indicating that warm-based ice eroded the summits during the last glacial period. From the isotope concentrations we model denudation histories using a recently developed Monte Carlo Markov Chain inversion model (Knudsen et al, 2015). The model relies on the benthic d18O curve (Lisiecki and Raymo, 2005...

  1. Coalition Warfare Program Presentation to: 2009 EUCOM/AFRICOM Science and Technology Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    compac an nexpens ve m cro- fluxgate magnetometer for use in multiple COCOMs. To continue T&E with joint services and apply lessons learned to...Partners in EUCOM/AFRICOM FY08 Starts • Advanced Dynamic Magnetometer FY09 Starts • ADNS Coalition Network FY10 New Starts • Clip-on Night Vision...Partner 2008 New Starts Advanced Dynamic Magnetometer for Static and Moving Applications T d l t d i i i US Navy (SPAWAR) Italy, Sweden o eve op a a

  2. Connecting and Reconnecting: Outfitting the Figure of the Cyborg for Transnational Coalition-building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E. Brophy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work attempts to rehabilitate Donna Haraway’s (1991 figure of the cyborg to increase the possibilities of alliances between transnational feminism and cyborg or technoscience feminism. Haraway’s cyborg offers little impetus for political investment and coalition building. This work develops an optional prosthesis of responseability for the cyborg figuration, one that enables the cyborg to invest locally. This ethic of response-ability is developed via the work of Mary Strine (1989, Adrienne Rich (1984 and Aimee Carillo Rowe (2005. This supplementary ethic grafts a “collectivist conscience” onto the permeable being of the cyborg, encouraging alliance- and coalitionbuilding.

  3. Grassroots responsiveness to human rights abuse: history of the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Laura; Martinez, Ramiro; Harner, Margaret; Harner, Melanie; Horner, Pilar; Delva, Jorge

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss how a community agency based in Washtenaw County, the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigration Rights (WICIR), emerged in response to increasing punitive immigration practices and human rights abuses toward the Latino community. The article discusses how WICIR is engaged in advocacy, community education on immigration issues, and political action toward a more humane immigration reform. Detailed examples of human rights abuses and the WICIR activities described in response to the abuses serve as illustrations of social work advocacy, education, and policy formulation that affect the general public, policymakers, and law enforcement officials.

  4. Coalition of distributed generation units to virtual power players - a game theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Sousa, Tiago M; Santos, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    and the existence of new management players such as several types of aggregators. This paper proposes a methodology to facilitate the coalition between distributed generation units originating Virtual Power Players (VPP) considering a game theory approach. The proposed approach consists in the analysis...... strategies, size and goals, each parameter has different importance. VPP can also manage other type of energy resources, like storage units, electric vehicles, demand response programs or even parts of the MV and LV distribution network. A case study with twelve VPPs with different characteristics and one...

  5. Democracy in Brazil: presidentialism, party coalitions and the decision making process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Limongi

    Full Text Available There is no reason to treat the Brazilian political system as singular. Coalitions obey and are governed by party principles. The president, whose institutional power was enhanced by the 1988 Constitution, has a monopoly over legislative initiative, which approximates the Brazilian system to the European parliamentary democracies. Even though it is based upon empirical data, this essay formulates theoretical problems, such as the importance of institutional choices and how these impact on relations between the majority and minority in democratic governments.

  6. Band of Brothers or Dysfunctional Family? A Military Perspective on Coalition Challenges During Stability Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    the army, there were lots of examples of NGOs [that] were quite happy on a working level to meet for coffee in Pristina and sit over a map and...coalition units for a visit and found that the units would have the coffee brewing . . . and we’d lay out where we are going . . . and they’d go off and...our obsession with this curious taxonomy, in a world of our own, where we talk about “supporting effects” and “end states”—it just isn’t how these

  7. IMPLEMENTASI PROGRAM CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR USED MOTORCYCLE DEPARTMENT DALAM MENINGKATKAN CITRA PT. SUMMIT OTO FINANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERRIANSYAH FIRDAUS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is a program that held by the company as a form of social or environmental responsibility. UMC Dept of PT Summit Oto Finance do the CSR programs to establish good relations with the public and dealers. CSR program is handled by some sections, namely UMC Dept. Head, UMC Staff, Branch Manager and Marketing Head.The purpose of this report is to investigate the preparation, implementation and evaluation of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR UMC Department to improve the image of PT Summit Oto Finance. The concept of this research is public relations, corporate social responsibility and corporate image. This study used a qualitative approach with case study method. The data obtained by using observation, library research and in-depth interviews of key informants. The results of this study discusses the UMC Dept. CSR program in improving the image of PT Summit Oto Finance are divided into three stages, namely the preparation and planning stages, stages of implementation and evaluation stages. These three stages are carried out by the HO (head office that UMC Dept. Head and Staff and from the branch are Branch Manager and Marketing Head. The conclusion of this report is the CSR program UMC held on July 22, 2014. The three stages are performed optimally for results that have been planned, namely to establish good relations with the community and dealers as well as increasing the image that has been built.   Tanggung Jawab Sosial Perusahaan (CSR adalah program yang diselenggarakan oleh perusahaan sebagai bentuk tanggung jawab sosial atau lingkungan. UMC Dept dari PT Summit Oto Finance melakukan program CSR untuk menjalin hubungan baik dengan masyarakat dan dealer. Program CSR ditangani oleh beberapa bagian, yaitu Kepala Dept UMC, Staf UMC, Branch Manager dan Marketing Head. Tujuan dari laporan ini adalah untuk mengetahui persiapan, pelaksanaan dan evaluasi Tanggung Jawab Sosial Perusahaan UMC untuk memperbaiki

  8. Severe Hallux Valgus With Coalition of the Hallux Sesamoids Treated With Modified Lapidus Procedure: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Toshinori; Suzuki, Seiichi

    2017-12-01

    Coalition of the hallux sesamoids is an extremely rare condition. To our knowledge, only 1 case report has been published. We report a case of severe hallux valgus deformities with coalitions of the hallux sesamoids. The coalitions themselves were asymptomatic; however, this severe hallux valgus deformity needed to be surgically treated. The hallux sesamoids in both feet appeared to be fused and heart shaped on anteroposterior radiographs and dumbbell shaped on axial radiographs. It is known that postoperative incomplete reduction of the medial sesamoids can be a risk factor for the recurrence of hallux valgus. The computed tomography scan demonstrated a groove in the bottom of the center of the heart-shaped sesamoid. The flexor hallucis longus tendon was located in the groove. Therefore, a modified Lapidus procedure was performed considering the medial half of the heart-shaped sesamoid as the medial sesamoid. Although delayed union occurred, successful correction of the deformity was achieved. Level IV.

  9. Community Coalitions' Gender-Aware Policy and Systems Changes to Improve the Health of Women and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Shelly; Randolph, Suzanne M; Oravecz, Linda

    2017-10-17

    Addressing environmental barriers and community conditions through policy and systems change provides the foundation for creating sustainable public health change at the population level. In an effort to influence population-level change that is gender aware, the United States Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health funded the Coalition for a Healthier Community initiative supporting 10 grantees in the implementation of gender-based, public health systems approaches to improve women and girls' health. A national evaluation assessed the extent to which these gender-aware public health systems approaches result in programs and policies that are sustainable and cost effective in addressing health disparities in women and girls. For this paper, a review of policies reported on in grantees' quarterly progress reports was conducted, and policies were categorized based on each policy's status, level, sector affected, and whether it was gender aware. The review revealed 77 policies at varying stages of development or implementation intended to facilitate systems-level change at the coalition, school, organizational, local, or state level. Fifty-one percent of these policies were identified as being gender aware, because they were intended to reduce barriers to or increase facilitators of gender equity. Community coalitions, like the Coalition for a Healthier Community coalitions, can be valuable channels for promoting policy change, as demonstrated by the many policies developed and/or supported by the Coalition for a Healthier Community grantees in their attempt to meet the needs of women and girls. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Bringing Psychological Science to the Forefront of Educational Policy: Collaborative Efforts of the American Psychological Association's Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Stephen A.; Subotnik, Rena F.; Bassford, Maya; Smulson, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The following article details the work of the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education (CPSE). First, a brief history of the background and creation of the coalition is described. The article then details the projects, completed and ongoing, of the CPSE. Those projects include a Teacher…

  11. Education Policy and Governance in England under the Coalition Government (2010-15): Academies, the Pupil Premium, and Free Early Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the governance of school-based and early education in England under the Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition Government (2010-15). It draws on three prominent Coalition policy areas--the academies programme, the pupil premium, and free part-time early education--and focuses on changes to the role played by central government…

  12. Landscape preservation under ice? In-situ 10Be and 26Al from summit surfaces along Sognefjord, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jane Lund; Egholm, David Lundbek; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou

    then be used to determine the total Quaternary bedrock erosion between the summits. However, the amount of Quaternary erosion of these summit flats remains debated (e.g. Steer, 2012) Here, we present an extensive new dataset of in-situ produced cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in bedrock and boulders from high...... and flat summits along a 200 km long transect from the coast to the inner parts of Sognefjorden. Our results indicate substantial glacial modification of the summits within the last 50 ka. Close to the coast, at an elevation of around 700 meters, the cosmogenic nuclide signal was reset around the Younger...... et al. Landscape preservation under Fennoscandian ice sheets determined from in situ produced 10 Be and 26 Al. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 201(2), 397-406, 2002. Gjermundsen et al. Minimal erosion of Arctic alpine topography during late Quaternary glaciation. Nature Geoscience 8(10), 789...

  13. The first conference of Signatory States to the UN Global Climate Convention: Results of the Berlin summit conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrmann, M.

    1996-01-01

    The article briefly explains the background of the Berlin summit conference as well as some results, as for instance the ''Berlin mandate'', or agreements concerning organisational structures or procedures like those termed ''joint implementation''. (Orig./CB) [de

  14. Joy Development Properties, LLC, Pleasant Valley, Iowa and Summit Concrete, Inc., LeClaire, Iowa - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Joy Development Properties, LLC and Summit Concrete, Inc., for alleged violations at the companies’ residential construction site known as the Schutter Farms Addition loca

  15. Modeling Multi-Mobile Agents System Based on Coalition Signature Mechanism Using UML

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNZhixin; HUANGHaiping; WANGRuchuan

    2004-01-01

    With the development of electronic commerce and agent techniques, multi-mobile agents cooperation can not only improve the efficiency of electronic business trade, but more importantly, it has a comprehensive applicative value in solving the security issues of mobile agent system. This paper firstly describes the mechanism of multi-mobile agents coalition signature aiming at the system security. Subsequently it brings forward a basic architecture of Multi-mobile agents system (MMAS) based on the design pattern of multi-mobile agents. The paper uses the diagrs_rn of UML, such as use case diagram, class diagram and sequence diagram to build the detailed model of the coalition signature and multi-mobile agents cooperation results. Through security analysis, we find that multimobile agents cooperation and interaction can solve some security problems of mobile agents in transfer, and also it can improve the efficiency of business trade. These results indicate that MMAS has a high security performance and can be widely used in E-commerce trade.

  16. Online Air-Conditioning Energy Management under Coalitional Game Framework in Smart Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the potential ability of air conditioning (A/C units in demand response, this paper explores how to utilize A/C units to increase the profit of a smart community. A coalitional game between the households and the load serving entity (LSE in a smart community is studied, where the LSE joins by selling renewable energy to householders and providing an energy saving service to them through an A/C controller. The A/C controller is designed to reduce the amount of electricity purchased from the main grid by controlling A/C units. An online A/C energy management algorithm is developed, based on Lyapunov optimization, that considers both the A/C energy consumption and the thermal comfort level of consumers. In order to quantify the contribution of A/C units, the Shapley value is adopted for distribution of the reward among the participating householders and the LSE, based on their contribution. The simulation result verifies the effectiveness of the proposed coalitional game for a smart community and the algorithm for A/C.

  17. From the Earth Summit to Rio+20: integration of health and sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Andy; Alleyne, George; Kickbusch, Ilona; Dora, Carlos

    2012-06-09

    In 2012, world leaders will meet at the Rio+20 conference to advance sustainable development--20 years after the Earth Summit that resulted in agreement on important principles but insufficient action. Many of the development goals have not been achieved partly because social (including health), economic, and environmental priorities have not been addressed in an integrated manner. Adverse trends have been reported in many key environmental indicators that have worsened since the Earth Summit. Substantial economic growth has occurred in many regions but nevertheless has not benefited many populations of low income and those that have been marginalised, and has resulted in growing inequities. Variable progress in health has been made, and inequities are persistent. Improved health contributes to development and is underpinned by ecosystem stability and equitable economic progress. Implementation of policies that both improve health and promote sustainable development is urgently needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Raising the profile of worker safety: highlights of the 2013 North American Agricultural Safety Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William J; Heiberger, Scott; Lee, Barbara C

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 North American Agricultural Safety Summit, an unprecedented gathering of industry leaders and safety experts, was held September 25-27 in Minneapolis, MN. Hosted by the industry-led Agricultural Safety and Health Council of America (ASHCA), there were 250 attendees, 82 speakers, 76 abstracts with poster presentations, along with "best practices" videos, genius bars sessions, learning stations, exhibits, breakfast roundtable topics, and receptions. The event was a mix of knowledge, inspiration and networking to enable participants to influence the adoption of safety practices in their home/work settings. Given the agriculture industry's commitment to feed nine billion people, the projected world population by 2050, it is imperative that producers and agribusiness strive to do it safely, humanely and sustainably. Evaluation feedback was very positive, indicating ASHCA's original objectives for the Summit were achieved.

  19. Peran Penting Asia Africa Smart City Summit (AASCS 2015 terhadap Perkembangan Paradiplomasi Kota Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irsyaad Suharyadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bandung merupakan salah satu kota yang telah menerapkan  konsep smart city untuk menghadapi berbagai permasalahan kota. Sayangnya, konsep ini masih terkendala pada ketersediaan dana dan teknologi. Oleh karena itu, Ridwan Kamil sebagai kepala pemerintahan kota Bandung melakukan kegiatan paradiplomasi untuk mempromosikan Smart Kota Bandung. Salah satunya, melalui program 'Mercusuar' Asia Afrika Cerdas Kota Summit (AASCS. Kegitan Asia Afrika Cerdas Kota Summit (AASCS ini dihadiri oleh 26 walikota di seluruh Asia dan Afrika, dan delegasi dari 39 negara dan mengeluarkan kesepakatan Bandung Declaration on Smart Cities. Dalam penelitian ini, penulis akan menilai manfaat dan AASCS peran dalam kegiatan paradiplomasi Bandung menggunakan teori paradiplomasi yang dipopulerkan oleh Ivo Duchacek (1990, dan membandingkannya dengan prestasi kota lain, seperti Amsterdam dan Bogota. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa konferensi internasional seperti AASCS mampu meningkatkan secara signifikan popularitas kota, serta kesempatan untuk mengadakan kerjasama lebih lanjut.

  20. Technology for Children With Brain Injury and Motor Disability: Executive Summary From Research Summit IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Jennifer B; Lobo, Michele A; Bjornson, Kristie; Dusing, Stacey C; Field-Fote, Edelle; Gannotti, Mary; Heathcock, Jill C; OʼNeil, Margaret E; Rimmer, James H

    Advances in technology show promise as tools to optimize functional mobility, independence, and participation in infants and children with motor disability due to brain injury. Although technologies are often used in adult rehabilitation, these have not been widely applied to rehabilitation of infants and children. In October 2015, the Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy sponsored Research Summit IV, "Innovations in Technology for Children With Brain Insults: Maximizing Outcomes." The summit included pediatric physical therapist researchers, experts from other scientific fields, funding agencies, and consumers. Participants identified challenges in implementing technology in pediatric rehabilitation including accessibility, affordability, managing large data sets, and identifying relevant data elements. Participants identified 4 key areas for technology development: to determine (1) thresholds for learning, (2) appropriate transfer to independence, (3) optimal measurement of subtle changes, and (4) how to adapt to growth and changing abilities.

  1. Current research in aging: a report from the 2015 Ageing Summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyse, Emmanuel; Lahousse, Lies; Krantic, Slavica

    2015-01-01

    Ageing Summit, London, UK, 10-12 February 2015 The Ageing Summit 2015 held on 10-12 February 2015 in London (UK) provided an extensive update to our knowledge of the 'Biology of Ageing' and a forum to discuss the participants' latest research progress. The meeting was subdivided into four thematic sessions: cellular level research including the aging brain; slowing down progression, rejuvenation and self-repair; genetic and epigenetic regulation; and expression and pathology of age-related diseases. Each session included multiple key presentations, three to five short research communications and ongoing poster presentations. The meeting provided an exciting multidisciplinary overview of the aging process from cellular and molecular mechanisms to medico-social aspects of human aging.

  2. Efficient Mobility Summit: Transportation and the Future of Dynamic Mobility Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    On October 27, 2015, The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) brought together local and national thought leaders to discuss the convergence of connectivity, vehicle automation, and transportation infrastructure investments at the Future Energy Efficient Mobility Workshop. The half-day workshop was held in conjunction with the Colorado Department of Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications. Transportation's (CDOT) Transportation Matters Summit and featured four panel sessions that showcased perspectives on efficient mobility from federal and state agencies, automakers and their suppliers, transportation data providers, and freight companies. This summary provides highlights from the meeting's exchanges of ideas and existing applications.

  3. On sustainable development problems, also according to the world summit in Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Moncada lo Giudice

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available In the intervention at the Environment Commission of the Senate on the problems of the sustainable development, following the recent World Summit in Johannesburg, some fundamental points are underpinned: the question is summed up and an exam is made about the results of the Summit and on the meaning of the commitments taken for the future. Indeed, it is universally accepted that, to be considered sustainable, the development must reach a compromise between economical, social and environmental goals, to maximize the present well-being, without challenging the right of future generations to satisfy their own needs. It is also accepted that this cannot be realised without defence for our eco-system and without a simultaneous and well coordinated intervention of all Countries and the participation of all productive and social categories; probably, this should be the true finality of the so much acclaimed “globalisation”.

  4. El único hotel asociado con summit hotels & resorts en Colombia - Hotel Bogotá Plaza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carolina Rojas

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Es importante conocer acerca de la historia del Hotel Bogotá Plaza. Este es el primer hotel del norte de Bogotá. La misión del hotel es permanecer en el corazón de los huéspedes y visitantes, al satisfacer sus deseos con amor, calidez, amabilidad, seguridad y servicio de excelente calidad. Desde 1996 el Bogotá Plaza Hotel ha pertenecido a Summit Hotels & Resorts. Esta es una firma que proporciona al hotel un sistema de reservas por Internet, esta alianza ha generado que el hotel sea reconocido en muchos países del mundo. Summit además se ha establecido como una organización líder en ventas, mercadeo y reservas hoteleras del mundo. Es importante asociarse con compañías destacadas así como lo hizo el Hotel Bogotá Plaza.

  5. Defining Survivorship Trajectories Across Patients With Solid Tumors: An Evidence-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dood, Robert L; Zhao, Yang; Armbruster, Shannon D; Coleman, Robert L; Tworoger, Shelley; Sood, Anil K; Baggerly, Keith A

    2018-06-02

    Survivorship involves a multidisciplinary approach to surveillance and management of comorbidities and secondary cancers, overseen by oncologists, surgeons, and primary care physicians. Optimal timing and coordination of care, however, is unclear and often based on arbitrary 5-year cutoffs. To determine high- and low-risk periods for all tumor types that could define when survivorship care might best be overseen by oncologists and when to transition to primary care physicians. In this pan-cancer, longitudinal, observational study, excess mortality hazard, calculated as an annualized mortality risk above a baseline population, was plotted over time. The time this hazard took to stabilize defined a high-risk period. The percent morality elevation above age- and sex-matched controls in the latter low-risk period was reported as a mortality gap. The US population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database defined the cancer population, and the US Census life tables defined controls. Incident cases of patients with cancer were separated into tumor types based on International Classification of Diseases for Oncology definitions. Population-level data on incident cancer cases was compared with the general US population. Overall mortality and cause of death were reported on observed cancer cases. A total of 2 317 185 patients (median age, 63 years; 49.8% female) with 66 primary tumor types were evaluated. High-risk surveillance period durations ranged from less than 1 year (breast, prostate, lip, ocular, and parathyroid cancers) up to 19 years (unspecified gastrointestinal cancers). The annualized mortality gap, representing the excess mortality in the stable period, ranged from a median 0.26% to 9.33% excess annual mortality (thyroid and hypopharyngeal cancer populations, respectively). Cluster analysis produced 6 risk cluster groups: group 1, with median survival of 16.2 (5th to 95th percentile range [PR], 10.7-40.2) years and median high-risk period

  6. European Summit on the Prevention and Self-Management of Chronic Respiratory Diseases: report of the European Union Parliament Summit (29 March 2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, Peter W; Borrelli, David; Pietikainen, Sirpa; Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi; Bachert, Claus; Bewick, Michael; Botjes, Erna; Constantinidis, Jannis; Fokkens, Wytske; Haahtela, Tari; Hopkins, Claire; Illario, Maddalena; Joos, Guy; Lund, Valerie; Muraro, Antonella; Pugin, Benoit; Seys, Sven; Somekh, David; Stjärne, Pär; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Bousquet, Jean

    2017-01-01

    On March 29, 2017, a European Summit on the Prevention and Self-Management of Chronic Respiratory Diseases (CRD) was organized by the European Forum for Research and Education in Allergy and Airway Diseases. The event took place in the European Parliament of Brussels and was hosted by MEP David Borrelli and MEP Sirpa Pietikainen. The aim of the Summit was to correspond to the needs of the European Commission and of patients suffering from CRD to join forces in Europe for the prevention and self-management. Delegates of the European Rhinologic Society, European Respiratory Society, European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, European Academy of Paediatrics, and European Patients Organization EFA all lectured on their vision and action plan to join forces in achieving adequate prevention and self-management of CRD in the context of Precision Medicine. Recent data highlight the preventive capacity of education on optimal care pathways for CRD. Self-management and patient empowerment can be achieved by novel educational on-line materials and by novel mobile health tools enabling patients and doctors to monitor and optimally treat CRDs based on the level of control. This report summarizes the contributions of the representatives of different European academic stakeholders in the field of CRD.

  7. Educator Toolkits on Second Victim Syndrome, Mindfulness and Meditation, and Positive Psychology: The 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit

    OpenAIRE

    Jon Smart; Michael Zdradzinski; Sarah Roth; Alecia Gende; Kylie Conroy; Nicole Battaglioli

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout, depression, and suicidality among residents of all specialties have become a critical focus of attention for the medical education community. Methods: As part of the 2017 Resident Wellness Consensus Summit in Las Vegas, Nevada, resident participants from 31 programs collaborated in the Educator Toolkit workgroup. Over a seven-month period leading up to the summit, this workgroup convened virtually in the Wellness Think Tank, an online resident community, to perform a li...

  8. A Comparative Analysis on the Strategy of Impression Management and Public Diplomacy of Two Indonesian Presidents at APEC CEO Summit

    OpenAIRE

    INDRAYANI, INRI INGGRIT

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to analyze speeches of the former Indonesian President SusiloBambang Yudhoyono (SBY) and the current Indonesia President Joko Widodo(Jokowi) at the APEC CEO Summit. Jokowi gave his speech in Beijing, China in2014, while SBY delivered his speech in Bali in 2013. Both speeches have constructively examined as image management strategies to build an impressionmanagement at the APEC CEO Summit. APEC is one of crucial forum to buildinternational relationships, draw the investment...

  9. Gender representation of cancer patients in medical treatment and psychosocial survivorship research: changes over three decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Michael A; Rubin, Lisa R

    2012-10-01

    Prior studies raise concern about gender bias in cancer research, including insufficient inclusion of women or men, or studying women and men differently. The 1993 National Institutes of Health Revitalization Act aimed to eliminate gender bias in medicine. To examine changes in medical and psychological literature, this study reviews gender representation in biomedical treatment studies and psychosocial survivorship studies published in a single year. Research published in Cancer in 2007, and all empirical psychological studies about cancer published that year, provided a 15-year update to findings reported by Meyerowitz and Hart. The gender distribution and context of included articles were coded and compared with findings from 1983 and 1992. Across biomedical studies, 34.3% of subjects were women (vs 47% of new cancers and 48% of cancer deaths). Among men, 41.3% had sex-specific cancers (vs 12.5% [1983] and 12.3% [1992]). Among women, 46.1% had sex-specific cancers (vs 69.1% [1983] and 64.6% [1992]). Fewer women (36.8%) were represented in sex-nonspecific cancer studies (vs 41.4% [1983] and 42.5% [1992]); however, fewer studies had a significant (>20%) gender disparity. Across psychosocial studies, representation of men increased to 47.9% (vs 30.4% [1983] and 29.9% [1992]). The proportion of men in studies of feelings/relationships increased to 47% (vs 22.9% [1992]); the proportion of women in studies assessing physical/functional ability increased to 58.3% (vs 45.4%). Women remain under-represented in sex-nonspecific biomedical research, whereas men's representation in sex-specific research increased substantially. Psychosocial research trends suggest movement from research questions supporting traditional stereotypes that women feel and men act. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society.

  10. Usability and acceptance evaluation of ACESO: a Web-based breast cancer survivorship tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Akshat; Nambisan, Priya

    2018-01-25

    The specific objective of this research is to design and develop a personalized Web application to support breast cancer survivors after treatment, as they deal with post-treatment challenges, such as comorbidities and side effects of treatment. A mixed-methods approach, utilizing a combination of think-aloud analysis, personal interviews, and surveys, was adopted for user acceptance and usability testing among a group of breast cancer survivors. User feedback was gathered on their perceived value of the application, and any user-interface issues that may hinder the overall usability were identified. The application's portability and capability of organizing their entire breast cancer-related medical history as well as tracking various quality of life indicators were perceived to be valuable features. The application had an overall high usability; however, certain sections of the application were not as intuitive to locate. Visual elements of the website were appreciated; however, overall experience would benefit from incorporating more sociable elements that exhibit positive re-enforcement within the end user and provide a friendlier experience. The results of the study showcase the need for more personalized tools and resources to support survivors in self-management. It also demonstrates the ability to integrate breast cancer survivorship care plans from diverse providers and paves the way to add further value-added features in consumer health applications, such as personal decision support. Using a personal decision support-based tool can serve as a training tool and resource, providing these patients with pertinent information about the various aspects of their long-term health, while educating them about any related side effects and symptoms. It is hoped that making such tools more accessible could help in engaging survivors to play an active role in managing their health and encourage shared decision-making with their providers.

  11. Augmenting the post-transplantation growth and survivorship of juvenile scleractinian corals via nutritional enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Chong Toh

    Full Text Available Size-dependent mortality influences the recolonization success of juvenile corals transplanted for reef restoration and assisting juvenile corals attain a refuge size would thus improve post-transplantation survivorship. To explore colony size augmentation strategies, recruits of the scleractinian coral Pocillopora damicornis were fed with live Artemia salina nauplii twice a week for 24 weeks in an ex situ coral nursery. Fed recruits grew significantly faster than unfed ones, with corals in the 3600, 1800, 600 and 0 (control nauplii/L groups exhibiting volumetric growth rates of 10.65 ± 1.46, 4.69 ± 0.9, 3.64 ± 0.55 and 1.18 ± 0.37 mm3/week, respectively. Corals supplied with the highest density of nauplii increased their ecological volume by more than 74 times their initial size, achieving a mean final volume of 248.38 ± 33.44 mm3. The benefits of feeding were apparent even after transplantation to the reef. The corals in the 3600, 1800, 600 and 0 nauplii/L groups grew to final sizes of 4875 ± 260 mm3, 2036 ± 627 mm3, 1066 ± 70 mm3 and 512 ± 116 mm3, respectively. The fed corals had significantly higher survival rates than the unfed ones after transplantation (63%, 59%, 56% and 38% for the 3600, 1800, 600 and 0 nauplii/L treatments respectively. Additionally, cost-effectiveness analysis revealed that the costs per unit volumetric growth were drastically reduced with increasing feed densities. Corals fed with the highest density of nauplii were the most cost-effective (US$0.02/mm3, and were more than 12 times cheaper than the controls. This study demonstrated that nutrition enhancement can augment coral growth and post-transplantation survival, and is a biologically and economically viable option that can be used to supplement existing coral mariculture procedures and enhance reef restoration outcomes.

  12. Beyond treatment – Psychosocial and behavioural issues in cancer survivorship research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil K. Aaronson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The population of cancer survivors has grown steadily over the past several decades. Surviving cancer, however, is not synonymous with a life free of problems related to the disease and its treatment. In this paper we provide a brief overview of selected physical and psychosocial health problems prevalent among cancer survivors, namely pain, fatigue, psychological distress and work participation. We also address issues surrounding self-management and e-Health interventions for cancer survivors, and programmes to encourage survivors to adopt healthier lifestyles. Finally, we discuss approaches to assessing health-related quality of life in cancer survivors, and the use of cancer registries in conducting psychosocial survivorship research. We highlight research and practice priorities in each of these areas. While the priorities vary per topic, common themes that emerged included: (1 Symptoms should not be viewed in isolation, but rather as part of a cluster of interrelated symptoms. This has implications for both understanding the aetiology of symptoms and for their treatment; (2 Psychosocial interventions need to be evidence-based, and where possible should be tailored to the needs of the individual cancer survivor. Relatively low cost interventions with self-management and e-Health elements may be appropriate for the majority of survivors, with resource intensive interventions being reserved for those most in need; (3 More effort should be devoted to disseminating and implementing interventions in practice, and to evaluating their cost-effectiveness; and (4 Greater attention should be paid to the needs of vulnerable and high-risk populations of survivors, including the socioeconomically disadvantaged and the elderly.

  13. Actor coalitions and implementation in strategic delta planning: Opening the Haringvliet sluices in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermoolen, Myrthe; Hermans, Leon

    2016-04-01

    The sustained development of urbanizing deltas is influenced by natural and societal processes. These processes are characterized by their long time span, in which conflicting interests of different stakeholders have to be reconciled. Reaching consent between actors is a challenge itself, but maintaining this consent throughout different stages of strategic planning - from advocacy and agenda setting to implementation - over these long periods of time is even more difficult. The implementation stage still includes many different actors involved, some of which are different than the ones who agreed before, due to both the long run of the strategic delta planning, and to a shift of tasks and responsibilities. Thus, implementation of strategic plans often features delays, deviations of agreed plans and unintended outcomes. A key question therefore is how coalition dynamics in (pre-)planning stages influence and are influenced by the coalition dynamics during implementation. The different stages in strategic planning are often studied from either a plan formulation or an implementation perspective, but the connection between the two proves an important bottleneck for strategic planning in deltas. For instance, many building with nature solutions are still in their pilot-phase, and their upscaling can profit from lessons concerning past implementation efforts. The proposed contribution will use the case of the management of the Dutch Haringvliet sluices and the decision ('Kierbesluit') in 2000 to put these sluices ajar, to study the link between the different strategic delta planning stages and the role of the formation and change of actor coalitions herein. With the completion of the Haringvliet dam with outlet sluices in 1970, the Haringvliet estuary of the rivers Rhine and Meuse was closed off from the sea, creating a fresh water lake. This was done to make the Dutch Southwest delta safe from flooding, and had positive effects for agricultural water supply and

  14. Romania's Iliescu to attend World Summit on Information Society organized by UN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Romanian President Ion Iliescu will be in Geneva, December 9-11, to attend a world summit on information society, organized by the United Nations Department of Public Information. On this occasion, Iliescu will visit on Tuesday the Geneva-based European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), where he will meet CERN General Director Luciano Maiani, as well as young Romanian researchers working there and will participate in a scientific session called The Role of Science in the Information Society" (1 page).

  15. Some comments about the situation of the Steel Industry in the Arab Countries (Arab Steel Summit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidar, Y.; Astier, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Arab Steel Summit, that convened in Abu Dhabi in April, gave us another opportunity to review the situation of the Arab Iron and Steel Industry, with regard to the present World economic context. We will address: - the World situation of steel production, focusing on the Arab Countries; - the related situation of steel consumption; - the steel trade, including imports, exports and prices; - the consequences for technology and economy. (authors)

  16. Properties of horizontally oriented ice crystals observed by polarization lidar over summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neely Ryan R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A source of error in microphysical retrievals and model simulations is the assumption that clouds are composed of only randomly oriented ice crystals. This assumption is frequently not true, as evidenced by optical phenomena such as parhelia. Here, observations from the Cloud, Aerosol and Polarization Backscatter Lidar at Summit, Greenland are utilized along with other sensors and beam imaging to examine the properties of horizontally oriented ice crystals and the environment conditions in which they occur.

  17. Travel Daily China Travel Innovation Summit to Be Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Guangzhou,China,April 7th- TravelDaily (www.traveldaily.cn), China’s leading online publisher and event organizer with emphasis on trends in the distribution,marketing and technology of the travel and tourism industries,today announced it will partner with PhoCusWright to host the 2009 China Travel Innovation Summit in Beijing from May 12 to 13,2009.

  18. Energy summit Hessen. Implementation concept of the state government Hessen; Hessischer Energiegipfel. Umsetzungskonzept der Hessischen Landesregierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-15

    By means of the concept under consideration, the state government of Hessen (Federal Republic of Germany) has pursued the possible and realistic course for the implementation of the targets of the energy summit. The main aspects of this contribution are the implementation of the energy policy of Hessen into the European and national framework; Status quo of the energy consumption in Hessen; Areas of action and measures of the state government of Hessen; Actors of the energy policy turnaround; Monitoring.

  19. Emerging hemodynamic signatures of the right heart (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Maron, Bradley A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Despite the importance of preserved right ventricular structure and function with respect to outcome across the spectrum of lung, cardiac, and pulmonary vascular diseases, only recently have organized efforts developed to consider the pulmonary vascular–right ventricular apparatus as a specific unit within the larger context of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. The Third International Right Heart Failure Summit (Boston, MA) was a multidisciplinary event dedicated to promoting a dialog...

  20. Blueprint for Action: Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sectish, Theodore C; Hay, William W; Mahan, John D; Mendoza, Fernando S; Spector, Nancy D; Stanton, Bonita; Szilagyi, Peter G; Turner, Teri L; Walker, Leslie R; Slaw, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    The Federation of Pediatric Organizations engaged members of the pediatric community in an 18-month process to envision the future of the workforce in pediatrics, culminating in a Visioning Summit on the Future of the Workforce in Pediatrics. This article documents the planning process and methods used. Four working groups were based on the 4 domains that are likely to affect the future workforce: Child Health Research and Training, Diversity and Inclusion, Gender and Generations, and Pediatric Training Along the Continuum. These groups identified the issues and trends and prioritized their recommendations. Before the summit, 5 key megatrends cutting across all domains were identified:1. Aligning Education to the Emerging Health Needs of Children and Families 2. Promoting Future Support for Research Training and for Child Health Research 3. Striving Toward Mastery Within the Profession 4. Aligning and Optimizing Pediatric Practice in a Changing Health Care Delivery System 5. Taking Advantage of the Changing Demographics and Expertise of the Pediatric Workforce At the Visioning Summit, we assembled members of each of the working groups, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations Board of Directors, and several invited guests to discuss the 5 megatrends and develop the vision, solutions, and actions for each megatrend. Based on this discussion, we offer 10 recommendations for the field of pediatrics and its leading organizations to consider taking action. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. The Toxicology Education Summit: building the future of toxicology through education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchowsky, Aaron; Buckley, Lorrene A; Carlson, Gary P; Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Ford, Sue M; Genter, Mary Beth; Germolec, Dori R; Leavens, Teresa L; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Safe, Stephen H; Sulentic, Courtney E W; Eidemiller, Betty J

    2012-06-01

    Toxicology and careers in toxicology, as well as many other scientific disciplines, are undergoing rapid and dramatic changes as new discoveries, technologies, and hazards advance at a blinding rate. There are new and ever increasing demands on toxicologists to keep pace with expanding global economies, highly fluid policy debates, and increasingly complex global threats to public health. These demands must be met with new paradigms for multidisciplinary, technologically complex, and collaborative approaches that require advanced and continuing education in toxicology and associated disciplines. This requires paradigm shifts in educational programs that support recruitment, development, and training of the modern toxicologist, as well as continued education and retraining of the midcareer professional to keep pace and sustain careers in industry, government, and academia. The Society of Toxicology convened the Toxicology Educational Summit to discuss the state of toxicology education and to strategically address educational needs and the sustained advancement of toxicology as a profession. The Summit focused on core issues of: building for the future of toxicology through educational programs; defining education and training needs; developing the "Total Toxicologist"; continued training and retraining toxicologists to sustain their careers; and, finally, supporting toxicology education and professional development. This report summarizes the outcomes of the Summit, presents examples of successful programs that advance toxicology education, and concludes with strategies that will insure the future of toxicology through advanced educational initiatives.

  2. Pedaling into high gear for bicycle policy in Canada : lessons from bike summit 2008 in Toronto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 bike summit provided a forum for the discussion of international and Canadian best practices related to bicycles and bicycling policy. The aim of the summit was to assist communities across Canada to improve conditions for cycling in the urban environment and help to generate a cultural shift towards greater acceptance of cycling on roads. This paper discussed lessons learned during the summit and outlined new methods of improving cycling in communities. The City of London has recently increased the amount of cyclists using its roads by 200 per cent. Cycling infrastructure is more affordable than constructing major public transit or road infrastructure. Savings in healthcare costs will be accrued over time as a result of the healthier lifestyles promoted by regular cycling activity. Bicycle trips can help to alleviate over-demand on heavy transit routes. Encouraging commuters to cycle will also reduce the amounts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in urban areas. Lane width reductions will help to reduce speeds as drivers are forced to pay more attention when driving. Public bike sharing programs and bike stations are now being used in many North American cities. It was concluded that strong advocacy is needed to ensure the growth and acceptance of cycling in urban centres. 23 figs

  3. Customer Satisfaction Among the Members of the Summit Point Golf and Country Club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERONICA JOY V. BENCITO

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the customer satisfaction among the members of the Summit Point Golf and Country Club which served as the basis for continuous improvement. It determined the level of customer satisfaction on the services offered by the Summit Point employees in terms of food and beverages, customer service and facilities. Lastly, it also tested the significant differences on the level of customer satisfactions when grouped according to their membership variables of the club. The descriptive type of research was used to assess the operation of the club. Data gathered were analyzed using the weighted mean and ANOVA method. The members of the Summit Point Golf and Country Club are generally satisfied in terms of facilities and amenities, food and beverages and customer service. The hypothesis has no significant difference between the membership profile and level of customer satisfaction in terms of facilities and amenities and customer service is rejected. This means that their responses differ as to their reasons of joining the club, their obtained degree and the frequency of playing in the club.

  4. Summit on Improving the Economics of America's Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mason, Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Summit on Improving the Economics of America’s Nuclear Power Plants was convened May 19, 2016, by Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and co-sponsored by Idaho Senator Mike Crapo to stress the importance of existing nuclear reactors in meeting our nation’s energy goals. The summit was also designed to identify and discuss policy options that can be pursued at federal and state levels to address economic challenges, as well as technical options that utilities can use to improve the economic competitiveness of operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) and avoid early plant retirements that are driven by temporary market conditions. The owners of NPPs face difficult economic decisions and are working to improve the performance of existing NPPs. However, it soon became clear that some of the actions taken by states and regional markets have had an impact on the economic viability of existing power plants, including carbon free NPPs. Summit speakers identified concepts and actions that could be taken at state and federal levels to improve the economics of the existing fleet within these regulated and restructured electricity markets. This report summarizes the speeches, concepts, and actions taken.

  5. The appeasement effect of a United Nations climate summit on the German public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Michael; de Silva-Schmidt, Fenja; Hoppe, Imke; Arlt, Dorothee; Schmitt, Josephine B.

    2017-11-01

    The annual UN climate summits receive intense global media coverage, and as such could engage local publics around the world, stimulate debate and knowledge about climate politics, and, ultimately, mobilize people to combat climate change. Here we show that, in contrast to these hopes, although the German public were exposed to news about the 2015 Paris summit, they did not engage with it in a more active way. Comparing knowledge and attitudes before, during and after the summit using a three-wave online panel survey (quota sample, N = 1,121), we find that respondents learnt a few basic facts about the conference but they continue to lack basic background knowledge about climate policy. Trust in global climate policy increased a little, but citizens were less inclined to support a leading role for Germany in climate politics. Moreover, they were not more likely to engage personally in climate protection. These results suggest that this global media event had a modest appeasing rather than mobilizing effect.

  6. Resource allocation on the frontlines of public health preparedness and response: report of a summit on legal and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Daniel J; Taylor, Holly A; Hodge, James G; Links, Jonathan M

    2009-01-01

    In the face of all-hazards preparedness challenges, local and state health department personnel have to date lacked a discrete set of legally and ethically informed public health principles to guide the distribution of scarce resources in crisis settings. To help address this gap, we convened a Summit of academic and practice experts to develop a set of principles for legally and ethically sound public health resource triage decision-making in emergencies. The invitation-only Summit, held in Washington, D.C., on June 29, 2006, assembled 20 experts from a combination of academic institutions and nonacademic leadership, policy, and practice settings. The Summit featured a tabletop exercise designed to highlight resource scarcity challenges in a public health infectious disease emergency. This exercise served as a springboard for Summit participants' subsequent identification of 10 public health emergency resource allocation principles through an iterative process. The final product of the Summit was a set of 10 principles to guide allocation decisions involving scarce resources in public health emergencies. The principles are grouped into three categories: obligations to community; balancing personal autonomy and community well-being/benefit; and good preparedness practice. The 10 Summit-derived principles represent an attempt to link law, ethics, and real-world public health emergency resource allocation practices, and can serve as a useful starting framework to guide further systematic approaches and future research on addressing public health resource scarcity in an all-hazards context.

  7. Assessing quality of life in young adult cancer survivors: development of the Survivorship-Related Quality of Life scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Crystal L; Wortmann, Jennifer H; Hale, Amy E; Cho, Dalnim; Blank, Thomas O

    2014-10-01

    Scientific advances in treatments and outcomes for those diagnosed with cancer in late adolescence and early adulthood depend, in part, on the availability of adequate assessment tools to measure health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for survivors in this age group. Domains especially relevant to late adolescence and young adulthood (LAYA; e.g., education and career, committed romantic relationships, worldview formation) are typically overlooked in studies assessing the impact of cancer, usually more appropriate for middle-aged or older survivors. Current HRQOL measures also tend to assess issues that are salient during or shortly after treatment rather than reflecting life years after treatment. To develop a new measure to better capture the experience of LAYA cancer survivors in longer-term survivorship (the LAYA Survivorship-Related Quality of Life measure, LAYA-SRQL), we completed an extensive measure development process. After a literature review and focus groups with LAYA cancer survivors, we generated items and ran confirmatory factor and reliability analyses using a sample of 292 LAYA cancer survivors. We then examined validity using existing measures of physical and mental health, quality of life, and impact of cancer. The final model consisted of two domains (satisfaction and impact), each consisting of ten factors: existential/spirituality, coping, relationship, dependence, vitality, health care, education/career, fertility, intimacy/sexuality, and cognition/memory. Confirmatory factor analysis and validity analyses indicated that the LAYA-SRQL is a psychometrically sound instrument with good validity. The LAYA-SRQL fills an important need in survivorship research, providing a way to assess HRQOL in LAYAs in a developmentally informed way.

  8. Survivorship care and support following treatment for breast cancer: a multi-ethnic comparative qualitative study of women's experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Charlotte; Scanlon, Karen; Scott, Emma; Ream, Emma; Harding, Seeromanie; Armes, Jo

    2016-08-18

    As the number of breast cancer survivors continues to rise, Western populations become more ethnically and socially diverse and healthcare resources become ever-more stretched, follow-up that focuses on monitoring for recurrence is no longer viable. New models of survivorship care need to ensure they support self-management and are culturally appropriate across diverse populations. This study explored experiences and expectations of a multi-ethnic sample of women with breast cancer regarding post-treatment care, in order to understand potential barriers to receiving care and inform new models of survivorship care. A phenomenological qualitative research design was employed. In-depth interviews were conducted with women from diverse socio-demographic backgrounds in England, who completed treatment for breast cancer in the 12 months prior to the study. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis. Sixty-six women participated and reported expectations and needs were unmet at follow-up. Whilst there were more commonalities in experiences, discernible differences, particularly by ethnicity and age, were identified relating to three key themes: emotional responses on transition to follow-up; challenges communicating with healthcare professionals at follow-up; and challenges finding and accessing information and support services to address unmet needs. There are cultural differences in the way healthcare professionals and women communicate, not necessarily differences in their post-treatment needs. We do not know if new models of care meet survivors' needs, or if they are appropriate for everyone. Further testing and potential cultural and linguistic adaptation of models of care is necessary to ensure their appropriateness and acceptability to survivors from different backgrounds. New ways of providing survivorship care mean survivors will need to be better prepared for the post-treatment period and the role they will have to play in managing their symptoms and care.

  9. Density dependence drives habitat production and survivorship of Acropora cervicornis used for restoration on a Caribbean coral reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Ladd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCoral restoration is gaining traction as a viable strategy to help restore degraded reefs. While the nascent field of coral restoration has rapidly progressed in the past decade, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the drivers of restoration success that may impede our ability to effectively restore coral reef communities. Here, we conducted a field experiment to investigate the influence of coral density on the growth, habitat production, and survival of corals outplanted for restoration. We used nursery-raised colonies of Acropora cervicornis to experimentally establish populations of corals with either 3, 6, 12, or 24 corals within 4m2 plots, generating a gradient of coral densities ranging from 0.75 corals m-2 to 12 corals m-2. After 13 months we found that density had a significant effect on the growth, habitat production, and survivorship of restored corals. We found that coral survivorship increased as colony density decreased. Importantly, the signal of density dependent effects was context dependent. Our data suggest that positive density dependent effects influenced habitat production at densities of 3 corals m-2, but further increases in density resulted in negative density dependent effects with decreasing growth and survivorship of corals. These findings highlight the importance of density dependence for coral restoration planning and demonstrate the need to evaluate the influence of density for other coral species used for restoration. Further work focused on the mechanisms causing density dependence such as increased herbivory, rapid disease transmission, or altered predation rates are important next steps to advance our ability to effectively restore coral reefs.

  10. Predictors for Long-Term Hip Survivorship Following Acetabular Fracture Surgery: Importance of Gap Compared with Step Displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Diederik O; van der List, Jelle P; Tissue, Camden M; Helfet, David L

    2018-06-06

    Historically, the greatest residual (gap or step) displacement is used to predict clinical outcome following acetabular fracture surgery. Gap and step displacement may, however, impact the outcome to different degrees. We assessed the individual relationship between gap or step displacement and hip survivorship and determined their independent association with conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Patients who had acetabular fracture fixation (from 1992 through 2014), follow-up of ≥2 years (or early conversion to total hip arthroplasty), and postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans were included. Of 227 patients, 55 (24.2%) had conversion to total hip arthroplasty at a mean follow-up (and standard deviation) of 8.7 ± 5.6 years. Residual gap and step displacement were measured using a standardized CT-based method, and assessors were blinded to the outcome. Kaplan-Meier survivorship curves for the hips were plotted and compared (log-rank test) using critical cutoff values for gap and step displacement. These values were identified using receiver operating characteristic curves. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify independent variables associated with conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Subgroup analysis was performed in younger patients (step displacement. Hip survivorship at 10 years was 82.0% for patients with a gap of step of step of ≥1.0 mm (p = 0.012). A gap of ≥5 mm (hazard ratio [HR], 2.3; p = 0.012) and an age of ≥50 years (HR, 4.2; p step of ≥1 mm (HR, 6.4; p = 0.017) was an independent factor for conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Residual gap and step displacement as measured on CT scans are both related to long-term hip survivorship, but step displacement (1 mm) is tolerated less than gap displacement (5 mm). Of the 2 types of displacement, only a large gap displacement (≥5 mm) was independently associated with conversion to total hip arthroplasty. In younger patients who had less articular impaction with smaller residual

  11. The dynamics of reproductive rate, offspring survivorship and growth in the lined seahorse, Hippocampus erectus Perry, 1810

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Li, Gang; Qin, Geng; Lin, Junda; Huang, Liangmin; Sun, Hushan; Feng, Peiyong

    2012-01-01

    Summary Seahorses are the vertebrate group with the embryonic development occurring within a special pouch in males. To understand the reproductive efficiency of the lined seahorse, Hippocampus erectus Perry, 1810 under controlled breeding experiments, we investigated the dynamics of reproductive rate, offspring survivorship and growth over births by the same male seahorses. The mean brood size of the 1-year old pairs in the 1st birth was 85.4±56.9 per brood, which was significantly smaller than that in the 6th birth (465.9±136.4 per brood) (Pseahorses H. erectus increased with the brood pouch development. PMID:23213429

  12. Expose-R experiment on effects of open space condition on survivorship in dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, Victor; Novikova, Nataliya; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Yusoff, Fatimah; Azuraidi, Osman

    2012-07-01

    Dormancy protects animals and plants in harsh environmental conditions from months up to hundred years. This phenomenon is perspective for space researches especially for interplanetary missions. Direct experiments in open space BYORYSK supported in principle the fact of survivorship of bacteria, fungi spores, seed of plants and crustacean dormant cysts. Even though the rate of survivorship in long-term treatments was low but good enough to conclude that biological invasion even to Mars is a real danger. As soon as the BYORYSK lunch was made of metal the possibility for resting stages to survive under UV treatment in vacuum without some protection was not clear. To test it an ESA and RSA equipment titled EXPOSE-R was applied. The EXPOSE-R facility was an external facility attached to the outside of the Zvezda Service Module in ISS in the end of November 2008. It had glace windows transparent for UV-radiation and possibility to measure temperature, space- and UV-radiation. Among a number of experiments requiring exposure to the open space environment it had a biological launch containing resting stages of terrestrial and aquatic organisms. These stages included dried ephippia of cladoceran Daphnia magna differentiated on size, dormant eggs of ostracode Eucypris ornate, cysts of fair-shrimp Streptocephalus torvicornis ( all from hemi desert Caspian area) and Artemis salina from salt lake Crimean populations. All dormant stages were kept in transparent to UV plastic bags placed in three layers. After about two years of exposing in open space dormant stages of 3 species A. salina, D. magna, S. torvicornis successfully survived at different scales but in second and third layers only . The highest level of survivorship was found in A. salina cysts. In preliminary land experiments that imitated land EXPOSE imitation of outside space station UV and vacuum conditions survivorship in resting eggs of D .magna, S. torvicornis and E. ornate was tested also. The total UV dose of

  13. Lava lake activity at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.; Elias, Tamar; Shiro, Brian

    2018-04-10

    The ongoing summit eruption at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, began in March 2008 with the formation of the Overlook crater, within Halema‘uma‘u Crater. As of late 2016, the Overlook crater contained a large, persistently active lava lake (250 × 190 meters). The accessibility of the lake allows frequent direct observations, and a robust geophysical monitoring network closely tracks subtle changes at the summit. These conditions present one of the best opportunities worldwide for understanding persistent lava lake behavior and the geophysical signals associated with open-vent basaltic eruptions. In this report, we provide a descriptive and visual summary of lava lake activity during 2016, a year consisting of continuous lava lake activity. The lake surface was composed of large black crustal plates separated by narrow incandescent spreading zones. The dominant motion of the surface was normally from north to south, but spattering produced transient disruptions to this steady motion. Spattering in the lake was common, consisting of one or more sites on the lake margin. The Overlook crater was continuously modified by the deposition of spatter (often as a thin veneer) on the crater walls, with frequent collapses of this adhered lava into the lake. Larger collapses, involving lithic material from the crater walls, triggered several small explosive events that deposited bombs and lapilli around the Halema‘uma‘u Crater rim, but these did not threaten public areas. The lava lake level varied over several tens of meters, controlled primarily by changes in summit magma reservoir pressure (in part driven by magma supply rates) and secondarily by fluctuations in spattering and gas release from the lake (commonly involving gas pistoning). The lake emitted a persistent gas plume, normally averaging 1,000–8,000 metric tons per day (t/d) of sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as a constant fallout of small juvenile and lithic particles, including Pele’s hair and tears. The

  14. Excellent Companies and Coalition-Building among the Fortune 500: A Value- and Relationship-Based Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laurie J.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses ways a revolution in business management emphasizing people, values, integrity, and communication should also change the approach to public relations. Reviews research to demonstrate that coalition companies possess the characteristics of excellent companies. Argues that perhaps this community relations function will lead from the…

  15. Advocating for Change? How a Civil Society-led Coalition Influences the Implementation of the Forest Rights Act in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, Clare; van Laerhoven, Frank; Driessen, Peter P J

    2016-01-01

    Forest policy implementation is a political endeavor involving both state and non-state actors. We observe that civil society organizations (CSOs) often federate into civil society-led coalitions (CSCs) in order to shape forest policies in their favor. They appear to be successful in doing this

  16. Mobilizing Communities around HIV Prevention for Youth: How Three Coalitions Applied Key Strategies to Bring about Structural Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Willard, Nancy; Sanchez, Kenia; Straub, Diane M.; Ochoa, Tara N.; Howell, Kourtney; Rivera, Carmen; Ramos, Ibrahim; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, HIV prevention efforts must focus on altering features of the social and physical environment to reduce risks associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. Community coalitions provide a vehicle for bringing about sustainable structural changes. This article shares lessons and key strategies regarding how three community…

  17. Evaluation of DELTA PREP: A Project Aimed at Integrating Primary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence within State Domestic Violence Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Kimberley E.; Zakocs, Ronda; Le, Brenda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a public health problem since the late 20th century. To spur IPV prevention efforts nationwide, the DELTA PREP Project selected 19 state domestic violence coalitions to build organizational prevention capacity and catalyze IPV primary prevention strategies within their states.…

  18. Advancing Strategies for Agenda Setting by Health Policy Coalitions: A Network Analysis of the Canadian Chronic Disease Prevention Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGetrick, Jennifer Ann; Raine, Kim D; Wild, T Cameron; Nykiforuk, Candace I J

    2018-06-11

    Health in all policies can address chronic disease morbidity and mortality by increasing population-level physical activity and healthy eating, and reducing tobacco and alcohol use. Both governmental and nongovernmental policy influencers are instrumental for health policy that modifies political, economic, and social environments. Policy influencers are informed and persuaded by coalitions that support or oppose changing the status quo. Empirical research examining policy influencers' contact with coalitions, as a social psychological exposure with health policy outcomes, can benefit from application of health communication theories. Accordingly, we analyzed responses to the 2014 Chronic Disease Prevention Survey for 184 Canadian policy influencers employed in provincial governments, municipalities, large workplaces, school boards, and the media. In addition to contact levels with coalitions, respondents' jurisdiction, organization, and ideology were analyzed as potential moderators. Calculating authority score centrality using network analysis, we determined health policy supporters to be more central in policy influencer networks, and theorized their potential to impact health policy public agenda setting via priming and framing processes. We discuss the implications of our results as presenting opportunities to more effectively promote health policy through priming and framing by coordinating coalitions across risk behaviors to advance a societal imperative for chronic disease prevention.

  19. Multidisciplinary and multisectoral coalitions as catalysts for action against antimicrobial resistance: Implementation experiences at national and regional levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mohan P; Chintu, Chifumbe; Mpundu, Mirfin; Kibuule, Dan; Hazemba, Oliver; Andualem, Tenaw; Embrey, Martha; Phulu, Bayobuya; Gerba, Heran

    2018-03-20

    The multi-faceted complexities of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) require consistent action, a multidisciplinary approach, and long-term political commitment. Building coalitions can amplify stakeholder efforts to carry out effective AMR prevention and control strategies. We have developed and implemented an approach to help local stakeholders kick-start the coalition-building process. The five-step process is to (1) mobilise support, (2) understand the local situation, (3) develop an action plan, (4) implement the plan, and (5) monitor and evaluate. We first piloted the approach in Zambia in 2004, then used the lessons learned to expand it for use in Ethiopia and Namibia and to the regional level through the Ecumenical Pharmaceutical Network [EPN]. Call-to-action declarations and workshops helped promote a shared vision, resulting in the development of national AMR action plans, revision of university curricula to incorporate relevant topics, infection control activities, engagement with journalists from various mass media outlets, and strengthening of drug quality assurance systems. Our experience with the coalition-building approach in Ethiopia, Namibia, Zambia, and with the EPN shows that coalitions can form in a variety of ways with many different stakeholders, including government, academia, and faith-based organisations, to organise actions to preserve the effectiveness of existing antimicrobials and contain AMR.

  20. Coalitions of things: supporting ISR tasks via internet of things approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Taylor, Ian; Dawson, Andrew; Braines, Dave; O'Leary, Nick; Thomas, Anna; Tomsett, Richard; La Porta, Tom; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Zaroukian, Erin

    2017-05-01

    In the wake of rapid maturing of Internet of Things (IoT) approaches and technologies in the commercial sector, the IoT is increasingly seen as a key `disruptive' technology in military environments. Future operational environments are expected to be characterized by a lower proportion of human participants and a higher proportion of autonomous and semi-autonomous devices. This view is reflected in both US `third offset' and UK `information age' thinking and is likely to have a profound effect on how multinational coalition operations are conducted in the future. Much of the initial consideration of IoT adoption in the military domain has rightly focused on security concerns, reflecting similar cautions in the early era of electronic commerce. As IoT approaches mature, this initial technical focus is likely to shift to considerations of interactivity and policy. In this paper, rather than considering the broader range of IoT applications in the military context, we focus on roles for IoT concepts and devices in future intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) tasks, drawing on experience in sensor-mission resourcing and human-computer collaboration (HCC) for ISR. We highlight the importance of low training overheads in the adoption of IoT approaches, and the need to balance proactivity and interactivity (push vs pull modes). As with sensing systems over the last decade, we emphasize that, to be valuable in ISR tasks, IoT devices will need a degree of mission-awareness in addition to an ability to self-manage their limited resources (power, memory, bandwidth, computation, etc). In coalition operations, the management and potential sharing of IoT devices and systems among partners (e.g., in cross-coalition tactical-edge ISR teams) becomes a key issue due heterogeneous factors such as language, policy, procedure and doctrine. Finally, we briefly outline a platform that we have developed in order to experiment with human-IoT teaming on ISR tasks, in both